WorldWideScience

Sample records for scale structure determination

  1. Size structure, not metabolic scaling rules, determines fisheries reference points

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Beyer, Jan

    2015-01-01

    these empirical relations is lacking. Here, we combine life-history invariants, metabolic scaling and size-spectrum theory to develop a general size- and trait-based theory for demography and recruitment of exploited fish stocks. Important concepts are physiological or metabolic scaled mortalities and flux...... of individuals or their biomass to size. The theory is based on classic metabolic relations at the individual level and uses asymptotic size W∞ as a trait. The theory predicts fundamental similarities and differences between small and large species in vital rates and response to fishing. The central result...... that even though small species have a higher productivity than large species their resilience towards fishing is lower than expected from metabolic scaling rules. Further, we show that the fishing mortality leading to maximum yield per recruit is an ill-suited reference point. The theory can be used...

  2. Climate, habitat, and species interactions at different scales determine the structure of a Neotropical bat community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada-Villegas, Sergio; McGill, Brian J; Kalko, Elisabeth K V

    2012-05-01

    Climate, habitat, and species interactions are factors that control community properties (e.g., species richness, abundance) across various spatial scales. Usually, researchers study how a few properties are affected by one factor in isolation and at one scale. Hence, there are few multi-scale studies testing how multiple controlling factors simultaneously affect community properties at different scales. We ask whether climate, habitat structure, or insect resources at each of three spatial scales explains most of the variation in six community properties and which theory best explains the distribution of selected community properties across a rainfall gradient. We studied a Neotropical insectivorous bat ensemble in the Isthmus of Panama with acoustic monitoring techniques. Using climatological data, habitat surveys, and insect captures in a hierarchical sampling design we determined how much variation of the community properties was explained by the three factors employing two approaches for variance partitioning. Our results revealed that most of the variation in species richness, total abundance, and feeding activity occurred at the smallest spatial scale and was explained by habitat structure. In contrast, climate at large scales explained most of the variation in individual species' abundances. Although each species had an idiosyncratic response to the gradient, species richness peaked at intermediate levels of precipitation, whereas total abundance was very similar across sites, suggesting density compensation. All community properties responded in a different manner to the factor and scale under consideration.

  3. Determination of the crystalline structure of scale solids from the 16H evaporator gravity drain line to tank 38H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oji, L. N. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-01

    August 2015, scale solids from the 16H Evaporator Gravity Drain Line (GDL) to the Tank 38H were delivered to SRNL for analysis. The desired analytical goal was to identify and confirm the crystalline structure of the scale material and determine if the form of the aluminosilicate mineral was consistent with previous analysis of the scale material from the GDL.

  4. The importance of different spatial scales in determining structural and functional characteristics of deep-sea infauna communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ingels

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The urge to understand spatial distributions of species and communities and their causative processes has continuously instigated the development and testing of conceptual models in spatial ecology. For the deep sea, there is evidence that structural and functional characteristics of benthic communities are regulated by a multitude of biotic and environmental processes that act in concert on different spatial scales, but the spatial patterns are poorly understood compared to those for terrestrial ecosystems. Deep-sea studies generally focus on very limited scale ranges, thereby impairing our understanding of which spatial scales and associated processes are most important in driving structural and functional diversity of communities. Here, we used an extensive integrated dataset of free-living nematodes from deep-sea sediments to unravel the importance of different spatial scales in determining benthic infauna communities. Multiple-factor multivariate permutational analyses were performed on different sets of community descriptors (structure, structural and functional diversity, standing stock. The different spatial scales investigated cover two margins in the northeast Atlantic, several submarine canyons/channel/slope areas, a bathymetrical range of 700–4300 m, different sampling locations at each station, and vertical sediment profiles. The results indicated that the most important spatial scale for structural and functional diversity and standing stock variability is the smallest one; infauna communities changed substantially more with differences between sediment depth layers than with differences associated to larger geographical or bathymetrical scales. Community structure differences were greatest between stations at both margins. Important regulating ecosystem processes and the scale on which they occur are discussed. The results imply that, if we are to improve our understanding of ecosystem patterns of deep-sea infauna and the

  5. Wind Loads on Ships and Offshore Structures Determined by Model Tests, CFD and Full-Scale Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    1998-01-01

    -scale measurements have been carried out as well. The CFD method also offers the possibility of a computational estimate of scale effects related to wind tunnel model testing. An example of such an estimate on the ferry is discussed. This work has been published in more details in Proceedings of BOSS'97, Aage et al......Wind loads on ships and offshore structures have until recently been determined only by model tests, or by statistical methods based on model tests. By the development of Computational Fluid Dynamics or CFD there is now a realistic computational alternative. In principle, both methods should...... be validated systematically against full-scale measurements, but due to the great practical difficulties involved, this is almost never done. In this investigation, wind loads on a seagoing ferry and on a semisubmersible platform have been determined by model tests and by CFD. On the ferry, full...

  6. Exploring the determinants of phylogenetic diversity and assemblage structure in conifers across temporal, spatial, and taxonomic scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Borchsenius, Finn; Sandel, Brody Steven

    -environmental models are important elements in this framework. Here, we integrate both types of data in order to explore the determinants of forest tree diversity using the conifers as a model group. Conifers are an old, diverse (ca. 650 spp. in 6 families) and widespread group of woody plants of high ecological...... and economic importance. They are better studied than most other globally distributed groups of forest trees, allowing integrative studies with high phylogenetic and spatial resolution. We analyse phylogenetic diversity, assemblage structure, and diversification rates for regional conifer assemblages...... throughout the natural range of the group (269 TDWG3 “botanical countries”) to infer the effects of current and past climate . To explore the effects of taxonomic and spatial scale, we deconstruct the overall pattern into families and perform a fine-scale analysis for one particular lineage (the genus Pinus...

  7. What Shapes the Phylogenetic Structure of Anuran Communities in a Seasonal Environment? The Influence of Determinism at Regional Scale to Stochasticity or Antagonistic Forces at Local Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Clarissa de Araújo; Roque, Fabio de Oliveira; Santos, Bráulio A; Ferreira, Vanda Lúcia; Strüssmann, Christine; Tomas, Walfrido Moraes

    2015-01-01

    Ecological communities are structured by both deterministic and stochastic processes. We investigated phylogenetic patterns at regional and local scales to understand the influences of seasonal processes in shaping the structure of anuran communities in the southern Pantanal wetland, Brazil. We assessed the phylogenetic structure at different scales, using the Net Relatedness Index (NRI), the Nearest Taxon Index (NTI), and phylobetadiversity indexes, as well as a permutation test, to evaluate the effect of seasonality. The anuran community was represented by a non-random set of species with a high degree of phylogenetic relatedness at the regional scale. However, at the local scale the phylogenetic structure of the community was weakly related with the seasonality of the system, indicating that oriented stochastic processes (e.g. colonization, extinction and ecological drift) and/or antagonist forces drive the structure of such communities in the southern Pantanal.

  8. Large-scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    White, S D M

    1993-01-01

    Abstract. Recent observational surveys have made substantial progress in quantifying the structure of the Universe on large scales. Galaxy density and galaxy velocity fields show deviations from the predictions of a homogeneous and isotropic world model on scales approaching one percent of the current hori— zon scale. A comparison of the amplitudes in density and in velocity provides the first direct dynamical evidence in favour of a high mean density similar to that required for closure. The fluctuations observed on these scales have the amplitude predicted by the standard Cold Dark Matter (CDM) model when this model is normalised to agree with the microwave background fluc- tuations measured on much larger scales by the COBE satellite. However, a CDM model with this amplitude appears inconsistent with observational data on smaller scales. In addition it predicts a scale dependence of fluctua— tion amplitude which disagrees with that observed for galaxies in the APM survey of two million faint galaxi...

  9. Determination of the structural damping coefficients of six full-scale helicopter rotor blades of different materials and methods of construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Frederick W

    1956-01-01

    Results of an experimental investigation of the structural damping of six full-scale helicopter rotor blades, made to determine the variation of structural damping with materials and methods of construction, are presented. The damping of the blades was determined for the first three flapwise bending modes, first chordwise bending mode, and first torsion mode. The contribution of structural damping to the total damping of the blades is discussed for several aerodynamic conditions in order to point out situations where structural damping is significant.

  10. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein-ligand structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Collins, Patrick; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian; von Delft, Frank

    2017-03-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein-ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallographic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011), Acta Cryst. D67, 235-242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010), Acta Cryst. D66, 213-221] have entrenched the paradigm that a `project' is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects.

  11. The XChemExplorer graphical workflow tool for routine or large-scale protein–ligand structure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krojer, Tobias; Talon, Romain; Pearce, Nicholas; Douangamath, Alice; Brandao-Neto, Jose; Dias, Alexandre; Marsden, Brian

    2017-01-01

    XChemExplorer (XCE) is a data-management and workflow tool to support large-scale simultaneous analysis of protein–ligand complexes during structure-based ligand discovery (SBLD). The user interfaces of established crystallo­graphic software packages such as CCP4 [Winn et al. (2011 ▸), Acta Cryst. D67, 235–242] or PHENIX [Adams et al. (2010 ▸), Acta Cryst. D66, 213–221] have entrenched the paradigm that a ‘project’ is concerned with solving one structure. This does not hold for SBLD, where many almost identical structures need to be solved and analysed quickly in one batch of work. Functionality to track progress and annotate structures is essential. XCE provides an intuitive graphical user interface which guides the user from data processing, initial map calculation, ligand identification and refinement up until data dissemination. It provides multiple entry points depending on the need of each project, enables batch processing of multiple data sets and records metadata, progress and annotations in an SQLite database. XCE is freely available and works on any Linux and Mac OS X system, and the only dependency is to have the latest version of CCP4 installed. The design and usage of this tool are described here, and its usefulness is demonstrated in the context of fragment-screening campaigns at the Diamond Light Source. It is routinely used to analyse projects comprising 1000 data sets or more, and therefore scales well to even very large ligand-design projects. PMID:28291762

  12. Origin of the catalytic activity of face-centered-cubic ruthenium nanoparticles determined from an atomic-scale structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, L S R; Sakata, Osami; Kohara, Shinji; Yang, Anli; Song, Chulho; Kusada, Kohei; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2016-11-09

    The 3-dimensional (3D) atomic-scale structure of newly discovered face-centered cubic (fcc) and conventional hexagonal close packed (hcp) type ruthenium (Ru) nanoparticles (NPs) of 2.2 to 5.4 nm diameter were studied using X-ray pair distribution function (PDF) analysis and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling. Atomic PDF based high-energy X-ray diffraction measurements show highly diffuse X-ray diffraction patterns for fcc- and hcp-type Ru NPs. We here report the atomic-scale structure of Ru NPs in terms of the total structure factor and Fourier-transformed PDF. It is found that the respective NPs have substantial structural disorder over short- to medium-range order atomic distances from the PDF analysis. The first-nearest-neighbor peak analyses show a significant size dependence for the fcc-type Ru NPs demonstrating the increase in the peak height due to an increase in the number density as a function of particle size. The bond angle and coordination number (CN) distribution for the RMC-simulated fcc- and hcp-type Ru NP models indicated inherited structural features from their bulk counterparts. The CN analysis of the whole NP and surface of each RMC model of Ru NPs show the low activation energy packing sites on the fcc-type Ru NP surface atoms. Finally, our newly defined order parameters for RMC simulated Ru NP models suggested that the enhancement of the CO oxidation activity of fcc-type NPs was due to a decrease in the close packing ordering that resulted from the increased NP size. These structural findings could be positively supported for synthesized low-cost and high performance nano-sized catalysts and have potential application in fuel-cell systems and organic synthesis.

  13. Significant scales in community structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traag, V A; Krings, G; Van Dooren, P

    2013-10-14

    Many complex networks show signs of modular structure, uncovered by community detection. Although many methods succeed in revealing various partitions, it remains difficult to detect at what scale some partition is significant. This problem shows foremost in multi-resolution methods. We here introduce an efficient method for scanning for resolutions in one such method. Additionally, we introduce the notion of "significance" of a partition, based on subgraph probabilities. Significance is independent of the exact method used, so could also be applied in other methods, and can be interpreted as the gain in encoding a graph by making use of a partition. Using significance, we can determine "good" resolution parameters, which we demonstrate on benchmark networks. Moreover, optimizing significance itself also shows excellent performance. We demonstrate our method on voting data from the European Parliament. Our analysis suggests the European Parliament has become increasingly ideologically divided and that nationality plays no role.

  14. Structural Similitude and Scaling Laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simitses, George J.

    1998-01-01

    Aircraft and spacecraft comprise the class of aerospace structures that require efficiency and wisdom in design, sophistication and accuracy in analysis and numerous and careful experimental evaluations of components and prototype, in order to achieve the necessary system reliability, performance and safety. Preliminary and/or concept design entails the assemblage of system mission requirements, system expected performance and identification of components and their connections as well as of manufacturing and system assembly techniques. This is accomplished through experience based on previous similar designs, and through the possible use of models to simulate the entire system characteristics. Detail design is heavily dependent on information and concepts derived from the previous steps. This information identifies critical design areas which need sophisticated analyses, and design and redesign procedures to achieve the expected component performance. This step may require several independent analysis models, which, in many instances, require component testing. The last step in the design process, before going to production, is the verification of the design. This step necessitates the production of large components and prototypes in order to test component and system analytical predictions and verify strength and performance requirements under the worst loading conditions that the system is expected to encounter in service. Clearly then, full-scale testing is in many cases necessary and always very expensive. In the aircraft industry, in addition to full-scale tests, certification and safety necessitate large component static and dynamic testing. Such tests are extremely difficult, time consuming and definitely absolutely necessary. Clearly, one should not expect that prototype testing will be totally eliminated in the aircraft industry. It is hoped, though, that we can reduce full-scale testing to a minimum. Full-scale large component testing is necessary in

  15. Inflation, large scale structure and particle physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review experimental and theoretical developments in inflation and its application to structure formation, including the curvation idea. We then discuss a particle physics model of supersymmetric hybrid inflation at the intermediate scale in which the Higgs scalar field is responsible for large scale structure, show how such ...

  16. Structure determination of enterovirus 71

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevka, Pavel; Perera, Rushika; Cardosa, Jane; Kuhn, Richard J.; Rossmann, Michael G. (Purdue); (Sentinext)

    2013-02-20

    Enterovirus 71 is a picornavirus that causes hand, foot and mouth disease but may induce fatal neurological illness in infants and young children. Enterovirus 71 crystallized in a body-centered orthorhombic space group with two particles in general orientations in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Determination of the particle orientations required that the locked rotation function excluded the twofold symmetry axes from the set of icosahedral symmetry operators. This avoided the occurrence of misleading high rotation-function values produced by the alignment of icosahedral and crystallographic twofold axes. Once the orientations and positions of the particles had been established, the structure was solved by molecular replacement and phase extension.

  17. Structural determinants of arrestin functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Gurevich, Eugenia V

    2013-01-01

    Arrestins are a small protein family with only four members in mammals. Arrestins demonstrate an amazing versatility, interacting with hundreds of different G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) subtypes, numerous nonreceptor signaling proteins, and components of the internalization machinery, as well as cytoskeletal elements, including regular microtubules and centrosomes. Here, we focus on the structural determinants that mediate various arrestin functions. The receptor-binding elements in arrestins were mapped fairly comprehensively, which set the stage for the construction of mutants targeting particular GPCRs. The elements engaged by other binding partners are only now being elucidated and in most cases we have more questions than answers. Interestingly, even very limited and imprecise identification of structural requirements for the interaction with very few other proteins has enabled the development of signaling-biased arrestin mutants. More comprehensive understanding of the structural underpinning of different arrestin functions will pave the way for the construction of arrestins that can link the receptor we want to the signaling pathway of our choosing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Computational applications of DNA structural scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldi, P.; Chauvin, Y.; Brunak, Søren

    1998-01-01

    that these scales provide an alternative or complementary compact representation of DNA sequences. As an example, we construct a strand-invariant representation of DNA sequences. The scales can also be used to analyze and discover new DNA structural patterns, especially in combination with hidden Markov models...

  19. Unifying Inference of Meso-Scale Structures in Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkan Tunç

    Full Text Available Networks are among the most prevalent formal representations in scientific studies, employed to depict interactions between objects such as molecules, neuronal clusters, or social groups. Studies performed at meso-scale that involve grouping of objects based on their distinctive interaction patterns form one of the main lines of investigation in network science. In a social network, for instance, meso-scale structures can correspond to isolated social groupings or groups of individuals that serve as a communication core. Currently, the research on different meso-scale structures such as community and core-periphery structures has been conducted via independent approaches, which precludes the possibility of an algorithmic design that can handle multiple meso-scale structures and deciding which structure explains the observed data better. In this study, we propose a unified formulation for the algorithmic detection and analysis of different meso-scale structures. This facilitates the investigation of hybrid structures that capture the interplay between multiple meso-scale structures and statistical comparison of competing structures, all of which have been hitherto unavailable. We demonstrate the applicability of the methodology in analyzing the human brain network, by determining the dominant organizational structure (communities of the brain, as well as its auxiliary characteristics (core-periphery.

  20. Unifying Inference of Meso-Scale Structures in Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunç, Birkan; Verma, Ragini

    2015-01-01

    Networks are among the most prevalent formal representations in scientific studies, employed to depict interactions between objects such as molecules, neuronal clusters, or social groups. Studies performed at meso-scale that involve grouping of objects based on their distinctive interaction patterns form one of the main lines of investigation in network science. In a social network, for instance, meso-scale structures can correspond to isolated social groupings or groups of individuals that serve as a communication core. Currently, the research on different meso-scale structures such as community and core-periphery structures has been conducted via independent approaches, which precludes the possibility of an algorithmic design that can handle multiple meso-scale structures and deciding which structure explains the observed data better. In this study, we propose a unified formulation for the algorithmic detection and analysis of different meso-scale structures. This facilitates the investigation of hybrid structures that capture the interplay between multiple meso-scale structures and statistical comparison of competing structures, all of which have been hitherto unavailable. We demonstrate the applicability of the methodology in analyzing the human brain network, by determining the dominant organizational structure (communities) of the brain, as well as its auxiliary characteristics (core-periphery).

  1. Large Scale Structure of the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplinghat, Manoj

    2011-03-01

    These notes are based on 4 lectures given at Theoretical Advanced Study Institute in 2009 on the large scale structure of the universe. They provide a pedagogical introduction to the temporal evolution of linear density perturbations in the universe and a discussion of how density perturbations on small scales depend on the particle properties of dark matter. The notes assume the reader is familiar with the concepts and mathematics required to describe isotropic and homogeneous cosmology.

  2. Large-scale film structures in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Kirill

    Up-to-date space technology calls for not only taking account of, but also employment of, specific attributes of the outer space environment such as weightlessness, centrifugal forces, hard vacuum, powerful solar radiation. These specific characteristics of outer space allow the use of various structures in space whose development and operation is impossible and inexpedient on Earth. Currently, interest in large-scale space structures is growing; there are various projects on such multi-body space structures and experiments are being conducted for their development. Such designs are represented by spacecraft with solar sails, orbiting solar reflectors, solar energy concentrators, low frequency antennas and others. This paper examines a large-scale flexible space structure made from thin reflective film used as the working surface of the sunlight reflector or the sailcraft. Specifically, this paper deals with techniques of modeling large-scale space structure attitude motion, numerical calculation of vibrations which occur in the system after a spatial slew is performed, as well as optimal trajectory computations. Various methods of the film structure attitude control and stabilization, including optimal slewing programs, are discussed.

  3. Scalings of intermittent structures in magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Uzdensky, Dmitri A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence is ubiquitous in plasmas, leading to rich dynamics characterized by irregularity, irreversibility, energy fluctuations across many scales, and energy transfer across many scales. Another fundamental and generic feature of turbulence, although sometimes overlooked, is the inhomogeneous dissipation of energy in space and in time. This is a consequence of intermittency, the scale-dependent inhomogeneity of dynamics caused by fluctuations in the turbulent cascade. Intermittency causes turbulent plasmas to self-organize into coherent dissipative structures, which may govern heating, diffusion, particle acceleration, and radiation emissions. In this paper, we present recent progress on understanding intermittency in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a strong guide field. We focus on the statistical analysis of intermittent dissipative structures, which occupy a small fraction of the volume but arguably account for the majority of energy dissipation. We show that, in our numerical simulat...

  4. Light trapping structures in wing scales of butterfly Trogonoptera brookiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhiwu; Niu, Shichao; Shang, Chunhui; Liu, Zhenning; Ren, Luquan

    2012-04-28

    The fine optical structures in wing scales of Trogonoptera brookiana, a tropical butterfly exhibiting efficient light trapping effect, were carefully examined and the reflectivity was measured using reflectance spectrometry. The optimized 3D configuration of the coupling structure was determined using SEM and TEM data, and the light trapping mechanism of butterfly scales was studied. It is found that the front and back sides of butterfly wings possess different light trapping structures, but both can significantly increase the optical path and thus result in almost total absorption of all incident light. An optical model was created to check the properties of this light trapping structure. The simulated reflectance spectra are in concordance with the experimental ones. The results reliably confirm that these structures induce efficient light trapping effect. This functional "biomimetic structure" would have a potential value in wide engineering and optical applications. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  5. Determinants of Glycosaminoglycan (GAG Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Prydz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Proteoglycans (PGs are glycosylated proteins of biological importance at cell surfaces, in the extracellular matrix, and in the circulation. PGs are produced and modified by glycosaminoglycan (GAG chains in the secretory pathway of animal cells. The most common GAG attachment site is a serine residue followed by a glycine (-ser-gly-, from which a linker tetrasaccharide extends and may continue as a heparan sulfate, a heparin, a chondroitin sulfate, or a dermatan sulfate GAG chain. Which type of GAG chain becomes attached to the linker tetrasaccharide is influenced by the structure of the protein core, modifications occurring to the linker tetrasaccharide itself, and the biochemical environment of the Golgi apparatus, where GAG polymerization and modification by sulfation and epimerization take place. The same cell type may produce different GAG chains that vary, depending on the extent of epimerization and sulfation. However, it is not known to what extent these differences are caused by compartmental segregation of protein cores en route through the secretory pathway or by differential recruitment of modifying enzymes during synthesis of different PGs. The topic of this review is how different aspects of protein structure, cellular biochemistry, and compartmentalization may influence GAG synthesis.

  6. Study of structural colour of Hebomoia glaucippe butterfly wing scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, V. Ya; Kuznetsov, D. K.; Pryakhina, V. I.; Kosobokov, M. S.; Zubarev, I. V.; Boymuradova, S. K.; Volchetskaya, K. V.

    2017-10-01

    Structural colours of Hebomoia glaucippe butterfly wing scales have been studied experimentally using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. Visualization of scales structures and computer simulation allowed distinguishing correlation between nanostructures on the scales and their colour.

  7. Structural response of reduced scale naval structures under impact tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calle M.A.G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Scaled models are important in naval engineering since actual ship size makes too expensive to test prototypes. However, the analysis of ship collision events employing naval structures in reduced scale is not an ordinary ship research area. The aim of this work is to create the basis for a posterior similarity study by analysing reduced scale ship structures submitted to impact loads. Two basic naval structures, commonly found in the construction of large ships, were considered for this study: a T cross-section beam submitted to a mid-span impact test and a double plate panel with inner cross reinforcement also submitted to a central impact load. These models were made in a reduced scale of 1:100. The experimental material characterization was also carried out in this work, including the evaluation of the stress strain curve under quasi static conditions, the strain rate sensitivity and the structural failure using three criteria developed particularly for numerical modelling of ship collision by other authors.

  8. Surface structure determines dynamic wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Junichiro; Wang, Jiayu; Do-Quang, Minh; Cannon, James; Yue, Feng; Suzuki, Yuji; Amberg, Gustav

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting, the spontaneous spreading process after droplet contacts a solid surface, is important in various engineering processes, such as in printing, coating, and lubrication. In the recent years, experiments and numerical simulations have greatly progressed the understanding in the dynamic wetting particularly on ``flat'' substrates. To gain further insight into the governing physics of the dynamic wetting, we perform droplet-wetting experiments on microstructured surfaces, just a few micrometers in size, with complementary numerical simulations, and investigate the dependence of the spreading rate on the microstructure geometries and fluid properties. We reveal that the influence of microstructures can be quantified in terms of a line friction coefficient for the energy dissipation rate at the contact line, and that this can be described in a simple formula in terms of the geometrical parameters of the roughness and the line-friction coefficient of the planar surface. The systematic study is also of practical importance since structures and roughness are omnipresent and their influence on spreading rate would give us additional degrees of freedom to control the dynamic wetting. This work was financially supported in part by, the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (J.W., J.C., and J.S) and Swedish Governmental Agency for Innovation Systems (M.D.-Q. and G.A.).

  9. Nonlinear Analysis and Scaling Laws for Noncircular Composite Structures Subjected to Combined Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Rose, Cheryl A.; Starnes, James H., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Results from an analytical study of the response of a built-up, multi-cell noncircular composite structure subjected to combined internal pressure and mechanical loads are presented. Nondimensional parameters and scaling laws based on a first-order shear-deformation plate theory are derived for this noncircular composite structure. The scaling laws are used to design sub-scale structural models for predicting the structural response of a full-scale structure representative of a portion of a blended-wing-body transport aircraft. Because of the complexity of the full-scale structure, some of the similitude conditions are relaxed for the sub-scale structural models. Results from a systematic parametric study are used to determine the effects of relaxing selected similitude conditions on the sensitivity of the effectiveness of using the sub-scale structural model response characteristics for predicting the full-scale structure response characteristics.

  10. Multi-scale structural community organisation of the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulos, Rasha E; Tremblay, Nicolas; Arneodo, Alain; Borgnat, Pierre; Audit, Benjamin

    2017-04-11

    Structural interaction frequency matrices between all genome loci are now experimentally achievable thanks to high-throughput chromosome conformation capture technologies. This ensues a new methodological challenge for computational biology which consists in objectively extracting from these data the structural motifs characteristic of genome organisation. We deployed the fast multi-scale community mining algorithm based on spectral graph wavelets to characterise the networks of intra-chromosomal interactions in human cell lines. We observed that there exist structural domains of all sizes up to chromosome length and demonstrated that the set of structural communities forms a hierarchy of chromosome segments. Hence, at all scales, chromosome folding predominantly involves interactions between neighbouring sites rather than the formation of links between distant loci. Multi-scale structural decomposition of human chromosomes provides an original framework to question structural organisation and its relationship to functional regulation across the scales. By construction the proposed methodology is independent of the precise assembly of the reference genome and is thus directly applicable to genomes whose assembly is not fully determined.

  11. Imaging meso-scale ionospheric structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burston, Robert

    2012-06-01

    The accuracy and capacity to resolve meso-scale structures of a four dimensional ionospheric imaging algorithm in the circumstance of data from dense networks of permanent GNSS ground receiver stations were investigated. Simulation studies were conducted in order to be able to assess the performance of the algorithm over the entire imaged region. The Multi-instrument Data Assimilation Software (MIDAS) algorithm was used for this purpose. Simulated input data in Receiver Independent Exchange Format (RINEX) were produced by calculating slant Total Electron Content (sTEC) values for satellite to receiver raypaths through an artificially generated ionosphere. Modeling these signals including Differential Code Biases (DCBs) and noise had negligible impact on the output from the imaging algorithm when compared with modeled signals that included neither. Comparing the output from MIDAS using a range of grid definitions show that finer grids have improved capacity to resolve meso-scale structures in the input model but over all are less accurate than coarser grids. The greatest errors occur in low-data regions of the grid and where structures in the input have the greatest gradients in vertical Total Electron Content (vTEC). A good compromise between the conflicting needs of resolution and accuracy is given by a grid defined with 2° × 2° latitude by longitude local horizontal grid divisions.

  12. Large scale structure statistics: Finite volume effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombi, S.; Bouchet, F. R.; Schaeffer, R.

    1994-01-01

    We study finite volume effects on the count probability distribution function PN(l) and the averaged Q-body correlations Xi-barQ (2 less than or = Q less than or equal 5). These statistics are computed for cubic cells, of size l. We use as an example the case of the matter distribution of a cold dark matter (CDM) universe involving approximately 3 x 105 particles. The main effect of the finiteness of the sampled volume is to induce an abrupt cut-off on the function PN(l) at large N. This clear signature makes an analysis of the consequences easy, and one can envisage a correction procedure. As a matter of fact, we demonstrate how an unfair sample can strongly affect the estimates of the functions Xi-barQ for Q greater than or = 3 (and decrease the measured zero of the two-body correlation function). We propose a method to correct for this are fact, or at least to evaluate the corresponding errors. We show that the correlations are systematically underestimated by direct measurements. We find that, once corrected, the statistical properties of the CDM universe appear compatible with the scaling relation SQ identically equals Xi-bar2 exp Q-1 = constant with respect to scale, in the non-linear regime; it was not the case with direct measurments. However, we note a deviation from scaling at scales close to the correlation length. It is probably due to the transition between the highly non-linear regime and the weakly correlated regime, where the functions SQ also seem to present a plateau. We apply the same procedure to simulations with hot dark matter (HDM) and white noise initial conditions, with similar results. Our method thus provides the first accurate measurement of the normalized skewness, S3, and the normalized kurtosis, S4, for three typical models of large scale structure formation in an expanding universe.

  13. Physical scale experiments on torrential filter structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiari, Michael; Moser, Markus; Trojer, Martin; Hübl, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the INTERREG Project "SedAlp" physical scale model experiments are carried out in the hydraulic laboratory of the Institute of Mountain Risk Engineering at the University of Life Sciences in Vienna in order to optimize torrent protection structures. Two different types of check dams are investigated. A screen-dam with inclined vertical beams is compared with a beam-dam with horizontal beams. The experiments evaluate the variation of sediment transport of these structures including the influence of coarse woody debris. Therefore the distance between the steel elements can be adjusted to show their ability to filter sediment. The physical scale of the experiments is 1:30. All experimental runs are Froude scaled. Both dams are tested in elongated and pear-shaped sediment retention basins in order to investigate the shape effect of the deposition area. For a systematic comparison of the two check dams experiments with fluvial bedload transport are made. First a typical hydrograph for an extreme flood with unlimited sediment supply is modelled. A typical torrential sediment mixture with a wide grain-size distribution is fed by a conveyor belt according the transport capacity of the upstream reach. Then the deposition is scanned with a laser-scan device in order to analyse the deposition pattern and the deposited volume. Afterwards a flood with a lower reoccurrence period without sediment transport from upstream is modelled to investigate the ability of the protection structure for self-emptying. To investigate the influence of driftwood on the deposition behaviour experiments with logs are made. Different log diameters and lengths are added upstream the basin. The results show, that the deposition during the experiments was not controlled by sorting-effects at the location of the dam. The deposition always started from upstream, where the transport capacity was reduced due to the milder slope and the widening of the basin. No grain sorting effects

  14. [Development of free will and determinism scale in Japanese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Takayuki; Ishibashi, Yuya; Kajimura, Shogo; Oka, Ryunosuke; Kusumi, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    We developed a free will and determinism scale in Japanese (FAD-J) to assess lay beliefs in free will, scientific determinism, fatalistic determinism, and unpredictability. In Study 1, we translated a free will and determinism scale (FAD-Plus) into Japanese and verified its reliability and validity. In Study 2, we examined the relationship between the FAD-J and eight other scales. Results suggested that lay beliefs in free will and determinism were related to self-regulation, critical thinking, other-oriented empathy, self-esteem, and regret and maximization in decision makings. We discuss the usefulness of the FAD-J for studying the psychological functions of lay beliefs in free will and determinism.

  15. Seeing Scale: Richard Dunn’s Structuralism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Broadfoot

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Writing on the occasion of a retrospective of Richard Dunn’s work, Terence Maloon argued that ‘structuralism had an important bearing on virtually all of Richard Dunn’s mature works’, with ‘his modular, “crossed” formats’ being the most obvious manifestation of this. In this article I wish to reconsider this relation, withdrawing from a broad consideration of the framework of structuralism to focus on some of the quite particular ideas that Lacan proposed in response to structuralism. Beginning from a pivotal painting in the 1960s that developed out of Dunn’s experience of viewing the work of Barnett Newman, I wish to suggest a relation between the ongoing exploration of the thematic of scale in Dunn’s work and the idea of the symbolic that Lacan derives from structuralist thought. This relation, I argue, opens up a different way of understanding the art historical transition from Minimalism to Conceptual art.

  16. Fire structures pine serotiny at different scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Serrano, Ana; Verdú, Miguel; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Pausas, Juli G

    2013-12-01

    Serotiny (delayed seed release with the consequent accumulation of a canopy seedbank) confers fitness benefits in environments with crown-fire regimes. Thus, we predicted that serotiny level should be higher in populations recurrently subjected to crown-fires than in populations where crown-fires are rare. In addition, under a high frequency of fires, space and resources are recurrently available, permitting recruitment around each mother to follow the seed rain shadow. Thus, we also predicted spatial aggregation of serotiny within populations. We compared serotiny, considering both the proportion and the age of serotinous cones, in populations living in contrasting fire regimes for two iconic Mediterranean pine species (Pinus halepensis, P. pinaster). We framed our results by quantitatively comparing the strength of the fire-serotiny relationship with previous studies worldwide. For the two species, populations living under high crown-fire recurrence regimes had a higher serotiny level than those populations where the recurrence of crown-fires was low. For P. halepensis (the species with higher serotiny), populations in high fire recurrence regimes had higher fine-scale spatial aggregation of serotiny than those inhabiting low fire recurrence systems. The strength of the observed fire-serotiny relationship in P. halepensis is among the highest in published literature. Fire regime shapes serotiny level among populations, and in populations with high serotiny, recurrent fires maintain a significant spatial structure for this trait. Consequently, fire has long-term evolutionary implications at different scales, emphasizing its prominent role in shaping the ecology of pines.

  17. Responses in large-scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreira, Alexandre; Schmidt, Fabian

    2017-06-01

    We introduce a rigorous definition of general power-spectrum responses as resummed vertices with two hard and n soft momenta in cosmological perturbation theory. These responses measure the impact of long-wavelength perturbations on the local small-scale power spectrum. The kinematic structure of the responses (i.e., their angular dependence) can be decomposed unambiguously through a ``bias'' expansion of the local power spectrum, with a fixed number of physical response coefficients, which are only a function of the hard wavenumber k. Further, the responses up to n-th order completely describe the (n+2)-point function in the squeezed limit, i.e. with two hard and n soft modes, which one can use to derive the response coefficients. This generalizes previous results, which relate the angle-averaged squeezed limit to isotropic response coefficients. We derive the complete expression of first- and second-order responses at leading order in perturbation theory, and present extrapolations to nonlinear scales based on simulation measurements of the isotropic response coefficients. As an application, we use these results to predict the non-Gaussian part of the angle-averaged matter power spectrum covariance CovNGl=0(k1,k2), in the limit where one of the modes, say k2, is much smaller than the other. Without any free parameters, our model results are in very good agreement with simulations for k2 lesssim 0.06 h Mpc-1, and for any k1 gtrsim 2k2. The well-defined kinematic structure of the power spectrum response also permits a quick evaluation of the angular dependence of the covariance matrix. While we focus on the matter density field, the formalism presented here can be generalized to generic tracers such as galaxies.

  18. Determinants of Market Structure and the Airline Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raduchel, W.

    1972-01-01

    The general economic determinants of market structure are outlined with special reference to the airline industry. Included are the following facets: absolute size of firms; distributions of firms by size; concentration; entry barriers; product and service differentiation; diversification; degrees of competition; vertical integration; market boundaries; and economies of scale. Also examined are the static and dynamic properties of market structure in terms of mergers, government policies, and economic growth conditions.

  19. PHENIX: building new software for automated crystallographic structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul D; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W; Hung, Li Wei; Ioerger, Thomas R; McCoy, Airlie J; Moriarty, Nigel W; Read, Randy J; Sacchettini, James C; Sauter, Nicholas K; Terwilliger, Thomas C

    2002-11-01

    Structural genomics seeks to expand rapidly the number of protein structures in order to extract the maximum amount of information from genomic sequence databases. The advent of several large-scale projects worldwide leads to many new challenges in the field of crystallographic macromolecular structure determination. A novel software package called PHENIX (Python-based Hierarchical ENvironment for Integrated Xtallography) is therefore being developed. This new software will provide the necessary algorithms to proceed from reduced intensity data to a refined molecular model and to facilitate structure solution for both the novice and expert crystallographer.

  20. Determining and visualizing flexibility in protein structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Walter R P; Straus, Suzana K

    2015-05-01

    How to compare the structures of an ensemble of protein conformations is a fundamental problem in structural biology. As has been previously observed, the widely used RMSD measure due to Kabsch, in which a rigid-body superposition minimizing the least-squares positional deviations is performed, has its drawbacks when comparing and visualizing a set of flexible protein structures. Here, we develop a method, fleximatch, of protein structure comparison that takes flexibility into account. Based on a distance matrix measure of flexibility, a weighted superposition of distance matrices rather than of atomic coordinates is performed. Subsequently, this allows a consistent determination of (a) a superposition of structures for visualization, (b) a partitioning of the protein structure into rigid molecular components (core atoms), and (c) an atomic mobility measure. The method is suitable for highlighting both particularly flexible and rigid parts of a protein from structures derived from NMR, X-ray diffraction or molecular simulation. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Protein Structure Determination Using Chemical Shifts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Anders Steen

    In this thesis, a protein structure determination using chemical shifts is presented. The method is implemented in the open source PHAISTOS protein simulation framework. The method combines sampling from a generative model with a coarse-grained force field and an energy function that includes...... chemical shifts. The method is benchmarked on folding simulations of five small proteins. In four cases the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with experimental data, the fifth case fail likely due to inaccuracies in the energy function. For the Chymotrypsin Inhibitor protein, a structure...... is determined using only chemical shifts recorded and assigned through automated processes. The CARMSD to the experimental X-ray for this structure is 1.1. Å. Additionally, the method is combined with very sparse NOE-restraints and evolutionary distance restraints and tested on several protein structures >100...

  2. Large-Scale Structures of Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray-Clay, Ruth; Rogers, Leslie A.

    2015-12-01

    A class of solar system analogs has yet to be identified among the large crop of planetary systems now observed. However, since most observed worlds are more easily detectable than direct analogs of the Sun's planets, the frequency of systems with structures similar to our own remains unknown. Identifying the range of possible planetary system architectures is complicated by the large number of physical processes that affect the formation and dynamical evolution of planets. I will present two ways of organizing planetary system structures. First, I will suggest that relatively few physical parameters are likely to differentiate the qualitative architectures of different systems. Solid mass in a protoplanetary disk is perhaps the most obvious possible controlling parameter, and I will give predictions for correlations between planetary system properties that we would expect to be present if this is the case. In particular, I will suggest that the solar system's structure is representative of low-metallicity systems that nevertheless host giant planets. Second, the disk structures produced as young stars are fed by their host clouds may play a crucial role. Using the observed distribution of RV giant planets as a function of stellar mass, I will demonstrate that invoking ice lines to determine where gas giants can form requires fine tuning. I will suggest that instead, disk structures built during early accretion have lasting impacts on giant planet distributions, and disk clean-up differentially affects the orbital distributions of giant and lower-mass planets. These two organizational hypotheses have different implications for the solar system's context, and I will suggest observational tests that may allow them to be validated or falsified.

  3. Correlations between scale structure and pigmentation in butterfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, J M; Monteiro, A; Brakefield, P M

    2001-01-01

    We examined the correlation between color and structure of wing scales in the nymphalid butterflies Bicyclus anynana and Heliconius melpomene. All scales in B. anynana are rather similar in comparison to the clear structural differences of differently pigmented scales in H. melpomene. Where scale structural differences in H. melpomene are qualitative, they seem to be quantitative in B. anynana. There is a "gradient" in the density of some structural elements, the cross ribs, in the scales of B. anynana: black, gold, and brown scales show progressively lower cross rib density within an individual. There is, however, high individual variation in the absolute cross rib densities (i.e., scales with a particular color and cross rib density in one individual may have a different color but similar density in another individual). By ectopically inducing color pattern during early pupal development, we examined whether a scale's color and its microstructure could be uncoupled. The effect of these manipulations appears to be different in B. anynana and H. melpomene. In Bicyclus, "black" scales induced by wing damage at an ectopic location normally containing brown scales acquire both an intermediate structure and color between that of brown and normal black scales. In Heliconius, however, intermediate colors or scale structure were never observed, and scales with an altered color (due to damage) always have the same structure as normal scales with that color. The results are discussed on the basis of gene expression patterns, variability in rates of scale development and pigment, and scale sclerotization pathways.

  4. Response function of the large-scale structure of the universe to the small scale inhomogeneities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimichi, Takahiro, E-mail: takahiro.nishimichi@ipmu.jp [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 6 et CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); CREST, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Bernardeau, Francis, E-mail: francis.bernardeau@iap.fr [Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 6 et CNRS, UMR 7095, Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France); CEA, CNRS, UMR 3681, Institut de Physique Théorique, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Taruya, Atsushi, E-mail: ataruya@yukawa.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan)

    2016-11-10

    In order to infer the impact of the small-scale physics to the large-scale properties of the universe, we use a series of cosmological N-body simulations of self-gravitating matter inhomogeneities to measure, for the first time, the response function of such a system defined as a functional derivative of the nonlinear power spectrum with respect to its linear counterpart. Its measured shape and amplitude are found to be in good agreement with perturbation theory predictions except for the coupling from small to large-scale perturbations. The latter is found to be significantly damped, following a Lorentzian form. These results shed light on validity regime of perturbation theory calculations giving a useful guideline for regularization of small scale effects in analytical modeling. Most importantly our result indicates that the statistical properties of the large-scale structure of the universe are remarkably insensitive to the details of the small-scale physics, astrophysical or gravitational, paving the way for the derivation of robust estimates of theoretical uncertainties on the determination of cosmological parameters from large-scale survey observations.

  5. Determination of Validity and Reliability of the Mobbing Scale for Indoor Sports Referees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serkan HACICAFEROĞLU

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of this study is to conduct validity and reliability analyses of the scale prepared for determining the mobbing of indoor sports referees, who take active duties in different classes (basketball, handball and volleyball. In orde r to develop the scale, a trial scale made of 31 items in likert type was prepared and applied to referees and then factor analysis method was used, which converts many variables into meaningful and independent factors in fewer number. According to the dat a obtained from factor analysis, the scale has a structure of 14 articles and single component. It was determined that the total variance of scale items was 43.721 and factor load was between 0.48 and 0.76. The cronbach alpha internal coefficient of consis tency was computed as 0.82. Based on the values obtained from the scale it could be said that the Mobbing Scale for Indoor Sports Referees is valid and reliable.

  6. Capital Structure Determinants and Governance Structure Variety in Franchising

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Jiang (Tao)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis investigates two questions: the determinants of capital structure in franchising and its subsequent impact on the franchise financing decisions; and the efficient governance structure choice in franchising. We posit that firms franchise in order to benefit from the reduced

  7. Evaluating protein structures determined by structural genomics consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Aneerban; Tejero, Roberto; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2007-03-01

    Structural genomics projects are providing large quantities of new 3D structural data for proteins. To monitor the quality of these data, we have developed the protein structure validation software suite (PSVS), for assessment of protein structures generated by NMR or X-ray crystallographic methods. PSVS is broadly applicable for structure quality assessment in structural biology projects. The software integrates under a single interface analyses from several widely-used structure quality evaluation tools, including PROCHECK (Laskowski et al., J Appl Crystallog 1993;26:283-291), MolProbity (Lovell et al., Proteins 2003;50:437-450), Verify3D (Luthy et al., Nature 1992;356:83-85), ProsaII (Sippl, Proteins 1993;17: 355-362), the PDB validation software, and various structure-validation tools developed in our own laboratory. PSVS provides standard constraint analyses, statistics on goodness-of-fit between structures and experimental data, and knowledge-based structure quality scores in standardized format suitable for database integration. The analysis provides both global and site-specific measures of protein structure quality. Global quality measures are reported as Z scores, based on calibration with a set of high-resolution X-ray crystal structures. PSVS is particularly useful in assessing protein structures determined by NMR methods, but is also valuable for assessing X-ray crystal structures or homology models. Using these tools, we assessed protein structures generated by the Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium and other international structural genomics projects, over a 5-year period. Protein structures produced from structural genomics projects exhibit quality score distributions similar to those of structures produced in traditional structural biology projects during the same time period. However, while some NMR structures have structure quality scores similar to those seen in higher-resolution X-ray crystal structures, the majority of NMR structures

  8. Membrane protein structure determination in membrana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yi; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M

    2013-09-17

    The two principal components of biological membranes, the lipid bilayer and the proteins integrated within it, have coevolved for specific functions that mediate the interactions of cells with their environment. Molecular structures can provide very significant insights about protein function. In the case of membrane proteins, the physical and chemical properties of lipids and proteins are highly interdependent; therefore structure determination should include the membrane environment. Considering the membrane alongside the protein eliminates the possibility that crystal contacts or detergent molecules could distort protein structure, dynamics, and function and enables ligand binding studies to be performed in a natural setting. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy is compatible with three-dimensional structure determination of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayer membranes under physiological conditions and has played an important role in elucidating the physical and chemical properties of biological membranes, providing key information about the structure and dynamics of the phospholipid components. Recently, developments in the recombinant expression of membrane proteins, sample preparation, pulse sequences for high-resolution spectroscopy, radio frequency probes, high-field magnets, and computational methods have enabled a number of membrane protein structures to be determined in lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we illustrate solid-state NMR methods with examples from two bacterial outer membrane proteins (OmpX and Ail) that form integral membrane β-barrels. The ability to measure orientation-dependent frequencies in the solid-state NMR spectra of membrane-embedded proteins provides the foundation for a powerful approach to structure determination based primarily on orientation restraints. Orientation restraints are particularly useful for NMR structural studies of membrane proteins because they provide information about both three-dimensional structure

  9. Determination of lead 210 in scales from industrial processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faria, Lígia S.; Moreira, Rubens M.; Kastner, Geraldo F.; Barbosa, João B.S., E-mail: ligsfaria@gmail.com, E-mail: rubens@cdtn.br, E-mail: gfk@cdtn.br, E-mail: jbsb@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    Industrial processes such as oil and gas extraction and groundwater exploitation are examples of installations that can accumulate naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) during the extraction and production. Lead-210 deposits in the production can be formed by the same mechanisms that occur in the environment through the support of Radon-222, (where {sup 210}Pb is produced at {sup 222}Rn decay) or without support, as {sup 210}Pb. The objective of this work is to evaluate the mineralogical characteristics and determine the activity of lead-210 in the scales using the X-Ray Diffraction and Gamma Spectrometry techniques. Were analyzed fifteen samples, four scales from oil industry, ten scales from groundwater conductors and one for groundwater supply pipe. The highest activity found in the oil scale and groundwater conductors scale was 0.30 ± 0.06 Bq g{sup -1} and 3.80 ± 0.20 Bq g{sup -1}, respectively. (author)

  10. FACTOR STRUCTURE OF MF SCALES AND ITEMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LUNNEBORG, CLIFFORD E.; LUNNEBORG, PATRICIA W.

    FACTOR ANALYSES WERE PERFORMED UPON FOUR MASCULINITY-FEMINITY (MF) SCALES AND UPON THE 136-ITEMS COMPRISING THESE SCALES. RESULTS OF THE FIRST ANALYSIS ILLUSTRATED THE DIFFICULTY OF INTERPRETING FACTORS BASED ON HETEROGENEOUS SCALES. THE ITEM FACTORING REVEALED THE MULTIDIMENSIONALITY OF MF. CERTAIN ITEM FACTORS WERE UNCORRELATED WITH SEX STATUS…

  11. Procedure for Determining Turbulence Length Scales Using Hotwire Anemometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gabry, Lamyaa A.; Thurman, Douglas R.; Poinsatte, Philip E.

    2014-01-01

    Hotwire anemometers are used to measure instantaneous velocity from which the mean velocity and the velocity fluctuation can be determined. Using a hotwire system, it is possible to deduce not only the velocity components and their fluctuation but to also analyze the energy spectra and from that the turbulence length scales. In this experiment, hotwire anemometry is used to measure the flow field turbulence for an array of film cooling holes. The objective of this paper is to document the procedure that is used to reduce the instantaneous velocity measurements to determine the turbulence length scales using data from the film-cooling experiments to illustrate the procedure.

  12. Optical Properties Of Nanometer-Scale Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Kudykina, T A

    2016-01-01

    Two approaches (micro- and macro- investigations) are used to determine the dimension dependences of the optical parameters of the nanometer-scale layers of materials. It is shown that both an index of refraction and coefficient of absorption depend strongly on the thickness of the layer. In this region of thicknesses, the dimension resonance occurs, where an index of refraction has a maximum and a coefficient of absorption has a minimum. The numerical calculation of the optical parameters of some materials (Ag, Al, Fe, Ge, Si, Se, Te) have been carried out with the use of the experimental data of reflection and transparency of thin layers, obtained in a series of works, and with our formulas for the wave amplitudes and the laws of refractions. The analogues of the Fresnel formulas and the Snell law have been derived from the Maxwell boundary conditions where the absorption and conductivity of media were taken into account. The use of our formulas for the wave amplitudes leads to the fulfillment of the conser...

  13. Science achievement determinants: factorial structure of family ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Personality and Social Psychology. Bulletin. 19:474-480. Wetchler JL 1990. Family treatment of a fifteen year old social isolate. Journal of. Family Psychotherapy, 1:29-38. Science achievement determinants: factorial structure of family variables. Elias Oupa Mashile. Faculty of Education, University of South Africa, P.O. Box ...

  14. Representing Personal Determinants in Causal Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandura, Albert

    1984-01-01

    Responds to Staddon's critique of the author's earlier article and addresses issues raised by Staddon's (1984) alternative models of causality. The author argues that it is not the formalizability of causal processes that is the issue but whether cognitive determinants of behavior are reducible to past stimulus inputs in causal structures.…

  15. Scale, Diversity, and Determinants of Labour Migration in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Zaiceva, Anzelika; Zimmermann, Klaus F

    2008-01-01

    While global migration is increasing, internal EU migration flows have remained low. This paper contributes to a better understanding of the determinants and scale of European migration. It surveys previous historical experiences and empirical findings including the recent Eastern enlargements. The determinants of migration before and after the 2004 enlargement and in the EU15 and EU10 countries are analysed using individual data on migration intentions. In addition, perceptions about the siz...

  16. Investigation of scale effects in the TRF determined by VLBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahl, Daniel; Heinkelmann, Robert; Schuh, Harald

    2017-04-01

    The improvement of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) is of great significance for Earth sciences and one of the major tasks in geodesy. The translation, rotation and the scale-factor, as well as their linear rates, are solved in a 14-parameter transformation between individual frames of each space geodetic technique and the combined frame. In ITRF2008, as well as in the current release ITRF2014, the scale-factor is provided by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) in equal shares. Since VLBI measures extremely precise group delays that are transformed to baseline lengths by the velocity of light, a natural constant, VLBI is the most suitable method for providing the scale. The aim of the current work is to identify possible shortcomings in the VLBI scale contribution to ITRF2008. For developing recommendations for an enhanced estimation, scale effects in the Terrestrial Reference Frame (TRF) determined with VLBI are considered in detail and compared to ITRF2008. In contrast to station coordinates, where the scale is defined by a geocentric position vector, pointing from the origin of the reference frame to the station, baselines are not related to the origin. They are describing the absolute scale independently from the datum. The more accurate a baseline length, and consequently the scale, is estimated by VLBI, the better the scale contribution to the ITRF. Considering time series of baseline length between different stations, a non-linear periodic signal can clearly be recognized, caused by seasonal effects at observation sites. Modeling these seasonal effects and subtracting them from the original data enhances the repeatability of single baselines significantly. Other effects influencing the scale strongly, are jumps in the time series of baseline length, mainly evoked by major earthquakes. Co- and post-seismic effects can be identified in the data, having a non-linear character likewise. Modeling the non

  17. Method of fan sound mode structure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, G. F.; Sofrin, T. G.; Wells, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A method for the determination of fan sound mode structure in the Inlet of turbofan engines using in-duct acoustic pressure measurements is presented. The method is based on the simultaneous solution of a set of equations whose unknowns are modal amplitude and phase. A computer program for the solution of the equation set was developed. An additional computer program was developed which calculates microphone locations the use of which results in an equation set that does not give rise to numerical instabilities. In addition to the development of a method for determination of coherent modal structure, experimental and analytical approaches are developed for the determination of the amplitude frequency spectrum of randomly generated sound models for use in narrow annulus ducts. Two approaches are defined: one based on the use of cross-spectral techniques and the other based on the use of an array of microphones.

  18. Stress determination in thermally grown alumina scales using ruby luminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renusch, D.; Veal, B.W.; Koshelev, I.; Natesan, K.; Grimsditch [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hou, P.Y. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    By exploiting the strain dependence of the ruby luminescence line, we have measured the strain in alumina scales thermally grown on Fe-Cr- Al alloys. Results are compared and found to be reasonably consistent with strains determined using x rays. Oxidation studies were carried out on alloys Fe - 5Cr - 28Al and Fe - 18Cr - 10Al (at.%). Significantly different levels of strain buildup were observed in scales on these alloys. Results on similar alloys containing a ``reactive element`` (Zr or Hf) in dilute quantity are also presented. Scales on alloys containing a reactive element (RE) can support significantly higher strains than scales on RE-free alloys. With the luminescence technique, strain relief associated with spallation thresholds is readily observed.

  19. Pesticide safety practice and its determinants among small scale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pesticide safety practice and its determinants among small scale vegetables farmers in Eyasi area, Arusha region Tanzania. ... the lack of protective behavior, it is then very important that farmers and farm workers are reminded of the hazardous nature of pesticides and the need to have their health monitored regularly.

  20. The effective field theory of cosmological large scale structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco, John Joseph M. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); Hertzberg, Mark P. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2012-09-20

    Large scale structure surveys will likely become the next leading cosmological probe. In our universe, matter perturbations are large on short distances and small at long scales, i.e. strongly coupled in the UV and weakly coupled in the IR. To make precise analytical predictions on large scales, we develop an effective field theory formulated in terms of an IR effective fluid characterized by several parameters, such as speed of sound and viscosity. These parameters, determined by the UV physics described by the Boltzmann equation, are measured from N-body simulations. We find that the speed of sound of the effective fluid is c2s ≈ 10–6c2 and that the viscosity contributions are of the same order. The fluid describes all the relevant physics at long scales k and permits a manifestly convergent perturbative expansion in the size of the matter perturbations δ(k) for all the observables. As an example, we calculate the correction to the power spectrum at order δ(k)4. As a result, the predictions of the effective field theory are found to be in much better agreement with observation than standard cosmological perturbation theory, already reaching percent precision at this order up to a relatively short scale k ≃ 0.24h Mpc–1.

  1. Beam Coupling to Optical Scale Accelerating Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, C.M.; Byer, R.L.; Colby, E.R.; Cowan, B.M.; Ischebeck, R.; Lincoln, M.R.; Siemann, R.H.; Spencer, J.E.; /SLAC; Plettner, T.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2007-03-27

    Current research efforts into structure based laser acceleration of electrons utilize beams from standard RF linacs. These beams must be coupled into very small structures with transverse dimensions comparable to the laser wavelength. To obtain decent transmission, a permanent magnet quadrupole (PMQ) triplet with a focusing gradient of 560 T/m is used to focus into the structure. Also of interest is the induced wakefield from the structure, useful for diagnosing potential accelerator structures or as novel radiation sources.

  2. Determination of DNA structural detail using radioprobing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Peter M; Laughton, Charles; Nikjoo, Hooshang

    2012-01-01

    To put radioprobing into context as a relatively new method of determining structural detail in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and to review its use since first proposed in 1997. The key feature of the method is that, by experiment or simulation, a radionuclide such as iodine-125 ((125)I) is placed near the DNA at a known point relative to the DNA base sequence, and the number of resulting strand breaks in each nucleotide is determined. As the intensity of damage declines consistently with distance from the radionuclide, relative distances between the emitter and the nucleotides can be deduced, and hence potentially the topology or structural detail of the DNA. For simulation, appropriate software includes a Molecular Dynamics package, analysis and visualization tools, and a Monte Carlo track structure program. A review of published work and our own recent unpublished studies have shown that radioprobing is sufficiently sensitive and consistent to determine structural detail such as internal folding topology and flexing behavior, and can be applied to DNA or a DNA-protein complex in an approximation to its normal biological environment.

  3. Structural colors from Morpho peleides butterfly wing scales

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Yong

    2009-01-01

    A male Morpho peleides butterfly wing is decorated by two types of scales, cover and ground scales. We have studied the optical properties of each type of scales in conjunction with the structural information provided by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and computer simulation. The shining blue color is mainly from the Bragg reflection of the one-dimensional photonic structure, e.g., the shelf structure packed regularly in each ridges on cover scales. A thin-film-like interference effect from the base plate of the cover scale enhances such blue color and further gives extra reflection peaks in the infrared and ultraviolet regions. The analogy in the spectra acquired from the original wing and that from the cover scales suggests that the cover scales take a dominant role in its structural color. This study provides insight of using the biotemplates for fabricating smart photonic structures. © 2009 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Structural colors from Morpho peleides butterfly wing scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yong; Xu, Sheng; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2009-10-01

    A male Morpho peleides butterfly wing is decorated by two types of scales, cover and ground scales. We have studied the optical properties of each type of scales in conjunction with the structural information provided by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and computer simulation. The shining blue color is mainly from the Bragg reflection of the one-dimensional photonic structure, e.g., the shelf structure packed regularly in each ridges on cover scales. A thin-film-like interference effect from the base plate of the cover scale enhances such blue color and further gives extra reflection peaks in the infrared and ultraviolet regions. The analogy in the spectra acquired from the original wing and that from the cover scales suggests that the cover scales take a dominant role in its structural color. This study provides insight of using the biotemplates for fabricating smart photonic structures.

  5. Three-dimensional structure determination from a single view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, Kevin S; Salha, Sara; Sandberg, Richard L; Jiang, Huaidong; Rodríguez, Jose A; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Kapteyn, Henry C; Du, Jincheng; Miao, Jianwei

    2010-01-14

    The ability to determine the structure of matter in three dimensions has profoundly advanced our understanding of nature. Traditionally, the most widely used schemes for three-dimensional (3D) structure determination of an object are implemented by acquiring multiple measurements over various sample orientations, as in the case of crystallography and tomography, or by scanning a series of thin sections through the sample, as in confocal microscopy. Here we present a 3D imaging modality, termed ankylography (derived from the Greek words ankylos meaning 'curved' and graphein meaning 'writing'), which under certain circumstances enables complete 3D structure determination from a single exposure using a monochromatic incident beam. We demonstrate that when the diffraction pattern of a finite object is sampled at a sufficiently fine scale on the Ewald sphere, the 3D structure of the object is in principle determined by the 2D spherical pattern. We confirm the theoretical analysis by performing 3D numerical reconstructions of a sodium silicate glass structure at 2 A resolution, and a single poliovirus at 2-3 nm resolution, from 2D spherical diffraction patterns alone. Using diffraction data from a soft X-ray laser, we also provide a preliminary demonstration that ankylography is experimentally feasible by obtaining a 3D image of a test object from a single 2D diffraction pattern. With further development, this approach of obtaining complete 3D structure information from a single view could find broad applications in the physical and life sciences.

  6. Simultaneous determination of protein structure and dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Best, Robert B.; DePristo, M. A.

    2005-01-01

    at the atomic level about the structural and dynamical features of proteins-with the ability of molecular dynamics simulations to explore a wide range of protein conformations. We illustrate the method for human ubiquitin in solution and find that there is considerable conformational heterogeneity throughout......We present a protocol for the experimental determination of ensembles of protein conformations that represent simultaneously the native structure and its associated dynamics. The procedure combines the strengths of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy-for obtaining experimental information...... the protein structure. The interior atoms of the protein are tightly packed in each individual conformation that contributes to the ensemble but their overall behaviour can be described as having a significant degree of liquid-like character. The protocol is completely general and should lead to significant...

  7. Large-scale structure non-Gaussianities with modal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmittfull, Marcel

    2016-10-01

    Relying on a separable modal expansion of the bispectrum, the implementation of a fast estimator for the full bispectrum of a 3d particle distribution is presented. The computational cost of accurate bispectrum estimation is negligible relative to simulation evolution, so the bispectrum can be used as a standard diagnostic whenever the power spectrum is evaluated. As an application, the time evolution of gravitational and primordial dark matter bispectra was measured in a large suite of N-body simulations. The bispectrum shape changes characteristically when the cosmic web becomes dominated by filaments and halos, therefore providing a quantitative probe of 3d structure formation. Our measured bispectra are determined by ~ 50 coefficients, which can be used as fitting formulae in the nonlinear regime and for non-Gaussian initial conditions. We also compare the measured bispectra with predictions from the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structures (EFTofLSS).

  8. Large scale structure from viscous dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Blas, Diego; Garny, Mathias; Tetradis, Nikolaos; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological perturbations of sufficiently long wavelength admit a fluid dynamic description. We consider modes with wavevectors below a scale $k_m$ for which the dynamics is only mildly non-linear. The leading effect of modes above that scale can be accounted for by effective non-equilibrium viscosity and pressure terms. For mildly non-linear scales, these mainly arise from momentum transport within the ideal and cold but inhomogeneous fluid, while momentum transport due to more microscopic degrees of freedom is suppressed. As a consequence, concrete expressions with no free parameters, except the matching scale $k_m$, can be derived from matching evolution equations to standard cosmological perturbation theory. Two-loop calculations of the matter power spectrum in the viscous theory lead to excellent agreement with $N$-body simulations up to scales $k=0.2 \\, h/$Mpc. The convergence properties in the ultraviolet are better than for standard perturbation theory and the results are robust with respect to varia...

  9. Determining the Products of Inertia for Small Scale UAVs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzetti, Joseph S.; Banuelos, Leonel C.; Clarke, Robert; Murillo, Oscar J.; Bowers, Albion H.

    2017-01-01

    Moments of inertia and products of inertia often need to be determined for aircraft. As complex bodies, their mass properties need to be determined experimentally for best accuracy. While several moment of inertia experimental techniques have been developed, there are few to determine the products of inertia. Products of inertia can be easily determined mathematically if the angle between the aircraft x body axis and principal x axis is known. This method finds the principal inclination angle by mathematically correlating the measured moments of inertia about a range of axes of the aircraft. This correlation uses a least squares error minimization of a mathematical model that describes the ellipse of inertia in the aircraft's x-z axes plane. Results from a test conducted on a small scale UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) at NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center is also presented, which is an example of the intended application of this technique.

  10. Spatial Structure and Scaling of Agricultural Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sousa, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Considering agricultural landscapes as networks can provide information about spatial connectivity relevant for a wide range of applications including pollination, pest management, and ecology. Global agricultural networks are well-described by power law rank-size distributions. However, regional analyses capture only a subset of the total global network. Most analyses are regional. In this paper, we seek to address the following questions: Does the globally observed scale-free property of agricultural networks hold over smaller spatial domains? Can similar properties be observed at kilometer to meter scales? We analyze 9 intensively cultivated Landsat scenes on 5 continents with a wide range of vegetation distributions. We find that networks of vegetation fraction within the domain of each of these Landsat scenes exhibit substantial variability - but still possess similar scaling properties to the global distribution of agriculture. We also find similar results using a 39 km2 IKONOS image. To illustrate an a...

  11. Macromolecular structure determination in the post-genome era

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, P

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in genetics, molecular biology and crystallographic instrumentation and methodology have led to a revolution in the field of Structural Molecular Biology (SMB). These combined advances have paved the way to a more complete and detailed understanding of the biological macromolecules that make up an organism, both in terms of their individual functions and also the interactions between them. In this paper we describe a large-scale, genomic approach to the three-dimensional structure determination of macromolecules and their complexes, using high-throughput methodology to streamline all aspects of the process. This task requires the development of automated high-intensity synchrotron beam lines for X-ray diffraction data collection from single crystal samples. Furthermore, these beam lines must be operated within a sophisticated software and hardware environment, which is capable of delivering a completely automated structure determination pipeline. The SMB resource at SSRL is developing a system...

  12. Factorial Structure of the Existence Scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, Tomic, W. A.

    2015-01-01

    Existential meaning in life is becoming an increasingly important measure of personal assessment. In search of a suitable instrument to measure existential meaning, the authors reviewed several measures. Eventually, they selected the Existence Scale (ES), doing so on theoretical grounds. The ES is a

  13. The Large Scale Structure: Polarization Aspects

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polarized radio emission is detected at various scales in the Universe. In this document, I will briefly review our knowledge on polarized radio sources in galaxy clusters and at their outskirts, emphasizing the crucial information provided by the polarized signal on the origin and evolution of such sources. Successively, I will ...

  14. Ultra-large-scale electronic structure theory and numerical algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshi, Takeo

    2008-01-01

    This article is composed of two parts; In the first part (Sec. 1), the ultra-large-scale electronic structure theory is reviewed for (i) its fundamental numerical algorithm and (ii) its role in nano-material science. The second part (Sec. 2) is devoted to the mathematical foundation of the large-scale electronic structure theory and their numerical aspects.

  15. Optimization of Large-Scale Structural Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, F. M.

    solutions to small problems with one or two variables to the optimization of large structures such as bridges, ships and offshore structures. The methods used for salving these problems have evolved from being classical differential calculus and calculus of variation to very advanced numerical techniques....... In the same period of time the problems have grown in size and the ongoing research in the various engineering fields has introduced new areas to complicate the optimization task further. These are e.g. structural reliability theory (including new, more complex constraints), discrete optimization (introducing...... new narrow bounds on the optimization variables), s tachastic FEM, vibration theory or multiobjective optimization. At the same time researchers always try to salve problems ahead of to-day's capabilities, thereby utilising current mathematical programming (MP) methods to the limit. However, when...

  16. Fine-Scale Structure Design for 3D Printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panetta, Francis Julian

    Modern additive fabrication technologies can manufacture shapes whose geometric complexities far exceed what existing computational design tools can analyze or optimize. At the same time, falling costs have placed these fabrication technologies within the average consumer's reach. Especially for inexpert designers, new software tools are needed to take full advantage of 3D printing technology. This thesis develops such tools and demonstrates the exciting possibilities enabled by fine-tuning objects at the small scales achievable by 3D printing. The thesis applies two high-level ideas to invent these tools: two-scale design and worst-case analysis. The two-scale design approach addresses the problem that accurately simulating--let alone optimizing--the full-resolution geometry sent to the printer requires orders of magnitude more computational power than currently available. However, we can decompose the design problem into a small-scale problem (designing tileable structures achieving a particular deformation behavior) and a macro-scale problem (deciding where to place these structures in the larger object). This separation is particularly effective, since structures for every useful behavior can be designed once, stored in a database, then reused for many different macroscale problems. Worst-case analysis refers to determining how likely an object is to fracture by studying the worst possible scenario: the forces most efficiently breaking it. This analysis is needed when the designer has insufficient knowledge or experience to predict what forces an object will undergo, or when the design is intended for use in many different scenarios unknown a priori. The thesis begins by summarizing the physics and mathematics necessary to rigorously approach these design and analysis problems. Specifically, the second chapter introduces linear elasticity and periodic homogenization. The third chapter presents a pipeline to design microstructures achieving a wide range of

  17. Recent Progress in Large-Scale Structure

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    I will discuss recent progress in the understanding of how to model galaxy clustering. While recent analyses have focussed on the baryon acoustic oscillations as a probe of cosmology, galaxy redshift surveys contain a lot more information than the acoustic scale. In extracting this additional information three main issues need to be well understood: nonlinear evolution of matter fluctuations, galaxy bias and redshift-space distortions. I will present recent progress in modeling these three effects that pave the way to constraining cosmology and galaxy formation with increased precision.

  18. Tailored cellulose esters: synthesis and structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebert, Tim F; Heinze, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    A broad variety of cellulose esters with complex and sensitive (against hydrolysis and light) structures was synthesized homogeneously in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc)/LiCl and in the new solvent dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)/tetrabutylammonium fluoride (TBAF) via in situ activation of the carboxylic acids with N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI). New esters of chiral (-)-menthyloxyacetic acid, of unsaturated 3-(2-furyl)-acrylcarboxylic- and furane-2-carboxylic acid, acids with crownether moieties (4'-carboxybenzo-18-crown-6), and with carboxymethyl-beta-cyclodextrin were accessible in a one-pot reaction. Because of the mild conditions and the efficiency of the reaction via imidazolides, very pure and highly functionalized cellulose derivatives were obtained up to a degree of substitution of 2.5 possessing a degree of polymerization in the range of the starting cellulose. Structure determination was carried out by different one- and two-dimensional NMR techniques confirming the high purity of the esters and a pronounced regioselectivity for the primary OH function. The structural features, the purity, the solubility, and the film forming properties, make these materials desired products for the preparation of membranes with tailored separation characteristics.

  19. Icosahedral Quasicrystal Structure Determination: Aluminum-Copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Shi-Yue

    This dissertation reports the theoretical study of the determination of quasicrystal atomic structures. A new method is developed for phasing the quasicrystal diffraction data (neutron, X-ray diffraction). A mathematical model is built which explicitly relates quasicrystals to their related periodic crystals. A test of the method is made on a simple theoretical system, the icosahedral quasiperiodic Ammann tiling decorated with point scatterers (Dirac delta scattering potential) on vertices. A success is achieved in reconstructing the phases of the quasicrystal. The method is applied to a real quasicrystal system, the icosahedral quasicrystal i(Al_{.570 }Cu_{.108}Li _{.322}), where single -grain X-ray as well as neutron diffraction data are available, and the structure of the related large-unit-cell crystal of R(Al_{.564}Cu _{.116}Li_{.320 }), is well known. The reconstructed phases give the density of scatterers, which can then be used in the analysis of the atomic structure, and provide a guide to the final structure modeling. The validity of the method is evaluated with respect to the non-negativity of the resulting electron densities. In order to identify the negativity due to the intensity cut -off, the negativity is evaluated as a function of the cut -off and compared with the exact and reconstructed quasiperiodic Ammann tilings as well as with the experimental and model crystal data of R(Al_{.564}Cu _{.116}Li_ {.320}). It is concluded that the negativity of the reconstructed quasiperiodic electron density of i(Al_{.570}Cu _{.108}Li_{.322 }) is consistent with a cut-off effect. Modeling of the i(Al_{.570 }Cu_{.108}Li _{.322}) atomic structure in six-dimensional hyperspace is discussed. It is assumed that atomic surfaces can be modeled by polyhedra which can be described by a finite number of parameters. Under the conditions that the structure model should produce right density, stoichiometry, no unphysically short interatomic distances, we successfully

  20. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sini Kerminen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Coupling dense genotype data with new computational methods offers unprecedented opportunities for individual-level ancestry estimation once geographically precisely defined reference data sets become available. We study such a reference data set for Finland containing 2376 such individuals from the FINRISK Study survey of 1997 both of whose parents were born close to each other. This sampling strategy focuses on the population structure present in Finland before the 1950s. By using the recent haplotype-based methods ChromoPainter (CP and FineSTRUCTURE (FS we reveal a highly geographically clustered genetic structure in Finland and report its connections to the settlement history as well as to the current dialectal regions of the Finnish language. The main genetic division within Finland shows striking concordance with the 1323 borderline of the treaty of Nöteborg. In general, we detect genetic substructure throughout the country, which reflects stronger regional genetic differences in Finland compared to, for example, the UK, which in a similar analysis was dominated by a single unstructured population. We expect that similar population genetic reference data sets will become available for many more populations in the near future with important applications, for example, in forensic genetics and in genetic association studies. With this in mind, we report those extensions of the CP + FS approach that we found most useful in our analyses of the Finnish data.

  1. Multi-scale structural similarity index for motion detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Abdel-Salam Nasr

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The most recent approach for measuring the image quality is the structural similarity index (SSI. This paper presents a novel algorithm based on the multi-scale structural similarity index for motion detection (MS-SSIM in videos. The MS-SSIM approach is based on modeling of image luminance, contrast and structure at multiple scales. The MS-SSIM has resulted in much better performance than the single scale SSI approach but at the cost of relatively lower processing speed. The major advantages of the presented algorithm are both: the higher detection accuracy and the quasi real-time processing speed.

  2. Problems in large-scale structural optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, J. S.; Belegundu, A. D.

    1984-01-01

    A general design optimization model for large complex systems is defined. Major features of the model that challenge various optimization algorithms are discussed. Requirements of a model optimization algorithm are identified. Objectives of the study of various algorithms are defined and a basis for conducting such a study is developed. Primal as well as transformation methods are analytically studied and a unified viewpoint of various methods is presented. Several numerical examples are solved using different methods to study their performance. Conclusions drawn from the study are presented and discussed. Areas of future research in nonlinear programming as well as structural optimization are identified and discussed.

  3. Image-Based Chemical Structure Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner, Johannes; Brenner, Florian; Wieland, Karin; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Kirschner, Johannes; Eisenmenger-Sittner, Christoph; Török, Szilvia; Döme, Balazs; Konegger, Thomas; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Hutter, Herbert; Friedbacher, Gernot; Lendl, Bernhard; Lohninger, Hans

    2017-07-28

    Chemical imaging is a powerful tool for understanding the chemical composition and nature of heterogeneous samples. Recent developments in elemental, vibrational, and mass-spectrometric chemical imaging with high spatial resolution (50-200 nm) and reasonable timescale (a few hours) are capable of providing complementary chemical information about various samples. However, a single technique is insufficient to provide a comprehensive understanding of chemically complex materials. For bulk samples, the combination of different analytical methods and the application of statistical methods for extracting correlated information across different techniques is a well-established and powerful concept. However, combined multivariate analytics of chemical images obtained via different imaging techniques is still in its infancy, hampered by a lack of analytical methodologies for data fusion and analysis. This study demonstrates the application of multivariate statistics to chemical images taken from the same sample via various methods to assist in chemical structure determination.

  4. Structure determination by X-ray crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M F C

    1977-01-01

    Crystallography may be described as the science of the structure of materi­ als, using this word in its widest sense, and its ramifications are apparent over a broad front of current scientific endeavor. It is not surprising, therefore, to find that most universities offer some aspects of crystallography in their undergraduate courses in the physical sciences. It is the principal aim of this book to present an introduction to structure determination by X-ray crystal­ lography that is appropriate mainly to both final-year undergraduate studies in crystallography, chemistry, and chemical physics, and introductory post­ graduate work in this area of crystallography. We believe that the book will be of interest in other disciplines, such as physics, metallurgy, biochemistry, and geology, where crystallography has an important part to play. In the space of one book, it is not possible either to cover all aspects of crystallography or to treat all the subject matter completely rigorously. In particular, certain ...

  5. Scaling the relative dominance of exogenous drivers in structuring desert small mammal assemblages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Daniela; Ojeda, Ricardo A.

    2015-11-01

    Assemblage patterns could be primarily generated by two types of drivers: exogenous (such as environmental and climatic factors) and endogenous (interactions such as competition, predation, mutualism or herbivory). The most widely accepted hypothesis states that at smaller scales (such as patch scale), interspecific interactions are the major drivers structuring communities, whereas at larger regional scales, factors such as climate, topography and soil act as ecological filters that determine assemblage composition. The general aim of this paper is to compare different exogenous drivers in terms of their relative dominance in structuring desert small mammal communities across a range of spatial scales, from patch to regional, and compare them with previous results on endogenous drivers. Our results show that as spatial scale increases, the explanatory power of exogenous factors also increases, e.g. from 17% at the patch scale (i.e. abundance) to 99% at the regional scale (i.e. diversity). Moreover, environmental drivers vary in type and strength depending on the community estimator across several spatial scales. On the other hand, endogenous drivers such as interspecific interactions are more important at the patch scale, diminishing in importance towards the regional scale. Therefore, the relative importance of exogenous versus endogenous drivers affects small mammal assemblage structure at different spatial scales. Our results fill up a knowledge gap concerning ecological drivers of assemblage structure at intermediate spatial scales for Monte desert small mammals, and highlight the importance of dealing with multi-causal factors in explaining ecological patterns of assemblages.

  6. Structural connectivity at a national scale: Wildlife corridors in Tanzania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Riggio

    Full Text Available Wildlife corridors can help maintain landscape connectivity but novel methods must be developed to assess regional structural connectivity quickly and cheaply so as to determine where expensive and time-consuming surveys of functional connectivity should occur. We use least-cost methods, the most accurate and up-to-date land conversion dataset for East Africa, and interview data on wildlife corridors, to develop a single, consistent methodology to systematically assess wildlife corridors at a national scale using Tanzania as a case study. Our research aimed to answer the following questions; (i which corridors may still remain open (i.e. structurally connected at a national scale, (ii which have been potentially severed by anthropogenic land conversion (e.g., agriculture and settlements, (iii where are other remaining potential wildlife corridors located, and (iv which protected areas with lower forms of protection (e.g., Forest Reserves and Wildlife Management Areas may act as stepping-stones linking more than one National Park and/or Game Reserve. We identify a total of 52 structural connections between protected areas that are potentially open to wildlife movement, and in so doing add 23 to those initially identified by other methods in Tanzanian Government reports. We find that the vast majority of corridors noted in earlier reports as "likely to be severed" have actually not been cut structurally (21 of 24. Nonetheless, nearly a sixth of all the wildlife corridors identified in Tanzania in 2009 have potentially been separated by land conversion, and a third now pass across lands likely to be converted to human use in the near future. Our study uncovers two reserves with lower forms of protection (Uvinza Forest Reserve in the west and Wami-Mbiki Wildlife Management Area in the east that act as apparently crucial stepping-stones between National Parks and/or Game Reserves and therefore require far more serious conservation support. Methods

  7. Structural connectivity at a national scale: Wildlife corridors in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Jason; Caro, Tim

    2017-01-01

    Wildlife corridors can help maintain landscape connectivity but novel methods must be developed to assess regional structural connectivity quickly and cheaply so as to determine where expensive and time-consuming surveys of functional connectivity should occur. We use least-cost methods, the most accurate and up-to-date land conversion dataset for East Africa, and interview data on wildlife corridors, to develop a single, consistent methodology to systematically assess wildlife corridors at a national scale using Tanzania as a case study. Our research aimed to answer the following questions; (i) which corridors may still remain open (i.e. structurally connected) at a national scale, (ii) which have been potentially severed by anthropogenic land conversion (e.g., agriculture and settlements), (iii) where are other remaining potential wildlife corridors located, and (iv) which protected areas with lower forms of protection (e.g., Forest Reserves and Wildlife Management Areas) may act as stepping-stones linking more than one National Park and/or Game Reserve. We identify a total of 52 structural connections between protected areas that are potentially open to wildlife movement, and in so doing add 23 to those initially identified by other methods in Tanzanian Government reports. We find that the vast majority of corridors noted in earlier reports as "likely to be severed" have actually not been cut structurally (21 of 24). Nonetheless, nearly a sixth of all the wildlife corridors identified in Tanzania in 2009 have potentially been separated by land conversion, and a third now pass across lands likely to be converted to human use in the near future. Our study uncovers two reserves with lower forms of protection (Uvinza Forest Reserve in the west and Wami-Mbiki Wildlife Management Area in the east) that act as apparently crucial stepping-stones between National Parks and/or Game Reserves and therefore require far more serious conservation support. Methods used in this

  8. Structured ecosystem-scale approach to marine water quality management

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Taljaard, Susan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available and implement environmental management programmes. A structured ecosystem-scale approach for the design and implementation of marine water quality management programmes developed by the CSIR (South Africa) in response to recent advances in policies...

  9. Validity and factor structure of the bodybuilding dependence scale

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, D; Hale, B

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the bodybuilding dependence scale and to investigate differences in bodybuilding dependence between men and women and competitive and non-competitive bodybuilders.

  10. Large and small-scale structures in Saturn's rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, N.; Rehnberg, M. E.; Brown, Z. L.; Sremcevic, M.; Esposito, L. W.

    2017-09-01

    Observations made by the Cassini spacecraft have revealed both large and small scale structures in Saturn's rings in unprecedented detail. Analysis of high-resolution measurements by the Cassini Ultraviolet Spectrograph (UVIS) High Speed Photometer (HSP) and the Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) show an abundance of intrinsic small-scale structures (or clumping) seen across the entire ring system. These include self-gravity wakes (50-100m), sub-km structure at the A and B ring edges, and "straw"/"ropy" structures (1-3km).

  11. Probes of large-scale structure in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Yasushi; Gorski, Krzysztof; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Silk, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A general formalism is developed which shows that the gravitational instability theory for the origin of the large-scale structure of the universe is now capable of critically confronting observational results on cosmic background radiation angular anisotropies, large-scale bulk motions, and large-scale clumpiness in the galaxy counts. The results indicate that presently advocated cosmological models will have considerable difficulty in simultaneously explaining the observational results.

  12. Development of large-scale structure in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Ostriker, J P

    1991-01-01

    This volume grew out of the 1988 Fermi lectures given by Professor Ostriker, and is concerned with cosmological models that take into account the large scale structure of the universe. He starts with homogeneous isotropic models of the universe and then, by considering perturbations, he leads us to modern cosmological theories of the large scale, such as superconducting strings. This will be an excellent companion for all those interested in the cosmology and the large scale nature of the universe.

  13. The Large Scale Structure: Polarization Aspects R. F. Pizzo

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    e-mail: pizzo@astron.nl. Abstract. Polarized radio emission is detected at various scales in the ... are located at the nodes of the filamentary large-scale structure of the cosmic web and form by subsequent merging .... After calibration, we produced Q and U channel images for each dataset and we inspected them to remove ...

  14. Factor Structure of Child Behavior Scale Scores in Peruvian Preschoolers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Erin L.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Soto, Cesar Merino; Simmons, Crystal S.; Anguiano, Rebecca; Brett, Jeremy; Holman, Alea; Martin, Justin F.; Hata, Heidi K.; Roberts, Kimberly J.; Mello, Zena R.; Worrell, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    Behavior rating scales aid in the identification of problem behaviors, as well as the development of interventions to reduce such behavior. Although scores on many behavior rating scales have been validated in the United States, there have been few such studies in other cultural contexts. In this study, the structural validity of scores on a…

  15. A novel way to determine the scale of inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enqvist, Kari; Hardwick, Robert J.; Tenkanen, Tommi; Vennin, Vincent; Wands, David

    2018-02-01

    We show that in the Feebly Interacting Massive Particle (FIMP) model of Dark Matter (DM), one may express the inflationary energy scale H* as a function of three otherwise unrelated quantities, the DM isocurvature perturbation amplitude, its mass and its self-coupling constant, independently of the tensor-to-scalar ratio. The FIMP model assumes that there exists a real scalar particle that alone constitutes the DM content of the Universe and couples to the Standard Model via a Higgs portal. We consider carefully the various astrophysical, cosmological and model constraints, accounting also for variations in inflationary dynamics and the reheating history, to derive a robust estimate for H* that is confined to a relatively narrow range. We point out that, within the context of the FIMP DM model, one may thus determine H* reliably even in the absence of observable tensor perturbations.

  16. Quantitative Determination of Organic Semiconductor Microstructure from the Molecular to Device Scale

    KAUST Repository

    Rivnay, Jonathan

    2012-10-10

    A study was conducted to demonstrate quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale. The quantitative determination of organic semiconductor microstructure from the molecular to device scale was key to obtaining precise description of the molecular structure and microstructure of the materials of interest. This information combined with electrical characterization and modeling allowed for the establishment of general design rules to guide future rational design of materials and devices. Investigations revealed that a number and variety of defects were the largest contributors to the existence of disorder within a lattice, as organic semiconductor crystals were dominated by weak van der Waals bonding. Crystallite size, texture, and variations in structure due to spatial confinement and interfaces were also found to be relevant for transport of free charge carriers and bound excitonic species over distances that were important for device operation.

  17. Hierarchical structure and cytocompatibility of fish scales from Carassius auratus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhou; Wang, Yukun; Feng, Qingling; Kienzle, Arne; Müller, Werner E G

    2014-10-01

    To study the structure and the cytocompatibility of fish scales from Carassius auratus, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the morphology of fish scales treated with different processing methods. Based on varying morphologies and components, the fish scales can be divided into three regions on the surface and three layers in vertical. The functions of these three individual layers were analyzed. SEM results show that the primary inorganic components are spherical or cubic hydroxyapatite (HA) nanoparticles. The fish scales have an ~60° overlapped plywood structure of lamellas in the fibrillary plate. The plywood structure consists of co-aligned type I collagen fibers, which are parallel to the HA lamellas. X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry (TGA/DSC) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis indicate that the main components are HA and type I collagen fibers. MC3T3-E1 cell culture results show a high cytocompatibility and the ability to guide cell proliferation and migration along the scale ridge channels of the fish scales. This plywood structure provides inspiration for a structure-enhanced composite material. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Graph-based linear scaling electronic structure theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Mniszewski, Susan M; Negre, Christian F A; Cawkwell, Marc J; Swart, Pieter J; Mohd-Yusof, Jamal; Germann, Timothy C; Wall, Michael E; Bock, Nicolas; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Djidjev, Hristo

    2016-06-21

    We show how graph theory can be combined with quantum theory to calculate the electronic structure of large complex systems. The graph formalism is general and applicable to a broad range of electronic structure methods and materials, including challenging systems such as biomolecules. The methodology combines well-controlled accuracy, low computational cost, and natural low-communication parallelism. This combination addresses substantial shortcomings of linear scaling electronic structure theory, in particular with respect to quantum-based molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. An Evaluation Framework for Large-Scale Network Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Knudsen, Thomas Phillip; Madsen, Ole Brun

    2004-01-01

    An evaluation framework for large-scale network structures is presented, which facilitates evaluations and comparisons of different physical network structures. A number of quantitative and qualitative parameters are presented, and their importance to networks discussed. Choosing a network...... is closed by an example of how the framework can be used. The framework supports network planners in decision-making and researchers in evaluation and development of network structures....

  20. Emergence of scale-free close-knit friendship structure in online social networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Xiang Cui

    Full Text Available Although the structural properties of online social networks have attracted much attention, the properties of the close-knit friendship structures remain an important question. Here, we mainly focus on how these mesoscale structures are affected by the local and global structural properties. Analyzing the data of four large-scale online social networks reveals several common structural properties. It is found that not only the local structures given by the indegree, outdegree, and reciprocal degree distributions follow a similar scaling behavior, the mesoscale structures represented by the distributions of close-knit friendship structures also exhibit a similar scaling law. The degree correlation is very weak over a wide range of the degrees. We propose a simple directed network model that captures the observed properties. The model incorporates two mechanisms: reciprocation and preferential attachment. Through rate equation analysis of our model, the local-scale and mesoscale structural properties are derived. In the local-scale, the same scaling behavior of indegree and outdegree distributions stems from indegree and outdegree of nodes both growing as the same function of the introduction time, and the reciprocal degree distribution also shows the same power-law due to the linear relationship between the reciprocal degree and in/outdegree of nodes. In the mesoscale, the distributions of four closed triples representing close-knit friendship structures are found to exhibit identical power-laws, a behavior attributed to the negligible degree correlations. Intriguingly, all the power-law exponents of the distributions in the local-scale and mesoscale depend only on one global parameter, the mean in/outdegree, while both the mean in/outdegree and the reciprocity together determine the ratio of the reciprocal degree of a node to its in/outdegree. Structural properties of numerical simulated networks are analyzed and compared with each of the four

  1. Multi-scale structures of turbulent magnetic reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T. K. M., E-mail: takuma.nakamura@oeaw.ac.at; Nakamura, R.; Narita, Y.; Baumjohann, W. [Space Research Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Graz 8042 (Austria); Daughton, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    We have analyzed data from a series of 3D fully kinetic simulations of turbulent magnetic reconnection with a guide field. A new concept of the guide filed reconnection process has recently been proposed, in which the secondary tearing instability and the resulting formation of oblique, small scale flux ropes largely disturb the structure of the primary reconnection layer and lead to 3D turbulent features [W. Daughton et al., Nat. Phys. 7, 539 (2011)]. In this paper, we further investigate the multi-scale physics in this turbulent, guide field reconnection process by introducing a wave number band-pass filter (k-BPF) technique in which modes for the small scale (less than ion scale) fluctuations and the background large scale (more than ion scale) variations are separately reconstructed from the wave number domain to the spatial domain in the inverse Fourier transform process. Combining with the Fourier based analyses in the wave number domain, we successfully identify spatial and temporal development of the multi-scale structures in the turbulent reconnection process. When considering a strong guide field, the small scale tearing mode and the resulting flux ropes develop over a specific range of oblique angles mainly along the edge of the primary ion scale flux ropes and reconnection separatrix. The rapid merging of these small scale modes leads to a smooth energy spectrum connecting ion and electron scales. When the guide field is sufficiently weak, the background current sheet is strongly kinked and oblique angles for the small scale modes are widely scattered at the kinked regions. Similar approaches handling both the wave number and spatial domains will be applicable to the data from multipoint, high-resolution spacecraft observations such as the NASA magnetospheric multiscale (MMS) mission.

  2. Structural genomics of the Thermotoga maritima proteome implemented in a high-throughput structure determination pipeline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesley, Scott A.; Kuhn, Peter; Godzik, Adam; Deacon, Ashley M.; Mathews, Irimpan; Kreusch, Andreas; Spraggon, Glen; Klock, Heath E.; McMullan, Daniel; Shin, Tanya; Vincent, Juli; Robb, Alyssa; Brinen, Linda S.; Miller, Mitchell D.; McPhillips, Timothy M.; Miller, Mark A.; Scheibe, Daniel; Canaves, Jaume M.; Guda, Chittibabu; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Selby, Thomas L.; Elsliger, Marc-Andre; Wooley, John; Taylor, Susan S.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wilson, Ian A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    Structural genomics is emerging as a principal approach to define protein structure–function relationships. To apply this approach on a genomic scale, novel methods and technologies must be developed to determine large numbers of structures. We describe the design and implementation of a high-throughput structural genomics pipeline and its application to the proteome of the thermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. By using this pipeline, we successfully cloned and attempted expression of 1,376 of the predicted 1,877 genes (73%) and have identified crystallization conditions for 432 proteins, comprising 23% of the T. maritima proteome. Representative structures from TM0423 glycerol dehydrogenase and TM0449 thymidylate synthase-complementing protein are presented as examples of final outputs from the pipeline. PMID:12193646

  3. The scale dependence of single-nucleon shell structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somà, V., E-mail: vittorio.soma@cea.fr [Centre de Saclay, IRFU/Service de Physique Nucléaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Duguet, T. [Centre de Saclay, IRFU/Service de Physique Nucléaire, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); KU Leuven, Instituut voor Kern-en Stralingsfysica, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); Hergert, H. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-1321 (United States); The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Holt, J. D. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)

    2015-10-15

    We address the scale dependence of (effective) single-particle energies, non-observable quantities that are commonly used for interpreting nuclear structure observables measured in experiments and computed in many-body theories. We first demonstrate their scale dependence on a formal level, making them intrinsically theoretical objects, before illustrating this point via ab initio calculations in the oxygen isotopes. Finally, we consider a modified definition of effective single-particle energy and investigate its running properties.

  4. Intermittent structures at ion scales in the turbulent solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Denise; Alexandrova, Olga; Lion, Sonny; Roberts, Owen W.; Maksimovic, Milan; Escoubet, Philippe C.; Zouganelis, Yannis

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the physical mechanisms of dissipation, and the related heating, in turbulent collisionless plasmas (such as the solar wind) represents nowadays one of the key issues of plasma physics. Although the complex behavior of the solar wind has been matter of investigation of many years, some of the primary problems still remain a puzzle for the scientific community. Here, we study coherent structures responsible for solar wind intermittency around ion characteristic scales. We find that, in fast solar wind, intermittency is due to current sheets and Alfvén vortex-like structures. In slow solar wind, we observe as well compressive structures like magnetic solitons, holes and shocks. By using high-time resolution magnetic field data of multi-point measurements of Cluster spacecraft, we characterize the observed coherent structures in terms of topology and propagation speed. We show that all structures, both in fast and slow solar wind, are characterized by a strong wave-vector anisotropy in the perpendicular direction with respect to the local magnetic field and typical scales around ion characteristic scales. Moreover, some of them propagate in the plasma rest frame. Moreover, a further analysis on the ion velocity distribution shows a high variability; in particular, close to coherent structures the proton distribution function appears strongly deformed and far from the thermodynamic equilibrium. We discuss possible interpretation of the observed structures and their role in the heating process of the plasma.

  5. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A.; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T.; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sikkema, Andrew P.; Skiba, Meredith A.; Maloney, Finn P.; Beinlich, Felix R. M.; Caglar, Ahmet; Coral, Alan; Jensen, Alice Elizabeth; Lubow, Allen; Boitano, Amanda; Lisle, Amy Elizabeth; Maxwell, Andrew T.; Failer, Barb; Kaszubowski, Bartosz; Hrytsiv, Bohdan; Vincenzo, Brancaccio; de Melo Cruz, Breno Renan; McManus, Brian Joseph; Kestemont, Bruno; Vardeman, Carl; Comisky, Casey; Neilson, Catherine; Landers, Catherine R.; Ince, Christopher; Buske, Daniel Jon; Totonjian, Daniel; Copeland, David Marshall; Murray, David; Jagieła, Dawid; Janz, Dietmar; Wheeler, Douglas C.; Cali, Elie; Croze, Emmanuel; Rezae, Farah; Martin, Floyd Orville; Beecher, Gil; de Jong, Guido Alexander; Ykman, Guy; Feldmann, Harald; Chan, Hugo Paul Perez; Kovanecz, Istvan; Vasilchenko, Ivan; Connellan, James C.; Borman, Jami Lynne; Norrgard, Jane; Kanfer, Jebbie; Canfield, Jeffrey M.; Slone, Jesse David; Oh, Jimmy; Mitchell, Joanne; Bishop, John; Kroeger, John Douglas; Schinkler, Jonas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Brownlee, June M.; Bell, Justin; Fellbaum, Karl Willem; Harper, Kathleen; Abbey, Kirk J.; Isaksson, Lennart E.; Wei, Linda; Cummins, Lisa N.; Miller, Lori Anne; Bain, Lyn; Carpenter, Lynn; Desnouck, Maarten; Sharma, Manasa G.; Belcastro, Marcus; Szew, Martin; Szew, Martin; Britton, Matthew; Gaebel, Matthias; Power, Max; Cassidy, Michael; Pfützenreuter, Michael; Minett, Michele; Wesselingh, Michiel; Yi, Minjune; Cameron, Neil Haydn Tormey; Bolibruch, Nicholas I.; Benevides, Noah; Kathleen Kerr, Norah; Barlow, Nova; Crevits, Nykole Krystyne; Dunn, Paul; Roque, Paulo Sergio Silveira Belo Nascimento; Riber, Peter; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Hettler, Stephen; Telehany, Stephen; Schwegmann, Steven A.; Parkes, Steven; Kleinfelter, Susan C.; Michael Holst, Sven; van der Laan, T. J. A.; Bausewein, Thomas; Simon, Vera; Pulley, Warwick; Hull, William; Kim, Annes Yukyung; Lawton, Alexis; Ruesch, Amanda; Sundar, Anjali; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Afrin, Antara; Maheshwer, Bhargavi; Turfe, Bilal; Huebner, Christian; Killeen, Courtney Elizabeth; Antebi-Lerrman, Dalia; Luan, Danny; Wolfe, Derek; Pham, Duc; Michewicz, Elaina; Hull, Elizabeth; Pardington, Emily; Galal, Galal Osama; Sun, Grace; Chen, Grace; Anderson, Halie E.; Chang, Jane; Hewlett, Jeffrey Thomas; Sterbenz, Jennifer; Lim, Jiho; Morof, Joshua; Lee, Junho; Inn, Juyoung Samuel; Hahm, Kaitlin; Roth, Kaitlin; Nair, Karun; Markin, Katherine; Schramm, Katie; Toni Eid, Kevin; Gam, Kristina; Murphy, Lisha; Yuan, Lucy; Kana, Lulia; Daboul, Lynn; Shammas, Mario Karam; Chason, Max; Sinan, Moaz; Andrew Tooley, Nicholas; Korakavi, Nisha; Comer, Patrick; Magur, Pragya; Savliwala, Quresh; Davison, Reid Michael; Sankaran, Roshun Rajiv; Lewe, Sam; Tamkus, Saule; Chen, Shirley; Harvey, Sho; Hwang, Sin Ye; Vatsia, Sohrab; Withrow, Stefan; Luther, Tahra K; Manett, Taylor; Johnson, Thomas James; Ryan Brash, Timothy; Kuhlman, Wyatt; Park, Yeonjung; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-01-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality. PMID:27633552

  6. Determining crystal structures through crowdsourcing and coursework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Scott; Koepnick, Brian; Martin, Raoul; Tymieniecki, Agnes; Winburn, Amanda A.; Cooper, Seth; Flatten, Jeff; Rogawski, David S.; Koropatkin, Nicole M.; Hailu, Tsinatkeab T.; Jain, Neha; Koldewey, Philipp; Ahlstrom, Logan S.; Chapman, Matthew R.; Sikkema, Andrew P.; Skiba, Meredith A.; Maloney, Finn P.; Beinlich, Felix R. M.; Caglar, Ahmet; Coral, Alan; Jensen, Alice Elizabeth; Lubow, Allen; Boitano, Amanda; Lisle, Amy Elizabeth; Maxwell, Andrew T.; Failer, Barb; Kaszubowski, Bartosz; Hrytsiv, Bohdan; Vincenzo, Brancaccio; de Melo Cruz, Breno Renan; McManus, Brian Joseph; Kestemont, Bruno; Vardeman, Carl; Comisky, Casey; Neilson, Catherine; Landers, Catherine R.; Ince, Christopher; Buske, Daniel Jon; Totonjian, Daniel; Copeland, David Marshall; Murray, David; Jagieła, Dawid; Janz, Dietmar; Wheeler, Douglas C.; Cali, Elie; Croze, Emmanuel; Rezae, Farah; Martin, Floyd Orville; Beecher, Gil; de Jong, Guido Alexander; Ykman, Guy; Feldmann, Harald; Chan, Hugo Paul Perez; Kovanecz, Istvan; Vasilchenko, Ivan; Connellan, James C.; Borman, Jami Lynne; Norrgard, Jane; Kanfer, Jebbie; Canfield, Jeffrey M.; Slone, Jesse David; Oh, Jimmy; Mitchell, Joanne; Bishop, John; Kroeger, John Douglas; Schinkler, Jonas; McLaughlin, Joseph; Brownlee, June M.; Bell, Justin; Fellbaum, Karl Willem; Harper, Kathleen; Abbey, Kirk J.; Isaksson, Lennart E.; Wei, Linda; Cummins, Lisa N.; Miller, Lori Anne; Bain, Lyn; Carpenter, Lynn; Desnouck, Maarten; Sharma, Manasa G.; Belcastro, Marcus; Szew, Martin; Szew, Martin; Britton, Matthew; Gaebel, Matthias; Power, Max; Cassidy, Michael; Pfützenreuter, Michael; Minett, Michele; Wesselingh, Michiel; Yi, Minjune; Cameron, Neil Haydn Tormey; Bolibruch, Nicholas I.; Benevides, Noah; Kathleen Kerr, Norah; Barlow, Nova; Crevits, Nykole Krystyne; Dunn, Paul; Silveira Belo Nascimento Roque, Paulo Sergio; Riber, Peter; Pikkanen, Petri; Shehzad, Raafay; Viosca, Randy; James Fraser, Robert; Leduc, Robert; Madala, Roman; Shnider, Scott; de Boisblanc, Sharon; Butkovich, Slava; Bliven, Spencer; Hettler, Stephen; Telehany, Stephen; Schwegmann, Steven A.; Parkes, Steven; Kleinfelter, Susan C.; Michael Holst, Sven; van der Laan, T. J. A.; Bausewein, Thomas; Simon, Vera; Pulley, Warwick; Hull, William; Kim, Annes Yukyung; Lawton, Alexis; Ruesch, Amanda; Sundar, Anjali; Lawrence, Anna-Lisa; Afrin, Antara; Maheshwer, Bhargavi; Turfe, Bilal; Huebner, Christian; Killeen, Courtney Elizabeth; Antebi-Lerrman, Dalia; Luan, Danny; Wolfe, Derek; Pham, Duc; Michewicz, Elaina; Hull, Elizabeth; Pardington, Emily; Galal, Galal Osama; Sun, Grace; Chen, Grace; Anderson, Halie E.; Chang, Jane; Hewlett, Jeffrey Thomas; Sterbenz, Jennifer; Lim, Jiho; Morof, Joshua; Lee, Junho; Inn, Juyoung Samuel; Hahm, Kaitlin; Roth, Kaitlin; Nair, Karun; Markin, Katherine; Schramm, Katie; Toni Eid, Kevin; Gam, Kristina; Murphy, Lisha; Yuan, Lucy; Kana, Lulia; Daboul, Lynn; Shammas, Mario Karam; Chason, Max; Sinan, Moaz; Andrew Tooley, Nicholas; Korakavi, Nisha; Comer, Patrick; Magur, Pragya; Savliwala, Quresh; Davison, Reid Michael; Sankaran, Roshun Rajiv; Lewe, Sam; Tamkus, Saule; Chen, Shirley; Harvey, Sho; Hwang, Sin Ye; Vatsia, Sohrab; Withrow, Stefan; Luther, Tahra K.; Manett, Taylor; Johnson, Thomas James; Ryan Brash, Timothy; Kuhlman, Wyatt; Park, Yeonjung; Popović, Zoran; Baker, David; Khatib, Firas; Bardwell, James C. A.

    2016-09-01

    We show here that computer game players can build high-quality crystal structures. Introduction of a new feature into the computer game Foldit allows players to build and real-space refine structures into electron density maps. To assess the usefulness of this feature, we held a crystallographic model-building competition between trained crystallographers, undergraduate students, Foldit players and automatic model-building algorithms. After removal of disordered residues, a team of Foldit players achieved the most accurate structure. Analysing the target protein of the competition, YPL067C, uncovered a new family of histidine triad proteins apparently involved in the prevention of amyloid toxicity. From this study, we conclude that crystallographers can utilize crowdsourcing to interpret electron density information and to produce structure solutions of the highest quality.

  7. Determinants of the detrital arthropod community structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lessard, J.P.; Sackett, Tara E.; Reynolds, William N.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the factors that shape community structure, and whether those factors vary geographically, has a long history in ecology. Because the abiotic environment often varies in predictable ways along elevational gradients, montane systems are ideal to study geographic variation in the dete......Understanding the factors that shape community structure, and whether those factors vary geographically, has a long history in ecology. Because the abiotic environment often varies in predictable ways along elevational gradients, montane systems are ideal to study geographic variation...

  8. Quality of occupational health provision: two rating scales and their determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venables, Katherine M; Allender, Steven

    2008-09-01

    To develop quality scales for occupational health services (OHSs) and describe and explain variation in quality across the UK university sector. Analysis of data from a national survey, to which 93 of 117 (79%) UK universities responded, and from the Higher Education Statistics Agency. Two quality scales were generated, one from the 1985 International Labour Organization recommendations on OHSs and one from clinicians' perceptions (good, adequate, poor) about their OHS. The determinants examined were number of university staff, type of OHS (in-house, contracted, none/other), number of full-time equivalent occupational health doctors and nurses and OHS leadership (doctor, nurse, other). There was wide variation in quality and a correlation (r = 0.65) between scales. In-house service, increasing service size and leadership by a doctor or nurse were determinants of higher quality; size of the university was not statistically significant after taking account of these factors. Some university OHSs may not be structured or operated to promote the highest quality of service. Inspection of individual quality scale items may be informative. These scales may be applicable in other employment sectors.

  9. Structural determinants in the bulk heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acocella, Angela; Höfinger, Siegfried; Haunschmid, Ernst; Pop, Sergiu C; Narumi, Tetsu; Yasuoka, Kenji; Yasui, Masato; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2018-02-21

    Photovoltaics is one of the key areas in renewable energy research with remarkable progress made every year. Here we consider the case of a photoactive material and study its structural composition and the resulting consequences for the fundamental processes driving solar energy conversion. A multiscale approach is used to characterize essential molecular properties of the light-absorbing layer. A selection of bulk-representative pairs of donor/acceptor molecules is extracted from the molecular dynamics simulation of the bulk heterojunction and analyzed at increasing levels of detail. Significantly increased ground state energies together with an array of additional structural characteristics are identified that all point towards an auxiliary role of the material's structural organization in mediating charge-transfer and -separation. Mechanistic studies of the type presented here can provide important insights into fundamental principles governing solar energy conversion in next-generation photovoltaic devices.

  10. Structure determination by X-ray crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Ladd, M F C

    1995-01-01

    X-ray crystallography provides us with the most accurate picture we can get of atomic and molecular structures in crystals. It provides a hard bedrock of structural results in chemistry and in mineralogy. In biology, where the structures are not fully crystalline, it can still provide valuable results and, indeed, the impact here has been revolutionary. It is still an immense field for young workers, and no doubt will provide yet more striking develop­ ments of a major character. It does, however, require a wide range of intellectual application, and a considerable ability in many fields. This book will provide much help. It is a very straightforward and thorough guide to every aspect of the subject. The authors are experienced both as research workers themselves and as teachers of standing, and this is shown in their clarity of exposition. There are plenty of iliustrations and worked examples to aid the student to obtain a real grasp of the subject.

  11. Some structural determinants of melody recall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, M

    1991-05-01

    Sophisticated musicians were asked to recall, using musical notation, a set of unfamiliar folk tunes that varied in rhythmic structure and referents of tonality. The results showed that memory was facilitated by tonic triad members marking phrase endings, but only when their presence was highlighted by a corresponding pattern of temporal accents. Conversely, recall significantly declined when tonal information was either absent or obscured by rhythmic structure. Error analyses further revealed that the retention of overall pitch contour and information at phrase ending points varied as a function of these manipulations. The results are discussed in terms of a framework that links the acts of perceiving and remembering to a common attentional scheme.

  12. Constraining cosmological ultralarge scale structure using numerical relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Jonathan; Johnson, Matthew C.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Aguirre, Anthony

    2017-07-01

    Cosmic inflation, a period of accelerated expansion in the early universe, can give rise to large amplitude ultralarge scale inhomogeneities on distance scales comparable to or larger than the observable universe. The cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy on the largest angular scales is sensitive to such inhomogeneities and can be used to constrain the presence of ultralarge scale structure (ULSS). We numerically evolve nonlinear inhomogeneities present at the beginning of inflation in full general relativity to assess the CMB quadrupole constraint on the amplitude of the initial fluctuations and the size of the observable universe relative to a length scale characterizing the ULSS. To obtain a statistically meaningful ensemble of simulations, we adopt a toy model in which inhomogeneities are injected along a preferred direction. We compute the likelihood function for the CMB quadrupole including both ULSS and the standard quantum fluctuations produced during inflation. We compute the posterior given the observed CMB quadrupole, finding that when including gravitational nonlinearities, ULSS curvature perturbations of order unity are allowed by the data, even on length scales not too much larger than the size of the observable universe. To demonstrate the robustness of our conclusions, we also explore a semianalytic model for the ULSS which reproduces our numerical results for the case of planar symmetry, and which can be extended to ULSS with a three-dimensional inhomogeneity structure. Our results illustrate the utility and importance of numerical relativity for constraining early universe cosmology.

  13. INVESTIGATING THE FACTOR STRUCTURE OF THE BLOG ATTITUDE SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra SHAHSAVAR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Due to the wide application of advanced technology in education, many attitude scales have been developed to evaluate learners’ attitudes toward educational tools. However, with the rapid development of emerging technologies, using blogs as one of the Web 2.0 tools is still in its infancy and few blog attitude scales have been developed yet. In view of this need, a lot of researchers like to design a new scale based on their conceptual and theoretical framework of their own study rather than using available scales. The present study reports the design and development of a blog attitude scale (BAS. The researchers developed a pool of items to capture the complexity of the blog attitude trait, selected 29 items in the content analysis, and assigned the scale comprising 29 items to 216 undergraduate students to explore the underlying structure of the BAS. In exploratory factor analysis, three factors were discovered: blog anxiety, blog desirability, and blog self-efficacy; 14 items were excluded. The extracted items were subjected to a confirmatory factor analysis which lent further support to the BAS underpinning structure.

  14. determination of verticality of reservoir engineering structure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) are used nowadays as Geomatics instruments for various applications. One of these applications is 3D survey and management of oil and gas facilities and other engineering structures. This recent attention is due to the fact that laser scanner has the ability to generate massive amounts of ...

  15. Electron Diffraction Determination of Nanoscale Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parks, Joel H

    2013-03-01

    Dominant research results on adsorption on gold clusters are reviewed, including adsorption of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} on gold cluster cations and anions, kinetics of CO adsorption to middle sized gold cluster cations, adsorption of CO on Au{sub n}{sup +} with induced changes in structure, and H{sub 2}O enhancement of CO adsorption.

  16. Atomic scale structures of interfaces between kaolinite edges and water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, X.; Lu, X.; Wang, R.; Meijer, E.J.; Zhou, H.; He, H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the atomic scale structures of kaolinite edge surfaces in contact with water. The commonly occurring edge surfaces are investigated (i.e. (0 1 0) and (1 1 0)) by using first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) technique. For (1 1 0)-type edge surface, there are two different

  17. Factor Structure of Japanese Versions of Two Emotional Intelligence Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Eriko; Saklofske, Donald H.; Tamaoka, Katsuo; Fung, Tak Shing; Miyaoka, Yayoi; Kiyama, Sachiko

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the psychometric properties of two emotional intelligence measures translated into Japanese. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine the factor structure of a Japanese version of the Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS) completed by 310 Japanese university students. A second study employed CFA…

  18. Random walk models of large-scale structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper describes the insights gained from the excursion set approach, in which vari- ous questions about the phenomenology of large-scale structure formation can be mapped to problems associated with the first crossing distribution of appropriately defined barriers by random walks. Much of this is ...

  19. Gregory Research Beliefs Scale: Factor Structure and Internal Consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Virgil L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluates the factor structure and internal consistency of the Gregory Research Beliefs Scale (GRBS). Method: Data were collected from subject matter experts, a pilot study, an online sample, and a classroom sample. Psychometric analyses were conducted after combining the online and classroom samples. Results: An a priori…

  20. A structured ecosystem-scale approach to marine water quality ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These, in turn, created the need for holistic and integrated frameworks within which to design and implement environmental management programmes. A structured ecosystem-scale approach for the design and implementation of marine water quality management programmes developed by the CSIR (South Africa) in ...

  1. Examining the factor structure of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Shawn M; Li, Jian; Rumrill, Phillip D; Merchant, William; Bishop, Malachy

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the factor structure of the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29) to assess its suitability for modeling the impact of MS on a nation-wide sample of individuals from the United States. Investigators completed a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to examine the two-factor structure proposed by Hobart et al. [17]. Although the original MSIS-29 factor structure did not fit the data exactly, the hypothesized two-factor model was partially supported in the current data. Implications for future instrument development and rehabilitation practice are discussed.

  2. Large-Scale Structure Effects on Particle Motion in a Spatialy Developing Mixing Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Acharya, Sumanta; Ning, Hui

    1996-11-01

    We will present results from a simulation of particle motion in a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer forced by a single frequency. The simulation is based on a model which utilizes Eulerian formulation for the carrier phase flowfield and Lagrangian formulation for the dispersed particles. The carrier-phase mean flow is determined from the classical turbulent boundary layer equations and a traditional k-ɛ turbulence model modified to include interaction terms with the imposed large-scale structure. An integral energy method is used to determine the evolution of the large-scale structure which is modeled as a spatially growing wave. The effect of the carrier phase small-scale turbulent fluctuations is taken into account by using a classical stochastic model with a gaussian PDF. The effects of the particle time scale magnitude relative to the large-scale structure timescale (Stokes number) are discussed as well as the effects of the particle injection conditions. It is found that the Stokes number for which the cross-stream dispersion of the particles is maximized has a strong dependence on the particle injection conditions. The particle injection phase relative to the large-scale structure also has a profound influence on the motion of the particles and their distribution within the mixing layer.

  3. Determination of micro structural corrosion by BN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zergoug, M.; Kamel, G.; Benchaala, A. [Laboratoire d' Electronique et d' Electrotechnique, Centre de soudage et de controle, Route de Dely Ibrahim, B.P:64, Cheraga (Algeria)

    2004-07-01

    The quality control of industrial components requires adaptation and the development of new material characterization and particular non destructive testing techniques. To characterize steel, it would be useful to know its chemical composition, physic-chemical constitution, metallurgical state (annealed, hammered) and other parameters (superficial and chemical processing, etc.). The testing method using Barkhausen noise (B.N.) is a particular method, which can be applied on ferromagnetic materials. It is a magnetic non destructive evaluation (NDE) method and can provide very important information about the material microstructure. The work here presented documents the ability to determine the metallurgical state of steel submitted to the corrosive attack by electrochemical process. The samples are characterized by Barkhausen noise as non destructive methods and are compared with methods as metallography, micro hardness measurement, and toughness determination. (authors)

  4. Visualization of small scale structures on high resolution DEMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokalj, Žiga; Zakšek, Klemen; Pehani, Peter; Čotar, Klemen; Oštir, Krištof

    2015-04-01

    Knowledge on the terrain morphology is very important for observation of numerous processes and events and digital elevation models are therefore one of the most important datasets in geographic analyses. Furthermore, recognition of natural and anthropogenic microrelief structures, which can be observed on detailed terrain models derived from aerial laser scanning (lidar) or structure-from-motion photogrammetry, is of paramount importance in many applications. In this paper we thus examine and evaluate methods of raster lidar data visualization for the determination (recognition) of microrelief features and present a series of strategies to assist selecting the preferred visualization of choice for structures of various shapes and sizes, set in varied landscapes. Often the answer is not definite and more frequently a combination of techniques has to be used to map a very diverse landscape. Researchers can only very recently benefit from free software for calculation of advanced visualization techniques. These tools are often difficult to understand, have numerous options that confuse the user, or require and produce non-standard data formats, because they were written for specific purposes. We therefore designed the Relief Visualization Toolbox (RVT) as a free, easy-to-use, standalone application to create visualisations from high-resolution digital elevation data. It is tailored for the very beginners in relief interpretation, but it can also be used by more advanced users in data processing and geographic information systems. It offers a range of techniques, such as simple hillshading and its derivatives, slope gradient, trend removal, positive and negative openness, sky-view factor, and anisotropic sky-view factor. All included methods have been proven to be effective for detection of small scale features and the default settings are optimised to accomplish this task. However, the usability of the tool goes beyond computation for visualization purposes, as sky

  5. Mechanical properties and the laminate structure of Arapaima gigas scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y S; Wei, C T; Olevsky, E A; Meyers, Marc A

    2011-10-01

    The Arapaima gigas scales play an important role in protecting this large Amazon basin fish against predators such as the piranha. They have a laminate composite structure composed of an external mineralized layer and internal lamellae with thickness of 50-60 μm each and composed of collagen fibers with ~1 μm diameter. The alignment of collagen fibers is consistent in each individual layer but varies from layer to layer, forming a non-orthogonal plywood structure, known as Bouligand stacking. X-ray diffraction revealed that the external surface of the scale contains calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite. EDS results confirm that the percentage of calcium is higher in the external layer. The micro-indentation hardness of the external layer (550 MPa) is considerably higher than that of the internal layer (200 MPa), consistent with its higher degree of mineralization. Tensile testing of the scales carried out in the dry and wet conditions shows that the strength and stiffness are hydration dependent. As is the case of most biological materials, the elastic modulus of the scale is strain-rate dependent. The strain-rate dependence of the elastic modulus, as expressed by the Ramberg-Osgood equation, is equal to 0.26, approximately ten times higher than that of bone. This is attributed to the higher fraction of collagen in the scales and to the high degree of hydration (30% H(2)O). Deproteinization of the scale reveals the structure of the mineral component consisting of an interconnected network of platelets with a thickness of ~50 nm and diameter of ~500 nm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Clonal growth and fine-scale genetic structure in tanoak (Notholithocarpus densiflorus: Fagaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard S. Dodd; Wasima Mayer; Alejandro Nettel; Zara. Afzal-Rafii

    2013-01-01

    The combination of sprouting and reproduction by seed can have important consequences on fine-scale spatial distribution of genetic structure (SGS). SGS is an important consideration for species’ restoration because it determines the minimum distance among seed trees to maximize genetic diversity while not prejudicing locally adapted genotypes. Local environmental...

  7. Factor Structure of the Rorschach Prognostic Rating Scale and Its Relation to Therapeutic Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Stephen M.; Edinger, Jack D.

    1976-01-01

    This study evaluated the factor structure of the Rorschach Prognostic Rating Scale (RPRS) in order to: (a) test the assumption that the RPRS represents a unitary response system and (b) determine the efficacy of employing population specific factor scores as predictors of therapy outcome. (Author/NG)

  8. Extreme reaction times determine fluctuation scaling in human color vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, José M.; Díaz, José A.

    2016-11-01

    In modern mental chronometry, human reaction time defines the time elapsed from stimulus presentation until a response occurs and represents a reference paradigm for investigating stochastic latency mechanisms in color vision. Here we examine the statistical properties of extreme reaction times and whether they support fluctuation scaling in the skewness-kurtosis plane. Reaction times were measured for visual stimuli across the cardinal directions of the color space. For all subjects, the results show that very large reaction times deviate from the right tail of reaction time distributions suggesting the existence of dragon-kings events. The results also indicate that extreme reaction times are correlated and shape fluctuation scaling over a wide range of stimulus conditions. The scaling exponent was higher for achromatic than isoluminant stimuli, suggesting distinct generative mechanisms. Our findings open a new perspective for studying failure modes in sensory-motor communications and in complex networks.

  9. Reliability Evaluation considering Structures of a Large Scale Wind Farm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Je-Seok; Cha, Seung-Tae; Wu, Qiuwei

    2012-01-01

    Wind energy is one of the most widely used renewable energy resources. Wind power has been connected to the grid as large scale wind farm which is made up of dozens of wind turbines, and the scale of wind farm is more increased recently. Due to intermittent and variable wind source, reliability...... wind farm which is able to enhance a capability of delivering a power instead of controlling an uncontrollable output of wind power. Therefore, this paper introduces a method to evaluate the reliability depending upon structures of wind farm and to reflect the result to the planning stage of wind farm....

  10. How structure determines correlations in neuronal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volker Pernice

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Networks are becoming a ubiquitous metaphor for the understanding of complex biological systems, spanning the range between molecular signalling pathways, neural networks in the brain, and interacting species in a food web. In many models, we face an intricate interplay between the topology of the network and the dynamics of the system, which is generally very hard to disentangle. A dynamical feature that has been subject of intense research in various fields are correlations between the noisy activity of nodes in a network. We consider a class of systems, where discrete signals are sent along the links of the network. Such systems are of particular relevance in neuroscience, because they provide models for networks of neurons that use action potentials for communication. We study correlations in dynamic networks with arbitrary topology, assuming linear pulse coupling. With our novel approach, we are able to understand in detail how specific structural motifs affect pairwise correlations. Based on a power series decomposition of the covariance matrix, we describe the conditions under which very indirect interactions will have a pronounced effect on correlations and population dynamics. In random networks, we find that indirect interactions may lead to a broad distribution of activation levels with low average but highly variable correlations. This phenomenon is even more pronounced in networks with distance dependent connectivity. In contrast, networks with highly connected hubs or patchy connections often exhibit strong average correlations. Our results are particularly relevant in view of new experimental techniques that enable the parallel recording of spiking activity from a large number of neurons, an appropriate interpretation of which is hampered by the currently limited understanding of structure-dynamics relations in complex networks.

  11. Scaling relation for determining the critical threshold for continuum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study continuum percolation of overlapping circular discs of two sizes. We propose a phenomenological scaling equation for the increase in the effective size of the larger discs due to the presence of the smaller discs. The critical percolation threshold as a function of the ratio of sizes of discs, for different values of the ...

  12. Scaling relation for determining the critical threshold for continuum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We study continuum percolation of overlapping circular discs of two sizes. We propose a phenomenological scaling equation for the increase in the effective size of the larger discs due to the presence of the smaller discs. The critical percolation threshold as a function of the ratio of sizes of discs, for different values ...

  13. Cultural Attitudes as WTP Determinants: A Revised Cultural Worldview Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy S. Choi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been little attention paid to the systematic measurement issue of general attitudes toward human-culture relationships. This paper applied the Cultural Worldview (CW scale that was developed by Choi et al. in 2007 (published in the Journal of Cultural Economics, and investigated its dimensionality and relationship with willingness to pay (WTP for cultural heritage protection through a sequential integration between latent variables and valuation models. A case study of 997 Korean respondents was employed to examine conservation values of cultural heritage sites using discrete choice models. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that this scale can be used either as a single second-order factor or four correlated factors. A more parsimonious version of the CW scale with twelve items is endorsed in this paper and the results also confirm that it is valid for use with non-Western nations. The findings support a significant attitude–WTP relationship; there was a significant role of the CW scale that reveals unobserved factors in valuation models.

  14. Determining Scale-dependent Patterns in Spatial and Temporal Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A.; Perfect, E.; Mukerji, T.; Sylvester, L.

    2016-12-01

    Spatial and temporal datasets of interest to Earth scientists often contain plots of one variable against another, e.g., rainfall magnitude vs. time or fracture aperture vs. spacing. Such data, comprised of distributions of events along a transect / timeline along with their magnitudes, can display persistent or antipersistent trends, as well as random behavior, that may contain signatures of underlying physical processes. Lacunarity is a technique that was originally developed for multiscale analysis of data. In a recent study we showed that lacunarity can be used for revealing changes in scale-dependent patterns in fracture spacing data. Here we present a further improvement in our technique, with lacunarity applied to various non-binary datasets comprised of event spacings and magnitudes. We test our technique on a set of four synthetic datasets, three of which are based on an autoregressive model and have magnitudes at every point along the "timeline" thus representing antipersistent, persistent, and random trends. The fourth dataset is made up of five clusters of events, each containing a set of random magnitudes. The concept of lacunarity ratio, LR, is introduced; this is the lacunarity of a given dataset normalized to the lacunarity of its random counterpart. It is demonstrated that LR can successfully delineate scale-dependent changes in terms of antipersistence and persistence in the synthetic datasets. This technique is then applied to three different types of data: a hundred-year rainfall record from Knoxville, TN, USA, a set of varved sediments from Marca Shale, and a set of fracture aperture and spacing data from NE Mexico. While the rainfall data and varved sediments both appear to be persistent at small scales, at larger scales they both become random. On the other hand, the fracture data shows antipersistence at small scale (within cluster) and random behavior at large scales. Such differences in behavior with respect to scale-dependent changes in

  15. Structural determinants of criticality in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Sergi; Ohse, Sebastian; Turalska, Malgorzata; West, Bruce J; Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi

    2015-01-01

    Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness, and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behavior in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organization can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system toward criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality.

  16. Structural Determinants of Criticality in Biological Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergi eValverde

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many adaptive evolutionary systems display spatial and temporal features, such as long-range correlations, typically associated with the critical point of a phase transition in statistical physics. Empirical and theoretical studies suggest that operating near criticality enhances the functionality of biological networks, such as brain and gene networks, in terms for instance of information processing, robustness and evolvability. While previous studies have explained criticality with specific system features, we still lack a general theory of critical behaviour in biological systems. Here we look at this problem from the complex systems perspective, since in principle all critical biological circuits have in common the fact that their internal organisation can be described as a complex network. An important question is how self-similar structure influences self-similar dynamics. Modularity and heterogeneity, for instance, affect the location of critical points and can be used to tune the system towards criticality. We review and discuss recent studies on the criticality of neuronal and genetic networks, and discuss the implications of network theory when assessing the evolutionary features of criticality.

  17. Advancing multiscale structural mapping of the brain through fluorescence imaging and analysis across length scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogstrom, L. J.; Guo, S. M.; Murugadoss, K.; Bathe, M.

    2016-01-01

    Brain function emerges from hierarchical neuronal structure that spans orders of magnitude in length scale, from the nanometre-scale organization of synaptic proteins to the macroscopic wiring of neuronal circuits. Because the synaptic electrochemical signal transmission that drives brain function ultimately relies on the organization of neuronal circuits, understanding brain function requires an understanding of the principles that determine hierarchical neuronal structure in living or intact organisms. Recent advances in fluorescence imaging now enable quantitative characterization of neuronal structure across length scales, ranging from single-molecule localization using super-resolution imaging to whole-brain imaging using light-sheet microscopy on cleared samples. These tools, together with correlative electron microscopy and magnetic resonance imaging at the nanoscopic and macroscopic scales, respectively, now facilitate our ability to probe brain structure across its full range of length scales with cellular and molecular specificity. As these imaging datasets become increasingly accessible to researchers, novel statistical and computational frameworks will play an increasing role in efforts to relate hierarchical brain structure to its function. In this perspective, we discuss several prominent experimental advances that are ushering in a new era of quantitative fluorescence-based imaging in neuroscience along with novel computational and statistical strategies that are helping to distil our understanding of complex brain structure. PMID:26855758

  18. Geophysical mapping of complex glaciogenic large-scale structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer, Anne-Sophie

    2013-01-01

    is required to understand the structures. In practice, however, also the applicability and costs of the methods are crucial. The SkyTEM method is very cost-effective in providing dense data sets, and it is therefore recommendable to use this method initially in mapping campaigns. For more detailed structural...... information, seismic data can profitably be acquired in certain areas of interest, preferably selected on the basis of the SkyTEM data. In areas where extremely detailed information about the near-surface is required, geoelec¬tri¬cal data (resistivity information) and ground penetrating radar data (structural......This thesis presents the main results of a four year PhD study concerning the use of geophysical data in geological mapping. The study is related to the Geocenter project, “KOMPLEKS”, which focuses on the mapping of complex, large-scale geological structures. The study area is approximately 100 km2...

  19. Inferring synaptic structure in presence of neural interaction time scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Capone

    Full Text Available Biological networks display a variety of activity patterns reflecting a web of interactions that is complex both in space and time. Yet inference methods have mainly focused on reconstructing, from the network's activity, the spatial structure, by assuming equilibrium conditions or, more recently, a probabilistic dynamics with a single arbitrary time-step. Here we show that, under this latter assumption, the inference procedure fails to reconstruct the synaptic matrix of a network of integrate-and-fire neurons when the chosen time scale of interaction does not closely match the synaptic delay or when no single time scale for the interaction can be identified; such failure, moreover, exposes a distinctive bias of the inference method that can lead to infer as inhibitory the excitatory synapses with interaction time scales longer than the model's time-step. We therefore introduce a new two-step method, that first infers through cross-correlation profiles the delay-structure of the network and then reconstructs the synaptic matrix, and successfully test it on networks with different topologies and in different activity regimes. Although step one is able to accurately recover the delay-structure of the network, thus getting rid of any a priori guess about the time scales of the interaction, the inference method introduces nonetheless an arbitrary time scale, the time-bin dt used to binarize the spike trains. We therefore analytically and numerically study how the choice of dt affects the inference in our network model, finding that the relationship between the inferred couplings and the real synaptic efficacies, albeit being quadratic in both cases, depends critically on dt for the excitatory synapses only, whilst being basically independent of it for the inhibitory ones.

  20. Scale and structure of capitated physician organizations in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M B; Frank, R G; Buchanan, J L; Epstein, A M

    2001-01-01

    Physician organizations in California broke new ground in the 1980s by accepting capitated contracts and taking on utilization management functions. In this paper we present new data that document the scale, structure, and vertical affiliations of physician organizations that accept capitation in California. We provide information on capitated enrollment, the share of revenue derived by physician organizations from capitation contracts, and the scope of risk sharing with health maintenance organizations (HMOs). Capitation contracts and risk sharing dominate payment arrangements with HMOs. Physician organizations appear to have responded to capitation by affiliating with hospitals and management companies, adopting hybrid organizational structures, and consolidating into larger entities.

  1. Language structure is partly determined by social structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Lupyan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Languages differ greatly both in their syntactic and morphological systems and in the social environments in which they exist. We challenge the view that language grammars are unrelated to social environments in which they are learned and used. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a statistical analysis of >2,000 languages using a combination of demographic sources and the World Atlas of Language Structures--a database of structural language properties. We found strong relationships between linguistic factors related to morphological complexity, and demographic/socio-historical factors such as the number of language users, geographic spread, and degree of language contact. The analyses suggest that languages spoken by large groups have simpler inflectional morphology than languages spoken by smaller groups as measured on a variety of factors such as case systems and complexity of conjugations. Additionally, languages spoken by large groups are much more likely to use lexical strategies in place of inflectional morphology to encode evidentiality, negation, aspect, and possession. Our findings indicate that just as biological organisms are shaped by ecological niches, language structures appear to adapt to the environment (niche in which they are being learned and used. As adults learn a language, features that are difficult for them to acquire, are less likely to be passed on to subsequent learners. Languages used for communication in large groups that include adult learners appear to have been subjected to such selection. Conversely, the morphological complexity common to languages used in small groups increases redundancy which may facilitate language learning by infants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We hypothesize that language structures are subjected to different evolutionary pressures in different social environments. Just as biological organisms are shaped by ecological niches, language structures appear to adapt to the

  2. Determination of finite-difference weights using scaled binomial windows

    KAUST Repository

    Chu, Chunlei

    2012-05-01

    The finite-difference method evaluates a derivative through a weighted summation of function values from neighboring grid nodes. Conventional finite-difference weights can be calculated either from Taylor series expansions or by Lagrange interpolation polynomials. The finite-difference method can be interpreted as a truncated convolutional counterpart of the pseudospectral method in the space domain. For this reason, we also can derive finite-difference operators by truncating the convolution series of the pseudospectral method. Various truncation windows can be employed for this purpose and they result in finite-difference operators with different dispersion properties. We found that there exists two families of scaled binomial windows that can be used to derive conventional finite-difference operators analytically. With a minor change, these scaled binomial windows can also be used to derive optimized finite-difference operators with enhanced dispersion properties. © 2012 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  3. Implicit Priors in Galaxy Cluster Mass and Scaling Relation Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, A.; Allen, S. W.

    2011-01-01

    Deriving the total masses of galaxy clusters from observations of the intracluster medium (ICM) generally requires some prior information, in addition to the assumptions of hydrostatic equilibrium and spherical symmetry. Often, this information takes the form of particular parametrized functions used to describe the cluster gas density and temperature profiles. In this paper, we investigate the implicit priors on hydrostatic masses that result from this fully parametric approach, and the implications of such priors for scaling relations formed from those masses. We show that the application of such fully parametric models of the ICM naturally imposes a prior on the slopes of the derived scaling relations, favoring the self-similar model, and argue that this prior may be influential in practice. In contrast, this bias does not exist for techniques which adopt an explicit prior on the form of the mass profile but describe the ICM non-parametrically. Constraints on the slope of the cluster mass-temperature relation in the literature show a separation based the approach employed, with the results from fully parametric ICM modeling clustering nearer the self-similar value. Given that a primary goal of scaling relation analyses is to test the self-similar model, the application of methods subject to strong, implicit priors should be avoided. Alternative methods and best practices are discussed.

  4. Topological analysis of large-scale biomedical terminology structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Michael E; Lussier, Yves A; Johnson, Stephen B

    2007-01-01

    To characterize global structural features of large-scale biomedical terminologies using currently emerging statistical approaches. Given rapid growth of terminologies, this research was designed to address scalability. We selected 16 terminologies covering a variety of domains from the UMLS Metathesaurus, a collection of terminological systems. Each was modeled as a network in which nodes were atomic concepts and links were relationships asserted by the source vocabulary. For comparison against each terminology we created three random networks of equivalent size and density. Average node degree, node degree distribution, clustering coefficient, average path length. Eight of 16 terminologies exhibited the small-world characteristics of a short average path length and strong local clustering. An overlapping subset of nine exhibited a power law distribution in node degrees, indicative of a scale-free architecture. We attribute these features to specific design constraints. Constraints on node connectivity, common in more synthetic classification systems, localize the effects of changes and deletions. In contrast, small-world and scale-free features, common in comprehensive medical terminologies, promote flexible navigation and less restrictive organic-like growth. While thought of as synthetic, grid-like structures, some controlled terminologies are structurally indistinguishable from natural language networks. This paradoxical result suggests that terminology structure is shaped not only by formal logic-based semantics, but by rules analogous to those that govern social networks and biological systems. Graph theoretic modeling shows early promise as a framework for describing terminology structure. Deeper understanding of these techniques may inform the development of scalable terminologies and ontologies.

  5. Determination of atomic cluster structure with cluster fusion algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obolensky, Oleg I.; Solov'yov, Ilia; Solov'yov, Andrey V.

    2005-01-01

    We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters.......We report an efficient scheme of global optimization, called cluster fusion algorithm, which has proved its reliability and high efficiency in determination of the structure of various atomic clusters....

  6. Scaling collapse and structure functions: identifying self-affinity in finite length time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Chapman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Empirical determination of the scaling properties and exponents of time series presents a formidable challenge in testing, and developing, a theoretical understanding of turbulence and other out-of-equilibrium phenomena. We discuss the special case of self affine time series in the context of a stochastic process. We highlight two complementary approaches to the differenced variable of the data: i attempting a scaling collapse of the Probability Density Functions which should then be well described by the solution of the corresponding Fokker-Planck equation and ii using structure functions to determine the scaling properties of the higher order moments. We consider a method of conditioning that recovers the underlying self affine scaling in a finite length time series, and illustrate it using a Lévy flight.

  7. Identification of the underlying factor structure of the Derriford Appearance Scale 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Victoria; White, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Derriford Appearance Scale24 (DAS24) is a widely used measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. It has been used in clinical and research settings, and translated into numerous European and Asian languages. Hitherto, no study has conducted an analysis to determine the underlying factor structure of the scale. Methods. A large (n = 1,265) sample of community and hospital patients with a visible difference were recruited face to face or by post, and completed the DAS24. Results. A two factor solution was generated. An evaluation of the congruence of the factor solutions on each of the the hospital and the community samples using Tucker’s Coefficient of Congruence (rc = .979) and confirmatory factor analysis, which demonstrated a consistent factor structure. A main factor, general self consciousness (GSC), was represented by 18 items. Six items comprised a second factor, sexual and body self-consciousness (SBSC). The SBSC scale demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity in identifying distress for sexually significant areas of the body. Discussion. The factor structure of the DAS24 facilitates a more nuanced interpretation of scores using this scale. Two conceptually and statistically coherent sub-scales were identified. The SBSC sub-scale offers a means of identifying distress and dysfunction around sexually significant areas of the body not previously possible with this scale. PMID:26157633

  8. Identification of the underlying factor structure of the Derriford Appearance Scale 24

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy P. Moss

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The Derriford Appearance Scale24 (DAS24 is a widely used measure of distress and dysfunction in relation to self-consciousness of appearance. It has been used in clinical and research settings, and translated into numerous European and Asian languages. Hitherto, no study has conducted an analysis to determine the underlying factor structure of the scale.Methods. A large (n = 1,265 sample of community and hospital patients with a visible difference were recruited face to face or by post, and completed the DAS24.Results. A two factor solution was generated. An evaluation of the congruence of the factor solutions on each of the the hospital and the community samples using Tucker’s Coefficient of Congruence (rc = .979 and confirmatory factor analysis, which demonstrated a consistent factor structure. A main factor, general self consciousness (GSC, was represented by 18 items. Six items comprised a second factor, sexual and body self-consciousness (SBSC. The SBSC scale demonstrated greater sensitivity and specificity in identifying distress for sexually significant areas of the body.Discussion. The factor structure of the DAS24 facilitates a more nuanced interpretation of scores using this scale. Two conceptually and statistically coherent sub-scales were identified. The SBSC sub-scale offers a means of identifying distress and dysfunction around sexually significant areas of the body not previously possible with this scale.

  9. Structure of catalase determined by MicroED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannenga, Brent L; Shi, Dan; Hattne, Johan; Reyes, Francis E; Gonen, Tamir

    2014-01-01

    MicroED is a recently developed method that uses electron diffraction for structure determination from very small three-dimensional crystals of biological material. Previously we used a series of still diffraction patterns to determine the structure of lysozyme at 2.9 Å resolution with MicroED (Shi et al., 2013). Here we present the structure of bovine liver catalase determined from a single crystal at 3.2 Å resolution by MicroED. The data were collected by continuous rotation of the sample under constant exposure and were processed and refined using standard programs for X-ray crystallography. The ability of MicroED to determine the structure of bovine liver catalase, a protein that has long resisted atomic analysis by traditional electron crystallography, demonstrates the potential of this method for structure determination. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03600.001 PMID:25303172

  10. Determinants of agricultural land use intensity among small scale ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study identifies drivers of agricultural land intensity and analyzed farmers' perceived constraints to sustainable land management in Oruk Anam Local Government Area of Akwa Ibom State. Cross sectional data were collected from sampled arable crop farmers using structured questionnaire. Descriptive tools and ...

  11. Ab initio structure determination via powder X-ray diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Although the method of structure completion when once the starting model is provided is facile through the Rietveld refinement technique, the structure solution ab initio os still not push-button technology. In this article a survey of the recent development in this area is provided with an illustration of the structure determination ...

  12. Risk Syndromes and Scales Determining Risk in Schizophrenia and Other Psychoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soner Cakmak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a chronic disorder leading to lifelong deterioration of social and vocational functioning. Prodromal period, designates the time interval starting with emerging nonspecific signs and deficits and extending up to presentation of distinct and ongoing schizophrenic symptoms, is observed in most of schizophrenia patients. In schizophrenia, poor premorbid adjustment leads to a worse prognosis and thus early detection and intervention is required in prodromal period. To this end, under the heading of risk factors for schizophrenia and psychosis, classification and scales to determine the risk are being utilized. Most frequently used scales are; Bonn Scale for the Assessment of Basic Symptoms (BSABS, Comprehensive Assessment of At-Risk Mental States (CAARMS, Structured Interview for Psychosis-Risk Syndromes (SIPS. Through the light of these latest developments, recent edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 added psychosis risk syndrome or attenuated psychosis syndrome to indicate risk of transition to psychosis. These approaches revealed that the risk of progression to psychosis was not reliably correlated with fulfilled criteria, but abscence of criteria credibly predicted the unlikelihood of psychosis emergence. Evidently, concomitant premorbid features and prodromal symptoms significantly increase the risk of progression to psychosis and schizophrenia in comparison to normal population. Nevertheless, specification and elaboration of risk criteria will enhance reliability of risk determination. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2015; 24(4.000: 494-508

  13. Dark matter self-interactions and small scale structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulin, Sean; Yu, Hai-Bo

    2018-02-01

    We review theories of dark matter (DM) beyond the collisionless paradigm, known as self-interacting dark matter (SIDM), and their observable implications for astrophysical structure in the Universe. Self-interactions are motivated, in part, due to the potential to explain long-standing (and more recent) small scale structure observations that are in tension with collisionless cold DM (CDM) predictions. Simple particle physics models for SIDM can provide a universal explanation for these observations across a wide range of mass scales spanning dwarf galaxies, low and high surface brightness spiral galaxies, and clusters of galaxies. At the same time, SIDM leaves intact the success of ΛCDM cosmology on large scales. This report covers the following topics: (1) small scale structure issues, including the core-cusp problem, the diversity problem for rotation curves, the missing satellites problem, and the too-big-to-fail problem, as well as recent progress in hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy formation; (2) N-body simulations for SIDM, including implications for density profiles, halo shapes, substructure, and the interplay between baryons and self-interactions; (3) semi-analytic Jeans-based methods that provide a complementary approach for connecting particle models with observations; (4) merging systems, such as cluster mergers (e.g., the Bullet Cluster) and minor infalls, along with recent simulation results for mergers; (5) particle physics models, including light mediator models and composite DM models; and (6) complementary probes for SIDM, including indirect and direct detection experiments, particle collider searches, and cosmological observations. We provide a summary and critical look for all current constraints on DM self-interactions and an outline for future directions.

  14. Dispersal ability determines the scaling properties of species abundance distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borda-De-Água, Luís; Whittaker, Robert James; Cardoso, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    Species abundance distributions (SAD) are central to the description of diversity and have played a major role in the development of theories of biodiversity and biogeography. However, most work on species abundance distributions has focused on one single spatial scale. Here we used data on arthr......Species abundance distributions (SAD) are central to the description of diversity and have played a major role in the development of theories of biodiversity and biogeography. However, most work on species abundance distributions has focused on one single spatial scale. Here we used data...... on arthropods to test predictions obtained with computer simulations on whether dispersal ability influences the rate of change of SADs as a function of sample size. To characterize the change of the shape of the SADs we use the moments of the distributions: the skewness and the raw moments. In agreement...... with computer simulations, low dispersal ability species generate a hump for intermediate abundance classes earlier than the distributions of high dispersal ability species. Importantly, when plotted as function of sample size, the raw moments of the SADs of arthropods have a power law pattern similar...

  15. Photon energy scale determination and commissioning with radiative Z decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondu Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL is composed of 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. It has been designed to be fast, compact, and radiation hard, with fine granularity and excellent energy resolution. Obtaining the design resolution is a crucial challenge for the SM Higgs search in the two photon channel at the LHC, and more generally good photon calibration and knowledge of the photon energy scale is required for analyses with photons in the final state. The behavior of photons and electrons in the calorimeter is not identical, making the use of a dedicated standard candle for photons, complementary to the canonical highyield Z decay to electrons, highly desirable. The use of Z decays to a pair of muons, where one of the muons emits a Bremsstrahlung photon, can be such a standard candle. These events, which can be cleanly selected, are a source of high-purity, relatively high-pt photons. Their kinematics are well-constrained by the Z boson mass and the precision on the muon momenta, and can be used for numerous calibration and measurement purposes. This proceeding presents the event selection method and the results of the photon energy scale measurement via Z0 → μμγ events as well as their use in evaluating the efficiency of photon identification requirements, based on data recorded by the CMS experiment in 2010.

  16. Structural Quality of Service in Large-Scale Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    , telephony and data. To meet the requirements of the different applications, and to handle the increased vulnerability to failures, the ability to design robust networks providing good Quality of Service is crucial. However, most planning of large-scale networks today is ad-hoc based, leading to highly......Digitalization has created the base for co-existence and convergence in communications, leading to an increasing use of multi service networks. This is for example seen in the Fiber To The Home implementations, where a single fiber is used for virtually all means of communication, including TV...... complex networks lacking predictability and global structural properties. The thesis applies the concept of Structural Quality of Service to formulate desirable global properties, and it shows how regular graph structures can be used to obtain such properties....

  17. Structures, profile consistency, and transport scaling in electrostatic convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    that for interchange modes, profile consistency is in fact due to mixing by persistent large-scale convective cells. This mechanism is not a turbulent diffusion, cannot occur in collisionless systems, and is the analog of the well-known laminar "magnetic flux expulsion" in magneiohydrodynamics. This expulsion process...... involves a "pinch" across closed streamlines and further results in the formation of pressure fingers along the-separatrix of the convective cells. By nature, these coherent structures are dissipative because the mixing process that leads to their formation relies on a finite amount of collisional...... diffusion. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional interchange modes confirm the role of laminar expulsion by convective cells, for profile consistency and structure formation. They also show that the fingerlike pressure structures ultimately control the rate of heat transport across the plasma layer...

  18. Determinants of Capital Structure: Empirical Evidence From UK

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Wenjing

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of capital structure for the companies in the United Kingdom. The aim of this study is to determine which capital structure is more appropriate to UK listed companies. Results obtained will be compared against previous empirical and theoretical predictions. Panel data set containing 342 UK public quoted companies across 8 industries during the period from 2000-2009 is employed. A Pooled OLS regression is constructed to discuss what the determinants...

  19. Geographical ecology of the palms (Arecaceae): determinants of diversity and distributions across spatial scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eiserhardt, Wolf L.; Svenning, J.-C.; Kissling, W. Daniel

    2011-01-01

    palm species distributions, community composition and species richness such as the abiotic environment (climate, soil chemistry, hydrology and topography), the biotic environment (vegetation structure and species interactions) and dispersal. The importance of contemporary vs. historical impacts...... to be important at landscape and broader scales, soil, topography and vegetation at landscape and local scales, hydrology at local scales, and dispersal at all scales. For community composition, soil appears important at regional and finer scales, hydrology, topography and vegetation at landscape and local scales.......g. climate on regional to finer scales, and hydrology and topography on landscape and broader scales. The importance of biotic interactions – apart from general vegetation structure effects – for the geographic ecology of palms is generally underexplored. Future studies should target scale...

  20. Determinant of Profit Efficiency among Small Scale Traditional Palm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was designed to examine the determinants of profit efficiency among traditional palm oil processing in Nigeria, using stochastic Cobb – Douglas profit frontier model. A Multi – Stage random sampling technique was used to select 240 traditional palm oil processors from which input – output data were collected.

  1. Novel Small-scale Technique for Determining Detonation Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Daniel; Hill, Larry; Tappan, Bryce

    2013-06-01

    Measuring the local detonation velocity of an explosive has been limited to rate stick and cylinder tests. These tests traditionally used break wires, pins, and more recently PDV as a velocity diagnostic. These experimental techniques can be very accurate at measuring detonation velocities but are costly and require tens to hundreds of grams of material. This paper presents a novel small-scale technique for inferring detonation velocity from a modest sized pellet of explosive. A streak image is taken of the breakout shock on the flat output side of the pellet. Assuming a spherical shock wave, one can show that the breakout trace is of hyperbolic form. From this, one can simultaneously infer detonation velocty and apparent center. This method is ideal for energetic formulation and synthesis development due to the small amount of material required. Furthermore, this paper discusses the accuracy and limitations of this technique.

  2. Compressive Coherent Structures at Ion Scales in the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, D.; Alexandrova, O.; Mangeney, A.; Maksimovic, M.; Lacombe, C.; Rakoto, V.; Kasper, J. C.; Jovanovic, D.

    2016-08-01

    We present a study of magnetic field fluctuations in a slow solar wind stream, close to ion scales, where an increase of the level of magnetic compressibility is observed. Here, the nature of these compressive fluctuations is found to be characterized by coherent structures. Although previous studies have shown that current sheets can be considered the principal cause of intermittency at ion scales, here we show for the first time that, in the case of the slow solar wind, a large variety of coherent structures contributes to intermittency at proton scales, and current sheets are not the most common. Specifically, we find compressive (δ {b}\\parallel \\gg δ {b}\\perp ), linearly polarized structures in the form of magnetic holes, solitons, and shock waves. Examples of Alfvénic structures (δ {b}\\perp \\gt δ {b}\\parallel ) are identified as current sheets and vortex-like structures. Some of these vortices have δ {b}\\perp \\gg δ {b}\\parallel , as in the case of Alfvén vortices, but the majority of them are characterized by δ {b}\\perp ≳ δ {b}\\parallel . Thanks to multi-point measurements by the Cluster spacecraft, for about 100 structures we could determine the normal, the propagation velocity, and the spatial scale along this normal. Independently of the nature of the structures, the normal is always perpendicular to the local magnetic field, meaning that k ⊥ ≫ k ∥. The spatial scales of the studied structures are found to be between two and eight times the proton gyroradius. Most of them are simply convected by the wind, but 25% propagate in the plasma frame. Possible interpretations of the observed structures and the connection with plasma heating are discussed.

  3. Crystal Structure of the 30S Ribosomal Subunit from Thermus Thermophilus. Purification, Crystallization and Structure Determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, William M.; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; McCutcheonn, John P.; May, Joanna L.C.; Carter, Andrew P.; Morgan-Warren, Robert J.; Wimberly, Brian T.; Ramakrishnan, Venki (MRC); (Utah); (MRC)

    2009-10-07

    We describe the crystallization and structure determination of the 30 S ribosomal subunit from Thermus thermophilus. Previous reports of crystals that diffracted to 10 {angstrom} resolution were used as a starting point to improve the quality of the diffraction. Eventually, ideas such as the addition of substrates or factors to eliminate conformational heterogeneity proved less important than attention to detail in yielding crystals that diffracted beyond 3 {angstrom} resolution. Despite improvements in technology and methodology in the last decade, the structure determination of the 30 S subunit presented some very challenging technical problems because of the size of the asymmetric unit, crystal variability and sensitivity to radiation damage. Some steps that were useful for determination of the atomic structure were: the use of anomalous scattering from the LIII edges of osmium and lutetium to obtain the necessary phasing signal; the use of tunable, third-generation synchrotron sources to obtain data of reasonable quality at high resolution; collection of derivative data precisely about a mirror plane to preserve small anomalous differences between Bijvoet mates despite extensive radiation damage and multi-crystal scaling; the pre-screening of crystals to ensure quality, isomorphism and the efficient use of scarce third-generation synchrotron time; pre-incubation of crystals in cobalt hexaammine to ensure isomorphism with other derivatives; and finally, the placement of proteins whose structures had been previously solved in isolation, in conjunction with biochemical data on protein-RNA interactions, to map out the architecture of the 30 S subunit prior to the construction of a detailed atomic-resolution model.

  4. Kinetic Scale Structure of Low-frequency Waves and Fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A.; Yoon, Peter H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Araneda, Jaime A., E-mail: rlopezh@umd.edu, E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile)

    2017-08-10

    The dissipation of solar wind turbulence at kinetic scales is believed to be important for the heating of the corona and for accelerating the wind. The linear Vlasov kinetic theory is a useful tool for identifying various wave modes, including kinetic Alfvén, fast magnetosonic/whistler, and ion-acoustic (or kinetic slow), and their possible roles in the dissipation. However, the kinetic mode structure in the vicinity of ion-cyclotron modes is not clearly understood. The present paper aims to further elucidate the structure of these low-frequency waves by introducing discrete particle effects through hybrid simulations and Klimontovich formalism of spontaneous emission theory. The theory and simulation of spontaneously emitted low-frequency fluctuations are employed to identify and distinguish the detailed mode structures associated with ion-Bernstein modes versus quasi-modes. The spontaneous emission theory and simulation also confirm the findings of the Vlasov theory in that the kinetic Alfvén waves can be defined over a wide range of frequencies, including the proton cyclotron frequency and its harmonics, especially for high-beta plasmas. This implies that these low-frequency modes may play predominant roles even in the fully kinetic description of kinetic scale turbulence and dissipation despite the fact that cyclotron harmonic and Bernstein modes may also play important roles in wave–particle interactions.

  5. Target Selection and Determination of Function in Structural Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, James D.; Todd, Annabel E.; Bray, James; Laskowski, Roman A.; Edwards, Aled; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Orengo, Christine A.; Thornton, Janet M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The first crucial step in any structural genomics project is the selection and prioritization of target proteins for structure determination. There may be a number of selection criteria to be satisfied, including that the proteins have novel folds, that they be representatives of large families for which no structure is known, and so on. The better the selection at this stage, the greater is the value of the structures obtained at the end of the experimental process. This value can be further enhanced once the protein structures have been solved if the functions of the given proteins can also be determined. Here we describe the methods used at either end of the experimental process: firstly, sensitive sequence comparison techniques for selecting a high-quality list of target proteins, and secondly the various computational methods that can be applied to the eventual 3D structures to determine the most likely biochemical function of the proteins in question. PMID:12880206

  6. Practical guidelines to select and scale earthquake records for nonlinear response history analysis of structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Erol; Chopra, Anil K.

    2010-01-01

    Earthquake engineering practice is increasingly using nonlinear response history analysis (RHA) to demonstrate performance of structures. This rigorous method of analysis requires selection and scaling of ground motions appropriate to design hazard levels. Presented herein is a modal-pushover-based scaling (MPS) method to scale ground motions for use in nonlinear RHA of buildings and bridges. In the MPS method, the ground motions are scaled to match (to a specified tolerance) a target value of the inelastic deformation of the first-'mode' inelastic single-degree-of-freedom (SDF) system whose properties are determined by first-'mode' pushover analysis. Appropriate for first-?mode? dominated structures, this approach is extended for structures with significant contributions of higher modes by considering elastic deformation of second-'mode' SDF system in selecting a subset of the scaled ground motions. Based on results presented for two bridges, covering single- and multi-span 'ordinary standard' bridge types, and six buildings, covering low-, mid-, and tall building types in California, the accuracy and efficiency of the MPS procedure are established and its superiority over the ASCE/SEI 7-05 scaling procedure is demonstrated.

  7. Manufacturing and design of the offshore structure Froude scale model related to basin restrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurtu, I. C.

    2015-11-01

    Manufacturing steps for a modern three - column semi-submersible structure are delivered using CFD/CAE software and actual Froude scaled model testing. The three- column offshore is part of the Wind Float Project already realized as prototype for wind energy extraction in water depths more than 40 meters, and the actual model will not consider the wind turbine. The model will have heave plates for a smaller heave motion in order to compare it with the case without heave plates. The heave plates will be part of the Froude scale model.. Using a smaller model will determine a smaller heave motion and this will affect predictions of the vertical movement of the three- column offshore structure in real sea. The Froude criterion is used for the time, speed and acceleration scale. The scale model is manufactured from steel and fiberglass and all parts are subjected to software analysis in order to get the smallest stress in connections inside the model. The model mass was restricted by scale dimensions and also the vertical position of centre gravity will be considered during the manufacturing and design process of the Froude scale offshore structure. All conditions must converge in model manufacturing and design in order to get the best results to compare with real sea states and heave motion data.

  8. Rapid and reliable protein structure determination via chemical shift threading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafsa, Noor E; Berjanskii, Mark V; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2017-12-01

    Protein structure determination using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy can be both time-consuming and labor intensive. Here we demonstrate how chemical shift threading can permit rapid, robust, and accurate protein structure determination using only chemical shift data. Threading is a relatively old bioinformatics technique that uses a combination of sequence information and predicted (or experimentally acquired) low-resolution structural data to generate high-resolution 3D protein structures. The key motivations behind using NMR chemical shifts for protein threading lie in the fact that they are easy to measure, they are available prior to 3D structure determination, and they contain vital structural information. The method we have developed uses not only sequence and chemical shift similarity but also chemical shift-derived secondary structure, shift-derived super-secondary structure, and shift-derived accessible surface area to generate a high quality protein structure regardless of the sequence similarity (or lack thereof) to a known structure already in the PDB. The method (called E-Thrifty) was found to be very fast (often structure) and to significantly outperform other shift-based or threading-based structure determination methods (in terms of top template model accuracy)-with an average TM-score performance of 0.68 (vs. 0.50-0.62 for other methods). Coupled with recent developments in chemical shift refinement, these results suggest that protein structure determination, using only NMR chemical shifts, is becoming increasingly practical and reliable. E-Thrifty is available as a web server at http://ethrifty.ca .

  9. Structural colour: Colour mixing in wing scales of a butterfly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukusic, P.; Sambles, J. R.; Lawrence, C. R.

    2000-03-01

    Green coloration in the animal kingdom, as seen in birds' feathers and reptile integument, is often an additive mixture of structurally effected blue and pigmentary yellow. Here we investigate the origin of the bright green coloration of the wing scales of the Indonesian male Papilio palinurus butterfly, the microstructure of which generates an extraordinary combination of both yellow and blue iridescence. The dual colour arises from a modulation imposed on the multilayer, producing the blue component as a result of a previously undiscovered retro-reflection process.

  10. Cosmology from large-scale structure observations: a subjective review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilicki, Maciej; Hellwing, Wojciech A.

    2017-08-01

    In these lecture notes we give a brief overview of cosmological inference from the observed large-scale structure (LSS) of the Universe. After a general introduction, we briefly summarize the current status of the standard cosmological model, ΛCDM, and then discuss a few general puzzles related to this otherwise successful model. Next, after a concise presentation of LSS properties, we describe various observational cosmological probes, such as baryon acoustic oscillations, redshift space distortions and weak gravitational lensing. We also provide examples of how the rapidly developing technique of cross-correlations of cosmological datasets is applied. Finally, we briefly mention the promise brought to cosmology by gravitational wave detections.

  11. Cosmological constraints from large-scale structure growth rate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Anatoly; Farooq, Omer; Ratra, Bharat

    2014-07-01

    We compile a list of 14 independent measurements of a large-scale structure growth rate between redshifts 0.067≤z≤0.8 and use this to place constraints on model parameters of constant and time-evolving general-relativistic dark energy cosmologies. With the assumption that gravity is well modeled by general relativity, we discover that growth-rate data provide restrictive cosmological parameter constraints. In combination with type Ia supernova apparent magnitude versus redshift data and Hubble parameter measurements, the growth rate data are consistent with the standard spatially flat ΛCDM model, as well as with mildly evolving dark energy density cosmological models.

  12. Linear scaling 3D fragment method for large-scale electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Lin-Wang; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, HongZhang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David

    2008-07-11

    We present a new linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method for large scale ab initio electronic structure calculations. LS3DF is based on a divide-and-conquer approach, which incorporates a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects due to the subdivision of the system. As a consequence, the LS3DF program yields essentially the same results as direct density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The fragments of the LS3DF algorithm can be calculated separately with different groups of processors. This leads to almost perfect parallelization on tens of thousands of processors. After code optimization, we were able to achieve 35.1 Tflop/s, which is 39% of the theoretical speed on 17,280 Cray XT4 processor cores. Our 13,824-atom ZnTeO alloy calculation runs 400 times faster than a direct DFT calculation, even presuming that the direct DFT calculation can scale well up to 17,280 processor cores. These results demonstrate the applicability of the LS3DF method to material simulations, the advantage of using linearly scaling algorithms over conventional O(N{sup 3}) methods, and the potential for petascale computation using the LS3DF method.

  13. Linearly Scaling 3D Fragment Method for Large-Scale Electronic Structure Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Lee, Byounghak; Shan, Hongzhang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Strohmaier, Erich; Bailey, David H.

    2008-07-01

    We present a new linearly scaling three-dimensional fragment (LS3DF) method for large scale ab initio electronic structure calculations. LS3DF is based on a divide-and-conquer approach, which incorporates a novel patching scheme that effectively cancels out the artificial boundary effects due to the subdivision of the system. As a consequence, the LS3DF program yields essentially the same results as direct density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The fragments of the LS3DF algorithm can be calculated separately with different groups of processors. This leads to almost perfect parallelization on tens of thousands of processors. After code optimization, we were able to achieve 35.1 Tflop/s, which is 39percent of the theoretical speed on 17,280 Cray XT4 processor cores. Our 13,824-atom ZnTeO alloy calculation runs 400 times faster than a direct DFTcalculation, even presuming that the direct DFT calculation can scale well up to 17,280 processor cores. These results demonstrate the applicability of the LS3DF method to material simulations, the advantage of using linearly scaling algorithms over conventional O(N3) methods, and the potential for petascale computation using the LS3DF method.

  14. Predicting fracture in micron-scale polycrystalline silicon MEMS structures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazra, Siddharth S. (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); de Boer, Maarten Pieter (Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA); Boyce, Brad Lee; Ohlhausen, James Anthony; Foulk, James W., III; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.

    2010-09-01

    Designing reliable MEMS structures presents numerous challenges. Polycrystalline silicon fractures in a brittle manner with considerable variability in measured strength. Furthermore, it is not clear how to use a measured tensile strength distribution to predict the strength of a complex MEMS structure. To address such issues, two recently developed high throughput MEMS tensile test techniques have been used to measure strength distribution tails. The measured tensile strength distributions enable the definition of a threshold strength as well as an inferred maximum flaw size. The nature of strength-controlling flaws has been identified and sources of the observed variation in strength investigated. A double edge-notched specimen geometry was also tested to study the effect of a severe, micron-scale stress concentration on the measured strength distribution. Strength-based, Weibull-based, and fracture mechanics-based failure analyses were performed and compared with the experimental results.

  15. Protein Structure Determination Using Protein Threading and Sparse NMR Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, O.H.; Einstein, J.R.; Xu, D.; Xu, Y.

    1999-11-14

    It is well known that the NMR method for protein structure determination applies to small proteins and that its effectiveness decreases very rapidly as the molecular weight increases beyond about 30 kD. We have recently developed a method for protein structure determination that can fully utilize partial NMR data as calculation constraints. The core of the method is a threading algorithm that guarantees to find a globally optimal alignment between a query sequence and a template structure, under distance constraints specified by NMR/NOE data. Our preliminary tests have demonstrated that a small number of NMR/NOE distance restraints can significantly improve threading performance in both fold recognition and threading-alignment accuracy, and can possibly extend threading's scope of applicability from structural homologs to structural analogs. An accurate backbone structure generated by NMR-constrained threading can then provide a significant amount of structural information, equivalent to that provided by the NMR method with many NMR/NOE restraints; and hence can greatly reduce the amount of NMR data typically required for accurate structure determination. Our preliminary study suggests that a small number of NMR/NOE restraints may suffice to determine adequately the all-atom structure when those restraints are incorporated in a procedure combining threading, modeling of loops and sidechains, and molecular dynamics simulation. Potentially, this new technique can expand NMR's capability to larger proteins.

  16. Determination of Longitudinal Electron Bunch Lengths on Picosecond Time Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez, C; Calviño, F

    1999-01-01

    At CERN (European Laboratory for Particle Physics) the CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) study is pursuing the design of an electron-positron high-energy linear collider using an innovative concept for the RF (Radio Frequency) power production, the socalled two-beam acceleration scheme. In order to keep the length of the collider in a reasonable range while being able of accelerating electrons and positrons up to 5 TeV, the normal-conducting accelerating structures should operate at very high frequency (in this case 30 GHz). The RF power necessary to feed the accelerating cavities is provided by a second electron beam, the drive beam, running parallel to the main beam. The CLIC Test Facility (CTF) was build with the main aim of studying and demonstrating the feasibility of the two beam acceleration scheme and technology. It is composed of two beams, the drive beam that will generate the 30 GHz RF power and the main beam which will be accelerated by this power. In order to have a good efficiency for the power gen...

  17. Determination of Velocity And Acceleration of Structural Deformation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of the Nigerian Association of Mathematical Physics ... Objects and engineering structures are subject to displacements resulting from ... is possible on the basis of cyclic measurements of changes in position of points determining the ...

  18. Determination of Structures of Proteins in Solution using Nuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 8; Issue 8. Determination of Structures of Proteins in Solution using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Siddhartha P Sarma. Research News Volume 8 Issue 8 August 2003 pp 86-99 ...

  19. Steps to Self-Determination: A Curriculum To Help Adolescents Learn To Achieve Their Goals. Self-Determination Knowledge Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Alan; Field, Sharon; Sawilowsky, Shlomo

    The "Self-Determination Knowledge Scale" (SDKS) Form A and Form B are designed as a pretest and posttest for the "Steps to Self-Determination" curriculum. The program is meant to assist students, with and without disabilities, to learn more about themselves and develop skills to achieve their goals, get support from family and friends, and learn…

  20. UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3): reliability, validity, and factor structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, D W

    1996-02-01

    In this article I evaluated the psychometric properties of the UCLA Loneliness Scale (Version 3). Using data from prior studies of college students, nurses, teachers, and the elderly, analyses of the reliability, validity, and factor structure of this new version of the UCLA Loneliness Scale were conducted. Results indicated that the measure was highly reliable, both in terms of internal consistency (coefficient alpha ranging from .89 to .94) and test-retest reliability over a 1-year period (r = .73). Convergent validity for the scale was indicated by significant correlations with other measures of loneliness. Construct validity was supported by significant relations with measures of the adequacy of the individual's interpersonal relationships, and by correlations between loneliness and measures of health and well-being. Confirmatory factor analyses indicated that a model incorporating a global bipolar loneliness factor along with two method factor reflecting direction of item wording provided a very good fit to the data across samples. Implications of these results for future measurement research on loneliness are discussed.

  1. The scaling structure of the global road network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Emanuele; Giometto, Andrea; Shai, Saray; Bertuzzo, Enrico; Mucha, Peter J; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2017-10-01

    Because of increasing global urbanization and its immediate consequences, including changes in patterns of food demand, circulation and land use, the next century will witness a major increase in the extent of paved roads built worldwide. To model the effects of this increase, it is crucial to understand whether possible self-organized patterns are inherent in the global road network structure. Here, we use the largest updated database comprising all major roads on the Earth, together with global urban and cropland inventories, to suggest that road length distributions within croplands are indistinguishable from urban ones, once rescaled to account for the difference in mean road length. Such similarity extends to road length distributions within urban or agricultural domains of a given area. We find two distinct regimes for the scaling of the mean road length with the associated area, holding in general at small and at large values of the latter. In suitably large urban and cropland domains, we find that mean and total road lengths increase linearly with their domain area, differently from earlier suggestions. Scaling regimes suggest that simple and universal mechanisms regulate urban and cropland road expansion at the global scale. As such, our findings bear implications for global road infrastructure growth based on land-use change and for planning policies sustaining urban expansions.

  2. Transaction cost determinants of credit governance structures of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores transaction cost determinants of credit governance structures (CGS) of commercial banks in Tanzania. Descriptive statistics, linear regression model, binary and multinomial logistic regression models were employed for analysis. Findings revealed four modes of credit governance structures that are ...

  3. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electronic structures of rutile and anatase polymorph of TiO2 were determined by resonant inelastic X-ray scattering measurements and FEFF9.0 calculations. Difference between crystalline structures led to shifts in the rutile Ti -band to lower energy with respect to anatase, i.e., decrease in band gap. Anatase possesses ...

  4. Food web structure in three contrasting estuaries determined using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Food web structure in three contrasting estuaries determined using stable isotope (δ 13 C) analysis. ... African Journal of Aquatic Science ... Food web structure in three contrasting estuaries, the freshwater-deprived Kariega, the freshwater-dominated Great Fish River and the temporarily open/closed Kasouga estuary, along ...

  5. Mass Spectrometric Determination of Gas Phase Structures of Amino Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Rožman, Marko; Srzić, Dunja

    2005-01-01

    In the past two decades mass spectrometry became an important tool in the structural investigations of biomolecules (amino acids). Although, the primary focus of mass spectrometry is on compound identification and sequence information (primary structure), some mass spectrometry based methods as ion chromatography, hydrogen/deuterium exchange, and kinetic method are able to determine secondary gas phase structure of the amino acids. For example, it is possible to distinguish the zwitterionic a...

  6. Scour around Support Structures of Scaled Model Marine Hydrokinetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpe, M. A.; Beninati, M. L.; Krane, M.; Fontaine, A.

    2013-12-01

    Experiments are presented to explore scour due to flows around support structures of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices. Three related studies were performed to understand how submergence, scour condition, and the presence of an MHK device impact scour around the support structure (cylinder). The first study focuses on clear-water scour conditions for a cylinder of varying submergence: surface-piercing and fully submerged. The second study centers on three separate scour conditions (clear-water, transitional and live-bed) around the fully submerged cylinder. Lastly, the third study emphasizes the impact of an MHK turbine on scour around the support structure, in live-bed conditions. Small-scale laboratory testing of model devices can be used to help predict the behavior of MHK devices at full-scale. Extensive studies have been performed on single cylinders, modeling bridge piers, though few have focused on fully submerged structures. Many of the devices being used to harness marine hydrokinetic energy are fully submerged in the flow. Additionally, scour hole dimensions and scour rates have not been addressed. Thus, these three studies address the effect of structure blockage/drag, and the ambient scour conditions on scour around the support structure. The experiments were performed in the small-scale testing platform in the hydraulic flume facility (9.8 m long, 1.2 m wide and 0.4 m deep) at Bucknell University. The support structure diameter (D = 2.54 cm) was held constant for all tests. The submerged cylinder (l/D = 5) and sediment size (d50 = 790 microns) were held constant for all three studies. The MHK device (Dturbine = 10.2 cm) is a two-bladed horizontal axis turbine and the rotating shaft is friction-loaded using a metal brush motor. For each study, bed form topology was measured after a three-hour time interval using a traversing two-dimensional bed profiler. During the experiments, scour hole depth measurements at the front face of the support structure

  7. Morphological Characterization and Effective Thermal Conductivity of Dual-Scale Reticulated Porous Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Ackermann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Reticulated porous ceramic (RPC made of ceria are promising structures used in solar thermochemical redox cycles for splitting CO2 and H2O. They feature dual-scale porosity with mm-size pores for effective radiative heat transfer during reduction and µm-size pores within its struts for enhanced kinetics during oxidation. In this work, the detailed 3D digital representation of the complex dual-scale RPC is obtained using synchrotron submicrometer tomography and X-ray microtomography. Total and open porosity, pore size distribution, mean pore diameter, and specific surface area are extracted from the computer tomography (CT scans. The 3D digital geometry is then applied in direct pore level simulations (DPLS of Fourier’s law within the solid and the fluid phases for the accurate determination of the effective thermal conductivity at each porosity scale and combined, and for fluid-to-solid thermal conductivity from 10−5 to 1. Results are compared to predictions by analytical models for structures with a wide range of porosities 0.09–0.9 in both the strut’s µm-scale and bulk’s mm-scale. The morphological properties and effective thermal conductivity determined in this work serve as an input to volume-averaged models for the design and optimization of solar chemical reactors.

  8. Morphological Characterization and Effective Thermal Conductivity of Dual-Scale Reticulated Porous Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackermann, Simon; Scheffe, Jonathan R; Duss, Jonas; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-10-28

    Reticulated porous ceramic (RPC) made of ceria are promising structures used in solar thermochemical redox cycles for splitting CO₂ and H₂O. They feature dual-scale porosity with mm-size pores for effective radiative heat transfer during reduction and µm-size pores within its struts for enhanced kinetics during oxidation. In this work, the detailed 3D digital representation of the complex dual-scale RPC is obtained using synchrotron submicrometer tomography and X-ray microtomography. Total and open porosity, pore size distribution, mean pore diameter, and specific surface area are extracted from the computer tomography (CT) scans. The 3D digital geometry is then applied in direct pore level simulations (DPLS) of Fourier's law within the solid and the fluid phases for the accurate determination of the effective thermal conductivity at each porosity scale and combined, and for fluid-to-solid thermal conductivity from 10-5 to 1. Results are compared to predictions by analytical models for structures with a wide range of porosities 0.09-0.9 in both the strut's µm-scale and bulk's mm-scale. The morphological properties and effective thermal conductivity determined in this work serve as an input to volume-averaged models for the design and optimization of solar chemical reactors.

  9. Detecting small scale CO2 emission structures using OCO-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, Florian M.; Eldering, Annmarie; Verhulst, Kristal R.; Miller, Charles E.; Nguyen, Hai M.; Oda, Tomohiro; O'Dell, Christopher; Rao, Preeti; Kahn, Brian; Crisp, David; Gunson, Michael R.; Sanchez, Robert M.; Ashok, Manasa; Pieri, David; Linick, Justin P.; Yuen, Karen

    2016-04-01

    Localized carbon dioxide (CO2) emission structures cover spatial domains of less than 50 km diameter and include cities and transportation networks, as well as fossil fuel production, upgrading and distribution infra-structure. Anthropogenic sources increasingly upset the natural balance between natural carbon sources and sinks. Mitigation of resulting climate change impacts requires management of emissions, and emissions management requires monitoring, reporting and verification. Space-borne measurements provide a unique opportunity to detect, quantify, and analyze small scale and point source emissions on a global scale. NASA's first satellite dedicated to atmospheric CO2 observation, the July 2014 launched Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2), now leads the afternoon constellation of satellites (A-Train). Its continuous swath of 2 to 10 km in width and eight footprints across can slice through coincident emission plumes and may provide momentary cross sections. First OCO-2 results demonstrate that we can detect localized source signals in the form of urban total column averaged CO2 enhancements of ~2 ppm against suburban and rural backgrounds. OCO-2's multi-sounding swath observing geometry reveals intra-urban spatial structures reflected in XCO2 data, previously unobserved from space. The transition from single-shot GOSAT soundings detecting urban/rural differences (Kort et al., 2012) to hundreds of soundings per OCO-2 swath opens up the path to future capabilities enabling urban tomography of greenhouse gases. For singular point sources like coal fired power plants, we have developed proxy detections of plumes using bands of imaging spectrometers with sensitivity to SO2 in the thermal infrared (ASTER). This approach provides a means to automate plume detection with subsequent matching and mining of OCO-2 data for enhanced detection efficiency and validation. © California Institute of Technology

  10. Denotational, Causal, and Operational Determinism in Event Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend; Kirchner, H.

    1996-01-01

    Determinism of labelled transition systems and trees is a concept of theoretical and practical importance. We study its generalisation to event structures. It turns out that the result depends on what characterising property of tree determinism one sets out to generalise. We present three distinct

  11. Denotational, Causal, and Operational Determinism in Event Structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rensink, Arend

    Determinism is a theoretically and practically important concept in labelled transition systems and trees. We study its generalisation to event structures. It turns out that the result depends on what characterising property of tree determinism one sets out to generalise. We present three distinct

  12. Improving the Factor Structure of Psychological Scales: The Expanded Format as an Alternative to the Likert Scale Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xijuan; Savalei, Victoria

    2016-01-01

    Many psychological scales written in the Likert format include reverse worded (RW) items in order to control acquiescence bias. However, studies have shown that RW items often contaminate the factor structure of the scale by creating one or more method factors. The present study examines an alternative scale format, called the Expanded format,…

  13. Some Methods to Determine Scaled Mode Shapes in Natural Input Modal Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aenlle, Manuel López; Brincker, Rune; Canteli, Alfonso Fernández

    2005-01-01

    When the modal model is going to be used for structural modification or for structural response simulation, the scaled mode shapes must be known. If natural input modal analysis is performed, only un-scaled mode shapes can be obtained and an extra method is necessary to obtain the scaling factor....... In this paper, two new methods based on mass change are proposed. The first method involves small mass changes in two repeated tests allowing to achieve good accuracy. The second method involves only one mass change and enables the scaling factors of both the modified and unmodified mode shapes to be obtained...

  14. Multi-scale structural analysis of gas diffusion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göbel, Martin; Godehardt, Michael; Schladitz, Katja

    2017-07-01

    The macroscopic properties of materials are strongly determined by their micro structure. Here, transport properties of gas diffusion layers (GDL) for fuel cells are considered. In order to simulate flow and thermal properties, detailed micro structural information is essential. 3D images obtained by high-resolution computed tomography using synchrotron radiation and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) combined with focused ion beam (FIB) serial slicing were used. A recent method for reconstruction of porous structures from FIB-SEM images and sophisticated morphological image transformations were applied to segment the solid structural components. The essential algorithmic steps for segmenting the different components in the tomographic data-sets are described and discussed. In this paper, two types of GDL, based on a non-woven substrate layer and a paper substrate layer were considered, respectively. More than three components are separated within the synchrotron radiation computed tomography data. That is, fiber system, polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder/impregnation, micro porous layer (MPL), inclusions within the latter, and pore space are segmented. The usage of the thus derived 3D structure data in different simulation applications can be demonstrated. Simulations of macroscopic properties such as thermal conductivity, depending on the flooding state of the GDL are possible.

  15. Integral membrane protein structure determination using pseudocontact shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Duncan J; Wang, Jue X; Graham, Bim; Swarbrick, James D; Mott, Helen R; Nietlispach, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Obtaining enough experimental restraints can be a limiting factor in the NMR structure determination of larger proteins. This is particularly the case for large assemblies such as membrane proteins that have been solubilized in a membrane-mimicking environment. Whilst in such cases extensive deuteration strategies are regularly utilised with the aim to improve the spectral quality, these schemes often limit the number of NOEs obtainable, making complementary strategies highly beneficial for successful structure elucidation. Recently, lanthanide-induced pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) have been established as a structural tool for globular proteins. Here, we demonstrate that a PCS-based approach can be successfully applied for the structure determination of integral membrane proteins. Using the 7TM α-helical microbial receptor pSRII, we show that PCS-derived restraints from lanthanide binding tags attached to four different positions of the protein facilitate the backbone structure determination when combined with a limited set of NOEs. In contrast, the same set of NOEs fails to determine the correct 3D fold. The latter situation is frequently encountered in polytopical α-helical membrane proteins and a PCS approach is thus suitable even for this particularly challenging class of membrane proteins. The ease of measuring PCSs makes this an attractive route for structure determination of large membrane proteins in general.

  16. Integral membrane protein structure determination using pseudocontact shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crick, Duncan J.; Wang, Jue X. [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom); Graham, Bim; Swarbrick, James D. [Monash University, Monash Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences (Australia); Mott, Helen R.; Nietlispach, Daniel, E-mail: dn206@cam.ac.uk [University of Cambridge, Department of Biochemistry (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-15

    Obtaining enough experimental restraints can be a limiting factor in the NMR structure determination of larger proteins. This is particularly the case for large assemblies such as membrane proteins that have been solubilized in a membrane-mimicking environment. Whilst in such cases extensive deuteration strategies are regularly utilised with the aim to improve the spectral quality, these schemes often limit the number of NOEs obtainable, making complementary strategies highly beneficial for successful structure elucidation. Recently, lanthanide-induced pseudocontact shifts (PCSs) have been established as a structural tool for globular proteins. Here, we demonstrate that a PCS-based approach can be successfully applied for the structure determination of integral membrane proteins. Using the 7TM α-helical microbial receptor pSRII, we show that PCS-derived restraints from lanthanide binding tags attached to four different positions of the protein facilitate the backbone structure determination when combined with a limited set of NOEs. In contrast, the same set of NOEs fails to determine the correct 3D fold. The latter situation is frequently encountered in polytopical α-helical membrane proteins and a PCS approach is thus suitable even for this particularly challenging class of membrane proteins. The ease of measuring PCSs makes this an attractive route for structure determination of large membrane proteins in general.

  17. Patch-Scale Effects of Equine Disturbance on Arthropod Assemblages and Vegetation Structure in Subalpine Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G.; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Ballenger, Elizabeth A.

    2014-06-01

    Assessments of vertebrate disturbance to plant and animal assemblages often contrast grazed versus ungrazed meadows or other larger areas of usage, and this approach can be powerful. Random sampling of such habitats carries the potential, however, for smaller, more intensely affected patches to be missed and for other responses that are only revealed at smaller scales to also escape detection. We instead sampled arthropod assemblages and vegetation structure at the patch scale (400-900 m2 patches) within subalpine wet meadows of Yosemite National Park (USA), with the goal of determining if there were fine-scale differences in magnitude and directionality of response at three levels of grazing intensity. Effects were both stronger and more nuanced than effects evidenced by previous random sampling of paired grazed and ungrazed meadows: (a) greater negative effects on vegetation structure and fauna in heavily used patches, but (b) some positive effects on fauna in lightly grazed patches, suggested by trends for mean richness and total and population abundances. Although assessment of disturbance at either patch or landscape scales should be appropriate, depending on the management question at hand, our patch-scale work demonstrated that there can be strong local effects on the ecology of these wetlands that may not be detected by comparing larger scale habitats.

  18. Structure Determination of Natural Products by Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biemann, Klaus

    2015-07-01

    I review laboratory research on the development of mass spectrometric methodology for the determination of the structure of natural products of biological and medical interest, which I conducted from 1958 to the end of the twentieth century. The methodology was developed by converting small peptides to their corresponding polyamino alcohols to make them amenable to mass spectrometry, thereby making it applicable to whole proteins. The structures of alkaloids were determined by analyzing the fragmentation of a known alkaloid and then using the results to deduce the structures of related compounds. Heparin-like structures were investigated by determining their molecular weights from the mass of protonated molecular ions of complexes with highly basic, synthetic peptides. Mass spectrometry was also employed in the analysis of lunar material returned by the Apollo missions. A miniaturized gas chromatograph mass spectrometer was sent to Mars on board of the two Viking 1976 spacecrafts.

  19. Structural determination of intact proteins using mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruppa, Gary [San Francisco, CA; Schoeniger, Joseph S [Oakland, CA; Young, Malin M [Livermore, CA

    2008-05-06

    The present invention relates to novel methods of determining the sequence and structure of proteins. Specifically, the present invention allows for the analysis of intact proteins within a mass spectrometer. Therefore, preparatory separations need not be performed prior to introducing a protein sample into the mass spectrometer. Also disclosed herein are new instrumental developments for enhancing the signal from the desired modified proteins, methods for producing controlled protein fragments in the mass spectrometer, eliminating complex microseparations, and protein preparatory chemical steps necessary for cross-linking based protein structure determination.Additionally, the preferred method of the present invention involves the determination of protein structures utilizing a top-down analysis of protein structures to search for covalent modifications. In the preferred method, intact proteins are ionized and fragmented within the mass spectrometer.

  20. Indicators and Determinants of Small-Scale Bamboo Commercialization in Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Lindner

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bamboo is an abundant resource in Ethiopia and has a great potential for commercialization, which can drive rural development. In view of these realities, this study analyzed the state and determinants of small-scale bamboo commercialization in Ethiopia. Data were collected from three major bamboo-growing districts (Awi, Sidama, and Sheka and four urban centers (Masha, Hawassa, Bahir Dar, and Addis Ababa via semi-structured interviews, group discussions, and questionnaire surveys with key actors along the value chain. Results revealed distinctive differences in proportion of cash income, value chain structure, and management engagement among the districts. Percentages of cash income were 60.15, 42.60, and 9.48 at Awi, Sidam, and Sheka, respectively. Differences were statistically significant between Sheka and both other districts (p = 0.05, but not between Awi and Sidama. The value chain structure showed that compared with Sheka, Awi and Sidama have a relatively large number of actors involved. The major factors explaining commercialization differences among regions were distance to market and presence of alternative forest products. Within Sheka, households with larger family size, higher education attainment, and access to training reportedly engaged more in commercial extraction. Therefore, we conclude that development of infrastructure for linking resource and consumer centers and expansion of extension education among producers may enhance the commercial engagement of producers and improve the accessibility of bamboo resources for commercial production.

  1. Statistics of Caustics in Large-Scale Structure Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldbrugge, Job L.; Hidding, Johan; van de Weygaert, Rien

    2016-10-01

    The cosmic web is a complex spatial pattern of walls, filaments, cluster nodes and underdense void regions. It emerged through gravitational amplification from the Gaussian primordial density field. Here we infer analytical expressions for the spatial statistics of caustics in the evolving large-scale mass distribution. In our analysis, following the quasi-linear Zel'dovich formalism and confined to the 1D and 2D situation, we compute number density and correlation properties of caustics in cosmic density fields that evolve from Gaussian primordial conditions. The analysis can be straightforwardly extended to the 3D situation. We moreover, are currently extending the approach to the non-linear regime of structure formation by including higher order Lagrangian approximations and Lagrangian effective field theory.

  2. Testing Inflation with Large Scale Structure: Connecting Hopes with Reality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Marcello [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Baldauf, T. [Inst. of Advanced Studies, Princeton, NJ (United States); Bond, J. Richard [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Dalal, N. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States); Putter, R. D. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Dore, O. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Green, Daniel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Canadian Inst. for Advanced Research, Toronto, ON (Canada); Hirata, Chris [The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Huang, Zhiqi [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Huterer, Dragan [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Jeong, Donghui [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew C. [York Univ., Toronto, ON (Canada); Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, ON (Canada); Krause, Elisabeth [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Loverde, Marilena [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Meyers, Joel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Meeburg, Daniel [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Senatore, Leonardo [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Shandera, Sarah [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Silverstein, Eva [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Slosar, Anze [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Smith, Kendrick [Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, Toronto, ON (Canada); Zaldarriaga, Matias [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Assassi, Valentin [Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom); Braden, Jonathan [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Hajian, Amir [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Kobayashi, Takeshi [Perimeter Inst., Waterloo, Toronto, ON (Canada); Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Stein, George [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada); Engelen, Alexander van [Univ. of Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    The statistics of primordial curvature fluctuations are our window into the period of inflation, where these fluctuations were generated. To date, the cosmic microwave background has been the dominant source of information about these perturbations. Large-scale structure is, however, from where drastic improvements should originate. In this paper, we explain the theoretical motivations for pursuing such measurements and the challenges that lie ahead. In particular, we discuss and identify theoretical targets regarding the measurement of primordial non-Gaussianity. We argue that when quantified in terms of the local (equilateral) template amplitude f$loc\\atop{NL}$ (f$eq\\atop{NL}$), natural target levels of sensitivity are Δf$loc, eq\\atop{NL}$ ≃ 1. We highlight that such levels are within reach of future surveys by measuring 2-, 3- and 4-point statistics of the galaxy spatial distribution. This paper summarizes a workshop held at CITA (University of Toronto) on October 23-24, 2014.

  3. Breed locally, disperse globally: fine-scale genetic structure despite landscape-scale panmixia in a fire-specialist.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer C Pierson

    Full Text Available An exciting advance in the understanding of metapopulation dynamics has been the investigation of how populations respond to ephemeral patches that go 'extinct' during the lifetime of an individual. Previous research has shown that this scenario leads to genetic homogenization across large spatial scales. However, little is known about fine-scale genetic structuring or how this changes over time in ephemeral patches. We predicted that species that specialize on ephemeral habitats will delay dispersal to exploit natal habitat patches while resources are plentiful and thus display fine-scale structure. To investigate this idea, we evaluated the effect of frequent colonization of ephemeral habitats on the fine-scale genetic structure of a fire specialist, the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus and found a pattern of fine-scale genetic structure. We then tested for differences in spatial structure between sexes and detected a pattern consistent with male-biased dispersal. We also detected a temporal increase in relatedness among individuals within newly burned forest patches. Our results indicate that specialist species that outlive their ephemeral patches can accrue significant fine-scale spatial structure that does not necessarily affect spatial structure at larger scales. This highlights the importance of both spatial and temporal scale considerations in both sampling and data interpretation of molecular genetic results.

  4. Detection of Coherent Structures in Extreme-Scale Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, C; Iverson, J; Kirk, R; Karypis, G

    2012-03-24

    The analysis of coherent structures is a common problem in many scientific domains ranging from astrophysics to combustion, fusion, and materials science. The data from three-dimensional simulations are analyzed to detect the structures, extract statistics on them, and track them over time to gain insights into the phenomenon being modeled. This analysis is typically done off-line, using data that have been written out by the simulations. However, the move towards extreme scale architectures, with multi-core processors and graphical processing units, will affect how such analysis is done as it is unlikely that the systems will support the I/O bandwidth required for off-line analysis. Moving the analysis in-situ is a solution only if we know a priori what analysis will be done, as well as the algorithms used and their parameter settings. Even then, we need to ensure that this will not substantially increase the memory requirements or the data movement as the former will be limited and the latter will be expensive. In the Exa-DM project, a collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and University of Minnesota, we are exploring ways in which we can address the conflicting demands of coherent structure analysis of simulation data and the architecture of modern parallel systems, while enabling scientific discovery at the exascale. In this paper, we describe our work in two areas: the in situ implementation of an existing algorithm for coherent structure analysis and the use of graph-based techniques to efficiently compress the data.

  5. Iron phosphate glasses: Bulk properties and atomic scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph, Kitheri; Stennett, Martin C.; Hyatt, Neil C.; Asuvathraman, R.; Dube, Charu L.; Gandy, Amy S.; Govindan Kutty, K. V.; Jolley, Kenny; Vasudeva Rao, P. R.; Smith, Roger

    2017-10-01

    Bulk properties such as glass transition temperature, density and thermal expansion of iron phosphate glass compositions, with replacement of Cs by Ba, are investigated as a surrogate for the transmutation of 137Cs to 137Ba, relevant to the immobilisation of Cs in glass. These studies are required to establish the appropriate incorporation rate of 137Cs in iron phosphate glass. Density and glass transition temperature increases with the addition of BaO indicating the shrinkage and reticulation of the iron phosphate glass network. The average thermal expansion coefficient reduces from 19.8 × 10-6 K-1 to 13.4 × 10-6 K-1, when 25 wt. % of Cs2O was replaced by 25 wt. % of BaO in caesium loaded iron phosphate glass. In addition to the above bulk properties, the role of Ba as a network modifier in the structure of iron phosphate glass is examined using various spectroscopic techniques. The FeII content and average coordination number of iron in the glass network was estimated using Mössbauer spectroscopy. The FeII content in the un-doped iron phosphate glass and barium doped iron phosphate glasses was 20, 21 and 22 ± 1% respectively and the average Fe coordination varied from 5.3 ± 0.2 to 5.7 ± 0.2 with increasing Ba content. The atomic scale structure was further probed by Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The average coordination number provided by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure was in good agreement with that given by the Mössbauer data.

  6. Inflationary tensor fossils in large-scale structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Fasiello, Matteo [Department of Physics, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Jeong, Donghui [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kamionkowski, Marc, E-mail: ema@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: mrf65@case.edu, E-mail: duj13@psu.edu, E-mail: kamion@jhu.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 3400 N. Charles St., Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Inflation models make specific predictions for a tensor-scalar-scalar three-point correlation, or bispectrum, between one gravitational-wave (tensor) mode and two density-perturbation (scalar) modes. This tensor-scalar-scalar correlation leads to a local power quadrupole, an apparent departure from statistical isotropy in our Universe, as well as characteristic four-point correlations in the current mass distribution in the Universe. So far, the predictions for these observables have been worked out only for single-clock models in which certain consistency conditions between the tensor-scalar-scalar correlation and tensor and scalar power spectra are satisfied. Here we review the requirements on inflation models for these consistency conditions to be satisfied. We then consider several examples of inflation models, such as non-attractor and solid-inflation models, in which these conditions are put to the test. In solid inflation the simplest consistency conditions are already violated whilst in the non-attractor model we find that, contrary to the standard scenario, the tensor-scalar-scalar correlator probes directly relevant model-dependent information. We work out the predictions for observables in these models. For non-attractor inflation we find an apparent local quadrupolar departure from statistical isotropy in large-scale structure but that this power quadrupole decreases very rapidly at smaller scales. The consistency of the CMB quadrupole with statistical isotropy then constrains the distance scale that corresponds to the transition from the non-attractor to attractor phase of inflation to be larger than the currently observable horizon. Solid inflation predicts clustering fossils signatures in the current galaxy distribution that may be large enough to be detectable with forthcoming, and possibly even current, galaxy surveys.

  7. Deep structure beneath Lake Ontario: Crustal-scale Grenville subdivisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D. A.; Milkereit, B.; Zelt, Colin A.; White, D. J.; Easton, R. M.; Hutchinson, Deborah R.

    1994-01-01

    Lake Ontario marine seismic data reveal major Grenville crustal subdivisions beneath central and southern Lake Ontario separated by interpreted shear zones that extend to the lower crust. A shear zone bounded transition between the Elzevir and Frontenac terranes exposed north of Lake Ontario is linked to a seismically defined shear zone beneath central Lake Ontario by prominent aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies, easterly dipping wide-angle reflections, and fractures in Paleozoic strata. We suggest the central Lake Ontario zone represents crustal-scale deformation along an Elzevir–Frontenac boundary zone that extends from outcrop to the south shore of Lake Ontario.Seismic images from Lake Ontario and the exposed western Central Metasedimentary Belt are dominated by crustal-scale shear zones and reflection geometries featuring arcuate reflections truncated at their bases by apparent east-dipping linear reflections. The images show that zones analogous to the interpreted Grenville Front Tectonic Zone are also present within the Central Metasedimentary Belt and support models of northwest-directed crustal shortening for Grenvillian deep crustal deformation beneath most of southeastern Ontario.A Precambrian basement high, the Iroquoian high, is defined by a thinning of generally horizontal Paleozoic strata over a crestal area above the basement shear zone beneath central Lake Ontario. The Iroquoian high helps explain the peninsular extension into Lake Ontario forming Prince Edward County, the occurrence of Precambrian inlier outcrops in Prince Edward County, and Paleozoic fractures forming the Clarendon–Linden structure in New York.

  8. Validity and factor structure of the bodybuilding dependence scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D; Hale, B

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the bodybuilding dependence scale and to investigate differences in bodybuilding dependence between men and women and competitive and non-competitive bodybuilders. Methods: Seventy two male competitive bodybuilders, 63 female competitive bodybuilders, 87 male non-competitive bodybuilders, and 63 non-competitive female bodybuilders completed the bodybuilding dependence scale (BDS), the exercise dependence questionnaire (EDQ), and the muscle dysmorphia inventory (MDI). Results: Confirmatory factor analysis of the BDS supported a three factor model of bodybuilding dependence, consisting of social dependence, training dependence, and mastery dependence (Q = 3.16, CFI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.04). Internal reliability of all three subscales was high (Cronbach's α = 0.92, 0.92, and 0.93 respectively). Significant (p0.05). Conclusion: The three factor BDS appears to be a reliable and valid measure of bodybuilding dependence. Symptoms of bodybuilding dependence are more prevalent in competitive bodybuilders than non-competitive ones, but there are no significant sex differences in bodybuilding dependence. PMID:15039255

  9. Validity and factor structure of the bodybuilding dependence scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D; Hale, B

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the factor structure, validity, and reliability of the bodybuilding dependence scale and to investigate differences in bodybuilding dependence between men and women and competitive and non-competitive bodybuilders. Seventy two male competitive bodybuilders, 63 female competitive bodybuilders, 87 male non-competitive bodybuilders, and 63 non-competitive female bodybuilders completed the bodybuilding dependence scale (BDS), the exercise dependence questionnaire (EDQ), and the muscle dysmorphia inventory (MDI). Confirmatory factor analysis of the BDS supported a three factor model of bodybuilding dependence, consisting of social dependence, training dependence, and mastery dependence (Q = 3.16, CFI = 0.98, SRMR = 0.04). Internal reliability of all three subscales was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92, 0.92, and 0.93 respectively). Significant (pbodybuilders scored significantly (pbodybuilders. However, there were no significant sex differences on any of the BDS subscales (p>0.05). The three factor BDS appears to be a reliable and valid measure of bodybuilding dependence. Symptoms of bodybuilding dependence are more prevalent in competitive bodybuilders than non-competitive ones, but there are no significant sex differences in bodybuilding dependence.

  10. Towards a true vario-scale structure supporting smooth-zoom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Oosterom, P.J.M.; Meijers, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the first true vario-scale structure for geographic information: a delta in scale leads to a delta in the map (and smaller scale deltas lead to smaller map deltas until and including the infinitesimal small delta) for all scales. The structure is called smooth tGAP and its

  11. Compound semiconductor alloys: From atomic-scale structure to bandgap bowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnohr, C. S.

    2015-09-01

    Compound semiconductor alloys such as InxGa1-xAs, GaAsxP1-x, or CuInxGa1-xSe2 are increasingly employed in numerous electronic, optoelectronic, and photonic devices due to the possibility of tuning their properties over a wide parameter range simply by adjusting the alloy composition. Interestingly, the material properties are also determined by the atomic-scale structure of the alloys on the subnanometer scale. These local atomic arrangements exhibit a striking deviation from the average crystallographic structure featuring different element-specific bond lengths, pronounced bond angle relaxation and severe atomic displacements. The latter, in particular, have a strong influence on the bandgap energy and give rise to a significant contribution to the experimentally observed bandgap bowing. This article therefore reviews experimental and theoretical studies of the atomic-scale structure of III-V and II-VI zincblende alloys and I-III-VI2 chalcopyrite alloys and explains the characteristic findings in terms of bond length and bond angle relaxation. Different approaches to describe and predict the bandgap bowing are presented and the correlation with local structural parameters is discussed in detail. The article further highlights both similarities and differences between the cubic zincblende alloys and the more complex chalcopyrite alloys and demonstrates that similar effects can also be expected for other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors of the adamantine structural family.

  12. Evaluating the Latent Structure of the MMPI-2 F(p) Scale in a Forensic Sample: A Taxometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, David R.; Glassmire, David M.; Frederick, Richard I.; Greene, Roger L.

    2006-01-01

    P. A. Arbisi and Y. S. Ben-Porath (1995) originally proposed that the Infrequency Psychopathology scale, F(p), be used as the final step in an algorithm to determine the validity of a Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) protocol. The current study used taxometric procedures to determine the latent structure of F(p) among…

  13. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David William Green

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a water-tight barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachement complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement.. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organising cell-cell connections, cell-matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis.

  14. Small-Scale Fabrication of Biomimetic Structures for Periodontal Regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W.; Lee, Jung-Seok; Jung, Han-Sung

    2016-01-01

    The periodontium is the supporting tissues for the tooth organ and is vulnerable to destruction, arising from overpopulating pathogenic bacteria and spirochaetes. The presence of microbes together with host responses can destroy large parts of the periodontium sometimes leading tooth loss. Permanent tissue replacements are made possible with tissue engineering techniques. However, existing periodontal biomaterials cannot promote proper tissue architectures, necessary tissue volumes within the periodontal pocket and a “water-tight” barrier, to become clinically acceptable. New kinds of small-scale engineered biomaterials, with increasing biological complexity are needed to guide proper biomimetic regeneration of periodontal tissues. So the ability to make compound structures with small modules, filled with tissue components, is a promising design strategy for simulating the anatomical complexity of the periodotium attachment complexes along the tooth root and the abutment with the tooth collar. Anatomical structures such as, intima, adventitia, and special compartments such as the epithelial cell rests of Malassez or a stellate reticulum niche need to be engineered from the start of regeneration to produce proper periodontium replacement. It is our contention that the positioning of tissue components at the origin is also necessary to promote self-organizing cell–cell connections, cell–matrix connections. This leads to accelerated, synchronized and well-formed tissue architectures and anatomies. This strategy is a highly effective preparation for tackling periodontitis, periodontium tissue resorption, and to ultimately prevent tooth loss. Furthermore, such biomimetic tissue replacements will tackle problems associated with dental implant support and perimimplantitis. PMID:26903872

  15. Large scale structures in liquid crystal/clay colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Duijneveldt, Jeroen S.; Klein, Susanne; Leach, Edward; Pizzey, Claire; Richardson, Robert M.

    2005-04-01

    Suspensions of three different clays in K15, a thermotropic liquid crystal, have been studied by optical microscopy and small angle x-ray scattering. The three clays were claytone AF, a surface treated natural montmorillonite, laponite RD, a synthetic hectorite, and mined sepiolite. The claytone and laponite were sterically stabilized whereas sepiolite formed a relatively stable suspension in K15 without any surface treatment. Micrographs of the different suspensions revealed that all three suspensions contained large scale structures. The nature of these aggregates was investigated using small angle x-ray scattering. For the clays with sheet-like particles, claytone and laponite, the flocs contain a mixture of stacked and single platelets. The basal spacing in the stacks was independent of particle concentration in the suspension and the phase of the solvent. The number of platelets in the stack and their percentage in the suspension varied with concentration and the aspect ratio of the platelets. The lath shaped sepiolite did not show any tendency to organize into ordered structures. Here the aggregates are networks of randomly oriented single rods.

  16. Scale-adaptive surface modeling of vascular structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Xin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effective geometric modeling of vascular structures is crucial for diagnosis, therapy planning and medical education. These applications require good balance with respect to surface smoothness, surface accuracy, triangle quality and surface size. Methods Our method first extracts the vascular boundary voxels from the segmentation result, and utilizes these voxels to build a three-dimensional (3D point cloud whose normal vectors are estimated via covariance analysis. Then a 3D implicit indicator function is computed from the oriented 3D point cloud by solving a Poisson equation. Finally the vessel surface is generated by a proposed adaptive polygonization algorithm for explicit 3D visualization. Results Experiments carried out on several typical vascular structures demonstrate that the presented method yields both a smooth morphologically correct and a topologically preserved two-manifold surface, which is scale-adaptive to the local curvature of the surface. Furthermore, the presented method produces fewer and better-shaped triangles with satisfactory surface quality and accuracy. Conclusions Compared to other state-of-the-art approaches, our method reaches good balance in terms of smoothness, accuracy, triangle quality and surface size. The vessel surfaces produced by our method are suitable for applications such as computational fluid dynamics simulations and real-time virtual interventional surgery.

  17. Decoupling structural and environmental determinants of sap velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caylor, K. K.; Dragoni, D.

    2007-12-01

    Characterization of transpiration based on the water use of individual tress has the advantage of preserving vital information on the plant-environment functional links and flux partitioning between species and landscape areas. Whole-tree transpiration has been estimated by means of sap velocity probes, which offer the dual advantages of practicality and repeatability. However, the assumptions underlying the technique require careful verification in order to determine total sap flow from point-based estimates of sap velocity. Our work presents a novel theoretical framework for the study of individual tree sap flow that incorporates both spatial and temporal variability in sap velocities. The instantaneous sap velocity at any point in the radial profile of xylem tissue is defined as the product of two components: (1) a time-invariant sap velocity distribution linked to the species- specific anatomical and structural properties of the conducting xylem, and (2) a time-varying term linked to the dynamics of the atmospheric water demand and available soil moisture. The separation of structural and temporal variation in sap velocity observations provides a direct mechanism for investigating how sap flow is governed by variation in environmental conditions as well as a means for comparing characteristic rates of plant water use among individuals of varying size. Most critically, this approach allows for a consistent and physically meaningful method for extrapolating point observations of sap velocity across the entire depth of conducting xylem. Experimental evidence supports our theoretical framework in the case of a population of sugar maples in a mixed deciduous forest, where observations were taken from a wide range of tree sizes, under varying soil water availability and atmospheric transpiration demand. We have also applied our approach to a small homogeneous sample of dwarf apple trees in a managed orchard, with favorable results. While these results require further

  18. A study on determinants of capital structure in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshu Handoo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper identifies the most important determinants of capital structure of 870 listed Indian firms comprising both private sector companies and government companies for the period 2001–2010. Ten independent variables and three dependent variables have been tested using regression analysis. It has been concluded that factors such as profitability, growth, asset tangibility, size, cost of debt, tax rate, and debt serving capacity have significant impact on the leverage structure chosen by firms in the Indian context.

  19. Optimizing an emperical scoring function for transmembrane protein structure determination.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Malin M.; Sale, Kenneth L.; Gray, Genetha Anne; Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2003-10-01

    We examine the problem of transmembrane protein structure determination. Like many other questions that arise in biological research, this problem cannot be addressed by traditional laboratory experimentation alone. An approach that integrates experiment and computation is required. We investigate a procedure which states the transmembrane protein structure determination problem as a bound constrained optimization problem using a special empirical scoring function, called Bundler, as the objective function. In this paper, we describe the optimization problem and some of its mathematical properties. We compare and contrast results obtained using two different derivative free optimization algorithms.

  20. Organizational Structure as a Determinant of Job Burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilal, Atif; Ahmed, Hafiz Mushtaq

    2017-03-01

    This exploratory study determined the impact of organizational structure, particularly participation in decision making, instrumental communication, formalization, integration, and promotional opportunity, on burnout among Pakistani pediatric nurses. Data were collected from pediatric nurses working for Punjab's largest state-run hospital. The findings revealed that participation in decision making, instrumental communication, and promotional opportunity prevented burnout. Formalization contributed to burnout but integration was not related to burnout. Quite interestingly, except for supervisory status, most control variables for this study were not significantly related to emotional burnout. Hence, the hypothesis that organizational structure is a determinant of job burnout was accepted.

  1. Pulsar Rotation Measures and the Large-Scale Structure of the Galactic Magnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J. L.; Manchester, R. N.; Lyne, A. G.; Qiao, G. J.; van Straten, W.

    2006-05-01

    The large-scale magnetic field of our Galaxy can be probed in three dimensions using Faraday rotation of pulsar signals. We report on the determination of 223 rotation measures from polarization observations of relatively distant southern pulsars made using the Parkes radio telescope. Combined with previously published observations, these data give clear evidence for large-scale counterclockwise fields (viewed from the north Galactic pole) in the spiral arms interior to the Sun and weaker evidence for a counterclockwise field in the Perseus arm. However, in interarm regions, including the solar neighborhood, we present evidence that suggests that large-scale fields are clockwise. We propose that the large-scale Galactic magnetic field has a bisymmetric structure with reversals on the boundaries of the spiral arms. Streaming motions associated with spiral density waves can directly generate such a structure from an initial, inwardly directed radial field. Large-scale fields increase toward the Galactic center, with a mean value of about 2 μG in the solar neighborhood and 4 μG at a galactocentric radius of 3 kpc.

  2. Full-Scale Structural and NDI Validation Tests of Bonded Composite Doublers for Commercial Aircraft Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roach, D.; Walkington, P.

    1999-02-01

    Composite doublers, or repair patches, provide an innovative repair technique which can enhance the way aircraft are maintained. Instead of riveting multiple steel or aluminum plates to facilitate an aircraft repair, it is possible to bond a single Boron-Epoxy composite doubler to the damaged structure. Most of the concerns surrounding composite doubler technology pertain to long-term survivability, especially in the presence of non-optimum installations, and the validation of appropriate inspection procedures. This report focuses on a series of full-scale structural and nondestructive inspection (NDI) tests that were conducted to investigate the performance of Boron-Epoxy composite doublers. Full-scale tests were conducted on fuselage panels cut from retired aircraft. These full-scale tests studied stress reductions, crack mitigation, and load transfer capabilities of composite doublers using simulated flight conditions of cabin pressure and axial stress. Also, structures which modeled key aspects of aircraft structure repairs were subjected to extreme tension, shear and bending loads to examine the composite laminate's resistance to disbond and delamination flaws. Several of the structures were loaded to failure in order to determine doubler design margins. Nondestructive inspections were conducted throughout the test series in order to validate appropriate techniques on actual aircraft structure. The test results showed that a properly designed and installed composite doubler is able to enhance fatigue life, transfer load away from damaged structure, and avoid the introduction of new stress risers (i.e. eliminate global reduction in the fatigue life of the structure). Comparisons with test data obtained prior to the doubler installation revealed that stresses in the parent material can be reduced 30%--60% through the use of the composite doubler. Tests to failure demonstrated that the bondline is able to transfer plastic strains into the doubler and that

  3. A Modified Rule of Thumb for Evaluating Scale Reproducibilities Determined by Electronic Computers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Richard J.

    1978-01-01

    The Goodenough technique for determining scale error is compared to the Guttman technique and demonstrated to be more conservative than the Guttman technique. Implications with regard to Guttman's evaluative rule of thumb for evaluating a reproducibility are noted. (Author)

  4. Agri-Environmental Resource Management by Large-Scale Collective Action: Determining KEY Success Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large-scale collective action is necessary when managing agricultural natural resources such as biodiversity and water quality. This paper determines the key factors to the success of such action. Design/Methodology/Approach: This paper analyses four large-scale collective actions used to manage agri-environmental resources in Canada and…

  5. Determinants of savings among small-scale food crop farmers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study on the Determinants of savings among small scale farmers was conducted in Owerri West Local Government Area of Imo State. A multi-stage random sampling technique was used to select 110 small scale farmers. Data were analyzed with the use of descriptive statistics and the multiple linear regression analysis ...

  6. Cosmological parameters from large scale structure - geometric versus shape information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Århus C (Denmark); Lesgourgues, Julien [CERN, Theory Division, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rampf, Cornelius; Wong, Yvonne Y.Y., E-mail: hamann@phys.au.dk, E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk, E-mail: julien.lesgourgues@cern.ch, E-mail: rampf@physik.rwth-aachen.de, E-mail: ywong@physik.rwth-aachen.de [Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik und Kosmologie, RWTH Aachen, D-52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The matter power spectrum as derived from large scale structure (LSS) surveys contains two important and distinct pieces of information: an overall smooth shape and the imprint of baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). We investigate the separate impact of these two types of information on cosmological parameter estimation for current data, and show that for the simplest cosmological models, the broad-band shape information currently contained in the SDSS DR7 halo power spectrum (HPS) is by far superseded by geometric information derived from the baryonic features. An immediate corollary is that contrary to popular beliefs, the upper limit on the neutrino mass m{sub ν} presently derived from LSS combined with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data does not in fact arise from the possible small-scale power suppression due to neutrino free-streaming, if we limit the model framework to minimal ΛCDM+m{sub ν}. However, in more complicated models, such as those extended with extra light degrees of freedom and a dark energy equation of state parameter w differing from -1, shape information becomes crucial for the resolution of parameter degeneracies. This conclusion will remain true even when data from the Planck spacecraft are combined with SDSS DR7 data. In the course of our analysis, we update both the BAO likelihood function by including an exact numerical calculation of the time of decoupling, as well as the HPS likelihood, by introducing a new dewiggling procedure that generalises the previous approach to models with an arbitrary sound horizon at decoupling. These changes allow a consistent application of the BAO and HPS data sets to a much wider class of models, including the ones considered in this work. All the cases considered here are compatible with the conservative 95%-bounds Σm{sub ν} < 1.16eV, N{sub eff} = 4.8±2.0.

  7. Structural characterization of genomes by large scale sequence-structure threading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherkasov Artem

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using sequence-structure threading we have conducted structural characterization of complete proteomes of 37 archaeal, bacterial and eukaryotic organisms (including worm, fly, mouse and human totaling 167,888 genes. Results The reported data represent first rather general evaluation of performance of full sequence-structure threading on multiple genomes providing opportunity to evaluate its general applicability for large scale studies. According to the estimated results the sequence-structure threading has assigned protein folds to more then 60% of eukaryotic, 68% of archaeal and 70% of bacterial proteomes. The repertoires of protein classes, architectures, topologies and homologous superfamilies (according to the CATH 2.4 classification have been established for distant organisms and superkingdoms. It has been found that the average abundance of CATH classes decreases from "alpha and beta" to "mainly beta", followed by "mainly alpha" and "few secondary structures". 3-Layer (aba Sandwich has been characterized as the most abundant protein architecture and Rossman fold as the most common topology. Conclusion The analysis of genomic occurrences of CATH 2.4 protein homologous superfamilies and topologies has revealed the power-law character of their distributions. The corresponding double logarithmic "frequency – genomic occurrence" dependences characteristic of scale-free systems have been established for individual organisms and for three superkingdoms. Supplementary materials to this works are available at 1.

  8. Novel genetic algorithm search procedure for LEED surface structure determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, M L; dos Reis, D D; Soares, E A; Van Hove, M A; Moritz, W; de Carvalho, V E

    2014-06-04

    Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) is one of the most powerful experimental techniques for surface structure analysis but until now only a trial-and-error approach has been successful. So far, fitting procedures developed to optimize structural and nonstructural parameters-by minimization of the R-factor-have had a fairly small convergence radius, suitable only for local optimization. However, the identification of the global minimum among the several local minima is essential for complex surface structures. Global optimization methods have been applied to LEED structure determination, but they still require starting from structures that are relatively close to the correct one, in order to find the final structure. For complex systems, the number of trial structures and the resulting computation time increase so rapidly that the task of finding the correct model becomes impractical using the present methodologies. In this work we propose a new search method, based on Genetic Algorithms, which is able to determine the correct structural model starting from completely random structures. This method-called here NGA-LEED for Novel Genetic Algorithm for LEED-utilizes bond lengths and symmetry criteria to select reasonable trial structures before performing LEED calculations. This allows a reduction of the parameter space and, consequently of the calculation time, by several orders of magnitude. A refinement of the parameters by least squares fit of simulated annealing is performed only at some intermediate stages and in the final step. The method was successfully tested for two systems, Ag(1 1 1)(4 × 4)-O and Au(1 1 0)-(1 × 2), both in theory versus theory and in theory versus experiment comparisons. Details of the implementation as well as the results for these two systems are presented.

  9. A Laboratory Exercise in the Determination of Carbohydrate Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bernard J.; Robyt, John F.

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which students are given a naturally occurring oligosaccharide as an unknown and are asked to determine both its monosaccharide composition and its structure. Discusses methods and experimental techniques including thin layer chromatography and the use of enzymes. (CW)

  10. Birthday Cake Activity Structured Arrangement for Helping Children Determining Quantities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariana, Neni

    2010-01-01

    Few researches have been concerned about relation between children's spatial thinking and number sense. Narrowing for this small research, we focused on one component of spatial thinking, that is structuring objects, and one component of number senses, that is cardinality by determining quantities. This study focused on a design research that was…

  11. Determining the Cognitive Structures of Geography Teacher Candidates on "Earthquake"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Bastürk; Aladag, Caner

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the cognitive structures of the students of geography teaching department by identifying their conceptual frameworks about the concept of earthquake. A case study design from qualitative research approaches was used in this research. Sample group of the study constitutes 155 students from the Department…

  12. X-ray structure determination and analysis of hydrogen interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The crystal structure of 3,3′-dimethoxybiphenyl has been determined by X-ray diffraction methods with an aim of describing the hydrogen interaction in biphenyl derivatives. The title compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group 21/ with unit cell dimensions, = 7.706(1), = 11.745(2), = 12.721(2) Å, ...

  13. Determining modulus of elasticity of ancient structural timber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houjiang Zhang; Lei Zhu; Yanliang Sun; Xiping Wang; Haicheng Yan

    2011-01-01

    During maintenance of ancient timber architectures, it is important to determine mechanical properties of the wood component materials non-destructively and effectively, so that degraded members may be replaced or repaired to avoid structural failure. Experimental materials are four larch (Larix principis-rupprechtii Mayr.) components, which were taken down from the...

  14. Determining carrier mobility with a metal–insulator–semiconductor structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stallinga, P.; Benvenho, A.R.V.; Smits, E.C.P.; Mathijssen, S.G.J.; Colle, M.; Gomes, H.L.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2008-01-01

    The electron and hole mobility of nickel-bis(dithiolene) (NiDT) are determined in a metal– insulator–semiconductor (MIS) structure using admittance spectroscopy. The relaxation times found in the admittance spectra are attributed to the diffusion time of carriers to reach the insulator interface and

  15. The determinants of financial structure in the algerian enterprises: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this work is to identify the determinants of the financing structure of the Algerian companies, using the financial statements of 83 large companies and 165 SMEs over the period 2008-2010. This is done through a comparative study between SMEs and large companies in order to verify the existence of a size ...

  16. Determination of bone structural parameters from multiple projection DXA images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisz, Thomas S.; Beck, Thomas J.; Feldmesser, Howard S.; Chen, Michelle H.; Magee, Thomas C.; Bade, Paul R.; Charles, Harry K., Jr.

    2004-04-01

    To more precisely measure and monitor bone health, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab and School of Medicine have developed the Advanced Multiple Projection Dual-Energy X-Ray Absorptiometry (AMPDXA) scanner. This system provides improvements over conventional DXA scanners in image resolution and multiple projection capability. These improvements allow us to determine structural information about the bone in addition to the standard bone mineral density (BMD) measurements. Algorithms and software were developed to process data acquired from the AMPDXA scanner and to determine important structural parameters, such as the center of mass axis in three dimensions and cross-sectional moments of inertia. The analysis operates on three projections about 15 degrees apart, calculates BMD for each projection, and then combines the data into a three dimensional coordinate system. By knowing the patient position in three dimensions, bone structural parameters are calculated more precisely. Using repeated testing of cadaver bones, the precision of determining these structural parameters is approximately the detector pixel size of 0.127 mm. Data on artificial bone cylinders indicate accuracy of about 3%. Comparisons between bone structural parameters derived from AMPDXA and CT scans show very similar results.

  17. Perfluoroalkyl Acids Shift Microbial Community Structure Across Experimental Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, T. S.; Sharp, J.

    2016-12-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAAs) are contaminants of emerging concern that have increasingly been found in groundwater and drinking water systems. Previously, we demonstrated that PFAAs significantly alter the abundance of specific microbial clades in batch reductive dechlorinating systems, resulting in decreased chlorinated solvent attenuation capabilities. To further understand the impacts of PFAA exposure on subsurface microbial processes and PFAA transport, we investigated changes in microbial community structure as a function of PFAA presence in flow-through columns simulating aquifer transport. Phylogenetic analysis using high throughput, next generation sequencing performed after exposure to 250 pore volumes of source zone concentrations of PFAAs (10 mg/L each of 11 analytes including PFOS and PFOA) resulted in patterns that mirrored those observed in batch systems, demonstrating a conservation of community dynamics across experimental scales. Of the nine clades observed in both batch and flow-through systems, six were similarly impacted as a function of PFAA exposure, regardless of the experimental differences in transport and redox state. Specifically, the presence of PFAAs enhanced the relative abundance of Archaea, Bacteroidetes (phylum), and the family Veillonellaceae in both systems. Repressed clades include the genus Sedimentibacter, Ruminococcaceae (family), and the Anaerolineales, which contains Dehalococcoides, a genus known for its ability to fully dechlorinate TCE. As PFAAs are often co-located with TCE and BTEX, changes in microbial community structure can result in hindered bioremediation of these co-contaminants. Consideration of community shifts and corresponding changes in behavior, such as repressed reductive dechlorination or increased biofilm formation, will aid in the development of conceptual site models that account for co-contaminant bioremediation potential and PFAA transport.

  18. Factor Structure of the Conflict Tactics Scale 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Baba

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Conflict Tactics Scale 1 (CTS1 is a widely used self-report measure of abusive attitudes of parents towards children. The factor structure of the CTS1 still remains to be clarified. The aim of this study was to examine the factor structure of the Japanese version of the CTS1 for postpartum women in community settings. Method: The data in this study came from the Okayama and Kumamoto’s study. These were part of a larger survey using longitudinal questionnaire studies conducted in Japan from 2001 to 2002 and in 2011, respectively. In both study sites, the participant mothers were asked to fill in the CTS1 one month after delivery when they attended for check-up at the out-patient clinic. Results: A total of 1,150 questionnaires were collected, excluding the participants with missing values in the CTS1. Finally, 1,078 were included in the statistical analyses. Data of 1,078 women were divided into two parts. In the first halved sample (n=578, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted for the CTS1 items after exluding nine items with extremely low prevalence. It revealed 2-factor or 3-factor models. Then, we conducted a model comparison with the second halved sample (n=500, using confirmatory factor analysis. In terms of goodness-of-fit indeces, the 2-factor model was superior. Its subscales were Reasoning and Psycholosical Aggression. Conclusion: The 2-factor model of the CTS1 consisting of Reasoning and Psychological Aggression was superior to the 3-factor model. This is not inconsistent with the original authors’ theoretical model.

  19. Faster scaling of visual neurons in cortical areas relative to subcortical structures in non-human primate brains

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, C. E.; Leitch, D. B.; Wong, P.; Kaas, J. H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2012-01-01

    Cortical expansion, both in absolute terms and in relation to subcortical structures, is considered a major trend in mammalian brain evolution with important functional implications, given that cortical computations should add complexity and flexibility to information processing. Here, we investigate the numbers of neurons that compose 4 structures in the visual pathway across 11 non-human primate species to determine the scaling relationships that apply to these structures and among them. We...

  20. Scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities using functional diversity and community deconstruction approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pedro Giovâni da; Hernández, Malva Isabel Medina

    2015-01-01

    Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass) for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae) community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in the distribution

  1. Scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities using functional diversity and community deconstruction approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Giovâni da Silva

    Full Text Available Community structure is driven by mechanisms linked to environmental, spatial and temporal processes, which have been successfully addressed using metacommunity framework. The relative importance of processes shaping community structure can be identified using several different approaches. Two approaches that are increasingly being used are functional diversity and community deconstruction. Functional diversity is measured using various indices that incorporate distinct community attributes. Community deconstruction is a way to disentangle species responses to ecological processes by grouping species with similar traits. We used these two approaches to determine whether they are improvements over traditional measures (e.g., species composition, abundance, biomass for identification of the main processes driving dung beetle (Scarabaeinae community structure in a fragmented mainland-island landscape in southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest. We sampled five sites in each of four large forest areas, two on the mainland and two on the island. Sampling was performed in 2012 and 2013. We collected abundance and biomass data from 100 sampling points distributed over 20 sampling sites. We studied environmental, spatial and temporal effects on dung beetle community across three spatial scales, i.e., between sites, between areas and mainland-island. The γ-diversity based on species abundance was mainly attributed to β-diversity as a consequence of the increase in mean α- and β-diversity between areas. Variation partitioning on abundance, biomass and functional diversity showed scale-dependence of processes structuring dung beetle metacommunities. We identified two major groups of responses among 17 functional groups. In general, environmental filters were important at both local and regional scales. Spatial factors were important at the intermediate scale. Our study supports the notion of scale-dependence of environmental, spatial and temporal processes in

  2. Deciphering Adsorption Structure on Insulators at the Atomic Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurmer, Konrad [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Materials Physics; Feibelman, Peter J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States). Integrated Nanotechnologies

    2014-09-01

    We applied Scanning Probe Microscopy and Density Functional Theory (DFT) to discover the basics of how adsorbates wet insulating substrates, addressing a key question in geochemistry. To allow experiments on insulating samples we added Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) capability to our existing UHV Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM). This was accomplished by integrating and debugging a commercial qPlus AFM upgrade. Examining up-to-40-nm-thick water films grown in vacuum we found that the exact nature of the growth spirals forming around dislocations determines what structure of ice, cubic or hexagonal, is formed at low temperature. DFT revealed that wetting of mica is controlled by how exactly a water layer wraps around (hydrates) the K+ ions that protrude from the mica surface. DFT also sheds light on the experimentally observed extreme sensitivity of the mica surface to preparation conditions: K atoms can easily be rinsed off by water flowing past the mica surface.

  3. [Aging and spirituality: Factorial structure and reliability of 2 scales].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiana, Laura; Sancho, Patricia; Oliver, Amparo; Tomás, José Manuel; Calatayud, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    In the field of gerontology, the study of the improvement of health and quality of life, and «successfully aging», spirituality plays a key role and, is one of the current research approaches. However, its incorporation into scientific literature is arduous and slow, a fact that is in part due to the absence of developed and validated measurement tools, particularly, in the Spanish speaking area. This work aims to present evidence of the psychometric properties of two tools for the measurement of spirituality: the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy Spiritual Well-Being (FACIT-Sp) and the GES Questionnaire. A sample of 224 elderly persons from Valencia (Spain) was recruited, on which two confirmatory factor analyses were estimated, with the proposed a priori structures for each tool, together with several reliability coefficients. Both models presented an good fit to the data: χ(2)51=104.97 (P.05); CFI=.996; RMSEA=.050 for the GES Questionnaire. Reliability indices also supported the use of the scales in elderly population, with alphas of .85 and .86, respectively. These results may be useful as a starting point to include spirituality in works that aim to discover the mechanisms involved in successful aging. Copyright © 2016 SEGG. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Large-Scale Structure of the Carina Nebula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith; Egan; Carey; Price; Morse; Price

    2000-04-01

    Observations obtained with the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) satellite reveal for the first time the complex mid-infrared morphology of the entire Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). On the largest size scale of approximately 100 pc, the thermal infrared emission from the giant H ii region delineates one coherent structure: a (somewhat distorted) bipolar nebula with the major axis perpendicular to the Galactic plane. The Carina Nebula is usually described as an evolved H ii region that is no longer actively forming stars, clearing away the last vestiges of its natal molecular cloud. However, the MSX observations presented here reveal numerous embedded infrared sources that are good candidates for sites of current star formation. Several compact infrared sources are located at the heads of dust pillars or in dark globules behind ionization fronts. Because their morphology suggests a strong interaction with the peculiar collection of massive stars in the nebula, we speculate that these new infrared sources may be sites of triggered star formation in NGC 3372.

  5. Far field scattering pattern of differently structured butterfly scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giraldo, M. A.; Yoshioka, S.; Stavenga, D. G.

    The angular and spectral reflectance of single scales of five different butterfly species was measured and related to the scale anatomy. The scales of the pierids Pieris rapae and Delias nigrina scatter white light randomly, in close agreement with Lambert's cosine law, which can be well understood

  6. Automated High Throughput Protein Crystallization Screening at Nanoliter Scale and Protein Structural Study on Lactate Dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fenglei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To develop an economical, easy to use, automated, high throughput system for large scale protein crystallization screening. (2) To develop a new protein crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and complete compatibility with high throughput screening system. (3) To determine the structure of lactate dehydrogenase complexed with NADH by x-ray protein crystallography to study its inherent structural properties. Firstly, we demonstrated large scale protein crystallization screening can be performed in a high throughput manner with low cost, easy operation. The overall system integrates liquid dispensing, crystallization and detection and serves as a whole solution to protein crystallization screening. The system can dispense protein and multiple different precipitants in nanoliter scale and in parallel. A new detection scheme, native fluorescence, has been developed in this system to form a two-detector system with a visible light detector for detecting protein crystallization screening results. This detection scheme has capability of eliminating common false positives by distinguishing protein crystals from inorganic crystals in a high throughput and non-destructive manner. The entire system from liquid dispensing, crystallization to crystal detection is essentially parallel, high throughput and compatible with automation. The system was successfully demonstrated by lysozyme crystallization screening. Secondly, we developed a new crystallization method with high screening efficiency, low protein consumption and compatibility with automation and high throughput. In this crystallization method, a gas permeable membrane is employed to achieve the gentle evaporation required by protein crystallization. Protein consumption is significantly reduced to nanoliter scale for each condition and thus permits exploring more conditions in a phase diagram for given amount of protein. In addition

  7. Inverse Force Determination on a Small Scale Launch Vehicle Model Using a Dynamic Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Christina L.; Powell, Jessica M.; Ross, James C.

    2017-01-01

    A launch vehicle can experience large unsteady aerodynamic forces in the transonic regime that, while usually only lasting for tens of seconds during launch, could be devastating if structural components and electronic hardware are not designed to account for them. These aerodynamic loads are difficult to experimentally measure and even harder to computationally estimate. The current method for estimating buffet loads is through the use of a few hundred unsteady pressure transducers and wind tunnel test. Even with a large number of point measurements, the computed integrated load is not an accurate enough representation of the total load caused by buffeting. This paper discusses an attempt at using a dynamic balance to experimentally determine buffet loads on a generic scale hammer head launch vehicle model tested at NASA Ames Research Center's 11' x 11' transonic wind tunnel. To use a dynamic balance, the structural characteristics of the model needed to be identified so that the natural modal response could be and removed from the aerodynamic forces. A finite element model was created on a simplified version of the model to evaluate the natural modes of the balance flexures, assist in model design, and to compare to experimental data. Several modal tests were conducted on the model in two different configurations to check for non-linearity, and to estimate the dynamic characteristics of the model. The experimental results were used in an inverse force determination technique with a psuedo inverse frequency response function. Due to the non linearity, the model not being axisymmetric, and inconsistent data between the two shake tests from different mounting configuration, it was difficult to create a frequency response matrix that satisfied all input and output conditions for wind tunnel configuration to accurately predict unsteady aerodynamic loads.

  8. The determinants of capital structure of microfinance institutions in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Kyereboah-Coleman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Using a panel data methodology, this study examines the determinants of capital structure of 52 microfinance institutions (MFIs in Ghana. The empirical results show that the MFIs are highly leveraged and that their capital structure is explained partly by standard finance theory and by other unconventional variables. Specifically, the study confirms that leverage is positively related to asset tangibility, with small MFIs using short-term and large MFIs using long-term debt. Though, the findings confirm that leverage is inversely related to risk, they also suggest that some MFIs enjoy long-term debt in spite of risk, while profitability is irrelevant in explaining the capital structure decisions of MFIs. Finally, the study shows that the reputation and board independence of MFIs significantly and positively affect their capital structure decisions.

  9. X-ray structure determination and deuteration of nattokinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide [Chiba Institute of Science, 15-8 Shiomi-cho, Cho-shi, Chiba 288-025 (Japan); Chatake, Toshiyuki, E-mail: chatake@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Kyoto University, Asashironishi 2, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Yatagai, Chieko; Sumi, Hiroyuki [Kurashiki University of Science and the Arts, 2640 Nishinoura, Tsurajima-cho, Kurashiki, Okayama 712-8505 (Japan); Kawaguchi, Akio [Kyoto University, Asashironishi 2, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Chiba-Kamosida, Kaori [Nippon Advanced Technology Co. Ltd, J-PARC, 2-4 Shirane Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ogawa, Megumi; Adachi, Tatsumi [Chiba Institute of Science, 15-8 Shiomi-cho, Cho-shi, Chiba 288-025 (Japan); Morimoto, Yukio [Kyoto University, Asashironishi 2, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    X-ray structure determination and deuteration of nattokinase were performed to facilitate neutron crystallographic analysis. Nattokinase (NK) is a strong fibrinolytic enzyme, which is produced in abundance by Bacillus subtilis natto. Although NK is a member of the subtilisin family, it displays different substrate specificity when compared with other subtilisins. The results of molecular simulations predict that hydrogen arrangements around Ser221 at the active site probably account for the substrate specificity of NK. Therefore, neutron crystallographic analysis should provide valuable information that reveals the enzymatic mechanism of NK. In this report, the X-ray structure of the non-hydrogen form of undeuterated NK was determined, and the preparation of deuterated NK was successfully achieved. The non-hydrogen NK structure was determined at 1.74 Å resolution. The three-dimensional structures of NK and subtilisin E from Bacillus subtilis DB104 are near identical. Deuteration of NK was carried out by cultivating Bacillus subtilis natto in deuterated medium. The D{sub 2}O resistant strain of Bacillus subtilis natto was obtained by successive cultivation rounds, in which the concentration of D{sub 2}O in the medium was gradually increased. NK was purified from the culture medium and its activity was confirmed by the fibrin plate method. The results lay the framework for neutron protein crystallography analysis.

  10. Evidence against the continuum structure underlying motivation measures derived from self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemolli, Emanuela; Gagné, Marylène

    2014-06-01

    Self-determination theory (SDT) proposes a multidimensional conceptualization of motivation in which the different regulations are said to fall along a continuum of self-determination. The continuum has been used as a basis for using a relative autonomy index as a means to create motivational scores. Rasch analysis was used to verify the continuum structure of the Multidimensional Work Motivation Scale and of the Academic Motivation Scale. We discuss the concept of continuum against SDT's conceptualization of motivation and argue against the use of the relative autonomy index on the grounds that evidence for a continuum structure underlying the regulations is weak and because the index is statistically problematic. We suggest exploiting the full richness of SDT's multidimensional conceptualization of motivation through the use of alternative scoring methods when investigating motivational dynamics across life domains.

  11. Regional Mechanics Determine Collagen Fiber Structure in Healing Myocardial Infarcts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomovsky, Gregory M.; Rouillard, Andrew D.; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shape, and/or location produce different patterns of mechanical stretch that guide evolving collagen fiber structure. We tested the effects of infarct shape and location using a combined experimental and computational approach. We studied mechanics and collagen fiber structure in cryoinfarcts in 53 Sprague-Dawley rats and found that regardless of shape or orientation, cryoinfarcts near the equator of the left ventricle stretched primarily in the circumferential direction and developed circumferentially aligned collagen, while infarcts at the apex stretched similarly in the circumferential and longitudinal direction and developed randomly oriented collagen. In a computational model of infarct healing, an effect of mechanical stretch on fibroblast and collagen alignment was required to reproduce the experimental results. We conclude that mechanical environment determines collagen fiber structure in healing myocardial infarcts. Our results suggest that emerging post-infarction therapies that alter regional mechanics will also alter infarct collagen structure, offering both potential risks and novel therapeutic opportunities. PMID:22418281

  12. Estimation of the Scale of Fluctuation for Spatial Variables of RC Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilyati S.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dimensional and structural properties of RC structures are nonhomogenous due to the quality of workmanship, environmental and material variability. One of the required statistical information for spatial variability analysis of RC structures includes the scale of fluctuation, θ. This paper discusses the estimation of θ for two spatial variables; concrete compressive strength and concrete cover. Methods used to estimate the θ are the Curve fitting method and the Kriging Method. Kriging is an optimal interpolation method which uses the concept of randomness that allows the uncertainty of the predicted values to be calculated. Data measurements for concrete compressive strength and concrete cover were obtained from Peterson (1964 and Public Work Department of Malaysia respectively. The most reliable value for θ of fcu was determined and the value obtained for θ of c was found unreliable due to the insufficient of data points from the available data.

  13. Sulfated oligosaccharide structures, as determined by NMR techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noseda, M.D.; Duarte, M.E.R.; Tischer, C.A.; Gorin, P.A.J. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. De Bioquimica; Cerezo, A.S. [Buenos Aires Univ. Nacional (Argentina). Dept. de Quimica Organica

    1997-12-31

    Carrageenans are sulfated polysaccharides, produced by red seaweeds (Rhodophyta), that have important biological and physico-chemical properties. Using partial autohydrolysis, we obtained sulfated oligosaccharides from a {lambda}-carrageenan (Noseda and Cerezo, 1993). These oligosaccharides are valuable not only for the study of the structures of the parent carrageenans but also for their possible biological activities. In this work we determined the chemical structure of one of the sulfated oligosaccharides using 1D and 2D NMR techniques. (author) 4 refs., 8 figs., 1 tabs.

  14. Identifying large scale structures at 1 AU using fluctuations and wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niembro, T.; Lara, A.

    2016-12-01

    The solar wind (SW) is inhomogeneous and it is dominated for two types of flows: one quasi-stationary and one related to large scale transients (such as coronal mass ejections and co-rotating interaction regions). The SW inhomogeneities can be study as fluctuations characterized by a wide range of length and time scales. We are interested in the study of the characteristic fluctuations caused by large scale transient events. To do so, we define the vector space F with the normalized moving monthly/annual deviations as the orthogonal basis. Then, we compute the norm in this space of the solar wind parameters (velocity, magnetic field, density and temperature) fluctuations using WIND data from August 1992 to August 2015. This norm gives important information about the presence of a large structure disturbance in the solar wind and by applying a wavelet transform to this norm, we are able to determine, without subjectivity, the duration of the compression regions of these large transient structures and, even more, to identify if the structure corresponds to a single or complex (or merged) event. With this method we have automatically detected most of the events identified and published by other authors.

  15. Testing the simplex assumption underlying the Sport Motivation Scale: a structural equation modeling analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F; Harmer, P

    1996-12-01

    Self-determination theory (Deci & Ryan, 1985) suggests that motivational orientation or regulatory styles with respect to various behaviors can be conceptualized along a continuum ranging from low (a motivation) to high (intrinsic motivation) levels of self-determination. This pattern is manifested in the rank order of correlations among these regulatory styles (i.e., adjacent correlations are expected to be higher than those more distant) and is known as a simplex structure. Using responses from the Sport Motivation Scale (Pelletier et al., 1995) obtained from a sample of 857 college students (442 men, 415 women), the present study tested the simplex structure underlying SMS subscales via structural equation modeling. Results confirmed the simplex model structure, indicating that the various motivational constructs are empirically organized from low to high self-determination. The simplex pattern was further found to be invariant across gender. Findings from this study support the construct validity of the SMS and have important implications for studies focusing on the influence of motivational orientation in sport.

  16. Scaling Issues in the Determination of Wind loads on Lattice Masts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koss, Holger; Srouji, Robin G.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents a study conducted to investigate the influence of geometric scale and flow condition on the wind load coefficients for lattice masts structures. An initial study in 2008 on a full size mast section indicated a possible contingency, which could be used to add equipment on teleco...... reflecting model scale behavior than full scale aerodynamics. This reveals the main challenge if for reasons of economic production and operation of telecommunication towers and masts a more accurate wind load description is required: full size testing....

  17. The potential for biological structure determination with pulsed neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.C. [CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton Didcot Oxon (United Kingdom)

    1994-12-31

    The potential of pulsed neutron diffraction in structural determination of biological materials is discussed. The problems and potential solutions in this area are outlined, with reference to both current and future sources and instrumentation. The importance of developing instrumentation on pulsed sources in emphasized, with reference to the likelihood of future expansion in this area. The possibilities and limitations of single crystal, fiber and powder diffraction in this area are assessed.

  18. Determination of the Basin Structure Beneath European Side of Istanbul

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Savas; Cengiz Cinku, Mulla; Thomas, Michael; Lamontagne, Maurice

    2016-04-01

    Istanbul (near North Anatolian Fault Zone:NAFZ, Turkey) is located in northern part of Sea of Marmara, an area that has been influenced by possible Marmara Earthquakes. The general geology of Istanbul divided into two stratigraphic unit such as sedimentary (from Oligocene to Quaternary Deposits) and bedrock (Paleozoic and Eocene). The bedrock units consists of sand stone, clay stone to Paleozoic age and limestone to Eocene age and sedimentary unit consist of sand, clay, mil and gravel from Oligocene to Quaternary age. Earthquake disaster mitigation studies divided into two important phases, too. Firstly, earthquake, soil and engineering structure problems identify for investigation area, later on strategic emergency plan can prepare for these problems. Soil amplification play important role the disaster mitigation and the site effect analysis and basin structure is also a key parameter for determining of site effect. Some geophysical, geological and geotechnical measurements are requeired to defined this relationship. Istanbul Megacity has been waiting possible Marmara Earthquake and their related results. In order to defined to possible damage potential related to site effect, gravity measurements carried out for determining to geological structure, basin geometry and faults in Istanbul. Gravity data were collected at 640 sites by using a Scientrex CG-5 Autogravity meter Standard corrections applied to the gravity data include those for instrumental drift, Earth tides and latitude, and the free-air and Bouguer corrections. The corrected gravity data were imported into a Geosoft database to create a grid and map of the Bouguer gravity anomaly (grid cell size of 200 m). As a previously results, we determined some lineminants, faults and basins beneath Istanbul City. Especially, orientation of faults were NW-SE direction and some basin structures determined on between Buyukcekmece and Kucukcekmece Lake.

  19. Regional Mechanics Determine Collagen Fiber Structure in Healing Myocardial Infarcts

    OpenAIRE

    Fomovsky, Gregory M.; Rouillard, Andrew D; Holmes, Jeffrey W.

    2012-01-01

    Following myocardial infarction, the mechanical properties of the healing infarct are an important determinant of heart function and the risk of progression to heart failure. In particular, mechanical anisotropy (having different mechanical properties in different directions) in the healing infarct can preserve pump function of the heart. Based on reports of different collagen structures and mechanical properties in various animal models, we hypothesized that differences in infarct size, shap...

  20. Geophysical determination of buried structural features at Ovbiogie ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Computer iterated data from the study area made the structural determination possible with resistivity values ranging from 85ohm-m to 735ohm-m and depth ... soil at a depth of 1.0m, sandy soil at a depth of 3.0m, clay and mart at a depth of 12.6m, river sand and gravel at a depth of 35.1m and basalt at a depth of infinity.

  1. Screening and Scale-Up of GLUT Transporter Constructs Suitable for Biochemical and Structural Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Grégory; Kang, Hae Joo; Drew, David

    2018-01-01

    Identifying membrane proteins that can be produced and isolated in homogenous form in detergent is a lengthy trial-and-error process that can be facilitated by fluorescence-based screening approaches. We describe (1) the strategy and protocol of cloning by homologous recombination, (2) whole-cell and in-gel fluorescence measurements to estimate GLUT-GFP fusion protein yields, (3) use of size-exclusion chromatography monitored by fluorescence (FSEC) for assessing the homogeneity of the GLUT-GFP fusion proteins, and (4) the protocol for large-scale production and purification of the Bos taurus GLUT5 construct that enabled its crystal structure determination.

  2. Planetary-scale streak structures produced in a high-resolution simulation of Venus atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimura, H.; Sugimoto, N.; Takagi, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Ohfuchi, W.; Enomoto, T.; Nakajima, K.; Ishiwatari, M.; Sato, T. M.; Hashimoto, G. L.; Satoh, T.; Takahashi, Y. O.; Hayashi, Y.-Y.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary-scale streak structures captured by the IR2 camera onboard AKATSUKI was reproduced in a high-resolution simulation of Venus Atmosphere. We have found that the streak structures are extending from the polar vortices and synchronized in both hemispheres. Our experiments suggest that a low-stability layer is a key for forming the planetary-scale streak structures.

  3. MOTIVATION INTERNALIZATION AND SIMPLEX STRUCTURE IN SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlü, Ali; Dettweiler, Ulrich

    2015-12-01

    Self-determination theory, as proposed by Deci and Ryan, postulated different types of motivation regulation. As to the introjected and identified regulation of extrinsic motivation, their internalizations were described as "somewhat external" and "somewhat internal" and remained undetermined in the theory. This paper introduces a constrained regression analysis that allows these vaguely expressed motivations to be estimated in an "optimal" manner, in any given empirical context. The approach was even generalized and applied for simplex structure analysis in self-determination theory. The technique was exemplified with an empirical study comparing science teaching in a classical school class versus an expeditionary outdoor program. Based on a sample of 84 German pupils (43 girls, 41 boys, 10 to 12 years old), data were collected using the German version of the Academic Self-Regulation Questionnaire. The science-teaching format was seen to not influence the pupils' internalization of identified regulation. The internalization of introjected regulation differed and shifted more toward the external pole in the outdoor teaching format. The quantification approach supported the simplex structure of self-determination theory, whereas correlations may disconfirm the simplex structure.

  4. Otoliths versus scales: evaluating the most suitable structure for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Otoliths (1.4% rejected) were more readable than scales (41.7% and 7.5% rejected) for Wriggleswade and Mankazana Impoundments respectively. Otolith readings were more precise (average percentage error (APE) = 13.6%; coefficient of variation (CV) = 15.8%) than scales (APE = 18.0%; CV = 21.9%) for the total sample ...

  5. Rich Linguistic Structure from Large-Scale Web Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamangil, Elif

    2013-01-01

    The past two decades have shown an unexpected effectiveness of "Web-scale" data in natural language processing. Even the simplest models, when paired with unprecedented amounts of unstructured and unlabeled Web data, have been shown to outperform sophisticated ones. It has been argued that the effectiveness of Web-scale data has…

  6. GPR determination of physical parameters of railway structural layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khakiev, Zelimkhan; Shapovalov, Vladimir; Kruglikov, Alexander; Yavna, Victor

    2014-07-01

    The paper studies the possibility of quantitative processing of the GPR data for determining the refractive index and conductivity of motor road and railway constructional layers. The main objective of the work is to develop a method of obtaining quantitative information on chosen physical properties of soil layers from regular GPR surveys. Theoretical study of plane electromagnetic wave propagation is made for the model of layered soil structure. As a result of the study appropriate equation systems are derived for the calculations of refractive index and conductivity of structural layers. Based on these equations the method of quantitative processing of radargrams is proposed. The method includes the GPR data processing algorithm and theoretical techniques for determination of refractive index and conductivity of the structural layers. The applicability of the proposed method was initially validated by lab experiments using radargrams of the soil samples with specified values of moisture and conductivity and reliable results were achieved. The methods were also successfully used while monitoring the long term seasonal changes in structural layers of several Russian railways sections. The contamination of ballast material is also evaluated by this method in addition to the refractive index and conductivity.

  7. Workshop on Measurement Needs for Local-Structure Determination in Inorganic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Igor; Vanderah, Terrell

    2008-01-01

    The functional responses (e.g., dielectric, magnetic, catalytic, etc.) of many industrially-relevant materials are controlled by their local structure-a term that refers to the atomic arrangements on a scale ranging from atomic (sub-nanometer) to several nanometers. Thus, accurate knowledge of local structure is central to understanding the properties of nanostructured materials, thereby placing the problem of determining atomic positions on the nanoscale-the so-called "nanostructure problem"-at the center of modern materials development. Today, multiple experimental techniques exist for probing local atomic arrangements; nonetheless, finding accurate comprehensive, and robust structural solutions for the nanostructured materials still remains a formidable challenge because any one of these methods yields only a partial view of the local structure. The primary goal of this 2-day NIST-sponsored workshop was to bring together experts in the key experimental and theoretical areas relevant to local-structure determination to devise a strategy for the collaborative effort required to develop a comprehensive measurement solution on the local scale. The participants unanimously agreed that solving the nanostructure problem-an ultimate frontier in materials characterization-necessitates a coordinated interdisciplinary effort that transcends the existing capabilities of any single institution, including national laboratories, centers, and user facilities. The discussions converged on an institute dedicated to local structure determination as the most viable organizational platform for successfully addressing the nanostructure problem. The proposed "institute" would provide an intellectual infrastructure for local structure determination by (1) developing and maintaining relevant computer software integrated in an open-source global optimization framework (Fig. 2), (2) connecting industrial and academic users with experts in measurement techniques, (3) developing and

  8. Determining ecological equivalence in service-to-service scaling of salt marsh restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strange, Elizabeth; Galbraith, Hector; Bickel, Sarah; Mills, Dave; Beltman, Douglas; Lipton, Joshua

    2002-02-01

    The amount of ecological restoration required to mitigate or compensate for environmental injury or habitat loss is often based on the goal of achieving ecological equivalence. However, few tools are available for estimating the extent of restoration required to achieve habitat services equivalent to those that were lost. This paper describes habitat equivalency analysis (HEA), a habitat-based "service-to-service" approach for determining the amount of restoration needed to compensate for natural resource losses, and examines issues in its application in the case of salt marsh restoration. The scientific literature indicates that although structural attributes such as vegetation may recover within a few years, there is often a significant lag in the development of ecological processes such as nutrient cycling that are necessary for a fully functioning salt marsh. Moreover, natural variation can make recovery trajectories difficult to define and predict for many habitat services. HEA is an excellent tool for scaling restoration actions because it reflects this ecological variability and complexity. At the same time, practitioners must recognize that conclusions about the amount of restoration needed to provide ecological services equivalent to those that are lost will depend critically on the ecological data and assumptions that are used in the HEA calculation.

  9. Establishing the Turkish version of the SIGAM mobility scale, and determining its validity and reliability in lower extremity amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Hülya; Gafuroğlu, Ümit; Ryall, Nicola; Yüksel, Selcen

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study is to adapt the Special Interest Group in Amputee Medicine (SIGAM) mobility scale to Turkish, and to test its validity and reliability in lower extremity amputees. Adaptation of the scale into Turkish was performed by following the steps in American Association of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) guideline. Turkish version of the scale was tested twice on 109 patients who had lower extremity amputations, at hours 0 and 72. The reliability of the Turkish version was tested for internal consistency and test-retest reliability. Structural validity was tested using the "scale validity" method. For this purpose, the scores of the Short Form-36 (SF-36), Functional Ambulation Scale (FAS), Get Up and Go Test, and Satisfaction with the Prosthesis Questionnaire (SATPRO) were calculated, and analyzed using Spearman's correlation test. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was 0.67 for the Turkish version of the SIGAM mobility scale. Cohen's kappa coefficients were between 0.224 and 0.999. Repeatability according to the results of the SIGAM mobility scale (grades A-F) was 0.822. We found significant and strong positive correlations of the SIGAM mobility scale results with the FAS, Get Up and Go Test, SATPRO, and all of the SF-36 subscales. In our study, the Turkish version of the SIGAM mobility scale was found as a reliable, valid, and easy to use scale in everyday practice for measuring mobility in lower extremity amputees. Implications for Rehabilitation Amputation is the surgical removal of a severely injured and nonfunctional extremity, at a level of one or more bones proximal to the body. Loss of a lower extremity is one of the most important conditions that cause functional disability. The Special Interest Group in Amputee Medicine (SIGAM) mobility scale contains 21 questions that evaluate the mobility of lower extremity amputees. Lack of a specific Turkish scale that evaluates rehabilitation results and mobility of lower extremity amputees, and determines their

  10. Scale-invariant structure of energy fluctuations in real earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Chang, Zhe; Wang, Huanyu; Lu, Hong

    2017-11-01

    Earthquakes are obviously complex phenomena associated with complicated spatiotemporal correlations, and they are generally characterized by two power laws: the Gutenberg-Richter (GR) and the Omori-Utsu laws. However, an important challenge has been to explain two apparently contrasting features: the GR and Omori-Utsu laws are scale-invariant and unaffected by energy or time scales, whereas earthquakes occasionally exhibit a characteristic energy or time scale, such as with asperity events. In this paper, three high-quality datasets on earthquakes were used to calculate the earthquake energy fluctuations at various spatiotemporal scales, and the results reveal the correlations between seismic events regardless of their critical or characteristic features. The probability density functions (PDFs) of the fluctuations exhibit evidence of another scaling that behaves as a q-Gaussian rather than random process. The scaling behaviors are observed for scales spanning three orders of magnitude. Considering the spatial heterogeneities in a real earthquake fault, we propose an inhomogeneous Olami-Feder-Christensen (OFC) model to describe the statistical properties of real earthquakes. The numerical simulations show that the inhomogeneous OFC model shares the same statistical properties with real earthquakes.

  11. The Large-scale Galactic Magnetic Field Structure and Pulsar Rotation Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J. L.; Manchester, R. N.; Qiao, G. J.; Lyne, A. G.

    Pulsars provide unique probes for the {\\it large-scale} interstellar magnetic field in the Galactic disk. The Parkes multibeam pulsar survey has discovered many distant pulsars which enables us for the first time to explore the magnetic field in most of the nearby half of the Galactic disk. The fields are found to be {\\it coherent in direction} over a linear scale of $\\sim 10$ kpc between the Carina-Sagittarius and Crux-Scutum arms from $l\\sim45\\degr$ to $l\\sim305\\degr$. The coherent spiral structures and field direction reversals, including the newly determined counterclockwise field near the Norma arm, are consistent with bi-symmetric spiral model for the disk field. However, the antisymmetric rotation measure sky from the Galactic halo and the dipole field in the Galactic center suggest that the A0 dynamo is operating there.

  12. Determination of organic crystal structures by X ray powder diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    McBride, L

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of Ibuprofen has been solved from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the GA is improved by incorporating prior chemical information in the form of hard limits on the values that can be taken by the flexible torsion angles within the molecule. Powder X-ray diffraction data were collected for the anti-convulsant compounds remacemide, remacemide nitrate and remacemide acetate at 130 K on BM 16 at the X-ray European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble. High quality crystal structures were obtained using data collected to a resolution of typically 1.5 A. The structure determinations were performed using a simulated annealing (SA) method and constrained Rietveld refinements for the structures converged to chi sup 2 values of 1.64, 1.84 and 1.76 for the free base, nitrate and acetate respectively. The previously unknown crystal structure of the drug famotidine Form B has been solved using X-ray powder diffraction data colle...

  13. Micron-scale lens array having diffracting structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Kenneth A

    2013-10-29

    A novel micron-scale lens, a microlens, is engineered to concentrate light efficiently onto an area of interest, such as a small, light-sensitive detector element in an integrated electronic device. Existing microlens designs imitate the form of large-scale lenses and are less effective at small sizes. The microlenses described herein have been designed to accommodate diffraction effects, which dominate the behavior of light at small length scales. Thus a new class of light-concentrating optical elements with much higher relative performance has been created. Furthermore, the new designs are much easier to fabricate than previous designs.

  14. Effects of structural connectivity on fine scale population genetic structure of muskrat, Ondatra zibethicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurence, Sophie; Smith, Matthew J; Schulte-Hostedde, Albrecht I

    2013-01-01

    In heterogeneous landscapes, physical barriers and loss of structural connectivity have been shown to reduce gene flow and therefore lead to population structuring. In this study, we assessed the influence of landscape features on population genetic structure and gene flow of a semiaquatic species, the muskrat. A total of 97 muskrats were sampled from three watersheds near Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. We estimated population genetic structure using 11 microsatellite loci and identified a single genetic cluster and no genetic differences were found among the watersheds as a result of high levels of gene flow. At finer scales, we assessed the correlation between individual pairwise genetic distances and Euclidean distance as well as different models of least cost path (LCP). We used a range of cost values for the landscape types in order to build our LCP models. We found a positive relationship between genetic distance and least cost distance when we considered roads as corridors for movements. Open landscapes and urban areas seemed to restrict but not prevent gene flow within the study area. Our study underlines the high-dispersal ability of generalist species in their use of landscape and highlights how landscape features often considered barriers to animal movements are corridors for other species. PMID:24223287

  15. Fractals and the Large-Scale Structure in the Universe

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gasket. Hence by definition, the self-similarity dimension of the. Sierpinski gasket is. (1). The n = 5 approximation of the Sierpinski gasket is shown in Fig1.LTe B. say .8 . ern. : If it is scaled down by a factor of 1/2 we win get a line segment of length 4 cm. Two such scaled down line segments 'put together produce the original.

  16. X-ray structure determination and deuteration of nattokinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Yasuhide; Chatake, Toshiyuki; Naito, Sawa; Ohsugi, Tadanori; Yatagai, Chieko; Sumi, Hiroyuki; Kawaguchi, Akio; Chiba-Kamosida, Kaori; Ogawa, Megumi; Adachi, Tatsumi; Morimoto, Yukio

    2013-11-01

    Nattokinase (NK) is a strong fibrinolytic enzyme, which is produced in abundance by Bacillus subtilis natto. Although NK is a member of the subtilisin family, it displays different substrate specificity when compared with other subtilisins. The results of molecular simulations predict that hydrogen arrangements around Ser221 at the active site probably account for the substrate specificity of NK. Therefore, neutron crystallographic analysis should provide valuable information that reveals the enzymatic mechanism of NK. In this report, the X-ray structure of the non-hydrogen form of undeuterated NK was determined, and the preparation of deuterated NK was successfully achieved. The non-hydrogen NK structure was determined at 1.74 Å resolution. The three-dimensional structures of NK and subtilisin E from Bacillus subtilis DB104 are near identical. Deuteration of NK was carried out by cultivating Bacillus subtilis natto in deuterated medium. The D2O resistant strain of Bacillus subtilis natto was obtained by successive cultivation rounds, in which the concentration of D2O in the medium was gradually increased. NK was purified from the culture medium and its activity was confirmed by the fibrin plate method. The results lay the framework for neutron protein crystallography analysis.

  17. Structural Observability Analysis of Large Scale Systems Using Modelica and Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anushka S. Perera

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available State observability of dynamic systems is a notion which determines how well the states can be inferred from input-output data. For small-scale systems, observability analysis can be done manually, while for large-scale systems an automated systematic approach is advantageous. Here we present an approach based on the concept of structural observability analysis, using graph theory. This approach can be automated and applied to large-scale, complex dynamic systems modeled using Modelica. Modelica models are imported into Python via the JModelica.org-CasADi interface, and the Python packages NetworkX (for graph-theoretic analysis and PyGraphviz (for graph layout and visualization are used to analyze the structural observability of the systems. The method is demonstrated with a Modelica model created for the Copper production plant at Glencore Nikkelverk, Kristiansand, Norway. The Copper plant model has 39 states, 11 disturbances and 5 uncertain parameters. The possibility of estimating disturbances and parameters in addition to estimating the states are also discussed from the graph-theory point of view. All the software tools used on the analysis are freely available.

  18. The Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure at Two Loops: the apparent scale dependence of the speed of sound

    OpenAIRE

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mercolli, Lorenzo; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-01-01

    We study the Effective Field Theory of Large Scale Structure for cosmic density and momentum fields. We show that the finite part of the two-loop calculation and its counterterms introduce an apparent scale dependence for the leading order parameter $c_\\text{s}^2$ of the EFT starting at k=0.1 h/Mpc. These terms limit the range over which one can trust the one-loop EFT calculation at the 1 % level to k

  19. Strain, nano-phase separation, multi-scale structures and function of advanced materials

    OpenAIRE

    Billinge, S. J. L.

    2002-01-01

    Recent atomic pair distribution function results from our group from manganites and cuprate systems are reviewed in light of the presence of multi-scale structures. These structures have a profound effect on the material properties

  20. Determining relative bulk viscosity of kilometre-scale crustal units using field observations and numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Robyn L.; Piazolo, Sandra; Daczko, Nathan R.

    2017-11-01

    Though the rheology of kilometre-scale polymineralic rock units is crucial for reliable large-scale, geotectonic models, this information is difficult to obtain. In geotectonic models, a layer is defined as an entity at the kilometre scale, even though it is heterogeneous at the millimetre to metre scale. Here, we use the shape characteristics of the boundaries between rock units to derive the relative bulk viscosity of those units at the kilometre scale. We examine the shape of a vertically oriented ultramafic, harzburgitic-lherzolitic unit, which developed a kilometre-scale pinch and swell structure at mid-crustal conditions ( 600 °C, 8.5 kbar), in the Anita Shear Zone, New Zealand. The ultramafic layer is embedded between a typical polymineralic paragneiss to the west, and a feldspar-quartz-hornblende orthogneiss, to the east. Notably, the boundaries on either side of the ultramafic layer give the ultramafics an asymmetric shape. Microstructural analysis shows that deformation was dominated by dislocation creep (n = 3). Based on the inferred rheological behaviour from the field, a series of numerical simulations are performed. Relative and absolute values are derived for bulk viscosity of the rock units by comparing boundary tortuosity difference measured on the field example and the numerical series. Our analysis shows that during deformation at mid-crustal conditions, paragneisses can be 30 times less viscous than an ultramafic unit, whereas orthogneisses have intermediate viscosity, 3 times greater than the paragneisses. If we assume a strain rate of 10- 14 s- 1 the ultramafic, orthogneiss and paragneiss have syn-deformational viscosities of 3 × 1022, 2.3 × 1021 and 9.4 × 1020 Pa s, respectively. Our study shows pinch and swell structures are useful as a gauge to assess relative bulk viscosity of rock units based on shape characteristics at the kilometre scale and in non-Newtonian flow regimes, even where heterogeneity occurs within the units at the

  1. The Phenix software for automated determination of macromolecular structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Paul D; Afonine, Pavel V; Bunkóczi, Gábor; Chen, Vincent B; Echols, Nathaniel; Headd, Jeffrey J; Hung, Li-Wei; Jain, Swati; Kapral, Gary J; Grosse Kunstleve, Ralf W; McCoy, Airlie J; Moriarty, Nigel W; Oeffner, Robert D; Read, Randy J; Richardson, David C; Richardson, Jane S; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Zwart, Peter H

    2011-09-01

    X-ray crystallography is a critical tool in the study of biological systems. It is able to provide information that has been a prerequisite to understanding the fundamentals of life. It is also a method that is central to the development of new therapeutics for human disease. Significant time and effort are required to determine and optimize many macromolecular structures because of the need for manual interpretation of complex numerical data, often using many different software packages, and the repeated use of interactive three-dimensional graphics. The Phenix software package has been developed to provide a comprehensive system for macromolecular crystallographic structure solution with an emphasis on automation. This has required the development of new algorithms that minimize or eliminate subjective input in favor of built-in expert-systems knowledge, the automation of procedures that are traditionally performed by hand, and the development of a computational framework that allows a tight integration between the algorithms. The application of automated methods is particularly appropriate in the field of structural proteomics, where high throughput is desired. Features in Phenix for the automation of experimental phasing with subsequent model building, molecular replacement, structure refinement and validation are described and examples given of running Phenix from both the command line and graphical user interface. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Computational determination of radiation damage effects on DNA structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2003-03-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) studies of several radiation originated lesions on the DNA molecules are presented. The pyrimidine lesions (cytosinyl radical, thymine dimer, thymine glycol) and purine lesion (8-oxoguanine) were subjected to the MD simulations for several hundred picoseconds using MD simulation code AMBER 5.0 (4.0). The simulations were performed for fully dissolved solute molecules in water. Significant structural changes in the DNA double helical structure were observed in all cases which may be categorized as: a) the breaking of hydrogen bonds network between complementary bases and resulted opening of the double helix (cytosinyl, radical, 8-oxoguanine); b) the sharp bending of the DNA helix centered at the lesion site (thymine dimer, thymine glycol); and c) the flippingout of adenine on the strand complementary to the lesion (8-oxoguanine). These changes related to the overall collapsing of the double helical structure around the lesion, are expected to facilitate the docking of the repair enzyme into the DNA in the formation of DNA-enzyme complex. The stable DNA-enzyme complex is a necessary condition for the onset of the enzymatic repair process. In addition to structural changes, specific values of electrostatic interaction energy were determined at several lesion sites (thymine dimer, thymine glycol and 8-oxoguanine). This lesion-specific electrostatic energy is a factor that enables repair enzyme to discriminate lesion from the native site during the scanning of the DNA surface.

  3. The Price of Precision: Large-Scale Mapping of Forest Structure and Biomass Using Airborne Lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubayah, R.

    2015-12-01

    Lidar remote sensing provides one of the best means for acquiring detailed information on forest structure. However, its application over large areas has been limited largely because of its expense. Nonetheless, extant data exist over many states in the U.S., funded largely by state and federal consortia and mainly for infrastructure, emergency response, flood plain and coastal mapping. These lidar data are almost always acquired in leaf-off seasons, and until recently, usually with low point count densities. Even with these limitations, they provide unprecedented wall-to-wall mappings that enable development of appropriate methodologies for large-scale deployment of lidar. In this talk we summarize our research and lessons learned in deriving forest structure over regional areas as part of NASA's Carbon Monitoring System (CMS). We focus on two areas: the entire state of Maryland and Sonoma County, California. The Maryland effort used low density, leaf-off data acquired by each county in varying epochs, while the on-going Sonoma work employs state-of-the-art, high density, wall-to-wall, leaf-on lidar data. In each area we combine these lidar coverages with high-resolution multispectral imagery from the National Agricultural Imagery Program (NAIP) and in situ plot data to produce maps of canopy height, tree cover and biomass, and compare our results against FIA plot data and national biomass maps. Our work demonstrates that large-scale mapping of forest structure at high spatial resolution is achievable but products may be complex to produce and validate over large areas. Furthermore, fundamental issues involving statistical approaches, plot types and sizes, geolocation, modeling scales, allometry, and even the definitions of "forest" and "non-forest" must be approached carefully. Ultimately, determining the "price of precision", that is, does the value of wall-to-wall forest structure data justify their expense, should consider not only carbon market applications

  4. Structure determination of spider silk from X-ray images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulrich, Stephan; Zippelius, Annette [Universitaet Goettingen, Institut fuer Theoretische Physik (Germany); Meling, Martin [Max-Planck-Institut fuer biophysikalische Chemie, Goettingen (Germany); Glisovic, Anja; Salditt, Tim [Universitaet Goettingen, Institut fuer Roentgenphysik (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Spider silk consists of interconnected crystallites, which are typically aligned along the fiber axis. We present a method to systematically determine the structure of these crystallites. Hereby we introduce a model that calculates the scattering function G(q) which is fitted to the measured X-ray image (silk from nephila clavipes). With it, the crystallites' size, the constitution and dimensions of their unit cell, as well as their tilt with respect to the fiber axis is identified, and furthermore the effect of coherent scattering from different crystallites is investigated. The shown methods and the presented model can easily be generalized to a wide class of composite materials.

  5. Total structure determination of thiolate-protected Au38 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Huifeng; Eckenhoff, William T; Zhu, Yan; Pintauer, Tomislav; Jin, Rongchao

    2010-06-23

    We report the total structure of Au(38)(SC(2)H(4)Ph)(24) nanoparticles determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. This nanoparticle is based upon a face-fused Au(23) biicosahedral core, which is further capped by three monomeric Au(SR)(2) staples at the waist of the Au(23) rod and six dimeric staples with three on the top icosahedron and other three on the bottom icosahedron. The six Au(2)(SR)(3) staples are arranged in a staggered configuration, and the Au(38)S(24) framework has a C(3) rotation axis.

  6. A Visual Method of Time Scale Determination using a PC for Radio ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Visual Method of Time Scale Determination using a PC for Radio Sources. Yong Huang1,2,∗. , Jun-Hui Fan2,3 & Jing Pan2,3. 1School of Computer Science & Educational Software, Guangzhou University,. Guangzhou, China. 2Astronomy Science and Technology Research Laboratory of Department of Education.

  7. Integration of nano-scale components and supports in micromachined 3D silicon structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Azimi, S.; Y Dang, Z.; Breese, M. B. H.

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a process for the three-dimensional (3D) machining of p-type silicon on a micro- and nano-scale using high-energy ion beam irradiation with one or more energies and fluences, followed by electrochemical anodization in hydrofluoric acid. We present a study of the dependence of our fabricated structures on irradiating ion energies, fluences, geometries and wafer resistivity. All these factors determine whether the micro- and nano-scale features are properly connected to the supports in the 3D silicon structures. If wrongly chosen, any of these factors may cause a breakage at the connection through localized over-etching. Under optimum irradiation and anodization conditions, free-standing patterned membranes can be fabricated with feature dimensions of 100 nm over areas of many square millimeters. This investigation is based on silicon structures but is relevant to any electro-assisted etching process for 3D fabrication, paving the way for achieving free-standing silicon photonics, mechanical resonators and micro-/nano-electromechanical systems.

  8. Three-dimensional fine-scale genetic structure of the neotropical epiphytic orchid, Laelia rubescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapnell, Dorset W; Hamrick, J L; Nason, John D

    2004-05-01

    Epiphytic plants occupy three-dimensional space, which allows more individuals to be closely clustered spatially than is possible for populations occupying two dimensions. The unique characteristics of epiphytes can act in concert to influence the fine-scale genetic structure of their populations which can, in turn, influence mating patterns and other population phenomena. Three large populations of Laelia rubescens (Orchidaceae) in the Costa Rican seasonal dry forest were sampled at two levels of intensity to determine: (i) whether individual clusters contain more than one genotype, and (ii) the spatial distribution and fine-scale genetic structure of genotypes within populations. Samples were assayed for their multilocus allozyme genotypes and spatial autocorrelation analyses were performed. High levels of genetic diversity, high genotypic diversity and low among-population variation were found. In the larger clusters, multiple genets per cluster were common with discrete clusters containing up to nine genotypes. Spatial autocorrelation analyses indicated significant positive genetic structure at distances of

  9. Experimental Investigation of Large-Scale Flow Structures in Turbulent Mixed Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koerner, Max; Resagk, Christian; Thess, Andre

    2014-11-01

    We report on experimental investigations of the temporal and spatial behavior of large-scale flow structures (LSC) in turbulent mixed convection. Using a reduced scale model room with a passenger cabin based geometry allows a global view on the LSCs, which are mainly responsible for thermal comfort and air quality within rooms. Moreover, the usage of pressurized working gases like air or sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) enables experimental investigations within broad ranges of the Reynolds number Re and Rayleigh number Ra. Thus, it is also possible to achieve realistic values of the dimensionless numbers allowing direct conclusions to be drawn about the LSCs in rooms similar to passenger cabins. The LSCs are determined by measurements of the 2D velocity field using a 2D2C particle image velocimetry system. In order to characterize three-dimensionally evolved flow structures, the measurement plane can be moved throughout the depth of the model room. We found very complex LSCs ranging from two-dimensional to three-dimensional structures and from one-roll systems over simple two-roll ones to chaotic behavior of the flow. The formation the LSCs has a strong dependency on the relation between Re and Ra and they often show distinct coherent oscillations. The authors gratefully acknowledge the DFG (Grant No. TH497-32-1) for financial support.

  10. Multiple Scales of Control on the Structure and Spatial Distribution of Woody Vegetation in African Savanna Watersheds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas R Vaughn

    Full Text Available Factors controlling savanna woody vegetation structure vary at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and as a consequence, unraveling their combined effects has proven to be a classic challenge in savanna ecology. We used airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging to map three-dimensional woody vegetation structure throughout four savanna watersheds, each contrasting in geologic substrate and climate, in Kruger National Park, South Africa. By comparison of the four watersheds, we found that geologic substrate had a stronger effect than climate in determining watershed-scale differences in vegetation structural properties, including cover, height and crown density. Generalized Linear Models were used to assess the spatial distribution of woody vegetation structural properties, including cover, height and crown density, in relation to mapped hydrologic, topographic and fire history traits. For each substrate and climate combination, models incorporating topography, hydrology and fire history explained up to 30% of the remaining variation in woody canopy structure, but inclusion of a spatial autocovariate term further improved model performance. Both crown density and the cover of shorter woody canopies were determined more by unknown factors likely to be changing on smaller spatial scales, such as soil texture, herbivore abundance or fire behavior, than by our mapped regional-scale changes in topography and hydrology. We also detected patterns in spatial covariance at distances up to 50-450 m, depending on watershed and structural metric. Our results suggest that large-scale environmental factors play a smaller role than is often attributed to them in determining woody vegetation structure in southern African savannas. This highlights the need for more spatially-explicit, wide-area analyses using high resolution remote sensing techniques.

  11. Multiple Scales of Control on the Structure and Spatial Distribution of Woody Vegetation in African Savanna Watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Nicholas R; Asner, Gregory P; Smit, Izak P J; Riddel, Edward S

    2015-01-01

    Factors controlling savanna woody vegetation structure vary at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and as a consequence, unraveling their combined effects has proven to be a classic challenge in savanna ecology. We used airborne LiDAR (light detection and ranging) to map three-dimensional woody vegetation structure throughout four savanna watersheds, each contrasting in geologic substrate and climate, in Kruger National Park, South Africa. By comparison of the four watersheds, we found that geologic substrate had a stronger effect than climate in determining watershed-scale differences in vegetation structural properties, including cover, height and crown density. Generalized Linear Models were used to assess the spatial distribution of woody vegetation structural properties, including cover, height and crown density, in relation to mapped hydrologic, topographic and fire history traits. For each substrate and climate combination, models incorporating topography, hydrology and fire history explained up to 30% of the remaining variation in woody canopy structure, but inclusion of a spatial autocovariate term further improved model performance. Both crown density and the cover of shorter woody canopies were determined more by unknown factors likely to be changing on smaller spatial scales, such as soil texture, herbivore abundance or fire behavior, than by our mapped regional-scale changes in topography and hydrology. We also detected patterns in spatial covariance at distances up to 50-450 m, depending on watershed and structural metric. Our results suggest that large-scale environmental factors play a smaller role than is often attributed to them in determining woody vegetation structure in southern African savannas. This highlights the need for more spatially-explicit, wide-area analyses using high resolution remote sensing techniques.

  12. Evolution of Wechsler's Memory Scales: Content and structural analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Phillip L

    2017-01-01

    The Wechsler Memory Scale-1 was introduced to the professional community 70 years ago and has been the most widely used standardized memory battery for over 50 years. Since its introduction, the test has been revised three times, with the last revision occurring in 2009 . Few clinicians are aware that Wechsler developed a prior memory battery in 1917 , which was used to assess retention deficits in persons with Korsakoff psychosis. The purpose of the present article is to describe the development of Wechsler's memory scales from 1917 through 2009 . Suggestions for the next revision are offered.

  13. Structural genomics of eukaryotic targets at a laboratory scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busso, Didier; Poussin-Courmontagne, Pierre; Rosé, David; Ripp, Raymond; Litt, Alain; Thierry, Jean-Claude; Moras, Dino

    2005-01-01

    Structural genomics programs are distributed worldwide and funded by large institutions such as the NIH in United-States, the RIKEN in Japan or the European Commission through the SPINE network in Europe. Such initiatives, essentially managed by large consortia, led to technology and method developments at the different steps required to produce biological samples compatible with structural studies. Besides specific applications, method developments resulted mainly upon miniaturization and parallelization. The challenge that academic laboratories faces to pursue structural genomics programs is to produce, at a higher rate, protein samples. The Structural Biology and Genomics Department (IGBMC - Illkirch - France) is implicated in a structural genomics program of high eukaryotes whose goal is solving crystal structures of proteins and their complexes (including large complexes) related to human health and biotechnology. To achieve such a challenging goal, the Department has established a medium-throughput pipeline for producing protein samples suitable for structural biology studies. Here, we describe the setting up of our initiative from cloning to crystallization and we demonstrate that structural genomics may be manageable by academic laboratories by strategic investments in robotic and by adapting classical bench protocols and new developments, in particular in the field of protein expression, to parallelization.

  14. Examining the validity of the Academic Motivation Scale by comparing scale construction to self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokley, K O

    2000-04-01

    This study examined the construct validity of the Academic Motivation Scale. Specifically, subscale correlations were examined to assess whether support for a continuum of self-determination would be provided. The three types of Intrinsic Motivation were significantly and positively correlated with each other .67, .62, and .58, while the three types of Extrinsic Motivation were significantly and positively intercorrelated .50, .49, and .45. The former subscales, however, correlated higher with Introjected Regulation than Identified Regulation, suggesting that Introjected Regulation may be indicative of more self-determined behavior than has previously been believed. Also, the Intrinsic Motivation To Accomplish subscale had a stronger relationship with two of the Extrinsic Motivation subscales, Identified Regulation and Introjected Regulation, than did the Extrinsic Motivation subscales with each other. This suggests that the differences between Extrinsic and Intrinsic Motivation are not as obvious as has been believed. Also, contrary to self-determination theory, Amotivation had a stronger negative correlation with Identified Regulation (r = -.31) than with any of the Intrinsic Motivation subscales (rs = -.27, -.19, and -.11).

  15. mRNA/protein sequence complementarity and its determinants: The impact of affinity scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartonek, Lukas; Zagrovic, Bojan

    2017-07-01

    It has recently been demonstrated that the nucleobase-density profiles of mRNA coding sequences are related in a complementary manner to the nucleobase-affinity profiles of their cognate protein sequences. Based on this, it has been proposed that cognate mRNA/protein pairs may bind in a co-aligned manner, especially if unstructured. Here, we study the dependence of mRNA/protein sequence complementarity on the properties of the nucleobase/amino-acid affinity scales used. Specifically, we sample the space of randomly generated scales by employing a Monte Carlo strategy with a fitness function that depends directly on the level of complementarity. For model organisms representing all three domains of life, we show that even short searches reproducibly converge upon highly optimized scales, implying that the topology of the underlying fitness landscape is decidedly funnel-like. Furthermore, the optimized scales, generated without any consideration of the physicochemical attributes of nucleobases or amino acids, resemble closely the nucleobase/amino-acid binding affinity scales obtained from experimental structures of RNA-protein complexes. This provides support for the claim that mRNA/protein sequence complementarity may indeed be related to binding between the two. Finally, we characterize suboptimal scales and show that intermediate-to-high complementarity can be reached by substantially diverse scales, but with select amino acids contributing disproportionally. Our results expose the dependence of cognate mRNA/protein sequence complementarity on the properties of the underlying nucleobase/amino-acid affinity scales and provide quantitative constraints that any physical scales need to satisfy for the complementarity to hold.

  16. Measuring health workers' motivation composition: validation of a scale based on Self-Determination Theory in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, Julia; Souares, Aurélia; Tiendrebéogo, Justin; Houlfort, Nathalie; Robyn, Paul Jacob; Somda, Serge M A; De Allegri, Manuela

    2017-05-22

    Although motivation of health workers in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) has become a topic of increasing interest by policy makers and researchers in recent years, many aspects are not well understood to date. This is partly due to a lack of appropriate measurement instruments. This article presents evidence on the construct validity of a psychometric scale developed to measure motivation composition, i.e., the extent to which motivation of different origin within and outside of a person contributes to their overall work motivation. It is theoretically grounded in Self-Determination Theory (SDT). We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 1142 nurses in 522 government health facilities in 24 districts of Burkina Faso. We assessed the scale's validity in a confirmatory factor analysis framework, investigating whether the scale measures what it was intended to measure (content, structural, and convergent/discriminant validity) and whether it does so equally well across health worker subgroups (measurement invariance). Our results show that the scale measures a slightly modified version of the SDT continuum of motivation well. Measurements were overall comparable between subgroups, but results indicate that caution is warranted if a comparison of motivation scores between groups is the focus of analysis. The scale is a valuable addition to the repository of measurement tools for health worker motivation in LMICs. We expect it to prove useful in the quest for a more comprehensive understanding of motivation as well as of the effects and potential side effects of interventions intended to enhance motivation.

  17. The deep structure of Gaussian scale space images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijper, Arjan

    2002-01-01

    In order to be able to deal with the discrete nature of images in a continuous way, one can use results of the mathematical field of 'distribution theory'. Under almost trivial assumptions, like 'we know nothing', one ends up with convolving the image with a Gaussian filter. In this manner scale is

  18. Structural Validity of the Fear of Success Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler, Jonathan N.; Conroy, David E.

    2004-01-01

    Fear of success is a dispositional form of anxiety that can have harmful effects on athletes' motivation and performance; however, empirical research on fear of success in sport has been limited. Zuckerman and Allison's (1976) Fear of Success Scale (FOSS) has been the most popular fear of success measure used in sport, yet it is laden with…

  19. ADVANTAGES OF RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINING SCALE MASS AND DECARBURIZED LAYER OF ROLLED COIL STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Parusov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the universal empirical relationships that allow for operational calculation of scale mass and decarbonized layer depth based on the parameters of the technological process for rolled coil steel production. Methodology. The research is carried out on the industrial batches of the rolled steel of SAE 1006 and SAE 1065 grades. Scale removability was determined in accordance with the procedure of «Bekaert» company by the specifi-cations: GA-03-16, GA-03-18, GS-03-02, GS-06-01. The depth of decarbonized layer was identified in accordance with GOST 1763-68 (M method. Findings. Analysis of experimental data allowed us to determine the rational temperature of coil formation of the investigated steel grades, which provide the best possible removal of scale from the metal surface, a minimal amount of scale, as well as compliance of the metal surface color with the require-ments of European consumers. Originality. The work allowed establishing correlation of the basic quality indicators of the rolled coil high carbon steel (scale mass, depth of decarbonized layer and inter-laminar distance in pearlite with one of the main parameters (coil formation temperature of the deformation and heat treatment mode. The re-sulting regression equations, without metallographic analysis, can be used to determine, with a minimum error, the quantitative values of the total scale mass, depth of decarbonized layer and the average inter-lamellar distance in pearlite of the rolled coil high carbon steel. Practical value. Based on the specifications of «Bekaert» company (GA-03-16, GA-03-18, GS-03-02 and GS-06-01 the method of testing descaling by mechanical means from the surface of the rolled coil steel of low- and high-carbon steel grades was developed and approved in the environment of PJSC «ArcelorMittal Kryvyi Rih». The work resulted in development of the rapid method for determination of total and remaining scale mass on the rolled coil steel

  20. The Student Perception of University Support and Structure Scale: Development and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintre, Maxine G.; Gates, Shawn K. E.; Pancer, W. Mark; Pratt, Michael S.; Polivy, Janet; Birnie-Lefcovitch, S.; Adams, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    A new scale, the Student Perception of University Support and Structure Scale (SPUSS), was developed for research on the transition to university. The scale was based on concepts derived from Baumrind's (1971) theory of parenting styles. Data were obtained from two separate cohorts of freshmen (n=759 and 397) attending six Canadian universities of…

  1. Disturbance frequency determines morphology and community development in multi-species biofilm at the landscape scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Milferstedt

    Full Text Available Many natural and engineered biofilm systems periodically face disturbances. Here we present how the recovery time of a biofilm between disturbances (expressed as disturbance frequency shapes the development of morphology and community structure in a multi-species biofilm at the landscape scale. It was hypothesized that a high disturbance frequency favors the development of a stable adapted biofilm system while a low disturbance frequency promotes a dynamic biofilm response. Biofilms were grown in laboratory-scale reactors over a period of 55-70 days and exposed to the biocide monochloramine at two frequencies: daily or weekly pulse injections. One untreated reactor served as control. Biofilm morphology and community structure were followed on comparably large biofilm areas at the landscape scale using automated image analysis (spatial gray level dependence matrices and community fingerprinting (single-strand conformation polymorphisms. We demonstrated that a weekly disturbed biofilm developed a resilient morphology and community structure. Immediately after the disturbance, the biofilm simplified but recovered its initial complex morphology and community structure between two biocide pulses. In the daily treated reactor, one organism largely dominated a morphologically simple and stable biofilm. Disturbances primarily affected the abundance distribution of already present bacterial taxa but did not promote growth of previously undetected organisms. Our work indicates that disturbances can be used as lever to engineer biofilms by maintaining a biofilm between two developmental states.

  2. Relationships between avian richness and landscape structure at multiple scales using multiple landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael S. Mitchell; Scott H. Rutzmoser; T. Bently Wigley; Craig Loehle; John A. Gerwin; Patrick D. Keyser; Richard A. Lancia; Roger W. Perry; Christopher L. Reynolds; Ronald E. Thill; Robert Weih; Don White; Petra Bohall Wood

    2006-01-01

    Little is known about factors that structure biodiversity on landscape scales, yet current land management protocols, such as forest certification programs, place an increasing emphasis on managing for sustainable biodiversity at landscape scales. We used a replicated landscape study to evaluate relationships between forest structure and avian diversity at both stand...

  3. Double inflation: A possible resolution of the large-scale structure problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, M.S.; Villumsen, J.V.; Vittorio, N.; Silk, J.; Juszkiewicz, R.

    1986-11-01

    A model is presented for the large-scale structure of the universe in which two successive inflationary phases resulted in large small-scale and small large-scale density fluctuations. This bimodal density fluctuation spectrum in an ..cap omega.. = 1 universe dominated by hot dark matter leads to large-scale structure of the galaxy distribution that is consistent with recent observational results. In particular, large, nearly empty voids and significant large-scale peculiar velocity fields are produced over scales of approx.100 Mpc, while the small-scale structure over less than or equal to 10 Mpc resembles that in a low density universe, as observed. Detailed analytical calculations and numerical simulations are given of the spatial and velocity correlations. 38 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Structural determinants of the eosinophil cationic protein antimicrobial activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boix, Ester; Salazar, Vivian A; Torrent, Marc; Pulido, David; Nogués, M Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed

    2012-08-01

    Antimicrobial RNases are small cationic proteins belonging to the vertebrate RNase A superfamily and endowed with a wide range of antipathogen activities. Vertebrate RNases, while sharing the active site architecture, are found to display a variety of noncatalytical biological properties, providing an excellent example of multitask proteins. The antibacterial activity of distant related RNases suggested that the family evolved from an ancestral host-defence function. The review provides a structural insight into antimicrobial RNases, taking as a reference the human RNase 3, also named eosinophil cationic protein (ECP). A particular high binding affinity against bacterial wall structures mediates the protein action. In particular, the interaction with the lipopolysaccharides at the Gram-negative outer membrane correlates with the protein antimicrobial and specific cell agglutinating activity. Although a direct mechanical action at the bacteria wall seems to be sufficient to trigger bacterial death, a potential intracellular target cannot be discarded. Indeed, the cationic clusters at the protein surface may serve both to interact with nucleic acids and cell surface heterosaccharides. Sequence determinants for ECP activity were screened by prediction tools, proteolysis and peptide synthesis. Docking results are complementing the structural analysis to delineate the protein anchoring sites for anionic targets of biological significance.

  5. Structure of Manila Clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) Microbiota at the Organ Scale in Contrasting Sets of Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisterhans, Guillaume; Raymond, Natalie; Girault, Emilie; Lambert, Christophe; Bourrasseau, Line; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Garabetian, Frédéric; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Marine invertebrate microbiota has a key function in host physiology and health. To date, knowledge about bivalve microbiota is poorly documented except public health concerns. This study used a molecular approach to characterize the microbiota associated with the bivalve Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) by determining (1) the difference among organs either or not under the influence of host habitat, (2) small-scale variability of microbiota, and (3) the experimental response of the Manila clam microbiota submitted to different lateral transmissions. These questions were investigated by sampling two groups of individuals living in contrasting habitats and carrying out a transplant experiment. Manila clam microbiota (i.e., bacterial community structure) was determined at organ-scale (gills, gut, and a pool of remaining tissues) by capillary electrophoresis DNA fingerprinting (CE fingerprinting). The Manila clam microbiota structure differed among organs indicating a selection of Manila clam microbiota at organ scale. Habitat strongly influenced gill and gut microbiota. In contrast, microbiota associated with remaining tissues was similar between group individuals suggesting that these communities are mostly autochthonous, i.e., Manila clam specific. Transplant experiment showed that improving living condition did not induce any change in microbiota associated with remaining tissues. In contrast, the reduction in individual habitat quality led to individuals in declining health as strongly suggested by the increase in phagocytosis activity and decrease in condition index together with the change in internal organ microbiota. This study provides a first description of the Manila clam holobiont which can withstand disturbance and respond opportunistically to improved environmental conditions.

  6. Determining Subsurface Structure From Microtremors Using a Passive Circular Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, D. S.; Doser, D. I.; Velasco, A. A.

    2005-12-01

    The amount of damage to a structure during an earthquake is related to the ground motion at that site. Therefore, it is important to study seismic waves that propagate through specific soil types to understand site response. However, active seismic surveys are susceptible to noise interference and are limited due to spatial need while boreholes are costly. We develop a method using a passive array to study Rayleigh waves from microtremors, waves originating from building appliances, cars, pedestrians walking, etc. By using everyday noises as the source, site-specific analysis can be done in urban areas without worrying about noise interference or disturbing the public with explosions or other loud active sources. The array is comprised of short period Texans, self contained geophones, which record continuously for 24 hours. Our technique differs slightly from traditional SPAC (SPatial Auto-Correlation) methods used in passive arrays. We first cross correlate time windows between two receivers then stack the correlations to determine a phase delay. Performing the correlation at different frequencies will create a dispersion curve that can be inverted for shear velocity. This approach is similar to the two-station phase delay method used in regional tomography studies at much longer periods. Stacking removes off-azimuth energy, so we do not need to assume a source direction. Preliminary results from a previous passive array survey conducted near El Paso, Texas show 1-D velocity models can be created by cross-correlating noise at various frequencies. We will conduct another survey in alluvium sands at Rio Bosque Park east of El Paso. We will validate the results with active seismic refraction and surface wave survey results as well as other geophysical techniques to determine if a passive array using microtremors is an accurate method of determining subsurface structure.

  7. Titanium alloy lattice structures with millimeter scale cell sizes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moongkhamklang, Pimsiree; Wadley, Haydn N.G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 22904-4745 (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Titanium sandwich panels with cellular cores of a uniform 1-5 mm diameter open cell size are well suited for impact energy absorption and cross flow heat exchange applications. Periodic cellular structures (lattices) made from high specific strength, high temperature alloys are preferred for these multifunctional uses. A diffusion bonding method has been applied here to make cellular lattice structures from a Ti-6A1-4V alloy. To illustrate the approach, lattice structures with both square and diamond collinear topologies, a 2 mm open cell size, and a relative density of 15% were made from 254 {mu}m diameter titanium alloy wires. These structures were found to have a compressive strength of 40 {+-} 5 MPa that was controlled by plastic yield followed by buckling of the struts. The cellular structures have been brazed to titanium alloy face sheets to create sandwich panel structures that appear well suited for multifunctional applications up to 420 C. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Fine-Scale Analysis Reveals Cryptic Landscape Genetic Structure in Desert Tortoises

    OpenAIRE

    Latch, Emily K.; William I Boarman; Andrew Walde; Robert C Fleischer

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing the effects of landscape features on genetic variation is essential for understanding how landscapes shape patterns of gene flow and spatial genetic structure of populations. Most landscape genetics studies have focused on patterns of gene flow at a regional scale. However, the genetic structure of populations at a local scale may be influenced by a unique suite of landscape variables that have little bearing on connectivity patterns observed at broader spatial scales. We inves...

  9. Effective spatial scales for evaluating environmental determinants of population density in Yakushima macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agetsuma, Naoki; Koda, Ryosuke; Tsujino, Riyou; Agetsuma-Yanagihara, Yoshimi

    2015-02-01

    Population densities of wildlife species tend to be correlated with resource productivity of habitats. However, wildlife density has been greatly modified by increasing human influences. For effective conservation, we must first identify the significant factors that affect wildlife density, and then determine the extent of the areas in which the factors should be managed. Here, we propose a protocol that accomplishes these two tasks. The main threats to wildlife are thought to be habitat alteration and hunting, with increases in alien carnivores being a concern that has arisen recently. Here, we examined the effect of these anthropogenic disturbances, as well as natural factors, on the local density of Yakushima macaques (Macaca fuscata yakui). We surveyed macaque densities at 30 sites across their habitat using data from 403 automatic cameras. We quantified the effect of natural vegetation (broad-leaved forest, mixed coniferous/broad-leaved forest, etc.), altered vegetation (forestry area and agricultural land), hunting pressure, and density of feral domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). The effect of each vegetation type was analyzed at numerous spatial scales (between 150 and 3,600-m radii from the camera locations) to determine the best scale for explaining macaque density (effective spatial scale). A model-selection procedure (generalized linear mixed model) was used to detect significant factors affecting macaque density. We detected that the most effective spatial scale was 400 m in radius, a scale that corresponded to group range size of the macaques. At this scale, the amount of broad-leaved forest was selected as a positive factor, whereas mixed forest and forestry area were selected as negative factors for macaque density. This study demonstrated the importance of the simultaneous evaluation of all possible factors of wildlife population density at the appropriate spatial scale. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Hydrologic response to valley-scale structure in alpine headwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weekes, Anne A.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Montgomery, David R.; Woodward, Andrea; Bolton, Susan M.

    2015-01-01

    Few systematic studies of valley-scale geomorphic drivers of streamflow regimes in complex alpine headwaters have compared response between catchments. As a result, little guidance is available for regional-scale hydrological research and monitoring efforts that include assessments of ecosystem function. Physical parameters such as slope, elevation range, drainage area and bedrock geology are often used to stratify differences in streamflow response between sampling sites within an ecoregion. However, these metrics do not take into account geomorphic controls on streamflow specific to glaciated mountain headwaters. The coarse-grained nature of depositional features in alpine catchments suggests that these landforms have little water storage capacity because hillslope runoff moves rapidly just beneath the rock mantle before emerging in fluvial networks. However, recent studies show that a range of depositional features, including talus slopes, protalus ramparts and 'rock-ice' features may have more storage capacity than previously thought.

  11. Local Large-Scale Structure and the Assumption of Homogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Ryan C.; Barger, Amy J.; Cowie, Lennox L.

    2016-10-01

    Our recent estimates of galaxy counts and the luminosity density in the near-infrared (Keenan et al. 2010, 2012) indicated that the local universe may be under-dense on radial scales of several hundred megaparsecs. Such a large-scale local under-density could introduce significant biases in the measurement and interpretation of cosmological observables, such as the inferred effects of dark energy on the rate of expansion. In Keenan et al. (2013), we measured the K-band luminosity density as a function of distance from us to test for such a local under-density. We made this measurement over the redshift range 0.01 0.07, we measure an increasing luminosity density that by z ~ 0.1 rises to a value of ~ 1.5 times higher than that measured locally. This implies that the stellar mass density follows a similar trend. Assuming that the underlying dark matter distribution is traced by this luminous matter, this suggests that the local mass density may be lower than the global mass density of the universe at an amplitude and on a scale that is sufficient to introduce significant biases into the measurement of basic cosmological observables. At least one study has shown that an under-density of roughly this amplitude and scale could resolve the apparent tension between direct local measurements of the Hubble constant and those inferred by Planck team. Other theoretical studies have concluded that such an under-density could account for what looks like an accelerating expansion, even when no dark energy is present.

  12. Determination of critical length scales for corrosion processes using microelectroanalytical techniques.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Wall, Frederick Douglas

    2004-03-01

    A key factor in our ability to produce and predict the stability of metal-based macro- to nano-scale structures and devices is a fundamental understanding of the localized nature of corrosion. Corrosion processes where physical dimensions become critical in the degradation process include localized corrosion initiation in passivated metals, microgalvanic interactions in metal alloys, and localized corrosion in structurally complex materials like nanocrystalline metal films under atmospheric and inundated conditions. This project focuses on two areas of corrosion science where a fundamental understanding of processes occurring at critical dimensions is not currently available. Sandia will study the critical length scales necessary for passive film breakdown in the inundated aluminum (Al) system and the chemical processes and transport in ultra-thin water films relevant to the atmospheric corrosion of nanocrystalline tungsten (W) films. Techniques are required that provide spatial information without significantly perturbing or masking the underlying relationships. Al passive film breakdown is governed by the relationship between area of the film sampled and its defect structure. We will combine low current measurements with microelectrodes to study the size scale required to observe a single initiation event and record electrochemical breakdown events. The resulting quantitative measure of stability will be correlated with metal grain size, secondary phase size and distribution to understand which metal properties control stability at the macro- and nano-scale. Mechanisms of atmospheric corrosion on W are dependent on the physical dimensions and continuity of adsorbed water layers as well as the chemical reactions that take place in this layer. We will combine electrochemical and scanning probe microscopic techniques to monitor the chemistry and resulting material transport in these thin surface layers. A description of the length scales responsible for driving the

  13. Insufficient evidence to determine the effects of routine scale and polish treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slot, Dagmar Else; Van der Weijden, Fridus

    2014-09-01

    The Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), Medline, Embase, the metaRegister of Controlled Trials and the US National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Register. Randomised controlled trials (excluding split mouth) of routine scale and polish treatments with and without OHI in healthy dentate adults without severe periodontitis. Study assessment, data extraction and risk of bias assessment were carried out independently by two reviewers. Mean and standardised mean differences were calculated when different scales were reported. Fixed effects models were used as there were only a small number of studies. Three studies involving a total of 837 patients, and all considered to be at unclear risk of bias were included. No studies reported any adverse effects. Only one trial (conducted in general practice) provided data comparing scale and polish versus no scale and polish. It found no evidence to claim or refute benefit for scale and polish treatments for the outcomes of gingivitis, calculus and plaque. Two studies, both at unclear risk of bias, compared routine scale and polish provided at different time intervals. When comparing six with 12 months there was insufficient evidence to determine a difference for gingivitis at 24 months. There were some statistically significant differences in favour of scaling and polishing provided at more frequent intervals, in particular between three and 12 months for the outcome of gingivitis at 24 months, with OHI, MD -0.14 (95% CI -0.23 to -0.05; P value = 0.003) and without OHI MD -0.21 (95% CI -0.30 to -0.12; P value polish treatment with and without OHI. There was a reduction in gingivitis for the 12-month scale and polish treatment when assessed at 24 months MD -0.14 (95% CI -0.22 to -0.06) in favour of including OHI. There were also significant reductions in plaque for both three and 12-month scale and polish treatments when OHI was included. The body of

  14. [Scale Relativity Theory in living beings morphogenesis: fratal, determinism and chance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaline, J

    2012-10-01

    The Scale Relativity Theory has many biological applications from linear to non-linear and, from classical mechanics to quantum mechanics. Self-similar laws have been used as model for the description of a huge number of biological systems. Theses laws may explain the origin of basal life structures. Log-periodic behaviors of acceleration or deceleration can be applied to branching macroevolution, to the time sequences of major evolutionary leaps. The existence of such a law does not mean that the role of chance in evolution is reduced, but instead that randomness and contingency may occur within a framework which may itself be structured in a partly statistical way. The scale relativity theory can open new perspectives in evolution. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Determination of the refractive index of single crystal bulk samples and micro-structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt-Grund, R., E-mail: Schmidt-Grund@physik.uni-leipzig.de; Kuehne, P.; Czekalla, C.; Schumacher, D.; Sturm, C.; Grundmann, M.

    2011-02-28

    We present comparative studies for the exact determination of the refractive index of single crystals using spectroscopic ellipsometry and photonic-mode-structure investigations by means of spatially resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy, especially in the near band-gap spectral range. By applying such complementary methods we can overcome the uncertainties in the determination of the bulk refractive index introduced by surface properties. The physical effects used are the electromagnetic field reflection used by spectroscopic ellipsometry at large scale planar single crystals and the whispering-gallery-mode formation by total internal reflection in confined micro-structures. We demonstrate the applicability of such studies using the example of uniaxial ZnO bulk samples and micro-wires. By assuming a surface near region with electronic properties different from the bulk material, the method presented here gives the refractive index dispersion for both types of samples in an energy range from 1 to 3.4 eV.

  16. Determination of the interaction parameter and topological scaling features of symmetric star polymers in dilute solution

    KAUST Repository

    Rai, Durgesh K.

    2015-07-15

    Star polymers provide model architectures to understand the dynamic and rheological effects of chain confinement for a range of complex topological structures like branched polymers, colloids, and micelles. It is important to describe the structure of such macromolecular topologies using small-angle neutron and x-ray scattering to facilitate understanding of their structure-property relationships. Modeling of scattering from linear, Gaussian polymers, such as in the melt, has applied the random phase approximation using the Debye polymer scattering function. The Flory-Huggins interaction parameter can be obtained using neutron scattering by this method. Gaussian scaling no longer applies for more complicated chain topologies or when chains are in good solvents. For symmetric star polymers, chain scaling can differ from ν=0.5(df=2) due to excluded volume, steric interaction between arms, and enhanced density due to branching. Further, correlation between arms in a symmetric star leads to an interference term in the scattering function first described by Benoit for Gaussian chains. In this work, a scattering function is derived which accounts for interarm correlations in symmetric star polymers as well as the polymer-solvent interaction parameter for chains of arbitrary scaling dimension using a hybrid Unified scattering function. The approach is demonstrated for linear, four-arm and eight-arm polyisoprene stars in deuterated p-xylene.

  17. Additive Manufacturing of Metal Structures at the Micrometer Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirt, Luca; Reiser, Alain; Spolenak, Ralph; Zambelli, Tomaso

    2017-05-01

    Currently, the focus of additive manufacturing (AM) is shifting from simple prototyping to actual production. One driving factor of this process is the ability of AM to build geometries that are not accessible by subtractive fabrication techniques. While these techniques often call for a geometry that is easiest to manufacture, AM enables the geometry required for best performance to be built by freeing the design process from restrictions imposed by traditional machining. At the micrometer scale, the design limitations of standard fabrication techniques are even more severe. Microscale AM thus holds great potential, as confirmed by the rapid success of commercial micro-stereolithography tools as an enabling technology for a broad range of scientific applications. For metals, however, there is still no established AM solution at small scales. To tackle the limited resolution of standard metal AM methods (a few tens of micrometers at best), various new techniques aimed at the micrometer scale and below are presently under development. Here, we review these recent efforts. Specifically, we feature the techniques of direct ink writing, electrohydrodynamic printing, laser-assisted electrophoretic deposition, laser-induced forward transfer, local electroplating methods, laser-induced photoreduction and focused electron or ion beam induced deposition. Although these methods have proven to facilitate the AM of metals with feature sizes in the range of 0.1-10 µm, they are still in a prototype stage and their potential is not fully explored yet. For instance, comprehensive studies of material availability and material properties are often lacking, yet compulsory for actual applications. We address these items while critically discussing and comparing the potential of current microscale metal AM techniques. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Low-energy electron diffraction experiment, theory and surface structure determination

    CERN Document Server

    Hove, Michel A; Chan, Chi-Ming

    1986-01-01

    Surface crystallography plays the same fundamental role in surface science which bulk crystallography has played so successfully in solid-state physics and chemistry. The atomic-scale structure is one of the most important aspects in the understanding of the behavior of surfaces in such widely diverse fields as heterogeneous catalysis, microelectronics, adhesion, lubrication, cor­ rosion, coatings, and solid-solid and solid-liquid interfaces. Low-Energy Electron Diffraction or LEED has become the prime tech­ nique used to determine atomic locations at surfaces. On one hand, LEED has yielded the most numerous and complete structural results to date (almost 200 structures), while on the other, LEED has been regarded as the "technique to beat" by a variety of other surface crystallographic methods, such as photoemission, SEXAFS, ion scattering and atomic diffraction. Although these other approaches have had impressive successes, LEED has remained the most productive technique and has shown the most versatility...

  19. Critical Scales, Fundamental Structures and Inherent Instabilities of Turbulent Flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    turbulence scales were both analyzed. It was shown that in both limits interactions of detonations with non-uniform fluid density fields had greater...effects than interactions with non-uniform fluid velocity fields. High-speed turbulent-combustion dynamics thereby was shown to behave very...Williams,   “Ignition  Time  of  Hydrogen-­‐Air  Diffusion  Flames,”  Comptes  Rendus   Mecanique  340,  882-­‐893  (2012

  20. Structural Determinants of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Glucosyltransferase Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruitt, Rory N.; Chumbler, Nicole M.; Rutherford, Stacey A.; Farrow, Melissa A.; Friedman, David B.; Spiller, Ben; Lacy, D. Borden (Vanderbilt)

    2012-03-28

    The principle virulence factors in Clostridium difficile pathogenesis are TcdA and TcdB, homologous glucosyltransferases capable of inactivating small GTPases within the host cell. We present crystal structures of the TcdA glucosyltransferase domain in the presence and absence of the co-substrate UDP-glucose. Although the enzymatic core is similar to that of TcdB, the proposed GTPase-binding surface differs significantly. We show that TcdA is comparable with TcdB in its modification of Rho family substrates and that, unlike TcdB, TcdA is also capable of modifying Rap family GTPases both in vitro and in cells. The glucosyltransferase activities of both toxins are reduced in the context of the holotoxin but can be restored with autoproteolytic activation and glucosyltransferase domain release. These studies highlight the importance of cellular activation in determining the array of substrates available to the toxins once delivered into the cell.

  1. The scaling and structure of aquatic animal wakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Videler, JJ; Stamhuis, EJ; Muller, UK; van Duren, LA

    2002-01-01

    Animal generated water movements are visualized and quantified using two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV). The resulting vector flow fields allow for the study of the distribution of velocity, vorticity and vortices. Structural and temporal aspects of animal-induced flows covering a

  2. Overlapping communities reveal rich structure in large-scale brain networks during rest and task conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mahshid; McMenamin, Brenton W; Simon, Jonathan Z; Pessoa, Luiz

    2016-07-15

    Large-scale analysis of functional MRI data has revealed that brain regions can be grouped into stable "networks" or communities. In many instances, the communities are characterized as relatively disjoint. Although recent work indicates that brain regions may participate in multiple communities (for example, hub regions), the extent of community overlap is poorly understood. To address these issues, here we investigated large-scale brain networks based on "rest" and task human functional MRI data by employing a mixed-membership Bayesian model that allows each brain region to belong to all communities simultaneously with varying membership strengths. The approach allowed us to 1) compare the structure of disjoint and overlapping communities; 2) determine the relationship between functional diversity (how diverse is a region's functional activation repertoire) and membership diversity (how diverse is a region's affiliation to communities); 3) characterize overlapping community structure; 4) characterize the degree of non-modularity in brain networks; 5) study the distribution of "bridges", including bottleneck and hub bridges. Our findings revealed the existence of dense community overlap that was not limited to "special" hubs. Furthermore, the findings revealed important differences between community organization during rest and during specific task states. Overall, we suggest that dense overlapping communities are well suited to capture the flexible and task dependent mapping between brain regions and their functions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nano-scale patterned magnetic structures for investigations of spin-momentum transfer effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlig, W. Casey; Shi, Jing

    2002-10-01

    A spin-polarized current incident on a thin film nanomagnet exerts a torque on its magnetic moment. This can cause reversal or coherent precession of the moment. The basic structure needed to realize these spin-momentum transfer effects consists of two thin magnetic layers separated by a thin conducting layer. High current densities are required to obtain these effects; therefore, the layers need to be patterned on the nano-scale. At such small length scales strong magneto-static coupling between the two magnetic layers has been found to dominate their switching characteristics. We will present a study of magnetization reversal on a variety of three-layer (Co/Cu/Co) 200nm wide structures ranging in aspect ratio and thickness. This data will be compared to single layer elements as well as magnetoresistive measurements of individual devices. Arrays of the elements were prepared using e-beam lithography and their magnetic switching characteristics were determined using a Magneto-optic Kerr Effect measurement system.

  4. The Small-Scale Structure of the Magellanic Stream as a Foundation for Galaxy Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigra, L.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The Magellanic Stream (MS is the nearest example of agaseous trail formed by interacting galaxies. While the substantial gas masses in these kinds of circumgalactic structures are postulated to represent important sources of fuel for future star formation, the mechanisms whereby this material might be accreted back into galaxies remain unclear. Recent neutral hydrogen (HI observations have demonstrated that the northern portion of the MS, which probably has been interacting with the Milky Way's hot gaseous halo for close to 1000~Myr, has a larger spatial extent than previously recognized, while also containing significant amounts of small-scale structure. After a brief consideration of the large-scale kinematics of the MS as traced by the recently-discovered extension of the MS, we explore the aging process of the MS gas through the operation of various hydrodynamic instabilities and interstellar turbulence. This in turn leads to consideration of processes whereby MS material survives as cool gas, and yet also evidently fails to form stars.Parallels between the MS and extragalactic tidal features are briefly discussed with an emphasis on steps toward establishing what the MS reveals about the critical role of local processes in determining the evolution of these kinds of systems.

  5. The small-scale structure of the Magellanic stream as a foundation for galaxy evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanimirović S.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Magellanic Stream (MS is the nearest example of a gaseous trail formed by interacting galaxies. While the substantial gas masses in these kinds of circumgalactic structures are postulated to represent important sources of fuel for future star formation, the mechanisms whereby this material might be accreted back into galaxies remain unclear. Recent neutral hydrogen (HI observations have demonstrated that the northern portion of the MS, which probably has been interacting with the Milky Way's hot gaseous halo for close to 1000 Myr, has a larger spatial extent than previously recognized, while also containing significant amounts of small-scale structure. After a brief consideration of the large-scale kinematics of the MS as traced by the recently-discovered extension of the MS, we explore the aging process of the MS gas through the operation of various hydrodynamic instabilities and interstellar turbulence. This in turn leads to consideration of processes whereby MS material survives as cool gas, and yet also evidently fails to form stars. Parallels between the MS and extragalactic tidal features are brie'y discussed with an emphasis on steps toward establishing what the MS reveals about the critical role of local processes in determining the evolution of these kinds of systems.

  6. Large-scale structure and gravitational waves. III. Tidal effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Fabian; Pajer, Enrico; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2014-04-01

    The leading locally observable effect of a long-wavelength metric perturbation corresponds to a tidal field. We derive the tidal field induced by scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations, and use second-order perturbation theory to calculate the effect on the locally measured small-scale density fluctuations. For subhorizon scalar perturbations, we recover the standard perturbation theory result (F2 kernel). For tensor modes of wavenumber kL, we find that effects persist for kLτ ≫1, i.e. even long after the gravitational wave has entered the horizon and redshifted away ("fossil effect"). We then use these results, combined with the "ruler perturbations" of F. Schmidt and D. Jeong [Phys. Rev. D 86, 083527 (2012)], to predict the observed distortion of the small-scale matter correlation function induced by a long-wavelength tensor mode. We also estimate the observed signal in the B mode of the cosmic shear from a gravitational wave background, including both tidal (intrinsic alignment) and projection (lensing) effects. The nonvanishing tidal effect in the kLτ≫1 limit significantly increases the intrinsic alignment contribution to shear B modes, especially at low redshifts z≲2.

  7. PERSISTENT ASYMMETRIC STRUCTURE OF SAGITTARIUS A* ON EVENT HORIZON SCALES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, Vincent L.; Doeleman, Sheperd S.; Lu, Ru-Sen; Akiyama, Kazunori; Beaudoin, Christopher; Cappallo, Roger [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Haystack Observatory, Route 40, Westford, MA 01886 (United States); Johnson, Michael D.; Blackburn, Lindy; Blundell, Ray; Chael, Andrew A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Broderick, Avery E. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, 31 Caroline Street North, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Psaltis, Dimitrios; Chan, Chi-Kwan [Steward Observatory and Department of Astronomy, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Alef, Walter; Bertarini, Alessandra [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Algaba, Juan Carlos [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdae-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Asada, Keiichi [Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Bower, Geoffrey C. [Academia Sinica Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 645 N. A‘ohōkū Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Brinkerink, Christiaan [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, 6500 GL, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Chamberlin, Richard, E-mail: vfish@haystack.mit.edu [Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); and others

    2016-04-01

    The Galactic Center black hole Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) is a prime observing target for the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT), which can resolve the 1.3 mm emission from this source on angular scales comparable to that of the general relativistic shadow. Previous EHT observations have used visibility amplitudes to infer the morphology of the millimeter-wavelength emission. Potentially much richer source information is contained in the phases. We report on 1.3 mm phase information on Sgr A* obtained with the EHT on a total of 13 observing nights over four years. Closure phases, which are the sum of visibility phases along a closed triangle of interferometer baselines, are used because they are robust against phase corruptions introduced by instrumentation and the rapidly variable atmosphere. The median closure phase on a triangle including telescopes in California, Hawaii, and Arizona is nonzero. This result conclusively demonstrates that the millimeter emission is asymmetric on scales of a few Schwarzschild radii and can be used to break 180° rotational ambiguities inherent from amplitude data alone. The stability of the sign of the closure phase over most observing nights indicates persistent asymmetry in the image of Sgr A* that is not obscured by refraction due to interstellar electrons along the line of sight.

  8. Assessment of the methods for determining net radiation at different time-scales of meteorological variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni An

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available When modeling the soil/atmosphere interaction, it is of paramount importance to determine the net radiation flux. There are two common calculation methods for this purpose. Method 1 relies on use of air temperature, while Method 2 relies on use of both air and soil temperatures. Nowadays, there has been no consensus on the application of these two methods. In this study, the half-hourly data of solar radiation recorded at an experimental embankment are used to calculate the net radiation and long-wave radiation at different time-scales (half-hourly, hourly, and daily using the two methods. The results show that, compared with Method 2 which has been widely adopted in agronomical, geotechnical and geo-environmental applications, Method 1 is more feasible for its simplicity and accuracy at shorter time-scale. Moreover, in case of longer time-scale, daily for instance, less variations of net radiation and long-wave radiation are obtained, suggesting that no detailed soil temperature variations can be obtained. In other words, shorter time-scales are preferred in determining net radiation flux.

  9. A Determination of the Neutron Spin Structure Function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Emlyn W

    2003-08-18

    The authors report the results of the experiment E142 which measured the spin dependent structure function of the neutron, g{sub 1}{sup n}(x, Q{sup 2}). The experiment was carried out at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center by measuring an asymmetry in the deep inelastic scattering of polarized electrons from a polarized {sup 3}He target, at electron energies from 19 to 26 GeV. The structure function was determined over the kinematic range 0.03 < BJorken x < 0.6 and 1.0 < Q{sup 2} < 5.5 (GeV/c){sup 2}. An evaluation of the integral {integral}{sub 0}{sup 1} g{sub 1}{sup n}(x,Q{sup 2})dx at fixed Q{sup 2} = 2 (GeV/c){sup 2} yields the final result {Lambda}{sub 1}{sup n} = -0.032 {+-} 0.006 (stat.) {+-} 0.009 (syst.). This result, when combined with the integral of the proton spin structure function measured in other experiments, confirms the fundamental Bjorken sum rule with O({alpha}{sub s}{sup 3}) corrections to within one standard deviation. This is a major success for perturbative Quantum Chromodynamics. Some ancillary results include the findings that the Ellis-Jaffe sum rule for the neutron is violated at the 2 {sigma} level, and that the total contribution of the quarks to the helicity of the nucleon is 0.36 {+-} 0.10. The strange sea polarization is estimated to be small and negative, {Delta}s = -0.07 {+-} 0.04.

  10. Evidence of variant intra- and interspecific scaling of tree crown structure and relevance for allometric theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretzsch, Hans; Dieler, Jochen

    2012-07-01

    General scaling rules or constants for metabolic and structural plant allometry as assumed by the theory of Euclidian geometric scaling (2/3-scaling) or metabolic scaling (3/4-scaling) may meet human's innate propensity for simplicity and generality of pattern and processes in nature. However, numerous empirical works show that variability of crown structure rather than constancy is essential for a tree's success in coping with crowding. In order to link theory and empiricism, we analyzed the intra- and inter-specific scaling of crown structure for 52 tree species. The basis is data from 84 long-term plots of temperate monospecific forests under survey since 1870 and a set of 126 yield tables of angiosperm and gymnosperm forest tree species across the world. The study draws attention to (1) the intra-specific variation and correlation of the three scaling relationships: tree height versus trunk diameter, crown cross-sectional area versus trunk diameter, and tree volume versus trunk diameter, and their dependence on competition, (2) the inter-specific variation and correlation of the same scaling exponents ([Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]) across 52 tree species, and (3) the relevance of the revealed variable scaling of crown structure for leaf organs and metabolic scaling. Our results arrive at suggesting a more extended metabolic theory of ecology which includes variability and covariation between allometric relationships as prerequisite for the individual plant's competitiveness.

  11. Transmission Power Determination Based on Power Amplifier Operations in Large-Scale MIMO-OFDM Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Byung Moo Lee; Youngok Kim

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method to determine transmission power based on power amplifier (PA) operations in order to improve the energy efficiency (EE) of a large-scale (LS) Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO)-OFDM system, which is a multi-carrier multiple antenna system with a large amount of transmitter (TX) antennas. Regarding the EE improvement, we propose two kinds of PA operation schemes: increasing the effective TX power (ITXP) and reducing the PA power consumption (RPC) assuming that a...

  12. GLOBAL EPIDEMIOLOGY OF HIV AMONG FEMALE SEX WORKERS: INFLUENCE OF STRUCTURAL DETERMINANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, K; Strathdee, SA; Goldenberg, SM; Duff, P; Mwangi, P; Rusakova, M; Reza-Paul, S; Lau, J; Deering, K; Pickles, M; Boily, M-C

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Female sex workers (FSWs) bear a disproportionately large burden of HIV infection worldwide. Despite decades of research and programme activity, the epidemiology of HIV and the role that structural determinants have in mitigating or potentiating HIV epidemics and access to care for FSWs is poorly understood. We reviewed available published data for HIV prevalence and incidence, condom use, and structural determinants among this group. Only 87 (43%) of 204 unique studies reviewed explicitly examined structural determinants of HIV. Most studies were from Asia, with few from areas with a heavy burden of HIV such as sub-Saharan Africa, Russia, and eastern Europe. To further explore the potential effect of structural determinants on the course of epidemics, we used a deterministic transmission model to simulate potential HIV infections averted through structural changes in regions with concentrated and generalised epidemics, and high HIV prevalence among FSWs. This modelling suggested that elimination of sexual violence alone could avert 17% of HIV infections in Kenya (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 1–31) and 20% in Canada (95% UI 3–39) through its immediate and sustained effect on non-condom use) among FSWs and their clients in the next decade. In Kenya, scaling up of access to antiretroviral therapy among FSWs and their clients to meet WHO eligibility of a CD4 cell count of less than 500 cells per μL could avert 34% (95% UI 25–42) of infections and even modest coverage of sex worker-led outreach could avert 20% (95% UI 8–36) of infections in the next decade. Decriminalisation of sex work would have the greatest effect on the course of HIV epidemics across all settings, averting 33–46% of HIV infections in the next decade. Multipronged structural and community-led interventions are crucial to increase access to prevention and treatment and to promote human rights for FSWs worldwide. PMID:25059947

  13. Global epidemiology of HIV among female sex workers: influence of structural determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Kate; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Goldenberg, Shira M; Duff, Putu; Mwangi, Peninah; Rusakova, Maia; Reza-Paul, Sushena; Lau, Joseph; Deering, Kathleen; Pickles, Michael R; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2015-01-03

    Female sex workers (FSWs) bear a disproportionately large burden of HIV infection worldwide. Despite decades of research and programme activity, the epidemiology of HIV and the role that structural determinants have in mitigating or potentiating HIV epidemics and access to care for FSWs is poorly understood. We reviewed available published data for HIV prevalence and incidence, condom use, and structural determinants among this group. Only 87 (43%) of 204 unique studies reviewed explicitly examined structural determinants of HIV. Most studies were from Asia, with few from areas with a heavy burden of HIV such as sub-Saharan Africa, Russia, and eastern Europe. To further explore the potential effect of structural determinants on the course of epidemics, we used a deterministic transmission model to simulate potential HIV infections averted through structural changes in regions with concentrated and generalised epidemics, and high HIV prevalence among FSWs. This modelling suggested that elimination of sexual violence alone could avert 17% of HIV infections in Kenya (95% uncertainty interval [UI] 1-31) and 20% in Canada (95% UI 3-39) through its immediate and sustained effect on non-condom use) among FSWs and their clients in the next decade. In Kenya, scaling up of access to antiretroviral therapy among FSWs and their clients to meet WHO eligibility of a CD4 cell count of less than 500 cells per μL could avert 34% (95% UI 25-42) of infections and even modest coverage of sex worker-led outreach could avert 20% (95% UI 8-36) of infections in the next decade. Decriminalisation of sex work would have the greatest effect on the course of HIV epidemics across all settings, averting 33-46% of HIV infections in the next decade. Multipronged structural and community-led interventions are crucial to increase access to prevention and treatment and to promote human rights for FSWs worldwide. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sediment Scaling for Mud Mountain Fish Barrier Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-28

    Structure by Jeremy A. Sharp, Gary L. Brown, and Gary L. Bell PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory technical note describes the process of... energy in the system (model) to keep the WL suspended until it encounters an area of momentum loss (e.g., behind the barrier). Satisfaction of Rouse...Seattle District hydraulic engineers and the fish barrier operators). At a flow of approximately 4,000 cubic feet/second, the bed mobilizes and readily

  15. Large scale structures and the cubic galileon model

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, Sourav; Tomaras, Theodore N

    2015-01-01

    The maximum size of a bound cosmic structure is computed perturbatively as a function of its mass in the framework of the cubic galileon, proposed recently to model the dark energy of our Universe. Comparison of our results with observations constrains the matter-galileon coupling of the model to $0.03\\lesssim \\alpha \\lesssim 0.17$, thus improving previous bounds based solely on solar system physics.

  16. Large Scale Structure From Motion for Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-09-01

    and putting up with my bad movie choices. Thanks Charlie for defending your ideals, for the runs together, and for being Charlie. Mark Johnson to...mosaicing, the information from multiple underwater views can be used to extract structure and motion estimates using ideas from SFM and photogrammetry ...to use images to measure and come up with estimates of uncertainty will bring some of the fruits of photogrammetry to underwater archeology such as

  17. Determination of the b Quark Mass at the Z Mass Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Allison, John; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Arcelli, S.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Azuelos, G.; Bailey, I.; Ball, A.H.; Barberio, E.; Barlow, Roger J.; Batley, R.J.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Bloodworth, I.J.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Bohme, J.; Bonacorsi, D.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Cammin, J.; Carnegie, R.K.; Caron, B.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, David G.; Clarke, P.E.L.; Clay, E.; Cohen, I.; Couchman, J.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.Marco; Dallison, S.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dixit, M.S.; Donkers, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Feld, L.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Furtjes, A.; Futyan, D.I.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Gaycken, G.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Glenzinski, D.; Goldberg, J.; Grandi, C.; Graham, K.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hanson, G.G.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Harin-Dirac, M.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Hensel, C.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Hoffman, Kara Dion; Homer, R.J.; Horvath, D.; Hossain, K.R.; Howard, R.; Huntemeyer, P.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jawahery, A.; Jeremie, H.; Jones, C.R.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanaya, N.; Kanzaki, J.; Karapetian, G.; Karlen, D.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kim, D.H.; Klein, K.; Klier, A.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kokott, T.P.; Komamiya, S.; Kowalewski, Robert V.; Kramer, T.; Kress, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Krop, D.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Kyberd, P.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lawson, I.; Layter, J.G.; Leins, A.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Liebisch, R.; Lillich, J.; Littlewood, C.; Lloyd, A.W.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Long, G.D.; Losty, M.J.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, J.; Macchiolo, A.; Macpherson, A.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Marchant, T.E.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, J.P.; Martinez, G.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McDonald, W.John; McKenna, J.; McMahon, T.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Mendez-Lorenzo, P.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Moed, S.; Mohr, W.; Montanari, A.; Mori, T.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oakham, F.G.; Odorici, F.; Oh, A.; Okpara, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Patrick, G.N.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Poli, B.; Polok, J.; Pooth, O.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Rick, H.; Rodning, N.; Roney, J.M.; Rosati, S.; Roscoe, K.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Rust, D.R.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sahr, O.; Sarkisian, E.K.G.; Sbarra, C.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Schwick, C.; Scott, W.G.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C.H.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Snow, G.A.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Sproston, M.; Stahl, A.; Stephens, K.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Stumpf, L.; Surrow, B.; Talbot, S.D.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Taylor, R.J.; Teuscher, R.; Thomas, J.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trefzger, T.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vachon, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Waller, D.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wetterling, D.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zacek, V.; Zer-Zion, D.

    2001-01-01

    In hadronic decays of Z bosons recorded with the OPAL detector at LEP, events containing b quarks were selected using the long lifetime of b flavoured hadrons. Comparing the 3-jet rate in b events with that in d u,s and c quark events, a significant difference was observed. Using Order(alpha_s squared) calculations for massive quarks, this difference was used to determine the b quark mass in the MSbar renormalisation scheme at the scale of the Z boson mass. By combining the results from seven different jet finders the running b quark mass was determined to be mb(MZ) = (2.67 +/- 0.03(stat) +0.29/-0.37(syst) +/- 0.19(theo.)) GeV. Evolving this value to the b quark mass scale itself yields mb(mb) = (3.95 +0.52/-0.62) GeV, consistent with results obtained at the b quark production threshold. This determination confirms the QCD expectation of a scale dependent quark mass. A constant mass is ruled out by 3.9 standard deviations.

  18. Equifinality and the Scaling Exponent of the Structure Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitton, G. F.; Mezematy, Y.; Schertzer, D. J. M.; Tchiguirinskaia, I.

    2014-12-01

    In turbulence the structure function is by far the most widely used tool for the empirical analysis of the velocity field. This is due mainly to the work of Kolmogorov (1941) who hypothesised a homogeneous flux of energy and derived the famous 2/3 power law for the second-order structure function; — which corresponds to a 5/3 law for the energy spectrum (Obukhov, 1942). In 1962 Kolmogorov refined his hypothesis to take into account the intermittency of the flux, with the consequence that the exponent ξ(q) of the structure function is not longer proportional to its statistical order q. In this communication, we first show that the refined hypothesis can lead to different models that can have opposite intermittency corrections. Secondly, we demonstrate that the inverse problem, i.e., starting from a given expression of ξ(q) to recover the involved flux leads to an interesting problem of equifinality for the definition of this flux. This is done in particular in the framework of the Fractionally Integrated Flux model that gives a precise meaning to the refined hypothesis. The theoretical and practical consequences are illustrated with the help data analysis and simulations of turbulence in wind farms and urban lakes.

  19. Computational tools for experimental determination and theoretical prediction of protein structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Donoghue, S.; Rost, B.

    1995-12-31

    This tutorial was one of eight tutorials selected to be presented at the Third International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology which was held in the United Kingdom from July 16 to 19, 1995. The authors intend to review the state of the art in the experimental determination of protein 3D structure (focus on nuclear magnetic resonance), and in the theoretical prediction of protein function and of protein structure in 1D, 2D and 3D from sequence. All the atomic resolution structures determined so far have been derived from either X-ray crystallography (the majority so far) or Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy (becoming increasingly more important). The authors briefly describe the physical methods behind both of these techniques; the major computational methods involved will be covered in some detail. They highlight parallels and differences between the methods, and also the current limitations. Special emphasis will be given to techniques which have application to ab initio structure prediction. Large scale sequencing techniques increase the gap between the number of known proteins sequences and that of known protein structures. They describe the scope and principles of methods that contribute successfully to closing that gap. Emphasis will be given on the specification of adequate testing procedures to validate such methods.

  20. Small scale structures in coupled scalar field dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Beyer

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate structure formation for ultra-light scalar field dark matter coupled to quintessence, in particular the cosmon–bolon system. The linear power spectrum is computed by a numerical solution of the coupled field equations. We infer the substructure abundance within a Milky Way-like halo. Estimates of dark halo abundances from recent galaxy surveys imply a lower bound on the bolon mass of about 9×10−22 eV. This seems to exclude a possible detection of scalar field dark matter through time variation in pulsar timing signals in the near future.

  1. Automatic Three-Dimensional Measurement of Large-Scale Structure Based on Vision Metrology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaokun Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available All relevant key techniques involved in photogrammetric vision metrology for fully automatic 3D measurement of large-scale structure are studied. A new kind of coded target consisting of circular retroreflective discs is designed, and corresponding detection and recognition algorithms based on blob detection and clustering are presented. Then a three-stage strategy starting with view clustering is proposed to achieve automatic network orientation. As for matching of noncoded targets, the concept of matching path is proposed, and matches for each noncoded target are found by determination of the optimal matching path, based on a novel voting strategy, among all possible ones. Experiments on a fixed keel of airship have been conducted to verify the effectiveness and measuring accuracy of the proposed methods.

  2. Automatic Three-Dimensional Measurement of Large-Scale Structure Based on Vision Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhaokun; Guan, Banglei; Zhang, Xiaohu; Li, Daokui; Yu, Qifeng

    2014-01-01

    All relevant key techniques involved in photogrammetric vision metrology for fully automatic 3D measurement of large-scale structure are studied. A new kind of coded target consisting of circular retroreflective discs is designed, and corresponding detection and recognition algorithms based on blob detection and clustering are presented. Then a three-stage strategy starting with view clustering is proposed to achieve automatic network orientation. As for matching of noncoded targets, the concept of matching path is proposed, and matches for each noncoded target are found by determination of the optimal matching path, based on a novel voting strategy, among all possible ones. Experiments on a fixed keel of airship have been conducted to verify the effectiveness and measuring accuracy of the proposed methods. PMID:24701143

  3. Mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts: Structure and mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Reinholdt; Brandbyge, Mads; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    1998-01-01

    We have simulated the mechanical deformation of atomic-scale metallic contacts under tensile strain using molecular dynamics and effective medium theory potentials. The evolution of the structure of the contacts and the underlying deformation mechanisms are described along with the calculated...... electronic conductance. Various defects such as intersecting stacking faults, local disorder, and vacancies are created during the deformation. Disordered regions act as weak spots that reduce the strength of the contacts. The disorder tends to anneal out again during the subsequent atomic rearrangements......, but vacancies can be permanently present. The transition states and energies for slip mechanisms have been determined using the nudged elastic band method, and we find a size-dependent crossover from a dislocation-mediated slip to a homogeneous slip when the contact diameter becomes less than a few nm. We show...

  4. Thermal scaling laws of the optical Bragg acceleration structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Karagodsky

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The temperature distribution and heat flow in the planar optical Bragg acceleration structure, fed by a train of high-power laser pulses, are analyzed. Dynamic analysis of a high-repetition rate train of pulses indicates that the stationary solution is an excellent approximation for the regime of interest. Analytic expressions for the temperature and heat distributions across the acceleration structure are developed. Assuming an accelerating gradient of 1  GV/m and a loss factor similar to that existing in communication optical fibers 1   dB/km (tan⁡δ∼10^{-11}, the temperature increase is less than 1 K and the heat flow is of the order of 1   W/cm^{2}, which is 3 orders of magnitude lower than the known technological limit for heat dissipation. Obviously, using materials with a significantly higher loss tangent may lead to unacceptable temperatures and temperature gradients as well as confinement difficulties and phase mismatch.

  5. Factor Structure of Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale in Malaysian patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Satpal; Zainal, Nor Zuraida; Low, Wah Yun; Ramasamy, Ravindran; Sidhu, Jaideep Singh

    2015-05-01

    The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) is a common screening instrument used to determine the levels of anxiety and depression experienced by a patient and has been extensively used in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). This study aimed to establish the factor structure of HADS in a Malaysian sample of 189 patients with CAD. Factor analysis of HADS using principal component analysis with varimax rotation yielded 3 factors. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the use of HADS in assessing 3 distinct dimensions of psychological distress--namely, anxiety, anhedonia, and psychomotor retardation. The HADS showed good internal consistency and was found to be a valid measure of psychological distress among Malaysian patients with CAD. However, low mean scores on the original 2 factors--that is, anxiety and depression--and also on the 2 depression subscales--anhedonia and psychomotor retardation--suggests that the recommended cutoff score to screen for psychological distress among CAD patients be reevaluated. Further research to determine the generalizability and consistency for the tridimensional structure of the HADS in Malaysia is recommended. © 2014 APJPH.

  6. Determining erosion relevant soil characteristics with a small-scale rainfall simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindewolf, M.; Schmidt, J.

    2009-04-01

    The use of soil erosion models is of great importance in soil and water conservation. Routine application of these models on the regional scale is not at least limited by the high parameter demands. Although the EROSION 3D simulation model is operating with a comparable low number of parameters, some of the model input variables could only be determined by rainfall simulation experiments. The existing data base of EROSION 3D was created in the mid 90s based on large-scale rainfall simulation experiments on 22x2m sized experimental plots. Up to now this data base does not cover all soil and field conditions adequately. Therefore a new campaign of experiments would be essential to produce additional information especially with respect to the effects of new soil management practices (e.g. long time conservation tillage, non tillage). The rainfall simulator used in the actual campaign consists of 30 identic modules, which are equipped with oscillating rainfall nozzles. Veejet 80/100 (Spraying Systems Co., Wheaton, IL) are used in order to ensure best possible comparability to natural rainfalls with respect to raindrop size distribution and momentum transfer. Central objectives of the small-scale rainfall simulator are - effectively application - provision of comparable results to large-scale rainfall simulation experiments. A crucial problem in using the small scale simulator is the restriction on rather small volume rates of surface runoff. Under this conditions soil detachment is governed by raindrop impact. Thus impact of surface runoff on particle detachment cannot be reproduced adequately by a small-scale rainfall simulator With this problem in mind this paper presents an enhanced small-scale simulator which allows a virtual multiplication of the plot length by feeding additional sediment loaded water to the plot from upstream. Thus is possible to overcome the plot length limited to 3m while reproducing nearly similar flow conditions as in rainfall experiments on

  7. Implementation of Grid-computing Framework for Simulation in Multi-scale Structural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Data Iranata

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A new grid-computing framework for simulation in multi-scale structural analysis is presented. Two levels of parallel processing will be involved in this framework: multiple local distributed computing environments connected by local network to form a grid-based cluster-to-cluster distributed computing environment. To successfully perform the simulation, a large-scale structural system task is decomposed into the simulations of a simplified global model and several detailed component models using various scales. These correlated multi-scale structural system tasks are distributed among clusters and connected together in a multi-level hierarchy and then coordinated over the internet. The software framework for supporting the multi-scale structural simulation approach is also presented. The program architecture design allows the integration of several multi-scale models as clients and servers under a single platform. To check its feasibility, a prototype software system has been designed and implemented to perform the proposed concept. The simulation results show that the software framework can increase the speedup performance of the structural analysis. Based on this result, the proposed grid-computing framework is suitable to perform the simulation of the multi-scale structural analysis.

  8. Factor structure of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS in German coronary heart disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Colin R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression and anxiety in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD are associated with a poorer prognosis. Therefore the screening for psychological distress is strongly recommended in cardiac rehabilitation. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS is a widely used screening tool that has demonstrated good sensitivity and specificity for mental disorders. Methods We assessed mental distress in in-patient cardiac rehabilitation in Germany. The factor structure of the German language version of the HADS was investigated in 1320 patients with CHD. Exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were used to determine the underlying factor structure of the instrument. Results Three-factor models were found to offer a superior fit to the data compared to two-factor (anxiety and depression models. The German language HADS performs similarly to the English language version of the instrument in CHD patients. The German language HADS fundamentally comprises a tri-dimensional underlying factor structure (labelled by Friedman et al. as psychomotor agitation, psychic anxiety and depression. Conclusion Despite of clinical usefulness in screening for mental disturbances the construct validity of the HADS is not clear. The resulting scores of the tri-dimensional model can be interpreted as psychomotor agitation, psychic anxiety, and depression in individual patient data or clinical investigations.

  9. Understanding multi-scale structural evolution in granular systems through gMEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette

    2013-06-01

    We show how the rheological response of a material to applied loads can be systematically coded, analyzed and succinctly summarized, according to an individual grain's property (e.g. kinematics). Individual grains are considered as their own smart sensor akin to microelectromechanical systems (e.g. gyroscopes, accelerometers), each capable of recognizing their evolving role within self-organizing building block structures (e.g. contact cycles and force chains). A symbolic time series is used to represent their participation in such self-assembled building blocks and a complex network summarizing their interrelationship with other grains is constructed. In particular, relationships between grain time series are determined according to the information theory Hamming distance or the metric Euclidean distance. We then use topological distance to find network communities enabling groups of grains at remote physical metric distances in the material to share a classification. In essence grains with similar structural and functional roles at different scales are identified together. This taxonomy distills the dissipative structural rearrangements of grains down to its essential features and thus provides pointers for objective physics-based internal variable formalisms used in the construction of robust predictive continuum models.

  10. Reliability of the factor structure of the Multidimensional Scale of Interpersonal Reactivity (EMRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton S. Formiga

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to check the internal consistency and factor structure evaluative of the empathy scale in a high school and college sample in the state of Minas Gerais. The instruments that measure empathy can be easily found, however, of the existing, just multidimensional scale of interpersonal reactivity (Emri is the theoretical framework that has far more and better organized, and the scale that is most commonly used to assess this construct. Participated 488 subjects, male and female, with ages from 14-54 years old, distributed in primary and college levels in Patrocínio-MG composed this study sample. The subjects answered the Multidimensional Scale of Interpersonal Reactivity and socio-demographic data. From an equation analysis and structural modeling were observed psychometric indicators that assured the structural consistency of the scale, promoting in the security of the measure theoretical construct of empathy.

  11. Laboratory-Scale Melter for Determination of Melting Rate of Waste Glass Feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Schweiger, Michael J.; Buchmiller, William C.; Matyas, Josef

    2012-01-09

    The purpose of this study was to develop the laboratory-scale melter (LSM) as a quick and inexpensive method to determine the processing rate of various waste glass slurry feeds. The LSM uses a 3 or 4 in. diameter-fused quartz crucible with feed and off-gas ports on top. This LSM setup allows cold-cap formation above the molten glass to be directly monitored to obtain a steady-state melting rate of the waste glass feeds. The melting rate data from extensive scaled-melter tests with Hanford Site high-level wastes performed for the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant have been compiled. Preliminary empirical model that expresses the melting rate as a function of bubbling rate and glass yield were developed from the compiled database. The two waste glass feeds with most melter run data were selected for detailed evaluation and model development and for the LSM tests so the melting rates obtained from LSM tests can be compared with those from scaled-melter tests. The present LSM results suggest the LSM setup can be used to determine the glass production rates for the development of new glass compositions or feed makeups that are designed to increase the processing rate of the slurry feeds.

  12. Coulometric-potentiometric determination of autoprotolysis constant and relative acidity scale of water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džudović Radmila M.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoprotolysis constant and relative acidity scale of water were determined by applying the coulometric-potentiometric method and a hydrogen/palladium (H2/Pd generator anode. In the described procedure for the evaluation of autoprotolysis constant, a strong base generated coulometrically at the platinum cathode in situ in the electrolytic cell, in presence of sodium perchlorate as the supporting electrolyte, is titrated with hydrogen ions obtained by the anodic oxidation of hydrogen dissolved in palladium electrode. The titration was carried out with a glass-SCE electrode pair at 25.0±0.1°C. The value obtained pKw = 13.91 ± 0.06 is in agreement with literature data. The range of acidity scale of water is determined from the difference between the halfneutralization potentials of electrogenerated perchloric acid and that of sodium hydroxide in a sodium perchlorate medium. The halfneutralization potentials were measured using both a glass-SCE and a (H2/Pdind-SCE electrode pairs. A wider range of relative acidity scale of water was obtained with the glass-SCE electrode pair.

  13. Catchment-scale determinants of nonindigenous minnow richness in the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Brandon K.; Midway, Stephen R.; DeWeber, Jefferson T.; Wagner, Tyler

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the drivers of biological invasions is critical for preserving aquatic biodiversity. Stream fishes make excellent model taxa for examining mechanisms driving species introduction success because their distributions are naturally limited by catchment boundaries. In this study, we compared the relative importance of catchment-scale abiotic and biotic predictors of native and nonindigenous minnow (Cyprinidae) richness in 170 catchments throughout the eastern United States. We compared historic and contemporary cyprinid distributional data to determine catchment-wise native/nonindigenous status for 152 species. Catchment-scale model predictor variables described natural (elevation, precipitation, flow accumulation) and anthropogenic (developed land cover, number of dams) abiotic features, as well as native congener richness. Native congener richness may represent either biotic resistance via interspecific competition, or trait preadaptation according to Darwin's naturalisation hypothesis. We used generalised linear mixed models to examine evidence supporting the relative roles of abiotic and biotic predictors of cyprinid introduction success. Native congener richness was positively correlated with nonindigenous cyprinid richness and was the most important variable predicting nonindigenous cyprinid richness. Mean elevation had a weak positive effect, and effects of other abiotic factors were insignificant and less important. Our results suggest that at this spatial scale, trait preadaptation may be more important than intrageneric competition for determining richness of nonindigenous fishes.

  14. A divide-and-conquer linear scaling three dimensional fragment method for large scale electronic structure calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Zhao, Zhengji; Meza, Juan; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2008-07-11

    We present a new linear scaling ab initio total energy electronic structure calculation method based on the divide-and-conquer strategy. This method is simple to implement, easily to parallelize, and produces very accurate results when compared with the direct ab initio method. The method has been tested using up to 8,000 processors, and has been used to calculate nanosystems up to 15,000 atoms.

  15. Chorus whistler wave source scales as determined from multipoint Van Allen Probe measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, Oleksiy; Mozer, Forrest; Blum, Lauren; Bonnell, John; Wygant, John

    2017-04-01

    Whistler-mode chorus waves are a particularly important process in outer radiation belt dynamics due to their key role in controlling the acceleration and scattering of electrons over a very wide energy range. The key parameters for both nonlinear and quasi-linear treatment of wave-particle interactions are the temporal and spatial scales of the wave source region and coherence of the wave field perturbations. Both of these scales, the source scale and the coherence scale, are not well-established experimentally, mostly because of a lack of VLF waveform data. We present an unprecedentedly long interval of coordinated VLF waveform measurements (sampled at 16384 s-1) aboard the two Van Allen Probes spacecraft. The cross spacecraft distance varied from about 100 up to 5000 km. Using time-domain correlation techniques, the chorus source regions have been determined to be about 450-550 km for upper band chorus waves with amplitude less than 100 pT and up to 1000 km for larger amplitude lower band chorus waves. The ratio between wave amplitudes measured on the two spacecraft is also examined and reveals that the wave amplitude distribution within a region of chorus element generation can be well approximated by the Gaussian with the characteristic distance r0 around 300 km. This work was supported by the JHU/APL contract 922613 (RBSP-EFW) and NASA Grant NNX16AF85G.

  16. Femtosecond structural dynamics on the atomic length scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dongfang

    2014-03-15

    This thesis reports on the development and application of two different but complementary ultrafast electron diffraction setups built at the Max Planck Research Department for Structural Dynamics. One is an ultra-compact femtosecond electron diffraction (FED) setup (Egun300), which is currently operational (with a maximum electron energy of 150 keV) and provides ultrashort (∝300 fs) and bright (∝10 e/μm{sup 2}) electron bunches. The other one, named as Relativistic Electron Gun for Atomic Exploration (REGAE) is a radio frequency driven 2 to 5 MeV FED setup built in collaboration with different groups from DESY. REGAE was developed as a facility that will provide high quality diffraction with sufficient coherence to even address structural protein dynamics and with electron pulses as short as 20 fs (FWHM). As one of the first students in Prof. R.J. Dwayne Miller's group, I led the femtosecond (fs) laser sub-group at REGAE being responsible for the construction of different key optical elements required to drive both of aforementioned FED systems. A third harmonic generation (THG) and a nonlinear optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) have been used for the photo-generation of ultrashort electron bursts as well as sample laser excitation. Different diagnostic tools have been constructed to monitor the performance of the fs optical system. A fast autocorrelator was developed to provide on the fly pulse duration correction. A transient-grating frequency-resolved optical gating (TG-FROG) was built to obtain detail information about the characteristics of fs optical pulse, i.e. phase and amplitude of its spectral components. In addition to these optical setups, I developed a fs optical pump-probe system, which supports broadband probe pulses. This setup was successfully applied to investigate the semiconductor-to-metal photoinduced phase transition in VO{sub 2} and the ultrafast photo-reduction mechanism of graphene oxide. In regard to FED setups, I have been

  17. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koeck, Philip J.B., E-mail: Philip.Koeck@ki.se

    2016-02-15

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. - Highlights: • I present theory and simulations for imaging proteins using annular dark field transmission electron microscopy and investigate its suitability for 3D-reconstruction. • I show that the images are approximately proportional to the square of the projected electrostatic potential within a given passband ). • 3D-reconstructions show errors in the interior of the molecule. More accurate maps might be calculated by reconstruction algorithms that take into account non-linear image formation.

  18. Spatial Scales of Genetic Structure in Free-Standing and Strangler Figs (Ficus, Moraceae Inhabiting Neotropical Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Heer

    Full Text Available Wind-borne pollinating wasps (Agaonidae can transport fig (Ficus sp., Moraceae pollen over enormous distances (> 100 km. Because of their extensive breeding areas, Neotropical figs are expected to exhibit weak patterns of genetic structure at local and regional scales. We evaluated genetic structure at the regional to continental scale (Panama, Costa Rica, and Peru for the free-standing fig species Ficus insipida. Genetic differentiation was detected only at distances > 300 km (Jost´s Dest = 0.68 ± 0.07 & FST = 0.30 ± 0.03 between Mesoamerican and Amazonian sites and evidence for phylogeographic structure (RST>>permuted RST was only significant in comparisons between Central and South America. Further, we assessed local scale spatial genetic structure (SGS, d ≤ 8 km in Panama and developed an agent-based model parameterized with data from F. insipida to estimate minimum pollination distances, which determine the contribution of pollen dispersal on SGS. The local scale data for F. insipida was compared to SGS data collected for an additional free-standing fig, F. yoponensis (subgenus Pharmacosycea, and two species of strangler figs, F. citrifolia and F. obtusifolia (subgenus Urostigma sampled in Panama. All four species displayed significant SGS (mean Sp = 0.014 ± 0.012. Model simulations indicated that most pollination events likely occur at distances > > 1 km, largely ruling out spatially limited pollen dispersal as the determinant of SGS in F. insipida and, by extension, the other fig species. Our results are consistent with the view that Ficus develops fine-scale SGS primarily as a result of localized seed dispersal and/or clumped seedling establishment despite extensive long-distance pollen dispersal. We discuss several ecological and life history factors that could have species- or subgenus-specific impacts on the genetic structure of Neotropical figs.

  19. Morphology Characterization of PP/Clay Nanocomposites Across the Length Scales of the Structural Architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szazdi, Laszlo; Abranyi, Agnes; Pukansky Jr, Bela; Vancso, Gyula J.; Pukanszky, B.; Pukanszky, Bela

    2006-01-01

    The structure and rheological properties of a large number of layered silicate poly(propylene) nanocomposites were studied with widely varying compositions. Morphology characterization at different length scales was achieved by SEM, TEM, and XRD. Rheological measurements supplied additional

  20. Gauged extended supergravity without cosmological constant no-scale structure and supersymmetry breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Andrianopoli, Laura; Ferrara, Sergio; Lledó, M A

    2003-01-01

    We consider the interplay of duality symmetries and gauged isometries of supergravity models giving N-extended, spontaneously broken supergravity with a no-scale structure. Some examples, motivated by superstring and M-theory compactifications are described.

  1. The Development of Large Scale Cosmic Structure:. A Theoretician's Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    2001-03-01

    The study of cosmology, the origin, nature and future evolution of structure in the universe, has been totally transformed in the last decade, and computers have played a major role in the change. New theories have arisen from particle physics which make the subject, formerly almost a branch of philosophy, into quantitative science. Initial, semi-quantitative tests of these theories, either using data on galaxy distributions in the local universe or the cosmic background radiation fluctuations reaching us from the distant universe, indicate rough agreement with the simplest predictions of the theories. But now that fully three-dimensional, time-dependent numerical simulations can be made on modern, parallel architecture computers, we can examine (using good physical modelling) the detailed quantitative predictions of the various theories that have been proposed to see which, if any, can produce an output consistent with the real world being revealed to us by the latest ground-and space-based instruments. Using these tools, we have been able to reduce to a small number the currently viable options for the correct cosmological theory. At present, the most acceptable model, passing all presently applied tests, is the low density but flat Cold Dark Matter model with Ωbaryon = 0.04, ΩCDM = 0.26, ΩLambda = 0.70. The nature of the "cosmological constant" presents a challenging problem of physics.

  2. Coupling Fine-Scale Root and Canopy Structure Using Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady S. Hardiman

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Ecosystem physical structure, defined by the quantity and spatial distribution of biomass, influences a range of ecosystem functions. Remote sensing tools permit the non-destructive characterization of canopy and root features, potentially providing opportunities to link above- and belowground structure at fine spatial resolution in functionally meaningful ways. To test this possibility, we employed ground-based portable canopy LiDAR (PCL and ground penetrating radar (GPR along co-located transects in forested sites spanning multiple stages of ecosystem development and, consequently, of structural complexity. We examined canopy and root structural data for coherence (i.e., correlation in the frequency of spatial variation at multiple spatial scales ≤10 m within each site using wavelet analysis. Forest sites varied substantially in vertical canopy and root structure, with leaf area index and root mass more becoming even vertically as forests aged. In all sites, above- and belowground structure, characterized as mean maximum canopy height and root mass, exhibited significant coherence at a scale of 3.5–4 m, and results suggest that the scale of coherence may increase with stand age. Our findings demonstrate that canopy and root structure are linked at characteristic spatial scales, which provides the basis to optimize scales of observation. Our study highlights the potential, and limitations, for fusing LiDAR and radar technologies to quantitatively couple above- and belowground ecosystem structure.

  3. MMPI-A Scale-Level Factor Structure: Replication in a Clinical Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Robert P.; Krishnamurthy, Radhika

    1997-01-01

    The scale-level factor structure of the adolescent form of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-A) was examined in a clinical sample of 358 adolescents receiving psychiatric services. Nine factors accounted for 75.6% of total variance in scale and subscale raw scores. Findings support use of the MMPI-A for assessment of…

  4. Examination of the Spanish Trait Meta-Mood Scale-24 Factor Structure in a Mexican Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia Vázquez, Juan Antonio; Rubio Sosa, Juan Carlos A.; French, Brian F.

    2015-01-01

    The Trait Meta-Mood Scale (TMMS) is an emotional intelligence (EI) assessment originally developed for the U.S. population. This scale measures three EI factors--attention, clarity, and repair--to evaluate how an individual perceives one's own EI skills. Although the TMMS has been adapted for use in several languages and cultures, the structure of…

  5. A Structural Equation Modelling of the Academic Self-Concept Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matovu, Musa

    2014-01-01

    The study aimed at validating the academic self-concept scale by Liu and Wang (2005) in measuring academic self-concept among university students. Structural equation modelling was used to validate the scale which was composed of two subscales; academic confidence and academic effort. The study was conducted on university students; males and…

  6. Relationship between microbial activity and microbial community structure in six full-scale anaerobic digesters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regueiro, L.; Veiga, P.; Figueroa, M.; Alonso-Gutierrez, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lema, J.M.; Carballa, M.

    2012-01-01

    High activity levels and balanced anaerobic microbial communities are necessary to attain proper anaerobic digestion performance. Therefore, this work was focused on the kinetic performance and the microbial community structure of six full-scale anaerobic digesters and one lab-scale co-digester.

  7. Factorial Structure of Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale among Crack-Cocaine Drug Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jichuan; Siegal, Harvey A.; Falck, Russell S.; Carlson, Robert G.

    2001-01-01

    Used nine different confirmatory factor analysis models to test the factorial structure of Rosenberg's (M. Rosenberg, 1965) self-esteem scale with a sample of 430 crack-cocaine users. Results partly support earlier research to show a single global self-esteem factor underlying responses to the Rosenberg scale, method effects associated with item…

  8. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing of PZT thick film micro-scale structures

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, D; Zhu, X.; Liang, J.; Ren, T.; Zha, W.; Dong,W.; Rocks, SA; Dorey, RA; Xu, Z; Wang, X

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. This paper reports the use of a printing technique, called electrohydrodynamic jet printing, for producing PZT thick film micro-scale structures without additional material removing processes. The PZT powder was ball-milled and the effect of milling time on the particle size was examined. This ball-milling process can significantly reduce the PZT particle size and help to prepare stable composite slurry suitable for the E-Jet printing. The PZT micro-scale structures with ...

  9. Egg distribution, bottom topography and small-scale cod population structure in a coastal marine system

    OpenAIRE

    Knutsen, Halvor; Olsen, Espen Moland; Ciannelli, Lorenzo; Espeland, Sigurd Heiberg; Knutsen, Jan Atle; Simonsen, Jan Henrik; Skreslet, Stig; Stenseth, Nils Christian

    2007-01-01

    Coastal marine species with pelagic egg and larval stages, such as the Atlantic cod Gadus morhua, can be structured into genetically distinct local populations on a surprisingly small geographic scale considering their dispersal potential. Mechanisms responsible for such small-scale genetic structure may involve homing of adults to their natal spawning grounds, but also local retention of pelagic eggs and larvae. For example, spawning within sheltered fjord habitats is expected to favour loca...

  10. Global Scale Determination of "Drainable" Water Resources by GRACE and/or Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riegger, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    In the context of water resources management and climate change there is an ongoing discussion on how to assess available water resources. A rate based definition for a sustainable use of water resources (given by long term recharge) (Sophocleous 1997, Bredehoeft 2002, Zhou 2009) does not help to determine the absolute volume of available resources. Thus the attempt was made to estimate the volume of the respective groundwater resources based on homogeneous assumptions for aquifers with respect to thickness, porosity and accessibility (Nace [1969] and Korzun [1978]). As ground based measurements of storage compartments like groundwater, surface water, snow water equivalent and soil moisture are point measurements the determination of total water storage is still quite inaccurate and unreliable on large spatial scales. Recent GRACE measurements allow to determine mass variations of global scale catchments. These mass variations do not directly represent the absolute storage volumes, which could be considerably larger than the mass variations themselves, yet cannot be recognized by GRACE, as they correspond to a static mass offset. In addition the mass variations comprise all storage compartments and thus do not allow to distinguish different storage compartments such as hydraulically coupled components contributing to river runoff and those which are not coupled like isolated surface water, soil moisture and snow / ice. Investigations of the Runoff - Storage relationship by GRACE and remote sensing however allow to discriminate between coupled / uncoupled storage components of a catchment (Riegger & Tourian. 2014). The linear relationship found between runoff and the coupled storage components allows to determine the respective hydraulic time constant and - based on the reasonable assumption of proportionality - to quantify the respective mass offset, which corresponds to the mean drainable water storage. Thus the total "Drainable Storage" i.e. the absolute water

  11. INTRINSIC FINE-SCALE STRUCTURE IN COMPLEX MATERIALS: BEYOND GLOBAL CRYSTALLOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. MIGLIORI; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    Many important classes of materials owe their interesting properties to structures and patterns produced by local atomic deviations from ideal crystallographic positions. The pattern scale may vary from a few atomic spacings to many microns. In a macroscopic sample these deviations may still average to an ideal lattice while retaining the intrinsic fine-scale structures, or a phase transition may create a pattern of variants of a new crystallographic structure. We have carried out experiments on the formation of fine-scale structures in a range of materials, particularly those produced by phase transitions. We have used Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy for elastic properties and dissipation, neutron pair-distribution function, and electronic transport measurements to characterize samples. We have carried out extensive dynamical modeling based on Ginzberg-Landau formalisms to simulate the development and appearance of the structures. Our results highlight the importance of long-range strain fields and the intrinsic unstable equilibrium features of the materials studied.

  12. The role of environmental variables in structuring landscape-scale species distributions in seafloor habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraan, Casper; Aarts, Geert; Van der Meer, Jaap; Piersma, Theunis

    2010-06-01

    Ongoing statistical sophistication allows a shift from describing species' spatial distributions toward statistically disentangling the possible roles of environmental variables in shaping species distributions. Based on a landscape-scale benthic survey in the Dutch Wadden Sea, we show the merits of spatially explicit generalized estimating equations (GEE). The intertidal macrozoobenthic species, Macoma balthica, Cerastoderma edule, Marenzelleria viridis, Scoloplos armiger, Corophium volutator, and Urothoe poseidonis served as test cases, with median grain-size and inundation time as typical environmental explanatory variables. GEEs outperformed spatially naive generalized linear models (GLMs), and removed much residual spatial structure, indicating the importance of median grain-size and inundation time in shaping landscape-scale species distributions in the intertidal. GEE regression coefficients were smaller than those attained with GLM, and GEE standard errors were larger. The best fitting GEE for each species was used to predict species' density in relation to median grain-size and inundation time. Although no drastic changes were noted compared to previous work that described habitat suitability for benthic fauna in the Wadden Sea, our predictions provided more detailed and unbiased estimates of the determinants of species-environment relationships. We conclude that spatial GEEs offer the necessary methodological advances to further steps toward linking pattern to process.

  13. Discovery and Structure Determination of the Orphan Enzyme Isoxanthopterin Deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, R.S.; Swaminathan, S.; Agarwal, R.; Hitchcock, D.; Sauder, J. M.; Burley, S. K.; Raushel, F. M.

    2010-05-25

    Two previously uncharacterized proteins have been identified that efficiently catalyze the deamination of isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The genes encoding these two enzymes, NYSGXRC-9339a (gi|44585104) and NYSGXRC-9236b (gi|44611670), were first identified from DNA isolated from the Sargasso Sea as part of the Global Ocean Sampling Project. The genes were synthesized, and the proteins were subsequently expressed and purified. The X-ray structure of Sgx9339a was determined at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution (Protein Data Bank entry 2PAJ). This protein folds as a distorted ({beta}/{alpha}){sub 8} barrel and contains a single zinc ion in the active site. These enzymes are members of the amidohydrolase superfamily and belong to cog0402 within the clusters of orthologous groups (COG). Enzymes in cog0402 have previously been shown to catalyze the deamination of guanine, cytosine, S-adenosylhomocysteine, and 8-oxoguanine. A small compound library of pteridines, purines, and pyrimidines was used to probe catalytic activity. The only substrates identified in this search were isoxanthopterin and pterin 6-carboxylate. The kinetic constants for the deamination of isoxanthopterin with Sgx9339a were determined to be 1.0 s{sup -1}, 8.0 {micro}M, and 1.3 x 10{sup 5} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} (k{sub cat}, K{sub m}, and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, respectively). The active site of Sgx9339a most closely resembles the active site for 8-oxoguanine deaminase (Protein Data Bank entry 2UZ9). A model for substrate recognition of isoxanthopterin by Sgx9339a was proposed on the basis of the binding of guanine and xanthine in the active site of guanine deaminase. Residues critical for substrate binding appear to be conserved glutamine and tyrosine residues that form hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl oxygen at C4, a conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with N5, and another conserved threonine residue that forms hydrogen bonds with the carbonyl group at C7. These conserved active site

  14. Contrasting effects of sampling scale on insect herbivores distribution in response to canopy structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico S. Neves

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Species diversity of insect herbivores associated to canopy may vary local and geographically responding to distinct factors at different spatial scales. The aim of this study was to investigate how forest canopy structure affects insect herbivore species richness and abundance depending on feeding guilds´ specificities. We tested the hypothesis that habitat structure affects insect herbivore species richness and abundance differently to sap-sucking and chewing herbivore guilds. Two spatial scales were evaluated: inside tree crowns (fine spatial scale and canopy regions (coarse spatial scale. In three sampling sites we measured 120 tree crowns, grouped in five points with four contiguous tree crowns. Insects were sampled by beating method from each crown and data were summed up for analyzing each canopy region. In crowns (fine spatial scale we measured habitat structure: trunk circumference, tree height, canopy depth, number of ramifications and maximum ramification level. In each point, defined as a canopy region (coarse spatial scale, we measured habitat structure using a vertical cylindrical transect: tree species richness, leaf area, sum of strata heights and maximum canopy height. A principal component analysis based on the measured variables for each spatial scale was run to estimate habitat structure parameters. To test the effects of habitat structure upon herbivores, different general linear models were adjusted using the first two principal components as explanatory variables. Sap-sucking insect species richness and all herbivore abundances increased with size of crown at fine spatial scale. On the other hand, chewer species richness and abundance increased with resource quantity at coarse scale. Feeding specialization, resources availability, and agility are discussed as ecological causes of the found pattern.

  15. Development of mother's lifestyle scale during pregnancy with an approach to social determinants of health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoodi, Zohreh; Karimlou, Masoud; Sajjadi, Homeira; Dejman, Masoumeh; Vameghi, Meroe

    2013-03-31

    The present study was conducted to design and measure psychometrics of mothers' lifestyle scale during pregnancy with regards to Iranians' cultural norms and an approach to social determinants. this study, started by reviewing previous studies and exploring similar questionnaires that examine different domains of lifestyle (nutrition, exercising, self-care, smoking, using alcohol and illegal drugs, social relations, and stress control), then besides translating questions of the questionnaires , content of some questions was modified and proper statements with regards to  social determinant of health and Iranian cultural was used. Secondly, the validity of the designed instruments was determined using face, content, criterion, and construct validity. Thirdly, the reliability of the measurement instruments was examined using Cronbach's alpha. Participants were Healthy Iranian pregnant women (37-42 week) who refer to selected hospital for delivery. In the first step of the study, of the 222 questions obtained from a review of the related instruments, certain questions were omitted due to their irrelevance to social determinants of health and finally 160 questions were selected in 10 sections. After determining the face and content validity qualitatively and quantitatively and exploratory factor analysis, the number of questionnaire items was reduced to 132. Calculation of Cronbach's alpha confirmed the high internal consistency (0.76) of the questionnaire. This measurement instrument was designed in the context of the Iranian culture and sounded suitable for studying the pregnant women's lifestyle due to its appropriate validity and reliability, simplicity, and functionality in different situations.

  16. Engineering data management through different breakdown structures in a large-scale project

    CERN Document Server

    Hameri, A P

    2002-01-01

    This document discusses the benefits stemming from managing different project breakdown structures with an engineering data management system. The structures discussed are project breakdown structure (PBS), assembly breakdown structure (ABS), as-built structure and hardware breakdown. Each structure is presented from the quality management point of view and a practical example of each of the four structures is given to illustrate their differences, and to show what kind of engineering information is to be stored in these structures. The main underlying case is that of CERN and its global, over a decade-long Large Hadron Collider project. The approach used for managing the new particle accelerator project is benchmarked against the way large-scale shipbuilding projects are managed. It is concluded that several structures are needed to manage complex system projects, and that linking information between structures plays a crucial role for the overall success of the project. Information technology and the WWW ar...

  17. A four-scale homogenization analysis of creep of a nuclear containment structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, A.B. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); EDF R and D – Département MMC Site des Renardières – Avenue des Renardières - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France); Department of Applied Informatics in Construction, National University of Civil Engineering, 55 Giai Phong Road, Hai Ba Trung District, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Yvonnet, J., E-mail: julien.yvonnet@univ-paris-est.fr [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); He, Q.-C. [Université Paris-Est, Laboratoire Modélisation et Simulation Multi Échelle, MSME UMR 8208 CNRS, 5 bd Descartes, F-77454 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Toulemonde, C.; Sanahuja, J. [EDF R and D – Département MMC Site des Renardières – Avenue des Renardières - Ecuelles, 77818 Moret sur Loing Cedex (France)

    2013-12-15

    A four-scale approach is proposed to predict the creep behavior of a concrete structure. The behavior of concrete is modeled through a numerical multiscale methodology, by successively homogenizing the viscoelastic behavior at different scales, starting from the cement paste. The homogenization is carried out by numerically constructing an effective relaxation tensor at each scale. In this framework, the impact of modifying the microstructural parameters can be directly observed on the structure response, like the interaction of the creep of concrete with the prestressing tendons network, and the effects of an internal pressure which might occur during a nuclear accident.

  18. Determinants of vegetation distribution at continental scale. The contribution of natural and anthropogenic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Michelle; Svenning, J.-C.; Lykke, Anne Mette

    2011-01-01

    vegetation distribution across Africa. Vegetation types were extracted from the Global Land Cover Map for the year 2000, and the distribution of vegetation types modelled in terms of climate, soil and topography. Annual precipitation was the best predictor of the distribution of all vegetation types......It has long been debated what determines distribution of vegetation types, though this has rarely been tested at continental scale. We thus aimed to determine which vegetation types are most accurately predicted by natural environmental factors, and which of these factors best predict current......, and response curves showed that, at lower rainfall levels, an increase in precipitation brought on vegetation types with greater woody cover, though this pattern disappeared at higher rainfall levels. Subsequently, the influence of current and historic human impacts on the distribution of vegetation types...

  19. A new scaling approach for the mesoscale simulation of magnetic domain structures using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, B., E-mail: radhakrishnb@ornl.gov; Eisenbach, M.; Burress, T.A.

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Developed new scaling technique for dipole–dipole interaction energy. • Developed new scaling technique for exchange interaction energy. • Used scaling laws to extend atomistic simulations to micrometer length scale. • Demonstrated transition from mono-domain to vortex magnetic structure. • Simulated domain wall width and transition length scale agree with experiments. - Abstract: A new scaling approach has been proposed for the spin exchange and the dipole–dipole interaction energy as a function of the system size. The computed scaling laws are used in atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of magnetic moment evolution to predict the transition from single domain to a vortex structure as the system size increases. The width of a 180° – domain wall extracted from the simulated structures is in close agreement with experimentally values for an F–Si alloy. The transition size from a single domain to a vortex structure is also in close agreement with theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for Fe.

  20. Seascape attributes, at different spatial scales, determine settlement and post-settlement of juvenile fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadros, Amalia; Moranta, Joan; Cardona, Luis; Thiriet, Pierre; Pastor, Jérémy; Arroyo, Nina Larissa; Cheminée, Adrien

    2017-02-01

    Concern has increased in recent decades regarding processes influencing fish juvenile density distributions; indeed, juveniles determine the replenishment of populations and their habitats are often found in shallow coastal areas, where human impacts are concentrated. We aimed to measure the relative importance of seascape attributes at various spatial scales (from seascape to microhabitat) in fish settlement and post-settlement processes. Along the coast of Minorca Island (NW Mediterranean), Diplodus sargus settlement variability was higher among the southern coast compared to the variability in the northern one. Independently of coast location, sheltered nurseries presented lower settlement intensity and recruitment levels compared to exposed ones. Such patterns suggested differential larval supply according to exposure level. Furthermore, subsequent density-dependent post-settlement mortality reduced the cove-specific variability of initial settlement. In addition, inside each cove, juveniles displayed ontogenetic changes of microhabitat use: smaller juveniles were more abundant in the most heterogeneous microhabitat. Consequently, juvenile density distributions responded to seascape attributes at different spatial scales; this suggests that both lager scale attributes and microhabitat influence both settlement and post-settlement processes, and may be limiting for recruitment. Our study demonstrated the importance of a diversified seascape to promote fish population replenishment.

  1. Determinants of the distribution of nitrogen-cycling microbial communities at the landscape scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bru, D; Ramette, A; Saby, N P A; Dequiedt, S; Ranjard, L; Jolivet, C; Arrouays, D; Philippot, L

    2011-03-01

    Little information is available regarding the landscape-scale distribution of microbial communities and its environmental determinants. However, a landscape perspective is needed to understand the relative importance of local and regional factors and land management for the microbial communities and the ecosystem services they provide. In the most comprehensive analysis of spatial patterns of microbial communities to date, we investigated the distribution of functional microbial communities involved in N-cycling and of the total bacterial and crenarchaeal communities over 107 sites in Burgundy, a 31,500 km(2) region of France, using a 16 × 16 km(2) sampling grid. At each sampling site, the abundance of total bacteria, crenarchaea, nitrate reducers, denitrifiers- and ammonia oxidizers were estimated by quantitative PCR and 42 soil physico-chemical properties were measured. The relative contributions of land use, spatial distance, climatic conditions, time, and soil physico-chemical properties to the spatial distribution of the different communities were analyzed by canonical variation partitioning. Our results indicate that 43-85% of the spatial variation in community abundances could be explained by the measured environmental parameters, with soil chemical properties (mostly pH) being the main driver. We found spatial autocorrelation up to 739 km and used geostatistical modelling to generate predictive maps of the distribution of microbial communities at the landscape scale. The present study highlights the potential of a spatially explicit approach for microbial ecology to identify the overarching factors driving the spatial heterogeneity of microbial communities even at the landscape scale.

  2. Scale Issues in the Assessment of Pesticide Leaching Vulnerability for Loamy Structured Soils in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van der Keur, Peter; Iversen, Bo Vangsø; Hollis, John

    Three approaches for vulnerability mapping of pesticide leaching for Denmark are considered. The first method is based on an approach developed at the European spatial scale, the second method relies on mapping soil hydraulic properties at a finer scale derived from a national soil property map...... for vulnerability due to change in climate and agricultural land management. In the European scale approach soil types in Denmark are classified using a decision tree structure that accounts for both soil texture as well as the lower boundary condition available from soil survey data at the European scale...... saturated conductivity. It is expected that loamy soils are vulnerable at both the low and high values as low values indicate risk for preferential flow, whereas high values correspond to a more coarse soil structure with high soil hydraulic conductivity. It appears that the coarse spatial scale of derived...

  3. Toward resolving small-scale structures in ionospheric convection from SuperDARN

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, R.; Villain, J.-P.; Senior, C.; Barthes, L.; Hanuise, C.; Cerisier, J.-C.; Thorolfsson, A.

    1999-09-01

    The combination of radial velocities measured by a pair of Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) HF coherent radars gives, in their common field of view, the velocity vectors in a plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. The standard merging is based on a natural grid defined by the beam intersections, which provides a resolution varying between 90 and 180 km (depending upon the distance to the radars). This allows the description of structures with a typical scale size (L) of the order of 500 km. The present study is devoted to a merging method which takes advantage of individual radar grids to enhance the resolution (L ≈ 200 km). After a brief description of the standard merging method, we define the high-resolution grid and discuss the potential problems which have to be overcome. The first problem concerns the localization of the scattering volume, whereas the second one deals with the independence of the velocity vectors. These two limitations have been addressed in previous studies [André et al., 1997; Barthes et al., 1998]. In the method proposed here, several velocity vectors are determined at each grid point, from which the selection is made by using the hypothesis of minimization of the divergence magnitude. The selected map is the one which minimizes the divergence. The performances are tested and compared to the standard merging algorithm through simulated double vortices. Finally, we apply this method to real data, and show, through two examples, its ability to describe small-scale structures (L ≈ 200 km).

  4. Factorial Structure and Invariance Analysis of the Sense of Belonging Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Esau; Simon, Merril A.

    2010-01-01

    Using a diverse sample of university students, this article describes outcomes of a confirmatory factor analysis and a group invariance analysis conducted to validate the factorial structure of the Sense of Belonging Scales. Accordingly, a modified factor structure departing significantly from that of the original authors is proposed. (Contains 5…

  5. Factorial Structure of the New Ecological Paradigm Scale in Two French Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury-Bahi, Ghozlane; Marcouyeux, Aurore; Renard, Elise; Roussiau, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The principal objective of this research is to test the factorial structure of the New Ecological Paradigm scale on a population of men and women residing in France. The tested model is a second-order factorial model. This factorial structure is evaluated on two separate samples to test the stability of the solution (a first sample of 253…

  6. Initial condition effects on large scale structure in numerical simulations of plane mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullan, W. A.; Garrett, S. J.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, Large Eddy Simulations are performed on the spatially developing plane turbulent mixing layer. The simulated mixing layers originate from initially laminar conditions. The focus of this research is on the effect of the nature of the imposed fluctuations on the large-scale spanwise and streamwise structures in the flow. Two simulations are performed; one with low-level three-dimensional inflow fluctuations obtained from pseudo-random numbers, the other with physically correlated fluctuations of the same magnitude obtained from an inflow generation technique. Where white-noise fluctuations provide the inflow disturbances, no spatially stationary streamwise vortex structure is observed, and the large-scale spanwise turbulent vortical structures grow continuously and linearly. These structures are observed to have a three-dimensional internal geometry with branches and dislocations. Where physically correlated provide the inflow disturbances a "streaky" streamwise structure that is spatially stationary is observed, with the large-scale turbulent vortical structures growing with the square-root of time. These large-scale structures are quasi-two-dimensional, on top of which the secondary structure rides. The simulation results are discussed in the context of the varying interpretations of mixing layer growth that have been postulated. Recommendations are made concerning the data required from experiments in order to produce accurate numerical simulation recreations of real flows.

  7. Factor Structure and Psychometric Properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Sawchuk, Craig N.; Moretz, Melanie W.; David, Bieke; Armstrong, Thomas; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    The present investigation examined the factor structure and psychometric properties of the Injection Phobia Scale-Anxiety (IPS-Anx). Principal components analysis of IPS-Anx items in Study 1 (n = 498) revealed a 2-factor structure consisting of Distal Fear and Contact Fear. However, CFA results in Study 2 (n = 567) suggest that a 1-factor…

  8. Application of Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling to Evaluate the Academic Motivation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guay, Frédéric; Morin, Alexandre J. S.; Litalien, David; Valois, Pierre; Vallerand, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    In this research, the authors examined the construct validity of scores of the Academic Motivation Scale using exploratory structural equation modeling. Study 1 and Study 2 involved 1,416 college students and 4,498 high school students, respectively. First, results of both studies indicated that the factor structure tested with exploratory…

  9. Scale-dependent genetic structure of the Idaho giant salamander (Dicamptodon aterrimus) in stream networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindy B. Mullen; H. Arthur Woods; Michael K. Schwartz; Adam J. Sepulveda; Winsor H. Lowe

    2010-01-01

    The network architecture of streams and rivers constrains evolutionary, demographic and ecological processes of freshwater organisms. This consistent architecture also makes stream networks useful for testing general models of population genetic structure and the scaling of gene flow. We examined genetic structure and gene flow in the facultatively paedomorphic Idaho...

  10. Unequivocal determination of complex molecular structures using anisotropic NMR measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yizhou; Saurí, Josep; Mevers, Emily; Peczuh, Mark W; Hiemstra, Henk; Clardy, Jon; Martin, Gary E; Williamson, R Thomas

    2017-04-07

    Assignment of complex molecular structures from nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data can be prone to interpretational mistakes. Residual dipolar couplings and residual chemical shift anisotropy provide a spatial view of the relative orientations between bonds and chemical shielding tensors, respectively, regardless of separation. Consequently, these data constitute a reliable reporter of global structural validity. Anisotropic NMR parameters can be used to evaluate investigators' structure proposals or structures generated by computer-assisted structure elucidation. Application of the method to several complex structure assignment problems shows promising results that signal a potential paradigm shift from conventional NMR data interpretation, which may be of particular utility for compounds not amenable to x-ray crystallography. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. Scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration: evidence from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Linna; Lei, Yalin

    2013-01-01

    With the continued growth in demand for mineral resources and China's efforts in increasing investment in geological prospecting, fiscal investment in geological exploration becomes a research hotspot. This paper examines the yearly relationship among fiscal investment in geological exploration of the current term, that of the last term and prices of mining rights over the period 1999-2009. Hines and Catephores' investment acceleration model is applied to describe the scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration which are value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights and fiscal investment in the last term. The results indicate that when value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights or fiscal investment in the last term moves at 1 unit, fiscal investment in the current term will move 0.381, 1.094 or 0.907 units respectively. In order to determine the scale of fiscal investment in geological exploration for the current year, the Chinese government should take fiscal investment in geological exploration for the last year and the capital stock of the previous investments into account. In practice, combination of government fiscal investment in geological exploration with its performance evaluation can create a virtuous circle of capital management mechanism.

  12. Determination of fractional flow reserve (FFR) based on scaling laws: a simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jerry T.; Molloi, Sabee

    2008-07-01

    Fractional flow reserve (FFR) provides an objective physiological evaluation of stenosis severity. A technique that can measure FFR using only angiographic images would be a valuable tool in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. To perform this, the diseased blood flow can be measured with a first pass distribution analysis and the theoretical normal blood flow can be estimated from the total coronary arterial volume based on scaling laws. A computer simulation of the coronary arterial network was used to gain a better understanding of how hemodynamic conditions and coronary artery disease can affect blood flow, arterial volume and FFR estimation. Changes in coronary arterial flow and volume due to coronary stenosis, aortic pressure and venous pressure were examined to evaluate the potential use of flow and volume for FFR determination. This study showed that FFR can be estimated using arterial volume and a scaling coefficient corrected for aortic pressure. However, variations in venous pressure were found to introduce some error in FFR estimation. A relative form of FFR was introduced and was found to cancel out the influence of pressure on coronary flow, arterial volume and FFR estimation. The use of coronary flow and arterial volume for FFR determination appears promising.

  13. Scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration: evidence from China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linna Lu

    Full Text Available With the continued growth in demand for mineral resources and China's efforts in increasing investment in geological prospecting, fiscal investment in geological exploration becomes a research hotspot. This paper examines the yearly relationship among fiscal investment in geological exploration of the current term, that of the last term and prices of mining rights over the period 1999-2009. Hines and Catephores' investment acceleration model is applied to describe the scale determinants of fiscal investment in geological exploration which are value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights and fiscal investment in the last term. The results indicate that when value-added of mining rights, value of mining rights or fiscal investment in the last term moves at 1 unit, fiscal investment in the current term will move 0.381, 1.094 or 0.907 units respectively. In order to determine the scale of fiscal investment in geological exploration for the current year, the Chinese government should take fiscal investment in geological exploration for the last year and the capital stock of the previous investments into account. In practice, combination of government fiscal investment in geological exploration with its performance evaluation can create a virtuous circle of capital management mechanism.

  14. STRUCTURAL SCALE LIFE PREDICTION OF AERO STRUCTURES EXPERIENCING COMBINED EXTREME ENVIRONMENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Using Complex Variables to Estimate the Derivatives of Nonlinear Reduced-Order Models,” AIAA-2016-1707, 57th AIAA/ ASME /ASCE/AHS/ASC Structures, Structural Dynamics and Materials Conference, San Diego, CA, Jan 2016.

  15. Large-Scale Recombinant Expression and Purification of Human Tyrosinase Suitable for Structural Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelei Lai

    Full Text Available Human tyrosinase (TYR is a glycoprotein that initiates the first two reactions in the melanin biosynthesis pathway. Mutations in its encoding gene cause Oculocutaneous Albinism type I (OCA1, the most severe form of albinism, which is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by reduced or absent production of melanin in skin, hair and eyes. Despite extensive structural and characterization studies of its homologues in lower eukaryotic organisms, the catalytic mechanism of human TYR and the molecular basis of OCA1 are largely unknown. In this work, we have carried out a large-scale recombinant expression of TYR that has enabled us to obtain high yields of pure and active protein, required for crystallization trials and screening of skin whitening agents, which is highly demanded in the cosmetic industry. Addition of an N-terminal honeybee melittin signal peptide for secretion of the produced protein into the (protein-free medium, as well as a cleavable His-tag at the C-terminus, was crucial for increasing the yield of pure protein. We have successfully crystallized two TYR variants, in both glycosylated and deglycosylated forms, showing preliminary X-ray diffraction patterns at 3.5 Å resolution. Hence, we have established an expression and purification protocol suitable for the crystal structure determination of human TYR, which will give unique atomic insight into the nature and conformation of the residues that shape the substrate binding pocket that will ultimately lead to efficient compound design.

  16. Chameleon: Dynamic Color Mapping for Multi-Scale Structural Biology Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldin, Nicholas; Le Muzic, Mathieu; Waldner, Manuela; Gröller, Eduard; Goodsell, David; Ludovic, Autin; Viola, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    Visualization of structural biology data uses color to categorize or separate dense structures into particular semantic units. In multiscale models of viruses or bacteria, there are atoms on the finest level of detail, then amino-acids, secondary structures, macromolecules, up to the compartment level and, in all these levels, elements can be visually distinguished by color. However, currently only single scale coloring schemes are utilized that show information for one particular scale only. We present a novel technology which adaptively, based on the current scale level, adjusts the color scheme to depict or distinguish the currently best visible structural information. We treat the color as a visual resource that is distributed given a particular demand. The changes of the color scheme are seamlessly interpolated between the color scheme from the previous views into a given new one. With such dynamic multi-scale color mapping we ensure that the viewer is able to distinguish structural detail that is shown on any given scale. This technique has been tested by users with an expertise in structural biology and has been overall well received.

  17. Skin and scales of teleost fish: Simple structure but high performance and multiple functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernerey, Franck J.; Barthelat, Francois

    2014-08-01

    Natural and man-made structural materials perform similar functions such as structural support or protection. Therefore they rely on the same types of properties: strength, robustness, lightweight. Nature can therefore provide a significant source of inspiration for new and alternative engineering designs. We report here some results regarding a very common, yet largely unknown, type of biological material: fish skin. Within a thin, flexible and lightweight layer, fish skins display a variety of strain stiffening and stabilizing mechanisms which promote multiple functions such as protection, robustness and swimming efficiency. We particularly discuss four important features pertaining to scaled skins: (a) a strongly elastic tensile behavior that is independent from the presence of rigid scales, (b) a compressive response that prevents buckling and wrinkling instabilities, which are usually predominant for thin membranes, (c) a bending response that displays nonlinear stiffening mechanisms arising from geometric constraints between neighboring scales and (d) a robust structure that preserves the above characteristics upon the loss or damage of structural elements. These important properties make fish skin an attractive model for the development of very thin and flexible armors and protective layers, especially when combined with the high penetration resistance of individual scales. Scaled structures inspired by fish skin could find applications in ultra-light and flexible armor systems, flexible electronics or the design of smart and adaptive morphing structures for aerospace vehicles.

  18. A new scaling approach for the mesoscale simulation of magnetic domain structures using Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Eisenbach, M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Burress, Timothy A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-24

    A new scaling approach has been proposed for the spin exchange and the dipole–dipole interaction energy as a function of the system size. The computed scaling laws are used in atomistic Monte Carlo simulations of magnetic moment evolution to predict the transition from single domain to a vortex structure as the system size increases. The width of a 180° – domain wall extracted from the simulated structures is in close agreement with experimentally values for an F–Si alloy. In conclusion, the transition size from a single domain to a vortex structure is also in close agreement with theoretically predicted and experimentally measured values for Fe.

  19. Factor structure of the Italian version of the religious fundamentalism scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlucci, Leonardo; Tommasi, Marco; Saggino, Aristide

    2013-02-01

    The Religious Fundamentalism Scale was applied to an Italian group, composed of 250 participants, to assess if it could be considered a reliable measure of fundamentalism. All participants professed to be believers of the Catholic religion. The overall group was split randomly into two smaller groups. The data of the first group were analyzed with an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) to test the factor structure of the Italian version of the scale. The data of the second sample were analyzed with a confirmatory factor analysis, to test the factor structure that emerged from EFA. Results indicated a two-dimensional structure, composed of two correlated factors apparently representing believing and skeptical attitudes.

  20. Fuzzy Reasoning to More Accurately Determine Void Areas on Optical Micrographs of Composite Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominquez, Jesus A.; Tate, Lanetra C.; Wright, M. Clara; Caraccio, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Accomplishing the best-performing composite matrix (resin) requires that not only the processing method but also the cure cycle generate low-void-content structures. If voids are present, the performance of the composite matrix will be significantly reduced. This is usually noticed by significant reductions in matrix-dominated properties, such as compression and shear strength. Voids in composite materials are areas that are absent of the composite components: matrix and fibers. The characteristics of the voids and their accurate estimation are critical to determine for high performance composite structures. One widely used method of performing void analysis on a composite structure sample is acquiring optical micrographs or Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) images of lateral sides of the sample and retrieving the void areas within the micrographs/images using an image analysis technique. Segmentation for the retrieval and subsequent computation of void areas within the micrographs/images is challenging as the gray-scaled values of the void areas are close to the gray-scaled values of the matrix leading to the need of manually performing the segmentation based on the histogram of the micrographs/images to retrieve the void areas. The use of an algorithm developed by NASA and based on Fuzzy Reasoning (FR) proved to overcome the difficulty of suitably differentiate void and matrix image areas with similar gray-scaled values leading not only to a more accurate estimation of void areas on composite matrix micrographs but also to a faster void analysis process as the algorithm is fully autonomous.

  1. Equilibration of experimentally determined protein structures for molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Emily B; Vanvliet, Krystyn J

    2006-12-01

    Preceding molecular dynamics simulations of biomolecular interactions, the molecule of interest is often equilibrated with respect to an initial configuration. This so-called equilibration stage is required because the input structure is typically not within the equilibrium phase space of the simulation conditions, particularly in systems as complex as proteins, which can lead to artifactual trajectories of protein dynamics. The time at which nonequilibrium effects from the initial configuration are minimized-what we will call the equilibration time-marks the beginning of equilibrium phase-space exploration. Note that the identification of this time does not imply exploration of the entire equilibrium phase space. We have found that current equilibration methodologies contain ambiguities that lead to uncertainty in determining the end of the equilibration stage of the trajectory. This results in equilibration times that are either too long, resulting in wasted computational resources, or too short, resulting in the simulation of molecular trajectories that do not accurately represent the physical system. We outline and demonstrate a protocol for identifying the equilibration time that is based on the physical model of Normal Mode Analysis. We attain the computational efficiency required of large-protein simulations via a stretched exponential approximation that enables an analytically tractable and physically meaningful form of the root-mean-square deviation of atoms comprising the protein. We find that the fitting parameters (which correspond to physical properties of the protein) fluctuate initially but then stabilize for increased simulation time, independently of the simulation duration or sampling frequency. We define the end of the equilibration stage--and thus the equilibration time--as the point in the simulation when these parameters attain constant values. Compared to existing methods, our approach provides the objective identification of the time at

  2. CCDC 1416891: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : Methyl-triphenyl-germanium

    KAUST Repository

    Bernatowicz, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  3. CCDC 1408042: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : 6,13-dimesitylpentacene

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Xueliang

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  4. Possible uses of the layered structure found in the scales of Hoplia coerulea (Coleoptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneron, Jean-Pol; Rassart, Marie; Simonis, Priscilla; Colomer, Jean-Francois; Bay, Annick

    2009-08-01

    The male of the beetle Hoplia coerulea is known for its spectacular blue-violet iridescence. The blue coloration is caused by the presence of an interesting photonic structure inside the scales which cover the dorsal parts of the insect's body. This structure can be described as the stacking of chitin plates supporting arrays of parallel rods. The change of colour of this structure with humidity is investigated, as well as its response to some other external conditions, such as mechanical strain.

  5. Mechanism and scaling for convection of isolated structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, O.E.; Bian, N.H.; Naulin, V.

    2005-01-01

    Large-scale radial advection of isolated structures in nonuniformly magnetized plasmas is investigated. The underlying mechanism considered is due to the nonlinear evolution of interchange motions, without any presumption of plasma sheaths. Theoretical arguments supported by numerical simulations...... of the structures, compares favorably with recent experimental measurements of radially propagating blob structures in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas. (C) 2005 American Institute of Physics....

  6. Structure function scaling in a Reλ = 250 turbulent mixing layer

    KAUST Repository

    Attili, Antonio

    2011-12-22

    A highly resolved Direct Numerical Simulation of a spatially developing turbulent mixing layer is presented. In the fully developed region, the flow achieves a turbulent Reynolds number Reλ = 250, high enough for a clear separation between large and dissipative scales, so for the presence of an inertial range. Structure functions have been calculated in the self-similar region using velocity time series and Taylor\\'s frozen turbulence hypothesis. The Extended Self-Similarity (ESS) concept has been employed to evaluate relative scaling exponents. A wide range of scales with scaling exponents and intermittency levels equal to homogeneous isotropic turbulence has been identified. Moreover an additional scaling range exists for larger scales; it is characterized by smaller exponents, similar to the values reported in the literature for flows with strong shear.

  7. Determining the Mechanical Properties of Lattice Block Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmoth, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Lattice block structures and shape memory alloys possess several traits ideal for solving intriguing new engineering problems in industries such as aerospace, military, and transportation. Recent testing at the NASA Glenn Research Center has investigated the material properties of lattice block structures cast from a conventional aerospace titanium alloy as well as lattice block structures cast from nickel-titanium shape memory alloy. The lattice block structures for both materials were sectioned into smaller subelements for tension and compression testing. The results from the cast conventional titanium material showed that the expected mechanical properties were maintained. The shape memory alloy material was found to be extremely brittle from the casting process and only compression testing was completed. Future shape memory alloy lattice block structures will utilize an adjusted material composition that will provide a better quality casting. The testing effort resulted in baseline mechanical property data from the conventional titanium material for comparison to shape memory alloy materials once suitable castings are available.

  8. Analysis of Scaling Parameters of the Batch Unscented Transformation for Precision Orbit Determination using Satellite Laser Ranging Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyuk Kim

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The current study analyzes the effects of the scaling parameters of the batch unscented transformation on precision satellite orbit determination. Satellite laser ranging (SLR data are used in the orbit determination algorithm, which consists of dynamics model, observation model and filtering algorithm composed of the batch unscented transformation. TOPEX/Poseidon SLR data are used by utilizing the normal point (NP data observed from ground station. The filtering algorithm includes a repeated series of processes to determine the appropriate scaling parameters for the batch unscented transformation. To determine appropriate scaling parameters, general ranges of the scaling parameters of α, β, κ, λ are established. Depending on the range settings, each parameter was assigned to the filtering algorithm at regular intervals. Appropriate scaling parameters are determined for observation data obtained from several observatories, by analyzing the relationship between tuning properties of the scaling parameters and estimated orbit precision. The orbit determination of satellite using the batch unscented transformation can achieve levels of accuracy within several tens of cm with the appropriate scaling parameters. The analyses in the present study give insights into the roles of scaling parameters in the batch unscented transformation method.

  9. Large Scale Applications Using FBG Sensors: Determination of In-Flight Loads and Shape of a Composite Aircraft Wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Technological advances have enabled the development of a number of optical fiber sensing methods over the last few years. The most prevalent optical technique involves the use of fiber Bragg grating (FBG sensors. These small, lightweight sensors have many attributes that enable their use for a number of measurement applications. Although much literature is available regarding the use of FBGs for laboratory level testing, few publications in the public domain exist of their use at the operational level. Therefore, this paper gives an overview of the implementation of FBG sensors for large scale structures and applications. For demonstration, a case study is presented in which FBGs were used to determine the deflected wing shape and the out-of-plane loads of a 5.5-m carbon-composite wing of an ultralight aerial vehicle. The in-plane strains from the 780 FBG sensors were used to obtain the out-of-plane loads as well as the wing shape at various load levels. The calculated out-of-plane displacements and loads were within 4.2% of the measured data. This study demonstrates a practical method in which direct measurements are used to obtain critical parameters from the high distribution of FBG sensors. This procedure can be used to obtain information for structural health monitoring applications to quantify healthy vs. unhealthy structures.

  10. Analytical challenges of determining composition and structure in small volumes with applications to semiconductor technology, nanostructures and solid state science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhiyong; Kuhn, Markus; Johnson, David C.

    2017-03-01

    Determining the structure and composition of small volumes is vital to the ability to understand and control nanoscale properties and critical for advancing both fundamental science and applications, such as semiconductor device manufacturing. While metrology of nanoscale materials (nanoparticles, nanocomposites) and nanoscale semiconductor structures is challenging, both basic research and cutting edge technology benefit from new and enhanced analytical techniques. This focus issue contains articles describing approaches to overcome the challenges in obtaining statistically significant atomic-scale quantification of structure and composition in a variety of materials and devices using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography.

  11. Protein Structure Determination by Assembling Super-Secondary Structure Motifs Using Pseudocontact Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilla, Kala Bharath; Otting, Gottfried; Huber, Thomas

    2017-03-07

    Computational and nuclear magnetic resonance hybrid approaches provide efficient tools for 3D structure determination of small proteins, but currently available algorithms struggle to perform with larger proteins. Here we demonstrate a new computational algorithm that assembles the 3D structure of a protein from its constituent super-secondary structural motifs (Smotifs) with the help of pseudocontact shift (PCS) restraints for backbone amide protons, where the PCSs are produced from different metal centers. The algorithm, DINGO-PCS (3D assembly of Individual Smotifs to Near-native Geometry as Orchestrated by PCSs), employs the PCSs to recognize, orient, and assemble the constituent Smotifs of the target protein without any other experimental data or computational force fields. Using a universal Smotif database, the DINGO-PCS algorithm exhaustively enumerates any given Smotif. We benchmarked the program against ten different protein targets ranging from 100 to 220 residues with different topologies. For nine of these targets, the method was able to identify near-native Smotifs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. WHAT DETERMINES THE CAPITAL STRUCTURE OF LISTED FIRMS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floriniţa Duca

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the relative importance of four factors in the capital structure decisions of Romanian listed firms. The existing empirical research on capital structure has been largely confined to developed countries. The Romanian Financial Market has been developing at an exponential rate and dedicated research in the field is required. We used 100 firms listed in 2010 at the Bucharest Stock Exchange. The objective of this paper is to build on previous studies model all the important factors affecting capital structure decisions. We find that factors such as tangibility of assets, firm size, liquidity, and profitability have significant influences on the leverage structure chosen by firms.These results are believed to have significant implications for the theory of finance and to be of importance to the corporate treasure in choice of new financing and to the financial analyst.

  13. Structural determinants of reductive terpene cyclization in iridoid biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kries, Hajo; Caputi, Lorenzo; Stevenson, Clare E M

    2016-01-01

    The carbon skeleton of ecologically and pharmacologically important iridoid monoterpenes is formed in a reductive cyclization reaction unrelated to canonical terpene cyclization. Here we report the crystal structure of the recently discovered iridoid cyclase (from Catharanthus roseus) bound...

  14. Large-scale structural analysis: The structural analyst, the CSM Testbed and the NAS System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Macy, Steven C.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM testbed methods development environment is presented and some numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  15. Hierarchical, Dual-Scale Structures of Atomically Thin MoS2 for Tunable Wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghyun; Mun, Jihun; Wang, Michael Cai; Ashraf, Ali; Kang, Sang-Woo; Nam, SungWoo

    2017-03-08

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), a well-known solid lubricant for low friction surface coatings, has recently drawn attention as an analogue two-dimensional (2D) material beyond graphene. When patterned to produce vertically grown, nanoflower-structures, MoS2 shows promise as a functional material for hydrogen evolution catalysis systems, electrodes for alkali metal-ion batteries, and field-emission arrays. Whereas the wettability of graphene has been substantially investigated, that of MoS2 structures, especially nanoflowers, has remained relatively unexplored despite MoS2 nanoflower's potential in future applications. Here, we demonstrate that the wettability of MoS2 can be controlled by multiscale modulation of surface roughness through (1) tuning of the nanoflower structures by chemical vapor deposition synthesis and (2) tuning of microscale topography via mechanical strain. This multiscale modulation offers broadened tunability (80-155°) compared to single-scale tuning (90-130°). In addition, surface adhesion, determined from contact angle hysteresis (CAH), can also be tuned by multiscale surface roughness modulation, where the CAH is changed in range of 20-40°. Finally, the wettability of crumpled MoS2 nanoflowers can be dynamically and reversibly controlled through applied strain (∼115-150° with 0-200% strain), and remains robust over 1000 strain cycles. These studies on the tunable wettability of MoS2 will contribute to future MoS2-based applications, such as tunable wettability coatings for desalination and hydrogen evolution.

  16. A standard model eye with micro scale multilayer structure for ophthalmic optical coherence tomography equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zhenggang; Ding, Zengqian; Hu, Zhixiong; Wen, Tao; Qiao, Wen; Liu, Wenli

    2016-10-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has been widely applied in diagnosis of eye diseases during the last 20 years. Differing from traditional two-dimension imaging technologies, OCT could also provide cross-sectional information of target tissues simultaneously and precisely. As well known, axial resolution is one of the most critical parameters impacting the OCT image quality, which determines whether an accurate diagnosis could be obtained. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the axial resolution of an OCT equipment. Phantoms always play an important role in the standardization and validation process. Here, a standard model eye with micro-scale multilayer structure was custom designed and manufactured. Mimicking a real human eye, analyzing the physical characteristic of layer structures of retina and cornea in-depth, appropriate materials were selected by testing the scattering coefficient of PDMS phantoms with difference concentration of TiO2 or BaSO4 particles. An artificial retina and cornea with multilayer-films which have a thickness of 10 to 60 micrometers for each layer were fabricated using spin coating technology. Considering key parameters of the standard model eye need to be traceable as well as accurate, the optical refractive index and layer structure thicknesses of phantoms were verified by utilizing Thickness Monitoring System. Consequently, a standard OCT model eye was obtained after the retinal or corneal phantom was embedded into a water-filled model eye which has been fabricated by 3D printing technology to simulate ocular dispersion and emmetropic refraction. The eye model was manufactured with a transparent resin to simulate realistic ophthalmic testing environment, and most key optical elements including cornea, lens and vitreous body were realized. By investigating with a research and a clinical OCT system respectively, the OCT model eye was demonstrated with similar physical properties as natural eye, and the multilayer film measurement

  17. Characterization of multi-scale porous structure of fly ash/phosphate geopolymer hollow sphere structures: from submillimeter to nano-scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruifeng; Wu, Gaohui; Jiang, Longtao; Sun, Dongli

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, the porous structure of fly ash/phosphate geopolymer hollow sphere structures (FPGHSS), prepared by pre-bonding and curing technology, has been characterized by multi-resolution methods from sub-millimeter to nano-scale. Micro-CT and confocal microscopy could provide the macroscopic distribution of porous structure on sub-millimeter scale, and hollow fly ashes with sphere shape and several sub-millimeter open cells with irregular shape were identified. SEM is more suitable to illustrate the distribution of micro-sized open and closed cells, and it was found that the open cells of FPGHSS were mainly formed in the interstitial porosity between fly ashes. Mercury porosimeter measurement showed that the micro-sized open cell of FPGHSS demonstrated a normal/bimodal distribution, and the peaks of pore size distribution were mainly around 100 and 10 μm. TEM observation revealed that the phosphate geopolymer was mainly composed of the porous area with nano-pores and dense areas, which were amorphous Al-O-P phase and α-Al2O3 respectively. The pore size of nano-pores demonstrated a quasi-normal distribution from about 10 to 100 nm. Therefore, detailed information of the porous structure of FPGHSS could be revealed using multiple methods. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of Molecular Dynamics Data in Biochemistry Courses: An Amphipathy Scale to Determine Protein [alpha]-Helix Transmembrane Segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazze, Fernanda M.; Fuzo, Carlos A.; Degreve, Leo; Ciancaglini, Pietro

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this manuscript is to explain the application of an amphipathy scale obtained from molecular dynamics simulations and to demonstrate how it can be useful in the protein structure field. It is shown that this scale is easy to be used with the advantage of revealing domains of transmembrane [alpha]-helix of proteins without the need of…

  19. Probing Newton's constant on vast scales: Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati gravity, cosmic acceleration, and large scale structure

    CERN Document Server

    Lue, Arthur; Starkman, G D

    2004-01-01

    The nature of the fuel that drives today's cosmic acceleration is an open and tantalizing mystery. The brane-world theory of Dvali, Gabadadze, and Porrati (DGP) provides a context where late-time acceleration is driven not by some energy-momentum component (dark energy), but rather is the manifestation of the excruciatingly slow leakage of gravity off our four-dimensional world into an extra dimension. At the same time, DGP gravity alters the gravitational force law in a specific and dramatic way at cosmologically accessible scales. We derive the DGP gravitational force law in a cosmological setting for spherical perturbations at subhorizon scales and compute the growth of large-scale structures. We find that a residual repulsive force at large distances gives rise to a suppression of the growth of density and velocity perturbations. Explaining the cosmic acceleration in this framework leads to a present day fluctuation power spectrum normalization sigma8<=0.8 at about the two-sigma level, in contrast with...

  20. Fully determined scaling laws for volumetrically heated convective systems, a tool for assessing habitability of exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Kenny; Kaminski, Edouard

    2017-05-01

    The long-term habitability of a planet rises from its ability to generate and maintain an atmosphere through partial melting and volcanism. This question has been mainly addressed in the framework of plate tectonics, which may be too specific to apply to the wide range of internal dynamics expected for exoplanets, and even to the thermal evolution of the early Earth. Here we propose a more general theoretical approach of convection to build a regime diagram giving the conditions for partial melting to occur, in planetary bodies, as a function of key parameters that can be estimated for exoplanets, their size and internal heating rate. To that aim, we introduce a refined view of the Thermal Boundary Layer (TBL) in a convective system heated from within, that focuses on the temperature and thickness of the TBL at the top of the hottest temperature profiles, along which partial melting shall first occur. This ;Hottest Thermal Boundary Layer; (HotTBL) is first characterized using fully theoretical scaling laws based on the dynamics of thermal boundary layers. These laws are the first ones proposed in the literature that do not rely on empirical determinations of dimensionless constants and that apply to both low Rayleigh and high Rayleigh convective regimes. We show that the scaling laws can be successfully applied to planetary bodies by comparing their predictions to full numerical simulations of the Moon. We then use the scaling laws to build a regime diagram for exoplanets. Combined with estimates of internal heating in exoplanets, the regime diagram predicts that in the habitable zone partial melting occurs in planets younger than the Earth.

  1. Impacts of small-scale variability on the determination of bulk thermal diffusivity in snowpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, H. J.; Higgins, C. W.; Huwald, H.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2012-04-01

    Thermal diffusivity of snow is an important physical property associated with key hydrological phenomena such as snowmelt and heat and water vapor exchange with the atmosphere. These phenomena have broad implications in studies of climate and heat and water budgets on many scales. Furthermore, sub grid scale phenomena may enhance these heat and mass exchanges in the snow pack due to its porous nature. We hypothesize that the heat transfer effects of these small-scale variabilities may be seen as an increased bulk thermal diffusivity of the snow. Direct measurements of snow thermal diffusivity require coupled measurements of thermal conductivity and density, which are nonstationary due to snow metamorphism. Furthermore, thermal conductivity measurements are typically obtained with specialized heating probes or plates and snow density measurements require digging snow pits. Therefore, direct measurements are difficult to obtain with high enough temporal resolution such that direct comparisons with atmospheric conditions can be made. This study uses highly resolved temperature measurements from the Plaine Morte glacier in Switzerland as initial and boundary conditions to numerically solve the 1D heat equation and iteratively optimize for thermal diffusivity. The method uses flux boundary conditions to constrain thermal diffusivity such that spuriously high values in thermal diffusivity are eliminated. Additionally, a t-test ensuring statistical significance between solutions of varied thermal diffusivity results in further constraints on thermal diffusivity that eliminate spuriously low values. The results show that time resolved thermal diffusivity can be determined from easily implemented and inexpensive temperature measurements of seasonal snow with good agreement to widely used parameterizations based on snow density. This high time resolution further affords the ability to explore possible turbulence-induced enhancements to heat and mass transfer in the snow.

  2. Assessing Communication Skills of Medical Students in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE)--A Systematic Review of Rating Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Musa; Zill, Jördis Maria; Christalle, Eva; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Teaching and assessment of communication skills have become essential in medical education. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been found as an appropriate means to assess communication skills within medical education. Studies have demonstrated the importance of a valid assessment of medical students' communication skills. Yet, the validity of the performance scores depends fundamentally on the quality of the rating scales used in an OSCE. Thus, this systematic review aimed at providing an overview of existing rating scales, describing their underlying definition of communication skills, determining the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified rating scales. We conducted a systematic review to identify psychometrically tested rating scales, which have been applied in OSCE settings to assess communication skills of medical students. Our search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed), reference tracking and consultation of experts. We included studies that reported psychometric properties of communication skills assessment rating scales used in OSCEs by examiners only. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated using the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Data of twelve studies reporting on eight rating scales on communication skills assessment in OSCEs were included. Five of eight rating scales were explicitly developed based on a specific definition of communication skills. The methodological quality of studies was mainly poor. The psychometric quality of the eight rating scales was mainly intermediate. Our results reveal that future psychometric evaluation studies focusing on improving the methodological quality are needed in order to yield psychometrically

  3. Assessing Communication Skills of Medical Students in Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE) - A Systematic Review of Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cömert, Musa; Zill, Jördis Maria; Christalle, Eva; Dirmaier, Jörg; Härter, Martin; Scholl, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Background Teaching and assessment of communication skills have become essential in medical education. The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE) has been found as an appropriate means to assess communication skills within medical education. Studies have demonstrated the importance of a valid assessment of medical students’ communication skills. Yet, the validity of the performance scores depends fundamentally on the quality of the rating scales used in an OSCE. Thus, this systematic review aimed at providing an overview of existing rating scales, describing their underlying definition of communication skills, determining the methodological quality of psychometric studies and the quality of psychometric properties of the identified rating scales. Methods We conducted a systematic review to identify psychometrically tested rating scales, which have been applied in OSCE settings to assess communication skills of medical students. Our search strategy comprised three databases (EMBASE, PsycINFO, and PubMed), reference tracking and consultation of experts. We included studies that reported psychometric properties of communication skills assessment rating scales used in OSCEs by examiners only. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the COnsensus based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) checklist. The quality of psychometric properties was evaluated using the quality criteria of Terwee and colleagues. Results Data of twelve studies reporting on eight rating scales on communication skills assessment in OSCEs were included. Five of eight rating scales were explicitly developed based on a specific definition of communication skills. The methodological quality of studies was mainly poor. The psychometric quality of the eight rating scales was mainly intermediate. Discussion Our results reveal that future psychometric evaluation studies focusing on improving the methodological quality are needed

  4. Determinants of Scale Efficiency in the Brazilian Third-Party Logistics Industry from 2001 to 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Wanke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the Brazilian third-party logistics (3PL sector which, increasingly competitive, offers clients a wide variety of services/information technologies in the quest to bolster efficiency. The main research objective is to determine which variables significantly impact 3PLs scale efficiency by applying two-stage DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis. Based on an unbalanced panel model, data from the annual study published by Revista Tecnologística (years 2001–2009 were analyzed. Results corroborate evidence in the literature that coordination mechanisms in the supply chain, supported by the availability of real time information and inventory synchronization, favor a more rational allocation of resources (inputs to client demands (outputs.

  5. Improved morphed potentials for Ar-HBr including scaling to the experimentally determined dissociation energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; McIntosh, A L; McElmurry, B A; Walton, J R; Lucchese, R R; Bevan, J W

    2005-09-15

    A lead salt diode infrared laser spectrometer has been employed to investigate the rotational predissociation in Ar-HBr for transitions up to J' = 79 in the v(1) HBr stretching vibration of the complex using a slit jet and static gas phase. Line-shape analysis and modeling of the predissociation lifetimes have been used to determine a ground-state dissociation energy D(0) of 130(1) cm(-1). In addition, potential energy surfaces based on ab initio calculations are scaled, shifted, and dilated to generate three-dimensional morphed potentials for Ar-HBr that reproduce the measured value of D(0) and that have predictive capabilities for spectroscopic data with nearly experimental uncertainty. Such calculations also provide a basis for making a comprehensive comparison of the different morphed potentials generated using the methodologies applied.

  6. Large-scale determinants of intestinal schistosomiasis and intermediate host snail distribution across Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensgaard, Anna-Sofie; Utzinger, Jürg; Vounatsou, Penelope

    2013-01-01

    to climate change. Here, we combine a growing degree day model for Schistosoma mansoni with species distribution models for the intermediate host snail (Biomphalaria spp.) to investigate large-scale environmental determinants of the distribution of the African S. mansoni-Biomphalaria system and potential...... impacts of climatic changes. Snail species distribution models included several combinations of climatic and habitat-related predictors; the latter divided into "natural" and "human-impacted" habitat variables to measure anthropogenic influence. The predictive performance of the combined snail......-parasite model was evaluated against a comprehensive compilation of historical S. mansoni parasitological survey records, and then examined for two climate change scenarios of increasing severity for 2080. Future projections indicate that while the potential S. mansoni transmission area expands, the snail ranges...

  7. Determination of conditions for the production scale sterilization of prefilled syringes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Norihiro; Maekawa, Tatsuyuki

    2003-01-01

    External and internal differences in pressure of prefilled syringes can cause plunger movement during sterilization, which might cause drug product contamination. Consequently the pressure inside the autoclave during sterilization should be controlled carefully to prevent contamination of the drug product by microorganism and particulates. A previously determined theoretical relationship of temperature to pressure in sealed bottles was modified for prefilled syringes to take plunger movement into account. This modification yielded a correction factor that includes a coefficient of linear thermal expansion for the syringe, thermal expansion of the plunger, and friction between the plunger and the syringe wall. To confirm the accuracy of this modified relationship, 100 mL polypropylene prefilled syringes with butyl rubber plungers, some of which carried pressure and temperature sensors, were used to test various sterilization conditions at the experimental scale. The results showed that the major problem in establishing the pressure conditions for production scale sterilization is temperature distribution throughout the load. However, an over pressure sterilization cycle at 121 degrees C and 0.34 MPa showed the best results. Microbial challenge and light-obscuration particle count tests were performed on the syringes from the worst-case location predicted from modified relationship; the results show that these conditions preserved the sterility of the drug product and protected it from particulate contamination.

  8. Age determination of Anisotremus interruptus (Perciformes: Haemulidae by scale reading, in the coast of Colima, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gallardo-Cabello

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the age determination in Anisotremus interruptus by reading of scales that allowed the identification of 9 age groups. The width of the growth rings diminishes as the age increases. The growth of the scales is proportional to the fish growth. The period of highest growth rate happens during the first year of life. During the first year A. interruptus grows 12.52 cm, the second year 4.95 cm and the third, 4.60 cm. The strategy of the quick growth during the first year of life allows A. interruptus to diminish the natural mortality.En el presente estudio se analiza la determinación de la edad de Anisotremus interruptus por medio del análisis de sus escamas. El estudio de las mismas permitió la identificación de 9 grupos de edad. La amplitud de los anillos de crecimiento disminuye conforme se incrementa la edad del pez. El crecimiento de las escamas es proporcional al del pez. El periodo de mayor crecimiento en longitud se presenta durante el primer año de vida del organismo, en el que A. interruptus crece 12.52 cm, en el segundo año 4.95 cm y en el tercero 4.60 cm. La estrategia de crecimiento rápido durante el primer año de vida permite a este organismo disminuir la mortalidad natural.

  9. A study on construction, validation and determination of normalization of adolescents depression scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadijeh Babakhani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an empirical investigation to construct, to validate and to determine normalization factors associated with adolescents depression scale. The study is performed among 750 randomly selected guided and high school students, 364 male and 386 female, who live in city of Zanjan, Iran. Validity of Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, Validity of Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS and divergence validity of the Coopersmith self- esteem coefficients are 0.72, 0.37 and -0.71, respectively. Result suggests that adolescents’ depression test is a reliable and valid tool for assessing depression, with utility in both research and clinical settings, counseling centers. In addition, the results of correlation test indicate there are some meaningful differences between depression levels of female and male students. In fact, our survey indicates that female students have more depression than male students do (F-value = 33.06, Sig. = 0.000. In addition, there are some meaningful differences between depression levels in various educational levels (F-value = 8.59, Sig. = 0.000. However, the study does not find sufficient evidence to believe there is any meaningful correlation between educational backgrounds and gender.

  10. Health at the Sub-catchment Scale: Typhoid and Its Environmental Determinants in Central Division, Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Aaron Peter; Jupiter, Stacy; Mueller, Ute; Jenney, Adam; Vosaki, Gandercillar; Rosa, Varanisese; Naucukidi, Alanieta; Mulholland, Kim; Strugnell, Richard; Kama, Mike; Horwitz, Pierre

    2016-12-01

    The impact of environmental change on transmission patterns of waterborne enteric diseases is a major public health concern. This study concerns the burden and spatial nature of enteric fever, attributable to Salmonella Typhi infection in the Central Division, Republic of Fiji at a sub-catchment scale over 30-months (2013-2015). Quantitative spatial analysis suggested relationships between environmental conditions of sub-catchments and incidence and recurrence of typhoid fever. Average incidence per inhabited sub-catchment for the Central Division was high at 205.9/100,000, with cases recurring in each calendar year in 26% of sub-catchments. Although the numbers of cases were highest within dense, urban coastal sub-catchments, the incidence was highest in low-density mountainous rural areas. Significant environmental determinants at this scale suggest increased risk of exposure where sediment yields increase following runoff. The study suggests that populations living on large systems that broaden into meandering mid-reaches and floodplains with alluvial deposition are at a greater risk compared to small populations living near small, erosional, high-energy headwaters and small streams unconnected to large hydrological networks. This study suggests that anthropogenic alteration of land cover and hydrology (particularly via fragmentation of riparian forest and connectivity between road and river networks) facilitates increased transmission of typhoid fever and that environmental transmission of typhoid fever is important in Fiji.

  11. Urban Structure as Determinant of Short Distance Goods Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Holmgren, Johan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, data on short distance goods transports is analysed in order to determine if variations in the amounts of goods generated could be explained by geographical and demographical variables...

  12. Water, land, fire, and forest: Multi-scale determinants of rainforests in the Australian monsoon tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondei, Stefania; Prior, Lynda D; Williamson, Grant J; Vigilante, Tom; Bowman, David M J S

    2017-03-01

    The small rainforest fragments found in savanna landscapes are powerful, yet often overlooked, model systems to understand the controls of these contrasting ecosystems. We analyzed the relative effect of climatic variables on rainforest density at a subcontinental level, and employed high-resolution, regional-level analyses to assess the importance of landscape settings and fire activity in determining rainforest density in a frequently burnt Australian savanna landscape. Estimates of rainforest density (ha/km 2 ) across the Northern Territory and Western Australia, derived from preexisting maps, were used to calculate the correlations between rainforest density and climatic variables. A detailed map of the northern Kimberley (Western Australia) rainforests was generated and analyzed to determine the importance of geology and topography in controlling rainforests, and to contrast rainforest density on frequently burnt mainland and nearby islands. In the northwestern Australian, tropics rainforest density was positively correlated with rainfall and moisture index, and negatively correlated with potential evapotranspiration. At a regional scale, rainforests showed preference for complex topographic positions and more fertile geology. Compared with mainland areas, islands had significantly lower fire activity, with no differences between terrain types. They also displayed substantially higher rainforest density, even on level terrain where geomorphological processes do not concentrate nutrients or water. Our multi-scale approach corroborates previous studies that suggest moist climate, infrequent fires, and geology are important stabilizing factors that allow rainforest fragments to persist in savanna landscapes. These factors need to be incorporated in models to predict the future extent of savannas and rainforests under climate change.

  13. Implications of a class of grand unified theories for large scale structure in the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafi, Q.; Stecker, F. W.

    1983-01-01

    A class of grand unified theories in which cosmologicaly significant axion and neutrino energy densities arise naturally is discussed. To obtain large scale structure three scenarios are considered: (1) an inflationary scenario; (2) inflation followed by string production; and (3) a non-inflationary scenario with density fluctuations caused solely by strings. Inflation may be compatible with the recent observational indications that mega 1 on the scale of superclusters, particularly if strings are present.

  14. Halo Models of Large Scale Structure and Reliability of Cosmological N-Body Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Gaite

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Halo models of the large scale structure of the Universe are critically examined, focusing on the definition of halos as smooth distributions of cold dark matter. This definition is essentially based on the results of cosmological N-body simulations. By a careful analysis of the standard assumptions of halo models and N-body simulations and by taking into account previous studies of self-similarity of the cosmic web structure, we conclude that N-body cosmological simulations are not fully reliable in the range of scales where halos appear. Therefore, to have a consistent definition of halos is necessary either to define them as entities of arbitrary size with a grainy rather than smooth structure or to define their size in terms of small-scale baryonic physics.

  15. Local factors determine plant community structure on closely neighbored islands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianbo Lu

    Full Text Available Despite the recent popularity of the metacommunity concept, ecologists have not evaluated the applicability of different metacommunity frameworks to insular organisms. We surveyed 50 closely spaced islands in the Thousand-Island Lake of China to examine the role of local (environmental and regional (dispersal factors in structuring woody plant assemblages (tree and shrub species on these islands. By partitioning the variation in plant community structure into local and regional causes, we showed that local environmental conditions, specifically island morphometric characteristics, accounted for the majority of the variation in plant community structure among the studied islands. Spatial variables, representing the potential importance of species dispersal, explained little variation. We conclude that one metacommunity framework-species sorting-best characterizes these plant communities. This result reinforces the idea that the traditional approach of emphasizing the local perspective when studying ecological communities continues to hold its value.

  16. Local factors determine plant community structure on closely neighbored islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jianbo; Jiang, Lin; Yu, Lin; Sun, Que

    2011-05-10

    Despite the recent popularity of the metacommunity concept, ecologists have not evaluated the applicability of different metacommunity frameworks to insular organisms. We surveyed 50 closely spaced islands in the Thousand-Island Lake of China to examine the role of local (environmental) and regional (dispersal) factors in structuring woody plant assemblages (tree and shrub species) on these islands. By partitioning the variation in plant community structure into local and regional causes, we showed that local environmental conditions, specifically island morphometric characteristics, accounted for the majority of the variation in plant community structure among the studied islands. Spatial variables, representing the potential importance of species dispersal, explained little variation. We conclude that one metacommunity framework-species sorting-best characterizes these plant communities. This result reinforces the idea that the traditional approach of emphasizing the local perspective when studying ecological communities continues to hold its value.

  17. RNA structure determination by solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchanka, Alexander; Simon, Bernd; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Carlomagno, Teresa

    2015-05-11

    Knowledge of the RNA three-dimensional structure, either in isolation or as part of RNP complexes, is fundamental to understand the mechanism of numerous cellular processes. Because of its flexibility, RNA represents a challenge for crystallization, while the large size of cellular complexes brings solution-state NMR to its limits. Here, we demonstrate an alternative approach on the basis of solid-state NMR spectroscopy. We develop a suite of experiments and RNA labeling schemes and demonstrate for the first time that ssNMR can yield a RNA structure at high-resolution. This methodology allows structural analysis of segmentally labelled RNA stretches in high-molecular weight cellular machines—independent of their ability to crystallize—and opens the way to mechanistic studies of currently difficult-to-access RNA-protein assemblies.

  18. Fine-scale analysis reveals cryptic landscape genetic structure in desert tortoises.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily K Latch

    Full Text Available Characterizing the effects of landscape features on genetic variation is essential for understanding how landscapes shape patterns of gene flow and spatial genetic structure of populations. Most landscape genetics studies have focused on patterns of gene flow at a regional scale. However, the genetic structure of populations at a local scale may be influenced by a unique suite of landscape variables that have little bearing on connectivity patterns observed at broader spatial scales. We investigated fine-scale spatial patterns of genetic variation and gene flow in relation to features of the landscape in desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii, using 859 tortoises genotyped at 16 microsatellite loci with associated data on geographic location, sex, elevation, slope, and soil type, and spatial relationship to putative barriers (power lines, roads. We used spatially explicit and non-explicit Bayesian clustering algorithms to partition the sample into discrete clusters, and characterize the relationships between genetic distance and ecological variables to identify factors with the greatest influence on gene flow at a local scale. Desert tortoises exhibit weak genetic structure at a local scale, and we identified two subpopulations across the study area. Although genetic differentiation between the subpopulations was low, our landscape genetic analysis identified both natural (slope and anthropogenic (roads landscape variables that have significantly influenced gene flow within this local population. We show that desert tortoise movements at a local scale are influenced by features of the landscape, and that these features are different than those that influence gene flow at larger scales. Our findings are important for desert tortoise conservation and management, particularly in light of recent translocation efforts in the region. More generally, our results indicate that recent landscape changes can affect gene flow at a local scale and that their

  19. Structure determination of T-cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, L.F.; Møller, K. B.; Pedersen, A.K.

    2002-01-01

    homologous T cell protein-tyrosine phosphatase (TC-PTP) has received much less attention, and no x-ray structure has been provided. We have previously co-crystallized PTP1B with a number of low molecular weight inhibitors that inhibit TC-PTP with similar efficiency. Unexpectedly, we were not able to co...... the high degree of functional and structural similarity between TC-PTP and PTP1B, we have been able to identify areas close to the active site that might be addressed to develop selective inhibitors of each enzyme....

  20. Towards a Gravity Dual for the Large Scale Structure of the Universe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehagias, A.; Riotto, Antonio; Sloth, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of the large-scale structure of the universe enjoys at all scales, even in the highly non-linear regime, a Lifshitz symmetry during the matter-dominated period. In this paper we propose a general class of six-dimensional spacetimes which could be a gravity dual to the four-dimensiona......The dynamics of the large-scale structure of the universe enjoys at all scales, even in the highly non-linear regime, a Lifshitz symmetry during the matter-dominated period. In this paper we propose a general class of six-dimensional spacetimes which could be a gravity dual to the four......-dimensional large-scale structure of the universe. In this set-up, the Lifshitz symmetry manifests itself as an isometry in the bulk and our universe is a four-dimensional brane moving in such six-dimensional bulk. After finding the correspondence between the bulk and the brane dynamical Lifshitz exponents, we find...... the intriguing result that the preferred value of the dynamical Lifshitz exponent of our observed universe, at both linear and non-linear scales, corresponds to a fixed point of the RGE flow of the dynamical Lifshitz exponent in the dual system where the symmetry is enhanced to the Schrodinger group containing...

  1. Particle-scale structure in frozen colloidal suspensions from small-angle x-ray scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Spannuth, Melissa

    2011-02-01

    During directional solidification of the solvent in a colloidal suspension, the colloidal particles segregate from the growing solid, forming high-particle-density regions with structure on a hierarchy of length scales ranging from that of the particle-scale packing to the large-scale spacing between these regions. Previous work has concentrated mostly on the medium- to large-length scale structure, as it is the most accessible and thought to be more technologically relevant. However, the packing of the colloids at the particle scale is an important component not only in theoretical descriptions of the segregation process, but also to the utility of freeze-cast materials for new applications. Here we present the results of experiments in which we investigated this structure across a wide range of length scales using a combination of small-angle x-ray scattering and direct optical imaging. As expected, during freezing the particles were concentrated into regions between ice dendrites forming a microscopic pattern of high- and low-particle-density regions. X-ray scattering indicates that the particles in the high-density regions were so closely packed as to be touching. However, the arrangement of the particles does not conform to that predicted by standard interparticle pair potentials, suggesting that the particle packing induced by freezing differs from that formed during equilibrium densification processes. © 2011 American Physical Society.

  2. Assessment of the confiability and factorial structure of three scales measuring chronic procrastination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Argumedo Bustinza

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the confiability and factorial structure of three scales measuring chronic procrastination: Scale of General Procrastination (EPG. Lay. 1986. Adult Procrastinatio Inventory (lPA. McCown & Johnson as cited in Ferrari. Johnson & McCown. 1995 and the Scale of Procrastination in Decision-Making (PTF. Mann. 1982. The sample included 514 adults between 20 and 65 years of age from Lima. The three scales showed high levels of intemal consistency and factorial analysis showed three factors for EPG and IPA and one factor for PTD A second degree factorial analysis suggested the presence of only one factor based on the grouping of items of the EPG and IPA scales The study did not find theoretically relevant dlfferences in chronic procrastination according to gender, age or education level. However,with respect to socioeconomic status. there were higher levels of chronic procrastmation in the poorest sector

  3. Decomposition of multi-scale coherent structures in a turbulent boundary layer by variational mode decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenkang; Pan, Chong; Wang, Jinjun

    2016-11-01

    Turbulent boundary layer (TBL) is believed to contain a wide spectrum of coherent structures, from near-wall low-speed streaks characterized by inner scale to log-layer large-scale coherent motions (LSM and VLSM) characterized by outer scale. Recent studies have evidenced the interaction between these multi-scale structures via either bottom-up or top-down mechanisms, which implies the possibility of identifying the coexistence of their footprints at medium flow layer. Here, we propose a Quasi-Bivariate Variational Mode Decomposition method (QB-VMD), which is an update of the traditional Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) with bandwidth limitation, for the decomposition of the PIV measured 2D flow fields with large ROI (Δx × Δz 4 δ × 1 . 5 δ) at specified wall-normal heights (y / δ = 0 . 05 0 . 2) of a turbulent boundary layer with Reτ = 3460 . The empirical modes identified by QB-VMD well capture the characteristics of log-layer LSMs as well as that of near-wall streak-like structures. The lateral scales of these structures are analyzed and their respective energy contribution are evaluated. Supported by both the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11372001 and 11490552) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. YWF-16-JCTD-A-05).

  4. Bridging scales from satellite to grains: Structural mapping aided by tablet and photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawemann, Friedrich; Mancktelow, Neil; Pennacchioni, Giorgio; Wex, Sebastian; Camacho, Alfredo

    2016-04-01

    Bridging scales from satellite to grains: Structural mapping aided by tablet and photogrammetry A fundamental problem in small-scale mapping is linking outcrop observations to the large scale deformation pattern. The evolution of handheld devices such as tablets with integrated GPS and the availability of airborne imagery allows a precise localization of outcrops. Detailed structural geometries can be analyzed through ortho-rectified photo mosaics generated by photogrammetry software. In this study, we use a cheap standard Samsung-tablet (used for photogrammetry. The software PhotoScan from Agisoft matches the photographs in a fully automated manner, calculates a 3D model of the outcrop, and has the option to project this as an orthophoto onto a flat surface. This allows original orientations of grain-scale structures to be recorded over areas on a scale up to tens to hundreds of metres. The photo mosaics can then be georeferenced with the aid of the GPS-tracks of the shear zones and included in a GIS. This provides a cheap recording of the structures in high detail. The great advantages over mapping with UAVs (drones) is the resolution (1cm), the independence from weather and energy source, and the low cost.

  5. Extending the scope of models for large-scale structure formation in the Universe

    CERN Document Server

    Buchert, T; Pérez-Mercader, J; Buchert, Thomas; Dominguez, Alvaro; Perez-Mercader, Juan

    1999-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological generalization of the models of large-scale structure formation in the Universe by gravitational instability in two ways: we include pressure forces to model multi-streaming, and noise to model fluctuations due to neglected short-scale physical processes. We show that pressure gives rise to a viscous-like force of the same character as that one introduced in the ``adhesion model'', while noise leads to a roughening of the density field yielding a scaling behavior of its correlations.

  6. Shear viscosity and structural scalings in model adhesive hard-sphere gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Aaron P. R.; Martys, Nicos; Porcar, Lionel; Kline, Steven R.; George, William L.; Kim, Jung M.; Butler, Paul D.; Wagner, Norman J.

    2014-05-01

    We present experiments and simulations that show a fundamental scaling for both the rheology and microstructure of flowing gels. Unique flow-SANS measurements demonstrate that the structure orients along both the neutral and compression axis. We quantify the anisotropy using a single parameter, αn, that scales by a dimensionless number, M', that arises from a force balance on a particle. Simulations support the scalings and confirm the results are independent of the shape and range of the potential suggesting a universal for colloidal gels with short-ranged attractions.

  7. Integral emission factors for methane determined using urban flux measurements and local-scale inverse models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Andreas; Johnson, Mark; Molodovskaya, Marina; Ketler, Rick; Nesic, Zoran; Crawford, Ben; Giometto, Marco; van der Laan, Mike

    2013-04-01

    The most important long-lived greenhouse gas (LLGHG) emitted during combustion of fuels is carbon dioxide (CO2), however also traces of the LLGHGs methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are released, the quantities of which depend largely on the conditions of the combustion process. Emission factors determine the mass of LLGHGs emitted per energy used (or kilometre driven for cars) and are key inputs for bottom-up emission modelling. Emission factors for CH4 are typically determined in the laboratory or on a test stand for a given combustion system using a small number of samples (vehicles, furnaces), yet associated with larger uncertainties when scaled to entire fleets. We propose an alternative, different approach - Can integrated emission factors be independently determined using direct micrometeorological flux measurements over an urban surface? If so, do emission factors determined from flux measurements (top-down) agree with up-scaled emission factors of relevant combustion systems (heating, vehicles) in the source area of the flux measurement? Direct flux measurements of CH4 were carried out between February and May, 2012 over a relatively densely populated, urban surface in Vancouver, Canada by means of eddy covariance (EC). The EC-system consisted of an ultrasonic anemometer (CSAT-3, Campbell Scientific Inc.) and two open-path infrared gas analyzers (Li7500 and Li7700, Licor Inc.) on a tower at 30m above the surface. The source area of the EC system is characterised by a relative homogeneous morphometry (5.3m average building height), but spatially and temporally varying emission sources, including two major intersecting arterial roads (70.000 cars drive through the 50% source area per day) and seasonal heating in predominantly single-family houses (natural gas). An inverse dispersion model (turbulent source area model), validated against large eddy simulations (LES) of the urban roughness sublayer, allows the determination of the spatial area that

  8. The determination of turbulent structures in the atmospheric surface layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schols, J.L.J.

    1984-01-01

    The turbulent flow in the atmospheric surface layer (ASL) contains turbulent structures, which are defined as spatially coherent, organized flow motions. 'Organized' means that characteristic patterns, observed at a point in space, occur almost simultaneously in more than one turbulence signal and

  9. Determination of conduction and valence band electronic structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    insufficient to study in-depth unoccupied states of investigated materials because it overlooks the shallow traps. Keywords. Photo-catalysis; high-resolution RIXS; electronic structure. 1. Introduction. Photocatalysis is an emerging field that offers poten- tial to address some of the energy and waste manage- ment challenges.

  10. The internal structure of magnetic nanoparticles determines the magnetic response

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pacáková, Barbara; Kubíčková, Simona; Salas, G.; Mantlíková, Alice; Marciello, M.; Morales, M.P.; Nižňanský, D.; Vejpravová, Jana

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 16 (2017), s. 5129-5140 ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : nanoparticles * single-domain * internal structure Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.367, year: 2016

  11. Generative probabilistic models extend the scope of inferential structure determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, Simon; Boomsma, Wouter; Frellsen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    demonstrate that the use of generative probabilistic models instead of physical forcefields in the Bayesian formalism is not only conceptually attractive, but also improves precision and efficiency. Our results open new vistas for the use of sophisticated probabilistic models of biomolecular structure...

  12. Structural Determinants of Intergroup Association: Interracial Marriage and Crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South, Scott J.; Messner, Steven F.

    1986-01-01

    Using data from a sample of 25 U. S. metropolitan cities, this study investigates the relationship between interracial marriage and violent interracial crime. Results show a positive relationship, one which was predicted by Blau's macrosociological theory of social structure. (Author/JDH)

  13. Determination of verticality of reservoir engineering structure from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) are used nowadays as Geomatics instruments for various applications. One of these applications is 3D survey and management of oil and gas facilities and other engineering structures. This recent attention is due to the fact that laser scanner has the ability to generate massive amounts of ...

  14. Host Proteins Determine MRSA Biofilm Structure and Integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Cindy; Nielsen, Astrid; Jørgensen, Nis Pedersen

    Human extracellular matrix (hECM) proteins aids the initial attachment and initiation of an infection, by specific binding to bacterial cell surface proteins. However, the importance of hECM proteins in structure, integrity and antibiotic resilience of a biofilm is unknown. This study aims to det...

  15. Horizontal Structure of Turbulence on Decimeter to 10m Scales in Fast Tidal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, R.; Hay, A. E.

    2016-02-01

    We characterize the structure of turbulence in a very fast tidal channel in the Bay of Fundy, Nova Scotia that has been identified for development as a commercial tidal power resource. A subsurface mooring that orients into the flow was equipped with a horizontally-aimed AD2CP, and upward- and downward-looking ADCPs. Two week-long deployments provide velocity measurements of tidal flows up to 4 m/s that are used to describe the spatial (lateral) and temporal structure of turbulent fluctuations on decimeter to 10m scales. The spatial scales and temporal intermittency vary with both speed of the flow and the effects of upstream topography.

  16. Primordial Non-Gaussianity in the Large-Scale Structure of the Universe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Desjacques

    2010-01-01

    generated the cosmological fluctuations observed today. Any detection of significant non-Gaussianity would thus have profound implications for our understanding of cosmic structure formation. The large-scale mass distribution in the Universe is a sensitive probe of the nature of initial conditions. Recent theoretical progress together with rapid developments in observational techniques will enable us to critically confront predictions of inflationary scenarios and set constraints as competitive as those from the Cosmic Microwave Background. In this paper, we review past and current efforts in the search for primordial non-Gaussianity in the large-scale structure of the Universe.

  17. Initial Validation Study for a Scale Used to Determine Service Intensity for Itinerant Teachers of Students with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrund, Rona L.; Darst, Shannon; Munro, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to begin validation of a scale that will be used by teachers of students with visual impairments to determine appropriate recommended type and frequency of services for their students based on identified student need. Methods: Validity and reliability of the Visual Impairment Scale of Service Intensity…

  18. Climate Effects and Feedback Structure Determining Weed Population Dynamics in a Long-Term Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements. PMID:22272362

  19. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio Lima

    Full Text Available Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors. Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  20. Climate effects and feedback structure determining weed population dynamics in a long-term experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Mauricio; Navarrete, Luis; González-Andujar, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Pest control is one of the areas in which population dynamic theory has been successfully applied to solve practical problems. However, the links between population dynamic theory and model construction have been less emphasized in the management and control of weed populations. Most management models of weed population dynamics have emphasized the role of the endogenous process, but the role of exogenous variables such as climate have been ignored in the study of weed populations and their management. Here, we use long-term data (22 years) on two annual weed species from a locality in Central Spain to determine the importance of endogenous and exogenous processes (local and large-scale climate factors). Our modeling study determined two different feedback structures and climate effects in the two weed species analyzed. While Descurainia sophia exhibited a second-order feedback and low climate influence, Veronica hederifolia was characterized by a first-order feedback structure and important effects from temperature and rainfall. Our results strongly suggest the importance of theoretical population dynamics in understanding plant population systems. Moreover, the use of this approach, discerning between the effect of exogenous and endogenous factors, can be fundamental to applying weed management practices in agricultural systems and to controlling invasive weedy species. This is a radical change from most approaches currently used to guide weed and invasive weedy species managements.

  1. What Determines HIV Prevention Costs at Scale? Evidence from the Avahan Programme in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lépine, Aurélia; Chandrashekar, Sudhashree; Shetty, Govindraj; Vickerman, Peter; Bradley, Janet; Alary, Michel; Moses, Stephen; Vassall, Anna

    2016-02-01

    Expanding essential health services through non-government organisations (NGOs) is a central strategy for achieving universal health coverage in many low-income and middle-income countries. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention services for key populations are commonly delivered through NGOs and have been demonstrated to be cost-effective and of substantial global public health importance. However, funding for HIV prevention remains scarce, and there are growing calls internationally to improve the efficiency of HIV prevention programmes as a key strategy to reach global HIV targets. To date, there is limited evidence on the determinants of costs of HIV prevention delivered through NGOs; and thus, policymakers have little guidance in how best to design programmes that are both effective and efficient. We collected economic costs from the Indian Avahan initiative, the largest HIV prevention project conducted globally, during the first 4 years of its implementation. We use a fixed-effect panel estimator and a random-intercept model to investigate the determinants of average cost. We find that programme design choices such as NGO scale, the extent of community involvement, the way in which support is offered to NGOs and how clinical services are organised substantially impact average cost in a grant-based payment setting. © 2016 The Authors. Health Economics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Universal small-scale structure in turbulence driven by magnetorotational instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdankin, Vladimir; Walker, Justin; Boldyrev, Stanislav; Lesur, Geoffroy

    2017-05-01

    The intermittent small-scale structure of turbulence governs energy dissipation in many astrophysical plasmas and is often believed to have universal properties for sufficiently large systems. In this work, we argue that small-scale turbulence in accretion discs is universal in the sense that it is insensitive to the magnetorotational instability (MRI) and background shear, and therefore indistinguishable from standard homogeneous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence at small scales. We investigate the intermittency of current density, vorticity and energy dissipation in numerical simulations of incompressible MHD turbulence driven by the MRI in a shearing box. We find that the simulations exhibit a similar degree of intermittency as in standard MHD turbulence. We perform a statistical analysis of intermittent dissipative structures and find that energy dissipation is concentrated in thin sheet-like structures that span a wide range of scales up to the box size. We show that these structures exhibit strikingly similar statistical properties to those in standard MHD turbulence. Additionally, the structures are oriented in the toroidal direction with a characteristic tilt of approximately 17.^{circ}5, implying an effective guide field in that direction.

  3. An Examination of the Structure and Construct Validity of the Wender Utah Rating Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, Kasey; Watson, David

    2016-01-01

    The Wender Utah Rating Scale (Ward, Wender, & Reimherr, 1993 ) has been widely used in adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) research to assess childhood symptoms retrospectively, but little research has examined its factor structure and specificity in predicting ADHD versus other psychopathology. Consequently, this study had 2 goals: (a) to examine the Wender Utah Rating Scale's structure, and (b) to explicate the construct validity of this measure by relating factors from our structural analyses to other ADHD, psychopathology, and personality measures. Structural analyses in an adult community sample (N = 294) yielded a 3-factor structure of aggression (e.g., angry), internalizing distress (e.g., depressed), and academic difficulties (e.g., underachiever). Correlational and regression analyses indicated that these factors failed to display specificity in their associations with ADHD versus other psychopathology. Aggression and internalizing distress associated most strongly with indicators of externalizing (e.g., ill temper, manipulativeness) and internalizing psychopathology (e.g., depression, anxiety), respectively. Academic difficulties associated most strongly with ADHD symptoms, but these relations were relatively weak. Taken together, these findings raise concerns about the Wender Utah Rating Scale's construct validity, although additional longitudinal research is needed to clarify to what extent the Wender Utah Rating Scale validly assesses childhood ADHD symptoms.

  4. The Light-Front Schrödinger Equation and Determination of the Perturbative QCD Scale from Color Confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); de Teramond, Guy F. [Univ. of Costa Rica, San Pedro (Costa Rica); Deur, Alexandre P. [Jefferson La.b, Newport News, VA (United States); Dosch, Hans G. [Institut fur Theoretische Physik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-09-01

    The valence Fock-state wavefunctions of the light-front QCD Hamiltonian satisfy a relativistic equation of motion with an effective confining potential U which systematically incorporates the effects of higher quark and gluon Fock states. If one requires that the effective action which underlies the QCD Lagrangian remains conformally invariant and extends the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan to light front Hamiltonian theory, the potential U has a unique form of a harmonic oscillator potential, and a mass gap arises. The result is a nonperturbative relativistic light-front quantum mechanical wave equation which incorporates color confinement and other essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics, including a massless pion for zero quark mass and linear Regge trajectories with the same slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. Only one mass parameter κ appears. Light-front holography thus provides a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. We also show how the mass scale κ underlying confinement and hadron masses determines the scale Λ{ovr MS} controlling the evolution of the perturbative QCD coupling. The relation between scales is obtained by matching the nonperturbative dynamics, as described by an effective conformal theory mapped to the light-front and its embedding in AdS space, to the perturbative QCD regime computed to four-loop order. The result is an effective coupling defined at all momenta. The predicted value Λ{ovr MS}=0.328±0.034 GeV is in agreement with the world average 0.339±0.010 GeV. The analysis applies to any renormalization scheme.

  5. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  6. Accelerating large-scale protein structure alignments with graphics processing units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pang Bin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale protein structure alignment, an indispensable tool to structural bioinformatics, poses a tremendous challenge on computational resources. To ensure structure alignment accuracy and efficiency, efforts have been made to parallelize traditional alignment algorithms in grid environments. However, these solutions are costly and of limited accessibility. Others trade alignment quality for speedup by using high-level characteristics of structure fragments for structure comparisons. Findings We present ppsAlign, a parallel protein structure Alignment framework designed and optimized to exploit the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs. As a general-purpose GPU platform, ppsAlign could take many concurrent methods, such as TM-align and Fr-TM-align, into the parallelized algorithm design. We evaluated ppsAlign on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card, and compared it with existing software solutions running on an AMD dual-core CPU. We observed a 36-fold speedup over TM-align, a 65-fold speedup over Fr-TM-align, and a 40-fold speedup over MAMMOTH. Conclusions ppsAlign is a high-performance protein structure alignment tool designed to tackle the computational complexity issues from protein structural data. The solution presented in this paper allows large-scale structure comparisons to be performed using massive parallel computing power of GPU.

  7. Gap-closing test structures for temperature budget determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faber, Erik Jouwert; Wolters, Robertus A.M.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the extension of a method for determining the temperature budget of the process side of silicon substrates and chips, employing silicide formation reactions. In this work, silicon-on-insulator type substrates are used instead of bulk silicon wafers. By an appropriate choice of the layer

  8. Determination of Velocity And Acceleration of Structural Deformation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper outlines the procedure of geodetic monitoring system of circular oil storage tanks and presents the analysis of the resulted observations to determine the values of their deformation. At the Forcados Tank Farm, there are eighteen tanks currently used for crude oil storage. In this study, only tank 6 was used as case ...

  9. Structure Discovery in Large Semantic Graphs Using Extant Ontological Scaling and Descriptive Statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    al-Saffar, Sinan; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Chappell, Alan R.

    2011-07-18

    As semantic datasets grow to be very large and divergent, there is a need to identify and exploit their inherent semantic structure for discovery and optimization. Towards that end, we present here a novel methodology to identify the semantic structures inherent in an arbitrary semantic graph dataset. We first present the concept of an extant ontology as a statistical description of the semantic relations present amongst the typed entities modeled in the graph. This serves as a model of the underlying semantic structure to aid in discovery and visualization. We then describe a method of ontological scaling in which the ontology is employed as a hierarchical scaling filter to infer different resolution levels at which the graph structures are to be viewed or analyzed. We illustrate these methods on three large and publicly available semantic datasets containing more than one billion edges each. Keywords-Semantic Web; Visualization; Ontology; Multi-resolution Data Mining;

  10. Quantifying forest vertical structure to determine bird habitat quality in the Greenbelt Corridor, Denton, TX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubayashi, Shiho

    This study presents the integration of light detection and range (LiDAR) and hyperspectral remote sensing to create a three-dimensional bird habitat map in the Greenbelt Corridor of the Elm Fork of the Trinity River. This map permits to examine the relationship between forest stand structure, landscape heterogeneity, and bird community composition. A biannual bird census was conducted at this site during the breeding seasons of 2009 and 2010. Census data combined with the three-dimensional map suggest that local breeding bird abundance, community structure, and spatial distribution patterns are highly influenced by vertical heterogeneity of vegetation surface. For local breeding birds, vertical heterogeneity of canopy surface within stands, connectivity to adjacent forest patches, largest forest patch index, and habitat (vegetation) types proved to be the most influential factors to determine bird community assemblages. Results also highlight the critical role of secondary forests to increase functional connectivity of forest patches. Overall, three-dimensional habitat descriptions derived from integrated LiDAR and hyperspectral data serve as a powerful bird conservation tool that shows how the distribution of bird species relates to forest composition and structure at various scales.

  11. Algebraic algorithms for structure determination in biological chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emiris, Ioannis Z.; Fritzilas, Epaminondas D.; Manocha, Dinesh

    Several problems in computational chemistry, structural molecular biology, and biological chemistry can be solved by symbolic-numerical algorithms. We introduce suitable algebraic tools and then survey their usage in concrete applications. In particular, questions on molecular structure can be modeled by systems of polynomial equations, mainly by drawing on techniques from robot kinematics. Resultant-based algorithms, including sparse resultants and their matrix formulae, are described in order to reduce the solving of polynomial systems to numerical linear algebra. As an illustration, we focus on computing all conformations of cyclic molecules and on matching pharmacophores under distance constraints; in both cases, the number of independent degrees of freedom is relatively small. We summarize some existing results as well as sketch some original work. Both lead to complete and accurate solutions for those problems in the sense that our algorithms output all solutions with sufficiently high precision for the needs of biochemical applications.

  12. High performance computing in structural determination by electron cryomicroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J J

    2008-10-01

    Computational advances have significantly contributed to the current role of electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) in structural biology. The needs for computational power are constantly growing with the increasing complexity of algorithms and the amount of data needed to push the resolution limits. High performance computing (HPC) is becoming paramount in cryoEM to cope with those computational needs. Since the nineties, different HPC strategies have been proposed for some specific problems in cryoEM and, in fact, some of them are already available in common software packages. Nevertheless, the literature is scattered in the areas of computer science and structural biology. In this communication, the HPC approaches devised for the computation-intensive tasks in cryoEM (single particles and tomography) are retrospectively reviewed and the future trends are discussed. Moreover, the HPC capabilities available in the most common cryoEM packages are surveyed, as an evidence of the importance of HPC in addressing the future challenges.

  13. Determination of the Structural Basis of Antibody Diversity Using NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-15

    diversity found in these anti- Lewitter, F. I., Rindone. W. P., Swindell , C. D. & Tung, C. S. DNP-SL antibodies provides a rich source for structural...matching heavy and light chains combi- Genetics il5. 169-176. natorially increases the number of related antibodies within 16. Jardetzky, 0. & Roberts . G. C...relative peak amplitudes & Roberts , 1981), giving an r- dependence for the effect that are consistent with those observed in the spectra. Using (Solomon

  14. Lifestyle and biomechanical determinants of knee joint structure and symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Teichtahl, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of arthritis and commonly affects weight-bearing joints, such as the knee. With the growing obesity endemic and aging population, the prevalence of knee OA will increase over the coming decades. Since the advent of Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), OA is now considered a whole-organ disease, affecting multiple articular structures. No cure exists for knee OA and the only definitive management is joint replacement surgery, indicated for painful end-s...

  15. X-ray structure determination and analysis of hydrogen interactions ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    with an aim of describing the hydrogen interaction in biphenyl derivatives. The title compound crystallizes in monoclinic space group P21/c with unit cell dimensions, a = 7⋅706(1), b = 11⋅745(2), c = 12⋅721(2) Å, β = 92⋅31(1)°,. Z = 4 and its structure has been refined up to the reliability index of 3⋅8%. The average torsion ...

  16. Determining the Optimal Work Breakdown Structure for Defense Acquisition Contracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-24

    reported in a format consistent with governing regulations and guidelines (DoD, 2011; Fitzpatrick, Meyer , & Stubbs, 2016). These programs can be...Fitzpatrick, Meyer , & Stubbs, 2016), a metric that can be applied reactively to a program’s Work Breakdown Structure, highlighting those leaf elements that...Hicks, 2008), program rebaselining (Ruter & Philip , 2007), and technological difficulties causing cost and schedule delays (Blickstein et al, 2011

  17. Reliability of a visual analog scale for determining the preferred mastication side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Orozco, Elan Ignacio; Rovira-Lastra, Bernat; Peraire, Maria; Salsench, Juan; Martinez-Gomis, Jordi

    2016-02-01

    Although the visual analog scale (VAS) is a simple tool for quantitatively measuring symptom perception, no studies have used the VAS to assess the degree of subjective masticatory laterality. The purpose of this study was to assess the reliability of the VAS for determining the preferred mastication side (PMS) and to compare it with other methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted in which 42 adults with natural dentition performed 2 masticatory sessions. Eight different methods were used to determine the PMS by combining different definitions, food tests, measurements, and number of cycles assessed. A test-retest was performed in 10 participants to evaluate the reliability of each method using the intraclass correlation coefficient. To assess the validity of the different methods, the Pearson correlations were performed (α=.05) between the 8 methods. Self-assessment using the VAS had the highest reliability; it also had a positive and significant relationship with 6 of the 7 other methods. The method that showed the best validity used bagged silicone as the test food, determined the PMS by video recording, and assessed all masticatory cycles using the asymmetry index. Low reliability was found for methods using the location of gum bolus at standardized time intervals or electromyographic recordings. The VAS provided a highly reliable means of assessing the degree of masticatory laterality perceived by the participant, with a positive and significant correlation with the majority of the other methods. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Using LiDAR Metrics to Characterize Forest Structural Complexity at Multiple Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, V. R.; McGaughey, R. J.; Gersonde, R.; Franklin, J. F.

    2007-12-01

    Forest structure - the size and arrangement of trees and foliage - reflects a stand's history of initiation, growth, disturbance, and mortality. Because of this, studying the structure of forests can provide key insights into ecological processes, guides to silvicultural prescriptions to improve habitat, and assessments of forested landscapes. This study tested LiDAR metrics to characterize stands based on canopy structure. The study site was the 34,591 ha of forests in the Cedar River Watershed in western Washington State, USA. Stands ranged in age from 350 years old (including old-growth). Study sites spanned the western hemlock- Douglas fir (Tsuga heterophylla-Pseudotsuga menziesii), Pacific silver fir (Abies amabilis), and mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertansiana) forest zones. Eighty sample plots were used to ground truth the LiDAR data. A variety of structural indices were used to study canopy structural variations at the plot, stand, and landscape scales. The two most successful indices used the exposed geometry of the canopy surface: (1) the ratio of the canopy surface area to ground surface area (rumple index), and (2) the ratio of the volume beneath the canopy surface to maximum volume beneath the 95th percentile height (modified canopy volume method). These two indices integrated the spatial effects of tree heights, foliage distribution, and tree arrangement within 15m pixels. Variation between pixels revealed structural complexity at larger scales. Results: At the plot scale (~4 pixels), correlations with standard plot metrics (e.g., diameter at breast height) were similar to those reported by other studies. Comparison of structural complexity with age and height revealed a diversity of development pathways. The relationship between height and complexity allowed stands to be classified by the degree to which they have achieved their potential structural complexity, a new way to examine forest development. At the stand scale, the indices allowed spatial

  19. Water Determines the Structure and Dynamics of Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire; Hassanali, Ali; Havenith, Martina; Henchman, Richard; Pohl, Peter; Sterpone, Fabio; van der Spoel, David; Xu, Yao; Garcia, Angel E

    2016-07-13

    Water is an essential participant in the stability, structure, dynamics, and function of proteins and other biomolecules. Thermodynamically, changes in the aqueous environment affect the stability of biomolecules. Structurally, water participates chemically in the catalytic function of proteins and nucleic acids and physically in the collapse of the protein chain during folding through hydrophobic collapse and mediates binding through the hydrogen bond in complex formation. Water is a partner that slaves the dynamics of proteins, and water interaction with proteins affect their dynamics. Here we provide a review of the experimental and computational advances over the past decade in understanding the role of water in the dynamics, structure, and function of proteins. We focus on the combination of X-ray and neutron crystallography, NMR, terahertz spectroscopy, mass spectroscopy, thermodynamics, and computer simulations to reveal how water assist proteins in their function. The recent advances in computer simulations and the enhanced sensitivity of experimental tools promise major advances in the understanding of protein dynamics, and water surely will be a protagonist.

  20. Three-dimensional structure of poliovirus serotype 1 neutralizing determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, G S; Mosser, A G; Hogle, J M; Filman, D J; Rueckert, R R; Chow, M

    1988-01-01

    Antigenic mutants of poliovirus (Sabin strain, serotype 1) were isolated by the resistance of the virus to anti-Sabin neutralizing monoclonal antibodies. The amino acid replacements within the capsid protein sequence causing the altered antigenicity were identified for each of 63 isolates. The mutations cluster into distinct nonoverlapping peptide segments that group into three general immunological phenotypes on the basis of cross-neutralization analyses with 15 neutralizing anti-Sabin monoclonal antibodies. Location of the mutated amino acid residues within the three-dimensional structure of the virion indicates that the majority of these amino acid residues are highly exposed and located within prominent structural features of the viral surface. Those mutated amino acid residues that are less accessible to antibody interaction are often involved in hydrogen bonds or salt bridges that would stabilize the local tertiary structure of the antigenic site. The interactions of the peptide segments that form these neutralizing sites suggest specific models for the generation of neutralization-resistant variants and for the interaction between the viral surface and antibody. Images PMID:2451757

  1. Atomic-scale Chemical Imaging and Quantification of Metallic Alloy Structures by Energy-Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ping; Zhou, Lin; Kramer, M. J.; Smith, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Determination of atomic-scale crystal structure for nanostructured intermetallic alloys, such as magnetic alloys containing Al, Ni, Co (alnico) and Fe, is crucial for understanding physical properties such as magnetism, but technically challenging due to the small interatomic distances and the similar atomic numbers. By applying energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) mapping to the study of two intermetallic phases of an alnico alloy resulting from spinodal decomposition, we have determined atomic-scale chemical composition at individual lattice sites for the two phases: one is the B2 phase with Fe0.76Co0.24 -Fe0.40Co0.60 ordering and the other is the L21 phase with Ni0.48Co0.52 at A-sites, Al at BΙ-sites and Fe0.20Ti0.80 at BΙΙ-sites, respectively. The technique developed through this study represents a powerful real-space approach to investigate structure chemically at the atomic scale for a wide range of materials systems. PMID:24492747

  2. Full-scale performance assessment of aircraft secondary sandwich structure using thermoelastic stress analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Crump, D.A.; Dulieu-Barton, J.M.; Savage, J

    2009-01-01

    The use of resin film infusion (RFI) has been proven to reduce the cost of production of aircraft secondary sandwich structure. In this paper thermoelastic stress analysis (TSA) is used to assess the performance of full scale aircraft sandwich structure panels produced using both the conventional autoclave process and RFI. Finite element (FE) models of both panel types are developed and TSA is used to validate the models.

  3. Large-Scale Computations Leading to a First-Principles Approach to Nuclear Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W E; Navratil, P

    2003-08-18

    We report on large-scale applications of the ab initio, no-core shell model with the primary goal of achieving an accurate description of nuclear structure from the fundamental inter-nucleon interactions. In particular, we show that realistic two-nucleon interactions are inadequate to describe the low-lying structure of {sup 10}B, and that realistic three-nucleon interactions are essential.

  4. Lack of sex-biased dispersal promotes fine-scale genetic structure in alpine ungulates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Luikart, Gordon; Sage, George K.; Pilgrim, Kristy L.; Adams, Layne G.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patterns of fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations can advance understanding of critical ecological processes such as dispersal and gene flow across heterogeneous landscapes. Alpine ungulates generally exhibit high levels of genetic structure due to female philopatry and patchy configuration of mountain habitats. We assessed the spatial scale of genetic structure and the amount of gene flow in 301 Dall’s sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) at the landscape level using 15 nuclear microsatellites and 473 base pairs of the mitochondrial (mtDNA) control region. Dall’s sheep exhibited significant genetic structure within contiguous mountain ranges, but mtDNA structure occurred at a broader geographic scale than nuclear DNA within the study area, and mtDNA structure for other North American mountain sheep populations. No evidence of male-mediated gene flow or greater philopatry of females was observed; there was little difference between markers with different modes of inheritance (pairwise nuclear DNA F ST = 0.004–0.325; mtDNA F ST = 0.009–0.544), and males were no more likely than females to be recent immigrants. Historical patterns based on mtDNA indicate separate northern and southern lineages and a pattern of expansion following regional glacial retreat. Boundaries of genetic clusters aligned geographically with prominent mountain ranges, icefields, and major river valleys based on Bayesian and hierarchical modeling of microsatellite and mtDNA data. Our results suggest that fine-scale genetic structure in Dall’s sheep is influenced by limited dispersal, and structure may be weaker in populations occurring near ancestral levels of density and distribution in continuous habitats compared to other alpine ungulates that have experienced declines and marked habitat fragmentation.

  5. Influence of structural length-scale variations on azimuth-resolved light scattering patterns of inhomogeneous cell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifler, Dizem; Guillaud, Martial

    2015-07-01

    Optical scattering provides an intrinsic contrast mechanism for the diagnosis of early precancerous changes in tissues. There have been a multitude of numerical studies targeted at delineating the relationship between cancer-related alterations in morphology and internal structure of cells and the resulting changes in their optical scattering properties. Despite these efforts, we still need to further our understanding of inherent scattering signatures that can be linked to precancer progression. As such, computational studies aimed at relating electromagnetic wave interactions to cellular and subcellular structural alterations are likely to provide a quantitative framework for a better assessment of the diagnostic content of optical signals. In this study, we aim to determine the influence of structural length-scale variations on two-dimensional light scattering properties of cells. We numerically construct cell models with different lower bounds on the size of refractive index heterogeneities and we employ the finite-difference time-domain method to compute their azimuth-resolved light scattering patterns. The results indicate that changes in length-scale variations can significantly alter the two-dimensional scattering patterns of cell models. More specifically, the degree of azimuthal asymmetry characterizing these patterns is observed to be highly dependent on the range of length-scale variations. Overall, the study described here is expected to offer useful insights into whether azimuth-resolved measurements can be explored for diagnostic purposes.

  6. Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure (VESS) at Clod scale (ClodVESS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannes, Alice; Boivin, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Visual soil structure evaluation in the field is very popular. It is fast, easy and inexpensive to perform. It opens exciting perspectives in terms of soil quality diagnosis and rapid survey. Some studies attempted to compare the scorings with measured physical properties, but most physical methods do not operate at the same scale. Visual evaluation is performed on a whole soil pit or layers, while physical measurements are usually performed on undisturbed soil samples collected in a layer. The match between the pit or layer VESS scores and the measured physical property can be poor due to short scale variability, even with numerous sample characterizations. This is particularly true with tilled soils. Moreover the field water content is heterogeneous, which introduces additional sources of variability. How far what we see matches with physical properties should be tested on the same sample, prior to handle the variability issue. Therefore, we adapted the VESS method to score soil cores of approximatively 150 cm3 in the laboratory, on which we performed also the physical characterization using shrinkage analysis. We collected 150 samples in a large area from the Swiss plateau (120 km long) in different land management (permanent pasture, no-till, conventional tillage), different seasons. The clay contents ranged from 10 to 30%. The samples were scored after performing shrinkage analysis according to the following criteria. The samples were equilibrated at -100 hPa to standardize the moisture conditions. Some criteria of the original method had to be discarded due to the small size of the soil core, namely (i) the indication on aggregate size over a few centimetres, (ii) rooting was found not consistent enough to be used, especially in cultivated soils where sampling season is determinant for root density. Three criteria could consistently be observed on all samples and were retained: (i) breaking difficulty, (ii) aggregate shape, (iii) visible porosity, and the

  7. Scaling of velocity and scalar structure functions in ac electrokinetic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Wang, Guiren

    2017-02-01

    Electrokinetic (EK) turbulence or electrohydrodynamic (EHD) turbulence has been recently achieved in different fluids under both ac [G. Wang et al., Lab Chip 14, 1452 (2014), 10.1039/C3LC51403J; Phys. Rev. E 93, 013106 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.013106] and dc electric fields [A. Varshney et al., Soft Matter 12, 1759 (2016), 10.1039/C5SM02316E]. Here, through dimensional analysis, scaling laws of both velocity and electric conductivity structure functions in the forced cascade region of ac EK turbulence can be predicated (similar to Bolgiano-Obukhov scaling law in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection), in either macroscale or microscale flows. In the forced cascade region, EK force, which relies on the direct cascade of conductivity structures, injects energy directly into a wide spectral region to sustain the flow disturbance. The scaling exponents of the second-order velocity and conductivity structures are 2/5 and 4/5, respectively. In addition to the scaling regions, two characteristic small length scales are derived for both weak and strong electric body forces, respectively. This theoretical investigation can significantly enhance our understanding of EK or EHD turbulence while forced by an ac electric field. It can further broaden our understanding of the forced cascade region of forced turbulence and make the manipulation of the turbulent cascade process more flexible and controllable.

  8. The natural armors of fish: A comparison of the lamination pattern and structure of scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murcia, Sandra; Lavoie, Ellen; Linley, Tim; Devaraj, Arun; Ossa, E. Alex; Arola, D.

    2017-09-01

    Fish scales exhibit a unique balance of flexibility, strength and toughness, which is essential to provide protection without encumbering locomotion. Although the mechanical behavior and structure of this natural armor are of recent interest, a comparison of these qualities from scales of different fish species has not been reported. In this investigation the armor of fish with different locomotion, size and protection needs were analyzed. Scales from the Arapaima gigas, the tarpon (Megalops atlanticus) and the carp (Cyprinus carpio) were compared in terms of the stacking sequence of individual plies and their microstructure. The scales were also compared with respect to anatomical position to distinguish site-specific functional differences. Results show that the lamination sequence of plies for the carp and tarpon exhibit a Bouligand structure with relative rotation of 75° between consecutive plies. The arapaima scales exhibit a cross-ply structure, with 90° rotation between adjacent plies. In addition, results indicate that the volume fraction of reinforcement, the number of plies and the variations in thickness with anatomical position are unique amongst the three fish. These characteristics should be considered in evaluations focused on the mechanical behavior.

  9. The natural armors of fish: A comparison of the lamination pattern and structure of scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murcia, Sandra; Lavoie, Ellen; Linley, Tim; Devaraj, Arun; Ossa, E Alex; Arola, D

    2017-09-01

    Fish scales exhibit a unique balance of flexibility, strength and toughness, which is essential to provide protection without encumbering locomotion. Although the mechanical behavior and structure of this natural armor are of recent interest, a comparison of these qualities from scales of different fish species has not been reported. In this investigation the armor of fish with different locomotion, size and protection needs were analyzed. Scales from the Arapaima gigas, the tarpon (Megalops atlanticus) and the carp (Cyprinus carpio) were compared in terms of the stacking sequence of individual plies and their microstructure. The scales were also compared with respect to anatomical position to distinguish site-specific functional differences. Results show that the lamination sequence of plies for the carp and tarpon exhibit a Bouligand structure with relative rotation of 75° between consecutive plies. The arapaima scales exhibit a cross-ply structure, with 90° rotation between adjacent plies. In addition, results indicate that the volume fraction of reinforcement, the number of plies and the variations in thickness with anatomical position are unique amongst the three fish. These characteristics should be considered in evaluations focused on the mechanical behavior. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Advances in RNA Structure Determination | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent years have witnessed a revolution in the field of RNA structure and function. Until recently the main contribution of RNA in cellular and disease functions was considered to be a role defined by the central dogma, namely DNA codes for mRNAs, which in turn encode for proteins, a notion facilitated by non-coding ribosomal RNA and tRNA. It was also assumed at the time that less than 2% of DNA in the human genome was used to encode genes, the remainder considered “junk”.

  11. Item-level and scale-level factor structures of the MMPI-A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, R P; Belevich, J K; Elkins, D E

    1994-04-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) is a 478-item test that represents a substantial revision of the original form of the MMPI. This investigation sought to identify the item-level factor structure of the MMPI-A and also examined the scale-level factor structure of the 69 scales and subscales of this instrument. The study utilized the 1,620 normal adolescents (805 boys and 815 girls) of the normative sample for the MMPI-A. These adolescents ranged in age from 14 to 18, inclusive, with a mean age of 15.54 for boys and 15.60 for girls. A principal factor analysis of item-level responses resulted in extraction of 14 factors that were subjected to promax (oblique) rotation procedures. These 14 factors incorporated 81% of the total MMPI-A item pool and accounted for 44% of the total item-level response variance. For the scale-level analysis, 8 factors were selected for extraction and submitted to promax rotation procedures. These eight factors accounted for a total of 93.5% of the total variance in MMPI-A scale and subscale raw scores. Item-level results were discussed in terms of areas of congruence and dissimilarities from previously reported MMPI factor analyses in adolescent and adult samples, and scale-level factor results were presented in terms of clinical implications for the interpretation of MMPI-A scales and subscales.

  12. German National Proficiency Scales in Biology: Internal Structure, Relations to General Cognitive Abilities and Verbal Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampa, Nele; Köller, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    National and international large-scale assessments (LSA) have a major impact on educational systems, which raises fundamental questions about the validity of the measures regarding their internal structure and their relations to relevant covariates. Given its importance, research on the validity of instruments specifically developed for LSA is…

  13. Bacterial community structure of a full-scale biofilter treating pig house exhaust air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Anja; Pedersen, Kristina Hadulla; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2011-01-01

    Biological air filters represent a promising tool for treating emissions of ammonia and odor from pig facilities. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and 16S rRNA gene sequencing were used to investigate the bacterial community structure and diversity in a full-scale biofilter...

  14. Factor structure and measurement invariance of a multidimensional loneliness scale : Comparisons across gender and age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maes, Marlies; Klimstra, T.A.; Van den Noortgate, Wim; Goossens, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the factor structure of a multidimensional loneliness measure, that is, the Loneliness and Aloneness Scale for Children and Adolescents (LACA). Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted on a large sample of children and adolescents (N = 9,676) in Belgium. Results indicated

  15. Atomic-scale structure of single-layer MoS2 nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helveg, S.; Lauritsen, J. V.; Lægsgaard, E.

    2000-01-01

    We have studied using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) the atomic-scale realm of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) nanoclusters, which are of interest as a model system in hydrodesulfurization catalysis. The STM gives the first real space images of the shape and edge structure of single-layer MoS2...

  16. Structure of isolated large-scale inhomogeneities in the outer ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinin, Iu. K.; Romanchuk, A. A.

    1991-03-01

    The structure of large-scale inhomogeneities in the outer ionosphere is examined with reference to Thomson scattering data. The dependence of delta Ne/Ne and delta Ne on the local coordinates is established. The shape function is also examined.

  17. Factor Structure of the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale in Turkish Early Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Ertugrul; Topkaya, Nursel

    2015-01-01

    Although the Social Appearance Anxiety Scale (SAAS) is most often validated with the use of confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) on undergraduate students, exploratory factor analysis and multiple factor retention decision criteria necessitate the analysis of underlying factor structure to prevent over and under factoring as well as to reveal…

  18. Homework Management Scale: Confirming the Factor Structure with Middle School Students in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianzhong; Fan, Xitao; Du, Jianxia

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a psychometric evaluation of the Homework Management Scale (HMS) for mathematics, consisting of five subscales for measuring homework management strategies. Confirmatory factor analyses were conducted with a sample of middle school students (N = 796). Results indicated that the factor structure of the Chinese version of the HMS…

  19. Factor Structure of the Korean Version of Wong and Law's Emotional Intelligence Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Eriko; Saklofske, Donald H.; Tamaoka, Katsuo; Lim, Hyunjung

    2012-01-01

    This study reports the factor structure of a Korean version of the 16-item Wong and Law Emotional Intelligence Scale (WLEIS) for a sample of 161 Korean university students. Confirmatory factor analysis supported the four-factor model of the WLEIS: (1) self-emotional appraisal, (2) others' emotional appraisal, (3) use of emotion, and (4) regulation…

  20. The Factor Structure of Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale Scores in Peruvian Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Kathryn R.; Schaefer, Barbara A.; Merino, Cesar; Worrell, Frank C.

    2009-01-01

    The factor structure of the Escala de Conductas de Aprendizaje Preescolar (ECAP), a Spanish translation of the Preschool Learning Behaviors Scale (PLBS), was examined in this study. Children aged 2 to 6 years (N = 328) enrolled in public and private preschools in the Republic of Peru were rated by classroom teachers on the frequency of observable,…