WorldWideScience

Sample records for scale immune profiling

  1. Scaling of Adaptive Immune System Repertoires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethna, Zachary; Elhanati, Yuval; Callan, Curtis

    The adaptive immune system has evolved a stochastic method called VDJ recombination for the purpose of generating the necessary receptor diversity to identify all foreign pathogens. Recent work characterizing the probability distributions of this VDJ recombination process in mouse and human T-cell repertoires shows a massive difference in the corresponding diversities. The increased diversity of the human repertoire is wholly driven by an increase in the average number of nucleotide insertions in VDJ recombination. In this talk the impact of different insertion profiles is quantified and a model for the scaling of such repertoires with respect to the size of the repertoire is laid out.

  2. Immune profile alterations in thalassaemic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, L; Mastromonaco, A; Giuliani, E; Buzzonetti, A; Sisti, P; Guglielmetti, M; Iudicone, P; Greca, E; Damiano, A M; Ciancamerla, A M

    1983-01-01

    Aspects of the humoral and cellular immune response have been studied in polytransfused patients with beta-thalassaemia major. Serum immunoglobulins (G, A, M) levels were significantly higher than in controls; reduced C4 serum level and high incidence of circulating immune complexes and anti-nuclear autoantibodies were found in the majority of patients. Marked increases were also observed in absolute and relative numbers of lymphocytes and their subpopulations. Such results suggested that the allogenic stimulation, by frequent transfusion, is the mainly responsible of the immunological alterations observed in these patients.

  3. Scale-free dynamics of somatic adaptability in immune system

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Shiro

    2009-01-01

    The long-time dynamics of somatic adaptability in immune system is simulated by a simple physical model. The immune system described by the model exhibits a scale free behavior as is observed in living systems. The balance between the positive and negative feedbacks of the model leads to a robust immune system where the positive one corresponds to the formation of memory cells and the negative one to immunosuppression. Also the immunosenescence of the system is discussed based on the time-dependence of the epigenetic landscape of the adaptive immune cells in the shape space.

  4. Transcript profiling of the murine immune response to invasive aspergillosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhesi, Zaneeta; Herbst, Susanne; Armstrong-James, Darius

    2012-01-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is an opportunistic infection for which complex host-pathogen interactions determine infection outcome. In particular, immunosuppressive therapies and other host factors, such as neutropenia, need to be taken into account when modelling the immune response to aspergillosis. Mammalian models have been developed in order to gain a deeper understanding of these biological interactions, which cannot be easily replicated in vitro. In vivo transcript profiling is emerging as a valuable technique to gain an overview of host responses to invasive infections. This approach can be applied to specific tissue sections, whole organs, or peripheral blood leukocyte populations. Here we describe a microarray technique for analyzing transcript profiles from whole lung homogenates in the context of invasive aspergillosis. This approach has the advantage of enabling a broad overview of the immune responses that govern disease outcome. The generic techniques described, however, have wider application to other infectious processes and tissue types.

  5. Functional and phenotypic profiling of innate immunity during Salmonella infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Brandt; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    Salmonellae are food borne pathogens, typically acquired by the oral ingestion of contaminated food or water, causing disease in both healthy and immunocompromised individuals. To gain insight into early immune regulation events caused by Salmonella as well as inflammatory signatures induced...... subsets, two of which following infection, accumulated in Peyer’s patches and lamina propria, respectively. Generally, we tend to set apart pathogenic bacteria from opportunistic pathogens and commensal bacteria based on their abilities to induce disease in different hosts, however, the nature...... to treatment regimes, as targeted modulation of DC profiles for instance by probiotics, could lead to improved therapy for a number of gut related diseases....

  6. Pangolin genomes and the evolution of mammalian scales and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Siew Woh; Rayko, Mike; Tan, Tze King; Hari, Ranjeev; Komissarov, Aleksey; Wee, Wei Yee; Yurchenko, Andrey A; Kliver, Sergey; Tamazian, Gaik; Antunes, Agostinho; Wilson, Richard K; Warren, Wesley C; Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Minx, Patrick; Krasheninnikova, Ksenia; Kotze, Antoinette; Dalton, Desire L; Vermaak, Elaine; Paterson, Ian C; Dobrynin, Pavel; Sitam, Frankie Thomas; Rovie-Ryan, Jeffrine J; Johnson, Warren E; Yusoff, Aini Mohamed; Luo, Shu-Jin; Karuppannan, Kayal Vizi; Fang, Gang; Zheng, Deyou; Gerstein, Mark B; Lipovich, Leonard; O'Brien, Stephen J; Wong, Guat Jah

    2016-10-01

    Pangolins, unique mammals with scales over most of their body, no teeth, poor vision, and an acute olfactory system, comprise the only placental order (Pholidota) without a whole-genome map. To investigate pangolin biology and evolution, we developed genome assemblies of the Malayan (Manis javanica) and Chinese (M. pentadactyla) pangolins. Strikingly, we found that interferon epsilon (IFNE), exclusively expressed in epithelial cells and important in skin and mucosal immunity, is pseudogenized in all African and Asian pangolin species that we examined, perhaps impacting resistance to infection. We propose that scale development was an innovation that provided protection against injuries or stress and reduced pangolin vulnerability to infection. Further evidence of specialized adaptations was evident from positively selected genes involving immunity-related pathways, inflammation, energy storage and metabolism, muscular and nervous systems, and scale/hair development. Olfactory receptor gene families are significantly expanded in pangolins, reflecting their well-developed olfaction system. This study provides insights into mammalian adaptation and functional diversification, new research tools and questions, and perhaps a new natural IFNE-deficient animal model for studying mammalian immunity. © 2016 Choo et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Scaling behavior of the Compton profile of alkali metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekania, Michael; Appelt, Wilhelm H.; Benea, Diana; Ebert, Hubert; Vollhardt, Dieter; Chioncel, Liviu

    2018-01-01

    The contribution of the valence electrons to the Compton profiles of the crystalline alkali metals is calculated using density functional theory. We show that the Compton profiles can be modeled by a q-Gaussian distribution, which is characterized by an anisotropic, element dependent parameter q. Thereby we derive an unexpected scaling behavior of the Compton profiles of all alkali metals.

  8. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarroux, Loic; Michel, Philippe; Adimy, Mostafa; Crauste, Fabien

    2016-06-01

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  9. Multi-scale modeling of the CD8 immune response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbarroux, Loic, E-mail: loic.barbarroux@doctorant.ec-lyon.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Institut Camille Jordan (France); Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Michel, Philippe, E-mail: philippe.michel@ec-lyon.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Institut Camille Jordan (France); Ecole Centrale de Lyon, 36 avenue Guy de Collongue, 69134 Ecully (France); Adimy, Mostafa, E-mail: mostafa.adimy@inria.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Université Lyon 1, Institut Camille Jordan, 43 Bd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69200 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Crauste, Fabien, E-mail: crauste@math.univ-lyon1.fr [Inria, Université de Lyon, UMR 5208, Université Lyon 1, Institut Camille Jordan, 43 Bd. du 11 novembre 1918, F-69200 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2016-06-08

    During the primary CD8 T-Cell immune response to an intracellular pathogen, CD8 T-Cells undergo exponential proliferation and continuous differentiation, acquiring cytotoxic capabilities to address the infection and memorize the corresponding antigen. After cleaning the organism, the only CD8 T-Cells left are antigen-specific memory cells whose role is to respond stronger and faster in case they are presented this very same antigen again. That is how vaccines work: a small quantity of a weakened pathogen is introduced in the organism to trigger the primary response, generating corresponding memory cells in the process, giving the organism a way to defend himself in case it encounters the same pathogen again. To investigate this process, we propose a non linear, multi-scale mathematical model of the CD8 T-Cells immune response due to vaccination using a maturity structured partial differential equation. At the intracellular scale, the level of expression of key proteins is modeled by a delay differential equation system, which gives the speeds of maturation for each cell. The population of cells is modeled by a maturity structured equation whose speeds are given by the intracellular model. We focus here on building the model, as well as its asymptotic study. Finally, we display numerical simulations showing the model can reproduce the biological dynamics of the cell population for both the primary response and the secondary responses.

  10. Comprehensive immune profiling reveals substantial immune system alterations in a subset of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael P Gustafson

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with a median lifespan of 2-3 years after diagnosis. There are few meaningful treatments that alter progression in this disease. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that neuroinflammation may play a key role in the progression rate of ALS. Despite this, there are no validated biomarkers of neuroinflammation for use in clinical practice or clinical trials. Biomarkers of neuroinflammation could improve patient management, provide new therapeutic targets, and possibly help stratify clinical trial selection and monitoring. However, attempts to identify a singular cause of neuroinflammation have not been successful. Here, we performed multi-parameter flow cytometry to comprehensively assess 116 leukocyte populations and phenotypes from lymphocytes, monocytes, and granulocytes in a cohort of 80 ALS patients. We identified 32 leukocyte phenotypes that were altered in ALS patients compared to age and gender matched healthy volunteers (HV that included phenotypes of both inflammation and immune suppression. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering and principle component analysis of ALS and HV immunophenotypes revealed two distinct immune profiles of ALS patients. ALS patients were clustered into a profile distinct from HVs primarily due to differences in a multiple T cell phenotypes, CD3+CD56+ T cells and HLA-DR on monocytes. Patients clustered into an abnormal immune profile were younger, more likely to have a familial form of the disease, and survived longer than those patients who clustered similarly with healthy volunteers (344 weeks versus 184 weeks; p = 0.012. The data set generated from this study establishes an extensive accounting of immunophenotypic changes readily suitable for biomarker validation studies. The extensive immune system changes measured in this study indicate that normal immune homeostatic mechanisms are disrupted in ALS patients, and that

  11. Length Scales of the Neutral Wind Profile over Homogeneous Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Mann, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    The wind speed profile for the neutral boundary layer is derived for a number of mixing-length parameterizations, which account for the height of the boundary layer. The wind speed profiles show good agreement with the reanalysis of the Leipzig wind profile (950 m high) and with combined cup...... is extended to the entire boundary layer, demonstrating the importance of the boundary layer height as a scaling parameter. The turbulence measurements, performed up to 160-m height only at the Høvsøre site, provide the opportunity to derive the spectral-length scales from two spectral models. Good agreement...

  12. Proteomic profile of circulating immune complexes in chronic Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohyama, K; Huy, N T; Yoshimi, H; Kishikawa, N; Nishizawa, J E; Roca, Y; Revollo Guzmán, R J; Velarde, F U G; Kuroda, N; Hirayama, K

    2016-10-01

    Immune complexes (ICs) are the direct and real-time products of humoral immune responses. The identification of constituent foreign or autoantigens within ICs might bring new insights into the pathology of infectious diseases. We applied immune complexome analysis of plasma to the study of Chagas disease caused by Trypanosoma cruzi. Twenty seropositive plasma samples including cardiac and/or megacolon determinate patients (n = 11) and indeterminate (n = 9) were analysed along with 10 seronegative individuals to characterize the antigens bound to circulating ICs. We identified 39 T. cruzi antigens and 114 human autoantigens specific to patients with Chagas. Among those antigens, two T. cruzi antigens (surface protease GP63, glucose-6-isomerase) and six human autoantigens (CD180 antigen, ceruloplasmin, fibrinogen beta chain, fibrinogen beta chain isoform 2 preprotein, isoform gamma-A of fibrinogen γ-chain, serum paraoxonase) were detected in more than 50% of the patients tested. Human isoform short of complement factor H-related protein 2 and trans-sialidase of T. cruzi were more frequently found in the indeterminate (5/9 for both) compared with in the determinate Chagas (0/11, P = 0·046 for human, 1/11, P = 0·0498 for T. cruzi). The immune complexome could illustrate the difference of immune status between clinical forms of chronic Chagas disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Immune responses and immune-related gene expression profile in orange-spotted grouper after immunization with Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Xue-Ming; Zhang, Tuan-Wei; Li, Yan-Wei; Li, An-Xing

    2013-03-01

    In order to elucidate the immune-protective mechanisms of inactivated Cryptocaryon irritans vaccine, different doses of C. irritans theronts were used to immunize orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). We measured serum immobilization titer, blood leukocyte respiratory burst activity, serum alternative complement activity, and serum lysozyme activity weekly. In addition, the expression levels of immune-related genes such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), major histocompatibility complexes I and II (MHC I and II), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) were determined in spleen and gills. The results showed that the immobilization titer, respiratory burst activity, and alternative complement activity of immunized fish were significantly increased, and the levels of the last two immune parameters in the high-dose vaccine group were significantly higher than in the low-dose vaccine group. Serum lysozyme activity in the high-dose vaccine group was significantly higher than in the PBS control group. Vaccination also regulated host immune-related gene expression. For example, at 2- and 3- weeks post immunization, IL-1β expression in the high-dose vaccine group spleen was significantly increased. At 4-weeks post immunization, the fish were challenged with a lethal dose of parasite, and the survival rates of high-dose vaccine group, low-dose vaccine group, PBS control group, and adjuvant control group were 80%, 40%, 0%, and 10% respectively. These results demonstrate that inactivated C. irritans vaccination improves specific and nonspecific immune responses in fish, enhancing their anti-parasite ability. These effects are vaccine antigen dose-dependent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic aspects of auto-immune profiles of healthy chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, Henk K; van der Vaart, Priscilla S; Nieuwland, Mike G B; Savelkoul, Huub F J

    2017-09-01

    Auto-antibody profiles binding liver antigens differed between chicken lines divergently selected for specific antibody responses to SRBC, and were affected by ageing suggesting both genetic and environmental effects. Presence and levels of IgM and IgG antibodies binding chicken liver cell lysate (CLL) fragments in plasma at 5 weeks of age from 10 individual full sibs and their parents from 5 Hsrbc and 5 Lsrbc line families was studied to reveal genetic relations. Non-genetic maternal effects were studied by comparing auto-antibody profiles of 36 weeks old hens from 2 other unrelated lines with the profiles from their chicks at hatch. IgM and IgG antibodies from parents and progeny from both Hsrbc and Lsrbc lines bound CLL fragments. Significant line and generation differences and their interactions were found for both isotypes. Higher staining of CLL fragments was usually found for Hsrbc line birds. Lines were clustered by auto-antibody profiles, but staining by birds of both lines in both generations was very individual for IgG and IgM. The current data with full sibs therefore not supported a genetic basis for auto-antibody profiles. IgG but not IgM auto-antibody profiles of chicks correlated with maternal auto-antibody profiles. The results suggest that the auto-antibody repertoire of healthy chickens is largely stochastically initiated and may be affected by environmental challenges during ageing, but genetic mechanisms may underlie staining intensity of individual bound CLL fragments. The present results suggest that identification of fragments or profiles to be used at early age for genetic selection for health traits is not feasible yet. Secondly, the IgM profile of neonatal chickens seems non-organised independent of the maternal profile, but the neonatal IgG profile is much more related with the maternal profile. Consequences of these findings for disease susceptibility or breeding for optimal health are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  15. Profile Similarity Metrics Increase Personality Scale Validity (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-15

    unless so designated by other documentation. Personality Tests • Modest scale validity & minor adverse impact • Scale scores often computed as the mean ...Profile Similarity Metrics Increase Personality Scale Validity Peter J. Legree, Robert N. Kilcullen U.S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral... Personality Tests & Distance Metrics • Conventional and distance scores are redundant: r = -1.00 3 Fitness Motivation Rating Conventional Score Key Distance

  16. Uterine immune profiling for increasing live birth rate: A one-to-one matched cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lédée, Nathalie; Prat-Ellenberg, Laura; Chevrier, Lucie; Balet, Richard; Simon, Cynthia; Lenoble, Clarisse; Irani, Elie El; Bouret, Dominique; Cassuto, Guy; Vitoux, Dominique; Vezmar, Katia; Bensussan, Armand; Chaouat, Gérard; Petitbarat, Marie

    2017-02-01

    Embryo implantation remains the main limiting factor in IVF/ICSI program. Endometrial immune remodeling events begin before implantation and are a vital process for pregnancy, preparing future maternal immune tolerance and regulating the placentation process. Between 2012 and 2014, 193 patients (analyzed group) enrolled in our IVF program benefitted of an endometrial immune profiling to determine if their uterus was immunologically ready to accept an embryo and, if not, the specific immune mechanisms involved. Subsequently, they had an effective embryo transfer (ET) with personalization of their treatments if an immune deregulation has been diagnosed. Each analyzed patient was paired to the closest patient included in the IVF program according to biological criteria (age, number of mature oocytes, stage and number of transferred embryo), which had no endometrial immune profiling (193 patients, non-analyzed group). 78% of analyzed patients had a uterine immune dysregulation and therefore care personalization. Their corresponding live birth rate (LBR) was twice higher than observed in the matched control group with conventional cares (30.5% versus 16.6%, OR: 2.2 [1.27-3.83] p=0.004) with a simultaneous drastic reduction of miscarriages per initiated pregnancy (17.9% versus 43.2%, OR: 0.29 [0.12-0.71], p=0.005). 22% of analyzed patients had no dysregulation. They did not differ from their matched controls for LBR and miscarriages. Uterine immune profiling enables an integrated approach of infertility that includes endometrial immunity as a key factor in planning personalized IVF/ICSI treatments. Personalization of treatment according to the woman's uterine immune balance produced a very significantly higher LBR. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Subgrouping Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Patients By Genetic and Immune Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Test -based exact confidence intervals for the difference of two binomial proportions. Biometrics, 55 (4), 1202-1209. Chi, E. C., & Lange , K. (2014...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT We have successfully performed all testing of the approximately 600 samples (200 CFS/ME patients vs 397 healthy... tested by two novel methods (CyTOF-phosphoflow and HLA Typing, respectively) to help us better understand the roles of immune responses and genetics

  18. An improved local immunization strategy for scale-free networks with a high degree of clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lingling; Jiang, Guoping; Song, Yurong; Song, Bo

    2017-01-01

    The design of immunization strategies is an extremely important issue for disease or computer virus control and prevention. In this paper, we propose an improved local immunization strategy based on node's clustering which was seldom considered in the existing immunization strategies. The main aim of the proposed strategy is to iteratively immunize the node which has a high connectivity and a low clustering coefficient. To validate the effectiveness of our strategy, we compare it with two typical local immunization strategies on both real and artificial networks with a high degree of clustering. Simulations on these networks demonstrate that the performance of our strategy is superior to that of two typical strategies. The proposed strategy can be regarded as a compromise between computational complexity and immune effect, which can be widely applied in scale-free networks of high clustering, such as social network, technological networks and so on. In addition, this study provides useful hints for designing optimal immunization strategy for specific network.

  19. On the length-scale of the wind profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Mann, Jakob

    2010-01-01

    We present the results of an analysis of simultaneous sonic anemometer observations of wind speed and velocity spectra over flat and homogeneous terrain from 10 up to 160 m height performed at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The mixing length, l, derived from...... the wind speed profile, is found to be linearly proportional to the length-scale of turbulence, derived either from the peak of the vertical velocity spectrum, (λm)w, or from a three-dimensional turbulence spectral model, for a range of atmospheric stability conditions, friction Rossby numbers, and within...... the range of observational heights ((λm)w ∼ 7l). Under very unstable conditions and above 100 m, the local wind shear is low, and the relation between both length-scales is slightly nonlinear. Mixing-length and wind profile models, which depend on both atmospheric stability and friction Rossby number...

  20. Gene Expression Profile of the Hypothalamus in DNP-KLH Immunized Mice Following Electroacupuncture Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Kwang Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical evidence indicates that electroacupuncture (EA is effective for allergic disorder. Recent animal studies have shown that EA treatment reduces levels of IgE and Th2 cytokines in BALB/c mice immunized with 2,4-dinitrophenylated keyhole limpet protein (DNP-KLH. The hypothalamus, a brain center of the neural-immune system, is known to be activated by EA stimulation. This study was performed to identify and characterize the differentially expressed genes in the hypothalamus of DNP-KLH immunized mice that were stimulated with EA or only restrained. To this aim, we conducted a microarray analysis to evaluate the global gene expression profiles, using the hypothalamic RNA samples taken from three groups of mice: (i normal control group (no treatments; (ii IMH group (DNP-KLH immunization + restraint; and (iii IMEA group (immunization + EA stimulation. The microarray analysis revealed that total 39 genes were altered in their expression levels by EA treatment. Ten genes, including T-cell receptor alpha variable region family 13 subfamily 1 (Tcra-V13.1, heat shock protein 1B (Hspa1b and 2′–5′ oligoadenylate synthetase 1F (Oas1f, were up-regulated in the IMEA group when compared with the IMH group. In contrast, 29 genes, including decay accelerating factor 2 (Daf2, NAD(PH dehydrogenase, quinone 1 (Nqo1 and programmed cell death 1 ligand 2 (Pdcd1lg2 were down-regulated in the IMEA group as compared with the IMH group. These results suggest that EA treatment can modulate immune response in DNP-KLH immunized mice by regulating expression levels of genes that are associated with innate immune, cellular defense and/or other kinds of immune system in the hypothalamus.

  1. Genome-Wide Profiling of Humoral Immune Response to Coxiella burnetii Infection by Protein Microarray

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Revised: March 5, 2010 Accepted: March 18, 2010 Keywords: Antibody I Coxiella burnetii I Humoral/ Microarray I Protein arrays I 0 fever 1 Introduction... Coxiella burnetii is a gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria, and the etiological agent of Q fever [1 ]. Distribution of C. burnetii is...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genome-wide profiling of humoral immune response to Coxiella burnetii infection by protein microarray 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  2. Structures, profile consistency, and transport scaling in electrostatic convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    that for interchange modes, profile consistency is in fact due to mixing by persistent large-scale convective cells. This mechanism is not a turbulent diffusion, cannot occur in collisionless systems, and is the analog of the well-known laminar "magnetic flux expulsion" in magneiohydrodynamics. This expulsion process...... involves a "pinch" across closed streamlines and further results in the formation of pressure fingers along the-separatrix of the convective cells. By nature, these coherent structures are dissipative because the mixing process that leads to their formation relies on a finite amount of collisional...... diffusion. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional interchange modes confirm the role of laminar expulsion by convective cells, for profile consistency and structure formation. They also show that the fingerlike pressure structures ultimately control the rate of heat transport across the plasma layer...

  3. Expression profile of immune-related genes in Lates calcarifer infected by Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd-Shaharuddin, Norashikin; Mohd-Adnan, Adura; Kua, Beng-Chu; Nathan, Sheila

    2013-03-01

    Cryptocaryon irritans causes Cyptocaryonosis or white spot disease in a wide range of marine fish including Lates calcarifer (Asian seabass). However, the immune response of this fish to the parasite is still poorly understood. In this study, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was performed to assess the expression profile of immune-related genes in L. calcarifer infected by C. irritans. A total of 21 immune-related genes encoding various functions in the fish immune system were utilized for the qPCR analysis. The experiment was initiated with the infection of juvenile fish by exposure to theronts from 200 C. irritans cysts, and non-infected juvenile fish were used as controls. Spleen, liver, gills and kidney tissues were harvested at three days post-infection from control and infected fish. In addition, organs were also harvested on day-10 post-infection from fish that had been allowed to recover from day-4 up to day-10 post-infection. L. calcarifer exhibited pathological changes on day-3 post-infection with the characteristic presence of white spots on the entire fish body, excessive mucus production and formation of a flap over the fish eye. High quality total RNA was extracted from all tissues and qPCR was performed. The qPCR analysis on the cohort of 21 immune-related genes of the various organs harvested on day-3 post-infection demonstrated that most genes were induced significantly (p irritans infection (10 days post-infection), expression of the immune-related genes was down-regulated to levels similar to the control fish. These results provide insights into the interaction between C. irritans and L. calcarifer and suggest that the innate immune system plays an important role in early defence against parasite infection allowing the fish to eventually recover from the infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Predicting Risk of Infection in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma: Utility of Immune Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin W. Teh

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundA translational study in patients with myeloma to determine the utility of immune profiling to predict infection risk in patients with hematological malignancy was conducted.MethodsBaseline, end of induction, and maintenance peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 40 patients were evaluated. Immune cell populations and cytokines released from 1 × 106 cells/ml cultured in the presence of a panel of stimuli (cytomegalovirus, influenza, S. pneumoniae, phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin and in media alone were quantified. Patient characteristics and infective episodes were captured from clinical records. Immunological variables associated with increased risk for infection in the 3-month period following sample collection were identified using univariate analysis (p < 0.05 and refined with multivariable analysis to define a predictive immune profile.Results525 stimulant samples with 19,950 stimulant–cytokine combinations across three periods were studied, including 61 episodes of infection. Mitogen-stimulated release of IL3 and IL5 were significantly associated with increased risk for subsequent infection during maintenance therapy. A lower Th1/Th2 ratio and higher cytokine response ratios for IL5 and IL13 during maintenance therapy were also significantly associated with increased risk for infection. On multivariable analysis, only IL5 in response to mitogen stimulation was predictive of infection. The lack of cytokine response and numerical value of immune cells were not predictive of infection.ConclusionProfiling cytokine release in response to mitogen stimulation can assist with predicting subsequent onset of infection in patients with hematological malignancy during maintenance therapy.

  5. Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  6. Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Why Exercise Is Wise Are Detox Diets Safe? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A What's in this article? ... fault if you don't have all the immunizations (vaccinations) you need. Shots that doctors recommend today ...

  7. Expression profile of immune response genes in patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Dessmon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS emerged in later February 2003, as a new epidemic form of life-threatening infection caused by a novel coronavirus. However, the immune-pathogenesis of SARS is poorly understood. To understand the host response to this pathogen, we investigated the gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from SARS patients, and compared with healthy controls. Results The number of differentially expressed genes was found to be 186 under stringent filtering criteria of microarray data analysis. Several genes were highly up-regulated in patients with SARS, such as, the genes coding for Lactoferrin, S100A9 and Lipocalin 2. The real-time PCR method verified the results of the gene array analysis and showed that those genes that were up-regulated as determined by microarray analysis were also found to be comparatively up-regulated by real-time PCR analysis. Conclusions This differential gene expression profiling of PBMCs from patients with SARS strongly suggests that the response of SARS affected patients seems to be mainly an innate inflammatory response, rather than a specific immune response against a viral infection, as we observed a complete lack of cytokine genes usually triggered during a viral infection. Our study shows for the first time how the immune system responds to the SARS infection, and opens new possibilities for designing new diagnostics and treatments for this new life-threatening disease.

  8. Variations in Academic Performance Trajectories during High School Transition: Exploring Change Profiles Via Multidimensional Scaling Growth Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Cody S.

    2008-01-01

    This study examines the baseline change profiles of academic performance (math and English) trajectories during the high school transition for the students who went from middle school to high school. Using multidimensional scaling growth profile analysis, we identified a no-change group plus 4 other groups with different change profile types: 1…

  9. Systemic Immune Activation Profiles of HIV-1 Subtype C-Infected Children and Their Mothers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tinyiko G. Makhubele

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about immune activation profiles of children infected with HIV-1 subtype C. The current study compared levels of selected circulating biomarkers of immune activation in HIV-1 subtype C-infected untreated mothers and their children with those of healthy controls. Multiplex bead array, ELISA, and immunonephelometric procedures were used to measure soluble CD14 (sCD14, beta-2 microglobulin (β2M, CRP, MIG, IP-10, and transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1. Levels of all 6 biomarkers were significantly elevated in the HIV-infected mothers and, with the exception of MIG, in their children (P<0.01–P<0.0001. The effects of antiretroviral therapy (ART and maternal smoking on these biomarkers were also assessed. With the exception of TGF-β1, which was unchanged in the children 12 months after therapy, initiation of ART was accompanied by decreases in the other biomarkers. Regression analysis revealed that although most biomarkers were apparently unaffected by smoking, exposure of children to maternal smoking was associated with a significant increase in IP-10. These findings demonstrate that biomarkers of immune activation are elevated in HIV-infected children pre-ART and decline, with the exception of TGF-β1, after therapy. Although preliminary, elevation of IP-10 in smoke-exposed infants is consistent with a higher level of immune activation in this group.

  10. Single amino acid modification of adeno-associated virus capsid changes transduction and humoral immune profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chengwen; Diprimio, Nina; Bowles, Dawn E; Hirsch, Matthew L; Monahan, Paul E; Asokan, Aravind; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, R Jude

    2012-08-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have the potential to promote long-term gene expression. Unfortunately, humoral immunity restricts patient treatment and in addition provides an obstacle to the potential option of vector readministration. In this study, we describe a comprehensive characterization of the neutralizing antibody (NAb) response to AAV type 1 (AAV1) through AAV5 both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrated that NAbs generated from one AAV type are unable to neutralize the transduction of other types. We extended this observation by demonstrating that a rationally engineered, muscle-tropic AAV2 mutant containing 5 amino acid substitutions from AAV1 displayed a NAb profile different from those of parental AAV2 and AAV1. Here we found that a single insertion of Thr from AAV1 into AAV2 capsid at residue 265 preserved high muscle transduction, while also changing the immune profile. To better understand the role of Thr insertion at position 265, we replaced all 20 amino acids and evaluated both muscle transduction and the NAb response. Of these variants, 8 mutants induced higher muscle transduction than AAV2. Additionally, three classes of capsid NAb immune profile were defined based on the ability to inhibit transduction from AAV2 or mutants. While no relationship was found between transduction, amino acid properties, and NAb titer or its cross-reactivity, these studies map a critical capsid motif involved in all steps of AAV infectivity. Our results suggest that AAV types can be utilized not only as templates to generate mutants with enhanced transduction efficiency but also as substrates for repeat administration.

  11. Seamustard ( Improves Growth, Immunity, Fatty Acid Profile and Reduces Cholesterol in Hanwoo Steers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Hwang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was designed to evaluate the effect of 2% seamustard (Undaria pinnatifida by-product (SW on growth performance, immunity, carcass characteristics, cholesterol content and fatty acid profile in Hanwoo steers. A total of 20 Hanwoo steers (ave. 22 months old; 619 kg body weight were randomly assigned to control (basal diet and 2% SW supplemented diet. Dietary SW supplementation significantly (p<0.05 improved average daily gain and gain:feed ratio as well as serum immunoglobulin G concentration. Chemical composition and quality grade of meat and carcass yield grades evaluated at the end of the trial were found to be unaffected by SW supplementation. Dietary SW significantly reduced meat cholesterol concentration (p<0.05. Dietary SW supplementation significantly reduced the myristic acid (C14:0 and palmitoleic acid (C16:ln-7 concentration, while SW increased the concentration of stearic acid (C18:0 and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3 compared to control (p<0.05. Dietary SW supplementation had no effect on saturated fatty acids (SFA, unsaturated fatty acids, poly unsaturated fatty acid (PUFA or mono unsaturated fatty acid content in muscles. A reduced ratio of PUFA/SFA and n-6/n-3 were found in SW supplemented group (p<0.05. In conclusion, 2% SW supplementation was found to improve growth, immunity and fatty acid profile with significantly reduced cholesterol of beef.

  12. Different profiles of immune reconstitution in children and adults with HIV-infection after highly active antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Manuel

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent advances in characterizing the immune recovery of HIV-1-infected people have highlighted the importance of the thymus for peripheral T-cell diversity and function. The aim of this study was to investigate differences in immune reconstitution profiles after highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART between HIV-children and adults. Methods HIV patients were grouped according to their previous clinical and immunological status: 9 HIV-Reconstituting-adults (HIV-Rec-adults and 10 HIV-Reconstituting-children (HIV-Rec-children on HAART with viral load (VL ≤400 copies/ml and CD4+ ≥500 cells/μL at least during 6 months before the study and CD4+ ≤300 cells/μL anytime before. Fifteen healthy-adults and 20 healthy-children (control subjects were used to calculate Z-score values to unify value scales between children and adults to make them comparable. Results HIV-Rec-children had higher T-cell receptor excision circles (TREC and lower interleukin (IL-7 levels than HIV-Rec-adults (p + (CD4+CD45RA hi+CD27+, naïve CD8+ (CD8+CD45RA hi+CD27+, and memory CD8+ (CD8+CD45RO+ cells/μl than HIV-Rec-adults, but similar memory CD4+ (CD4+CD45RO+ counts. HIV-Rec-children had lower naïve CD8+ Z-score values than HIV-Rec-adults (p = 0.05. Conclusion Our data suggest that HIV-Rec-children had better thymic function than HIV-Rec-adults and this fact affects the peripheral T-cell subsets. Thus, T-cell recovery after HAART in HIV-Rec-adults could be the consequence of antigen-independent peripheral T-cell expansion while in HIV-Rec-children thymic output could play a predominant role in immune reconstitution.

  13. Immune response profiles of calves following vaccination with live BCG and inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine candidates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E M D L van der Heijden

    Full Text Available Conventional control and eradication strategies for bovine tuberculosis (BTB face tremendous difficulties in developing countries; countries with wildlife reservoirs, a complex wildlife-livestock-human interface or a lack of veterinary and veterinary public health surveillance. Vaccination of cattle and other species might in some cases provide the only suitable control strategy for BTB, while in others it may supplement existing test-and-slaughter schemes. However, the use of live BCG has several limitations and the global rise of HIV/AIDS infections has furthermore warranted the exploration of inactivated vaccine preparations. The aim of this study was to compare the immune response profiles in response to parenteral vaccination with live BCG and two inactivated vaccine candidates in cattle. Twenty-four mixed breed calves (Bos taurus aged 4-6 months, were allocated to one of four groups and vaccinated sub-cutaneously with live M. bovis BCG (Danish 1331, formalin-inactivated M. bovis BCG, heat-killed M. bovis or PBS/Montanide™ (control. Interferon-γ responsiveness and antibody production were measured prior to vaccination and at weekly intervals thereafter for twelve weeks. At nine weeks post-priming, animals were skin tested using tuberculins and MTBC specific protein cocktails and subsequently challenged through intranodular injection of live M. bovis BCG. The animals in the heat-killed M. bovis group demonstrated strong and sustained cell-mediated and humoral immune responses, significantly higher than the control group in response to vaccination, which may indicate a protective immune profile. Animals in this group showed reactivity to the skin test reagents, confirming good vaccine take. Lastly, although not statistically significant, recovery of BCG after challenge was lowest in the heat-killed M. bovis group. In conclusion, the parenteral heat-killed M. bovis vaccine proved to be clearly immunogenic in cattle in the present study

  14. Immune response profiles of calves following vaccination with live BCG and inactivated Mycobacterium bovis vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, E M D L; Chileshe, J; Vernooij, J C M; Gortazar, C; Juste, R A; Sevilla, I; Crafford, J E; Rutten, V P M G; Michel, A L

    2017-01-01

    Conventional control and eradication strategies for bovine tuberculosis (BTB) face tremendous difficulties in developing countries; countries with wildlife reservoirs, a complex wildlife-livestock-human interface or a lack of veterinary and veterinary public health surveillance. Vaccination of cattle and other species might in some cases provide the only suitable control strategy for BTB, while in others it may supplement existing test-and-slaughter schemes. However, the use of live BCG has several limitations and the global rise of HIV/AIDS infections has furthermore warranted the exploration of inactivated vaccine preparations. The aim of this study was to compare the immune response profiles in response to parenteral vaccination with live BCG and two inactivated vaccine candidates in cattle. Twenty-four mixed breed calves (Bos taurus) aged 4-6 months, were allocated to one of four groups and vaccinated sub-cutaneously with live M. bovis BCG (Danish 1331), formalin-inactivated M. bovis BCG, heat-killed M. bovis or PBS/Montanide™ (control). Interferon-γ responsiveness and antibody production were measured prior to vaccination and at weekly intervals thereafter for twelve weeks. At nine weeks post-priming, animals were skin tested using tuberculins and MTBC specific protein cocktails and subsequently challenged through intranodular injection of live M. bovis BCG. The animals in the heat-killed M. bovis group demonstrated strong and sustained cell-mediated and humoral immune responses, significantly higher than the control group in response to vaccination, which may indicate a protective immune profile. Animals in this group showed reactivity to the skin test reagents, confirming good vaccine take. Lastly, although not statistically significant, recovery of BCG after challenge was lowest in the heat-killed M. bovis group. In conclusion, the parenteral heat-killed M. bovis vaccine proved to be clearly immunogenic in cattle in the present study, urging further

  15. Blood gene expression profiles suggest altered immune function associated with symptoms of generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingo, Aliza P; Gibson, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Prospective epidemiological studies found that generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) can impair immune function and increase risk for cardiovascular disease or events. Mechanisms underlying the physiological reverberations of anxiety, however, are still elusive. Hence, we aimed to investigate molecular processes mediating effects of anxiety on physical health using blood gene expression profiles of 336 community participants (157 anxious and 179 control). We examined genome-wide differential gene expression in anxiety, as well as associations between nine major modules of co-regulated transcripts in blood gene expression and anxiety. No significant differential expression was observed in women, but 631 genes were differentially expressed between anxious and control men at the false discovery rate of 0.1 after controlling for age, body mass index, race, and batch effect. Gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) revealed that genes with altered expression levels in anxious men were involved in response of various immune cells to vaccination and to acute viral and bacterial infection, and in a metabolic network affecting traits of metabolic syndrome. Further, we found one set of 260 co-regulated genes to be significantly associated with anxiety in men after controlling for the relevant covariates, and demonstrate its equivalence to a component of the stress-related conserved transcriptional response to adversity profile. Taken together, our results suggest potential molecular pathways that can explain negative effects of GAD observed in epidemiological studies. Remarkably, even mild anxiety, which most of our participants had, was associated with observable changes in immune-related gene expression levels. Our findings generate hypotheses and provide incremental insights into molecular mechanisms mediating negative physiological effects of GAD. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Quantitative profiling of innate immune activation by viral infection in single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timm, Andrea C; Warrick, Jay W; Yin, John

    2017-09-18

    Cells infected by viruses can exhibit diverse patterns of viral and cellular gene expression. The patterns arise in part from the stochastic or noisy reaction kinetics associated with the small number of genomes, enzymes, and other molecules that typically initiate virus replication and activate cellular anti-viral defenses. It is not known what features, if any, of the early viral or cellular gene expression correlate with later processes of viral replication or cell survival. Here we used two fluorescent reporters to visualize innate immune activation of human prostate cancer (PC3) cells against infection by vesicular stomatitis virus. The cells were engineered to express green-fluorescent protein under control of the promoter for IFIT2, an interferon-sensitive component of the anti-viral response, while red-fluorescent protein was expressed as a byproduct of virus infection. To isolate and quantitatively analyze single-cells, we used a unique microwell array device and open-source image processing software. Kinetic analysis of viral and cellular reporter profiles from hundreds of cells revealed novel relationships between gene expression and the outcome of infection. Specifically, the relative timing rather than the magnitude of the viral gene expression and innate immune activation correlated with the infection outcome. Earlier viral or anti-viral gene expression favored or hindered virus growth, respectively. Further, analysis of kinetic parameters estimated from these data suggests a trade-off between robust antiviral signaling and cell death, as indicated by a higher rate of detectable cell lysis in infected cells with a detectable immune response. In short, cells that activate an immune response lyse at a higher rate. More broadly, we demonstrate how the intrinsic heterogeneity of individual cell behaviors can be exploited to discover features of viral and host gene expression that correlate with single-cell outcomes, which will ultimately impact whether or

  17. Constructing Prediction Models from Expression Profiles for Large Scale lncRNA-miRNA Interaction Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-An; Chan, Keith C C; You, Zhu-Hong

    2017-10-23

    The interaction of miRNA and lncRNA is known to be important for gene regulations. However, not many computational approaches have been developed to analyse known interactions and predict the unknown ones. Given that there are now more evidences that suggest that lncRNA-miRNA interactions are closely related to their relative expression levels in the form of a titration mechanism, we analyzed the patterns in large-scale expression profiles of known lncRNA-miRNA interactions. From these uncovered patterns, we noticed that lncRNAs tend to interact collaboratively with miRNAs of similar expression profiles, and vice versa. By representing known interaction between lncRNA and miRNA as a bipartite graph, we propose here a technique, called EPLMI, to construct a prediction model from such a graph. EPLMI performs its tasks based on the assumption that lncRNAs that are highly similar to each other tend to have similar interaction or non-interaction patterns with miRNAs and vice versa. The effectiveness of the prediction model so constructed has been evaluated using the latest dataset of lncRNA-miRNA interactions. The results show that the prediction model can achieve AUCs of 0.8522 and 0.8447±0.0017 based on LOOCV and 5-fold cross validation. Using this model, we show that lncRNA-miRNA interactions can be reliably predicted. We also show that we can use it to select the most likely lncRNA targets that specific miRNAs would interact with. We believe that the prediction models discovered by EPLMI can yield great insights for further research on ceRNA regulation network. To the best of our knowledge, EPLMI is the first technique that is developed for large-scale lncRNA-miRNA interaction profiling. Matlab codes and dataset are available at https://github.com/yahuang1991polyu/EPLMI/. yu-an.huang@connect.polyu.hk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Immunization strategies against Piscirickettsia salmonis infections. Review of vaccination approaches and modalities and their associated immune response profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oystein Evensen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Salmonid rickettsial septicemia is a serious, infectious disease in Chilean salmon farming caused by Piscirickettsia salmonis, causing heavy losses to the salmonid industry. P. salmonis belongs to the Gammaproteobacteria, order Thiotrichales. SRS was first described in Chile in 1989, and infection with P. salmonis has since been described from a high number of fish species and in several geographic regions globally. P. salmonis infection of salmonids causes multifocal, necrotic areas of internal organs like liver, kidney and spleen. Histologically and immunologically the tissue response is formation of granulomas, often with central suppuration. The exact sequence of infection is not known but bacteria likely gain access to internal organs through mucosal surfaces and when infected, fish carry bacteria in macrophages. It has not been fully determined if the bacterium resides in the cytosol or hide within vesicular structures intracellularly, although there are indications that in vitro infection results in actin reorganization and formation of actin-coated vesicle within which the bacterium resides. Protection against lethal challenge is well documented in lab scale experiments but protection from vaccination has proven more difficult to attain long term under field conditions. Current vaccination protocols include whole cell, inactivated and adjuvanted vaccines for injection for primary immunization followed by oral boost where timing of boost delivery is followed by measuring circulating antibody levels against the pathogen. Documentation also exist that there is correlation between antibody titers and protection against mortality. Future vaccination regimes will likely also include live, attenuated vaccines or other technologies such as DNA vaccination. So far there is no documentation available for live vaccines and for DNA vaccines, studies have been unsuccessful under laboratory conditions.

  19. The substance use risk profile scale: a scale measuring traits linked to reinforcement-specific substance use profiles.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woicik, P.A.; Stewart, S.H.; Pihl, R.O.; Conrod, P.J.

    2009-12-01

    The Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) is based on a model of personality risk for substance abuse in which four personality dimensions (hopelessness, anxiety sensitivity, impulsivity, and sensation seeking) are hypothesized to differentially relate to specific patterns of substance use. The current series of studies is a preliminary exploration of the psychometric properties of the SURPS in two populations (undergraduate and high school students). In study 1, an analysis of the internal structure of two versions of the SURPS shows that the abbreviated version best reflects the 4-factor structure. Concurrent, discriminant, and incremental validity of the SURPS is supported by convergent/divergent relationships between the SURPS subscales and other theoretically relevant personality and drug use criterion measures. In Study 2, the factorial structure of the SURPS is confirmed and evidence is provided for its test-retest reliability and validity with respect to measuring personality vulnerability to reinforcement-specific substance use patterns. In Study 3, the SURPS was administered in a more youthful population to test its sensitivity in identifying younger problematic drinkers. The results from the current series of studies demonstrate support for the reliability and construct validity of the SURPS, and suggest that four personality dimensions may be linked to substance-related behavior through different reinforcement processes. This brief assessment tool may have important implications for clinicians and future research.

  20. Immune Cell Responses and Cytokine Profile in Intestines of Mice Infected with Trichinella spiralis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Ding

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The intestinal phase is critical for trichinellosis caused by Trichinella spiralis (T. spiralis, as it determines both process and consequences of the disease. Several previous studies have reported that T. spiralis induces the initial predominance of a Th1 response during the intestine stage and a subsequent predominance of a Th2 response during the muscle stage. In the present study, immune cells and cytokine profile were investigated in the intestine of mice infected with T. spiralis. The results showed that the number of eosinophils, goblet cells, mucosal mast cells, and 33D1+ dendritic cells (DCs increased during the intestinal phase of the infection. Among these, eosinophils, goblet cells, and mucosal mast cells continued to increase until 17 days post infection (dpi, and the number of 33D1+ DCs increased compared to wild type; however, it did not change with the days of infection. The mRNA and protein levels of Th1 cytokines IL-2, IL-12, and IFN-γ and the Th2 cytokines IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, IL-13, and TGF-β were all increased in the tissues of the small intestine in infected mice; however, in general, Th2 cytokines increased more than Th1 cytokines. In conclusion, our findings suggest that T. spiralis infection can induce an increase of small intestine mucosal immune cells and add further evidence to show that the intestinal mucosal immune system of infected mice was induced toward mixed Th1/Th2 phenotypes with the predominance of Th2 response at the early stage of infection.

  1. Transcriptional profiling of midgut immunity response and degeneration in the wandering silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiuyun Xu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lepidoptera insects have a novel development process comprising several metamorphic stages during their life cycle compared with vertebrate animals. Unlike most Lepidoptera insects that live on nectar during the adult stage, the Bombyx mori silkworm adults do not eat anything and die after egg-laying. In addition, the midguts of Lepidoptera insects produce antimicrobial proteins during the wandering stage when the larval tissues undergo numerous changes. The exact mechanisms responsible for these phenomena remain unclear. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used the silkworm as a model and performed genome-wide transcriptional profiling of the midgut between the feeding stage and the wandering stage. Many genes concerned with metabolism, digestion, and ion and small molecule transportation were down-regulated during the wandering stage, indicating that the wandering stage midgut loses its normal functions. Microarray profiling, qRT-PCR and western blot proved the production of antimicrobial proteins (peptides in the midgut during the wandering stage. Different genes of the immune deficiency (Imd pathway were up-regulated during the wandering stage. However, some key genes belonging to the Toll pathway showed no change in their transcription levels. Unlike butterfly (Pachliopta aristolochiae, the midgut of silkworm moth has a layer of cells, indicating that the development of midgut since the wandering stage is not usual. Cell division in the midgut was observed only for a short time during the wandering stage. However, there was extensive cell apoptosis before pupation. The imbalance of cell division and apoptosis probably drives the continuous degeneration of the midgut in the silkworm since the wandering stage. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided an insight into the mechanism of the degeneration of the silkworm midgut and the production of innate immunity-related proteins during the wandering stage. The imbalance of cell division and apoptosis

  2. The Uterine Immune Profile May Help Women With Repeated Unexplained Embryo Implantation Failure After In Vitro Fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lédée, Nathalie; Petitbarat, Marie; Chevrier, Lucie; Vitoux, Dominique; Vezmar, Katia; Rahmati, Mona; Dubanchet, Sylvie; Gahéry, Hanne; Bensussan, Armand; Chaouat, Gerard

    2016-03-01

    Embryo implantation remains the main limiting factor in assisted reproductive medicine (20% success rate). An endometrial immune profiling was performed among 394 women with the previous history of repeated embryo implantation failures (RIF). The endometrial immune profile documented the ratio of IL-15/Fn-14 mRNA as a biomarker of uNK cell activation/maturation (together with the uNK cell count) and the IL-18/TWEAK mRNA ratio as a biomarker of both angiogenesis and the Th1/Th2 balance. According to their profile, we recommended personalized care to counteract the documented dysregulation and assessed its effects by the live birth rate (LBR) for the next embryo transfer. Endometrial immune profiles appeared to be dysregulated in 81.7% of the RIF patients compared to control. Overactivation was diagnosed in 56.6% and low activation in 25%. The LBR among these dysregulated/treated patients at the first subsequent embryo transfer was 39.8%. Endometrial immune profiling may improve our understanding of RIF and subsequent LBR if treated. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Reproductive Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Mechanisms of HO-1 mediated attenuation of renal immune injury: a gene profiling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duann, Pu; Lianos, Elias A

    2011-10-01

    Using a mouse model of immune injury directed against the renal glomerular vasculature and resembling human forms of glomerulonephritis (GN), we assessed the effect of targeted expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase (HO)-1. A human (h) HO-1 complementary DNAN (cDNA) sequence was targeted to glomerular epithelial cells (GECs) using a GEC-specific murine nephrin promoter. Injury by administration of antibody against the glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) to transgenic (TG) mice with GEC-targeted hHO-1 was attenuated compared with wild-type (WT) controls. To explore changes in the expression of genes that could mediate this salutary effect, we performed gene expression profiling using a microarray analysis of RNA isolated from the renal cortex of WT or TG mice with or without anti-GBM antibody-induced injury. Significant increases in expression were detected in 9 major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-class II genes, 2 interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-inducible guanosine triphosphate (GTP)ases, and 3 genes of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. The increase in MHC-class II and proteasome gene expression in TG mice with injury was validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or Western blot analysis. The observations point to novel mechanisms underlying the cytoprotective effect of HO-1 in renal immune injury. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  4. Altered miRNAs expression profiles and modulation of immune response genes and proteins during neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiande; Jiang, Siyuan; Cao, Yun; Yang, Yi

    2014-04-01

    The dysregulated expression of miRNAs in the immune system may be critical for immune responses to pathogens and evolve into the inflammation seen in sepsis. The aim of this study is to explore the important role of miRNAs in the regulation of the immune response during neonatal sepsis. Using a microarray we performed the miRNA expression profiling of peripheral blood leukocytes from neonates with sepsis and uninfected neonates. Based on the predicted target genes of these miRNAs we selected 26 immune-related miRNAs out of the differentially expressed miRNAs for further testing by quantitative PCR. We simultaneously detected the immune response genes by PCR array and plasma cytokine levels using a protein chip to investigate the effect of the altered miRNAs on the immune response in neonatal sepsis. There were 10 immune regulatory miRNAs whose expression was significantly changed more than two fold in the neonates with sepsis compared with the uninfected neonates. The expression levels of 11 immune response genes and the plasma levels of 15 cytokines or receptors were significantly up- or down-regulated in the neonates with sepsis compared to the uninfected neonates. This comprehensive analysis suggests that the altered miRNAs modulate the immune response during neonatal sepsis in a way that represses the inflammatory response. Our investigation demonstrated some miRNAs with altered expression levels and their probable association with the regulation of immune response during neonatal sepsis. The characteristics of the neonatal inflammatory response could be attributed to immature immune function of neonates.

  5. Temperature influences the expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following DNA vaccination and VHS virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Einer-Jensen, Katja; Gautier, Laurent; Rasmussen, Jesper Skou

    -PCR. The expression profiles appeared similar for the two genes in terms of temperature dependency with a faster induction and shorter duration at the higher temperature. In order to analyze the temperature effect on the relative expression profiles across a larger set of immune genes time points displaying similar...... an early unspecific antiviral response as well as a long-lasting specific protection. However, temperature appears to influence immune response with respect to the nature and duration of the protective mechanisms. In this study, groups of fish were temperature acclimated, vaccinated and challenged at three...... different temperatures (5, 10 and 15ºC). Tissue and organ samples were collected at numerous time points post vaccination (pv) and post viral challenge (pch). Then, gene expression levels of a two immune genes (Vig-1 and Mx3) involved in unspecific antiviral response mechanisms were determined by Q...

  6. What's Normal? Immune Profiling of Human Milk from Healthy Women Living in Different Geographical and Socioeconomic Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lorena; Espinosa-Martos, Irene; García-Carral, Cristina; Manzano, Susana; McGuire, Michelle K; Meehan, Courtney L; McGuire, Mark A; Williams, Janet E; Foster, James; Sellen, Daniel W; Kamau-Mbuthia, Elizabeth W; Kamundia, Egidioh W; Mbugua, Samwel; Moore, Sophie E; Kvist, Linda J; Otoo, Gloria E; Lackey, Kimberly A; Flores, Katherine; Pareja, Rossina G; Bode, Lars; Rodríguez, Juan M

    2017-01-01

    Human milk provides a very wide range of nutrients and bioactive components, including immune factors, human milk oligosaccharides, and a commensal microbiota. These factors are essential for interconnected processes including immunity programming and the development of a normal infant gastrointestinal microbiome. Newborn immune protection mostly relies on maternal immune factors provided through milk. However, studies dealing with an in-depth profiling of the different immune compounds present in human milk and with the assessment of their natural variation in healthy women from different populations are scarce. In this context, the objective of this work was the detection and quantification of a wide array of immune compounds, including innate immunity factors (IL1β, IL6, IL12, INFγ, TNFα), acquired immunity factors (IL2, IL4, IL10, IL13, IL17), chemokines (IL8, Groα, MCP1, MIP1β), growth factors [IL5, IL7, epidermal growth factor (EGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, TGFβ2], and immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), in milk produced by healthy women of different ethnicities living in different geographic, dietary, socioeconomic, and environmental settings. Among the analyzed factors, IgA, IgG, IgM, EGF, TGFβ2, IL7, IL8, Groα, and MIP1β were detected in all or most of the samples collected in each population and, therefore, this specific set of compounds might be considered as the "core" soluble immune factors in milk produced by healthy women worldwide. This approach may help define which immune factors are (or are not) common in milk produced by women living in various conditions, and to identify host, lifestyle, and environmental factors that affect the immunological composition of this complex biological fluid. Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT02670278.

  7. What’s Normal? Immune Profiling of Human Milk from Healthy Women Living in Different Geographical and Socioeconomic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Lorena; Espinosa-Martos, Irene; García-Carral, Cristina; Manzano, Susana; McGuire, Michelle K.; Meehan, Courtney L.; McGuire, Mark A.; Williams, Janet E.; Foster, James; Sellen, Daniel W.; Kamau-Mbuthia, Elizabeth W.; Kamundia, Egidioh W.; Mbugua, Samwel; Moore, Sophie E.; Kvist, Linda J.; Otoo, Gloria E.; Lackey, Kimberly A.; Flores, Katherine; Pareja, Rossina G.; Bode, Lars; Rodríguez, Juan M.

    2017-01-01

    Human milk provides a very wide range of nutrients and bioactive components, including immune factors, human milk oligosaccharides, and a commensal microbiota. These factors are essential for interconnected processes including immunity programming and the development of a normal infant gastrointestinal microbiome. Newborn immune protection mostly relies on maternal immune factors provided through milk. However, studies dealing with an in-depth profiling of the different immune compounds present in human milk and with the assessment of their natural variation in healthy women from different populations are scarce. In this context, the objective of this work was the detection and quantification of a wide array of immune compounds, including innate immunity factors (IL1β, IL6, IL12, INFγ, TNFα), acquired immunity factors (IL2, IL4, IL10, IL13, IL17), chemokines (IL8, Groα, MCP1, MIP1β), growth factors [IL5, IL7, epidermal growth factor (EGF), granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor, TGFβ2], and immunoglobulins (IgA, IgG, IgM), in milk produced by healthy women of different ethnicities living in different geographic, dietary, socioeconomic, and environmental settings. Among the analyzed factors, IgA, IgG, IgM, EGF, TGFβ2, IL7, IL8, Groα, and MIP1β were detected in all or most of the samples collected in each population and, therefore, this specific set of compounds might be considered as the “core” soluble immune factors in milk produced by healthy women worldwide. This approach may help define which immune factors are (or are not) common in milk produced by women living in various conditions, and to identify host, lifestyle, and environmental factors that affect the immunological composition of this complex biological fluid. Clinical Trial Registration: www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT02670278. PMID:28713365

  8. Immune cell profile of dental pulp tissue treated with zoledronic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros Silva, P G; Verde, M E Q L; Brizeno, L A C; Wong, D V T; Lima Júnior, R C P; Sousa, F B; Mota, M R L; Alves, A P N N

    2017-11-01

    To characterize the pulp immune cell profile in the teeth of rats treated with zoledronic acid (ZA). Male Wistar rats (n = 6 per group) received four intravenous infusions of ZA at doses of 0.04, 0.20 or 1.00 mg kg-1 ZA or saline (control). On the 70th experimental day, they were euthanized. The first right molar was examined microscopically and submitted to toluidine blue reaction and immunohistochemical for CD68, tumour necrosis Factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB) and IL-18 binding protein (IL-18 bp). The presence of ectasic/dilated vessels and inflammatory cells was analysed, and mast cells and mononuclear CD68-positive cells were counted along with the intensity of immunostaining (0-3) for inflammatory markers in odontoblasts and nonodontoblasts pulp cells. The Kruskal-Wallis/Dunn's test (scores or quantitative data) and the chi-squared test (categorical data) were used (GraphPad Prism 5.0, P < 0.05). There was no differences in the number of animals exhibiting dilated/ectasic blood vessels (P = 0.242) and inflammatory cells (P = 0.489) or in the number of mast cells (P = 1.000). However, there was an increase in mononuclear CD68-positive cells (P = 0.026), immunostaining of TNF-α (P = 0.020), IL-1β (P = 0.027) and iNOS (P = 0.001) in odontoblasts, and IL-1β (P = 0.013) in nonodontoblast pulp cells dose-dependently. NFkB (nucleus and cytoplasm) and IL-18 bp did not differ between groups. ZA modified the immune cell profile in the dental pulp, increasing the number of macrophages and expression of pro-inflammatory markers independent of NFkB. © 2016 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Fatty acid profile of fish scale of Catla catla | Prabu | African Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fish scales are useful to ichthyologists for the purposes of classification, identification, age determination and history study. The fatty acid profile of the hexane extracts of the fresh water fish scale of Catla catla were analyzed by gas chromatography. Fish scales were collected from a local fish market, Chidambaram. The fatty ...

  10. Immunophenotyping of Newly Diagnosed and Recurrent Glioblastoma Defines Distinct Immune Exhaustion Profiles in Peripheral and Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohme, Malte; Schliffke, Simon; Maire, Cecile L; Rünger, Alessandra; Glau, Laura; Mende, Klaus C; Matschke, Jakob; Gehbauer, Christina; Akyüz, Nuray; Zapf, Svenja; Holz, Mareike; Schaper, Miriam; Martens, Tobias; Schmidt, Nils O; Peine, Sven; Westphal, Manfred; Binder, Mascha; Tolosa, Eva; Lamszus, Katrin

    2018-02-14

    Immunotherapeutic treatment strategies for glioblastoma (GBM) are under investigation in clinical trials. However, our understanding of the immune phenotype of GBM-infiltrating T-cells (TILs) and changes during disease progression is limited. Deeper insight is urgently needed to therapeutically overcome tumor-induced immune exhaustion. We used flow-cytometry and cytokine assays to profile TILs and blood lymphocytes (PBL) from GBM patients, comparing newly diagnosed or recurrent GBM to long-term survivors (LTS) and healthy donors. TCR sequencing was performed on paired samples of newly diagnosed and recurrent GBM. We identified a clear immune signature of exhaustion and clonal restriction in the TIL of patients with GBM. Exhaustion of CD8+ TILs was defined by an increased prevalence of PD-1+, CD39+, Tim-3+, CD45RO+, HLA-DR+ marker expression and exhibition of an effector-/transitional memory differentiation phenotype, whereas KLRG1 and CD57 were underrepresented. Immune signatures were similar in primary and recurrent tumors, however, restricted TCR repertoire clonality and a more activated memory phenotype were observed in TIL from recurrent tumors. Moreover, a reduced cytokine response to PHA stimulation in the blood compartment indicates a dysfunctional peripheral T-cell response in GBM patients. LTS displayed a distinct profile, with abundant naïve and less exhausted CD8+ T-cells. TILs and PBLs exhibit contrasting immune profiles, with a distinct exhaustion signature present in TILs. While the exhaustion profiles of primary and recurrent GBM are comparable, TCR sequencing demonstrated a contracted repertoire in recurrent GBM, concomitant with an increased frequency of activated memory T-cells in recurrent tumors. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Expression profiling of autism candidate genes during human brain development implicates central immune signaling pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark N Ziats

    Full Text Available The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD represent a clinically heterogeneous set of conditions with strong hereditary components. Despite substantial efforts to uncover the genetic basis of ASD, the genomic etiology appears complex and a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Autism remains elusive. We hypothesized that focusing gene interaction networks on ASD-implicated genes that are highly expressed in the developing brain may reveal core mechanisms that are otherwise obscured by the genomic heterogeneity of the disorder. Here we report an in silico study of the gene expression profile from ASD-implicated genes in the unaffected developing human brain. By implementing a biologically relevant approach, we identified a subset of highly expressed ASD-candidate genes from which interactome networks were derived. Strikingly, immune signaling through NFκB, Tnf, and Jnk was central to ASD networks at multiple levels of our analysis, and cell-type specific expression suggested glia--in addition to neurons--deserve consideration. This work provides integrated genomic evidence that ASD-implicated genes may converge on central cytokine signaling pathways.

  12. Expression profiling of autism candidate genes during human brain development implicates central immune signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziats, Mark N; Rennert, Owen M

    2011-01-01

    The Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) represent a clinically heterogeneous set of conditions with strong hereditary components. Despite substantial efforts to uncover the genetic basis of ASD, the genomic etiology appears complex and a clear understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying Autism remains elusive. We hypothesized that focusing gene interaction networks on ASD-implicated genes that are highly expressed in the developing brain may reveal core mechanisms that are otherwise obscured by the genomic heterogeneity of the disorder. Here we report an in silico study of the gene expression profile from ASD-implicated genes in the unaffected developing human brain. By implementing a biologically relevant approach, we identified a subset of highly expressed ASD-candidate genes from which interactome networks were derived. Strikingly, immune signaling through NFκB, Tnf, and Jnk was central to ASD networks at multiple levels of our analysis, and cell-type specific expression suggested glia--in addition to neurons--deserve consideration. This work provides integrated genomic evidence that ASD-implicated genes may converge on central cytokine signaling pathways.

  13. Minimal residual disease monitoring and immune profiling in multiple myeloma in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, Bruno; Cedena, Maria-Teresa; Puig, Noemi; Arana, Paula; Vidriales, Maria-Belen; Cordon, Lourdes; Flores-Montero, Juan; Gutierrez, Norma C; Martín-Ramos, María-Luisa; Martinez-Lopez, Joaquin; Ocio, Enrique M; Hernandez, Miguel T; Teruel, Ana-Isabel; Rosiñol, Laura; Echeveste, María-Asunción; Martinez, Rafael; Gironella, Mercedes; Oriol, Albert; Cabrera, Carmen; Martin, Jesus; Bargay, Joan; Encinas, Cristina; Gonzalez, Yolanda; Van Dongen, Jacques J M; Orfao, Alberto; Bladé, Joan; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Lahuerta, Juan José; San Miguel, Jesús F

    2016-06-23

    The value of minimal residual disease (MRD) in multiple myeloma (MM) has been more frequently investigated in transplant-eligible patients than in elderly patients. Because an optimal balance between treatment efficacy and toxicity is of utmost importance in patients with elderly MM, sensitive MRD monitoring might be particularly valuable in this patient population. Here, we used second-generation 8-color multiparameter-flow cytometry (MFC) to monitor MRD in 162 transplant-ineligible MM patients enrolled in the PETHEMA/GEM2010MAS65 study. The transition from first- to second-generation MFC resulted in increased sensitivity and allowed us to identify 3 patient groups according to MRD levels: MRD negative (75 years (HR, 4.8; P < .001), as well as those with high-risk cytogenetics (HR, 12.6; P = .01). Using second-generation MFC, immune profiling concomitant to MRD monitoring also contributed to identify patients with poor, intermediate, and favorable outcomes (25%, 61%, and 100% OS at 3 years, respectively; P = .01), the later patients being characterized by an increased compartment of mature B cells. Our results show that similarly to transplant candidates, MRD monitoring is one of the most relevant prognostic factors in elderly MM patients, irrespectively of age or cytogenetic risk. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01237249. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Nanometer-Scale Electrical Potential Profiling Across Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Chuanxiao; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Ke, Weijun; Wang, Changlei; Gorman, Brian; Yan, Yanfa; Al-Jassim, Mowafak

    2016-11-21

    We used Kelvin probe force microscopy to study the potential distribution on cross-section of perovskite solar cells with different types of electron-transporting layers (ETLs). Our results explain the low open-circuit voltage and fill factor in ETL-free cells, and support the fact that intrinsic SnO2 as an alternative ETL material can make high-performance devices. Furthermore, the potential-profiling results indicate a reduction in junction-interface recombination by the optimized SnO2 layer and adding a fullerene layer, which is consistent with the improved device performance and current-voltage hysteresis.

  15. Cross Validated Temperament Scale Validities Computed Using Profile Similarity Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-27

    The Challenge and Opportunity of the Inverted U. Perspectives on Psychological Science, 6, 61-76. Hogan, R. (2005). In defense of personality ...27 April 2017 at the 32nd Annual Conference of the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology , Orlando, FL Disclaimer: All...14. ABSTRACT Personality and temperament scales are used in employment settings to predict performance because they are valid and have

  16. Age and genetic selection affect auto-immune profiles of chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Parmentier, H.K.; Harms, E.; Lammers, A.; Nieuwland, M.G.B.

    2014-01-01

    Specificity, antibody isotype distribution and levels, of natural autoantibodies (NAAb) may be potential informative parameters for immune mediated natural disease resistance, immune modulation, and maintenance of physiological homeostasis. In a previous study we detected IgM and IgG antibodies to

  17. Vibration-immune compact optical metrology to enable production-line quantification of fine scale features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Erik

    2017-08-01

    Inspectors attempting to quantify defects and fine-scale features on precision machined surfaces are often limited by the capabilities and form factors of existing measurement techniques. Inspectors most often rely on imprecise and inaccurate visual comparison tools or pin gauges to determine the geometry of surface features. This paper will describe key attributes of a metrology system for quantification of small features in a production environment and present critical performance tests on the system including vertical and lateral resolution and correlation with other techniques. Additionally, various new applications will be discussed which are fundamentally enabled through access to a portable, vibration-immune, system that is both quantitative and easy-to-use.

  18. IMMUNE STATUS AND CYTOKINE PROFILE IN CHILDREN WITH PERINATAL DAMAGES OF CNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Nikogosova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The aim of the study was to verify etiological agents of CNS perinatal damages in children of early age and to study peculiarities of immune and cytokine statuses during pathogenetically grounded therapy.618 children aged from 1 month till 3 years were examined. Changes of neurologic status were interrogated and complete standard paraclinical examination was carried out. Basic clinical groups were formed.Immunoassay program, which included verification of a causative agent and determination of indices of cellular and humoral immunities, was used to identify a causative agent and to determin infectious activity. Direct methods of investigation which reveal a causative agent and indirect methods which register specific immune response were used. Patients were divided into groups on the basis of etiological agent.The program of pharmacotherapy was based on findings, immune status and in particular immune mediators. This program included specific anti-infectious therapy and adequate immunorehabilitation. Data analysis was made for groups of patients who got symptomatic therapy in neurologic disease and who got immunocorrective and anti-infectious therapy in addition to standard treatment. Comparison of clinical characteristics showed considerable improvement of patients in the latter group, what correlated with laboratorial data. Normalization of principal indices of immune and cytokine statuses which ensure development of anti-infectious immunity resulted in persistent infectious remission, noticeable improvement of clinical state of the invalidity rate.

  19. Profile of microRNA in Giant Panda Blood: A Resource for Immune-Related and Novel microRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingyu; Du, Lianming; Li, Wujiao; Shen, Fujun; Fan, Zhenxin; Jian, Zuoyi; Hou, Rong; Shen, Yongmei; Yue, Bisong; Zhang, Xiuyue

    2015-01-01

    The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) is one of the world's most beloved endangered mammals. Although the draft genome of this species had been assembled, little was known about the composition of its microRNAs (miRNAs) or their functional profiles. Recent studies demonstrated that changes in the expression of miRNAs are associated with immunity. In this study, miRNAs were extracted from the blood of four healthy giant pandas and sequenced by Illumina next generation sequencing technology. As determined by miRNA screening, a total of 276 conserved miRNAs and 51 novel putative miRNAs candidates were detected. After differential expression analysis, we noticed that the expressions of 7 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in young giant pandas compared with that of adults. Moreover, 2 miRNAs were up-regulated in female giant pandas and 1 in the male individuals. Target gene prediction suggested that the miRNAs of giant panda might be relevant to the expressions of 4,602 downstream genes. Subseuqently, the predicted target genes were conducted to KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis and we found that these genes were mainly involved in host immunity, including the Ras signaling pathway, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and the MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results provide the first miRNA profiles of giant panda blood, and the predicted functional analyses may open an avenue for further study of giant panda immunity.

  20. Obesity alters immune and metabolic profiles: New insight from obese-resistant mice on high-fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boi, Shannon K; Buchta, Claire M; Pearson, Nicole A; Francis, Meghan B; Meyerholz, David K; Grobe, Justin L; Norian, Lyse A

    2016-10-01

    Diet-induced obesity has been shown to alter immune function in mice, but distinguishing the effects of obesity from changes in diet composition is complicated. It was hypothesized that immunological differences would exist between diet-induced obese (DIO) and obese-resistant (OB-Res) mice fed the same high-fat diet (HFD). BALB/c mice were fed either standard chow or HFD to generate lean or DIO and OB-Res mice, respectively. Resulting mice were analyzed for serum immunologic and metabolic profiles and cellular immune parameters. BALB/c mice on HFD were categorized as DIO or OB-Res, based on body weight versus lean controls. DIO mice were physiologically distinct from OB-Res mice, whose serum insulin, leptin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, and eotaxin concentrations remained similar to lean controls. DIO mice had increased macrophage(+) crown-like structures in white adipose tissue, although macrophage percentages were unchanged from OB-Res and lean mice. DIO mice also had decreased splenic CD4(+) T cells, elevated serum GM-CSF, and increased splenic CD11c(+) dendritic cells, but impaired dendritic cell stimulatory capacity (P Diet-induced obesity results in alterations in immune and metabolic profiles that are distinct from effects caused by HFD alone. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  1. PBMC transcription profiles of pigs with divergent humoral immune responses and lean growth performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Marcel; Murani, Eduard; Ponsuksili, Siriluck; Wimmers, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    The identification of key genes and regulatory networks in the transcriptomic responses of blood cells to antigen stimulation could facilitate the understanding of host defence and disease resistance. Moreover, genetic relationships between immunocompetence and the expression of other phenotypes, such as those of metabolic interest, are debated but incompletely understood in farm animals. Both positive and negative associations between immune responsiveness and performance traits such as weight gain or lean growth have been reported. We designed an in vivo microarray study of transcriptional changes in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during the immune response to tetanus toxoid (TT) as a model antigen for combined cellular (Th1) and humoral (Th2) responses. The aim of the study was to investigate the responsiveness of PBMCs against the background of divergent lean growth (LG) performance and anti-TT antibody (AB) titers and to compare lean growth and humoral immune performance phenotypes. In general, high LG phenotypes had increased cellular immune response transcripts, while low AB phenotypes had increased transcripts for canonical pathways that represented processes of intracellular and second messenger signaling and immune responses. Comparison of lean growth phenotypes in the context of high AB titers revealed higher cellular immune response transcripts in high LG phenotypes. Similar comparisons in the context of low AB titers failed to identify any corresponding pathways. When high and low AB titer phenotypes were differentially compared, low AB phenotypes had higher cellular immune response transcripts on a low LG background and higher cell signaling, growth, and proliferation transcripts on a high LG background. Divergent phenotypes of both lean growth performance and humoral immune response are affected by significant and functional transcript abundance changes throughout the immune response. The selected high-performance phenotypes

  2. Implementing broad scale childhood immunization decision support as a web service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Vivienne J; Grannis, Shaun J; Rosenman, Marc B; Downs, Stephen M

    2009-11-14

    Timely vaccinations decrease a child's risk of contracting vaccine-preventable disease and prevent disease outbreaks. Childhood immunization schedules may represent the only clinical guideline for which there is official national consensus. So an immunization clinical decision support system (CDSS) is a natural application. However, immunization schedules are complex and change frequently. Maintaining multiple CDSS's is expensive and error prone. Therefore, a practical strategy would be an immunization CDSS as a centralized web service that can be easily accessed by various electronic medical record (EMR) systems. This allows centralized maintenance of immunization guidelines. We have developed a web service, based on Miller's tabular model with modifications, which implements routine childhood immunization guidelines. This immunization web service is currently operating in the Regenstrief Institute intranet and system evaluations are ongoing. We will make this web service available on the Internet. In this paper, we describe this web service -based immunization decision support tool.

  3. Expression Profiling of Innate Immune Genes in Milk Somatic Cells During Subclinical Mastitis in Crossbred Dairy Cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, A; Radhika, G; Aravindhakshan, T V; Anilkumar, K

    2016-10-01

    Innate immune mechanism plays a key role in mammary defense, from recognition of pathogens to activation of nonspecific and specific immunity involved in elimination of pathogens. Expression profiles of innate immune response genes namely Toll like receptor 2 (TLR-2), Peptidoglycan recognition protein 1 (PGLYRP-1), Interleukin 8 receptor (IL-8 R), L-Selectin (SELL), and Osteopontin (OPN) in milk somatic cells of subclinical mastitis (SCM) affected crossbred cows were investigated under this study at transcript level using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Dairy cows in mid lactation were screened for SCM using California Mastitis Test (CMT), Somatic Cell Count (SCC) and Electrical Conductivity test (EC). Based on results of SCM screening tests, crossbred cows were clustered into two groups with four Staphylococcus aureus infected SCM cows and four apparently healthy cows. The expressions levels of TLR-2, PGLYRP-1, IL-8 R, SELL, and OPN in milk somatic cells of SCM affected cows were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than healthy cows. These genes could be considered as candidate genes for innate immune response against S. aureus SCM infection.

  4. Immune-related genes expression profile in orange-spotted grouper during exposure to Cryptocaryon irritans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y W; Dan, X M; Zhang, T W; Luo, X C; Li, A X

    2011-12-01

    Cryptocaryon irritans is one of the most important ectoparasites of marine fish. To identify the potential role of immune-related genes in antiparasitic immune responses in fish, we monitored the expression change of IL-8, COX-2, C-type lectin and transferrin in local and systemic immune organs of orange-spotted grouper post-C. irritans infection. IL-8 expression was up-regulated during the course of infection in the skin, while COX-2 and transferrin expression was up-regulated in the gill. COX-2 expression was significantly down-regulated in the spleen (0·7-5% of its control) and head kidney (0·5-4% of its control) post-primary infection. Transferrin expression was also down-regulated in the spleen and head kidney from 6 h to 5 days post-primary infection. However, C-type lectin expression was up-regulated in all tested organs post-infection, with the exception of day 7 in the spleen post-primary infection where the expression level was slightly down-regulated (44% of its control). These results suggest that these four immune-related genes play an important role in grouper anti-C. irritans infection and that local immune organs as the active organs contribute more than systemic immune organs to this course. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Using scale heights derived from bottomside ionograms for modelling the IRI topside profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Reinisch

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundbased ionograms measure the Chapman scale height HT at the F2-layer peak that is used to construct the topside profile. After a brief review of the topside model extrapolation technique, comparisons are presented between the modeled profiles with incoherent scatter radar and satellite measurements for the mid latitude and equatorial ionosphere. The total electron content TEC, derived from measurements on satellite beacon signals, is compared with the height-integrated profiles ITEC from the ionograms. Good agreement is found with the ISR profiles and with results using the low altitude TOPEX satellite. The TEC values derived from GPS signal analysis are systematically larger than ITEC. It is suggested to use HT , routinely measured by a large number of Digisondes around the globe, for the construction of the IRI topside electron density profile.

  6. 3D profile measurement of large-scale curvature plates using structured light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, EunChang; Kim, ByoungChang; Lee, Hyunho; Han, JongMan

    2008-08-01

    In heavy industry, especially in the shipbuilding process, 3D profile measurement of large-scale hull pieces is needed for fabrication and assembly. Currently, using many kinds of templates made of wood or plastic still do an important role as a standard ruler. We suggest an efficient method of 3D profile measurement to obtain the xyz-coordinates of curvature plates. The measurement system comprises multiple line structured laser sources and performs profile measurement by projecting structured light source on the object surface. The measurement results show that measurement accuracy is within the boundary of accuracy required in the shipbuilding process.

  7. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan J Hansen

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta. Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation.Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene.B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats.B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to the identification of novel microbial targets

  8. The colitis-associated transcriptional profile of commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron enhances adaptive immune responses to a bacterial antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jonathan J; Huang, Yong; Peterson, Daniel A; Goeser, Laura; Fan, Ting-Jia; Chang, Eugene B; Sartor, R Balfour

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) may be caused in part by aberrant immune responses to commensal intestinal microbes including the well-characterized anaerobic gut commensal Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (B. theta). Healthy, germ-free HLA-B27 transgenic (Tg) rats develop chronic colitis when colonized with complex gut commensal bacteria whereas non-transgenic (nTg) rats remain disease-free. However, the role of B. theta in causing disease in Tg rats is unknown nor is much known about how gut microbes respond to host inflammation. Tg and nTg rats were monoassociated with a human isolate of B. theta. Colonic inflammation was assessed by histologic scoring and tissue pro-inflammatory cytokine measurement. Whole genome transcriptional profiling of B. theta recovered from ceca was performed using custom GeneChips and data analyzed using dChip, Significance Analysis of Microarrays, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) software. Western Blots were used to determine adaptive immune responses to a differentially expressed B. theta gene. B. theta monoassociated Tg rats, but not nTg or germ-free controls, developed chronic colitis. Transcriptional profiles of cecal B. theta were significantly different in Tg vs. nTg rats. GSEA revealed that genes in KEGG canonical pathways involved in bacterial growth and metabolism were downregulated in B. theta from Tg rats with colitis though luminal bacterial concentrations were unaffected. Bacterial genes in the Gene Ontology molecular function "receptor activity", most of which encode nutrient binding proteins, were significantly upregulated in B. theta from Tg rats and include a SusC homolog that induces adaptive immune responses in Tg rats. B. theta induces colitis in HLA-B27 Tg rats, which is associated with regulation of bacterial genes in metabolic and nutrient binding pathways that may affect host immune responses. These studies of the host-microbial dialogue may lead to the identification of novel microbial targets for IBD

  9. Proteome profiling illustrated by a large-scale fed-batch fermentation of Penicillium chrysogenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Helmel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous fungi are employed for the large-scale production of value-added products, including organic acids, enzymes, and antibiotics and bioprocess characterization is essential for production optimization but relies on empiricism-based strategies. Protein expression profiles in an industrial scale, 180 h fed-batch fermentation of Penicillium chrysogenum are presented. The biomass of P. chrysogenum, as well as the specific penicillin V production rate and fungal morphology were monitored during fermentation to be compared with obtained protein profiles. Our results demonstrate a correlation between proteomics data and biomass concentration, morphological changes, and penicillin production.

  10. Taking individual scaling differences into account by analyzing profile data with the Mixed Assessor Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per Bruun; Schlich, Pascal; Skovgaard, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Scale range differences between individual assessors will often constitute a non-trivial part of the assessor-by-product interaction in sensory profile data (Brockhoff, 2003, 1998; Brockhoff and Skovgaard, 1994). We suggest a new mixed model ANOVA analysis approach, the Mixed Assessor Model (MAM......) that properly takes this into account by a simple inclusion of the product averages as a covariate in the modeling and allowing the covariate regression coefficients to depend on the assessor. This gives a more powerful analysis by removing the scaling difference from the error term and proper confidence limits...... are deduced that include scaling difference in the error term to the proper extent. A meta study of 8619 sensory attributes from 369 sensory profile data sets from SensoBase (www.sensobase.fr) is conducted. In 45.3% of all attributes scaling heterogeneity is present (P-value

  11. Effect of purine nucleosides on growth performance, gut morphology, digestive enzymes, serum profile and immune response in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, A; Kermanshahi, Hassan; Danesh Mesgaran, M; King, A J; Ibrahim, S A

    2017-10-01

    1. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of purine nucleosides on performance, gut morphology, intestinal enzymes and immunity functions in broiler chickens from 0 to 21 d of age. 2. A total of 360 1-d-old male chickens (Cobb 500) were randomly assigned to 4 treatments with 6 replications. Experimental diets consisted of a control without any additives and diets containing 0.1% pure adenosine, 0.1% pure guanosine and 0.1% equal aliquots of pure adenosine and guanosine. Two birds per cage (12 birds per treatment) were killed on d 11 and 21 in order to obtain serum samples for lipid profile, jejunal samples for morphology and mucosal immunity, digestive enzymes for epithelial maturation, and bursa and spleen samples for relative weight of immune organs to live body weight. 3. Birds receiving adenosine in their diets showed a significant increase in body weight and average daily gain and a significantly lower feed conversion ratio compared to the control birds. Villus height and width in jejunal samples also increased significantly in birds supplemented with adenosine. Although maltase was not affected by the experimental diets, adenosine increased alkaline phosphatase and aminopeptidase. Adenosine and its combination with guanosine boosted mucosal immunity as a result of increased IgA production. While there was no significant difference among treatments regarding the relative weight of the spleen, adenosine increased the relative weight of the bursa of Fabricius. Present results also showed that adding guanosine to broiler diets had no significant effects on growth, gut morphology, enzymes activity and immunological indices. 4. In conclusion, the improvement in growth performance, gut morphology and immunity in birds receiving adenosine demonstrated that pure adenosine could be a beneficial feed additive for the poultry industry, while guanosine showed no significant improvement.

  12. Standardized Whole-Blood Transcriptional Profiling Enables the Deconvolution of Complex Induced Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Urrutia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Systems approaches for the study of immune signaling pathways have been traditionally based on purified cells or cultured lines. However, in vivo responses involve the coordinated action of multiple cell types, which interact to establish an inflammatory microenvironment. We employed standardized whole-blood stimulation systems to test the hypothesis that responses to Toll-like receptor ligands or whole microbes can be defined by the transcriptional signatures of key cytokines. We found 44 genes, identified using Support Vector Machine learning, that captured the diversity of complex innate immune responses with improved segregation between distinct stimuli. Furthermore, we used donor variability to identify shared inter-cellular pathways and trace cytokine loops involved in gene expression. This provides strategies for dimension reduction of large datasets and deconvolution of innate immune responses applicable for characterizing immunomodulatory molecules. Moreover, we provide an interactive R-Shiny application with healthy donor reference values for induced inflammatory genes.

  13. Evaluation of approaches to identify the targets of cellular immunity on a proteome-wide scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C Cardoso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Vaccine development against malaria and other complex diseases remains a challenge for the scientific community. The recent elucidation of the genome, proteome and transcriptome of many of these complex pathogens provides the basis for rational vaccine design by identifying, on a proteome-wide scale, novel target antigens that are recognized by T cells and antibodies from exposed individuals. However, there is currently no algorithm to effectively identify important target antigens from genome sequence data; this is especially challenging for T cell targets. Furthermore, for some of these pathogens, such as Plasmodium, protein expression using conventional platforms has been problematic but cell-free in vitro transcription translation (IVTT strategies have recently proved successful. Herein, we report a novel approach for proteome-wide scale identification of the antigenic targets of T cell responses using IVTT products. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments using IVTT proteins either unpurified, absorbed to carboxylated polybeads, or affinity purified through nickel resin or magnetic beads. In vitro studies in humans using CMV, EBV, and Influenza A virus proteins showed antigen-specific cytokine production in ELIspot and Cytometric Bead Array assays with cells stimulated with purified or unpurified IVTT antigens. In vitro and in vivo studies in mice immunized with the Plasmodium yoelii circumsporozoite DNA vaccine with or without IVTT protein boost showed antigen-specific cytokine production using purified IVTT antigens only. Overall, the nickel resin method of IVTT antigen purification proved optimal in both human and murine systems. CONCLUSIONS: This work provides proof of concept for the potential of high-throughput approaches to identify T cell targets of complex parasitic, viral or bacterial pathogens from genomic sequence data, for rational vaccine development against emerging and re

  14. Developmental profile of select immune cells in mice infected with Trichinella spiralis during the intestinal phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichinella spiralis can cause immunosuppression during the intestinal phase of early infection. However, changes in the peripheral blood during T. spiralis early infection remain unclear. Here, select immune cells in mice infected with 500 muscle larvae (ML) of T. spiralis during the intestinal pha...

  15. Plasma metabolomic profiles and immune responses of piglets after weaning and challenge with E. coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Lauridsen, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    Background The processes of weaning and exposure to pathogenic bacteria induce stress responses, which may alter the metabolism. In this study, we investigated the changes in plasma metabolites and immune responses in piglets in response to the stress induced by weaning and Escherichia coli...

  16. Multiple cytokine expression profiles reveal immune-based differences in occult hepatitis B genotype H-infected Mexican Nahua patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Alma Fierro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A high prevalence of occult hepatitis B (OHB genotype H infections has been observed in the native Mexican Nahua population. In addition, a low incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma has been described in Mexico. The immune response to infection among OHB-infected patients has been poorly evaluated in vivo. Therefore, we assessed the expression profiles of 23 cytokines in OHB genotype H-infected Nahua patients. A total of 41 sera samples from natives of the Nahua community were retrospectively analysed. Based on their HBV antibody profiles, patients were stratified into two groups: OHB patients (n = 21 and patients that had recovered from HBV infection (n = 20. Herein, we report distinctive cytokines profiles in OHB-infected individuals. Compared to healthy controls (n = 20 and patients who resolved HBV infection, OHB-infected patients displayed an increase in interleukin (IL-2 secretion in addition to a characteristic inflammation profile (decrease in IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels and increased levels of tumour growth factor-beta. IL-15 and interferon-gamma levels were reduced in OHB-infected individuals when compared to those patients who resolved HBV infection. In contrast, OHB patients showed an increase in monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1 and MCP-2 compared to healthy controls and patients who resolved HBV infection. These findings suggest that cytokine expression can influence the severity of OHB disease and could lead to new investigation into the treatment of liver and other infectious diseases.

  17. Multiple cytokine expression profiles reveal immune-based differences in occult hepatitis B genotype H-infected Mexican Nahua patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro, Nora Alma; Roman, Sonia; Realpe, Mauricio; Hernandez-Nazara, Zamira; Zepeda-Carrillo, Eloy Alfonso; Panduro, Arturo

    2011-12-01

    A high prevalence of occult hepatitis B (OHB) genotype H infections has been observed in the native Mexican Nahua population. In addition, a low incidence of hepatitis B virus (HBV)-associated hepatocellular carcinoma has been described in Mexico. The immune response to infection among OHB-infected patients has been poorly evaluated in vivo. Therefore, we assessed the expression profiles of 23 cytokines in OHB genotype H-infected Nahua patients. A total of 41 sera samples from natives of the Nahua community were retrospectively analysed. Based on their HBV antibody profiles, patients were stratified into two groups: OHB patients (n = 21) and patients that had recovered from HBV infection (n = 20). Herein, we report distinctive cytokines profiles in OHB-infected individuals. Compared to healthy controls (n = 20) and patients who resolved HBV infection, OHB-infected patients displayed an increase in interleukin (IL)-2 secretion in addition to a characteristic inflammation profile (decrease in IL-8 and tumour necrosis factor-alpha levels and increased levels of tumour growth factor-beta). IL-15 and interferon-gamma levels were reduced in OHB-infected individuals when compared to those patients who resolved HBV infection. In contrast, OHB patients showed an increase in monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 and MCP-2 compared to healthy controls and patients who resolved HBV infection. These findings suggest that cytokine expression can influence the severity of OHB disease and could lead to new investigation into the treatment of liver and other infectious diseases.

  18. Host immune transcriptional profiles reflect the variability in clinical disease manifestations in patients with Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Banchereau

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus infections are associated with diverse clinical manifestations leading to significant morbidity and mortality. To define the role of the host response in the clinical manifestations of the disease, we characterized whole blood transcriptional profiles of children hospitalized with community-acquired S. aureus infection and phenotyped the bacterial strains isolated. The overall transcriptional response to S. aureus infection was characterized by over-expression of innate immunity and hematopoiesis related genes and under-expression of genes related to adaptive immunity. We assessed individual profiles using modular fingerprints combined with the molecular distance to health (MDTH, a numerical score of transcriptional perturbation as compared to healthy controls. We observed significant heterogeneity in the host signatures and MDTH, as they were influenced by the type of clinical presentation, the extent of bacterial dissemination, and time of blood sampling in the course of the infection, but not by the bacterial isolate. System analysis approaches provide a new understanding of disease pathogenesis and the relation/interaction between host response and clinical disease manifestations.

  19. Profile of Immunization Practice by General Practitioners and Pediatricians in Private Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soedjatmiko Soedjatmiko

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Basic immunization coverage in Indonesia in 2013 was still low (59.2% (IBHS, 2013. Physicians’ attitude and practice were among the determinant factors of a successful immunization program. This survey aimed to describe general practitioner’s (GP and pediatrician’s attitude towards immunization and its coverage  in private practices. This cross-sectional study was performed by distributing questionnaires consisting of 5 items on opinion and 10 items on immunization practices to 100 respondents in November 2014. Completed questionnaires were obtained from 29 GPs and 65 pediatricians. Most respondents considered that the Expanded Program in Immunization vaccine should be given. First dose of hepatitis B vaccine was mostly given in the first 12 hours after birth (90% GPs and 74% pediatricians. Oral polio vaccine was mostly given shortly before hospital discharge (65% of GPs and 81% pediatricians while the DTwP-HB-Hib vaccine were given by 27% of GPs and 21% of pediatricians to >75% patients. Pneumococcal, rotavirus, hepatitis A, typhoid, and influenza vaccines were provided by less than 25% GPs and pediatricians, except for the influenza vaccine which was provided by 31% pediatricians. MMR vaccine was given to >75% patients by 16% of GPs and 29% of pediatricians. This pilot survey of immunization practice in private setting might be the first study in Indonesia that this can be considered as a preliminary report of immunization in private setting. Further studies need to be done, especially regarding problems in immunization in private practices.  Key words: Attitude, general practitioners, immunization practice, private setting, pediatricians Gambaran Praktek Imunisasi Dokter Umum dan Dokter Spesialis Anak di Praktek Swasta Riset Kesehatan Dasar 2013 melaporkan bahwa cakupan imunisasi Indonesia masih rendah (59,2%. Sikap dan praktik imunisasi dokter merupakan salah satu faktor penentu keberhasilan. Tujuan penelitian ini mengetahui sikap

  20. Profile of microRNA in Giant Panda Blood: A Resource for Immune-Related and Novel microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyu Yang

    Full Text Available The giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca is one of the world's most beloved endangered mammals. Although the draft genome of this species had been assembled, little was known about the composition of its microRNAs (miRNAs or their functional profiles. Recent studies demonstrated that changes in the expression of miRNAs are associated with immunity. In this study, miRNAs were extracted from the blood of four healthy giant pandas and sequenced by Illumina next generation sequencing technology. As determined by miRNA screening, a total of 276 conserved miRNAs and 51 novel putative miRNAs candidates were detected. After differential expression analysis, we noticed that the expressions of 7 miRNAs were significantly up-regulated in young giant pandas compared with that of adults. Moreover, 2 miRNAs were up-regulated in female giant pandas and 1 in the male individuals. Target gene prediction suggested that the miRNAs of giant panda might be relevant to the expressions of 4,602 downstream genes. Subseuqently, the predicted target genes were conducted to KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis and we found that these genes were mainly involved in host immunity, including the Ras signaling pathway, the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway, and the MAPK signaling pathway. In conclusion, our results provide the first miRNA profiles of giant panda blood, and the predicted functional analyses may open an avenue for further study of giant panda immunity.

  1. MCF: a tool to find multi-scale community profiles in biological networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shang; Chen, Alan; Rahmani, Ali; Jarada, Tamer; Alhajj, Reda; Demetrick, Doug; Zeng, Jia

    2013-12-01

    Recent developments of complex graph clustering methods have implicated the practical applications with biological networks in different settings. Multi-scale Community Finder (MCF) is a tool to profile network communities (i.e., clusters of nodes) with the control of community sizes. The controlling parameter is referred to as the scale of the network community profile. MCF is able to find communities in all major types of networks including directed, signed, bipartite, and multi-slice networks. The fast computation promotes the practicability of the tool for large-scaled analysis (e.g., protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression networks). MCF is distributed as an open-source C++ package for academic use with both command line and user interface options, and can be downloaded at http://bsdxd.cpsc.ucalgary.ca/MCF. Detailed user manual and sample data sets are also available at the project website. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Different cutaneous innate immunity profiles in acne patients with and without atrophic scars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Jean, Mélanie; Khammari, Amir; Jasson, Fiona; Nguyen, Jean-Michel; Dréno, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    Acne is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with scar development in many patients. To check whether early inflammatory events in the epidermis via keratinocytes influence the development of scars in acne patients. We investigated several immunological markers involved in epidermal innate immunity in both clinically normal skin and inflammatory early papules in acne patients prone to scars or not. In normal skin of acne patients prone to scars vs not prone to scars, TLR-4, IL-2, IL-10, TIMP-2 and JUN were significantly overexpressed and the MMP-9 protein level was decreased. Similar results were obtained in early inflammatory papules (no more than three days), except for TLR-4. These results suggest for the first time a link between the early events of inflammation with levels of activation of innate immunity in normal epidermis of acne patients and the development of scars. These markers could be a target for drugs in the field of scar prevention.

  3. Transcriptome profiling indicating canine parvovirus type 2a as a potential immune activator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xu-Xu; Gao, Yuan; Shu, Long; Wei, Yan-Quan; Yao, Xue-Ping; Cao, Sui-Zhong; Peng, Guang-Neng; Liu, Xiang-Tao; Sun, Shi-Qi

    2016-12-01

    Canine parvovirus type 2a (CPV-2a) is a variant of CPV-2, which is a highly contagious pathogen causing severe gastroenteritis and death in young dogs. However, how CPV-2 participates in cell regulation and immune response remains unknown. In this study, persistently infected MDCK cells were generated through culture passage of the CPV-2a-infected cells for ten generations. Our study showed that CPV-2a induces cell proliferation arrest and cell morphology alternation before the fourth generation, whereas, the cell morphology returns to normal after five times of passages. PCR detection of viral VP2 gene demonstrated that CPV-2a proliferate with cell passage. An immunofluorescence assay revealed that CPV-2a particles were mainly located in the cell nuclei of MDCK cell. Then transcriptome microarray revealed that gene expression pattern of MDCK with CPV-2a persistent infection is distinct compared with normal cells. Gene ontology annotation and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome pathway analysis demonstrated that CPV-2a infection induces a series of membrane-associated genes expression, including many MHC protein or MHC-related complexes. These genes are closely related to signaling pathways of virus-host interaction, including antigen processing and presentation pathway, intestinal immune network, graft-versus-host disease, and RIG-I-like helicases signaling pathway. In contrast, the suppressed genes mediated by CPV-2a showed low enrichment in any category, and were only involved in pathways linking to synthesis and metabolism of amino acids, which was confirmed by qPCR analysis. Our studies indicated that CPV-2a is a natural immune activator and has the capacity to activate host immune responses, which could be used for the development of antiviral strategy and biomaterial for medicine.

  4. Lymphocytic profiling in thyroid cancer provides clues for failure of tumor immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imam, Shahnawaz; Paparodis, Rodis; Sharma, Deepak; Jaume, Juan Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Thyroid cancers are usually surrounded by a significant number of immune-reactive cells. Tumor-associated lymphocytes as well as background lymphocytic thyroiditis are frequently mentioned in pathology reports of patients who have undergone surgery for thyroid cancer. The nature of this lymphocytic reaction is not well understood. The fact that cancer can survive in this adverse microenvironment is indicative of immune regulation. We characterized the lymphocytic infiltration that accompanies thyroid cancer and compared it with that present in thyroid autoimmunity. We found that double-negative (DN) T cells were significantly more abundant in thyroid cancer than in thyroid autoimmunity. Although FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells were also present, DN T cells were the dominant cell type, associated with thyroid cancer. Furthermore, upon stimulation, the DN T cells associated with cancer remained unchanged, while the few (thyroid autoimmunity increased in numbers (>20%). CD25 expression on DN T cells remained unchanged after stimulation, which indicates that the increase in the absolute number of DN T cells in thyroid autoimmunity was at the expense of inactivation of single-positive T cells. We concluded that in the setting of thyroid cancer, DN T cells appear to suppress tumor immunity. In contrast, in thyroid autoimmunity, DN T cells were barely present and only increased at the expense of inactivated, single-positive T cells upon induction. Together, these findings indicate that thyroid cancer-associated DN T cells might regulate proliferation and effector function of T cells and thereby contribute to tumor tolerance and active avoidance of tumor immunity. © 2014 Society for Endocrinology.

  5. Single Amino Acid Modification of Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Changes Transduction and Humoral Immune Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Chengwen; DiPrimio, Nina; Bowles, Dawn E.; Hirsch, Matthew L.; Monahan, Paul E.; Asokan, Aravind; Rabinowitz, Joseph; Agbandje-McKenna, Mavis; Samulski, R. Jude

    2012-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have the potential to promote long-term gene expression. Unfortunately, humoral immunity restricts patient treatment and in addition provides an obstacle to the potential option of vector readministration. In this study, we describe a comprehensive characterization of the neutralizing antibody (NAb) response to AAV type 1 (AAV1) through AAV5 both in vitro and in vivo. These results demonstrated that NAbs generated from one AAV type are unable to neutralize...

  6. 1H NMR-based profiling reveals differential immune-metabolic networks during influenza virus infection in obese mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Justin Milner

    Full Text Available Obese individuals are at greater risk for death from influenza virus infection. Paralleling human evidence, obese mice are also more susceptible to influenza infection mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms driving greater influenza severity in the obese remain unclear. Metabolic profiling has been utilized in infectious disease models to enhance prognostic or diagnostic methods, and to gain insight into disease pathogenesis by providing a more global picture of dynamic infection responses. Herein, metabolic profiling was used to develop a deeper understanding of the complex processes contributing to impaired influenza protection in obese mice and to facilitate generation of new explanatory hypotheses. Diet-induced obese and lean mice were infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabolic profiling of urine, feces, lung, liver, mesenteric white adipose tissue, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum revealed distinct metabolic signatures in infected obese mice, including perturbations in nucleotide, vitamin, ketone body, amino acid, carbohydrate, choline and lipid metabolic pathways. Further, metabolic data was integrated with immune analyses to obtain a more comprehensive understanding of potential immune-metabolic interactions. Of interest, uncovered metabolic signatures in urine and feces allowed for discrimination of infection status in both lean and obese mice at an early influenza time point, which holds prognostic and diagnostic implications for this methodology. These results confirm that obesity causes distinct metabolic perturbations during influenza infection and provide a basis for generation of new hypotheses and use of this methodology in detection of putative biomarkers and metabolic patterns to predict influenza infection outcome.

  7. Scaling of confinement and profiles in the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welander, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the EXTRAP T2 reversed-field pinch the diagnostic techniques for the measurement of electron density and temperature include; Thomson scattering which gives values at three radial positions in the core (r/a = 0, 0.28, 0.56), Langmuir probes which give values at the edge (r/a > 0.9) and interferometry which gives a line-averaged density. The empirical scaling of electron density and temperature including profile information with global plasma parameters has been studied. The density profile is subject to large variations, with an average parabolic shape when the density is low and flatter shapes when the density is increased. The change in the profile shape can be attributed to a shift in the penetration length of neutrals from the vicinity of the wall. The temperature scales roughly as I/n1/2 where I is the plasma current and n is the density. The temperature profile is always quite flat with lower variations and there is a tendency for a flatter profile at higher temperatures.

  8. Voice activity and participation profile - VAPP administered in two different scales of response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Marcela Dutra Esteves; Oliveira, Gisele; Behlau, Mara

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare two types of rating scales using the Voice Activity and Participation Profile (VAPP) self-assessment questionnaire, in order to check their influence on the results obtained by the same instrument. Participants were 32 individuals with vocal complaints of both genders, with ages between 15 and 58 years. All subjects answered the vocal self-assessment questionnaire VAPP using with two different rating scales, randomly presented: an 11-point numerical scale (NS) and a 10-cm long (or 100 points) visual analogue scale (VAS). Response time was registered and there was a two-week interval between applications. At the end of the task, participants were asked about the difficulties found in the task to answer each rating scale version, and also to indicate their preference. The mean VAPP scores were similar in both scales. Differences were found only in partial scores, referring to Activity Limitation and Effects on Emotion, with higher mean score in the numerical scale (p=0.008), however with no clinical impact. The order in which the scales were answered did not affect the results obtained, except for the aspect Effects on Social Communication, which presented lower scores with the visual analogue scale in the group of subjects that answered the numeric scale first (p=0.049). Finally, most participants answered faster to the questionnaire when using the numerical scale (p=0.003). The scores obtained in the VAPP by the two different rating scales were similar. The questionnaire with the numeric scale takes less time to be answered, which may be useful for clinical practice.

  9. Evaluation of scales and measurement instruments in immune-mediated polyneuropathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.S.J. Merkies (Ingemar)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractImmune-mediated neuropathies mainly include Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) (most common form: acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AJDP)), chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

  10. Estimating the outer scale in altitude - L0(h) - using the GeMS profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guesalaga, A.; Neichel, B.; Fusco, T.; Oberti, S.; Valenzuela, J.; Masciadri, E.; Correia, C.; Sauvage, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    We analyze the altitude distribution of the turbulence outer scale - L0(h) - at Cerro Pachon from Gemini South MCAO (GeMS) loop data. GeMS turbulence profiler is fed with telemetry from their 5 WFSs and from the voltages applied to the deformable mirrors, providing estimations of r0, Cn2(h), wind profile (speed and direction for every layer), isoplanatic angle and the outer scale distribution L0(h). It is shown that this last parameter ranges from less than 1 meter at the ground to more than 50m (the telescope is insensitive to larger cannot detect differences above this value). The technique is based on cross correlations of the pseudo-open-loop slopes that allow to disentangle the multiple constituents of L0.

  11. Adaptation to the Spanish population of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) and psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Calderón, Fermín; Díaz-Batanero, Carmen; Rojas-Tejada, Antonio J; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Lozano-Rojas, Óscar M

    2017-07-14

    The identification of different personality risk profiles for substance misuse is useful in preventing substance-related problems. This study aims to test the psychometric properties of a new version of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) for Spanish college students. Cross-sectional study with 455 undergraduate students from four Spanish universities. A new version of the SURPS, adapted to the Spanish population, was administered with the Beck Hopelessness Scale, the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Internal consistency reliability ranged between 0.652 and 0.806 for the four SURPS subscales, while reliability estimated by split-half coefficients varied from 0.686 to 0.829. The estimated test-retest reliability ranged between 0.733 and 0.868. The expected four-factor structure of the original scale was replicated. As evidence of convergent validity, we found that the SURPS subscales were significantly associated with other conceptually-relevant personality scales and significantly associated with alcohol use measures in theoretically-expected ways. This SURPS version may be a useful instrument for measuring personality traits related to vulnerability to substance use and misuse when targeting personality with preventive interventions.

  12. Immunizations and African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data > Minority Population Profiles > Black/African American > Immunizations Immunizations and African Americans African American adults are less ... 19 to 35 months had comparable rates of immunization. African American women are as likely to have ...

  13. Immune thrombocytopenia is associated with persistently deranged fibrosis-related seromarker profiles but low bone marrow fibrosis grades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghanima, Waleed; Boiocchi, Leonardo; Lee, Christina S.

    2018-01-01

    Bone marrow (BM) fibrosis is a potential side effect of thrombopoietin receptor agonist (TPO-RA) treatment. We aimed to investigate stromal seromarker profiles and growth factors in order to elucidate pathogenic and dynamic aspects of immune thrombocytopenia (ITP)-related BM fibrosis before...... and during TPO-RA treatment. Connective tissue metabolites [procollagen I and III peptides (PINP/PIIINP); hyaluronan (HYA), C-terminal-telopeptide (ICTP), and fibrosis-related growth factors (transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), HGF, basic fibroblast growth factor)] were measured in blood samples...... acquired before initiation of TPO-RA and subsequently at 6-month intervals for up to 2 years. BM fibrosis was graded MF-0 in 8 (18%), MF-1 30 (65%), and MF-2 8 (18%) in the last available BM biopsy. In the 21 patients having more than one biopsy, the grade of fibrosis from the first to the last available...

  14. PROFILE PD: profile of function and impairment level experience with Parkinson disease--clinimetric properties of a rating scale for physical therapist practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, Margaret; McFann, Kimberly; Barón, Anna E

    2010-12-01

    Individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) experience a range of deficits of body systems and activities. A clinical test is needed that is reliable, valid, applicable to physical therapist practice, and appropriate for use in early and mid-stages of the disease. PROFILE PD is one such scale, consisting of 24 items that would typically be assessed during the physical therapist's examination and evaluation of individuals with PD. The purpose of this article is to report on clinimetric properties of the PROFILE PD and to make the test available for use. Interrater reliability was determined using the intraclass correlation coefficient. Construct validity was determined by comparing scores on the PROFILE PD with the gold standard (Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [UPDRS]) as well as scales of physical activity and participation. Construct validity and structure of the PROFILE PD were further examined using exploratory factor analysis using principal component analysis with Promax rotation that allows a correlated factor structure. Interrater reliability of the PROFILE PD was high (ICC = 0.97). Construct validity was demonstrated with the UPDRS (r = 0.86, P Physical Functional Performance test (r = -0.62, P < 0.0001). Principal component analysis demonstrated that the test comprises a single scale. The PROFILE PD is a reliable and valid scale that can be used to quantify alterations in body systems and activity of individuals in early and mid-stages of PD. Use of the scale can provide an overall summary of the impact of PD on body systems and activities.

  15. Effects of tussah immunoreactive substances on growth, immunity, disease resistance against Vibrio splendidus and gut microbiota profile of Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuhui; Sun, Yongxin; Wang, Fuqiang; Mi, Rui; Wen, Zhixin; Li, Xuejun; Meng, Nan; Li, Yajie; Du, Xingfan; Li, Shuying

    2017-04-01

    Tussah immunoreactive substance (TIS) comprises a number of active chemicals with various bioactivities. The current study investigated the effects of these substances on the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus. The specific growth rate (SGR) of TIS-fed sea cucumbers was significantly enhanced, whereas no significant difference in SGR was observed between those soaked in antibiotics and those fed with basal diet only. TIS also improved the immune response of the animals when given at a dose of 1.0% or 2.0%, as shown by increased phagocytic, lysozyme, superoxide dismutase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, and catalase activities following injection with live Vibrio splendidus. At a dose of 1.0% or 2.0%, TIS significantly enhanced the immune ability (P flora counts and high-throughput sequencing showed that dietary TIS could improve the amount of probiotic bacteria, yielding a 6-fold increase in Bacillus and 10-fold increase in Lactobacillus for sea cucumbers fed with 2.0% TIS diet compared to the control. Furthermore, TIS-containing diet also greatly reduced the number of harmful bacteria, with the number of Vibrio in sea cucumbers fed with 1%TIS diet decreased by 67% compared to the control. The results thus indicated that TIS increased the growth of sea cucumbers and enhanced their resistance to V. splendidus infection by improving the immunity of the animals. TIS also improved the gut microbiota profiles of the animals by increasing the probiotics and reducing the harmful bacteria within their guts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Pollen lipidomics: lipid profiling exposes a notable diversity in 22 allergenic pollen and potential biomarkers of the allergic immune response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Elfatih H Bashir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Pollen grains are the male gametophytes that deliver sperm cells to female gametophytes during sexual reproduction of higher plants. Pollen is a major source of aeroallergens and environmental antigens. The pollen coat harbors a plethora of lipids that are required for pollen hydration, germination, and penetration of the stigma by pollen tubes. In addition to proteins, pollen displays a wide array of lipids that interact with the human immune system. Prior searches for pollen allergens have focused on the identification of intracellular allergenic proteins, but have largely overlooked much of the extracellular pollen matrix, a region where the majority of lipid molecules reside. Lipid antigens have attracted attention for their potent immunoregulatory effects. By being in close proximity to allergenic proteins on the pollen surface when they interact with host cells, lipids could modify the antigenic properties of proteins. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a comparative pollen lipid profiling of 22 commonly allergenic plant species by the use of gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy, followed by detailed data mining and statistical analysis. Three experiments compared pollen lipid profiles. We built a database library of the pollen lipids by matching acquired pollen-lipid mass spectra and retention times with the NIST/EPA/NIH mass-spectral library. We detected, identified, and relatively quantified more than 106 lipid molecular species including fatty acids, n-alkanes, fatty alcohols, and sterols. Pollen-derived lipids stimulation up-regulate cytokines expression of dendritic and natural killer T cells co-culture. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Here we report on a lipidomic analysis of pollen lipids that can serve as a database for identifying potential lipid antigens and/or novel candidate molecules involved in allergy. The database provides a resource that facilitates studies on the role of lipids in the

  17. Mice gut microbiota programming by using the infant food profile. The effect on growth, gut microbiota and the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Samper, Elvira; Gómez-Gallego, Carlos; Andreo-Martínez, Pedro; Salminen, Seppo; Ros, Gaspar

    2017-10-18

    During the complementary feeding (CF) period, nutritional imbalances can have negative consequences not only on a child's health in the short term but also later in adulthood, as a phenomenon known as "nutritional programming" takes place. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible changes in body growth, gut microbiota (GM) and the immune system in mice fed with two different commercial sterilized baby foods in jars (BFJs) for CF. Mice fed with different BFJs (A and B groups) showed an accelerated growth from the fifth week of life when compared with the control (C) group. Group A showed a higher BMI, post-weaning growth rate, and IL-10 levels and a decrease in the Lactobacillus group. Group B showed a significant decrease in the total bacterial count, Lactobacillus group, Enterococcus spp. and Bacteroidetes-Prevotella. The Bifidobacterium genus tended to be lower in groups A and B. Akkermansia muciniphila was more frequently detected in group C. The results obtained from groups A and B can be attributed to the BFJ fatty acid profile, rich in UFAs. This study demonstrates for the first time that the commercial BFJ composition during CF might be a "programming" factor for body growth, GM and the immune system.

  18. Nutritional formula improved immune profiles of seniors living in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langkamp-Henken, Bobbi; Wood, Steven M; Herlinger-Garcia, Kelli A; Thomas, Debra J; Stechmiller, Joyce K; Bender, Bradley S; Gardner, Elizabeth M; DeMichele, Stephen J; Schaller, Joseph P; Murasko, Donna M

    2006-12-01

    To assess whether an experimental nutritional formula (EXP) supports immune function in seniors living in long-term care facilities. Prospective, randomized, double-blind, controlled trial conducted September 2002 through January 2003. North central Florida nursing homes. Subjects aged 65 and older (n = 157). Subjects received 240 mL/d of EXP or standard liquid nutrition (CON) for 4 weeks before and 6 weeks after an influenza vaccination. Influenza vaccine antibody responses, immunophenotyping, lymphocyte activation, cytokines, and clinical measures (fever, number of prescribed antibiotics). Ninety-two subjects (n = 40, CON; n = 52, EXP) completed the study. Geometric mean antibody titers were similar between groups, yet the percentage of subjects with H1N1 antibody titers greater than 100 postvaccination was higher in the EXP group than in the CON group (43% vs 23%, P=.047). Similar trends were found for the percentage of subjects (intent to treat) with fourfold increases against the B/Hong Kong component (64% vs 46%, P = .09) or with H3N2 antibody titers of 40 or more (97% vs 89%, P=.06). EXP subjects had higher levels of influenza-activated lymphocytes (CD69+ and CD25+). Cytokine production after mitogen activation was lower in EXP than CON subjects (interleukin (IL)-6: 20+/-3 vs 29+/-3 ng/mL, P = .045; IL-10: 310+/-60 vs 603+/-140 pg/mL, P = .06). Fewer EXP subjects were treated for fever (5% vs 16%, P = .02) or prescribed antibiotics (7 vs 11 new antibiotics/100 days of study, P = .06). Seniors consuming the EXP formula demonstrated enhanced immune function, indicated by increased influenza vaccine response and lymphocyte activation, less fever, and fewer newly prescribed antibiotics than those consuming a standard ready-to-drink nutritional supplement.

  19. PBMC transcriptome profiles identifies potential candidate genes and functional networks controlling the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRSV vaccine in Pietrain pig

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md. Aminul; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Pröll, Maren Julia; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Aqter Rony, Sharmin; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Hoelker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Neuhoff, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a devastating viral disease affecting swine production, health and welfare throughout the world. A synergistic action of the innate and the adaptive immune system of the host is essential for mounting a durable protective immunity through vaccination. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the transcriptome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to characterize the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRS Virus (PRRSV) vaccination in Pietrain pigs. The Affymetrix gene chip porcine gene 1.0 ST array was used for the transcriptome profiling of PBMCs collected at immediately before (D0), at one (D1) and 28 days (D28) post PRRSV vaccination with three biological replications. With FDR activation, cytokine activity and inflammatory response were enriched during the innate immunity; cytolysis, T cell mediated cytotoxicity, immunoglobulin production were enriched during adaptive immunity to PRRSV vaccination. Significant enrichment of cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, signaling by interleukins, signaling by the B cell receptor (BCR), viral mRNA translation, IFN-gamma pathway and AP-1 transcription factor network pathways were indicating the involvement of altered genes in the antiviral defense. Network analysis revealed that four network modules were functionally involved with the transcriptional network of innate immunity, and five modules were linked to adaptive immunity in PBMCs. The innate immune transcriptional network was found to be regulated by LCK, STAT3, ATP5B, UBB and RSP17. While TGFß1, IL7R, RAD21, SP1 and GZMB are likely to be predictive for the adaptive immune transcriptional response to PRRSV vaccine in PBMCs. Results of the current immunogenomics study advances our understanding of PRRS in term of host-vaccine interaction, and thereby contribute to design a rationale for disease control strategy. PMID:28278192

  20. Impact of Persistent Cytomegalovirus Infection on Dynamic Changes in Human Immune System Profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosanna Vescovini

    Full Text Available Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV imprints the immune system after primary infection, however its effect during chronic infection still needs to be deciphered. In this study we report the variation of blood cell count along with anti-HCMV IgG and T cell responses to pp-65 and IE-1 antigens, that occurred after an interval of five years in a cohort of 25 seropositive healthy adults. We found increased anti-viral IgG antibody responses and intracellular interferon-gamma secreting CD8+ T cell responses to pp-65: a result consistent with memory inflation. With the only exception of shortage in naive CD8+ T cells most memory T cell subsets as well as total CD8+ T cells, T cells, lymphocytes, monocytes and leukocytes had increased. By contrast, none of the cell types tested were found to have increased in 14 subjects stably seronegative. Rather, in addition to a shortage in naive CD8+ T cells, also memory T cell subsets and most other cell types decreased, either in a statistically significant or non-significant manner. The trend of T cell pool representation with regard to CD4/CD8 ratio was in the opposing directions depending on HCMV serology. Globally, this study demonstrates different dynamic changes of most blood cell types depending on presence or absence of HCMV infection. Therefore, HCMV plays a continual role in modulating homeostasis of blood T cells and a broader expanding effect on other cell populations of lymphoid and myeloid origin.

  1. Impact of Persistent Cytomegalovirus Infection on Dynamic Changes in Human Immune System Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovini, Rosanna; Telera, Anna Rita; Pedrazzoni, Mario; Abbate, Barbara; Rossetti, Pietro; Verzicco, Ignazio; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana; Volpi, Riccardo; Sansoni, Paolo; Fagnoni, Francesco Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) imprints the immune system after primary infection, however its effect during chronic infection still needs to be deciphered. In this study we report the variation of blood cell count along with anti-HCMV IgG and T cell responses to pp-65 and IE-1 antigens, that occurred after an interval of five years in a cohort of 25 seropositive healthy adults. We found increased anti-viral IgG antibody responses and intracellular interferon-gamma secreting CD8+ T cell responses to pp-65: a result consistent with memory inflation. With the only exception of shortage in naive CD8+ T cells most memory T cell subsets as well as total CD8+ T cells, T cells, lymphocytes, monocytes and leukocytes had increased. By contrast, none of the cell types tested were found to have increased in 14 subjects stably seronegative. Rather, in addition to a shortage in naive CD8+ T cells, also memory T cell subsets and most other cell types decreased, either in a statistically significant or non-significant manner. The trend of T cell pool representation with regard to CD4/CD8 ratio was in the opposing directions depending on HCMV serology. Globally, this study demonstrates different dynamic changes of most blood cell types depending on presence or absence of HCMV infection. Therefore, HCMV plays a continual role in modulating homeostasis of blood T cells and a broader expanding effect on other cell populations of lymphoid and myeloid origin.

  2. Impact of Persistent Cytomegalovirus Infection on Dynamic Changes in Human Immune System Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vescovini, Rosanna; Telera, Anna Rita; Pedrazzoni, Mario; Abbate, Barbara; Rossetti, Pietro; Verzicco, Ignazio; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana; Volpi, Riccardo; Sansoni, Paolo; Fagnoni, Francesco Fausto

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) imprints the immune system after primary infection, however its effect during chronic infection still needs to be deciphered. In this study we report the variation of blood cell count along with anti-HCMV IgG and T cell responses to pp-65 and IE-1 antigens, that occurred after an interval of five years in a cohort of 25 seropositive healthy adults. We found increased anti-viral IgG antibody responses and intracellular interferon-gamma secreting CD8+ T cell responses to pp-65: a result consistent with memory inflation. With the only exception of shortage in naive CD8+ T cells most memory T cell subsets as well as total CD8+ T cells, T cells, lymphocytes, monocytes and leukocytes had increased. By contrast, none of the cell types tested were found to have increased in 14 subjects stably seronegative. Rather, in addition to a shortage in naive CD8+ T cells, also memory T cell subsets and most other cell types decreased, either in a statistically significant or non-significant manner. The trend of T cell pool representation with regard to CD4/CD8 ratio was in the opposing directions depending on HCMV serology. Globally, this study demonstrates different dynamic changes of most blood cell types depending on presence or absence of HCMV infection. Therefore, HCMV plays a continual role in modulating homeostasis of blood T cells and a broader expanding effect on other cell populations of lymphoid and myeloid origin. PMID:26990192

  3. Cytokine expression profiles of immune imbalance in post-mononucleosis chronic fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background As Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) has been known to follow Epstein-Bar virus (EBV) and other systemic infections; our objective was to describe differences in immune activation in post-infective CFS (PI-CFS) patients and recovered controls. We studied 301 adolescents prospectively over 24 months following the diagnosis of monospot-positive infectious mononucleosis (IM). We found an incidence of CFS at 6, 12 and 24 months of 13%, 7% and 4% respectively. Methods Using chemiluminescent imaging we measured the concentrations of IL-1a, 1b, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 (p70), 13, 15, 17 and 23, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TNF-β in duplicate plasma samples available in bio-bank from 9 PI-CFS subjects and 12 recovered controls at 24 months post-infection. Results Standard comparative analysis indicated significant differences in IL-8 and 23 across subject groups. In constructing a linear classification model IL-6, 8 and 23 were selected by two different statistical approaches as discriminating features, with IL-1a, IL-2 and IFN-γ also selected in one model or the other. This supported an assignment accuracy of better than 80% at a confidence level of 0.95 into PI-CFS versus recovered controls. Conclusion These results suggest that co-expression patterns in as few as 5 cytokines associated with Th17 function may hold promise as a tool for the diagnosis of post-infectious CFS. PMID:22973830

  4. Cytokine expression profiles of immune imbalance in post-mononucleosis chronic fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Broderick Gordon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS has been known to follow Epstein-Bar virus (EBV and other systemic infections; our objective was to describe differences in immune activation in post-infective CFS (PI-CFS patients and recovered controls. We studied 301 adolescents prospectively over 24 months following the diagnosis of monospot-positive infectious mononucleosis (IM. We found an incidence of CFS at 6, 12 and 24 months of 13%, 7% and 4% respectively. Methods Using chemiluminescent imaging we measured the concentrations of IL-1a, 1b, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 (p70, 13, 15, 17 and 23, IFN-γ, TNF-α and TNF-β in duplicate plasma samples available in bio-bank from 9 PI-CFS subjects and 12 recovered controls at 24 months post-infection. Results Standard comparative analysis indicated significant differences in IL-8 and 23 across subject groups. In constructing a linear classification model IL-6, 8 and 23 were selected by two different statistical approaches as discriminating features, with IL-1a, IL-2 and IFN-γ also selected in one model or the other. This supported an assignment accuracy of better than 80% at a confidence level of 0.95 into PI-CFS versus recovered controls. Conclusion These results suggest that co-expression patterns in as few as 5 cytokines associated with Th17 function may hold promise as a tool for the diagnosis of post-infectious CFS.

  5. Comparison of casein and whey in diets on performance, immune responses and metabolomic profile of weaning pigs challenged with E.coli F4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sugiharto, Sugiharto; Jensen, Bent Borg; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2014-01-01

    The differences in amino acid composition in casein and whey have been thought to exert different immunomodulatory and metabolic effects. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of casein and whey on performance, immune responses and plasma metabolomic profile of weanling pigs chal...

  6. Distributed parallel cooperative coevolutionary multi-objective large-scale immune algorithm for deployment of wireless sensor networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Bin; Zhao, Jianwei; Yang, Po

    2018-01-01

    -objective evolutionary algorithms the Cooperative Coevolutionary Generalized Differential Evolution 3, the Cooperative Multi-objective Differential Evolution and the Nondominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm III, the proposed algorithm addresses the deployment optimization problem efficiently and effectively.......Using immune algorithms is generally a time-intensive process especially for problems with a large number of variables. In this paper, we propose a distributed parallel cooperative coevolutionary multi-objective large-scale immune algorithm that is implemented using the message passing interface...... (MPI). The proposed algorithm is composed of three layers: objective, group and individual layers. First, for each objective in the multi-objective problem to be addressed, a subpopulation is used for optimization, and an archive population is used to optimize all the objectives. Second, the large...

  7. Demographic profile, Oral Health Impact Profile and Dental Anxiety Scale in patients with chronic periodontitis: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Liran; Zini, Avraham; Levine, Jonathan; Weiss, Maor; Lev, Ron; Chebath Taub, Daniella; Hai, Avihai; Almoznino, Galit

    2018-01-30

    To examine whether dental anxiety (DA) and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) differ between persons with and those without chronic periodontitis. One-hundred patients with chronic periodontitis and 50 age- and- sex-matched controls were included. Data were collected on the following: demographics; smoking habits; Numerical Rating Scale (NRS) for dental pain assessment; Corah's Dental Anxiety Scale (DAS); Oral Health Impact Profile 14 (OHIP-14); Decayed, Missing and Filled Teeth (DMFT) index; Plaque Index (PI); probing depth (PD); bleeding on probing (BOP); and radiographic bone loss. Patients with chronic periodontitis exhibited a significantly higher percentage of high anxiety and phobia compared with subjects in the control group. Furthermore, patients with chronic periodontitis were statistically significantly more likely to consider themselves as suffering from dental anxiety (68.7% vs. 14.3%, P noise and feeling a foreign object in the mouth. Patients with chronic periodontitis exhibited worse OHIP-14 global scores as well as worse scores in the following individual domains: functional limitation (P = 0.005); physical disability (P = 0.003); psychological disability (P = 0.010); social disability (P = 0.011); and handicap (P = 0.012). Compared with controls, patients with chronic periodontitis had higher levels of dental anxiety and worse OHRQoL. It is important to consider dental anxiety and OHRQoL assessment as an integral component of the evaluation of patients with chronic periodontitis. Communication between dental and behavioral health professionals is needed to implement a multidisciplinary team approach involving behavioural and psychological interventions. © 2018 FDI World Dental Federation.

  8. An increased expression profile of Th9/IL-9 correlated with Th17/IL-17 in patients with immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jianlin; Li, Xiaoqian; Wu, Yulu; Wu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Na; Qi, Kunming; Cheng, Hai; Li, Depeng; Sun, Haiying; Zeng, Lingyu; Xu, Kailin

    2017-05-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a heterogeneous autoimmune disease, characterized by dysregulation of cellular immunity. Th9 cells were recently identified as a new subtype of Th cells, characterized by preferential production of IL-9. Given the pleiotropic function of IL-9, Th9 cells are demonstrated to be involved in various autoimmune diseases. However, whether Th9 cells are involved in the pathogenesis of ITP remains unclear. In this study, 49 active ITP patients, 39 ITP with remission and 20 healthy controls were included. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from ITP and controls for measuring Th9 and Th17 cells by flow cytometry. Meanwhile, RNA was isolated from PBMCs for the measurement of the mRNA level of PU.1, IRF4, BATF, and RORγt by quantitative real-time PCR. Plasma levels of IL-9 and IL-17 were detected by ELISA. Our results showed that higher expressions of Th9, IL-9, and associated transcription factors (PU.1, IRF4, and BATF) were found in active ITP patients and restored to the normal level (except IL-9) in patients in remission. Meanwhile, Th9 cells and the IL-9 plasma level were positively correlated with Th17 cells and the IL-17 level in ITP patients, respectively. Moreover, a positive correlation of IRF4 or BATF with RORγt was found. In conclusion, an aberrant expression profile of Th9/IL-9 was associated with pathogenesis of ITP possibly through cooperatively working with Th17/IL-17 and therapeutically targeting Th9/IL-9 might be a novel approach in the treatment of ITP.

  9. Peripheral blood RNA gene expression profiling in illicit methcathinone users reveals effect on immune system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eSikk

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Methcathinone (ephedrone is relatively easily accessible for abuse. Its users develop an extrapyramidal syndrome and it is not known if this is caused by methcathinone itself, by side-ingredients (manganese, or both. In the present study we aimed to clarify molecular mechanisms underlying this condition. We analyzed whole genome gene expression patterns of peripheral blood from 20 methcathinone users and 20 matched controls. Gene expression profile data was analyzed by Bayesian modelling and functional annotation. In order to verify the genechip results we performed quantitative real-time (RT PCR in selected genes. 326 out of analyzed 28,869 genes showed statistically significant differential expression with FDR adjusted p-values below 0.05. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed differential expression for the most of selected genes. Functional annotation and network analysis indicated that most of the genes were related to activation immunological disease, cellular movement and cardiovascular disease gene network (enrichment score 42. As HIV and HCV infections were confounding factors, we performed additional stratification of patients. A similar functional activation of the immunological disease pathway was evident when we compared patients according to the injection status (past versus current users, balanced for HIV and HCV infection. However, this difference was not large therefore the major effect was related to the HIV status of the patients. Mn-methcathinone abusers have blood transcriptional patterns mostly caused by their HIV and HCV infections.

  10. A Pathway Proteomic Profile of Ischemic Stroke Survivors Reveals Innate Immune Dysfunction in Association with Mild Symptoms of Depression – A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vinh A.; Carey, Leeanne M.; Giummarra, Loretta; Faou, Pierre; Cooke, Ira; Howells, David W.; Tse, Tamara; Macaulay, S. Lance; Ma, Henry; Davis, Stephen M.; Donnan, Geoffrey A.; Crewther, Sheila G.

    2016-01-01

    Depression after stroke is a common occurrence, raising questions as to whether depression could be a long-term biological and immunological sequela of stroke. Early explanations for post-stroke depression (PSD) focused on the neuropsychological/psychosocial effects of stroke on mobility and quality of life. However, recent investigations have revealed imbalances of inflammatory cytokine levels in association with PSD, though to date, there is only one published proteomic pathway analysis testing this hypothesis. Thus, we examined the serum proteome of stroke patients (n = 44, mean age = 63.62 years) and correlated these with the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) scores at 3 months post-stroke. Overall, the patients presented with mild depression symptoms on the MADRS, M = 6.40 (SD = 7.42). A discovery approach utilizing label-free relative quantification was employed utilizing an LC-ESI–MS/MS coupled to a LTQ-Orbitrap Elite (Thermo-Scientific). Identified peptides were analyzed using the gene set enrichment approach on several different genomic databases that all indicated significant downregulation of the complement and coagulation systems with increasing MADRS scores. Complement and coagulation systems are traditionally thought to play a key role in the innate immune system and are established precursors to the adaptive immune system through pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling. Both systems are known to be globally affected after ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Thus, our results suggest that lowered complement expression in the periphery in conjunction with depressive symptoms post-stroke may be a biomarker for incomplete recovery of brain metabolic needs, homeostasis, and inflammation following ischemic stroke damage. Further proteomic investigations are now required to construct the temporal profile, leading from acute lesion damage to manifestation of depressive symptoms. Overall, the findings provide support for the

  11. Transcriptome profiling of the antiviral immune response in Atlantic cod macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslamloo, Khalil; Xue, Xi; Booman, Marije; Smith, Nicole C; Rise, Matthew L

    2016-10-01

    A study was conducted to determine the transcriptome response of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) macrophages to the viral mimic, polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC), using a 20K Atlantic cod microarray platform and qPCR. We identified 285 significantly up-regulated and 161 significantly down-regulated probes in cod macrophages 24 h after pIC stimulation. A subset of 26 microarray-identified transcripts was subjected to qPCR validation using samples treated with pIC or phosphate-buffered saline (control) over time (3, 6, 12, 24, 48 h), and 77% of them showed a significant response to pIC. The microarray and qPCR analyses in this study showed that pIC induced the expression of cod macrophage transcripts involved in RLR- and TLR-dependent pathogen recognition (e.g. tlr3, tlr7, mda5 and lgp2), as well as signal transducers (e.g. stat1 and nfkbia) and transcription activators (e.g. irf7 and irf10) in the MyD88-independent and dependent signalling pathways. Several immune effectors (e.g. isg15s, viperin, herc4, mip2 and ccl13) were significantly up-regulated in pIC-stimulated cod macrophages. The expression of some transcripts (e.g. irf7, irf10, viperin) was significantly up-regulated by pIC as early as 12 h. All pIC-induced transcripts had peak expression at either 24 h (e.g. tlr7, irf7, mip2) or 48 h (e.g. tlr3, lgp2, stat1). This study suggests possible roles of both vertebrate-conserved (e.g. tlr3 as an up-regulated gene) and fish-specific (tlr22g as a down-regulated gene) receptors in dsRNA recognition, and the importance of conserved and potentially fish-specific interferon stimulated genes in cod macrophages. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Functional profiling of mercuric reductase (mer A genes in biofilm communities of a technical scale biocatalyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    von Canstein Harald

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial mercury resistance is based on enzymatic reduction of ionic mercury to elemental mercury and has recently been demonstrated to be applicable for industrial wastewater clean-up. The long-term monitoring of such biocatalyser systems requires a cultivation independent functional community profiling method targeting the key enzyme of the process, the merA gene coding for the mercuric reductase. We report on the development of a profiling method for merA and its application to monitor changes in the functional diversity of the biofilm community of a technical scale biocatalyzer over 8 months of on-site operation. Results Based on an alignment of 30 merA sequences from Gram negative bacteria, conserved primers were designed for amplification of merA fragments with an optimized PCR protocol. The resulting amplicons of approximately 280 bp were separated by thermogradient gelelectrophoresis (TGGE, resulting in strain specific fingerprints for mercury resistant Gram negative isolates with different merA sequences. The merA profiling of the biofilm community from a technical biocatalyzer showed persistence of some and loss of other inoculum strains as well as the appearance of new bands, resulting in an overall increase of the functional diversity of the biofilm community. One predominant new band of the merA community profile was also detected in a biocatalyzer effluent isolate, which was identified as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The isolated strain showed lower mercury reduction rates in liquid culture than the inoculum strains but was apparently highly competitive in the biofilm environment of the biocatalyzer where moderate mercury levels were prevailing. Conclusions The merA profiling technique allowed to monitor the ongoing selection for better adapted strains during the operation of a biocatalyzer and to direct their subsequent isolation. In such a way, a predominant mercury reducing Ps. aeruginosa strain was identified by

  13. Utility of Systematic Isolation of immune cell subsets from HIV-infected individuals for miRNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargalló, Manel E; Guardo, Alberto C; Maleno, Maria J; Miralles, Laia; Egaña-Gorroño, Lander; Escribà, Tuixent; García, Felipe; Gatell, Jose M; Arnedo, Mireia; Plana, Montserrat

    2017-03-01

    sufficient quantity of different isolated immune cell subsets from HIV-infected individuals at different disease stages. Moreover, the assessed qualities of nucleic acids allow us to perform subsequent molecular studies, such as microRNA profiling. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Serological profiling of the EBV immune response in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome using a peptide microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loebel, Madlen; Eckey, Maren; Sotzny, Franziska; Hahn, Elisabeth; Bauer, Sandra; Grabowski, Patricia; Zerweck, Johannes; Holenya, Pavlo; Hanitsch, Leif G; Wittke, Kirsten; Borchmann, Peter; Rüffer, Jens-Ulrich; Hiepe, Falk; Ruprecht, Klemens; Behrends, Uta; Meindl, Carola; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reimer, Ulf; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Epstein-Barr-Virus (EBV) plays an important role as trigger or cofactor for various autoimmune diseases. In a subset of patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) disease starts with infectious mononucleosis as late primary EBV-infection, whereby altered levels of EBV-specific antibodies can be observed in another subset of patients. We performed a comprehensive mapping of the IgG response against EBV comparing 50 healthy controls with 92 CFS patients using a microarray platform. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and cancer-related fatigue served as controls. 3054 overlapping peptides were synthesised as 15-mers from 14 different EBV proteins. Array data was validated by ELISA for selected peptides. Prevalence of EBV serotypes was determined by qPCR from throat washing samples. EBV type 1 infections were found in patients and controls. EBV seroarray profiles between healthy controls and CFS were less divergent than that observed for MS or SLE. We found significantly enhanced IgG responses to several EBNA-6 peptides containing a repeat sequence in CFS patients compared to controls. EBNA-6 peptide IgG responses correlated well with EBNA-6 protein responses. The EBNA-6 repeat region showed sequence homologies to various human proteins. Patients with CFS had a quite similar EBV IgG antibody response pattern as healthy controls. Enhanced IgG reactivity against an EBNA-6 repeat sequence and against EBNA-6 protein is found in CFS patients. Homologous sequences of various human proteins with this EBNA-6 repeat sequence might be potential targets for antigenic mimicry.

  15. Serological profiling of the EBV immune response in Chronic Fatigue Syndrome using a peptide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlen Loebel

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr-Virus (EBV plays an important role as trigger or cofactor for various autoimmune diseases. In a subset of patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS disease starts with infectious mononucleosis as late primary EBV-infection, whereby altered levels of EBV-specific antibodies can be observed in another subset of patients.We performed a comprehensive mapping of the IgG response against EBV comparing 50 healthy controls with 92 CFS patients using a microarray platform. Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and cancer-related fatigue served as controls. 3054 overlapping peptides were synthesised as 15-mers from 14 different EBV proteins. Array data was validated by ELISA for selected peptides. Prevalence of EBV serotypes was determined by qPCR from throat washing samples.EBV type 1 infections were found in patients and controls. EBV seroarray profiles between healthy controls and CFS were less divergent than that observed for MS or SLE. We found significantly enhanced IgG responses to several EBNA-6 peptides containing a repeat sequence in CFS patients compared to controls. EBNA-6 peptide IgG responses correlated well with EBNA-6 protein responses. The EBNA-6 repeat region showed sequence homologies to various human proteins.Patients with CFS had a quite similar EBV IgG antibody response pattern as healthy controls. Enhanced IgG reactivity against an EBNA-6 repeat sequence and against EBNA-6 protein is found in CFS patients. Homologous sequences of various human proteins with this EBNA-6 repeat sequence might be potential targets for antigenic mimicry.

  16. Correlation of antinuclear antibody immunofluorescence patterns with immune profile using line immunoassay in the Indian scenario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastian, Wendy; Roy, Atanu; Kini, Usha; Mullick, Shalini

    2010-01-01

    Immunity status, individual response to disease and types of antibodies produced are well known to vary from person to person, place to place and probably from population to population. A broad spectrum of specific auto antibodies that have so far been associated with specific rheumatic diseases, as noted in Western literature, has been well taken as a reference standard all over the world. There is neither research work nor any data correlating the auto antibodies and their antinuclear antibody (ANA) patterns with the immunoprofile in the Indian population to date. To understand a definite association between ANA patterns and specific antibodies in the serum in the Indian study population and to document similarities / differences with the West. This prospective and retrospective double blind study was undertaken on the South Indian population referred for ANA testing by Indirect Immunofluorescence method and by immunoline methods. Serum samples of patients from a random South Indian population who sought medical help for rheumatic disease were subjected for ANA testing by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) method and line immunoassay during the study period of 27 months. Serum samples were processed in dilution of 1:100 using HEp - 2010 / liver biochip (Monkey) (EUROIMMUN AG). The serum samples which were further processed for line immunoassay were treated in 1:100 dilution on nylon strips coated with recombinant and purified antigens as discrete lines with plastic backing (EUROIMMUN AG) coated with antigens nRNP / Sm, Sm, SSA, Ro-52, SSB, Scl-70, PM-Scl, PCNA, Jo-1, CENP-B, dsDNA, nucleosomes, histones, ribosomal protein-P, anti-mitochondrial antibodies (AMA-M2) along with a control band. The analysis was done by comparing the intensity of the reaction with positive control line by image analysis. The antinuclear antibody indirect immunofluorescence (ANA - IIF) patterns obtained were projectable to visualize a certain spectrum of specific antibodies such as

  17. The validity of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) among Australian adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Nicola C; Barrett, Emma L; Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; Kelly, Erin; Champion, Katrina E; Stapinski, Lexine; Conrod, Patricia J; Slade, Tim; Nair, Natasha; Teesson, Maree

    2016-02-01

    This study investigated the validity of a brief personality screening measure for substance use in adolescents, the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS), among Australian adolescents. A total of 527 adolescents (mean age: 13.38years, SD=0.43) from seven Australian schools were assessed at two time points 24months apart. The concurrent and predictive validity of the SURPS was determined using a series of linear and logistic regressions, and was compared to the results in a United Kingdom (UK) sample. SURPS subscale scores for the Australian population were also reported and compared to those in the UK. Overall, the SURPS subscale scores for Australian adolescents were similar to those for adolescents from the UK. Tests of concurrent and predictive validity in the Australian sample demonstrated that the all four personality profiles - Hopelessness (H), Anxiety Sensitivity (AS), Impulsivity (IMP), and Sensation Seeking (SS) - were related to measures of substance use and other behavioural and emotional characteristics. In addition, all the predicted specific prospective relationships between the personality profiles and particular substance use and other behavioural problems were confirmed except that H was not associated with illicit drug use. Overall, the results were similar between the Australian and UK samples. The SURPS is a valid and useful measure for identifying Australian adolescents at high-risk for substance use and other emotional and behavioural problems. Implications for prevention are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology, clinical, immune, and molecular profiles of microsporidiosis and cryptosporidiosis among HIV/AIDS patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wumba R

    2012-07-01

    treating opportunistic intestinal parasites that may be acquired through fecal–oral transmission, surface water, normal immunity, rural area-based person–person and animal–human infection, and transmission of HIV. Therapy, including ART and treatment with fumagillin, is needed.Keywords: diarrhea, Enterocytozoon bieneusi, Cryptosporidium hominis, Cryptosporidium parvum, risk factors, Africans

  19. ImmunoGrid: towards agent-based simulations of the human immune system at a natural scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halling-Brown, M.; Pappalardo, F.; Rapin, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    , such as the European Virtual Physiological Human initiative. Finally, we ask a key question: How long will it take us to resolve these challenges and when can we expect to have fully functional models that will deliver health-care benefits in the form of personalized care solutions and improved disease prevention?......The ultimate aim of the EU-funded ImmunoGrid project is to develop a natural-scale model of the human immune system-that is, one that reflects both the diversity and the relative proportions of the molecules and cells that comprise it-together with the grid infrastructure necessary to apply...... resources required. In this paper, we explain the key challenges and the approaches adopted to overcome them. We also consider wider implications for the present ambitious plans to develop natural-scale, integrated models of the human body that can make contributions to personalized health care...

  20. Dataset on differential gene expression analysis for splenic transcriptome profiling and the transcripts related to six immune pathways in grass carp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoxi Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this paper are related to the research article entitled “Transcriptome profiling of developing spleen tissue and discovery of immune-related genes in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella” (Li et al. 2016 [1]. Please refer to this article for interpretation of the data. Data provided in this submission are comprised of the expression levels of unigenes, significantly differentially expressed genes(DEGs, significant enrichment GO term and KEGG pathway of DEGs, and information of the transcripts assigned to six immune pathways.

  1. Personality profiles between obese and control subjects assessed with five standardized personality scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pantoja, José L; Cabranes, José A; Sanchez-Quintero, Sabrina; Velao, Manuel; Sanz, Montserrat; Torres-Pardo, Beatriz; Ancín, Inés; Cabrerizo, Lucio; Rubio, Miguel A; Lopez-Ibor, Juan J; Barabash, Ana

    2012-01-01

    Psychopathology may exert influence on developing and maintaining obesity. Studies of personality traits or psychopathology of personality in obesity are scarce and contradictory. The aim of this study was to compare personality profiles between obese and normal-weight subjects and to determine the most useful tool to detect differences, considering that psychological assessment and psychotherapeutical support should be included within the overall management of these patients.* We examined 55 obese subjects (mean BMI=43kg/ m2) and 66 controls (mean BMI =21.7kg/m2). We used the personality assessment tools: MCMI-II, TCI-R, EPQ-A, BIS-111 and SSS. Factorial multivariate analysis of variance was applied; with factors BMI, Gender and Age as a covariate. Significant differences between groups were more marked in the clinical syndrome scales of MCMI-II, particularly in Major-Depression, Thought-Disorder, Anxiety, Somatoform and Alcohol-Dependence. Among obese, women scored higher than men in all scales but not significantly. We have found significant differences in normal personality dimensions between both groups in TCI-R. Obese showed higher scores in Harm Avoidance, and lower in Novelty Seeking, Persistence and Self-transcendence. The remaining tests have not been useful for differentiating personality traits between both groups. Obese subjects showed different personality profiles than control subjects. The most useful scales for determining these differences might be those designed to assess pathological personality such as MCMI-II. Less important would be those intended to measure normal personality traits, such as TCI-R and EPQ-A.

  2. Immune profiles and clinical outcomes between sepsis patients with or without active cancer requiring admission to intensive care units.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Feng Fang

    Full Text Available Immunoparalysis was observed in both patients with cancer and sepsis. In cancer patients, Cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 and programmed cell death protein 1/programmed death-ligand 1 axis are two key components of immunoparalysis. Several emerging therapies against these two axes gained significant clinical benefit. In severe sepsis patients, immunoparalysis was known as compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome and this has been suggested as an important cause of death in patients with sepsis. It would be interesting to see if immune status was different in severe sepsis patients with or without active cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the differences in immune profiles, and clinical outcomes between severe sepsis patients with or without cancer admitted to ICU.A combined retrospective and prospective observational study from a cohort of adult sepsis patients admitted to three medical ICUs at Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Hospital in Taiwan between August 2013 and June 2016.Of the 2744 patients admitted to the ICU, 532 patients with sepsis were included. Patients were divided into those with or without active cancer according to their medical history. Of the 532 patients, 95 (17.9% patients had active cancer, and 437 (82.1% patients had no active cancer history. Patients with active cancer were younger (p = 0.001 and were less likely to have diabetes mellitus (p < 0.001, hypertension (p < 0.001, coronary artery disease (p = 0.004, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (p = 0.002 or stroke (p = 0.002 compared to patients without active cancer. Patients with active cancer also exhibited higher baseline lactate levels (p = 0.038, and higher baseline plasma interleukin (IL-10 levels (p = 0.040, higher trend of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF (p = 0.004 compared to patients without active cancer. The 14-day, 28-day and 90-day mortality rates were higher for patients with active cancer than those without active cancer

  3. Targeting beta- and alpha-adrenergic receptors differentially shifts Th1, Th2, and inflammatory cytokine profiles in immune organs to attenuate adjuvant arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dianne eLorton

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The sympathetic nervous system (SNS regulates host defense responses and restores homeostasis. SNS-immune regulation is altered in rheumatoid arthritis (RA and rodent models of RA, characterized by nerve remodeling in immune organs and defective adrenergic receptor (AR signaling to immune cell targets that typically promotes or suppresses inflammation via α- and β2-AR activation, respectively, and indirectly drives humoral immunity by blocking Th1 cytokine secretion. Here, we investigate how β2-AR stimulation and/or α-AR blockade at disease onset affects disease pathology and cytokine profiles in relevant immune organs from male Lewis rats with adjuvant-induced arthritis (AA. Rats challenged to induce AA were treated with terbutaline (TERB, a β2-AR agonist (600 μg/kg/day and/or phentolamine (PHEN, an α-AR antagonist (5.0 mg/kg/day or vehicle from disease onset through severe disease. We report that in spleen, mesenteric (MLN and draining lymph node (DLN cells, TERB reduces proliferation, an effect independent of IL-2. TERB also fails to shift Th cytokines from a Th1 to Th2 profile in spleen and MLN (no effect on IFN-γ and DLN (greater IFN-γ cells. In splenocytes, TERB, PHEN and co-treatment (PT promotes an anti-inflammatory profile (greater IL-10 and lowers TNF-α (PT only. In DLN cells, drug treatments do not affect inflammatory profiles, except PT, which raised IL-10. In MLN cells, TERB or PHEN lowers MLN cell secretion of TNF-α or IL-10, respectively. Collectively, our findings indicate disrupted β2-AR, but not α-AR signaling in AA. Aberrant β2-AR signaling consequently derails the sympathetic regulation of lymphocyte expansion, Th cell differentiation, and inflammation in the spleen, DLNs and MLNs that is required for immune system homeostasis. Importantly, this study provides potential mechanisms through which reestablished balance between α- and β2-AR function in the immune system ameliorates inflammation and joint

  4. Gene expression profiling of coelomic cells and discovery of immune-related genes in the earthworm, Eisenia andrei, using expressed sequence tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Eun Sik; Cho, Sung-Jin; Park, Soon Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The coelomic cells of the earthworm consist of leukocytes, chlorogocytes, and coelomocytes, which play an important role in innate immunity reactions. To gain insight into the expression profiles of coelomic cells of the earthworm, Eisenia andrei, we analyzed 1151 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from the cDNA library of the coelomic cells. Among the 1151 ESTs analyzed, 493 ESTs (42.8%) showed a significant similarity to known genes and represented 164 unique genes, of which 93 ESTs were singletons and 71 ESTs manifested as two or more ESTs. From the 164 unique genes sequenced, we found 24 immune-related and cell defense genes. Furthermore, real-time PCR analysis showed that levels of lysenin-related proteins mRNA in coelomic cells of E. andrei were upregulated after the injection of Bacillus subtilis bacteria. This EST data-set would provide a valuable resource for future researches of earthworm immune system.

  5. Assessment of antioxidant activity, lipid profile, general biochemical and immune system responses of Wistar rats fed with dairy dessert containing Lactobacillus acidophilus La-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, C S; Lollo, P C B; Morato, P N; Esmerino, E A; Margalho, L P; Santos-Junior, V A; Coimbra, P T; Cappato, L P; Silva, M C; Garcia-Gomes, A S; Granato, D; Bolini, H M A; Sant'Ana, A S; Cruz, A G; Amaya-Farfan, Jaime

    2016-12-01

    The viability and survival of Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 under in vitro simulated gastrointestinal in probiotic dairy dessert was assessed. In addition, the effects of regular consumption of the dessert (5g/day) on the lipid profile, immune system, and antioxidant/biochemical status of Wistar rats were also evaluated after 2weeks of treatment. Adequate counts of L. acidophilus La-5 were observed regards the viability and gastrointestinal conditions. The probiotic dairy dessert was efficient in reducing the LDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol and increased the HDL-cholesterol in serum. Aspartate amino transferase, alanine aminotransferase, total protein, albumin, heat shock proteins, immune system responses, and blood-cells counts (monocyte, lymphocyte, neutrophil and leucocyte) were not affected (p>0.05) after 15days of treatment. Overall, the probiotic dairy dessert may be a viable alternative to enhance the blood lipid profile and could be used to improve the antioxidant defenses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Molecular Profiling of Peripheral Blood Cells from Patients with Polycythemia Vera and Related Neoplasms: Identification of Deregulated Genes of Significance for Inflammation and Immune Surveillance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Thomassen, Mads

    2012-01-01

    Essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) are haematopoietic stem cell neoplasms that may be associated with autoimmune or chronic inflammatory disorders. Earlier gene expression profiling studies have demonstrated aberrant expression of genes involved...... in inflammatory responses, mainly being performed on granulocytes or CD34+ cells. Using gene expression profiling of whole blood from patients with ET (n=16), PV (n=36), and PMF (n=9), several genes involved in inflammation and immune regulation were found to be significantly deregulated. Our findings may reflect...

  7. Evaluating the Stability of RNA-Seq Transcriptome Profiles and Drug-Induced Immune-Related Expression Changes in Whole Blood.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Bowyer

    Full Text Available Methods were developed to evaluate the stability of rat whole blood expression obtained from RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and assess changes in whole blood transcriptome profiles in experiments replicated over time. Expression was measured in globin-depleted RNA extracted from the whole blood of Sprague-Dawley rats, given either saline (control or neurotoxic doses of amphetamine (AMPH. The experiment was repeated four times (paired control and AMPH groups over a 2-year span. The transcriptome of the control and AMPH-treated groups was evaluated on: 1 transcript levels for ribosomal protein subunits; 2 relative expression of immune-related genes; 3 stability of the control transcriptome over 2 years; and 4 stability of the effects of AMPH on immune-related genes over 2 years. All, except one, of the 70 genes that encode the 80s ribosome had levels that ranked in the top 5% of all mean expression levels. Deviations in sequencing performance led to significant changes in the ribosomal transcripts. The overall expression profile of immune-related genes and genes specific to monocytes, T-cells or B-cells were well represented and consistent within treatment groups. There were no differences between the levels of ribosomal transcripts in time-matched control and AMPH groups but significant differences in the expression of immune-related genes between control and AMPH groups. AMPH significantly increased expression of some genes related to monocytes but down-regulated those specific to T-cells. These changes were partially due to changes in the two types of leukocytes present in blood, which indicate an activation of the innate immune system by AMPH. Thus, the stability of RNA-seq whole blood transcriptome can be verified by assessing ribosomal protein subunits and immune-related gene expression. Such stability enables the pooling of samples from replicate experiments to carry out differential expression analysis with acceptable power.

  8. Sub-bottom profiling for large-scale maritime archaeological survey An experience-based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøn, Ole; Boldreel, Lars Ole

    2013-01-01

    of the submerged cultural heritage. Elements such as archaeological wreck sites exposed on the sea floor are mapped using side-scan and multi-beam techniques. These can also provide information on bathymetric patterns representing potential Stone Age settlements, whereas the detection of such archaeological sites...... and wrecks partially or wholly embedded in the sea-floor sediments demands the application of highresolution sub-bottom profilers. This paper presents a strategy for the cost-effective large-scale mapping of unknown sedimentembedded sites such as submerged Stone Age settlements or wrecks, based on sub...... lines; c) on-site interpretation while acquiring data; d) recognition of anomalies not due to geology. Consequently, this strategy differs from those employed in detailed studies of known wreck sites (eg. Plets et al. 2009) and from the way in which geologists map the sea floor and the geological column...

  9. Exhaustion measured by the SF-36 vitality scale is associated with a flattened diurnal cortisol profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeberg, Sara I; Eek, Frida; Lindbladh, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The possible association between stress-related exhaustion and reduced activity in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is increasingly in focus. The aim of the present study was to examine whether exhaustion measured in a non-patient population is associated with alterations in diurnal...... cortisol profile. The study population included 78 working individuals. The study group was dichotomised into exhausted and non-exhausted groups by means of the SF-36 vitality scale. Salivary cortisol was measured at three times during 1 workday: at awakening, 30min after awakening, and in the evening....... The results showed that diurnal cortisol variation was significantly reduced in exhausted individuals. The difference in cortisol variation was mainly due to lowered morning cortisol in the exhausted group. Differences in cortisol levels at each sampling time or in mean diurnal output of cortisol were...

  10. The compare psychological profiles of people based on MMPI-2’s scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Habibi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the importance of screening and identifying people at risk of mental disorders in order to determine the prevalence of mental disorders and carry out activities to the prevention and treatment, the present study aimed to compare psychological profiles of people based on MMPI-2’s scales according to birth order, age and educational level in general population of 18-80 years old. Current study is analytical- cross sectional. Statistical population included all Iranian people between 18 to 80 years old who had minimum 8 classes of education and had no history of mental illness or brain injury. Among this population, 1418 individuals were selected by ratio sampling method from Tehran, Isfahan, Mashhad, Tabriz and Shiraz cities and they were assessed by Minnesota Multiphase Personality Inventory (MMPI-2. Results showed there is significant difference between people according to their age in scales of L (Lying, D (Depression, Ma (Mania, Pt (Psychastenia, Sc(Schizophrenia, and Si(Social Introversion, and there was significant difference based on level of education in scales of F (Infrequency, K (Defensiveness, Pa (Paranoia, Pt (Psychastenia, Sc (Schizophrenia and Si (Social Introversion. However, there was no significant differences between individuals based on birth order in validity and clinical scale of MMPI-2. Education and age are important factors which can influence mental health. It can be inferred that people with high level of education in comparison of people with low educational level have fewer mental disorders and higher mental wellbeing. Furthermore, people of different ages show different patterns of mental disorders.

  11. Cognitive profiles of groups of poor readers and dyslexic children on the British Ability Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, S; Elliott, C D

    1988-11-01

    Two samples of children with reading difficulties--145 poor readers and 121 dyslexic children--were tested on the British Ability Scales (BAS). The poor readers were classified, using Rutter & Yule's (1975) criteria, into children with specific reading retardation and general reading backwardness. These children's profiles of scores on the BAS were also entered into a cluster analysis which provided some confirmation of the validity of the Rutter & Yule classification. The BAS scores of the dyslexic children were also entered into a cluster analysis. Three groups were identified: 30 with mixed visuo-spatial and linguistic processing problems, 52 with sequential processing problems, and 39 with problems in the holistic retrieval of information. It was concluded that the data lend support to the view that children with specific reading retardation, and dyslexic children in particular, are not homogeneous in their cognitive profiles. Finally, each group identified above was analysed for fit to the Lawson & Inglis (1985) principal components model of learning disability. The fit to the model for most groups was poor. It was concluded that a model which implicates left hemisphere aetiology for all LD children is inadequate. Some benefit, however, is likely to accrue from the more rigorous definition of specific subtypes, and in this endeavour the BAS appear to offer a useful advance in such assessment and identification.

  12. Large-scale investigation of human TF-miRNA relations based on coexpression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Chia-Hung; Chiang-Hsieh, Yi-Fan; Tsou, Ann-Ping; Weng, Shun-Long; Chang, Wen-Chi; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2014-01-01

    Noncoding, endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) are fairly well known for regulating gene expression rather than protein coding. Dysregulation of miRNA gene, either upregulated or downregulated, may lead to severe diseases or oncogenesis, especially when the miRNA disorder involves significant bioreactions or pathways. Thus, how miRNA genes are transcriptionally regulated has been highlighted as well as target recognition in recent years. In this study, a large-scale investigation of novel cis- and trans-elements was undertaken to further determine TF-miRNA regulatory relations, which are necessary to unravel the transcriptional regulation of miRNA genes. Based on miRNA and annotated gene expression profiles, the term "coTFBS" was introduced to detect common transcription factors and the corresponding binding sites within the promoter regions of each miRNA and its coexpressed annotated genes. The computational pipeline was successfully established to filter redundancy due to short sequence motifs for TFBS pattern search. Eventually, we identified more convinced TF-miRNA regulatory relations for 225 human miRNAs. This valuable information is helpful in understanding miRNA functions and provides knowledge to evaluate the therapeutic potential in clinical research. Once most expression profiles of miRNAs in the latest database are completed, TF candidates of more miRNAs can be explored by this filtering approach in the future.

  13. Translatome profiling: methods for genome-scale analysis of mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Helen A; Gerber, André P

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a rapidly increased appreciation of the role of translation as a key regulatory node in gene expression. Thereby, the development of methods to infer the translatome, which refers to the entirety of mRNAs associated with ribosomes for protein synthesis, has facilitated the discovery of new principles and mechanisms of translation and expanded our view of the underlying logic of protein synthesis. Here, we review the three main methodologies for translatome analysis, and we highlight some of the recent discoveries made using each technique. We first discuss polysomal profiling, a classical technique that involves the separation of mRNAs depending on the number of bound ribosomes using a sucrose gradient, and which has been combined with global analysis tools such as DNA microarrays or high-throughput RNA sequencing to identify the RNAs in polysomal fractions. We then introduce ribosomal profiling, a recently established technique that enables the mapping of ribosomes along mRNAs at near-nucleotide resolution on a global scale. We finally refer to ribosome affinity purification techniques that are based on the cell-type-specific expression of tagged ribosomal proteins, allowing the capture of translatomes from specialized cells in organisms. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these three main techniques in the pursuit of defining the translatome, and we speculate about future developments. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. PBMC transcriptome profiles identifies potential candidate genes and functional networks controlling the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRSV vaccine in Pietrain pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Aminul; Große-Brinkhaus, Christine; Pröll, Maren Julia; Uddin, Muhammad Jasim; Aqter Rony, Sharmin; Tesfaye, Dawit; Tholen, Ernst; Hoelker, Michael; Schellander, Karl; Neuhoff, Christiane

    2017-01-01

    The porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is a devastating viral disease affecting swine production, health and welfare throughout the world. A synergistic action of the innate and the adaptive immune system of the host is essential for mounting a durable protective immunity through vaccination. Therefore, the current study aimed to investigate the transcriptome profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to characterize the innate and the adaptive immune response to PRRS Virus (PRRSV) vaccination in Pietrain pigs. The Affymetrix gene chip porcine gene 1.0 ST array was used for the transcriptome profiling of PBMCs collected at immediately before (D0), at one (D1) and 28 days (D28) post PRRSV vaccination with three biological replications. With FDR <0.05 and log2 fold change ±1.5 as cutoff criteria, 295 and 115 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in PBMCs during the stage of innate and adaptive response, respectively. The microarray expression results were technically validated by qRT-PCR. The gene ontology terms such as viral life cycle, regulation of lymphocyte activation, cytokine activity and inflammatory response were enriched during the innate immunity; cytolysis, T cell mediated cytotoxicity, immunoglobulin production were enriched during adaptive immunity to PRRSV vaccination. Significant enrichment of cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, signaling by interleukins, signaling by the B cell receptor (BCR), viral mRNA translation, IFN-gamma pathway and AP-1 transcription factor network pathways were indicating the involvement of altered genes in the antiviral defense. Network analysis revealed that four network modules were functionally involved with the transcriptional network of innate immunity, and five modules were linked to adaptive immunity in PBMCs. The innate immune transcriptional network was found to be regulated by LCK, STAT3, ATP5B, UBB and RSP17. While TGFß1, IL7R, RAD21, SP1 and GZMB are likely to

  15. On the computation of a retina resistivity profile for applications in multi-scale modeling of electrical stimulation and absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizos, Kyle; RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Anderson, James; Marc, Robert; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    This study proposes a methodology for computationally estimating resistive properties of tissue in multi-scale computational models, used for studying the interaction of electromagnetic fields with neural tissue, with applications to both dosimetry and neuroprosthetics. Traditionally, models at bulk tissue- and cellular-level scales are solved independently, linking resulting voltage from existing resistive tissue-scale models as extracellular sources to cellular models. This allows for solving the effects that external electric fields have on cellular activity. There are two major limitations to this approach: first, the resistive properties of the tissue need to be chosen, of which there are contradicting measurements in literature; second, the measurements of resistivity themselves may be inaccurate, leading to the mentioned contradicting results found across different studies. Our proposed methodology allows for constructing computed resistivity profiles using knowledge of only the neural morphology within the multi-scale model, resulting in a practical implementation of the effective medium theory; this bypasses concerns regarding the choice of resistive properties and accuracy of measurement setups. A multi-scale model of retina is constructed with an external electrode to serve as a test bench for analyzing existing and resulting resistivity profiles, and validation is presented through the reconstruction of a published resistivity profile of retina tissue. Results include a computed resistivity profile of retina tissue for use with a retina multi-scale model used to analyze effects of external electric fields on neural activity.

  16. Heavy metal mediated innate immune responses of the Indian green frog, Euphlyctis hexadactylus (Anura: Ranidae): Cellular profiles and associated Th1 skewed cytokine response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayawardena, Uthpala A.; Ratnasooriya, Wanigasekara D.; Wickramasinghe, Deepthi D.; Udagama, Preethi V., E-mail: dappvr@yahoo.com

    2016-10-01

    Immune cell and cytokine profiles in relation to metal exposure though much studied in mammals has not been adequately investigated in amphibians, due mainly to lack of suitable reagents for cytokine profiling in non-model species. However, interspecies cross reactivity of cytokines permitted us to assay levels of IFNγ, TNFα, IL6 and IL10in a common anuran, the Indian green frog (Euphlyctis hexadactylus), exposed to heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Pb, at ~ 5 ppm each) under field and laboratory settings in Sri Lanka. Enumeration of immune cells in blood and melanomacrophages in the liver, assay of serum and hepatic cytokines, and Th1/Th2 cytokine polarisation were investigated. Immune cell counts indicated overall immunosuppression with decreasing total WBC and splenocyte counts while neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio increased with metal exposure, indicating metal mediated stress. Serum IL6 levels of metal exposed frogs reported the highest (~ 9360 pg/mL) of all cytokines tested. Significantly elevated IFNγ production (P < 0.05) was evident in heavy metal exposed frogs. Th1/Th2 cytokine ratio in both serum and liver tissue homogenates was Th1 skewed due to significantly higher production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, IFNγ in serum and TNFα in the liver (P < 0.01).Metal mediated aggregations of melanomacrophages in the liver were positively and significantly (P < 0.05) correlated with the hepatic expression of TNFα, IL6 and IL10 activity. Overall, Th1 skewed response may well be due to oxidative stress mediated nuclear factor κ-light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) which enhances the transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Xenobiotic stress has recently imposed an unprecedented level of threat to wildlife, particularly to sensitive species such as amphibians. Therefore, understanding the interactions between physiological stress and related immune responses is fundamental to conserve these environmental sentinels in the face of emerging eco

  17. Evaluation of Efficacy and Sedative Profiles of H1 Antihistamines by Large-Scale Surveillance Using the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norimasa Izumi

    2008-01-01

    Conclusions: The sedative properties of the H1 antihistamines obtained from VAS analysis were very similar to those of H1R occupancy from positron emission tomography (PET studies and PIR from meta-analysis. Our results indicate that large-scale surveillance using VAS might be useful to evaluate the profiles of H1 antihistamines.

  18. Extracting body image symptom dimensions among eating disorder patients: the Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Kim, Se-Kang; Wall, David

    2015-09-01

    The present study employs Profile Analysis via Multidimensional Scaling (PAMS), a procedure for extracting dimensions, in order to identify core eating disorder symptoms in a clinical sample. A large sample of patients with eating disorders (N=5193) presenting for treatment completed the Eating Disorders Inventory-2 (EDI-2; Garner, 1991), and PAMS was then employed to estimate individual profile weights that reflect the degree to which an individual's observed symptom profile approximates the pattern of the dimensions. The findings revealed three symptom dimensions: Body Thinness, Body Perfectionism, and Body Awareness. Subsequent analysis using individual level data illustrate that the PAMS profiles properly operate as prototypical profiles that encapsulate all individuals' response patterns. The implications of these dimensional findings for the assessment and diagnosis of eating disorders are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Deep sequencing-based transcriptome profiling analysis of bacteria-challenged Lateolabrax japonicus reveals insight into the immune-relevant genes in marine fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li-xin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Systematic research on fish immunogenetics is indispensable in understanding the origin and evolution of immune systems. This has long been a challenging task because of the limited number of deep sequencing technologies and genome backgrounds of non-model fish available. The newly developed Solexa/Illumina RNA-seq and Digital gene expression (DGE are high-throughput sequencing approaches and are powerful tools for genomic studies at the transcriptome level. This study reports the transcriptome profiling analysis of bacteria-challenged Lateolabrax japonicus using RNA-seq and DGE in an attempt to gain insights into the immunogenetics of marine fish. Results RNA-seq analysis generated 169,950 non-redundant consensus sequences, among which 48,987 functional transcripts with complete or various length encoding regions were identified. More than 52% of these transcripts are possibly involved in approximately 219 known metabolic or signalling pathways, while 2,673 transcripts were associated with immune-relevant genes. In addition, approximately 8% of the transcripts appeared to be fish-specific genes that have never been described before. DGE analysis revealed that the host transcriptome profile of Vibrio harveyi-challenged L. japonicus is considerably altered, as indicated by the significant up- or down-regulation of 1,224 strong infection-responsive transcripts. Results indicated an overall conservation of the components and transcriptome alterations underlying innate and adaptive immunity in fish and other vertebrate models. Analysis suggested the acquisition of numerous fish-specific immune system components during early vertebrate evolution. Conclusion This study provided a global survey of host defence gene activities against bacterial challenge in a non-model marine fish. Results can contribute to the in-depth study of candidate genes in marine fish immunity, and help improve current understanding of host

  20. Deep immune profiling by mass cytometry links human T and NK cell differentiation and cytotoxic molecule expression patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengsch, Bertram; Ohtani, Takuya; Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Bovenschen, Niels; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Wherry, E John

    2018-02-01

    The elimination of infected or tumor cells by direct lysis is a key T and NK cell effector function. T and NK cells can kill target cells by coordinated secretion of cytotoxic granules containing one or both pore-forming proteins, perforin and granulysin and combinations of granzyme (Gzm) family effector proteases (in humans: Gzm A, B, K, M and H). Understanding the pattern of expression of cytotoxic molecules and the relationship to different states of T and NK cells may have direct relevance for immune responses in autoimmunity, infectious disease and cancer. Approaches capable of simultaneously evaluating expression of multiple cytotoxic molecules with detailed information on T and NK differentiation state, however, remain limited. Here, we established a high dimensional mass cytometry approach to comprehensively interrogate single cell proteomic expression of cytotoxic programs and lymphocyte differentiation. This assay identified a coordinated expression pattern of cytotoxic molecules linked to CD8 T cell differentiation stages. Coordinated high expression of perforin, granulysin, Gzm A, Gzm B and Gzm M was associated with markers of late effector memory differentiation and expression of chemokine receptor CX3CR1. However, classical gating and dimensionality reduction approaches also identified other discordant patterns of cytotoxic molecule expression in CD8 T cells, including reduced perforin, but high Gzm A, Gzm K and Gzm M expression. When applied to non-CD8 T cells, this assay identified different patterns of cytotoxic molecule co-expression by CD56 hi versus CD56 dim defined NK cell developmental stages; in CD4 T cells, low expression of cytotoxic molecules was found mainly in TH1 phenotype cells, but not in Tregs or T follicular helper cells (TFH). Thus, this comprehensive, single cell, proteomic assessment of cytotoxic protein co-expression patterns demonstrates specialized cytotoxic programs in T cells and NK cells linked to their differentiation

  1. Consanguinity profile in the Gaza Strip of Palestine: large-scale community-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirdah, Mahmoud M

    2014-02-01

    Consanguineous marriages which have been practiced throughout history continue to be practiced within different ethnic, religious and social groups to varying degrees with highest prevalences in North Africa, Middle East and central and south Asia. In the Gaza Strip of Palestine, little is known about the consanguinity profile, so the present large-scale study aims to explore the consanguinity profile of two generations using data from the β-thalassemia premarital screening program. Sociodemographic data analysis included 156,635 (141,200 males and 15,435 females) persons and their parents, representing 141,200 couples who were referred to the Thalassemia and Hemophilia Center for premarital testing. In addition, the consanguinity characteristics of parents of 217 transfusion-dependent β-thalassemic non-sibling patients were analyzed. Results revealed a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of consanguineous (first- and second-cousin) marriages between the previous (fathers') generation (45.2%) and the current (groom/bride) generation (39.9%). Among the five governorates of the Gaza Strip, records of Gaza Governorate revealed the lowest occurrence (36.9% current generation and 42.1% previous generation) of consanguineous marriages, as compared to all others. Consanguineous marriages are significantly higher in semi-urban areas (41.6%) than in urban areas (39.1%) in the current generation (previous generation, 46.4% vs 44.7%, respectively). Compound consanguinity (two generation) and a single level of consanguinity were seen in 20.7% and 43.7%, respectively, of the cases. The average age of those with first-cousin marriages is significantly lower (22.4±4.4 years) than those with second-cousin marriages (24.3±6.1 years) and the non-consanguineous (26.5±8.2 years). The rate of consanguineous marriages among never married people (42.2%) is significantly much higher than the rate of people with multiple marriages (18.1%). About 74.7% of the non

  2. A different immunologic profile characterizes patients with HER-2-overexpressing and HER-2-negative locally advanced breast cancer: implications for immune-based therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Elena; Martorelli, Debora; Turchet, Elisa; Miolo, Gianmaria; Scalone, Simona; Comaro, Elisa; Talamini, Renato; Mastorci, Katy; Lombardi, Davide; Perin, Tiziana; Carbone, Antonino; Veronesi, Andrea; Crivellari, Diana; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of trastuzumab and taxanes is at least partly related to their ability to mediate or promote antitumor immune responses. On these grounds, a careful analysis of basal immune profile may be capital to dissect the heterogeneity of clinical responses to these drugs in patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Blood samples were collected from 61 locally advanced breast cancers (36 HER2- and 25 HER2+) at diagnosis and from 23 healthy women. Immunophenotypic profiling of circulating and intratumor immune cells, including regulatory T (Treg) cells, was assessed by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Serum levels of 10 different cytokines were assessed by multiplex immunoassays. CD8+ T cell responses to multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAA) were evaluated by IFN-γ-enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). The Student's t test for two tailed distributions and the Wilcoxon two-sample test were used for the statistical analysis of the data. The proportion of circulating immune effectors was similar in HER2+ patients and healthy donors, whereas higher percentages of natural killer and Treg cells and a lower CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratio (with a prevalence of naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells) were observed in HER2- cases. Higher numbers of circulating CD8+ T cells specific for several HLA-A*0201-restricted TAA-derived peptides were observed in HER2+ cases, together with a higher prevalence of intratumor CD8+ T cells. Serum cytokine profile of HER2+ patients was similar to that of controls, whereas HER2- cases showed significantly lower cytokine amounts compared to healthy women (IL-2, IL-8, IL-6) and HER2+ cases (IL-2, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-6, IL-10). Compared to HER2- cases, patients with HER2-overexpressing locally advanced breast cancer show a more limited tumor-related immune suppression. This may account for the clinical benefit achieved in this subset of patients with the use of drugs acting

  3. Profiling of a few immune responsive genes expressed in postlarvae of Fenneropenaeus indicus challenged with Vibrio harveyi D3

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nayak, S.; Ajay, K.M.; Ramaiah, N.; Meena, R.M.; Sreepada, R.A.

    groups with approx. 29% of the sequences having no matches in the databases. Immune related transcripts in the library were carboxypeptidase B, ferritin, translationally controlled tumor proteins (TCTP), hemocyanin, chitinase and serine carboxy peptidase...

  4. Longer response scales improved the acceptability and performance of the Nottingham Health Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleopas, Agatta; Kolly, Véronique; Perneger, Thomas V

    2006-11-01

    To test alternative response formats for the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP), in terms of acceptability, score distributions, and measurement properties. Randomized trial of four response formats for the NHP: original "yes/no" format, a 3-point similarity format ("applies completely/in part/not at all"), a 5-point intensity format ("completely true" to "completely false"), and a 5-point frequency format ("all the time" to "never"). Respondents were patients discharged from a hospital. We compared scores distributions, reliability coefficients, correlations with dimension-specific numerical scales, and patient ratings of the instrument. Response rates were similar for the four versions. The original response format had the fewest fully completed questionnaires, and the largest ceiling effects. Internal consistency and test-retest coefficients were acceptable for all versions, but were higher for the two 5-point formats. Correlations reflecting convergent and discriminant validity were higher for the longer response formats than for the original version. The frequency format received the highest ratings from patients, particularly from the sicker and older subgroups. The psychometric performance and patient acceptability of the NHP can be improved by using a 5-point frequency response format instead of the original dichotomous response format.

  5. Measuring Child Poverty in South Africa: Sensitivity to the Choice of Equivalence Scale and an Updated Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streak, Judith Christine; Yu, Derek; Van der Berg, Servaas

    2009-01-01

    This paper offers evidence on the sensitivity of child poverty in South Africa to changes in the adult equivalence scale (AES) and updates the child poverty profile based on the Income and Expenditure Survey 2005/06. Setting the poverty line at the 40th percentile of households calculated with different AESs the scope and composition of child…

  6. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents: A Concurrent Validity Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagborg, Winston J.

    1993-01-01

    Administered Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSE) and Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Adolescents to 150 adolescents in grades 8 through 12. Correlational and cross-validation multiple regression analyses found that RSE total score and both its factor scores were strongly related to Global Self-Worth. Females reported significantly lower RSE…

  7. Cyclin-dependent Kinase 8 Module Expression Profiling Reveals Requirement of Mediator Subunits 12 and 13 for Transcription of Serpent-dependent Innate Immunity Genes in Drosophila*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuluvainen, Emilia; Hakala, Heini; Havula, Essi; Sahal Estimé, Michelle; Rämet, Mika; Hietakangas, Ville; Mäkelä, Tomi P.

    2014-01-01

    The Cdk8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8) module of Mediator integrates regulatory cues from transcription factors to RNA polymerase II. It consists of four subunits where Med12 and Med13 link Cdk8 and cyclin C (CycC) to core Mediator. Here we have investigated the contributions of the Cdk8 module subunits to transcriptional regulation using RNA interference in Drosophila cells. Genome-wide expression profiling demonstrated separation of Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 profiles. However, transcriptional regulation by Cdk8-CycC was dependent on Med12-Med13. This observation also revealed that Cdk8-CycC and Med12-Med13 often have opposite transcriptional effects. Interestingly, Med12 and Med13 profiles overlapped significantly with that of the GATA factor Serpent. Accordingly, mutational analyses indicated that GATA sites are required for Med12-Med13 regulation of Serpent-dependent genes. Med12 and Med13 were also found to be required for Serpent-activated innate immunity genes in defense to bacterial infection. The results reveal a novel role for the Cdk8 module in Serpent-dependent transcription and innate immunity. PMID:24778181

  8. Symptom profile of depression in elderly: Is assessment with geriatric depression rating scale enough?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseem Mehra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the Study: This study aimed to evaluate the symptom profile, including somatic symptoms among elderly patients with first episode depression using the Geriatric depression scale (GDS-30 and Patient Health Questionnaire-15 (PHQ-15 items version scale. Additional aims were to carry out the factor analysis of symptoms reported on GDS-30 and PHQ-15 among elderly. Methodology: Seventy-nine elderly patients (age ≥60 years were evaluated on GDS-30 item Hindi version and Hindi version of the PHQ-15. Results: As per GDS-30, the most common symptom noted among elderly was “dropped many of your activities and interests” (91.1%, mind not as clear as it used (88.6%, feeling that life is empty (86.1%, bothered by thoughts you cannot get out of your head (86.1% and hard to get started on new projects (86.1%, prefer to avoid social gatherings (86.1%. All patients reported at least one somatic complaint as per PHQ-15. The most common somatic symptoms were trouble sleeping (97.5%, feeling tired or having little energy (96.2%, feeling that the heart is racing (52.9%, constipation, loose bowels, or diarrhea (49.6%, shortness of breath (46.8%, nausea, gas or indigestion (45.6%, pain in the arms, legs, or joints (43.3%, and back pain (41.8%. The prevalence of somatic symptoms was not influenced to a large extent by the demographic variables, clinical variables and presence or absence of physical comorbidity. However, the severity of somatic symptoms correlated positively with GDS-30 score. Factor analysis of Hindi version of GDS-30 yielded a four-factor solution, which was similar to many studies across the world. The addition of items of PHQ-15 items of factor analysis still yielded a four-factor solution. Factor 1 of combined GDS-30 and PHQ-15 items included items only from GDS-30 and Factor 3 and 4 included items only from PHQ-15. There was some overlap of items on Factor 2. Conclusion: The present study suggests that GDS-30 does not tap all the

  9. Exercise alters the immune profile in Tg2576 Alzheimer mice toward a response coincident with improved cognitive performance and decreased amyloid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cribbs David H

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation is associated with Aβ pathology in Alzheimer's disease (AD and transgenic AD models. Previously, it has been demonstrated that chronic stimulation of the immune response induces pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α which contribute to neurodegeneration. However, recent evidence has shown that inducing the adaptive immune response reduces Aβ pathology and is neuroprotective. Low concentrations of IFN-γ modulate the adaptive immune response by directing microglia to differentiate to antigen presenting cells. Our objective was to determine if exercise could induce a shift from the immune profile in aged (17–19 months Tg2576 mice to a response that reduces Aβ pathology. Methods TG (n = 29 and WT (n = 27 mice were divided into sedentary (SED and exercised (RUN groups. RUN animals were provided an in-cage running wheel for 3 weeks. Tissue was harvested and hippocampus and cortex dissected out. Quantitative data was analyzed using 2 × 2 ANOVA and student's t-tests. Results IL-1β and TNF-α were significantly greater in hippocampi from sedentary Tg2576 (TGSED mice than in wildtype (WTSED (p = 0.04, p = 0.006. Immune response proteins IFN-γ and MIP-1α are lower in TGSED mice than in WTSED (p = 0.03, p = 0.07. Following three weeks of voluntary wheel running, IL-1β and TNF-α decreased to levels indistinguishable from WT. Concurrently, IFN-γ and MIP-1α increased in TGRUN. Increased CD40 and MHCII, markers of antigen presentation, were observed in TGRUN animals compared to TGSED, as well as CD11c staining in and around plaques and vasculature. Additional vascular reactivity observed in TGRUN is consistent with an alternative activation immune pathway, involving perivascular macrophages. Significant decreases in soluble Aβ40 (p = 0.01 and soluble fibrillar Aβ (p = 0.01 were observed in the exercised transgenic animals. Conclusion Exercise shifts the immune response from innate to an adaptive or

  10. Transcriptome and Expression Profiling Analysis of the Hemocytes Reveals a Large Number of Immune-Related Genes in Mud Crab Scylla paramamosain during Vibrio parahaemolyticus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Chuping; Chen, Yaping; Sun, Wanwei; Ding, Jun; Zhou, Lizhen; Wang, Shasha; Wang, Shuqi; Zhang, Yueling; Zhu, Dashi; Wen, Xiaobo; Hu, Songnian; Li, Shengkang

    2014-01-01

    Background Mud crab Scylla paramamosain is an economically important marine species in China. However, frequent outbreaks of infectious diseases caused by marine bacteria, such as Vibrio parahaemolyticus, result in great economic losses. Methodology/Principal Findings Comparative de novo transcriptome analysis of S. paramamosain infected with V. parahaemolyticus was carried out to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the immune response to pathogenic bacteria by using the Illumina paired-end sequencing platform. A total of 52,934,042 clean reads from the hemocytes of V. parahaemolyticus-infected mud crabs and controls were obtained and assembled into 186,193 contigs. 59,120 unigenes were identified from 81,709 consensus sequences of mud crabs and 48,934 unigenes were matched proteins in the Nr or Swissprot databases. Among these, 10,566 unigenes belong to 3 categories of Gene Ontology, 25,349 to 30 categories of KEGG, and 15,191 to 25 categories of COG database, covering almost all functional categories. By using the Solexa/Illumina's DGE platform, 1213 differentially expressed genes (P<0.05), including 538 significantly up-regulated and 675 down-regulated, were detected in V. parahaemolyticus-infected crabs as compared to that in the controls. Transcript levels of randomly-chosen genes were further measured by quantitative real-time PCR to confirm the expression profiles. Many differentially expressed genes are involved in various immune processes, including stimulation of the Toll pathway, Immune Deficiency (IMD) pathway, Ras-regulated endocytosis, and proPO-activating system. Conclusions/Significance Analysis of the expression profile of crabs under infection provides invaluable new data for biological research in S. paramamosain, such as the identification of novel genes in the hemocytes during V. parahaemolyticus infection. These results will facilitate our comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms involved in the immune response to bacterial

  11. Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores and profiles in African American adolescents involved with the juvenile justice system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worrell, Frank C; Andretta, James R; Woodland, Malcolm H

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we examined the internal consistency and structural validity of Cross Racial Identity Scale (CRIS) scores in a sample of 477 African American adolescents who had been arrested in a city in the mid-Atlantic. Using cluster analysis, we also identified profiles of CRIS scores and compared adolescents with different profiles on Major Depressive Episode, Manic Episode, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder scores. Results indicated that CRIS subscale scores were reliable, and the 6-factor structure of the CRIS was supported. Five nigrescence profiles were identified: Miseducation-Pro-Black, Conflicted-Self-Hatred, Multiculturalist, Low Race Salience, and Conflicted-Anti-White. Individuals with Conflicted-Self-Hatred profiles reported significantly and meaningfully higher scores on the 4 syndromes than did their peers, and individuals with the Multiculturalist and Low Race Salience profiles reported the lowest scores. A greater percentage of individuals with Conflicted racial identity profiles had syndrome scores in the clinically significant range. The results of this study demonstrate that some of the nigrescence profiles found in college-age students generalize to adolescents. The implications of the findings for theory, research, and practice are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Reliability and validity of observer ratings of pain using the visual analog scale (VAS) in infants undergoing immunization injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddio, Anna; O'Brien, Lisa; Ipp, Moshe; Stephens, Derek; Goldbach, Morton; Koren, Gideon

    2009-12-15

    We tested the reliability and validity of observer-rated pain in infants undergoing immunization using the visual analog scale (VAS). Pain was assessed in real time and later, from videotapes, in 120 1-year-old infants participating in a double-blind randomized controlled trial of amethocaine vs. placebo. Altogether, 2 (1 physician, 1 non-physician) of 4 raters [2 physicians, 2 non-physicians (nurse and graduate student)] independently assessed baseline and vaccine injection pain using a 100mm unmarked VAS line. Intra- and inter-rater reliability, assessed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), ranged from 0.69 to 0.91 and 0.55 to 0.97, respectively. Bland-Altman plots demonstrated no evidence of bias between real time and video assessments. When scores were dichotomized into 2 groups (no pain and pain) using a cut-off of >or=30mm, intra-rater reliability ranged from 0.35 to 0.92. The percent of scores deviating by >20mm was 4.5-14.29%. Criterion validity was demonstrated by correlations between the VAS and Modified Behavioural Pain Scale, a validated observational measure; (rho: 0.81-0.94). Injection scores were lower in the amethocaine group, when comparing difference (baseline-injection) or dichotomized scores; significance (pVAS as an outcome measure for acute procedural pain in infants. However, different conclusions may be reached about the effectiveness of analgesic interventions depending on the rater. Sources of variability include use of multiple raters, rater focus (procedure vs. child) and experience level.

  13. Equation of state, universal profiles, scaling and macroscopic quantum effects in warm dark matter galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, H.J. de [Sorbonne Universites, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie UPMC Paris VI, LPTHE CNRS UMR 7589, Paris Cedex 05 (France); Sanchez, N.G. [Observatoire de Paris PSL Research University, Sorbonne Universites UPMC Paris VI, Observatoire de Paris, LERMA CNRS UMR 8112, Paris (France)

    2017-02-15

    The Thomas-Fermi approach to galaxy structure determines self-consistently and non-linearly the gravitational potential of the fermionic warm dark matter (WDM) particles given their quantum distribution function f(E). This semiclassical framework accounts for the quantum nature and high number of DM particles, properly describing gravitational bounded and quantum macroscopic systems as neutron stars, white dwarfs and WDM galaxies. We express the main galaxy magnitudes as the halo radius r{sub h}, mass M{sub h}, velocity dispersion and phase space density in terms of the surface density which is important to confront to observations. From these expressions we derive the general equation of state for galaxies, i.e., the relation between pressure and density, and provide its analytic expression. Two regimes clearly show up: (1) Large diluted galaxies for M{sub h} >or similar 2.3 x 10{sup 6} M {sub CircleDot} and effective temperatures T{sub 0} > 0.017 K described by the classical self-gravitating WDM Boltzman gas with a space-dependent perfect gas equation of state, and (2) Compact dwarf galaxies for 1.6 x 10{sup 6} M {sub CircleDot} >or similar M{sub h} >or similar M{sub h,min} ≅ 3.10 x 10{sup 4} (2 keV/m){sup (16)/(5)} M {sub CircleDot}, T{sub 0} < 0.011 K described by the quantum fermionic WDM regime with a steeper equation of state close to the degenerate state. In particular, the T{sub 0} = 0 degenerate or extreme quantum limit yields the most compact and smallest galaxy. In the diluted regime, the halo radius r{sub h}, the squared velocity v{sup 2}(r{sub h}) and the temperature T{sub 0} turn to exhibit square-root of M{sub h} scaling laws. The normalized density profiles ρ(r)/ρ(0) and the normalized velocity profiles v{sup 2}(r)/v{sup 2}(0) are universal functions of r/r{sub h} reflecting the WDM perfect gas behavior in this regime. These theoretical results contrasted to robust and independent sets of galaxy data remarkably reproduce the observations. For

  14. A simple and sensitive method for lipoprotein and lipids profiles analysis of individual micro-liter scale serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Fan, Baoyan; Yang, Kangmin; Zhu, Haibo

    2012-02-01

    A simple and sensitive method to determine lipoprotein and lipids profiles in micro-liter scale individual serum sample is not presently available. Traditional lipoprotein separation techniques either by ultra-centrifugation or by liquid chromatography methods have their disadvantages in both lipoprotein separation and lipids component quantification. In this study we used small volume needing size-exclusion fast protein liquid chromatography to separate different lipoprotein subclasses in 50μL serum. And lipids contents, such as cholesterol, cholesterol ester and triacylglycerol, were measured by using two different fluorescence-based lipid detection methods. With this method, very low density lipoprotein, low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein could be easily separated, and follow-up lipid detection was completed by simple kinds of reactions. Serum lipoprotein and lipids profiling from C57BL/6 mice (n=5) and human (n=5) were analyzed. The elution profiles of five individuals were highly reproducible, and there were lipoprotein and lipids distribution variations between C57BL/6 mice and human beings. In conclusion, this method which combined small volume needing size-exclusion fast protein liquid chromatography and fluorescence-based lipids measurement, provided a simple, efficient, integrity and reproducible procedure for determining serum lipoprotein and lipids profiles in micro-liter scale levels. It becomes possible that determination of lipoprotein profiles and gaining information of lipids in different lipoproteins can be accomplished simultaneously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Population differences in immune marker profiles associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type I infection in Japan and Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmann, Brenda M; Breen, Elizabeth C; Stuver, Sherri; Cranston, Beverly; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel; Falk, Kerstin I; Okayama, Akihiko; Hanchard, Barrie; Mueller, Nancy; Hisada, Michie

    2009-01-01

    The natural history of human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) has been shown to differ markedly by geographic area. The differences include contrasting patterns of risk of adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL) and HTLV-I-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP), which may be due in part to differences in host immune response to infection. To characterize variations in host immunity across populations, we compared serologic immune marker patterns in HTLV-I-endemic populations in Japan and Jamaica. We matched 204 participants with archived blood from the Miyazaki Cohort Study (Japan) and the Food Handlers Study (Jamaica)-i.e., 51 HTLV-I-positive (“carriers”) and 51 HTLV-I-negative individuals (“non-carriers”) from each population-by age, sex, and blood collection year. We compared plasma concentrations of markers of T-cell-mediated (antigen-specific) and non-specific immunity using regression models and correlation coefficients. Compared to Jamaican HTLV-I non-carriers, Japanese non-carriers had higher covariate-adjusted mean levels of T-cell activation markers, including antibody to Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 (reciprocal titer 27 v. 71, respectively, p=0.005), soluble interleukin-2 receptor-α (477 v. 623 pg/mL, p=0.0008) and soluble CD30 (34 v. 46 U/mL, p=0.0001), and lower levels of C-reactive protein (1.1 v. 0.43 μg/mL, p=0.0004). HTLV-I infection was associated with activated T-cell immunity in Jamaicans but with diminished T-cell immunity in Japanese persons. The observed population differences in background and HTLV-I-related host immunity correspond closely to the divergent natural histories of infection observed among HTLV-I carriers in Japan and Jamaica and corroborate a role for host immune status in the contrasting patterns of ATL and HAM/TSP risk. PMID:18989900

  16. Immune response and protective profile elicited by a multi-epitope chimeric protein derived from Leptospira interrogans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Luis G V; Teixeira, Aline F; Filho, Antonio F S; Souza, Gisele O; Vasconcellos, Silvio A; Heinemann, Marcos B; Romero, Eliete C; Nascimento, Ana L T O

    2017-04-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the causative agent of leptospirosis, a widely disseminated disease of human and veterinary concern. The development of vaccines that elicit cross-protective immunity through multiple leptospiral serovars has long been pursued. The aim of this study was to develop a novel chimeric multi-epitope fusion antigen, containing sequences of previously studied outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Leptospira. The chimeric protein was designed based on the amino acid sequences of the LigA, Mce, Lsa45, OmpL1, and LipL41 proteins, cloned into pAE vector, the protein expressed in Escherichia coli, and its immune response evaluated in the hamster infection model. The recombinant chimeric protein (rChi) was recognized by antibodies present in serum samples of confirmed cases of human leptospirosis and experimentally infected hamsters, demonstrating that the rChi protein participates in the immune response activation during infection. However, despite high antibody titers achieved when the rChi protein was administered with either Alhydrogel or Bordetella pertussis monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), only 50% of the hamsters were protected against infection. Although a complete characterization of the immune response elicited by rChi/adjuvant in hamsters is required, it is believed that the construction of chimeric genes is an important attempt towards the generation of an effective vaccine against leptospirosis. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Immune response and protective profile elicited by a multi-epitope chimeric protein derived from Leptospira interrogans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis G.V. Fernandes

    2017-04-01

    Conclusions: Although a complete characterization of the immune response elicited by rChi/adjuvant in hamsters is required, it is believed that the construction of chimeric genes is an important attempt towards the generation of an effective vaccine against leptospirosis.

  18. Effects of novel vaccine/adjuvant complexes on the protective immunity against Eimeria acervulina and transcriptome profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the ability of two novel adjuvant formulations, QCDC (Quil A/cholesterol/DDA/Carbopol) and QCDCR (QCDC/Bay R1005), in combination with a recombinant profilin vaccine, to modulate host protective immunity and to alter gene expression during experimental avian coccidiosis. Vac...

  19. Differing activation status and immune effector molecule expression profiles of neonatal and maternal lymphocytes in an African population.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelmann, I.; Moeller, U.; Santamaria, A.; Kremsner, P.G.; Luty, A.J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Higher susceptibility of newborns to infections has been attributed to the hypo-responsiveness of their cellular immune system. Here we compared the activation status and expression of cytokines and cytotoxic molecules of cord versus maternal peripheral blood mononuclear cells in an African

  20. Differential profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity between endocervical and vaginal secretions from women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Rhoda; Kraus, Thomas A; Ding, Jian; Veretennikova, Alina; Lorde-Rollins, Elizabeth; Singh, Tricia; Lo, Yungtai; Quayle, Alison J; Chang, Theresa L

    2013-09-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis infection is one of the most prevalent bacterial STIs in the USA and worldwide, and women with C. trachomatis infection are at increased risk of acquiring HIV. Because immune activation at the genital mucosa facilitates HIV/SIV infection, C. trachomatis-mediated cytokine induction may contribute to increased HIV transmission in asymptomatic women. To begin to elucidate the mechanisms, we longitudinally analyzed profiles of innate immune factors and HIV infectivity in genital secretions from anatomically specific sites in asymptomatic women during C. trachomatis infection and post-antibiotic treatment. We found higher levels of cytokines and chemokines in endocervical secretions than vaginal secretions. Compared with the convalescent state, G-CSF, IL-1α, and RANTES were elevated in endocervical secretions, IFN-γ and TNF-α were elevated in vaginal secretions, and IFNγ, IL-1β, and MIP1-α were elevated in cervicolavage fluid (CVL), before adjustment of multiple comparisons. Elevated endocervical levels of IP-10 and MCP-1 were associated with the use of hormonal contraception in infected women after successful treatment, suggesting the role of hormonal contraception in inflammation independent of STIs. Importantly, soluble factors found in endocervical secretions during infection enhanced HIV infectivity while no difference in HIV infectivity was found with vaginal secretions or CVL during infection or at convalescence. Taken together, the profiles of immune mediators and in vitro HIV infectivity indicate that the endocervical and vaginal mucosa are immunologically distinct. Our results underscore the importance of considering anatomical site and local sampling methodology when measuring mucosal responses, particularly in the presence of C. trachomatis infection. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Immune-Inflammatory Cell Profile and Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa B Ligand/Osteoprotegerin Expression in Persistent Apical Periodontitis after Root Canal Retreatment Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrela, Carlos; Decurcio, Daniel de Almeida; Silva, Júlio Almeida; Batista, Aline Carvalho; de Souza Lima, Nathália Caroline; de Freitas Silva, Brunno Santos; de Souza, João Antonio Chaves; Souza Costa, Carlos Alberto

    2016-03-01

    This study assessed the immune-inflammatory profile and the expression of bone resorption activators receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL) and inhibitor osteoprotegerin (OPG) in apical periodontitis (n = 20) that persisted after root canal retreatment. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize lymphocyte populations (CD3+, CD45RO+, CD8+, and FoxP3+ cells), macrophages (CD68+), RANKL+ and OPG+ cells in persistent apical periodontitis (PAP) and primary periapical lesions (PPLs). By using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, the mRNA expression of RANKL and OPG in PAP and periodontal ligament from healthy teeth was comparatively analyzed. The data were analyzed by Mann-Whitney, Pearson χ2, and Wilcoxon tests (5% level). PAP showed an elevated number of FoxP3+ cells compared with PPL (P .05 for all comparisons). No differences in the RANKL, OPG, and immune-inflammatory cells were demonstrated when comparing PAP microscopically classified as cyst with those classified as granulomas (P > .05 for all comparisons). The assessment of mRNA expression revealed higher levels of RANKL and OPG in PAP compared with the periodontal ligament from healthy teeth (control) samples (P < .001). Also, a greater expression of RANKL in comparison with OPG was observed in PAP (P < .001). These findings indicate that PAP consists of biologically active lesions that demonstrate potential of bone resorption (higher expression of RANKL) and is characterized by an immune-inflammatory cell profile that suggests a suppressive and regulatory environment (higher number of FoxP3+ cells and lower number of macrophages) favorable to more chronic clinical behavior. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Metabolic Profiling of Geobacter sulfurreducens during Industrial Bioprocess Scale-Up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muhamadali, Howbeer; Xu, Yun; Ellis, David I; Allwood, J William; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Correa, Elon; Alrabiah, Haitham; Lloyd, Jonathan R; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-01-01

    During the industrial scale-up of bioprocesses it is important to establish that the biological system has not changed significantly when moving from small laboratory-scale shake flasks or culturing...

  3. The fight-or-flight response is associated with PBMC expression profiles related to immune defence and recovery in swine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oster

    Full Text Available Defining phenotypes according to molecular features would promote the knowledge of functional traits like behaviour in both human and animal research. Beside physiological states or environmental factors, an innate predisposition of individual coping strategies was discussed, including the proactive and reactive pattern. According to backtest reactivity, animals assigned as high-resisting (proactive and low-resisting (reactive were immune challenged with tetanus toxoid in a time course experiment. Using the Affymetrix platform and qPCR, individual coping characteristics were reflected as gene expression signatures in porcine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC at naïve state (day 0 and in response to the model antigen (day 14, day 28, and day 140. Further, the blood cell count was analysed at all stages. On the transcriptional level, processes acting on cell communication, vasculogenesis, and blood coagulation were highlighted in high-resisting animals at naïve state (day 0, temporarily blurred due to immune challenge (day 14 but subsequently restored and intensified (day 28. Notably, similar amounts of white and red blood cells, platelets and haematocrit between high-resisting and low-resisting samples suggest coping-specific expression patterns rather than alterations in blood cell distribution. Taken together, the gene expression patterns indicate that proactive pigs might favour molecular pathways enabling an effective strategy for defence and recovery. This corroborates the previously suggested belief, that proactive animals are prone to an increased number of injuries as an evolutionary inherited mechanism. In contrast to previous assumptions, coping-specific immunity in pigs lacks inherited shifts between cellular and humoral immune responses.

  4. Immune response and protective profile elicited by a multi-epitope chimeric protein derived from Leptospira interrogans

    OpenAIRE

    Luis G.V. Fernandes; Teixeira, Aline F.; Antonio F.S. Filho; Gisele O. Souza; Silvio A. Vasconcellos; Marcos B Heinemann; Eliete C. ROMERO; Nascimento, Ana L. T. O.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Pathogenic Leptospira is the causative agent of leptospirosis, a widely disseminated disease of human and veterinary concern. The development of vaccines that elicit cross-protective immunity through multiple leptospiral serovars has long been pursued. The aim of this study was to develop a novel chimeric multi-epitope fusion antigen, containing sequences of previously studied outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of Leptospira. Methods: The chimeric protein was designed based on th...

  5. Transcriptome profiling analysis on whole bodies of microbial challenged Eriocheir sinensis larvae for immune gene identification and SNP development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia Cui

    Full Text Available To study crab immunogenetics of individuals, newly hatched Eriocheir sinensis larvae were stimulated with a mixture of three pathogen strains (Gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus luteus, Gram-negative bacteria Vibrio alginolyticus and fungi Pichia pastoris; 10(8 cfu·mL(-1. A total of 44,767,566 Illumina clean reads corresponding to 4.52 Gb nucleotides were generated and assembled into 100,252 unigenes (average length: 1,042 bp; range: 201-19,357 bp. 17,097 (26.09% of 65,535 non-redundant unigenes were annotated in NCBI non-redundant protein (Nr database. Moreover, 23,188 (35.38% unigenes were assigned to three Gene Ontology (GO categories, 15,071 (23.00% to twenty-six Clusters of orthologous Groups (COG and 8,574 (13.08% to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways, respectively. Numerous genes were further identified to be associated with multiple immune pathways, including Toll, immune deficiency (IMD, janus kinase (JAK-signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways. Some of them, such as tumor necrosis factor receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP, JNK-interacting protein 1 (JIP1, were first identified in E. sinensis. TRAF6 was even first discovered in crabs. Additionally, 49,555 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs were developed from over 13,309 unigenes. This is the first transcriptome report of whole bodies of E. sinensis larvae after immune challenge. Data generated here not only provide detail information to identify novel genes in genome reference-free E. sinensis, but also facilitate our understanding on host immunity and defense mechanism of the crab at whole transcriptome level.

  6. Immune profile and Epstein-Barr virus infection in acute interstitial nephritis: an immunohistochemical study in 78 patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mansur, Abdurrezagh

    2011-01-01

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) is a common cause of acute kidney injury and is characterised by a dense interstitial cellular infiltrate, which has not been well defined. Previous studies have demonstrated a correlation between Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection and AIN. The purpose of our study was to define the nature of the interstitial immune infiltrate and to investigate the possibility of renal infection with EBV.

  7. Profiling of Measles-Specific Humoral Immunity in Individuals Following Two Doses of MMR Vaccine Using Proteome Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iana H. Haralambieva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Comprehensive evaluation of measles-specific humoral immunity after vaccination is important for determining new and/or additional correlates of vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. Methods: We used a novel proteome microarray technology and statistical modeling to identify factors and models associated with measles-specific functional protective immunity in 150 measles vaccine recipients representing the extremes of neutralizing antibody response after two vaccine doses. Results: Our findings demonstrate a high seroprevalence of antibodies directed to the measles virus (MV phosphoprotein (P, nucleoprotein (N, as well as antibodies to the large polymerase (L protein (fragment 1234 to 1900 AA. Antibodies to these proteins, in addition to anti-F antibodies (and, to a lesser extent, anti-H antibodies, were correlated with neutralizing antibody titer and/or were associated with and predictive of neutralizing antibody response. Conclusion: Our results identify antibodies to specific measles virus proteins and statistical models for monitoring and assessment of measles-specific functional protective immunity in vaccinated individuals.

  8. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A Induce a Distinctive Profile on Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells through Transcriptional Modulation of Genes Associated With Essential Processes of the Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina A. García-González

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the use of tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDCs as a potential target for immunotherapy. However, the molecular bases that drive the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs toward a tolerogenic state are still poorly understood. Here, we studied the transcriptional profile of moDCs from healthy subjects, modulated with dexamethasone (Dex and activated with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA, referred to as Dex-modulated and MPLA-activated DCs (DM-DCs, as an approach to identify molecular regulators and pathways associated with the induction of tolerogenic properties in tolDCs. We found that DM-DCs exhibit a distinctive transcriptional profile compared to untreated (DCs and MPLA-matured DCs. Differentially expressed genes downregulated by DM included MMP12, CD1c, IL-1B, and FCER1A involved in DC maturation/inflammation and genes upregulated by DM included JAG1, MERTK, IL-10, and IDO1 involved in tolerance. Genes related to chemotactic responses, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, fatty acid oxidation, metal homeostasis, and free radical scavenging were strongly enriched, predicting the activation of alternative metabolic processes than those driven by counterpart DCs. Furthermore, we identified a set of genes that were regulated exclusively by the combined action of Dex and MPLA, which are mainly involved in the control of zinc homeostasis and reactive oxygen species production. These data further support the important role of metabolic processes on the control of the DC-driven regulatory immune response. Thus, Dex and MPLA treatments modify gene expression in moDCs by inducing a particular transcriptional profile characterized by the activation of tolerance-associated genes and suppression of the expression of inflammatory genes, conferring the potential to exert regulatory functions and immune response modulation.

  9. Dexamethasone and Monophosphoryl Lipid A Induce a Distinctive Profile on Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells through Transcriptional Modulation of Genes Associated With Essential Processes of the Immune Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Paulina A; Schinnerling, Katina; Sepúlveda-Gutiérrez, Alejandro; Maggi, Jaxaira; Mehdi, Ahmed M; Nel, Hendrik J; Pesce, Bárbara; Larrondo, Milton L; Aravena, Octavio; Molina, María C; Catalán, Diego; Thomas, Ranjeny; Verdugo, Ricardo A; Aguillón, Juan C

    2017-01-01

    There is growing interest in the use of tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDCs) as a potential target for immunotherapy. However, the molecular bases that drive the differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs (moDCs) toward a tolerogenic state are still poorly understood. Here, we studied the transcriptional profile of moDCs from healthy subjects, modulated with dexamethasone (Dex) and activated with monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA), referred to as Dex-modulated and MPLA-activated DCs (DM-DCs), as an approach to identify molecular regulators and pathways associated with the induction of tolerogenic properties in tolDCs. We found that DM-DCs exhibit a distinctive transcriptional profile compared to untreated (DCs) and MPLA-matured DCs. Differentially expressed genes downregulated by DM included MMP12, CD1c, IL-1B, and FCER1A involved in DC maturation/inflammation and genes upregulated by DM included JAG1, MERTK, IL-10, and IDO1 involved in tolerance. Genes related to chemotactic responses, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, fatty acid oxidation, metal homeostasis, and free radical scavenging were strongly enriched, predicting the activation of alternative metabolic processes than those driven by counterpart DCs. Furthermore, we identified a set of genes that were regulated exclusively by the combined action of Dex and MPLA, which are mainly involved in the control of zinc homeostasis and reactive oxygen species production. These data further support the important role of metabolic processes on the control of the DC-driven regulatory immune response. Thus, Dex and MPLA treatments modify gene expression in moDCs by inducing a particular transcriptional profile characterized by the activation of tolerance-associated genes and suppression of the expression of inflammatory genes, conferring the potential to exert regulatory functions and immune response modulation.

  10. Ribosome profiling: a Hi-Def monitor for protein synthesis at the genome-wide scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Audrey M; Baranov, Pavel V

    2013-01-01

    Ribosome profiling or ribo-seq is a new technique that provides genome-wide information on protein synthesis (GWIPS) in vivo. It is based on the deep sequencing of ribosome protected mRNA fragments allowing the measurement of ribosome density along all RNA molecules present in the cell. At the same time, the high resolution of this technique allows detailed analysis of ribosome density on individual RNAs. Since its invention, the ribosome profiling technique has been utilized in a range of studies in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Several studies have adapted and refined the original ribosome profiling protocol for studying specific aspects of translation. Ribosome profiling of initiating ribosomes has been used to map sites of translation initiation. These studies revealed the surprisingly complex organization of translation initiation sites in eukaryotes. Multiple initiation sites are responsible for the generation of N-terminally extended and truncated isoforms of known proteins as well as for the translation of numerous open reading frames (ORFs), upstream of protein coding ORFs. Ribosome profiling of elongating ribosomes has been used for measuring differential gene expression at the level of translation, the identification of novel protein coding genes and ribosome pausing. It has also provided data for developing quantitative models of translation. Although only a dozen or so ribosome profiling datasets have been published so far, they have already dramatically changed our understanding of translational control and have led to new hypotheses regarding the origin of protein coding genes. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23696005

  11. IRIS Si iv LINE PROFILES: AN INDICATION FOR THE PLASMOID INSTABILITY DURING SMALL-SCALE MAGNETIC RECONNECTION ON THE SUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Innes, D. E.; Guo, L.-J. [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, D-37077 Göttingen (Germany); Huang, Y.-M.; Bhattacharjee, A., E-mail: innes@mps.mpg.de [Max Planck/Princeton Center for Plasma Physics, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2015-11-10

    Our understanding of the process of fast reconnection has undergone a dramatic change in the last 10 years driven, in part, by the availability of high-resolution numerical simulations that have consistently demonstrated the break-up of current sheets into magnetic islands, with reconnection rates that become independent of Lundquist number, challenging the belief that fast magnetic reconnection in flares proceeds via the Petschek mechanism which invokes pairs of slow-mode shocks connected to a compact diffusion region. The reconnection sites are too small to be resolved with images, but these reconnection mechanisms, Petschek and the plasmoid instability, have reconnection sites with very different density and velocity structures and so can be distinguished by high-resolution line-profile observations. Using IRIS spectroscopic observations we obtain a survey of typical line profiles produced by small-scale events thought to be reconnection sites on the Sun. Slit-jaw images are used to investigate the plasma heating and re-configuration at the sites. A sample of 15 events from 2 active regions is presented. The line profiles are complex with bright cores and broad wings extending to over 300 km s{sup −1}. The profiles can be reproduced with the multiple magnetic islands and acceleration sites that characterize the plasmoid instability but not by bi-directional jets that characterize the Petschek mechanism. This result suggests that if these small-scale events are reconnection sites, then fast reconnection proceeds via the plasmoid instability, rather than the Petschek mechanism during small-scale reconnection on the Sun.

  12. CATMA, a comprehensive genome-scale resource for silencing and transcript profiling of Arabidopsis genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreau Yves

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Complete Arabidopsis Transcript MicroArray (CATMA initiative combines the efforts of laboratories in eight European countries 1 to deliver gene-specific sequence tags (GSTs for the Arabidopsis research community. The CATMA initiative offers the power and flexibility to regularly update the GST collection according to evolving knowledge about the gene repertoire. These GST amplicons can easily be reamplified and shared, subsets can be picked at will to print dedicated arrays, and the GSTs can be cloned and used for other functional studies. This ongoing initiative has already produced approximately 24,000 GSTs that have been made publicly available for spotted microarray printing and RNA interference. Results GSTs from the CATMA version 2 repertoire (CATMAv2, created in 2002 were mapped onto the gene models from two independent Arabidopsis nuclear genome annotation efforts, TIGR5 and PSB-EuGène, to consolidate a list of genes that were targeted by previously designed CATMA tags. A total of 9,027 gene models were not tagged by any amplified CATMAv2 GST, and 2,533 amplified GSTs were no longer predicted to tag an updated gene model. To validate the efficacy of GST mapping criteria and design rules, the predicted and experimentally observed hybridization characteristics associated to GST features were correlated in transcript profiling datasets obtained with the CATMAv2 microarray, confirming the reliability of this platform. To complete the CATMA repertoire, all 9,027 gene models for which no GST had yet been designed were processed with an adjusted version of the Specific Primer and Amplicon Design Software (SPADS. A total of 5,756 novel GSTs were designed and amplified by PCR from genomic DNA. Together with the pre-existing GST collection, this new addition constitutes the CATMAv3 repertoire. It comprises 30,343 unique amplified sequences that tag 24,202 and 23,009 protein-encoding nuclear gene models in the TAIR6 and Eu

  13. Biomarker Analysis Revealed Distinct Profiles of Innate and Adaptive Immunity in Infants with Ocular Lesions of Congenital Toxoplasmosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Anderson Silva; Carneiro, Ana Carolina Aguiar Vasconcelos; Béla, Samantha Ribeiro; Andrade, Gláucia Manzan Queiroz; Vasconcelos-Santos, Daniel Vitor; Januário, José Nélio; Coelho-dos-Reis, Jordana G.; Ferro, Eloisa Amália Vieira; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Vitor, Ricardo Wagner Almeida; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; —UFMG-CTBG, UFMG Congenital Toxoplasmosis Brazilian Group

    2014-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is the main infectious cause of human posterior retinochoroiditis, the most frequent clinical manifestation of congenital toxoplasmosis. This investigation was performed after neonatal screening to identify biomarkers of immunity associated with immunopathological features of the disease by flow cytometry. The study included infected infants without NRL and with retinochoroidal lesions (ARL, ACRL, and CRL) as well as noninfected individuals (NI). Our data demonstrated that leukocytosis, with increased monocytes and lymphocytes, was a relevant hematological biomarker of ARL. Immunophenotypic analysis also revealed expansion of CD14+CD16+HLA-DRhigh monocytes and CD56dim cytotoxic NK-cells in ARL. Moreover, augmented TCRγ δ + and CD8+ T-cell counts were apparently good biomarkers of morbidity. Biomarker network analysis revealed that complex and intricated networks underscored the negative correlation of monocytes with NK- and B-cells in NRL. The remarkable lack of connections involving B-cells and a relevant shift of NK-cell connections from B-cells toward T-cells observed in ARL were outstanding. A tightly connected biomarker network was observed in CRL, with relevant connections of NK- and CD8+ T-cells with a broad range of cell subsets. Our findings add novel elements to the current knowledge on the innate and adaptive immune responses in congenital toxoplasmosis. PMID:25328286

  14. Profiling medical school learning environments in Malaysia: a validation study of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tackett, Sean; Bakar, Hamidah Abu; Shilkofski, Nicole A; Coady, Niamh; Rampal, Krishna; Wright, Scott

    2015-01-01

    While a strong learning environment is critical to medical student education, the assessment of medical school learning environments has confounded researchers. Our goal was to assess the validity and utility of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES) for preclinical students at three Malaysian medical schools with distinct educational and institutional models. Two schools were new international partnerships, and the third was school leaver program established without international partnership. First- and second-year students responded anonymously to surveys at the end of the academic year. The surveys included the JHLES, a 28-item survey using five-point Likert scale response options, the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM), the most widely used method to assess learning environments internationally, a personal growth scale, and single-item global learning environment assessment variables. The overall response rate was 369/429 (86%). After adjusting for the medical school year, gender, and ethnicity of the respondents, the JHLES detected differences across institutions in four out of seven domains (57%), with each school having a unique domain profile. The DREEM detected differences in one out of five categories (20%). The JHLES was more strongly correlated than the DREEM to two thirds of the single-item variables and the personal growth scale. The JHLES showed high internal reliability for the total score (α=0.92) and the seven domains (α, 0.56-0.85). The JHLES detected variation between learning environment domains across three educational settings, thereby creating unique learning environment profiles. Interpretation of these profiles may allow schools to understand how they are currently supporting trainees and identify areas needing attention.

  15. Profiling medical school learning environments in Malaysia: a validation study of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean Tackett

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: While a strong learning environment is critical to medical student education, the assessment of medical school learning environments has confounded researchers. Our goal was to assess the validity and utility of the Johns Hopkins Learning Environment Scale (JHLES for preclinical students at three Malaysian medical schools with distinct educational and institutional models. Two schools were new international partnerships, and the third was school leaver program established without international partnership. Methods: First- and second-year students responded anonymously to surveys at the end of the academic year. The surveys included the JHLES, a 28-item survey using five-point Likert scale response options, the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM, the most widely used method to assess learning environments internationally, a personal growth scale, and single-item global learning environment assessment variables. Results: The overall response rate was 369/429 (86%. After adjusting for the medical school year, gender, and ethnicity of the respondents, the JHLES detected differences across institutions in four out of seven domains (57%, with each school having a unique domain profile. The DREEM detected differences in one out of five categories (20%. The JHLES was more strongly correlated than the DREEM to two thirds of the single-item variables and the personal growth scale. The JHLES showed high internal reliability for the total score (α=0.92 and the seven domains (α, 0.56-0.85. Conclusion: The JHLES detected variation between learning environment domains across three educational settings, thereby creating unique learning environment profiles. Interpretation of these profiles may allow schools to understand how they are currently supporting trainees and identify areas needing attention.

  16. Substrate controls on the longitudinal profile of bedrock channels: Implications for reach-scale roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaime R. Goode; Ellen Wohl

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we examine the relationships among bedrock properties and hydraulics in shaping bedrock channel morphology at the reach scale. The Ocoee River and four other bedrock streams in the Blue Ridge province of the southeastern United States, which have reach scale differences in bedrock erodibility controlled by lithologic and structural variation, are the...

  17. Immune suppression and immune activation in depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blume, Joshua; Douglas, Steven D; Evans, Dwight L

    2011-02-01

    Depression has been characterized as a disorder of both immune suppression and immune activation. Markers of impaired cellular immunity (decreased natural killer cell cytotoxicity) and inflammation (elevated IL-6, TNFα, and CRP) have been associated with depression. These immunological markers have been associated with other medical illnesses, suggesting that immune dysregulation may be a central feature common to both depression and to its frequent medical comorbidities. Yet the significant associations of findings of both immune suppression and immune activation with depression raise questions concerning the relationship between these two classes of immunological observations. Depressed populations are heterogeneous groups, and there may be differences in the immune profiles of populations that are more narrowly defined in terms of symptom profile and/or demographic features. There have been few reports concurrently investigating markers of immune suppression and immune activation in the same depressed individuals. An emerging pre-clinical literature suggests that chronic inflammation may directly contribute to the pathophysiology of immune suppression in the context of illnesses such as cancer and rheumatoid arthritis. This literature provides us with specific immunoregulatory mechanisms mediating these relationships that could also explain differences in immune disturbances between subsets of depressed individuals We propose a research agenda emphasizing the assessment of these immunoregulatory mechanisms in large samples of depressed subjects as a means to define the relationships among immune findings (suppression and/or activation) within the same depressed individuals and to characterize subsets of depressed subjects based on shared immune profiles. Such a program of research, building on and integrating our knowledge of the psychoneuroimmunology of depression, could lead to innovation in the assessment and treatment of depression and its medical

  18. The influence of profiled ceilings on sports hall acoustics : Ground effect predictions and scale model measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattez, Y.C.M.; Tenpierik, M.J.; Nijs, L.

    2018-01-01

    Over the last few years, reverberation times and sound pressure levels have been measured in many sports halls. Most of these halls, for instance those made from stony materials, perform as predicted. However, sports halls constructed with profiled perforated steel roof panels have an unexpected

  19. Adolescent Risk Behaviors: Studying Typical and Atypical Individuals via Multidimensional Scaling Profile Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yang; Ding, Cody

    2012-01-01

    Within the framework of problem behavior theory, the purpose of this study was to examine risk behavior profiles of typical and atypical adolescents and the differential outcomes of well-beings for these individuals in the United States. Based on the data from the survey of Health Behavior of School-Aged Children by World Health Organization,…

  20. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales: II Profile of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sabrina; Paynter, Jessica M.; Gilmore, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive behaviour is a crucial area of assessment for individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This study examined the adaptive behaviour profile of 77 young children with ASD using the Vineland-II, and analysed factors associated with adaptive functioning. Consistent with previous research with the original Vineland a distinct autism…

  1. Dysarthria Impact Profile: Development of a Scale to Measure Psychosocial Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshe, Margaret; Peach, Richard K.; Miller, Nick

    2009-01-01

    Background: The psychosocial impact of acquired dysarthria on the speaker is well recognized. To date, speech-and-language therapists have no instrument available to measure this construct. This has implications for outcome measurement and for planning intervention. This paper describes the Dysarthria Impact Profile (DIP), an instrument that has…

  2. ANALYSIS OF PIG PROFILES ON SMALL-SCALE PIG FARMERS IN MANOKWARI-WEST PAPUA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Iyai

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was aimed to determine the profiles of pig farming systems. Participatory situation analysis was employed to gain data relating to pig profiles in the urban and rural areas of Manokwari. Due to the interests of combining many correlated data, multivariate analysis using Principal Component Analysis (PCA was performed. Cluster Analysis using Agglomerative Hierarchical Clustering was applied for analysis of merge samples based on similarity in components’ composition across sites. There were various twelve classes of pig profiles in Manokwari. In principal component of the first axis correlation of several components shows strong positive relation e.g. in piglets, sows, and total herd size. Status of region in the first axis of PCA (P1 through which pigs were raised had negative correlation, including grower, household member and pig production. In the second axis (P2, negative correlations were shown in piglets, grower, boars, total herd size and the Pig Production Potential (PPP. Status of region has underpinned profiles of pigs. Several farmers were able to manage their farm continuity in a steady composition. Selling pigs was the main aim and few farmers play a role as pure breeder.

  3. Long-term aerosol study on continental scale through EARLINET vertical profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Pappalardo, Gelsomina; Linne, Holger; Wandinger, Ulla

    2015-04-01

    Lidar techniques offer the opportunity for investigating the aerosol vertical profiles, which is an important information for climatological, meteorological and air quality issues. EARLINET (European Aerosol Research Lidar Network) has been providing aerosol optical properties vertical profiles over Europe since May 2000. Long-term aerosol observations performed within EARLINET allows a climatological study of aerosol properties over Europe. All EARLINET stations perform almost simultaneously measurements three times per week following a scheduling established in 2000. Besides these climatological measurements, additional measurements are performed in order to monitor special events (as volcanic eruptions and desert dust intrusion), for satellite data evaluation and integrated studies and during intensive measurements campaigns. Aerosol optical properties vertical profiles are freely available at www.earlinet.org and through ACRIS data center http://www.actris.net/. This data are currently published on the CERA database with an associated doi number. Based mainly on Raman technique, EARLINET stations typically provide direct measurement of extinction profiles, and therefore of the aerosol optical depth (AOD), a key parameter for understanding the aerosol role on radiation budget. The free troposphere contribution to AOD and altitude of lofted layers are provided thanks to the vertical profiling capability of lidar technique. The representativeness of EARLINET regular scheduling for climatological studies is investigating through the comparison with AERONET and MODIS measurements. We find that the regular measurements schedule is typically sufficient for climatological studies. In addition lidar punctual measurements are representative for a larger area (1°x1°) in a climatological sense. Long term analysis of EARLINET profiles shows that the AOD in generally decreasing over Europe in agreement with both passive-sensors and in situ measurements. Mean vertical

  4. A specific immune and lymphatic profile characterizes the pre-metastatic state of the sentinel lymph node in patients with early cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsat, Cédric; Blacher, Silvia; Herfs, Michael; Van de Velde, Maureen; Signolle, Nicolas; Sauthier, Philippe; Pottier, Charles; Gofflot, Stéphanie; De Cuypere, Marjolein; Delvenne, Philippe; Goffin, Frédéric; Noel, Agnès; Kridelka, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The lymph node (LN) pre-metastatic niche is faintly characterized in lymphophilic human neoplasia, although LN metastasis is considered as the strongest prognostic marker of patient survival. Due to its specific dissemination through a complex bilateral pelvic lymphatic system, early cervical cancer is a relevant candidate for investigating the early nodal metastatic process. In the present study, we analyzed in-depth both the lymphatic vasculature and the immune climate of pre-metastatic sentinel LN (SLN), in 48 cases of FIGO stage IB1 cervical neoplasms. An original digital image analysis methodology was used to objectively determine whole slide densities and spatial distributions of immunostained structures. We observed a marked increase in lymphatic vessel density (LVD) and a specific capsular and subcapsular distribution in pre-metastatic SLN when compared with non-sentinel counterparts. Such features persisted in the presence of nodal metastatic colonization. The inflammatory profile attested by CD8(+), Foxp3, CD20 and PD-1expression was also significantly increased in pre-metastatic SLN. Remarkably, the densities of CD20(+) B cells and PD-1 expressing germinal centers were positively correlated with LVD. All together, these data strongly support the existence of a pre-metastatic dialog between the primary tumor and the first nodal relay. Both lymphatic and immune responses contribute to the elaboration of a specific pre-metastatic microenvironment in human SLN. Moreover, this work provides evidence that, in the context of early cervical cancer, a pre-metastatic lymphangiogenesis occurs within the SLN (pre-metastatic niche) and is associated with a specific humoral immune response.

  5. Gene expression profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with common variable immunodeficiency: modulation of adaptive immune response following intravenous immunoglobulin therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Dolcino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Regular intravenous immunoglobulin treatment is used to replace antibody deficiency in primary immunodeficiency diseases; however the therapeutic effect seems to be related not only to antibody replacement but also to an active role in the modulation of the immune response. Common variable immunodeficiency is the most frequent primary immunodeficiency seen in clinical practice. METHODS: We have studied the effect of intravenous immunoglobulin replacement in patients with common variable immunodeficiency by evaluating the gene-expression profiles from Affimetrix HG-U133A. Some of the gene array results were validated by real time RT-PCR and by the measurement of circulating cytokines and chemokines by ELISA. Moreover we performed FACS analysis of blood mononuclear cells from the patients enrolled in the study. RESULTS: A series of genes involved in innate and acquired immune responses were markedly up- or down-modulated before therapy. Such genes included CD14, CD36, LEPR, IRF-5, RGS-1, CD38, TNFRSF25, IL-4, CXCR4, CCR3, IL-8. Most of these modulated genes showed an expression similar to that of normal controls after immunoglobulin replacement. Real time RT-PCR of selected genes and serum levels of IL-4, CXCR4 before and after therapy changed accordingly to gene array results. Interestingly, serum levels of IL-8 remained unchanged, as the corresponding gene, before and after treatment. FACS analysis showed a marked decrease of CD8+T cells and an increase of CD4+T cells following treatment. Moreover we observed a marked increase of CD23⁻CD27⁻IgM⁻IgG⁻ B cells (centrocytes. CONCLUSIONS: Our results are in accordance with previous reports and provide further support to the hypothesis that the benefits of intravenous immunoglobulin therapy are not only related to antibody replacement but also to its ability to modulate the immune response in common variable immunodeficiency.

  6. Anti-inflammatory treatment for major depressive disorder: implications for patients with an elevated immune profile and non-responders to standard antidepressant therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopschina Feltes, Paula; Doorduin, Janine; Klein, Hans C; Juárez-Orozco, Luis Eduardo; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Moriguchi-Jeckel, Cristina M; de Vries, Erik FJ

    2017-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a prevalent and disabling psychiatric disease with rates of non-responsiveness to antidepressants ranging from 30–50%. Historically, the monoamine depletion hypothesis has dominated the view on the pathophysiology of depression. However, the lack of responsiveness to antidepressants and treatment resistance suggests that additional mechanisms might play a role. Evidence has shown that a subgroup of depressive patients may have an underlying immune deregulation that could explain the lack of therapeutic benefit from antidepressants. Stimuli like inflammation and infection can trigger the activation of microglia to release pro-inflammatory cytokines, acting on two main pathways: (1) activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary adrenal axis, generating an imbalance in the serotonergic and noradrenergic circuits; (2) increased activity of the enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, resulting in depletion of serotonin levels and the production of quinolinic acid. If this hypothesis is proven true, the subgroup of MDD patients with increased levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, mainly IL-6, TNF-α and IL-1β, might benefit from an anti-inflammatory intervention. Here, we discuss the pre-clinical and clinical studies that have provided support for treatment with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in depressed patients with inflammatory comorbidities or an elevated immune profile, as well as evidences for anti-inflammatory properties of standard antidepressants. PMID:28653857

  7. Evaluation of P2X7 receptor expression in peripheral lymphocytes and immune profile from patients with indeterminate form of Chagas disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Viviane do Carmo Gonçalves; Dos Santos, Joabel Tonellotto; Cabral, Fernanda Licker; Barbisan, Fernanda; Azevedo, Maria Isabel; Dias Carli, Luiz Felipe; de Avila Botton, Sonia; Dos Santos Jaques, Jeandre Augusto; Rosa Leal, Daniela Bitencourt

    2017-03-01

    Chagas disease (CD) is caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, an intracellular protozoan which is a potent stimulator of cell-mediated immunity. In the indeterminate form of CD (IFCD) a modulation between pro- and anti-inflammatory responses establishes a host-parasite adaptation. It was previously demonstrated that purinergic ecto-enzymes regulates extracellular ATP and adenosine levels, influencing immune and inflammatory processes during IFCD. In inflammatory sites ATP, as well as its degradation product, adenosine, function as signaling molecules and immunoregulators through the activation of purinergic receptors. In this work, it was analyzed the gene and protein expression of P2X7 purinergic receptor in peripheral lymphocytes and serum immunoregulatory cytokines from IFCD patients. Gene and protein expression of P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), and serum cytokines (IL-2, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) were unaltered. However, IFCD group showed significantly higher IL-4 and IL-6 levels while TNF-α was significantly decreased. These results indicate that imune profile of IFCD patients displays anti-inflammatory characteristics, consistent with the establishment of an immunomodulatory response. Further study about the molecular knowledge of P2X7R in IFCD is useful to clarify the participation of purinergic system in the regulatory mechanism which avoid the progression of CD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The role of HPV RNA transcription, immune response-related gene expression and disruptive TP53 mutations in diagnostic and prognostic profiling of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wichmann, Gunnar; Rosolowski, Maciej; Krohn, Knut; Kreuz, Markus; Boehm, Andreas; Reiche, Anett; Scharrer, Ulrike; Halama, Dirk; Bertolini, Julia; Bauer, Ulrike; Holzinger, Dana; Pawlita, Michael; Hess, Jochen; Engel, Christoph; Hasenclever, Dirk; Scholz, Markus; Ahnert, Peter; Kirsten, Holger; Hemprich, Alexander; Wittekind, Christian; Herbarth, Olf; Horn, Friedemann; Dietz, Andreas; Loeffler, Markus

    2015-12-15

    Stratification of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) based on HPV16 DNA and RNA status, gene expression patterns, and mutated candidate genes may facilitate patient treatment decision. We characterize head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) with different HPV16 DNA and RNA (E6*I) status from 290 consecutively recruited patients by gene expression profiling and targeted sequencing of 50 genes. We show that tumors with transcriptionally inactive HPV16 (DNA+ RNA-) are similar to HPV-negative (DNA-) tumors regarding gene expression and frequency of TP53 mutations (47%, 8/17 and 43%, 72/167, respectively). We also find that an immune response-related gene expression cluster is associated with lymph node metastasis, independent of HPV16 status and that disruptive TP53 mutations are associated with lymph node metastasis in HPV16 DNA- tumors. We validate each of these associations in another large data set. Four gene expression clusters which we identify differ moderately but significantly in overall survival. Our findings underscore the importance of measuring the HPV16 RNA (E6*I) and TP53-mutation status for patient stratification and identify associations of an immune response-related gene expression cluster and TP53 mutations with lymph node metastasis in HNSCC. © 2015 UICC.

  9. Influence of different types of bedding materials on immune response and serum biochemical profile of caged mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayakumar . R

    Full Text Available Contact bedding material is an important environmental factor and welfare creator for laboratory mice. It can alter important physiological process and create potential chance for experimental variation which puts hurdle for comparability. The present experiment was conducted to assess the possible impact of different types of bedding material viz CPS, NWS and PH with fifty one albino mice for a period of fifteen weeks in Laboratory Animal Facility. It was observed that local immunity in mice was enhanced in NWS. During in vitro immune assays, mice from NWS showed higher OD value for reactive oxygen radical, produced more NO2 and higher stimulation index i.e. 0.71 ± 0.01, 30.67 ± 0.88 μM and 7.90 ± 0.17, respectively than PH (0.23 ± 0.01, 17.0 ± 1.15 μM and 6.33 ± 0.21 and CPS (0.33 ± 0.03, 15.67 ± 1.20 μM and 6.46 ± 0.27. There was no influence of bedding type on systemic response. Reduced glutathione value in liver was higher in NWS than PH and CPS i.e. 8.54 ± 0.2, 7.09 ± 0.18 and 6.96 ± 0.14 μmole/ gm of tissue. But heart reduced glutathione showed no variation among different types of bedding materials. Serum analysis showed significantly (p<0.05 higher total protein and albumin value for enriched groups. But globulin value was not significantly differing for enriched and non-enriched groups. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(9.000: 417-420

  10. Injury Profiles Associated with Artisanal and Small-Scale Gold Mining in Tarkwa, Ghana

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Calys-Tagoe, Benedict N L; Ovadje, Lauretta; Clarke, Edith; Basu, Niladri; Robins, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is inherently risky, but little is known about mining-associated hazards and injuries despite the tremendous growth worldwide of ASGM and the benefits it offers...

  11. GHEP-ISFG collaborative simulated exercise for DVI/MPI: Lessons learned about large-scale profile database comparisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vullo, Carlos M; Romero, Magdalena; Catelli, Laura; Šakić, Mustafa; Saragoni, Victor G; Jimenez Pleguezuelos, María Jose; Romanini, Carola; Anjos Porto, Maria João; Puente Prieto, Jorge; Bofarull Castro, Alicia; Hernandez, Alexis; Farfán, María José; Prieto, Victoria; Alvarez, David; Penacino, Gustavo; Zabalza, Santiago; Hernández Bolaños, Alejandro; Miguel Manterola, Irati; Prieto, Lourdes; Parsons, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    The GHEP-ISFG Working Group has recognized the importance of assisting DNA laboratories to gain expertise in handling DVI or missing persons identification (MPI) projects which involve the need for large-scale genetic profile comparisons. Eleven laboratories participated in a DNA matching exercise to identify victims from a hypothetical conflict with 193 missing persons. The post mortem database was comprised of 87 skeletal remain profiles from a secondary mass grave displaying a minimal number of 58 individuals with evidence of commingling. The reference database was represented by 286 family reference profiles with diverse pedigrees. The goal of the exercise was to correctly discover re-associations and family matches. The results of direct matching for commingled remains re-associations were correct and fully concordant among all laboratories. However, the kinship analysis for missing persons identifications showed variable results among the participants. There was a group of laboratories with correct, concordant results but nearly half of the others showed discrepant results exhibiting likelihood ratio differences of several degrees of magnitude in some cases. Three main errors were detected: (a) some laboratories did not use the complete reference family genetic data to report the match with the remains, (b) the identity and/or non-identity hypotheses were sometimes wrongly expressed in the likelihood ratio calculations, and (c) many laboratories did not properly evaluate the prior odds for the event. The results suggest that large-scale profile comparisons for DVI or MPI is a challenge for forensic genetics laboratories and the statistical treatment of DNA matching and the Bayesian framework should be better standardized among laboratories. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of supplementation of different levels of selenium as nanoparticles/sodium selenite on blood biochemical profile and humoral immunity in male Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Bunglavan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the effect of supplementation of different levels of selenium as nanoparticles/sodium selenite on blood biochemical profile and humoral immunity in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: The experimental research was conducted at Division of Animal Nutrition, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar. 63 male Wistar rats were divided into 9 equal groups on the basis of their mean body weight (BW (124.3±3.1 g BW following completely randomized design. Experimental feeding was similar in all the groups except for the source and level of selenium (Se in the diet. While Group 1 (control was fed a basal diet with no Se supplementation, in Groups 2 and 3, 150 ppb Se was supplemented either as sodium selenite or Se nanoparticles, respectively. In Groups 4, 5, 6 and 7, Se was supplemented as its nanoparticles at 50%, 25%, 12.5% and 6.25% levels respectively i.e. at 75 ppb, 37.5 ppb, 18.75 ppb and 9.375 ppb levels respectively. In Groups 8 and 9, 300 ppb Se was supplemented either as Se nanoparticles or sodium selenite, respectively. Experimental feeding was conducted for a period of 91 days. At the end of the experimental trial, blood samples were collected to analyze the blood serum biochemical profile (serum glucose, serum total protein (TP, serum albumin, serum globulin, serum albumin: globulin ratio [A:G ratio], serum total cholesterol and humoral immunity. Results: The levels of serum glucose, serum TP and serum albumin were comparable (p>0.05 among the nine groups of male Wistar rats. The mean serum total cholesterol was significantly (p<0.001 lowered in all the Se supplemented Wistar rats compared to the control group. The mean serum globulin level was significantly (p<0.05 higher and A:G ratio was significantly (p<0.05 lowered in Group 3 (supplemented with 150 ppb selenium nanoparticles followed by Groups 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 as compared to the control group. The mean serum antibody titer was significantly (p<0.001 higher

  13. Mammary gene expression profiles during an intramammary challenge reveal potential mechanisms linking negative energy balance with impaired immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyes, Kasey; Drackley, J K; Morin, D E

    2010-01-01

    Our objective was to compare mammary tissue gene expression profiles during a Streptococcus uberis (S. uberis) mastitis challenge between lactating cows subjected to dietary-induced negative energy balance (NEB; n = 5) and cows fed ad libitum to maintain positive energy balance (PEB; n = 5...... feed restriction, one rear mammary quarter of each cow was inoculated with 5,000 cfu of S. uberis (O140J). At 20 h post-inoculation, S. uberis-infected mammary quarters from all cows were biopsied for RNA extraction. Energy balance (NEB vs. PEB) resulted in 287 differentially expressed genes (DEG; FDR...

  14. Caloric restriction favorably impacts metabolic and immune/inflammatory profiles in obese mice but curcumin/piperine consumption adds no further benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junpeng; Vanegas, Sally M; Du, Xiaogang; Noble, Timothy; Zingg, Jean-Marc A; Meydani, Mohsen; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Wu, Dayong

    2013-03-27

    the proportion of different CD4+ T cell subsets. CR on an HFD favorably impacts both metabolic and immune/inflammatory profiles; however, the presence of curcumin and/or piperine does not amplify CR's beneficial effects.

  15. Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Asian American > Immunizations Immunizations and Asians and Pacific Islanders Asian/Pacific Islander ... 35 months reached the Healthy People goal for immunizations for hepatitis B, MMR (measles-mumps-rubella), polio ...

  16. Comprehensive Profiling of Immune Responses in MARV Survivors Demonstrates Robust Th1-Skewing with Short Lived Neutralizing Antibody Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-29

    unprecedented scale, spanning two years and infecting more than 28,000 individuals. Previously, the largest filovirus outbreaks had numbered in the tens to...virus (BDBV) have all caused outbreaks that numbered over 100 cases – twice, in the cases of MARV and SUDV. EBOV may garner much of the attention , but

  17. A neurodegeneration-specific gene expression signature and immune profile of acutely isolated microglia from an ALS mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Isaac M.; Morimoto, Emiko T.A.; Goodarzi, Hani; Liao, Jennifer T.; O’Keeffe, Sean; Phatnani, Hemali P.; Muratet, Michael; Carroll, Michael C.; Levy, Shawn; Tavazoie, Saeed; Myers, Richard M.; Maniatis, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident immune cells of the CNS that are activated by infection, neuronal injury and inflammation. Here we utilize flow cytometry and deep RNA sequencing of acutely isolated spinal cord microglia to define their activation in vivo. Analysis of resting microglia identified 29 genes that distinguish microglia from other CNS cells and peripheral macrophages/monocytes. We then analyzed molecular changes in microglia during neurodegenerative disease activation using the SOD1G93A mouse model of ALS. We find that SOD1G93A microglia are not derived from infiltrating monocytes, and that both potentially neuroprotective and toxic factors are concurrently up-regulated, including Alzheimer’s disease genes. Mutant microglia differed from SOD1WT, LPS activated microglia, and M1/M2 macrophages, that define an ALS-specific phenotype. Concurrent mRNA/FACS analysis revealed post-transcriptional regulation of microglia surface receptors, and T cell-associated changes in the transcriptome. These results provide insights into microglia biology and establish a resource for future studies of neuroinflammation. PMID:23850290

  18. Modelling of Temperature Profiles and Transport Scaling in Auxiliary Heated Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, J.D.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    -mode) scaling with input power, . The constant heat pinch or excess temperature gradient model leads to the offset linear law for the total stored energy W with Pin, W = τinc Pin + W(0), which describes JET auxiliary heating data quite well. It also provides definitions for the incremental energy confinement...

  19. 77 FR 68104 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Socio-Economic Profile of Small-Scale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... socio-economic data about small scale fishermen and seafood dealers operating in the U.S. Caribbean. The... information sought will be collected via in- person, telephone and mail surveys. III. Data OMB Control Number... information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d...

  20. Scale-down of a high-shear pelletisation process : Flow profile and growth kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramaker, JS; Jelgersma, MA; Vonk, P; Kossen, NWF

    1998-01-01

    For the predictive modelling of the high-shear pelletisation process it is necessary to have a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Therefore, pelletisation experiments were carried out with microcrystalline cellulose and lactose in a coffee grinder (small-scale) and in a Gral 10

  1. Large-scale profiling of diterpenoid glycosides from Stevia rebaudiana using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafii, Behnaz; Vismeh, Ramin; Beaudry, Randy; Warner, Ryan; Jones, A Daniel

    2012-07-01

    The plant Stevia rebaudiana accumulates a suite of diterpenoid metabolites that are natural sweeteners finding increased use as sugar substitutes. To guide breeding of stevia plants that accumulate substances with desirable flavor in high yield, rapid and accurate methods are needed to profile these substances in plant populations. This report describes an 8-min ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for separation and quantification of seven stevia glycosides including steviolbioside; stevioside; rebaudiosides A, B, and C; rubusoside; and dulcoside as well as aglycones steviol and isosteviol. This negative mode electrospray ionization/multiple reaction monitoring method yielded low limits of detection stevia glycosides. Stevioside and Reb A, B, and C were quantified in more than 1,100 extracts from stevia leaves as part of a large-scale profiling exercise. Leaf tissue levels in this population spanned about two orders of magnitude for stevioside (2-125 mg/g dry weight), Reb A (2.5-164 mg/g), Reb B (0.5-50 mg/g), and Reb C (1.5-125 mg/g), but levels of individual metabolites exhibited independent variation. The wide spread of metabolite levels highlights the utility and importance of performing targeted metabolic profiling for large plant populations.

  2. Large-Scale Profiling of Kinase Dependencies in Cancer Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Campbell

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One approach to identifying cancer-specific vulnerabilities and therapeutic targets is to profile genetic dependencies in cancer cell lines. Here, we describe data from a series of siRNA screens that identify the kinase genetic dependencies in 117 cancer cell lines from ten cancer types. By integrating the siRNA screen data with molecular profiling data, including exome sequencing data, we show how vulnerabilities/genetic dependencies that are associated with mutations in specific cancer driver genes can be identified. By integrating additional data sets into this analysis, including protein-protein interaction data, we also demonstrate that the genetic dependencies associated with many cancer driver genes form dense connections on functional interaction networks. We demonstrate the utility of this resource by using it to predict the drug sensitivity of genetically or histologically defined subsets of tumor cell lines, including an increased sensitivity of osteosarcoma cell lines to FGFR inhibitors and SMAD4 mutant tumor cells to mitotic inhibitors.

  3. A highly sensitive and specific system for large-scale gene expression profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui-Yun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rapid progress in the field of gene expression-based molecular network integration has generated strong demand on enhancing the sensitivity and data accuracy of experimental systems. To meet the need, a high-throughput gene profiling system of high specificity and sensitivity has been developed. Results By using specially designed primers, the new system amplifies sequences in neighboring exons separated by big introns so that mRNA sequences may be effectively discriminated from other highly related sequences including their genes, unprocessed transcripts, pseudogenes and pseudogene transcripts. Probes used for microarray detection consist of sequences in the two neighboring exons amplified by the primers. In conjunction with a newly developed high-throughput multiplex amplification system and highly simplified experimental procedures, the system can be used to analyze >1,000 mRNA species in a single assay. It may also be used for gene expression profiling of very few (n = 100 or single cells. Highly reproducible results were obtained from duplicate samples with the same number of cells, and from those with a small number (100 and a large number (10,000 of cells. The specificity of the system was demonstrated by comparing results from a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7, and an ovarian cancer cell line, NCI/ADR-RES, and by using genomic DNA as starting material. Conclusion Our approach may greatly facilitate the analysis of combinatorial expression of known genes in many important applications, especially when the amount of RNA is limited.

  4. Metabolic Profile and Inflammatory Responses in Dairy Cows with Left Displaced Abomasum Kept under Small-Scaled Farm Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenja Klevenhusen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Left displaced abomasum (LDA is a severe metabolic disease of cattle with a strong negative impact on production efficiency of dairy farms. Metabolic and inflammatory alterations associated with this disease have been reported in earlier studies, conducted mostly in large dairy farms. This research aimed to: (1 evaluate metabolic and inflammatory responses in dairy cows affected by LDA in small-scaled dairy farms; and (2 establish an Animals 2015, 5 1022 association between lactation number and milk production with the outcome of metabolic variables. The cows with LDA had lower serum calcium (Ca, but greater concentrations of non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and beta-hydroxy-butyrate (BHBA, in particular when lactation number was >2. Cows with LDA showed elevated levels of aspartate aminotransferase, glutamate dehydrogenase, and serum amyloid A (SAA, regardless of lactation number. In addition, this study revealed strong associations between milk yield and the alteration of metabolic profile but not with inflammation in the sick cows. Results indicate metabolic alterations, liver damage, and inflammation in LDA cows kept under small-scale farm conditions. Furthermore, the data suggest exacerbation of metabolic profile and Ca metabolism but not of inflammation and liver health with increasing lactation number and milk yield in cows affected by LDA.

  5. Lithologic influences on groundwater recharge through incised glacial till from profile to regional scales: Evidence from glaciated Eastern Nebraska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, John B.; Steele, Gregory V.; Nasta, Paolo; Szilagyi, Jozsef

    2014-01-01

    Variability in sediment hydraulic properties associated with landscape depositional and erosional features can influence groundwater recharge processes by affecting soil-water storage and transmission. This study considers recharge to aquifers underlying river-incised glaciated terrain where the distribution of clay-rich till is largely intact in upland locations but has been removed by alluvial erosion in stream valleys. In a stream-dissected glacial region in eastern Nebraska (Great Plains region of the United States), recharge estimates were developed for nested profile, aquifer, and regional scales using unsaturated zone profile measurements (matric potentials, Cl- and 3H), groundwater tracers (CFC-12 and SF6), and a remote sensing-assisted water balance model. Results show a consistent influence of till lithology on recharge rates across nested spatial scales despite substantial uncertainty in all recharge estimation methods, suggesting that minimal diffuse recharge occurs through upland glacial till lithology whereas diffuse recharge occurs in river valleys where till is locally absent. Diffuse recharge is estimated to account for a maximum of 61% of total recharge based on comparison of diffuse recharge estimated from the unsaturated zone (0-43 mm yr-1) and total recharge estimated from groundwater tracers (median 58 mm yr-1) and water balance modeling (median 56 mm yr-1). The results underscore the importance of lithologic controls on the distributions of both recharge rates and mechanisms.

  6. Altered genes profile of renin-angiotensin system, immune system, and adipokines receptors in leukocytes of children with primary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litwin, Mieczysław; Michałkiewicz, Jacek; Trojanek, Joanna; Niemirska, Anna; Wierzbicka, Aldona; Szalecki, Mieczysław

    2013-02-01

    Renin-angiotensin system, metabolic abnormalities, and immune activity have a role in the pathogenesis of primary hypertension. We assessed the leukocyte mRNA expression of angiotensinogen, angiotensin converting enzyme, renin, angiotensin 2 type 1 receptor, CD14 molecule, adiponectin type 1 receptor, and leptin receptor in hypertensive children before and after nonpharmacological treatment. Leukocyte mRNA expression was measured by means of quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in 23 hypertensive children before and after 6 months of nonpharmacological treatment based on dietary advice and physical activities. Twenty-three normotensive children matched for age, sex, and body mass index served as a control group. Before treatment patients had elevated expression of angiotensin converting enzyme and CD14 mRNA, decreased expression of angiotensinogen and angiotensin type 1 receptor mRNA, and unchanged expression of renin, adiponectin, and leptin receptors mRNA as compared with controls. Renin mRNA negatively correlated with 24-hour mean arterial pressure and carotid intima-media thickness. Six months of nonpharmacological treatment caused decrease of blood pressure and normalization of metabolic abnormalities. Renin, adiponectin, and leptin receptors mRNA expression decreased and were lower than in control group. Changes in blood pressure, left ventricular mass, carotid intima-media thickness, body mass index, and waist circumference did not correlate with changes in the expression of renin-angiotensin system genes, CD14, leptin, and adiponectin receptors mRNA. We conclude that leukocytes of hypertensive children displayed alterations in the expression of renin-angiotensin system genes as well as those of CD14. Nonpharmacological treatment resulted in downregulation of genes involved in renin-angiotensin activation and those engaged in leukocyte responses to adipokines.

  7. Molecular profiling of aromatase inhibitor-treated postmenopausal breast tumors identifies immune-related correlates of resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbier, Anita K; Ghazoui, Zara; Anderson, Helen; Salter, Janine; Nerurkar, Ashutosh; Osin, Peter; A'hern, Roger; Miller, William R; Smith, Ian E; Dowsett, Mitch

    2013-05-15

    Estrogen withdrawal by treatment with aromatase inhibitors is the most effective form of endocrine therapy for postmenopausal estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer. However, response to therapy varies markedly and understanding of the precise molecular effects of aromatase inhibitors and causes of resistance is limited. We aimed to identify in clinical breast cancer those genes and pathways most associated with resistance to aromatase inhibitors by examining the global transcriptional effects of AI treatment. Baseline and 2-week posttreatment biopsies were obtained from 112 postmenopausal women with ER+ breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant anastrozole. Gene expression data were obtained from 81 baseline and 2-week paired samples. Pathway analysis identified (i) the most prevalent changes in expression and (ii) the pretreatment genes/pathways most related to poor antiproliferative response. A total of 1,327 genes were differentially expressed after 2-week treatment (false discovery rate < 0.01). Proliferation-associated genes and classical estrogen-dependent genes were strongly downregulated whereas collagens and chemokines were upregulated. Pretreatment expression of an inflammatory signature correlated with antiproliferative response to anastrozole and this observation was validated in an independent study. Higher expression of immune-related genes such as SLAMF8 and TNF as well as lymphocytic infiltration were associated with poorer response (P < 0.001) and validated in an independent cohort. The molecular response to aromatase inhibitor treatment varies greatly between patients consistent with the variable clinical benefit from aromatase inhibitor treatment. Higher baseline expression of an inflammatory signature is associated with poor antiproliferative response and should be assessed further as a novel biomarker and potential target for aromatase inhibitor-treated patients. ©2013 AACR

  8. Gonadotrophin stimulation in IVF alters the immune cell profile in follicular fluid and the cytokine concentrations in follicular fluid and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, Z; Schneider, S; Fux, M; Bersinger, N A; von Wolff, M

    2017-04-01

    Are the immune cell profiles and the cytokine concentrations in follicular fluid (FF) and serum at the preovulatory stage different in conventional exogenous gonadotrophin stimulated IVF (c-IVF) compared with natural cycle IVF (NC-IVF)? The cell counts of CD45+ leucocytes and T cell subpopulations and the cytokine concentrations in FF and serum are different in c-IVF compared to NC-IVF. FF-derived cells are heterogeneous. Immune cells are involved in intra-ovarian processes and cytokines are required for normal follicular development. Gonadotrophins stimulate the regulatory intrafollicular system and influence the local distribution of immune cells and the intrafollicular release of cytokines. Administration of exogenous gonadotrophins may have a significant effect on this local regulatory system, which then in turn could influence oocyte quality. The study included 105 patients, 69 undergoing c-IVF and 36 undergoing NC-IVF. c-IVF was performed by exogenous ovarian stimulation with hMG and GnRH antagonists. FF samples were collected from the first dominant follicle in c-IVF without pooling and from single leading preovulatory follicles in NC-IVF. Three different approaches were used to analyze FF samples: (i) microscopic investigation of CD45+ leucocytes, (ii) fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine CD19+ B cells and CD3+ T cells including T cell subpopulations (CD4+, CD8+), and (iii) evaluation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (INF-γ), interleukins (IL)-2, -6, -8, -10 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in matched FF and serum samples using the Bio-Plex® platform. FF obtained from c-IVF contained proportionally more CD45+ leucocytes (P = 0.0384), but fewer CD8+ cytotoxic T cells than FF from NC-IVF. CD3+ T lymphocytes were the most common type of lymphocytes, and the number thereof was comparable in the two study groups. In c-IVF, serum VEGF levels were higher (P = 0.007) than in NC-IVF while FF contained

  9. Expression profiles and interaction suggest TBK1 can be regulated by Nrdp1 in response to immune stimulation in large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong Ling; Yu, Da Hui; Chen, Jian; Fan, Sigang; Wang, Zhi Yong

    2015-10-01

    TBK1 has been extensively studied in mammals because of its important roles as a molecular bridge, linking the TLRs (TLR3 and TLR4) and RLRs signals to activate transcriptional factors IRF3 and IRF7 for IFN-I production. However, the information on molecular and functional characteristics of TBK1 in teleosts is limited. In this study, the molecular characterization and immune response of TBK1 in Larimichthys crocea (named as LcTBK1) as well as its interaction with Nrdp1 were investigated. Sequence analysis demonstrated that LcTBK1 included four functional motifs, the N-terminal protein kinase domain and ATP-binding site, middle ULD and C-terminal coiled-coil domain. The tissue expression profiles indicated that LcTBK1 gene was constitutively expressed in the twelve tissues examined, with high expression in brain. Temporal expression analysis showed that LcTBK1 mRNA was obviously increased in the liver after injection of LPS, Poly I:C and inactive Vibrio parahaemolyticus, however, declined at some time points in spleen and head-kidney. Furthermore, we found that LcTBK1 can interact with LcNrdp1, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that involved in immune response to Cryptocaryon irritans infection in L. crocea. The qPCR showed that LcNrdp1 was also significantly up-regulated in liver, down-regualted at some time points in spleen and head-kidney after LPS, Poly I:C and inactive V. parahaemolyticus injection, although the expression patterns of the two genes after the three treatments were different in change magnitude and up-regulation timespan. These results suggested that LcTBK1 was involved in L. crocea defense against the pathogen infection and can be regulated by Nrdp1 in PPRs signaling pathway of fishes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  11. Psychometric evaluation of a Swedish version of the communication strategies scale of the communication profile for the hearing impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, L R; Eriksson-Mangold, M; Carlsson, S G

    1992-06-01

    The Communication Strategies scale of the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI) was translated into Swedish and used in several studies of people with hearing impairment (Hallberg & Carlsson, in press; Hallberg, Erlandsson, & Carlsson, 1991). In this study the scale was evaluated in terms of descriptive statistics, corrected item-total correlations, principal component analysis, and internal consistency reliability. Agreement with results from American studies is surprisingly good. Normative data based on three samples are presented: a general Swedish hearing-impaired sample with predominantly sensorineural hearing loss (N = 199), a subgroup of 105 younger subjects with noise-induced hearing loss, and a subgroup of 39 older subjects with sensorineural hearing loss due to heredity and/or old age. A significantly more frequent use of maladaptive behaviors (p less than .001) and verbal communication strategies (p less than .01) was reported by older subjects with age-related and/or hereditary hearing loss than by younger subjects with noise-induced hearing loss. The Communication Strategies scale seems to be an adequately reliable and clinically useful instrument for assessing adaptive and maladaptive strategies in hearing-impaired subjects.

  12. Predicting clinical outcomes from large scale cancer genomic profiles with deep survival models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Safoora; Amrollahi, Fatemeh; Amgad, Mohamed; Dong, Chengliang; Lewis, Joshua E; Song, Congzheng; Gutman, David A; Halani, Sameer H; Velazquez Vega, Jose Enrique; Brat, Daniel J; Cooper, Lee A D

    2017-09-15

    Translating the vast data generated by genomic platforms into accurate predictions of clinical outcomes is a fundamental challenge in genomic medicine. Many prediction methods face limitations in learning from the high-dimensional profiles generated by these platforms, and rely on experts to hand-select a small number of features for training prediction models. In this paper, we demonstrate how deep learning and Bayesian optimization methods that have been remarkably successful in general high-dimensional prediction tasks can be adapted to the problem of predicting cancer outcomes. We perform an extensive comparison of Bayesian optimized deep survival models and other state of the art machine learning methods for survival analysis, and describe a framework for interpreting deep survival models using a risk backpropagation technique. Finally, we illustrate that deep survival models can successfully transfer information across diseases to improve prognostic accuracy. We provide an open-source software implementation of this framework called SurvivalNet that enables automatic training, evaluation and interpretation of deep survival models.

  13. Chromosome scale genome assembly and transcriptome profiling of Nannochloropsis gaditana in nitrogen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corteggiani Carpinelli, Elisa; Telatin, Andrea; Vitulo, Nicola; Forcato, Claudio; D'Angelo, Michela; Schiavon, Riccardo; Vezzi, Alessandro; Giacometti, Giorgio Mario; Morosinotto, Tomas; Valle, Giorgio

    2014-02-01

    Nannochloropsis is rapidly emerging as a model organism for the study of biofuel production in microalgae. Here, we report a high-quality genomic assembly of Nannochloropsis gaditana, consisting of large contigs, up to 500 kbp long, and scaffolds that in most cases span the entire length of the chromosomes. We identified 10646 complete genes and characterized possible alternative transcripts. The annotation of the predicted genes and the analysis of cellular processes revealed traits relevant for the genetic improvement of this organism such as genes involved in DNA recombination, RNA silencing, and cell wall synthesis. We also analyzed the modification of the transcriptional profile in nitrogen deficiency-a condition known to stimulate lipid accumulation. While the content of lipids increased, we did not detect major changes in expression of the genes involved in their biosynthesis. At the same time, we observed a very significant down-regulation of mitochondrial gene expression, suggesting that part of the Acetyl-CoA and NAD(P)H, normally oxidized through the mitochondrial respiration, would be made available for fatty acids synthesis, increasing the flux through the lipid biosynthetic pathway. Finally, we released an information resource of the genomic data of N. gaditana, available online at www.nannochloropsis.org.

  14. Similar Metabolic, Innate Immunity, and Adipokine Profiles in Adult and Pediatric Sepsis Versus Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome-A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavladaki, Theonymfi; Spanaki, Anna Maria; Dimitriou, Helen; Kondili, Efmorfia; Choulaki, Christianna; Georgopoulos, Dimitris; Briassoulis, George

    2017-11-01

    profiles in adult and pediatric patients, characterized by enhanced inflammatory hormonal response and by repressed innate immunity, metabolism, and myocardial contractility. These features early distinguish sepsis from systemic inflammatory response syndrome across all age groups.

  15. Whole transcriptome profiling reveals major cell types in the cellular immune response against acute and chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Huaqing; Hu, Xinran; Janowski, Andrew B; Storch, Gregory A; Su, Liyun; Cao, Lingfeng; Yu, Jinsheng; Xu, Jin

    2017-12-19

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a common human pathogen that infects over 95% of the population worldwide. In the present study, the whole transcriptome microarray data were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells from Chinese children with acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) and chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV) that were also compared with a publicly available microarray dataset from a study of American college students with AIM. Our study characterized for the first time a broad spectrum of molecular signatures in AIM and CAEBV. The key findings from the transcriptome profiling were validated with qPCR and flow cytometry assays. The most important finding in our study is the discovery of predominant γδ TCR expression and γδ T cell expansion in AIM. This finding, in combination with the striking up-regulation of CD3, CD8 and CD94, suggests that CD8+ T cells and CD94+ NK cells may play a major role in AIM. Moreover, the unique up-regulation of CD64A/B and its significant correlation with the monocyte marker CD14 was observed in CAEBV and that implies an important role of monocytes in CAEBV. In conclusion, our study reveals major cell types (particularly γδ T cells) in the host cellular immune response against AIM and CAEBV.

  16. Dynamic profiles of neutralizing antibody responses elicited in rhesus monkeys immunized with a combined tetravalent DTaP-Sabin IPV candidate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingbo; Ma, Yan; Xu, Yinhua; Yang, Huijuan; Shi, Li; Che, Yanchun; Liao, Guoyang; Jiang, Shude; Zhang, Shumin; Li, Qihan

    2014-02-19

    The World Health Organization has recommended that a Sabin inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) should gradually and synchronously replace oral polio vaccines for routine immunizations because its benefits in eliminating vaccine-associated paralytic poliomyelitis have been reported in different phases of clinical trials. It is also considered important to explore new tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis-Sabin IPV (DTaP-sIPV) candidate vaccines for possible use in developing countries. In this study, the immunogenicity of a combined tetravalent DTaP-sIPV candidate vaccine was investigated in primates by evaluating the neutralizing antibody responses it induced. The dynamic profiles of the antibody responses to each of the separate antigenic components and serotypes of Sabin IPV were determined and their corresponding geometric mean titers were similar to those generated by the tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis-conventional IPV (DTaP-cIPV), the tetravalent diphtheria, tetanus, and acellular pertussis (DTaP), and Sabin IPV vaccines in the control groups. This implies that protective immunogenic effects are conferred by this combined tetravalent formulation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Glycan and Peptide IgE Epitopes of the TNF-alpha Blockers Infliximab and Adalimumab - Precision Diagnostics by Cross-Reactivity Immune Profiling of Patient Sera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homann, Arne; Röckendorf, Niels; Kromminga, Arno; Frey, Andreas; Platts-Mills, Thomas A; Jappe, Uta

    2017-01-01

    Biological drugs like therapeutic antibodies are widely used for the treatment of various diseases like inflammatory disorders and cancer. A drawback of these novel treatments is the substantial proportion of patients experiencing adverse reactions such as loss-of-drug effect or hypersensitivity reactions. These reactions are associated with pre-existing and/or developing anti-drug antibodies. Especially IgE development is a risk factor for life-threatening systemic anaphylaxis. In order to characterize the individual drug-specific serum IgE, an IgE cross-reactivity immune profiling (ICRIP) assay was developed. Individual IgG epitopes of anti-drug antibodies against adalimumab were identified by epitope mapping via peptide microarray. ICRIP analyses of sera from patients treated with the therapeutic antibodies adalimumab (ADL) and infliximab (IFX) reveal individual, distinct IgE binding patterns. IgG epitopes were identified mostly located in the variable region of ADL. Using ICRIP and peptide microarrays for pharmacovigilance of the TNF-α blockers IFX and ADL, risk factors and biomarkers before and during therapy shall be identified. These diagnostic systems provide the basis for a safe and efficacious therapy decision for each patient in cases of adverse drug reactions mediated by different types of anti-drug antibodies.

  18. The role of antioxidant supplement in immune system, neoplastic, and neurodegenerative disorders: a point of view for an assessment of the risk/benefit profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Benedetto Giulia

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review will discuss some issues related to the risk/benefit profile of the use of dietary antioxidants. Thus, recent progress regarding the potential benefit of dietary antioxidants in the treatment of chronic diseases with a special focus on immune system and neurodegenerative disorders will be discussed here. It is well established that reactive oxygen species (ROS play an important role in the etiology of numerous diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes and cancer. Among the physiological defense system of the cell, the relevance of antioxidant molecules, such as glutathione and vitamins is quite well established. Recently, the interest of researchers has, for example, been conveyed on antioxidant enzyme systems, such as the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase system, which appears modulated by dietary antioxidant molecules, including polyphenols and beta-carotene. These systems possibly counteract oxidative damage very efficiently and finally modulate the activity of oxidative phenomena occurring, for instance, during pathophysiological processes. Although evidence shows that antioxidant treatment results in cytoprotection, the potential clinical benefit deriving from both nutritional and supplemental antioxidants is still under wide debate. In this line, the inappropriate assumption of some lipophylic vitamins has been associated with increased incidence of cancer rather than with beneficial effects.

  19. Malaria in pregnant women living in areas of low transmission on the southeast Brazilian Coast: molecular diagnosis and humoural immunity profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Domingues Hristov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on autochthonous malaria in low-transmission areas in Brazil have acquired epidemiological relevance because they suggest continued transmission in what remains of the Atlantic Forest. In the southeastern portion of the state of São Paulo, outbreaks in the municipality of Juquitiba have been the focus of studies on the prevalence of Plasmodium, including asymptomatic cases. Data on the occurrence of the disease or the presence of antiplasmodial antibodies in pregnant women from this region have not previously been described. Although Plasmodium falciparum in pregnant women has been widely addressed in the literature, the interaction of Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium malariae with this cohort has been poorly explored to date. We monitored the circulation of Plasmodium in pregnant women in health facilities located in Juquitiba using thick blood film and molecular protocols, as well as immunological assays, to evaluate humoural immune parameters. Through real-time and nested polymerase chain reaction, P. vivax and P. malariae were detected for the first time in pregnant women, with a positivity of 5.6%. Immunoassays revealed the presence of IgG antibodies: 44% for ELISA-Pv, 38.4% for SD-Bioline-Pv and 18.4% for indirect immunofluorescence assay-Pm. The high prevalence of antibodies showed significant exposure of this population to Plasmodium. In regions with similar profiles, testing for a malaria diagnosis might be indicated in prenatal care.

  20. Divergent Response Profile in Activated Cord Blood T cells from First-born Child Implies Birth-order-associated in Utero Immune Programming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Marie; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Thysen, Anna Hammerich

    2016-01-01

    Background: First-born children are at higher risk for development of a range of immune-mediated diseases. The underlying mechanism of ‘birth-order-effects’ on disease risk is largely unknown, but in utero programming of the child's immune system may play a role. Objective: We studied...... programing may contribute to later development of immune-mediated diseases by increasing overall immune reactivity in first-born children as compared to younger siblings....

  1. Quantitative sensomics profiling of hop-derived bitter compounds throughout a full-scale beer manufacturing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseleu, Gesa; Lagemann, Annika; Stephan, Andreas; Intelmann, Daniel; Dunkel, Andreas; Hofmann, Thomas

    2010-07-14

    Although the complex taste profile of beer is well accepted to be reflected by the molecular blueprint of its sensometabolites, the knowledge available on the process-induced transformation of hop-derived phytochemicals into key sensometabolites during beer manufacturing is far from comprehensive. The objective of the present investigation was, therefore, to develop and apply a suitable HPLC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous and comprehensive quantitative monitoring of a total of 69 hop-derived sensometabolites in selected intermediary products throughout a full-scale beer manufacturing process. After data normalization, the individual sensometabolites were arranged into different clusters by means of agglomerative hierarchical analysis and visualized using a sensomics heatmap to verify the structure-specific reaction routes proposed for their formation during the beer brewing process.

  2. Cognitive Profile of Intellectually Gifted Adults: Analyzing the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Margherita; Matta, Michael; Parolin, Laura; Morrone, Cristina; Pezzuti, Lina

    2017-09-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) has been used extensively to study intellectual abilities of special groups. Here, we report the results of an intellectually gifted group on the WAIS-IV. Gifted individuals are people who obtained scores equal to or greater than 2 standard deviations above the mean on an intelligence test. Hence, the current study aims first, to examine mean group performance data of gifted individuals on the WAIS-IV; second, to revalidate the pattern of performance identified in this special group in previous studies (i.e., verbal skills higher than all other abilities); third, to compare scatter measures across intellectual domains with a matched comparison group. A total of 130 gifted individuals (79 males) were administered the full battery and their performance was compared with a matched comparison group. Analyses revealed that gifted group displayed higher scores in all intellectual domains. Contrary to expectations, they showed the highest scores in perceptual reasoning tasks. A multivariate approach revealed that this ability was statistically different from all other domains within the gifted group. Moreover, gifted individuals showed higher discrepancies across intellectual domains than average-intelligence people. Findings have important practical implications to detect intellectual giftedness in adulthood.

  3. Transcriptional profiles of cytokine/chemokine factors of immune cell-homing to the parasitic lesions: a comprehensive one-year course study in the liver of E. multilocularis-infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhua Wang

    Full Text Available Pathogenesis of chronically developing alveolar echinococcosis (AE is characterized by a continuous, granulomatous, periparasitic infiltration of immune cells surrounding the metacestode of Echinococcus multilocularis (E.multilocularis in the affected liver. A detailed cytokine and chemokine profile analysis of the periparasitic infiltrate in the liver has, however, not yet been carried out in a comprehensive way all along the whole course of infection in E. multilocularis intermediate hosts. We thus assessed the hepatic gene expression profiles of 18 selected cytokine and chemokine genes using qRT-PCR in the periparasitic immune reaction and the subsequent adjacent, not directly affected, liver tissue of mice from day 2 to day 360 post intra-hepatic injection of metacestode. DNA microarray analysis was also used to get a more complete picture of the transcriptional changes occurring in the liver surrounding the parasitic lesions. Profiles of mRNA expression levels in the hepatic parasitic lesions showed that a mixed Th1/Th2 immune response, characterized by the concomitant presence of IL-12α, IFN-γ and IL-4, was established very early in the development of E. multilocularis. Subsequently, the profile extended to a combined tolerogenic profile associating IL-5, IL-10 and TGF-β. IL-17 was permanently expressed in the liver, mostly in the periparasitic infiltrate; this was confirmed by the increased mRNA expression of both IL-17A and IL-17F from a very early stage, with a subsequent decrease of IL-17A after this first initial rise. All measured chemokines were significantly expressed at a given stage of infection; their expression paralleled that of the corresponding Th1, Th2 or Th17 cytokines. In addition to giving a comprehensive insight in the time course of cytokines and chemokines in E. multilocularis lesion, this study contributes to identify new targets for possible immune therapy to minimize E. multilocularis-related pathology and to

  4. Microbial forensics: predicting phenotypic characteristics and environmental conditions from large-scale gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minseung Kim

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A tantalizing question in cellular physiology is whether the cellular state and environmental conditions can be inferred by the expression signature of an organism. To investigate this relationship, we created an extensive normalized gene expression compendium for the bacterium Escherichia coli that was further enriched with meta-information through an iterative learning procedure. We then constructed an ensemble method to predict environmental and cellular state, including strain, growth phase, medium, oxygen level, antibiotic and carbon source presence. Results show that gene expression is an excellent predictor of environmental structure, with multi-class ensemble models achieving balanced accuracy between 70.0% (±3.5% to 98.3% (±2.3% for the various characteristics. Interestingly, this performance can be significantly boosted when environmental and strain characteristics are simultaneously considered, as a composite classifier that captures the inter-dependencies of three characteristics (medium, phase and strain achieved 10.6% (±1.0% higher performance than any individual models. Contrary to expectations, only 59% of the top informative genes were also identified as differentially expressed under the respective conditions. Functional analysis of the respective genetic signatures implicates a wide spectrum of Gene Ontology terms and KEGG pathways with condition-specific information content, including iron transport, transferases, and enterobactin synthesis. Further experimental phenotypic-to-genotypic mapping that we conducted for knock-out mutants argues for the information content of top-ranked genes. This work demonstrates the degree at which genome-scale transcriptional information can be predictive of latent, heterogeneous and seemingly disparate phenotypic and environmental characteristics, with far-reaching applications.

  5. Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counselors Kidney Stones Brain and Nervous System Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  6. Effect of Dietary Omega-3 to Omega-6 Ratio on Growth Performance, Immune Response, Carcass Traits and Meat Fatty Acids Profile of Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Katcha MI

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study the effect of dietary n-3 to n-6 ratio on performance, immune response, blood parameters and fatty acids profile of broiler chickens. A total number of 192 one day old broiler chicks were randomly alloctted into 6 groups. Chicks of groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 were fed balanced corn-soybean diets containing n-3 to n-6 ratios of 1:1, 1:3, 1:5, 1:7, 1:9 and 1:11, respectively. Different n-3 to n-6 ratioes had no significant effect on growth performance parameters. The best dressing percentage was recorded in group 3 while no significant difference was noticed in the weight of organs except for a significant increase in the weight of gizzard in group 4. There was a variable effect of the n-3 to n-6 ratio on parameters of innate immunity. The highest lymphocyte percentage was detected in group 5. Antibody titers against Newcastle disease (ND and Avian Influenza (AI increased in wider ratio groups. The lowest glucose level was detected in group 4. Though serum albumin and total protein were decreased in group 3, serum globulin increased in groups 2 and 3. The lowest cholesterol content of breast meat was detected in group 3 and the highest content was detected in group 6. The cholesterol content of the thigh recorded opposite results. Narrow dietary n-3 to n-6 groups tended to record higher n-3 PUFAs content especially DHA in breast meat. While wider n-3 to n-6 ratio groups tended to deposit more SFAS, MUFAs and n-6 PUFAs than the narrower ratio groups. The best n-3 to n-6 ratio of breast meat was recorded in group 2 receiving dietary n-3 to n-6 ratio of 1:3. From the results of this study, it could be concluded that the dietary n-3 to n-6 ratio had no significant effect on growth performance of broiler chickens. The best dressing percentage was detected in group with the ratio of 1:5. The ratio of 1:3 recorded the best health state parameters.

  7. Comparison of Immune Profiles in Fetal Hearts with Idiopathic Dilated Cardiomyopathy, Maternal Autoimmune-Associated Dilated Cardiomyopathy and the Normal Fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nield, Lynne E; von Both, Ingo; Popel, Najla; Strachan, Kate; Manlhiot, Cedric; Shannon, Patrick; McCrindle, Brian W; Atkinson, Adelle; Miner, Steven E S; Jaeggi, Edgar T; Taylor, Glenn P

    2016-02-01

    The etiology of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (iDCM) remains unknown. Immune therapies have improved outcome in fetuses with DCM born to mothers with autoimmune disease (aDCM). The purpose of this retrospective study was to compare the myocardial B and T cell profiles in fetuses and neonates with idiopathic DCM (iDCM) versus autoimmune-mediated DCM (aDCM) and to describe the normal cell maturation within the human fetal myocardium. Of 60 fetal autopsy cases identified from institutional databases, 10 had aDCM (18-38 weeks), 12 iDCM (19-37 weeks) and 38 had normal hearts (11-40 weeks). Paraffin-embedded myocardium sections were stained for all lymphocyte (CD45), B cells (CD20, CD79a), T cells (CD3, CD4, CD7, CD8) and monocyte (CD68) surface markers. Two independent, blinded cell counts were performed. Normal hearts expressed all B and T cell markers in a bimodal fashion, with peaks at 22 and 37 weeks of gestation. The aDCM cohort was most distinct from normal hearts, with less overall T cell markers [EST -9.1 (2.6) cells/mm(2), p = 0.001], CD4 [EST -2.0 (0.6), p = 0.001], CD3 [EST -3.9 (1.0), p cell markers [EST -4.9 (1.8), p = 0.01] and CD79a counts [EST -2.3 (0.9), p = 0.01]. The iDCM group had less overall B cell markers [EST -4.0 (1.8), p = 0.03] and CD79a [EST -1.7 (0.9), p = 0.05], but no difference in T cell markers. Autoimmune-mediated DCM fetuses have less B and T cell markers, whereas iDCM fetuses have less B cell markers compared with normal fetal hearts. The fetal immune system may play a role in the normal development of the heart and evolution of dilated cardiomyopathy.

  8. A comparison of licensed and un-licensed artisanal and small-scale gold miners (ASGM) in terms of socio-demographics, work profiles, and injury rates

    OpenAIRE

    Calys-Tagoe, Benedict N. L.; Clarke, Edith; Robins, Thomas; Basu, Niladri

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) represents one of the most hazardous work environments. While formalization of this sector has been suggested (e.g., Minamata Convention) as a means to improve working conditions, we are unaware of empirical evidence that supports this notion. This study aimed to compare sociodemographic profiles, work profiles, and injury rates among miners working in licensed versus un-licensed ASGM sites. Methods In the Tarkwa mining region o...

  9. National-Scale Changes in Soil Profile C and N in New Zealand Pastures are Determined by Land Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper, L. A.; Parfitt, R.; Ross, C.; Baisden, W. T.; Claydon, J.; Fraser, S.

    2010-12-01

    Grazed pasture is New Zealand’s predominant agricultural land-use and has been relatively recently developed from forest and native grasslands/shrub communities. From the 1850s onwards, land was cleared and exotic pastures established. Phosphorus fertilizer was increasingly used after 1950 which accelerated N fixation by clover. In the last two decades N fertilizers have been used, and grazing intensity has increased, thus affecting soil C and N. Re-sampling of 31 New Zealand soil profiles under grazed pasture measured surprisingly large losses of C and N over the last 2-3 decades (Schipper et al., 2007 Global Change Biology 13:1138-1144). These profiles were predominantly on the most intensively grazed flat land. We extended this re-sampling to 83 profiles (to 90 cm depth), to investigate whether changes in soil C and N stocks also occurred in less intensively managed pasture. Archived soils samples were analysed for total soil C and N alongside the newly collected samples. Intact cores were collected to determine bulk density through the profile. Over an average of 27 years, soils (0-30 cm) in flat dairy pastures significantly lost 0.73±0.16 Mg C ha-1y-1 and 57±16 kg N ha-1y-1 while we observed no change in soil C or N in flat pasture grazed by “dry stock” (e.g., sheep, beef), or in grazed tussock grasslands. Grazed hill country soils (0-30 cm) gained 0.52±0.18 Mg C ha-1y-1 and 66±18 kg N ha-1y-1. The losses of C and N were strongly correlated and C:N ratio has generally declined suggesting soils are becoming N saturated. Losses and gains also occurred in soil layers below 30 cm demonstrating that organic matter throughout the profile was responding to land use. The losses under dairying may be due to greater grazing pressure, fertilizer inputs and exports of C and N. There is evidence that grazing pressure reduces inputs of C below ground, reduces soil microbial C, and that dairy cow urine can mobilise C and N. Gains in hill country pastures may be due

  10. Assessment of real-world daily-living skills in early-onset schizophrenia trough the Life Skills Profile scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, O; Penadés, R; Baeza, I; De la Serna, E; Sánchez-Gistau, V; Lázaro, L; Bernardo, M; Castro-Fornieles, J

    2013-04-01

    Adolescents with early-onset schizophrenia (EOS) have marked deficits in their functional outcome. However, few short and reliable instruments for assessing real-world functioning have been specifically validated in EOS. The Life Skills Profile (LSP) is a brief scale widely used in schizophrenia and considered one of the optimal instruments for assessing real-world daily living skills. The purpose of this study was to examine the usefulness and the feasibility of the LSP to assess daily living skills in EOS. The sample included 53 clinically and pharmacologically stabilized adolescent patients with EOS and 53 healthy adolescents. Content review of the scale and internal consistency analysis were conducted in the EOS group. A subgroup of 30 patients was re-assessed over a 10-day interval to establish the test-retest reliability. Measures of functional outcome were used to assess convergent validity, and measures of intelligence and symptoms were used to assess divergent validity. Discriminant validity was analyzed through logistic analysis and the receiver-operating characteristic curve. The LSP and its subscales showed high reliability, adequate internal consistency and adequate convergent and divergent validity. The LSP was also found to be a sensitive instrument for detecting differences between patients and healthy adolescents, correctly classifying 84% of the sample. The estimated area under the curve was 0.925 (95% CI 0.875-0.976). The LSP showed adequate psychometric characteristics in adolescents with EOS and appeared to be a valid, reliable and time-efficient instrument for use in clinical practice and research settings to assess real-world daily-living skills in EOS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Large-Scale and Deep Quantitative Proteome Profiling Using Isobaric Labeling Coupled with Two-Dimensional LC-MS/MS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritsenko, Marina A.; Xu, Zhe; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2016-02-12

    Comprehensive, quantitative information on abundances of proteins and their post-translational modifications (PTMs) can potentially provide novel biological insights into diseases pathogenesis and therapeutic intervention. Herein, we introduce a quantitative strategy utilizing isobaric stable isotope-labelling techniques combined with two-dimensional liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (2D-LC-MS/MS) for large-scale, deep quantitative proteome profiling of biological samples or clinical specimens such as tumor tissues. The workflow includes isobaric labeling of tryptic peptides for multiplexed and accurate quantitative analysis, basic reversed-phase LC fractionation and concatenation for reduced sample complexity, and nano-LC coupled to high resolution and high mass accuracy MS analysis for high confidence identification and quantification of proteins. This proteomic analysis strategy has been successfully applied for in-depth quantitative proteomic analysis of tumor samples, and can also be used for integrated proteome and PTM characterization, as well as comprehensive quantitative proteomic analysis across samples from large clinical cohorts.

  12. Genome-scale expression and transcription factor binding profiles reveal therapeutic targets in transgenic ERG myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Liat; Tijssen, Marloes R; Birger, Yehudit; Hannah, Rebecca L; Kinston, Sarah J; Schütte, Judith; Beck, Dominik; Knezevic, Kathy; Schiby, Ginette; Jacob-Hirsch, Jasmine; Biran, Anat; Kloog, Yoel; Marcucci, Guido; Bloomfield, Clara D; Aplan, Peter D; Pimanda, John E; Göttgens, Berthold; Izraeli, Shai

    2013-10-10

    The ETS transcription factor ERG plays a central role in definitive hematopoiesis, and its overexpression in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with a stem cell signature and poor prognosis. Yet how ERG causes leukemia is unclear. Here we show that pan-hematopoietic ERG expression induces an early progenitor myeloid leukemia in transgenic mice. Integrated genome-scale analysis of gene expression and ERG binding profiles revealed that ERG activates a transcriptional program similar to human AML stem/progenitor cells and to human AML with high ERG expression. This transcriptional program was associated with activation of RAS that was required for leukemia cells growth in vitro and in vivo. We further show that ERG induces expression of the Pim1 kinase oncogene through a novel hematopoietic enhancer validated in transgenic mice and human CD34(+) normal and leukemic cells. Pim1 inhibition disrupts growth and induces apoptosis of ERG-expressing leukemic cells. The importance of the ERG/PIM1 axis is further underscored by the poorer prognosis of AML highly expressing ERG and PIM1. Thus, integrative genomic analysis demonstrates that ERG causes myeloid progenitor leukemia characterized by an induction of leukemia stem cell transcriptional programs. Pim1 and the RAS pathway are potential therapeutic targets of these high-risk leukemias.

  13. Performance comparison of differential evolution techniques on optimization of feeding profile for an industrial scale baker's yeast fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yüzgeç, Uğur

    2010-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is one of the novel evolutionary optimization methods used for solving the problems that consist of nondifferentiable, nonlinear and multi-objective functions. In this presented work, the classical DE technique and its various versions, such as opposition based on differential evolution (ODE), adaptive differential evolution (ADE), adaptive opposition based on differential evolution (AODE) which is an advanced version of ODE, are presented to determine the optimal feeding flow profile of an industrial scale fed-batch baker's yeast fermentation process. The main objective in any fed-batch fermentation process optimization is both to maximize the amount of the biomass at the end of the process and to minimize the ethanol formation during the process. Four different cases regarding the initial condition of the fermentation process were considered so as to evaluate the performances of proposed algorithms. Besides, two strategies of mutation and crossover operators, which are the most popular in DE's applications, were utilized for performance comparison tests. The influence of initial seed value, initial condition of the process, and both of the mutation and crossover strategies have been investigated for all the different classic, opposition-based, self-adaptive and adaptive opposition-based mechanisms. To demonstrate the performance comparison of the of DE's techniques, the experimental data collected from the fermentor with volume of 100 m(3) are presented with the optimization results obtained by using all the interested DE techniques for the same initial conditions. 2009 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. The profile of selected samples of Croatian athletes based on the items of sport jealousy scale (SJS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sindik Joško

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of jealousy in sport, as a negative emotional reaction, accompanied by thoughts of inadequacy when compared to others, is the issue of this article. This study had a purpose to define the characteristic profiles of the Croatian athletes, based on single items of Sport Jealousy Scale (SJS II, labeled by several variables: gender, type of sport, age group. Purposive sample of 73 athletes competing at Croatian championships in different sports (football, bowling, volleyball and handball were examined with Croatian version of SJS-II. Three clusters obtained are similarly balanced, according to the number of cases in each cluster. The most simply explained, clusters clearly differentiate the most jealous, moderately jealous and slightly/low jealous athletes. Among the features of the athletes in each cluster, in the most jealous (first cluster are the athletes from team sports, women and older athletes. Females, bowling athletes, athletes from individual (coactive sports and the youngest athletes are the least jealous (grouped in third cluster.

  15. Peripheral administration of the soluble TNF inhibitor XPro1595 modifies brain immune cell profiles, decreases beta-amyloid plaque load, and rescues impaired long-term potentiation in 5xFAD mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, Kathryn P; Sompol, Pradoldej; Kannarkat, George T; Chang, Jianjun; Sniffen, Lindsey; Wildner, Mary E; Norris, Christopher M; Tansey, Malú G

    2017-06-01

    Clinical and animal model studies have implicated inflammation and peripheral immune cell responses in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Peripheral immune cells including T cells circulate in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy adults and are found in the brains of AD patients and AD rodent models. Blocking entry of peripheral macrophages into the CNS was reported to increase amyloid burden in an AD mouse model. To assess inflammation in the 5xFAD (Tg) mouse model, we first quantified central and immune cell profiles in the deep cervical lymph nodes and spleen. In the brains of Tg mice, activated (MHCII + , CD45 high , and Ly6C high ) myeloid-derived CD11b + immune cells are decreased while CD3 + T cells are increased as a function of age relative to non-Tg mice. These immunological changes along with evidence of increased mRNA levels for several cytokines suggest that immune regulation and trafficking patterns are altered in Tg mice. Levels of soluble Tumor Necrosis Factor (sTNF) modulate blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and are increased in CSF and brain parenchyma post-mortem in AD subjects and Tg mice. We report here that in vivo peripheral administration of XPro1595, a novel biologic that sequesters sTNF into inactive heterotrimers, reduced the age-dependent increase in activated immune cells in Tg mice, while decreasing the overall number of CD4 + T cells. In addition, XPro1595 treatment in vivo rescued impaired long-term potentiation (LTP) measured in brain slices in association with decreased Aβ plaques in the subiculum. Selective targeting of sTNF may modulate brain immune cell infiltration, and prevent or delay neuronal dysfunction in AD. Immune cells and cytokines perform specialized functions inside and outside the brain to maintain optimal brain health; but the extent to which their activities change in response to neuronal dysfunction and degeneration is not well understood. Our findings indicate that neutralization of s

  16. Improving the quality and applicability of the Dutch scales of the communication profile for the hearing impaired using item response theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokkink, L.B.; Knol, D.L.; van Nispen, R.M.A.; Kramer, S.E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to improve the quality and applicability of the 6 Dutch scales of the Communication Profile for the Hearing Impaired (CPHI; Demorest & Erdman, 1986, 1987, 1988) using item response theory (IRT). IRT modeling can produce precise, valid, and relatively brief

  17. Some implications of Scale Relativity theory in avascular stages of growth of solid tumors in the presence of an immune system response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzea, C Gh; Agop, M; Moraru, Evelina; Stana, Bogdan A; Gîrţu, Manuela; Iancu, D

    2011-08-07

    We present a traveling-wave analysis of a reduced mathematical model describing the growth of a solid tumor in the presence of an immune system response in the framework of Scale Relativity theory. Attention is focused upon the attack of tumor cells by tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic lymphocytes (TICLs), in a small multicellular tumor, without necrosis and at some stage prior to (tumor-induced) angiogenesis. For a particular choice of parameters, the underlying system of partial differential equations is able to simulate the well-documented phenomenon of cancer dormancy and propagation of a perturbation in the tumor cell concentration by cnoidal modes, by depicting spatially heterogeneous tumor cell distributions that are characterized by a relatively small total number of tumor cells. This behavior is consistent with several immunomorphological investigations. Moreover, the alteration of certain parameters of the model is enough to induce soliton like modes and soliton packets into the system, which in turn result in tumor invasion in the form of a standard traveling wave. In the same framework of Scale Relativity theory, a very important feature of malignant tumors also results, that even in avascular stages they might propagate and invade healthy tissues, by means of a diffusion on a Newtonian fluid. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Possibilities of LA-ICP-MS technique for the spatial elemental analysis of the recent fish scales: Line scan vs. depth profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hola, Marketa [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Kalvoda, Jiri, E-mail: jkalvoda@centrum.cz [Department of Geological Sciences, Masaryk University of Brno, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Novakova, Hana [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Skoda, Radek [Department of Geological Sciences, Masaryk University of Brno, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Kanicky, Viktor [Department of Chemistry, Masaryk University of Brno, Kamenice 5, 625 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-01-01

    LA-ICP-MS and solution based ICP-MS in combination with electron microprobe are presented as a method for the determination of the elemental spatial distribution in fish scales which represent an example of a heterogeneous layered bone structure. Two different LA-ICP-MS techniques were tested on recent common carp (Cyprinus carpio) scales: (a)A line scan through the whole fish scale perpendicular to the growth rings. The ablation crater of 55 {mu}m width and 50 {mu}m depth allowed analysis of the elemental distribution in the external layer. Suitable ablation conditions providing a deeper ablation crater gave average values from the external HAP layer and the collagen basal plate. (b)Depth profiling using spot analysis was tested in fish scales for the first time. Spot analysis allows information to be obtained about the depth profile of the elements at the selected position on the sample. The combination of all mentioned laser ablation techniques provides complete information about the elemental distribution in the fish scale samples. The results were compared with the solution based ICP-MS and EMP analyses. The fact that the results of depth profiling are in a good agreement both with EMP and PIXE results and, with the assumed ways of incorporation of the studied elements in the HAP structure, suggests a very good potential for this method.

  19. Possibilities of LA-ICP-MS technique for the spatial elemental analysis of the recent fish scales: Line scan vs. depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holá, Markéta; Kalvoda, Jiří; Nováková, Hana; Škoda, Radek; Kanický, Viktor

    2011-01-01

    LA-ICP-MS and solution based ICP-MS in combination with electron microprobe are presented as a method for the determination of the elemental spatial distribution in fish scales which represent an example of a heterogeneous layered bone structure. Two different LA-ICP-MS techniques were tested on recent common carp ( Cyprinus carpio) scales: A line scan through the whole fish scale perpendicular to the growth rings. The ablation crater of 55 μm width and 50 μm depth allowed analysis of the elemental distribution in the external layer. Suitable ablation conditions providing a deeper ablation crater gave average values from the external HAP layer and the collagen basal plate. Depth profiling using spot analysis was tested in fish scales for the first time. Spot analysis allows information to be obtained about the depth profile of the elements at the selected position on the sample. The combination of all mentioned laser ablation techniques provides complete information about the elemental distribution in the fish scale samples. The results were compared with the solution based ICP-MS and EMP analyses. The fact that the results of depth profiling are in a good agreement both with EMP and PIXE results and, with the assumed ways of incorporation of the studied elements in the HAP structure, suggests a very good potential for this method.

  20. Spontaneous mucosal lymphocyte cytokine profiles in children with autism and gastrointestinal symptoms: mucosal immune activation and reduced counter regulatory interleukin-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, Paul; Anthony, Andrew; Torrente, Franco; Wakefield, Andrew J

    2004-11-01

    A lymphocytic enterocolitis has been reported in a cohort of children with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms. This study tested the hypothesis that dysregulated intestinal mucosal immunity with enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine production is present in these ASD children. Comparison was made with developmentally normal children with, and without, mucosal inflammation. Duodenal and colonic biopsies were obtained from 21 ASD children, and 65 developmentally normal paediatric controls, of which 38 had signs of histological inflammation. Detection of CD3+ lymphocyte staining for spontaneous intracellular TNFalpha, IL-2, IL-4, IFNgamma, and IL-10, was performed by multicolor flow cytometry. Duodenal and colonic mucosal CD3+ lymphocyte counts were elevated in ASD children compared with noninflamed controls (p<0.03). In the duodenum, the proportion of lamina propria (LP) and epithelial CD3(+)TNFalpha+ cells in ASD children was significantly greater compared with noninflamed controls (p<0.002) but not coeliac disease controls. In addition, LP and epithelial CD3(+)IL-2+ and CD3(+)IFNgamma+, and epithelial CD3(+)IL-4+ cells were more numerous in ASD children than in noninflamed controls (p<0.04). In contrast, CD3(+)IL-10+ cells were fewer in ASD children than in noninflamed controls (p<0.05). In the colon, LP CD3(+)TNFalpha+ and CD3(+)IFNgamma+ were more frequent in ASD children than in noninflamed controls (p<0.01). In contrast with Crohn's disease and non-Crohn's colitis, LP and epithelial CD3(+)IL-10+ cells were fewer in ASD children than in nondisease controls (p<0.01). There was a significantly greater proportion of CD3(+)TNFalpha+ cells in colonic mucosa in those ASD children who had no dietary exclusion compared with those on a gluten and/or casein free diet (p<0.05). There is a consistent profile of CD3+ lymphocyte cytokines in the small and large intestinal mucosa of these ASD children, involving increased pro-inflammatory and

  1. Broad-scale phosphoprotein profiling of beta adrenergic receptor (β-AR signaling reveals novel phosphorylation and dephosphorylation events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej J Chruscinski

    Full Text Available β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs are model G-protein coupled receptors that mediate signal transduction in the sympathetic nervous system. Despite the widespread clinical use of agents that target β-ARs, the signaling pathways that operate downstream of β-AR stimulation have not yet been completely elucidated. Here, we utilized a lysate microarray approach to obtain a broad-scale perspective of phosphoprotein signaling downstream of β-AR. We monitored the time course of phosphorylation states of 54 proteins after β-AR activation mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF cells. In response to stimulation with the non-selective β-AR agonist isoproterenol, we observed previously described phosphorylation events such as ERK1/2(T202/Y204 and CREB(S133, but also novel phosphorylation events such as Cdc2(Y15 and Pyk2(Y402. All of these events were mediated through cAMP and PKA as they were reproduced by stimulation with the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin and were blocked by treatment with H89, a PKA inhibitor. In addition, we also observed a number of novel isoproterenol-induced protein dephosphorylation events in target substrates of the PI3K/AKT pathway: GSK3β(S9, 4E-BP1(S65, and p70s6k(T389. These dephosphorylations were dependent on cAMP, but were independent of PKA and correlated with reduced PI3K/AKT activity. Isoproterenol stimulation also led to a cAMP-dependent dephosphorylation of PP1α(T320, a modification known to correlate with enhanced activity of this phosphatase. Dephosphorylation of PP1α coincided with the secondary decline in phosphorylation of some PKA-phosphorylated substrates, suggesting that PP1α may act in a feedback loop to return these phosphorylations to baseline. In summary, lysate microarrays are a powerful tool to profile phosphoprotein signaling and have provided a broad-scale perspective of how β-AR signaling can regulate key pathways involved in cell growth and metabolism.

  2. Caloric restriction favorably impacts metabolic and immune/inflammatory profiles in obese mice but curcumin/piperine consumption adds no further benefit

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Junpeng; Vanegas, Sally M; Du, Xiaogang; Noble, Timothy; Zingg, Jean-Marc A; Meydani, Mohsen; Meydani, Simin Nikbin; Wu, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-inflammation properties while piperine, another bioactive phenolic compound present in pepper spice, can enhance the bioavailability and efficacy of curcumin. This study sought to determ...

  3. Expression profile of immune-associated genes in the kidney of cultured large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea in the East China Sea area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shujiang; Zhao, Qian; Chen, Yinghua; Lv, Baoqiang; Wu, Xiongfei; Liu, Huihui; Zhu, Aiyi; Wu, Changwen

    2016-08-01

    To explore the effect of environment conditions on immune activity of fish, eight immune-associated genes responsible for innate immunity were selected from the GenBank, i.e. Pgrn-a, Ifit2, P-hepcidin, Lect2, β2m, Irf1, Il25 and Hsp96, and the mRNA expressions of them in the kidney of cultured large yellow croaker Larimichthys crocea in different sea areas in the East China Sea were examined with qPCR techniques. In the contrasts of immune-associated gene expression between areas and populations, significant differences were found, expression levels of these immune-associated genes were lower in the clear water area than in the poor water quantity area, and lower in May than in October. MY was more sensitive to environmental factors than DQ, which was coincident with the water quality in the culturing areas. Differential analyses of the expression levels of these immune-associated genes showed that significant up-regulation could be triggered by poor environmental factors. The expression patterns indicated that the expression levels of these genes were sensitive to ecological changes, thereby the immune-associated genes, especially Pgrn-a, Ifit2, β2m, Il25 and Hsp96, might serve as immediate and sensitive indicators of population immunologic vigor and ecosystem health. But the expression of immunity-associated genes at the level of gene transcription is highly influenced by multiple factors, and the exact causes or influencing factors of the up-regulation or down-regulation of these genes still need further thorough investigation.

  4. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven G.; Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Netea, Mihai G.; Dockrell, Hazel M.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) activates both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The antimycobacterial effects of these responses most likely account for the ability of BCG to protect against childhood forms of tuberculosis (TB). There is also evidence for a heterologous protective effect of BCG vaccination against TB-unrelated mortality in low birth weight infants. A possible mechanism of action of this effect, the induction of trained innate immunity, has been demonstrated when cells from BCG-vaccinated adults are restimulated in vitro with non-related microbial stimuli. Our aim was to examine an extensive panel of secreted immune biomarkers to characterize the profile of trained innate immunity in infants. Stimulation of whole blood for 48 h was performed 4 months after BCG vaccination, or in control unvaccinated infants. Stimulants were lipopolysaccharide; Pam3Cys (P3C); heat-killed Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and a lysate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Culture supernatants were tested for secreted cytokines and chemokines by 42-plex bead array and monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells assessed for expression of activation markers by flow cytometry. BCG-vaccinated infants displayed increases in 11 cytokines and chemokines in response to different non-specific innate immunity stimuli: epidermal growth factor (EGF); eotaxin; IL-6; IL-7; IL-8; IL-10; IL-12p40; monocyte chemotactic protein-3; macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; soluble CD40 ligand and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB. Although each stimulant induced a distinct response profile, three analytes, EGF, IL-6, and PDGF-AB/BB, were commonly higher after stimulation with Pam3Cys, C. albicans, and S. aureus. Conversely, certain cytokines such as interferon gamma-inducible protein-10, IL-2, IL-13, IL-17, GM-CSF, and GRO were suppressed in BCG-vaccinated infants, while no increases in TNFα or IL-1β production

  5. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Smith

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination of infants with bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG activates both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The antimycobacterial effects of these responses most likely account for the ability of BCG to protect against childhood forms of tuberculosis (TB. There is also evidence for a heterologous protective effect of BCG vaccination against TB-unrelated mortality in low birth weight infants. A possible mechanism of action of this effect, the induction of trained innate immunity, has been demonstrated when cells from BCG-vaccinated adults are restimulated in vitro with non-related microbial stimuli. Our aim was to examine an extensive panel of secreted immune biomarkers to characterize the profile of trained innate immunity in infants. Stimulation of whole blood for 48 h was performed 4 months after BCG vaccination, or in control unvaccinated infants. Stimulants were lipopolysaccharide; Pam3Cys (P3C; heat-killed Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and a lysate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Culture supernatants were tested for secreted cytokines and chemokines by 42-plex bead array and monocytes and natural killer (NK cells assessed for expression of activation markers by flow cytometry. BCG-vaccinated infants displayed increases in 11 cytokines and chemokines in response to different non-specific innate immunity stimuli: epidermal growth factor (EGF; eotaxin; IL-6; IL-7; IL-8; IL-10; IL-12p40; monocyte chemotactic protein-3; macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; soluble CD40 ligand and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF-AB/BB. Although each stimulant induced a distinct response profile, three analytes, EGF, IL-6, and PDGF-AB/BB, were commonly higher after stimulation with Pam3Cys, C. albicans, and S. aureus. Conversely, certain cytokines such as interferon gamma-inducible protein-10, IL-2, IL-13, IL-17, GM-CSF, and GRO were suppressed in BCG-vaccinated infants, while no increases in TNFα or IL-1

  6. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Steven G; Kleinnijenhuis, Johanneke; Netea, Mihai G; Dockrell, Hazel M

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) activates both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The antimycobacterial effects of these responses most likely account for the ability of BCG to protect against childhood forms of tuberculosis (TB). There is also evidence for a heterologous protective effect of BCG vaccination against TB-unrelated mortality in low birth weight infants. A possible mechanism of action of this effect, the induction of trained innate immunity, has been demonstrated when cells from BCG-vaccinated adults are restimulated in vitro with non-related microbial stimuli. Our aim was to examine an extensive panel of secreted immune biomarkers to characterize the profile of trained innate immunity in infants. Stimulation of whole blood for 48 h was performed 4 months after BCG vaccination, or in control unvaccinated infants. Stimulants were lipopolysaccharide; Pam3Cys (P3C); heat-killed Candida albicans, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, and a lysate of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Culture supernatants were tested for secreted cytokines and chemokines by 42-plex bead array and monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells assessed for expression of activation markers by flow cytometry. BCG-vaccinated infants displayed increases in 11 cytokines and chemokines in response to different non-specific innate immunity stimuli: epidermal growth factor (EGF); eotaxin; IL-6; IL-7; IL-8; IL-10; IL-12p40; monocyte chemotactic protein-3; macrophage inflammatory protein-1α; soluble CD40 ligand and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-AB/BB. Although each stimulant induced a distinct response profile, three analytes, EGF, IL-6, and PDGF-AB/BB, were commonly higher after stimulation with Pam3Cys, C. albicans, and S. aureus. Conversely, certain cytokines such as interferon gamma-inducible protein-10, IL-2, IL-13, IL-17, GM-CSF, and GRO were suppressed in BCG-vaccinated infants, while no increases in TNFα or IL-1β production

  7. Integrated Immune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  8. Epigenetics and Trained Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heijden, Charlotte D C C; Noz, Marlies P; Joosten, Leo A B; Netea, Mihai G; Riksen, Niels P; Keating, Samuel T

    2017-11-21

    A growing body of clinical and experimental evidence has challenged the traditional understanding that only the adaptive immune system can mount immunological memory. Recent findings describe the adaptive characteristics of the innate immune system, underscored by its ability to remember antecedent foreign encounters and respond in a nonspecific sensitized manner to reinfection. This has been termed trained innate immunity. Although beneficial in the context of recurrent infections, this might actually contribute to chronic immune-mediated diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Recent Advances: In line with its proposed role in sustaining cellular memories, epigenetic reprogramming has emerged as a critical determinant of trained immunity. Recent technological and computational advances that improve unbiased acquisition of epigenomic profiles have significantly enhanced our appreciation for the complexities of chromatin architecture in the contexts of diverse immunological challenges. Key to resolving the distinct chromatin signatures of innate immune memory is a comprehensive understanding of the precise physiological targets of regulatory proteins that recognize, deposit, and remove chemical modifications from chromatin as well as other gene-regulating factors. Drawing from a rapidly expanding compendium of experimental and clinical studies, this review details a current perspective of the epigenetic pathways that support the adapted phenotypes of monocytes and macrophages. We explore future strategies that are aimed at exploiting the mechanism of trained immunity to improve the prevention and treatment of infections and immune-mediated chronic disorders. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 00, 000-000.

  9. Aerodynamic performance of NACA four-digit profiles in small-scale wind turbines for small farms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Alexandre Costa Rocha

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, there are many places that do not have access to electric energy, mainly in rural areas with small farms. This situation has accentuated the importance of renewable energy sources, such as wind energy. This work consisted of the design, construction and field testing of two small three-bladed wind turbines with two different aerodynamic profiles. The aim of the study was to compare the profile influence on the turbine aerodynamic performance. Using the blade element momentum (BEM theory, two wind turbines were designed and built with different cross-section aerodynamic profiles (NACA 0012 (symmetric and 4412 (chambered. Following statistical analysis, the results of the field tests demonstrated that the performances of the turbines are similar when the rotational speed is near the designed value (?=5. However, when the rotational speed is under or above the designed value, the NACA 4412 profile yields superior performance

  10. Divergent Response Profile in Activated Cord Blood T cells from First-born Child Implies Birth-order-associated in Utero Immune Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Kragh, Marie; Larsen, Jeppe Madura; Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Wolsk, Helene Mygind; Bisgaard, Hans Flinker; Pedersen, Susanne Brix

    2016-01-01

    Background: First-born children are at higher risk for development of a range of immune-mediated diseases. The underlying mechanism of ‘birth-order-effects’ on disease risk is largely unknown, but in utero programming of the child's immune system may play a role. Objective: We studied the association between birth-order and the functional response of stimulated cord blood T cells. Method: Purified cord blood T cells were polyclonally activated with anti-CD3/CD28-coated beads in a subgroup of ...

  11. Regional immune responses with stage-specific antigen recognition profiles develop in lymph nodes of pigs following Ascaris suum larval migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers; Eriksen, Lizzie; Nansen, P.

    2001-01-01

    The early life-cycle of the pig round worm, Ascaris suum, involves well-defined larval development in the liver; lungs and finally the small intestine. Distinct regional immune responses to larval antigens of A. suum were observed in the draining lymph nodes of immunized and challenged pigs during...... specifically by ASC-probes of the liver lymph nodes at 7 but nor 14 days postchallenge (pc) which was not detected in other lymph nodes, serum or bile of the same pig. Similarly, a late larval antigen of 34 kDa was uniquely detected by lung and jejunal ASC-probes at 14 days pc. These observations demonstrate...

  12. ImmunoGrid, an integrative environment for large-scale simulation of the immune system for vaccine discovery, design and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pappalardo, F.; Halling-Brown, M. D.; Rapin, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    conceptual models of the immune system, models of antigen processing and presentation, system-level models of the immune system, Grid computing, and database technology to facilitate discovery, formulation and optimization of vaccines. ImmunoGrid modules share common conceptual models and ontologies...

  13. Influenza virus neutralizing antibodies and IgG isotype profiles after immunization of mice with influenza A subunit vaccine using various adjuvants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benne, CA; Harmsen, M; vanderGraaff, W; Verheul, AFM; Snippe, H; Kraaijeveld, CA

    The influence of various adjuvants on the development of influenza virus neutralizing antibodies and distribution of anti-influenza virus IgG isotypes after immunization of mice with influenza A (H3N2) subunit vaccine was investigated. Serum titres of influenza virus neutralizing antibodies and

  14. Comparison of the immune profile of nonhealing cutaneous Leishmaniasis patients with those with active lesions and those who have recovered from infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ajdary, S; Alimohammadian, M H; Eslami, M B

    2000-01-01

    Th1-type cellular immune responses play a critical role in protection against infection with Leishmania parasites, whereas activation of Th2-type cells results in progressive disease. Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania major is often a self-healing disease; however, persistent nonhealing...

  15. Integrated analysis of miRNAs and transcriptomes in Aedes albopictus midgut reveals the differential expression profiles of immune-related genes during dengue virus serotype-2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan-Xia; Li, Fen-Xiang; Liu, Zhuan-Zhuan; Jia, Zhi-Rong; Zhou, Yan-He; Zhang, Hao; Yan, Hui; Zhou, Xian-Qiang; Chen, Xiao-Guang

    2016-06-01

    Mosquito microRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in host-virus interaction, and have been reported to be altered by dengue virus (DENV) infection in Aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae). However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of Aedes albopictus midgut-the first organ to interact with DENV-involved in its resistance to DENV. Here we used high-throughput sequencing to characterize miRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression patterns in Aedes albopictus midgut in response to dengue virus serotype 2. A total of three miRNAs and 777 mRNAs were identified to be differentially expressed upon DENV infection. For the mRNAs, we identified 198 immune-related genes and 31 of them were differentially expressed. Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes enrichment analyses also showed that the differentially expressed immune-related genes were involved in immune response. Then the differential expression patterns of six immune-related genes and three miRNAs were confirmed by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Furthermore, seven known miRNA-mRNA interaction pairs were identified by aligning our two datasets. These analyses of miRNA and mRNA transcriptomes provide valuable information for uncovering the DENV response genes and provide a basis for future study of the resistance mechanisms in Aedes albopictus midgut. © 2016 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. Expression profiles of long non-coding RNAs located in autoimmune disease-associated regions reveal immune cell-type specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hrdlickova, Barbara; Kumar, Vinod; Kanduri, Kartiek; Zhernakova, Daria V.; Tripathi, Subhash; Karjalainen, Juha; Lund, Riikka J.; Li, Yang; Ullah, Ubaid; Modderman, Rutger; Abdulahad, Wayel; Lahdesmaki, Harri; Franke, Lude; Lahesmaa, Riitta; Wijmenga, Cisca; Withoff, Sebo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified hundreds of variants associated with a risk for autoimmune and immune-related disorders (AID), our understanding of the disease mechanisms is still limited. In particular, more than 90% of the risk variants lie in non-coding

  17. Immune response-related gene expression profile of a novel molluscan IκB protein member from Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Youngdeuk; Wickamarachchi, Wickramaarachchige Don Niroshana; Whang, Ilson; Oh, Minyoung; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; De Zoysa, Mahanama; Oh, Chulhong; Kang, Do-Hyung; Lee, Jehee

    2013-02-01

    Mollusks lack an adaptive immune system and rely solely on the innate immune response. The nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway is one of the most important components of the innate immune system and its activity is regulated by physical interaction with the inhibitor of NF-κB (IκB) protein. The manila clam, Ruditapes philippinarum (Rp), is a key species of the world's aquaculture industry, and recent pathogenic threats, such as the Gram-negative lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-expressing Vibrio tapetis bacteria, have produced severe adverse economic impacts. Here, we describe identification, characterization and immune responses of novel IκB (Rp-IκB) in the manila clam. The Rp-IκB cDNA is comprised of a 1,032 bp open reading frame, which encodes 343 amino acid residues and has a predicted molecular mass of 38 kDa. The Rp-IκB protein exhibits typical structural features of IκB family members, including the IκB degradation motif, PEST sequence, and six ankyrin repeats. Phylogenetic analysis showed that manila clam and other known molluscan IκB proteins grouped together in the invertebrate cluster. Analysis of the tissue expression distribution revealed that Rp-IκB was ubiquitously expressed. However, immune challenge with V. tapetis and purified LPS endotoxin induced significant up-regulation of Rp-IκB expression in gill and hemocytes. These results indicated that Rp-IκB may play an important role in manila clam defense against bacterial infection.

  18. Immunizations - diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  19. Childhood Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  20. Correlation of mRNA Profiles, miRNA Profiles, and Functional Immune Response in Rainbow Trout (Oncorrhynkus Mykiss) During Infection With Viral Hemorrhagic Septicemia Virus (VHSV) and in Fish Vaccinated With an Anti-VHSV DNA Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bela-Ong, Dennis; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    This project seeks to characterize molecular genetic and immunological mechanisms involved in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) immunity towards Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). To do so, we consider both relevant genes and the newly discovered small double-stranded RNAs called microR...

  1. Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may be given as part of a combination vaccine so that a child gets fewer shots. Talk with your doctor about ... Kids Teens Frequently Asked Questions About Immunizations Your Child's Immunizations Is the Flu Vaccine a Good Idea for Your Family? Word! Immunizations ...

  2. Selective changes in the immune profile of tumor-draining lymph nodes after different neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimens for locally advanced cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Martinelli, Enrica; Fanelli, Mara; Petrillo, Marco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2010-04-01

    To assess how neoadjuvant chemoradiation regimens modulate the immune system state in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN), in the setting of advanced cervical cancer. Tumor-draining lymph nodes of patients undergoing chemotherapy only (nonirradiated, NI-TDLN) and chemoradiation with lower-dose (39.6 Gy, LD-TDLN) and higher-dose radiation (50 Gy, HD-TDLN) were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry. Enlarging our previous data, LD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an enhanced antitumor response as compared with NI-TDLN, namely a significant Th1 and Tc1 polarization and a lower amount of the potent CD4(+)Foxp3(+)CD25(high) regulatory T cell (Treg) subset identified by neuropilin-1 expression. Conversely, compared with NI-TDLN, HD-TDLN showed features overall indicative of an impaired antitumor response, namely a significantly inverted CD4/CD8 cell ratio, a higher Nrp1(+)Treg frequency, and a higher frequency of CCR4(+)Treg, a Treg subset facilitated in migrating out from TDLN to suppress the immune response against distant cancer cells. Moreover, the Th1 and Tc1 polarization induced by LD radiation was lost, and there was an unfavorable tolerogenic/immunogenic dendritic cell ratio compared with LD-TDLN. Even minor differences in radiation dose in neoadjuvant regimens for locally advanced cervical cancer are crucial for determining the balance between a tolerogenic and an efficacious antitumor immune response in TDLN. Because most of the anticancer immune response takes place in TDLN, the present findings also emphasize the importance of chemoradiation protocols in the context of immunotherapeutic trials.

  3. Purinergic signalling links mechanical breath profile and alveolar mechanics with the pro-inflammatory innate immune response causing ventilation-induced lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Djo; Blankman, Paul; Nieman, Gary F

    2017-09-01

    Severe pulmonary infection or vigorous cyclic deformation of the alveolar epithelial type I (AT I) cells by mechanical ventilation leads to massive extracellular ATP release. High levels of extracellular ATP saturate the ATP hydrolysis enzymes CD39 and CD73 resulting in persistent high ATP levels despite the conversion to adenosine. Above a certain level, extracellular ATP molecules act as danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and activate the pro-inflammatory response of the innate immunity through purinergic receptors on the surface of the immune cells. This results in lung tissue inflammation, capillary leakage, interstitial and alveolar oedema and lung injury reducing the production of surfactant by the damaged AT II cells and deactivating the surfactant function by the concomitant extravasated serum proteins through capillary leakage followed by a substantial increase in alveolar surface tension and alveolar collapse. The resulting inhomogeneous ventilation of the lungs is an important mechanism in the development of ventilation-induced lung injury. The high levels of extracellular ATP and the upregulation of ecto-enzymes and soluble enzymes that hydrolyse ATP to adenosine (CD39 and CD73) increase the extracellular adenosine levels that inhibit the innate and adaptive immune responses rendering the host susceptible to infection by invading microorganisms. Moreover, high levels of extracellular adenosine increase the expression, the production and the activation of pro-fibrotic proteins (such as TGF-β, α-SMA, etc.) followed by the establishment of lung fibrosis.

  4. Toxoplasma gondii is dependent on glutamine and alters migratory profile of infected host bone marrow derived immune cells through SNAT2 and CXCR4 pathways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Ping Lee

    Full Text Available The obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii, disseminates through its host inside infected immune cells. We hypothesize that parasite nutrient requirements lead to manipulation of migratory properties of the immune cell. We demonstrate that 1 T. gondii relies on glutamine for optimal infection, replication and viability, and 2 T. gondii-infected bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs display both "hypermotility" and "enhanced migration" to an elevated glutamine gradient in vitro. We show that glutamine uptake by the sodium-dependent neutral amino acid transporter 2 (SNAT2 is required for this enhanced migration. SNAT2 transport of glutamine is also a significant factor in the induction of migration by the small cytokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1 in uninfected DCs. Blocking both SNAT2 and C-X-C chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4; the unique receptor for SDF-1 blocks hypermotility and the enhanced migration in T. gondii-infected DCs. Changes in host cell protein expression following T. gondii infection may explain the altered migratory phenotype; we observed an increase of CD80 and unchanged protein level of CXCR4 in both T. gondii-infected and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-stimulated DCs. However, unlike activated DCs, SNAT2 expression in the cytosol of infected cells was also unchanged. Thus, our results suggest an important role of glutamine transport via SNAT2 in immune cell migration and a possible interaction between SNAT2 and CXCR4, by which T. gondii manipulates host cell motility.

  5. Scaling from Surface Satellite Measurements of PIC to Integrated Euphotic Estimates over the Global Ocean: Do Vertical Profiles of Coccolithophores Look Like Vertical Profiles of Chlorophyll?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balch, W. M.; Drapeau, D.; Bowler, B.; Lyczkowski, E.; Lubelczyk, L.

    2016-02-01

    We have participated in a number of cruises throughout the world ocean, observing the vertical and horizontal distributions of coccolithophores, their particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) and associated optical properties. We will provide a synthesis of our observations in support of the NASA ocean color algorithm for PIC, highlighting how the integrated concentration of these plants can be interpreted from surface satellite measurements. Our work has shown consistencies in the vertical distributions of coccolithophores that allow us to extrapolate surface PIC observations (from the top optical depth observed by satellite) to the integrated euphotic zone on depth scales of 100m. Such results are a function of the degree of eutrophy and are critical for understanding the global consequences of this phytoplankton functional group, their associated biogeochemistry and implications to the alkalinity pump. We will end by showing whether the vertical distributions of PIC differ from those of diatom biogenic silica.

  6. Profiling of the metabolically active community from a production-scale biogas plant by means of high-throughput metatranscriptome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewski, Martha; Goesmann, Alexander; Jaenicke, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Structural composition and gene content of a biogas-producing microbial community from a production-scale biogas plant fed with renewable primary products was recently analyzed by means of a metagenome sequencing approach. To determine the transcriptionally active part of the same biogas community...... and to identify key transcripts for the biogas production process, the metatranscriptome of the microorganisms was sequenced for the first time. The metatranscriptome sequence dataset generated on the Genome Sequencer FLX platform is represented by 484,920 sequence reads. Taxonomic profiling of the active part...... reads resulted in 18,598 high-quality 16S rDNA sequences covering the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene. Comparison of the taxonomic profiles deduced from 16S rDNA amplicon sequences and the metatranscriptome dataset indicates a high transcriptional activity of archaeal species. Overall...

  7. Immunizing Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Jody Macdonald

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the complex contexts within which Canadian health professionals engage in immunizing children and focuses on the Canadian practice guidelines and current scientific evidence that direct Canadian health professional competencies. The article begins by presenting two current global vaccine initiatives and links these to immunization in Canada. A selected literature review identifies current best immunization practices. With the purpose of promoting quality improvement, three key Canadian immunization competencies for health professional are highlighted: communication with parents, including those who are experiencing vaccine hesitancy; administration of immunizing agents; and documentation of immunizations. Health professionals are encouraged to reflect on immunization competencies and ensure evidence-based practices underpin vaccine delivery in their primary care settings.

  8. Cohort Profile of The GOALS Study: A Large-scale Research of Physical Activity in Dutch Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Groot, Renate; Van Dijk, Martin; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    The GOALS study (Grootschalig Onderzoek naar Activiteiten van Limburgse Scholieren [Large-scale Research of Activities in Dutch Students]) was set up to investigate possible associations between different forms of physical activity and inactivity with cognitive performance, academic achievement and

  9. Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III profile in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease: performance in subtests sensitive to and resistant to normal decline with ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Osamu; Saito, Masahiko; Kato, Mayumi; Azami, Hiroki; Shido, Emi

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the significance of age-related subtest scores from the Japanese version of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III in patients in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The subjects of this study included 58 elderly Japanese persons classified into two groups: AD group (n = 29) and control group (n = 29). These groups did not differ in age, years of education, gender ratio, Hasegawa's Dementia Scale-Revised score, or Full-Scale IQ score. No subject scored below the cut-off point on Hasegawa's Dementia Scale-Revised, a frequently used dementia screen test in Japan. At the index score level, General Ability Index scores were the only scores that differed significantly between the groups, with the AD group scoring significantly lower than the control group (P crystallized intelligence, especially of acquired knowledge of general and factual information. Therefore, the results of this study seem to suggest that Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III profile of very early AD may be characterized by weak performance on subtests normally resistant to decline with ageing. © 2014 The Authors. Psychogeriatrics © 2014 Japanese Psychogeriatric Society.

  10. Characterising the Profile of Everyday Executive Functioning and Relation to IQ in Adults with Williams Syndrome: Is the BRIEF Adult Version a Valid Rating Scale?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren R Hocking

    Full Text Available Although there is evidence of a distinct profile of executive dysfunction in Williams syndrome (WS, a rare genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder, the utility of informant reports of everyday executive function (EF impairments and their relation to intelligence is not yet clear. Here we aimed to evaluate the functional impact of executive dysfunction in adults with WS and to establish the validity of child and adult versions of the most commonly used rating scale for EF assessment, the Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF. We were also interested in whether distinct components of everyday EF relate to intelligence in WS. Parent report child (BRIEF-C and adult (BRIEF-A ratings were collected on 20 adults with WS (aged 18.5 to 53 years, with a mean IQ of 60.95 (SD = 17.67. Neuropsychological measures of EF included: The Shape School Test (Espy, 2007; select subdomains of EF from the Woodcock-Johnson III Tests of Cognitive Abilities, Australian Adaptation (WJ III COG; and select subdomains from the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales, Second Edition-Parent Survey (Vineland-II. Results showed that the BRIEF-A, but not the BRIEF-C, was the most highly correlated with neuropsychological measures of EF, suggesting that it was a valid measure of the profile of EF impairments in adults with WS. The profile of everyday EF dysfunction revealed relative impairments in monitoring, working memory, planning and organisation in WS. In addition, both neuropsychological and rating scale measures showed an association between the shifting component of EF and intelligence. These findings indicate that the BRIEF-A is a valid measure of the multidimensional nature of real-world impairments in EF, and highlight its utility as a less labor intensive and low-cost screening tool for measuring specific EF impairments that could become the focus of targeted intervention in adults with WS.

  11. Effects of the Consumption of Milk Biofortified With Selenium, Vitamin E and Different Fatty Acid Profile on Immune Response in the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfrimer, Karina; Ferriolli, Eduardo; Takeuchi, Paula Lumy; Salles, Márcia Msv; Saran-Netto, Arlindo; Zanetti, Marcus A; Roma-Junior, Luiz C; Braga, Camila Bitu Moreno; Domenici, Fernanda A; Valim, Yara Ml; Paschoalato, Adriana Bp; Marchi, Larissa F; Azzolini, Ana Ecs; Donadi, Eduardo A; Martinez, Edson; Vannucchi, Helio

    2017-11-28

    Nutrition is a major contributing factor for immunocompetence. The aim was to assess the immune status of older after consuming a milk produced by lactating cows fed with one of the following diets: control diet(C), C+vitaminE+selenium(C+A), C+sunfloweroil(C+O), orC+sunflower oil+vitaminE+selenium(A+O). 60elderly received one of these biofortified milks during 12weeks. Immune response was assessed by measurement of the expression of COX-1,2, MCP-1, PPAR(δ,α and β/δ)genes, neutrophil production of oxygen reactive species induced by immune complexes, neutrophil phagocytosis and lytic activity of the alternative pathway of the complement system and cytokine levels. Variables were assessed before and after treatment. Our findings showed stability of some inflammatory mediators (complement activity and neutrophils burst) in treatment groups, except complement activity in C+A, and an increase of these markers in the C, especially reactive oxygen species production and phagocytic activity. TNF-α was significantly increased in all groups. In the C+A, IL-4 and IL-2 increased after treatment, and in the group that received the milk produced by cows fed with "O" diet CCL20 and IL-27 increased. Overall, as compared to C, milk biofortification was associated with stabilization of the activity of alternative complement pathway and the neutrophils burst, and modulated differently cytokines levels. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Detailing profiles of Lawsonia intracellularis specific lymphocytes in the immune response to a challenge inoculation after oral vaccination or primary inoculation with virulent bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riber, Ulla; Hvass, Henriette Cordes; Heegaard, Peter M. H.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination against the intracellular porcine enteric pathogen Lawsonia intracellularis remains a challenge as the commercially available vaccine does not provide full protection. In an experimental challenge study, the Enterisol® Ileitis attenuated live vaccine against Lawsonia intracellularis did...... not induce measurable primary humoral or cell-mediated immune responses, nor was it able to reduce faecal shedding of bacteria from eight vaccinated pigs compared to seven age-matched naïve challenge-control pigs. Vaccinated pigs did, however, respond to vaccination with an acute phase protein response...

  13. Immune-Related Gene Expression Profiling After PD-1 Blockade in Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma, Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma, and Melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Aleix; Navarro, Alejandro; Paré, Laia; Reguart, Noemí; Galván, Patricia; Pascual, Tomás; Martínez, Alex; Nuciforo, Paolo; Comerma, Laura; Alos, Llucia; Pardo, Nuria; Cedrés, Susana; Fan, Cheng; Parker, Joel S; Gaba, Lydia; Victoria, Iván; Viñolas, Nuria; Vivancos, Ana; Arance, Ana; Felip, Enriqueta

    2017-07-01

    Antibody targeting of the immune checkpoint receptor PD1 produces therapeutic activity in a variety of solid tumors, but most patients exhibit partial or complete resistance to treatment for reasons that are unclear. In this study, we evaluated tumor specimens from 65 patients with melanoma, lung nonsquamous, squamous cell lung or head and neck cancers who were treated with the approved PD1-targeting antibodies pembrolizumab or nivolumab. Tumor RNA before anti-PD1 therapy was analyzed on the nCounter system using the PanCancer 730-Immune Panel, and we identified 23 immune-related genes or signatures linked to response and progression-free survival (PFS). In addition, we evaluated intra- and interbiopsy variability of PD1, PD-L1, CD8A, and CD4 mRNAs and their relationship with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and PD-L1 IHC expression. Among the biomarkers examined, PD1 gene expression along with 12 signatures tracking CD8 and CD4 T-cell activation, natural killer cells, and IFN activation associated significantly with nonprogressive disease and PFS. These associations were independent of sample timing, drug used, or cancer type. TIL correlated moderately (∼0.50) with PD1 and CD8A mRNA levels and weakly (∼0.35) with CD4 and PD-L1. IHC expression of PD-L1 correlated strongly with PD-L1 (0.90), moderately with CD4 and CD8A, and weakly with PD1. Reproducibility of gene expression in intra- and interbiopsy specimens was very high (total SD <3%). Overall, our results support the hypothesis that identification of a preexisting and stable adaptive immune response as defined by mRNA expression pattern is reproducible and sufficient to predict clinical outcome, regardless of the type of cancer or the PD1 therapeutic antibody administered to patients. Cancer Res; 77(13); 3540-50. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  14. Longitudinal Profiles of Metabolism and Bioenergetics Associated with Innate Immune Hormonal Inflammatory Responses and Amino-Acid Kinetics in Severe Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanaki, Anna Maria; Tavladaki, Theonymfi; Dimitriou, Helen; Kozlov, Andrey V; Duvigneau, J Catharina; Meleti, Eftychia; Weidinger, Adelheid; Papakonstantinou, Evangelos; Briassoulis, George

    2018-01-16

    Experimental data indicate that sepsis influences the mitochondrial function and metabolism. We aim to investigate longitudinal bioenergetic, metabolic, hormonal, amino-acid, and innate immunity changes in children with sepsis. Sixty-eight children (sepsis, 18; systemic inflammatory response syndrome [SIRS], 23; healthy controls, 27) were enrolled. Plasma amino acids were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); flow-cytometry expressed as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of heat shock protein (HSP) levels from monocytes (m) and neutrophils (n); resistin, adiponectin, and extracellular (e) HSPs evaluated by ELISA; ATP levels in white blood cells by luciferase luminescent assay; lipid peroxidation products (TBARS) by colorimetric test; nitrite and nitrate levels by chemiluminescent assay; biliverdin reductase (BVR) activity by enzymatic assay; and energy-expenditure (EE) by E-COVX. Resistin, eHSP72, eHSP90α, and nitrate were longitudinally higher in sepsis compared with SIRS (pmetabolic pattern were repressed in sepsis compared with SIRS (pmetabolism, mHSP72, and induced resistin and adiponectin (pmetabolic-hormones and eHSP72/HSP90α, repression of bioenergetics and innate immunity, hypo-metabolism, and amino-acid kinetics changes discriminate sepsis from SIRS; malnutrition, hypo-metabolism, and persistently increased resistin and adiponectin are associated with poor outcome. © 2018 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  15. Diagnostic and prognostic role of MRI in spinal trauma, its comparison and correlation with clinical profile and neurological outcome, according to ASIA impairment scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umesh C Parashari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objectives: To evaluate the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI as a non-invasive diagnostic tool in patients with acute and chronic spinal trauma and to compare and correlate the MRI findings with those of patients′ clinical profile and neurological outcome according to ASIA impairment scale to assess prognostic and clinical value of MRI. Materials and Methods: Sixty two patients of spinal trauma formed the study group in a prospective fashion. The patients undergoing MR imaging and magnetic resonance images were analyzed and correlated with findings on neurological examination according to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA impairment scale (AIS at the time of MRI examination and subsequently at sub-acute interval to assess neurological outcome. Statistical Analysis : Sample profile was described in terms of 95% confidence limit and proportion. To describe strength of association between extent of spinal cord injury and outcome, odd′s ratio, bivariate and multi variant analysis, was used. Pearson′s chi square (χ 2 statistics was applied to test the association between two categorical variables. Data were analyzed using statistical software package, STATA 9.2 and the difference was considered to be significant if ′P′ value was <0.05. Observation and Results: The cord edema without hemorrhage was the most common MR finding (41.5%. The others were sizable focus of hemorrhage within the cord (33%, epidural hematoma (5.0%, and normal cord (26%. Majority of MR findings correlated well with clinical profile of the patient according to ASIA impairment scale. This study demonstrated that patients with presence of sizable focus of haemorrhage had larger cord edema and more severe grade of initial ASIA impairment scale( AIS with poor recovery at follow up (P=0.032.Improvement in upper extremity was more than lower extremity. Severe cord compression was also associated with poor neurological outcome; however it was not

  16. Two-region mass transfer to account for 2D profile scale heterogeneity in a 1D effective plot scale flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Vilim; Coquet, Yves; Gerke, Horst H.

    2017-04-01

    In arable soil landscapes, specific spatial heterogeneities related to tillage and trafficking can influence the movement of water and chemicals. The structure in the topsoil is characterized by spatial patterns with locally compacted zones. The contrasting hydraulic properties of more-and-less compacted soil zones can result in heterogeneous flow fields and preferential flow. Two- or three-dimensional models used to account for soil spatial variability are relatively too complex when trying to include local heterogeneities in the description of field scale flow and transport problems. The idea was to reduce the model complexity linked to the explicit description of heterogeneities in 2D or 3D without deteriorating the validity of simulation results. When reducing the spatial dimensionality, the geometry in a 2D, cross-sectional explicit plot description is removed on the expense of an increased complexity of the 1D model with two flow domains and mass exchange between them. Our objective was to design a simplified 1D model approach that effectively accounts for plot-scale soil structural variability. In this simplified 1D model, effective soil hydraulic parameters can be assigned to each of the two domains separately. Different theoretical scenarios simulating different shape, size and arrangement of compacted clods in the tilled layer were set to estimate their effect on solute behaviour. The mass exchange parameters could be determined from structure quantification and by comparing simplified 1D with reference 2D results accounting for defined soil structural (i.e., here the compacted regions) geometries. The mass exchange is strongly related to the geometry of the compacted zones including their distribution and size within the non-compacted soil. Additionally, the simplified model approach was tested by comparing it with measured results from a field tracer experiment.

  17. Large-scale profiling of signalling pathways reveals an asthma specific signature in bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, Elena; Nassa, Giovanni; Corleone, Giacomo; Buzdin, Anton; Aliper, Alexander M; Terekhanova, Nadezhda; Shepelin, Denis; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Tamm, Michael; Milanesi, Luciano; Miglino, Nicola; Weisz, Alessandro; Borger, Pieter

    2016-05-03

    Bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) cells from asthmatic patients maintain in vitro a distinct hyper-reactive ("primed") phenotype, characterized by increased release of pro-inflammatory factors and mediators, as well as hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy. This "primed" phenotype helps to understand pathogenesis of asthma, as changes in BSM function are essential for manifestation of allergic and inflammatory responses and airway wall remodelling. To identify signalling pathways in cultured primary BSMs of asthma patients and non-asthmatic subjects by genome wide profiling of differentially expressed mRNAs and activated intracellular signalling pathways (ISPs). Transcriptome profiling by cap-analysis-of-gene-expression (CAGE), which permits selection of preferentially capped mRNAs most likely to be translated into proteins, was performed in human BSM cells from asthmatic (n=8) and non-asthmatic (n=6) subjects and OncoFinder tool were then exploited for identification of ISP deregulations. CAGE revealed >600 RNAs differentially expressed in asthma vs control cells (p≤0.005), with asthma samples showing a high degree of similarity among them. Comprehensive ISP activation analysis revealed that among 269 pathways analysed, 145 (p<0.05) or 103 (p<0.01) are differentially active in asthma, with profiles that clearly characterize BSM cells of asthmatic individuals. Notably, we identified 7 clusters of coherently acting pathways functionally related to the disease, with ISPs down-regulated in asthma mostly targeting cell death-promoting pathways and up-regulated ones affecting cell growth and proliferation, inflammatory response, control of smooth muscle contraction and hypoxia-related signalization. These first-time results can now be exploited toward development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting ISP signatures linked to asthma pathophysiology.

  18. Profiling the ionome of rice and its use in discriminating geographical origins at the regional scale, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Nunes, Luis; Wang, Yijie; Williams, Paul N; Zheng, Maozhong; Zhang, Qiufang; Zhu, Yongguan

    2013-01-01

    Element profile was investigated for their use to trace the geographical origin of rice (Oryza sativa L.) samples. The concentrations of 13 elements (calcium (Ca), potassium (K), magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), boron (B), manganese (Mn), iron (Fe), nickel (Ni), copper (Cu), arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd)) were determined in the rice samples by inductively coupled plasma optical emission and mass spectrometry. Most of the essential elements for human health in rice were within normal ranges except for Mo and Se. Mo concentrations were twice as high as those in rice from Vietnam and Spain. Meanwhile, Se concentrations were three times lower in the whole province compared to the Chinese average level of 0.088 mg/kg. About 12% of the rice samples failed the Chinese national food safety standard of 0.2 mg/kg for Cd. Combined with the multi-elemental profile in rice, the principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant function analysis (DFA) and Fibonacci index analysis (FIA) were applied to discriminate geographical origins of the samples. Results indicated that the FIA method could achieve a more effective geographical origin classification compared with PCA and DFA, due to its efficiency in making the grouping even when the elemental variability was so high that PCA and DFA showed little discriminatory power. Furthermore, some elements were identified as the most powerful indicators of geographical origin: Ca, Ni, Fe and Cd. This suggests that the newly established methodology of FIA based on the ionome profile can be applied to determine the geographical origin of rice.

  19. Cohort Profile of the Goals Study: A Large-Scale Research of Physical Activity in Dutch Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Renate H. M.; van Dijk, Martin L.; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    The GOALS study (Grootschalig Onderzoek naar Activiteiten van Limburgse Scholieren [Large-scale Research of Activities in Dutch Students]) was set up to investigate possible associations between different forms of physical activity and inactivity with cognitive performance, academic achievement and mental well-being. It was conducted at a…

  20. Mechanistic modeling of microbial interactions at pore to profile scale resolve methane emission dynamics from permafrost soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-05-01

    The sensitivity of polar regions to raising global temperatures is reflected in rapidly changing hydrological processes associated with pronounced seasonal thawing of permafrost soil and increased biological activity. Of particular concern is the potential release of large amounts of soil carbon and stimulation of other soil-borne greenhouse gas emissions such as methane. Soil methanotrophic and methanogenic microbial communities rapidly adjust their activity and spatial organization in response to permafrost thawing and other environmental factors. Soil structural elements such as aggregates and layering affect oxygen and nutrient diffusion processes thereby contributing to methanogenic activity within temporal anoxic niches (hot spots). We developed a mechanistic individual-based model to quantify microbial activity dynamics in soil pore networks considering transport processes and enzymatic activity associated with methane production in soil. The model was upscaled from single aggregates to the soil profile where freezing/thawing provides macroscopic boundary conditions for microbial activity at different soil depths. The model distinguishes microbial activity in aerate bulk soil from aggregates (or submerged profile) for resolving methane production and oxidation rates. Methane transport pathways by diffusion and ebullition of bubbles vary with hydration dynamics. The model links seasonal thermal and hydrologic dynamics with evolution of microbial community composition and function affecting net methane emissions in good agreement with experimental data. The mechanistic model enables systematic evaluation of key controlling factors in thawing permafrost and microbial response (e.g., nutrient availability and enzyme activity) on long-term methane emissions and carbon decomposition rates in the rapidly changing polar regions.

  1. Large-scale profiling of signalling pathways reveals an asthma specific signature in bronchial smooth muscle cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, Elena; Nassa, Giovanni; Corleone, Giacomo; Buzdin, Anton; Aliper, Alexander M.; Terekhanova, Nadezhda; Shepelin, Denis; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Tamm, Michael; Milanesi, Luciano; Weisz, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Background Bronchial smooth muscle (BSM) cells from asthmatic patients maintain in vitro a distinct hyper-reactive (“primed”) phenotype, characterized by increased release of pro-inflammatory factors and mediators, as well as hyperplasia and/or hypertrophy. This “primed” phenotype helps to understand pathogenesis of asthma, as changes in BSM function are essential for manifestation of allergic and inflammatory responses and airway wall remodelling. Objective To identify signalling pathways in cultured primary BSMs of asthma patients and non-asthmatic subjects by genome wide profiling of differentially expressed mRNAs and activated intracellular signalling pathways (ISPs). Methods Transcriptome profiling by cap-analysis-of-gene-expression (CAGE), which permits selection of preferentially capped mRNAs most likely to be translated into proteins, was performed in human BSM cells from asthmatic (n=8) and non-asthmatic (n=6) subjects and OncoFinder tool were then exploited for identification of ISP deregulations. Results CAGE revealed >600 RNAs differentially expressed in asthma vs control cells (p≤0.005), with asthma samples showing a high degree of similarity among them. Comprehensive ISP activation analysis revealed that among 269 pathways analysed, 145 (psignalization. Conclusions These first-time results can now be exploited toward development of novel therapeutic strategies targeting ISP signatures linked to asthma pathophysiology. PMID:26863634

  2. On the consistency of personality types across adulthood: latent profile analyses in two large-scale panel studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Jule; Luhmann, Maike; Geiser, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Consistency and change in personality were analyzed by examining personality types across adulthood and old age using data from 2 nationally representative panel studies from Germany (N = 14,718; 16-82 years) and Australia (N = 8,315; 15-79 years). In both samples, the Big Five personality traits were measured twice across a period of 4 years. Latent profile analyses and latent profile transition analyses revealed 4 main findings: First, solutions with 3 (in the German sample) or 4 (in the Australian sample) personality types were found to be most interpretable. Second, measurement invariance tests revealed that these personality types were consistent across all age groups but differed slightly between men and women. Third, age was related to the number of individuals classified within each personality type. Namely, there were more resilients and fewer undercontrollers in older compared with younger age groups. Fourth, there was strong consistency of personality type membership across a period of 4 years in both genders and most age cohorts. Comparatively less consistency across time was found for undercontrollers and individuals in old age. Taken together, these findings show that in the 2 nations studied here, personality types were highly consistent across gender, age, and time. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  3. Maternal serum protein profile and immune response protein subunits as markers for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of trisomy 21, 18, and 13

    KAUST Repository

    Narasimhan, Kothandaraman

    2013-02-01

    Objectives: To use proteomics to identify and characterize proteins in maternal serum from patients at high-risk for fetal trisomy 21, trisomy 18, and trisomy 13 on the basis of ultrasound and maternal serum triple tests. Methods: We performed a comprehensive proteomic analysis on 23 trisomy cases and 85 normal cases during the early second trimester of pregnancy. Protein profiling along with conventional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis/Tandem mass spectrometry analysis was carried out to characterize proteins associated with each trisomy condition and later validated using Western blot. Results: Protein profiling approach using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass (SELDI-TOF/MS) spectrometry resulted in the identification of 37 unique hydrophobic proteomic features for three trisomy conditions. Using sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization - Time of Flight/Time of Flight (MALDI-TOF/TOF) and western blot, glyco proteins such as alpha-1-antitrypsin, apolipoprotein E, apolipoprotein H, and serum carrier protein transthyretin were identified as potential maternal serum markers for fetal trisomy condition. The identified proteins showed differential expression at the subunit level. Conclusions: Maternal serum protein profiling using proteomics may allow non-invasive diagnostic testing for the most common trisomies and may complement ultrasound-based methods to more accurately determine pregnancies with fetal aneuploidies. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Mosquito immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Julián F

    2010-01-01

    Throughout their lifetime, mosquitoes are exposed to pathogens during feeding, through breaks in their cuticle and following pathogen-driven cuticular degradation. To resist infection, mosquitoes mount innate cellular and humoral immune responses that are elicited within minutes of exposure and can lead to pathogen death via three broadly defined mechanisms: lysis, melanization and hemocyte-mediated phagocytosis. This chapter reviews our current understanding of the mosquito immune system, with an emphasis on the physical barriers that prevent pathogens from entering the body, the organs and tissues that regulate immune responses and the mechanistic and molecular bases of immunity.

  5. Immune system simulation online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, Nicolas; Lund, Ole; Castiglione, Filippo

    2011-01-01

    MOTIVATION: The recognition of antigenic peptides is a major event of an immune response. In current mesoscopic-scale simulators of the immune system, this crucial step has been modeled in a very approximated way. RESULTS: We have equipped an agent-based model of the immune system with immuno......-informatics methods to allow the simulation of the cardinal events of the antigenic recognition, going from single peptides to whole proteomes. The recognition process accounts for B cell-epitopes prediction through Parker-scale affinity estimation, class I and II HLA peptide prediction and binding through position...... simulation. AVAILABILITY: http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/C-ImmSim-10.1/ CONTACT: f.castiglione@iac.cnr.it...

  6. The effect of dietary flaxseed meal on liver and egg yolk fatty acid profiles, immune response and antioxidant status of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek M. Shafey

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of supplementing laying hen diets with 0, 50, or 100 g flaxseed meal (FSM/kg over a 12-week period on liver and egg yolk fatty acids (FA composition, liver and serum lipid peroxidation [thiobarbituric acid reactant substances (TBARS, activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPx], serum lipids (triglyerides, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein cholesterol, proteins (total protein, globulin and albumin, and immune response [serum antibody titres to sheep red blood cells (SRBC and white blood cell count (WBC and differential (heterophils (H, lymphocytes (L, monocytes (M, eosinophils (E and basophils (B] of laying hens were studied. The FSM diets increased total polyunsaturated FA (PUFA and omega-3 FA of α-linolenic acid (C18:3n-3, docosapentanoic (C22:5n-3 and docosahexaenoic (C22:6n-3, and they reduced total monounsaturated FA (MUFA and total omega- 3/total omega-6 FA (Σn-6:Σn-3 ratio in the liver and egg yolk. Hens fed the FSM diets had a higher serum anti-SRBC and a lower blood H:L ratio. The 100 g FSM/kg diet increased liver TBARS level when compared with the control diet. Dietary FSM did not influence levels of TBARS, SOD, lipids and proteins in the serum, SOD and GPx in the liver, and blood count of M, E, B and total WBC. It was concluded that the addition of FSM to the diet of laying hens enhanced immune response of birds, increased omeg-3 FA and PUFA, and reduced MUFA and Σn-6:Σn-3 ratio in the liver and egg yolk, and that of 100 g FSM/kg diet increased hepatic lipid peroxidation.

  7. TFF2 deficiency exacerbates weight loss and alters immune cell and cytokine profiles in DSS colitis, and this cannot be rescued by wild-type bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judd, Louise M; Chalinor, Heather V; Walduck, Anna; Pavlic, Daniel I; Däbritz, Jan; Dubeykovskaya, Zinaida; Wang, Timothy C; Menheniott, Trevelyan R; Giraud, Andrew S

    2015-01-01

    The trefoil factor TFF2 is a member of a tripartite family of small proteins that is produced by the stomach and the colon. Recombinant TFF2, when applied intrarectally in a rodent model of hapten colitis, hastens mucosal healing and reduces inflammatory indexes. Additionally, TFF2 is expressed in immune organs, supporting a potential immunomodulatory and reparative role in the bowel. In this study we confirm that TFF2 is expressed in the colon and is specifically enriched in epithelial cells relative to colonic leukocytes. TFF2-deficient, but not TFF1-deficient, mice exhibit a more severe response to acute or chronic dextran sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis that correlates with a 50% loss of expression of TFF3, the principal colonic trefoil. In addition, the response to acute colitis is associated with altered expression of IL-6 and IL-33, but not other inflammatory cytokines. While TFF2 can reduce macrophage responsiveness and block inflammatory cell recruitment to the colon, the major role in limiting the susceptibility to acute colitis appears to be maintenance of barrier function. Bone marrow transfer experiments demonstrate that leukocyte expression of TFF2 is not sufficient for prevention of colitis induction but, rather, that the gastrointestinal epithelium is the primary source of TFF2. Together, these findings illustrate that epithelial TFF2 is an important endogenous regulator of gut mucosal homeostasis that can modulate immune and epithelial compartments. Because of its extreme stability, even in the corrosive gut lumen, TFF2 is an attractive candidate as an oral therapeutic scaffold for future drug development in the treatment of inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenal Vyas

    Full Text Available The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas, the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB. The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt, classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/. Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas

  9. Global gene expression profiling reveals a suppressed immune response pathway associated with 3q amplification in squamous carcinoma of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Qian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Chromosome 3q26–28 is a critical region of genomic amplification in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, particularly lung squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs. No molecular therapeutic target has shown clinical utility for SCC, in contrast with adenocarcinomas of the lung. To identify novel candidate drivers in this region, we performed both Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization (array CGH, Agilent Human Genome CGH 244A oligo-microarrays and Gene Expression Microarray (Agilent Human Gene Expression 4 × 44 K microarray on 24 untreated lung SCC specimens. Using our previously published integrative genomics approach, we identified 12 top amplified driver genes within this region that are highly correlated and overexpressed in lung SCC. We further demonstrated one of the 12 top amplified driver Fragile X mental retardation-related protein 1 (FXR1 as a novel cancer gene in NSCLC and FXR1 executes its regulatory function by forming a novel complex with two other oncogenes, protein kinase C, iota ( PRKCI and epithelial cell transforming 2 (ECT2 within the same amplicon in lung cancer cell. Here we report that immune response pathways are significantly suppressed in lung SCC and negatively associated with 3q driver gene expression, implying a potential role of 3q drivers in cancer immune-surveillance. In light of the attractive immunotherapy strategy using blockade of negative regulators of T cell function for multiple human cancer including lung SCC, our findings may provide a rationale for targeting 3q drivers in combination of immunotherapies for human tumors harboring the 3q amplicon. The data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE40089.

  10. Comparative Safety and Efficacy Profile of a Novel Oil in Water Vaccine Adjuvant Comprising Vitamins A and E and a Catechin in Protective Anti-Influenza Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapna Patel

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-replicating vaccines, such as those based on recombinant proteins, require adjuvants and delivery systems, which have thus far depended on mimicking pathogen danger signals and strong pro-inflammatory responses. In search of a safer and more efficacious alternative, we tested whether vaccinations with influenza recombinant hemagglutinin (HA mixed with a novel vegetable oil in water emulsion adjuvant (Natural Immune-enhancing Delivery System, NIDS, based on the immune-enhancing synergy of vitamins A and E and a catechin, could protect against intra-nasal challenge with live influenza virus. Vaccinations of inbred Brag Albino strain c (BALB/c mice, with HA mixed with NIDS compared to other adjuvants, i.e., a squalene oil in water emulsion (Sq. oil, and the Toll Like Receptor 3 (TLR3 agonist Poly (I:C, induced significantly lower select innate pro-inflammatory responses in serum, but induced significantly higher adaptive antibody and splenic T Helper 1 (TH1 or TH2, but not TH17, responses. Vaccinations with NIDS protected against infection, as measured by clinical scores, lung viral loads, and serum hemagglutination inhibition titers. The NIDS exhibited a strong dose sparing effect and the adjuvant action of NIDS was intact in the outbred CD1 mice. Importantly, vaccinations with the Sq. oil, but not NIDS, induced a significantly higher Serum Amyloid P component, an acute phase reactant secreted by hepatocytes, and total serum IgE. Thus, the NIDS may be used as a clinically safer and more efficacious vaccine adjuvant against influenza, and potentially other infectious diseases.

  11. Asian Citrus Psyllid Expression Profiles Suggest Candidatus Liberibacter Asiaticus-Mediated Alteration of Adult Nutrition and Metabolism, and of Nymphal Development and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Meenal; Fisher, Tonja W; He, Ruifeng; Nelson, William; Yin, Guohua; Cicero, Joseph M; Willer, Mark; Kim, Ryan; Kramer, Robin; May, Greg A; Crow, John A; Soderlund, Carol A; Gang, David R; Brown, Judith K

    2015-01-01

    The Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) is the insect vector of the fastidious bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the causal agent of citrus greening disease, or Huanglongbing (HLB). The widespread invasiveness of the psyllid vector and HLB in citrus trees worldwide has underscored the need for non-traditional approaches to manage the disease. One tenable solution is through the deployment of RNA interference technology to silence protein-protein interactions essential for ACP-mediated CLas invasion and transmission. To identify psyllid interactor-bacterial effector combinations associated with psyllid-CLas interactions, cDNA libraries were constructed from CLas-infected and CLas-free ACP adults and nymphs, and analyzed for differential expression. Library assemblies comprised 24,039,255 reads and yielded 45,976 consensus contigs. They were annotated (UniProt), classified using Gene Ontology, and subjected to in silico expression analyses using the Transcriptome Computational Workbench (TCW) (http://www.sohomoptera.org/ACPPoP/). Functional-biological pathway interpretations were carried out using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes databases. Differentially expressed contigs in adults and/or nymphs represented genes and/or metabolic/pathogenesis pathways involved in adhesion, biofilm formation, development-related, immunity, nutrition, stress, and virulence. Notably, contigs involved in gene silencing and transposon-related responses were documented in a psyllid for the first time. This is the first comparative transcriptomic analysis of ACP adults and nymphs infected and uninfected with CLas. The results provide key initial insights into host-parasite interactions involving CLas effectors that contribute to invasion-virulence, and to host nutritional exploitation and immune-related responses that appear to be essential for successful ACP-mediated circulative, propagative CLas transmission.

  12. Large-scale automated image analysis for computational profiling of brain tissue surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices using Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas eRey-Villamizar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we describe use of Python for large-scale automated server-based bio-image analysis in FARSIGHT, a free and open-source toolkit of image analysis methods for quantitative studies of complex and dynamic tissue microenvironments imaged by modern optical microscopes including confocal, multi-spectral, multi-photon, and time-lapse systems. The core FARSIGHT modules for image segmentation, feature extraction, tracking, and machine learning are written in C++, leveraging widely used libraries including ITK, VTK, Boost, and Qt. For solving complex image analysis task, these modules must be combined into scripts using Python. As a concrete example, we consider the problem of analyzing 3-D multi-spectral brain tissue images surrounding implanted neuroprosthetic devices, acquired using high-throughput multi-spectral spinning disk step-and-repeat confocal microscopy. The resulting images typically contain 5 fluorescent channels, 6,000$times$10,000$times$500 voxels with 16 bits/voxel, implying image sizes exceeding 250GB. These images must be mosaicked, pre-processed to overcome imaging artifacts, and segmented to enable cellular-scale feature extraction. The features are used to identify cell types, and perform large-scale analytics for identifying spatial distributions of specific cell types relative to the device. Python was used to build a server-based script (Dell 910 PowerEdge servers with 4 sockets/server with 10 cores each, 2 threads per core and 1TB of RAM running on Red Hat Enterprise Linux linked to a RAID 5 SAN capable of routinely handling image datasets at this scale and performing all these processing steps in a collaborative multi-user multi-platform environment consisting. Our Python script enables efficient data storage and movement between compute and storage servers, logging all processing steps, and performs full multi-threaded execution of all codes, including open and closed-source third party libraries.

  13. Genome-scale analysis and comparison of gene expression profiles in developing and germinated pollen in Oryza sativa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Yongbiao

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pollen development from the microspore involves a series of coordinated cellular events, and the resulting mature pollen has a specialized function to quickly germinate, produce a polar-growth pollen tube derived from the vegetative cell, and deliver two sperm cells into the embryo sac for double fertilization. The gene expression profiles of developing and germinated pollen have been characterised by use of the eudicot model plant Arabidopsis. Rice, one of the most important cereal crops, has been used as an excellent monocot model. A comprehensive analysis of transcriptome profiles of developing and germinated pollen in rice is important to understand the conserved and diverse mechanism underlying pollen development and germination in eudicots and monocots. Results We used Affymetrix GeneChip® Rice Genome Array to comprehensively analyzed the dynamic changes in the transcriptomes of rice pollen at five sequential developmental stages from microspores to germinated pollen. Among the 51,279 transcripts on the array, we found 25,062 pollen-preferential transcripts, among which 2,203 were development stage-enriched. The diversity of transcripts decreased greatly from microspores to mature and germinated pollen, whereas the number of stage-enriched transcripts displayed a "U-type" change, with the lowest at the bicellular pollen stage; and a transition of overrepresented stage-enriched transcript groups associated with different functional categories, which indicates a shift in gene expression program at the bicellular pollen stage. About 54% of the now-annotated rice F-box protein genes were expressed preferentially in pollen. The transcriptome profile of germinated pollen was significantly and positively correlated with that of mature pollen. Analysis of expression profiles and coexpressed features of the pollen-preferential transcripts related to cell cycle, transcription, the ubiquitin/26S proteasome system, phytohormone

  14. Profiling the native specific human humoral immune response to Sudan Ebola virus strain Gulu by chemiluminescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobarzo, Ariel; Perelman, Eddie; Groseth, Allison; Dolnik, Olga; Becker, Stephan; Lutwama, Julius Julian; Dye, John M; Yavelsky, Victoria; Lobel, Leslie; Marks, Robert S

    2012-11-01

    Ebolavirus, a member of the family Filoviridae, causes high lethality in humans and nonhuman primates. Research focused on protection and therapy for Ebola virus infection has investigated the potential role of antibodies. Recent evidence suggests that antibodies can be effective in protection from lethal challenge with Ebola virus in nonhuman primates. However, despite these encouraging results, studies have not yet determined the optimal antibodies and composition of an antibody cocktail, if required, which might serve as a highly effective and efficient prophylactic. To better understand optimal antibodies and their targets, which might be important for protection from Ebola virus infection, we sought to determine the profile of viral protein-specific antibodies generated during a natural cycle of infection in humans. To this end, we characterized the profile of antibodies against individual viral proteins of Sudan Ebola virus (Gulu) in human survivors and nonsurvivors of the outbreak in Gulu, Uganda, in 2000-2001. We developed a unique chemiluminescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for this purpose based on the full-length recombinant viral proteins NP, VP30, and VP40 and two recombinant forms of the viral glycoprotein (GP(1-294) and GP(1-649)) of Sudan Ebola virus (Gulu). Screening results revealed that the greatest immunoreactivity was directed to the viral proteins NP and GP(1-649), followed by VP40. Comparison of positive immunoreactivity between the viral proteins NP, GP(1-649), and VP40 demonstrated a high correlation of immunoreactivity between these viral proteins, which is also linked with survival. Overall, our studies of the profile of immunorecognition of antibodies against four viral proteins of Sudan Ebola virus in human survivors may facilitate development of effective monoclonal antibody cocktails in the future.

  15. DNA methylation profiling of sorted cells from myelofibrosis patients reveals aberrant epigenetic regulation of immune pathways and identifies early MPN driver genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Helene Myrtue; Andersen, Christen Lykkegaard; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2015-01-01

    , PV) toadvancedMF. Multiple studies report frequent mutations in epigenetic regulators. However, the association to epigenetic changes and the role of epigenetic aberrations in different cell populations is still unknown. Aims: We therefore performed DNA methylation profiling of sorted cells from MF...... patients to unravel pathways contributing to disease phenotype and gain insight into MF pathogenesis. As an aberrant DNA methylation pattern may be an early event in tumorigenesis and may be crucial for progression of the malignant clone towards the more aggressive forms of MPN, we further aimed...

  16. Immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... viruses, and substances that appear foreign and harmful. Information The immune system protects the body from possibly harmful substances by ... reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team. Immune System and Disorders Read more Latest Health News Read ...

  17. Season of birth shapes neonatal immune function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thysen, Anna Hammerich; Rasmussen, Morten Arendt; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil

    2016-01-01

    Birth season has been reported to be a risk factor for several immune-mediated diseases. We hypothesized that this association is mediated by differential changes in neonatal immune phenotype and function with birth season. We sought to investigate the influence of season of birth on cord blood...... immune cell subsets and inflammatory mediators in neonatal airways. Cord blood was phenotyped for 26 different immune cell subsets, and at 1 month of age, 20 cytokines and chemokines were quantified in airway mucosal lining fluid. Multivariate partial least squares discriminant analyses were applied...... to determine whether certain immune profiles dominate by birth season, and correlations between individual cord blood immune cells and early airway immune mediators were defined. We found a birth season-related fluctuation in neonatal immune cell subsets and in early-life airway mucosal immune function...

  18. Seismic images of Caledonian, lithosphere-scale collision structures in the southeastern North Sea along Mona Lisa Profile 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramovitz, Tanni; Thybo, Hans

    2000-02-01

    The unexposed suture between Baltica and Eastern Avalonia is imaged by coincident normal-incidence reflection and wide-angle reflection/refraction seismic data of the MONA LISA project. We present new results of the upper lithospheric, seismic structure from the N-S-striking profile 2 across the Caledonian Deformation Front, which represents the crustal collision suture between Baltica and Eastern Avalonia that formed after closure of the Tornquist Sea during the Caledonian orogeny in Late Ordovician times. Three different crustal types are identified with great similarities to the nearby profile 1: (1) a three-layered crust typical of shields to the north; (2) a transitional crust (suture zone) in the central part; and (3) a two-layered crust of Caledonian origin to the south characterized by very low velocities throughout the crust. The crustal thickness varies from 38-35 km under the northern margin of the Ringkøbing-Fyn High (Baltica crust) to 28-27 km beneath the North German Basin in the Caledonian crust to the south. The suture zone is imaged by S-dipping crustal reflections from 1.9 to 10.6 s two-way travel time (twt) over a horizontal distance of ˜70 km within the transitional crust. The reflection suture zone terminates in a ˜60 km wide reflective lens with velocities of 6.6-6.8 km/s in the lowermost crust. The reflective lens may be interpreted as a remnant of oceanic or island-arc crust that was accreted to the leading edge of Baltica during closure of the Tornquist Sea. Alternatively, the reflective lens may represent an indentor of Baltica crust into the Avalonian terrane. The change in lower crustal reflectivity and the abrupt transition from a three- to a two-layered crust further south suggest that the Trans-European Fault and the Elbe Lineament continue into the North Sea. The upper mantle reflectivity is dominated by bands of strong-amplitude, S-dipping reflections from 13.5 to 21.8 s twt, and a weaker band of N-dipping reflections from 12 to

  19. Aroma profiling of an aerated fermentation of natural grape must with selected yeast strains at pilot scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronchoni, Jordi; Curiel, José Antonio; Sáenz-Navajas, María Pilar; Morales, Pilar; de-la-Fuente-Blanco, Arancha; Fernández-Zurbano, Purificación; Ferreira, Vicente; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2018-04-01

    The use of non-Saccharomyces strains in aerated conditions has proven effective for alcohol content reduction in wine during lab-scale fermentation. The process has been scaled up to 20 L batches, in order to produce lower alcohol wines amenable to sensory analysis. Sequential instead of simultaneous inoculation was chosen to prevent oxygen exposure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during fermentation, since previous results indicated that this would result in increased acetic acid production. In addition, an adaptation step was included to facilitate non-Saccharomyces implantation in natural must. Wines elaborated with Torulaspora delbrueckii or Metschnikowia pulcherrima in aerated conditions contained less alcohol than control wine (S. cerevisiae, non-aerated). Sensory and aroma analysis revealed that the quality of mixed fermentations was affected by the high levels of some yeast amino acid related byproducts, which suggests that further progress requires a careful selection of non-Saccharomyces strains and the use of specific N-nutrients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mixed-effects modelling of scale growth profiles predicts the occurrence of early and late fish migrants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Marco-Rius

    Full Text Available Fish growth is commonly used as a proxy for fitness but this is only valid if individual growth variation can be interpreted in relation to conspecifics' performance. Unfortunately, assessing individual variation in growth rates is problematic under natural conditions because subjects typically need to be marked, repeated measurements of body size are difficult to obtain in the field, and recaptures may be limited to a few time events which will generally vary among individuals. The analysis of consecutive growth rings (circuli found on scales and other hard structures offers an alternative to mark and recapture for examining individual growth variation in fish and other aquatic vertebrates where growth rings can be visualized, but accounting for autocorrelations and seasonal growth stanzas has proved challenging. Here we show how mixed-effects modelling of scale growth increments (inter-circuli spacing can be used to reconstruct the growth trajectories of sea trout (Salmo trutta and correctly classify 89% of individuals into early or late seaward migrants (smolts. Early migrants grew faster than late migrants during their first year of life in freshwater in two natural populations, suggesting that migration into the sea was triggered by ontogenetic (intrinsic drivers, rather than by competition with conspecifics. Our study highlights the profound effects that early growth can have on age at migration of a paradigmatic fish migrant and illustrates how the analysis of inter-circuli spacing can be used to reconstruct the detailed growth of individuals when these cannot be marked or are only caught once.

  1. Quantitative large scale gene expression profiling from human stem cell culture micro samples using multiplex pre-amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibschull, Mark; Lye, Stephen J; Okino, Steven T; Sarras, Haya

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional profiling is a powerful tool to study biological mechanisms during stem cell differentiation and reprogramming. Genome-wide methods like microarrays or next generation sequencing are expensive, time consuming, and require special equipment and bioinformatics expertise. Quantitative RT-PCR remains one of today's most widely accepted and used methods for analyzing gene expression in biological samples. However, limitations in the amount of starting materials often hinder the quantity and quality of information that could be obtained from a given sample. Here, we present a fast 4-step workflow allowing direct, column-free RNA isolation from limited human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC) cultures that is directly compatible with subsequent reverse transcription, target specific multiplex pre-amplification, and standard SYBR-Green quantitative PCR (qPCR) analysis. The workflow delivers excellent correlations in normalized gene-expression data obtained from different samples of hPSCs over a wide range of cell numbers (500-50,000 cells). We demonstrate accurate and unbiased target gene quantification in limiting stem cell cultures which allows for monitoring embryoid body differentiation and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) reprogramming. This method highlights a rapid and cost effective screening process, allowing reduction of culture formats and increase of processing throughputs for various stem cell applications.

  2. Simultaneous diagnosis of radial profiles and mix in NIF ignition-scale implosions via X-ray spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciricosta, O.; Scott, H.; Durey, P.; Hammel, B. A.; Epstein, R.; Preston, T. R.; Regan, S. P.; Vinko, S. M.; Woolsey, N. C.; Wark, J. S.

    2017-11-01

    In a National Ignition Facility implosion, hydrodynamic instabilities may cause the cold material from the imploding shell to be injected into the hot-spot (hot-spot mix), enhancing the radiative and conductive losses, which in turn may lead to a quenching of the ignition process. The bound-bound features of the spectrum emitted by high-Z ablator dopants that get mixed into the hot-spot have been previously used to infer the total amount of mixed mass; however, the typical errorbars are larger than the maximum tolerable mix. We present here an improved 2D model for mix spectroscopy which can be used to retrieve information on both the amount of mixed mass and the full imploded plasma profile. By performing radiation transfer and simultaneously fitting all of the features exhibited by the spectra, we are able to constrain self-consistently the effect of the opacity of the external layers of the target on the emission, thus improving the accuracy of the inferred mixed mass. The model's predictive capabilities are first validated by fitting simulated spectra arising from fully characterized hydrodynamic simulations, and then, the model is applied to previously published experimental results, providing values of mix mass in agreement with previous estimates. We show that the new self consistent procedure leads to better constrained estimates of mix and also provides insight into the sensitivity of the hot-spot spectroscopy to the spatial properties of the imploded capsule, such as the in-flight aspect ratio of the cold fuel surrounding the hotspot.

  3. Genes versus environment: geography and phylogenetic relationships shape the chemical profiles of stingless bees on a global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara D.; Rasmussen, Claus; Schmitt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Chemical compounds are highly important in the ecology of animals. In social insects, compounds on the body surface represent a particularly interesting trait, because they comprise different compound classes that are involved in different functions, such as communication, recognition and protection, all of which can be differentially affected by evolutionary processes. Here, we investigate the widely unknown and possibly antagonistic influence of phylogenetic and environmental factors on the composition of the cuticular chemistry of tropical stingless bees. We chose stingless bees because some species are unique in expressing not only self-produced compounds, but also compounds that are taken up from the environment. By relating the cuticular chemistry of 40 bee species from all over the world to their molecular phylogeny and geographical occurrence, we found that distribution patterns of different groups of compounds were differentially affected by genetic relatedness and biogeography. The ability to acquire environmental compounds was, for example, highly correlated with the bees' phylogeny and predominated in evolutionarily derived species. Owing to the presence of environmentally derived compounds, those species further expressed a higher chemical and thus functional diversity. In Old World species, chemical similarity of both environmentally derived and self-produced compounds was particularly high among sympatric species, even when they were less related to each other than to allopatric species, revealing a strong environmental effect even on largely genetically determined compounds. Thus, our findings do not only reveal an unexpectedly strong influence of the environment on the cuticular chemistry of stingless bees, but also demonstrate that even within one morphological trait (an insect's cuticular profile), different components (compound classes) can be differentially affected by different drivers (relatedness and biogeography), depending on the

  4. Junction Quality of SnO2-Based Perovskite Solar Cells Investigated by Nanometer-Scale Electrical Potential Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Ke, Weijun; Gorman, Brian P; Ye, Jichun; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Yan, Yanfa; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M

    2017-11-08

    Electron-selective layers (ESLs) and hole-selective layers (HSLs) are critical in high-efficiency organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite (PS) solar cells for charge-carrier transport, separation, and collection. We developed a procedure to assess the quality of the ESL/PS junction by measuring potential distribution on the cross section of SnO2-based PS solar cells using Kelvin probe force microscopy. Using the potential profiling, we compared three types of cells made of different ESLs but otherwise having an identical device structure: (1) cells with PS deposited directly on bare fluorine-doped SnO2 (FTO)-coated glass; (2) cells with an intrinsic SnO2 thin layer on the top of FTO as an effective ESL; and (3) cells with the SnO2 ESL and adding a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of fullerene. The results reveal two major potential drops or electric fields at the ESL/PS and PS/HSL interfaces. The electric-field ratio between the ESL/PS and PS/HSL interfaces increased in devices as follows: FTO SnO2-ESL SnO2 + SAM; this sequence explains the improvements of the fill factor (FF) and open-circuit voltage (Voc). The improvement of the FF from the FTO to SnO2-ESL cells may result from the reduction in voltage loss at the PS/HSL back interface and the improvement of Voc from the prevention of hole recombination at the ESL/PS front interface. The further improvements with adding an SAM is caused by the defect passivation at the ESL/PS interface, and hence, improvement of the junction quality. These nanoelectrical findings suggest possibilities for improving the device performance by further optimizing the SnO2-based ESL material quality and the ESL/PS interface.

  5. Clinical Profile, Dosing, and Quality-of-Life Outcomes in Primary Immune Deficiency Patients Treated at Home with Immunoglobulin G: Data from the IDEaL Patient Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, Sean; Kristofek, Loretta; Bolgar, William; Seidu, Luqman; Kile, Samantha

    2017-04-01

    Patients with primary immune deficiency (PID) often require immunoglobulin G (IgG, commonly referred to as Ig) replacement therapy to prevent infections and associated comorbidities. Ig therapy can be given either through intravenous or subcutaneous routes, and both can be done in the home setting. There is limited information available on the real-world diagnosis, management, and outcomes of this patient population, given the variable disease presentation and treatment options. The Immunoglobulin Diagnosis, Evaluation, and key Learnings (IDEaL) Patient Registry is designed to capture nursing, pharmacy, and patient-reported data for patients receiving Ig at home. To (a) present a real-world population of patients with PID who have received Ig at home and (b) examine how differences in administration, dosing, and insurance affect health and quality-of-life outcomes in these patients. As of July 2015, 383 patients receiving Ig therapy from Coram/CVS specialty infusion services, across multiple disease states, signed consent forms and enrolled in the IDEaL Patient Registry. Patients' referral paperwork, including lab values, and standard of care nursing and pharmacy follow-up forms were collected. Patients were mailed quality-of-life surveys at the time of enrollment and every 6 months after their enrollment. The most common diagnosis (78%) in these PID patients was common variable immunodeficiency (CVID). For Ig-naive adult patients, the average age at the start of treatment was 59 years. For pediatric patients, average age at start of treatment was 9 years. A majority of these PID patients (80%) received subcutaneous Ig (SCIg) at home, and 20% received intravenous Ig (IVIg). The average SCIg dose was 10 grams per week, or 130 mg per kg, and the average IVIg dose was 36 grams every 4 weeks, or 472 mg per kg. In the IVIg patient population, 34% had a dose or frequency change while on treatment, while 30% of the SCIg patients had a dose or frequency change. Patient

  6. Effect of HIV and malaria parasites co-infection on immune-hematological profiles among patients attending anti-retroviral treatment (ART clinic in Infectious Disease Hospital Kano, Nigeria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyisayo Ebenezer Jegede

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and malaria co-infection may present worse health outcomes in the tropics. Information on HIV/malaria co-infection effect on immune-hematological profiles is critical for patient care and there is a paucity of such data in Nigeria.To evaluate immune-hematological profiles among HIV infected patients compared to HIV/malaria co-infected for ART management improvement.This was a cross sectional study conducted at Infectious Disease Hospital, Kano. A total of 761 consenting adults attending ART clinic were randomly selected and recruited between June and December 2015. Participants' characteristics and clinical details including two previous CD4 counts were collected. Venous blood sample (4ml was collected in EDTA tube for malaria parasite diagnosis by rapid test and confirmed with microscopy. Hematological profiles were analyzed by Sysmex XP-300 and CD4 count by Cyflow cytometry. Data was analyzed with SPSS 22.0 using Chi-Square test for association between HIV/malaria parasites co-infection with age groups, gender, ART, cotrimoxazole and usage of treated bed nets. Mean hematological profiles by HIV/malaria co-infection and HIV only were compared using independent t-test and mean CD4 count tested by mixed design repeated measures ANOVA. Statistical significant difference at probability of <0.05 was considered for all variables.Of the 761 HIV infected, 64% were females, with a mean age of ± (SD 37.30 (10.4 years. Prevalence of HIV/malaria co-infection was 27.7% with Plasmodium falciparum specie accounting for 99.1%. No statistical significant difference was observed between HIV/malaria co-infection in association to age (p = 0.498 and gender (p = 0.789. A significantly (p = 0.026 higher prevalence (35.2% of co-infection was observed among non-ART patients compared to (26% ART patients. Prevalence of co-infection was significantly lower (20.0% among cotrimoxazole users compared to those not on cotrimoxazole (37

  7. Examining the relationship between personality and affect-related attributes and adolescents' intentions to try smoking using the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memetovic, Jasmina; Ratner, Pamela A; Gotay, Carolyn; Richardson, Christopher G

    2016-05-01

    Assessments of adolescents' smoking intentions indicate that many are susceptible to smoking initiation because they do not have resolute intentions to abstain from trying smoking in the future. Although researchers have developed personality and affect-related risk factor profiles to understand risk for the initiation of substance use and abuse (e.g., alcohol), few have examined the extent to which these risk factors are related to the tobacco use intentions of adolescents who have yet to try tobacco smoking. The objective of this study was to examine the relationships between personality and affect-related risk factors measured by the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) and smoking intentions in a sample of adolescents who have not experimented with tobacco smoking. Data is based on responses from 1352 participants in the British Columbia Adolescent Substance Use Survey (56% female, 76% in Grade 8) who had never tried smoking tobacco. Of these 1352 participants, 29% (n=338) were classified as not having resolute intentions to not try smoking. Generalized estimating equations were used to examine the relationship between each SURPS dimension (Anxiety Sensitivity, Hopelessness, Impulsivity and Sensation Seeking) and the intention to try cigarettes in the future. Hopelessness (AOR 1.06, 95% CI [1.03, 1.10], psmoking. These findings may be used to inform a prevention-oriented framework to reduce susceptibility to tobacco smoking. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Transcript profiling of salinity stress responses by large-scale expressed sequence tag analysis in Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kore-eda, Shin; Cushman, Mary Ann; Akselrod, Inna; Bufford, Davina; Fredrickson, Monica; Clark, Elizabeth; Cushman, John C

    2004-10-27

    The common ice plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, is a halophytic (salt-loving) member of the Aizoaceae, which switches from C3 photosynthesis to Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) when exposed to salinity or water-deficit stress. CAM is a metabolic adaptation of photosynthetic carbon fixation that improves water use efficiency by shifting net CO2 uptake to the night, thereby reducing transpirational water loss. To improve our understanding of the molecular genetic underpinnings and control mechanisms for Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) and other salinity stress response adaptations, a total of 9733 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from cDNAs derived from leaf tissues of well-watered and salinity-stressed (0.5 M NaCl for 30 and 48 h) were characterized. Clustering and assembly of these ESTs resulted in the identification of a total of 3676 tentative unique gene sequences (1249 tentative consensus sequences and 2427 singleton ESTs) expressed in leaves of ice plant under unstressed and salinity stressed conditions. The same number (2782) of ESTs from each library (total=8346 ESTs) were randomly selected and analyzed to compare expression profiles among the control and salt stressed leaf tissues. EST frequencies for transcripts encoding CAM-related enzymes, pathogenesis-related, senescence-associated, cell death-related, and stress-related proteins such as heat shock proteins (HSPs), chaperones, early light-inducible proteins, ion homeostasis, antioxidative stress, detoxification, and biosynthetic enzymes for osmoprotectants increased 2-12-fold in cDNA libraries constructed from salt stressed plants. In contrast, the frequency of ESTs encoding light-harvesting and photosystem complexes and C3 photosynthetic enzymes decreased 4-fold overall following salinity stress with transcripts for ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO) subunits decreasing 7-fold. Moreover, stressed plants contained a higher percentage of ESTs encoding novel and/or functionally

  9. Single-cell profiling of lineage determining transcription factors in antigen-specific CD4+T cells reveals unexpected complexity in recall responses during immune reconstitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Xu, Yin; Munier, Mee Ling; Zaunders, John J; Kelleher, Anthony D

    2017-08-01

    Recent studies of protein and gene expression at the single-cell level have revealed that the memory T-cell compartment is more heterogeneous than previously acknowledged. Identifying different T helper subsets involved in memory responses at the single-cell level is thus necessary to understand the level of heterogeneity within this population. Antigen-specific CD4 + T cells were measured using the CD25/OX40 assay together with a qualitative multiplex single-cell RT-PCR assay. Transcription profiles and subset proportions within the antigen-specific CD4 + T-cell population were dissected. Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4 + T-cell responses skewed toward a Th1 response, whereas Tetanus toxoid responses skewed toward a Th2 type response. Fluctuations in CD4 + T-cell subsets were observed within the HIV-Gag-specific response during ongoing antiretroviral therapy. Strong effector responses (Th1) were observed in early treatment, however with ongoing therapy this effector response significantly decreased in combination with an increase in Tregs and circulating Tfh-like BCL-6 + memory cells. The apparent increase in Tcm in peripheral blood after a several weeks of antiretroviral therapy may be due to Tfh-like cell egress from germinal centers into the periphery.

  10. Nitrous oxide emissions and dissolved oxygen profiling in a full-scale nitrifying activated sludge treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboobakar, Amina; Cartmell, Elise; Stephenson, Tom; Jones, Mark; Vale, Peter; Dotro, Gabriela

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports findings from online, continuous monitoring of dissolved and gaseous nitrous oxide (N₂O), combined with dissolved oxygen (DO) and ammonia loading, in a full-scale nitrifying activated sludge plant. The study was conducted over eight weeks, at a 210,000 population equivalent sewage treatment works in the UK. Results showed diurnal variability in the gaseous and dissolved N₂O emissions, with hourly averages ranging from 0 to 0.00009 kgN₂O-N/h for dissolved and 0.00077-0.0027 kgN₂O-N/h for gaseous nitrous oxide emissions respectively, per ammonia loading, depending on the time of day. Similarly, the spatial variability was high, with the highest emissions recorded immediately after the anoxic zone and in the final pass of the aeration lane, where ammonia concentrations were typically below 0.5 mg/L. Emissions were shown to be negatively correlated to dissolved oxygen, which fluctuated between 0.5 and 2.5 mgO₂/L, at the control set point of 1.5 mgO₂/L. The resulting dynamic DO conditions are known to favour N₂O production, both by autotrophic and heterotrophic processes in mixed cultures. Average mass emissions from the lane were greater in the gaseous (0.036% of the influent total nitrogen) than in the dissolved (0.01% of the influent total nitrogen) phase, and followed the same diurnal and spatial patterns. Nitrous oxide emissions corresponded to over 34,000 carbon dioxide equivalents/year, adding 13% to the carbon footprint associated with the energy requirements of the monitored lane. A clearer understanding of emissions obtained from real-time data can help towards finding the right balance between improving operational efficiency and saving energy, without increasing N₂O emissions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictive functional profiling using marker gene sequences and community diversity analyses of microbes in full-scale anaerobic sludge digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jing; Liu, Guoji; Li, Hongping; Xu, Li; Du, Lili; Yang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion (AD) is widely used in treating the sewage sludge, as it can reduce the amount of sludge, eliminate pathogens and produce biofuel. To enhance the operational performance and stability of anaerobic bioreactors, operational and conventional chemical data from full-scale sludge anaerobic digesters were collected over a 2-year period and summarized, and the microbial community diversity of the sludge sample was investigated at various stages of the AD process. For the purpose of distinguishing between the functional and community diversity of the microbes, Phylogenetic Investigation of Communities by Reconstruction of Unobserved States (PICRUSt) software was used to impute the prevalence of 16S rDNA marker gene sequences in the difference in various sludge samples. Meanwhile, a taxa analysis was also carried out to investigate the different sludge samples. The microbial community diversity analysis of one AD sludge sample showed that the most dominant bacterial genera were Saccharicrinis, Syntrophus, Anaerotruncus and Thermanaerothrix. Among archaea, acetoclastic Methanosaeta represented 56.0 %, and hydrogenotrophic Methanospirillum, Methanoculleus, Methanothermus and Methanolinea accounted for 41.3 % of all methanogens. The taxa, genetic and functional prediction analyses of the feedstock and AD sludge samples suggested great community diversity differences between them. The taxa of bacteria in two AD sludge samples were considerably different, but the abundances of the functional KEGG pathways took on similar levels. The numbers of identified pathogens were significantly lower in the digested sludge than in the feedstock, but the PICRUSt results showed the difference in "human diseases" abundances in the level-1 pathway between the two sludge samples was small.

  12. Using river long profiles and geomorphic indices to evaluate the geomorphological signature of continental scale drainage capture, Duero basin (NW Iberia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antón, Loreto; De Vicente, Gerardo; Muñoz-Martín, Alfonso; Stokes, Martin

    2014-02-01

    Well-constrained case studies of transient landscape responses are needed to improve our understanding of erosion processes associated with drainage captures. The Duero basin is an excellent location for such a study because the landscape is currently undergoing pronounced geomorphological changes resulting from the opening of a former closed drainage. The present-day continental interior basin (> 50,000 km2) drains to the Atlantic Ocean via the Duero River, but during the Cenozoic the basin experienced a long endorheic period marked by the formation of evaporites. Currently, the entire continental interior is an area of relative tectonic quiescence, characterised by a relict low-relief upland topography (Meseta). Systematic variations in lithology and a well-constrained tectonic setting throughout the basin and adjacent areas allow for the comparison of channel morphology between the Cenozoic Duero basin and its western fringe. To explore the signal of transient geomorphic response to capture and opening of the former endorheic basin, the main channel and 24 tributaries were analysed in terms of their longitudinal profiles and the application of geomorphic indices (concavity index [Ci], valley floor width-to-height ratio [Vf], and stream-length gradient index [SL]). The analysis reveals two zones with distinctive morphologies: (1) an upper reach domain consisting of broad flat valleys and low-gradient streams where concave longitudinal profiles dominate and (2) a middle reach domain characterised by steep, deeply incised canyons where a convex long profile dominates marking a major kinckzone. The quantitative information on channel shapes and long profile geometries allows the interpretation of these patterns in terms of driving forces for fluvial landscape development. Large-scale morphometric analysis highlights the transient response of the entire basin to a capture-related base level lowering and illustrates the importance of drainage captures as potential

  13. Evaluation of blood chemical, lipids profile and immune response on broiler chicks fed with milk thistle (Silybum mari- anum L. and thyme (Thymus vulgaris L. seeds in south-eastern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Ansari Nik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the effects of supplementation of milk thistle seeds (MTS and thyme seeds (TS on blood chemical, lipid profile and immune response in broiler chicks. In this study, 160 one-day-old chicks (Ross 308 were allocated to four treatments with four replicates based on a completely randomized design in a 2×2 factorial arrangement. The treatment groups were (A basal control diet, (B basal diet with 0.2 g/kg of MTS, (C basal diet with 0.2 g/kg of TS and (D basal diet with 0.2 g/kg of MTS and 0.2 g/kg of TS. Birds fed the (D supplemented treatment (MTS plus TS had the greatest levels of total protein, 4.26±0.27 g/L; albumin, 2.21±0.02 g/L; globulin 2.28±0.23 g/L; and aspartate aminotransferase (AST activity, 152.18±4.46 U/L than the control birds [group (A] (P<0.05. MTS alone or in combination with TS reduced the cholesterol in the serum of the broilers (P<0.05, and this effect was more pronounced for the (C treatment (TS alone (P<0.05. Treatment consumption with MTS plus TS [group (D] significantly increased the concentration of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C, 90.32±2.28 mmol/L, but low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C, 10.44±0.07 mmol/L, and triglyceride concentrations, 60.75±2.65 mmol/L, were decreased compared to control (P<0.05. However, none of the immunity parameters and liver enzymes differed significantly in MTS or TS groups. The present research indicated that supplements of MTS and TS have a protective influence on the lipids profile, total protein, globulin, albumin and AST levels in broiler chicks.

  14. Personality and substance use: psychometric evaluation and validation of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS) in English, Irish, French, and German adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurk, Sarah; Kuitunen-Paul, Sören; Kroemer, Nils B; Artiges, Eric; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bokde, Arun L W; Büchel, Christian; Conrod, Patricia; Fauth-Bühler, Mira; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jürgen; Garavan, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Mann, Karl F; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomáš; Pausova, Zdenka; Poustka, Luise; Rietschel, Marcella; Schumann, Gunter; Struve, Maren; Smolka, Michael N

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present longitudinal study was the psychometric evaluation of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS). We analyzed data from N = 2,022 adolescents aged 13 to 15 at baseline assessment and 2 years later (mean interval 2.11 years). Missing data at follow-up were imputed (N = 522). Psychometric properties of the SURPS were analyzed using confirmatory factor analysis. We examined structural as well as convergent validity with other personality measurements and drinking motives, and predictive validity for substance use at follow-up. The hypothesized 4-factorial structure (i.e., anxiety sensitivity, hopelessness, impulsivity [IMP], and sensation seeking [SS]) based on all 23 items resulted in acceptable fit to empirical data, acceptable internal consistencies, low to moderate test-retest reliability coefficients, as well as evidence for factorial and convergent validity. The proposed factor structure was stable for both males and females and, to lesser degree, across languages. However, only the SS and the IMP subscales of the SURPS predicted substance use outcomes at 16 years of age. The SURPS is unique in its specific assessment of traits related to substance use disorders as well as the resulting shortened administration time. Test-retest reliability was low to moderate and comparable to other personality scales. However, its relation to future substance use was limited to the SS and IMP subscales, which may be due to the relatively low-risk substance use pattern in the present sample. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  15. Immunization for Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immunization for the entire family. Diseases & Vaccines Overview Immunization Schedules Talk to you doctor about your immunization ... years Immunization Schedule for Children, 7-18 years Immunization News September 29, 2017 CDC released a new ...

  16. The role of functional polymorphisms in immune response genes as biomarkers of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy outcome in bladder cancer: establishment of a predictive profile in a Southern Europe population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Luís; Oliveira, Daniela; Ferreira, José A; Tavares, Ana; Cruz, Ricardo; Medeiros, Rui; Santos, Lúcio

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate the predictive value of genetic polymorphisms in the context of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) immunotherapy outcome and create a predictive profile that may allow discrimination of the risk of recurrence. In a dataset of 204 patients treated with BCG, we evaluated 42 genetic polymorphisms in 38 genes involved in the BCG mechanism of action, using Sequenom MassARRAY(®) technology. Stepwise multivariate Cox regression was used for data mining. In agreement with previous studies we found that gender, age, tumour multiplicity and treatment scheme were associated with BCG failure. Using stepwise multivariate Cox regression analysis we propose the first predictive profile of BCG immunotherapy outcome and a risk score based on polymorphisms in immune system molecules [single nucleotide polymorphisms in tumour necrosis factor α (TNFA)-1031T/C (rs1799964), interleukin 2 receptor α (IL2RA) rs2104286 T/C, IL17A-197G/A (rs2275913), IL17RA-809A/G (rs4819554), IL18R1 rs3771171 T/C, intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) K469E (rs5498), Fas ligand (FASL)-844T/C (rs763110) and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand receptor 1 (TRAILR1)-397T/G (rs79037040)] in association with clinicopathological variables. This risk score allows the categorisation of patients into risk groups: patients within the low-risk group have a 90% chance of successful treatment, whereas patients in the high-risk group present a 75% chance of recurrence after BCG treatment. We have established the first predictive score of BCG immunotherapy outcome combining clinicopathological characteristics and a panel of genetic polymorphisms. Further studies using an independent cohort are warranted. Moreover, the inclusion of other biomarkers may help to improve the proposed model. © 2014 The Authors BJU International © 2014 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Candida Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian R. Naglik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The human pathogenic fungus Candida albicans is the predominant cause of both superficial and invasive forms of candidiasis. C. albicans primarily infects immunocompromised individuals as a result of either immunodeficiency or intervention therapy, which highlights the importance of host immune defences in preventing fungal infections. The host defence system utilises a vast communication network of cells, proteins, and chemical signals distributed in blood and tissues, which constitute innate and adaptive immunity. Over the last decade the identity of many key molecules mediating host defence against C. albicans has been identified. This review will discuss how the host recognises this fungus, the events induced by fungal cells, and the host innate and adaptive immune defences that ultimately resolve C. albicans infections during health.

  18. Exploring the Effects of Genetic Variants on Clinical Profiles of Parkinson's Disease Assessed by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and the Hoehn-Yahr Stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Chaodong; Zhang, Dabao; Zhang, Min; Chan, Piu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Many genetic variants have been linked to familial or sporadic Parkinson's disease (PD), among which those identified in PARK16, BST1, SNCA, LRRK2, GBA and MAPT genes have been demonstrated to be the most common risk factors worldwide. Moreover, complex gene-gene and gene-environment interactions have been highlighted in PD pathogenesis. Compared to studies focusing on the predisposing effects of genes, there is a relative lack of research investigating how these genes and their interactions influence the clinical profiles of PD. In a cohort consisting of 2,011 Chinese Han PD patients, we selected 9 representative variants from the 6 above-mentioned common PD genes to analyze their main and epistatic effects on the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) stage of PD. With multiple linear regression models adjusting for medication status, disease duration, gender and age at onset, none of the variants displayed significant main effects on UPDRS or the H-Y scores. However, for gene-gene interaction analyses, 7 out of 37 pairs of variants showed significant or marginally significant associations with these scores. Among these, the GBA rs421016 (L444P)×LRRK2 rs33949390 (R1628P) interaction was consistently significant in relation to UPDRS III and UPDRS total (I+II+III), even after controlling for the family-wise error rate using False Discovery Rate (FDR-corrected p values are 0.0481 and 0.0070, respectively). Although the effects of the remaining pairs of variants did not survive the FDR correction, they showed marginally significant associations with either UPDRS or the H-Y stage (raw p<0.05). Our results highlight the importance of epistatic effects of multiple genes on the determination of PD clinical profiles and may have implications for molecular classification and personalized intervention of the disease.

  19. Development of the first marmoset-specific DNA microarray (EUMAMA: a new genetic tool for large-scale expression profiling in a non-human primate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waegele Brigitte

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus, a small non-endangered New World primate native to eastern Brazil, is becoming increasingly used as a non-human primate model in biomedical research, drug development and safety assessment. In contrast to the growing interest for the marmoset as an animal model, the molecular tools for genetic analysis are extremely limited. Results Here we report the development of the first marmoset-specific oligonucleotide microarray (EUMAMA containing probe sets targeting 1541 different marmoset transcripts expressed in hippocampus. These 1541 transcripts represent a wide variety of different functional gene classes. Hybridisation of the marmoset microarray with labelled RNA from hippocampus, cortex and a panel of 7 different peripheral tissues resulted in high detection rates of 85% in the neuronal tissues and on average 70% in the non-neuronal tissues. The expression profiles of the 2 neuronal tissues, hippocampus and cortex, were highly similar, as indicated by a correlation coefficient of 0.96. Several transcripts with a tissue-specific pattern of expression were identified. Besides the marmoset microarray we have generated 3215 ESTs derived from marmoset hippocampus, which have been annotated and submitted to GenBank [GenBank: EF214838 – EF215447, EH380242 – EH382846]. Conclusion We have generated the first marmoset-specific DNA microarray and demonstrated its use to characterise large-scale gene expression profiles of hippocampus but also of other neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. In addition, we have generated a large collection of ESTs of marmoset origin, which are now available in the public domain. These new tools will facilitate molecular genetic research into this non-human primate animal model.

  20. Innate immunity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    not listed in Table 1, epithelial cells and endothelial cells, and to a lesser extent other types of structural cells such as fibroblasts and smooth-muscle cells, are critically involved in promoting both innate and adaptive immune responses. In the case of epithelial cells, this is achieved via production of pro-inflammatory.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis of innate immunity reveals novel and conserved components in crustacean food crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Alvina G; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2017-05-18

    Growing global demands for crustacean food crop species have driven large investments in aquaculture research worldwide. However, large-scale production is susceptible to pathogen-mediated destruction particularly in developing economies. Thus, a thorough understanding of the immune system components of food crop species is imperative for research to combat pathogens. Through a comparative genomics approach utilising extant data from 55 species, we describe the innate immune system of the class Malacostraca, which includes all food crop species. We identify 7407 malacostracan genes from 39 gene families implicated in different aspects of host defence and demonstrate dynamic evolution of innate immunity components within this group. Malacostracans have achieved flexibility in recognising infectious agents through divergent evolution and expansion of pathogen recognition receptors genes. Antiviral RNAi, Toll and JAK-STAT signal transduction pathways have remained conserved within Malacostraca, although the Imd pathway appears to lack several key components. Immune effectors such as the antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have unique evolutionary profiles, with many malacostracan AMPs not found in other arthropods. Lastly, we describe four putative novel immune gene families, potentially representing important evolutionary novelties of the malacostracan immune system. Our analyses across the broader Malacostraca have allowed us to not only draw analogies with other arthropods but also to identify evolutionary novelties in immune modulation components and form strong hypotheses as to when key pathways have evolved or diverged. This will serve as a key resource for future immunology research in crustacean food crops.

  2. Large-Scale microRNA Expression Profiling Identifies Putative Retinal miRNA-mRNA Signaling Pathways Underlying Form-Deprivation Myopia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkatchenko, Andrei V; Luo, Xiaoyan; Tkatchenko, Tatiana V; Vaz, Candida; Tanavde, Vivek M; Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Zauscher, Stefan; Gonzalez, Pedro; Young, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Development of myopia is associated with large-scale changes in ocular tissue gene expression. Although differential expression of coding genes underlying development of myopia has been a subject of intense investigation, the role of non-coding genes such as microRNAs in the development of myopia is largely unknown. In this study, we explored myopia-associated miRNA expression profiles in the retina and sclera of C57Bl/6J mice with experimentally induced myopia using microarray technology. We found a total of 53 differentially expressed miRNAs in the retina and no differences in miRNA expression in the sclera of C57BL/6J mice after 10 days of visual form deprivation, which induced -6.93 ± 2.44 D (p myopia. We also identified their putative mRNA targets among mRNAs found to be differentially expressed in myopic retina and potential signaling pathways involved in the development of form-deprivation myopia using miRNA-mRNA interaction network analysis. Analysis of myopia-associated signaling pathways revealed that myopic response to visual form deprivation in the retina is regulated by a small number of highly integrated signaling pathways. Our findings highlighted that changes in microRNA expression are involved in the regulation of refractive eye development and predicted how they may be involved in the development of myopia by regulating retinal gene expression.

  3. Vaccines (immunizations) - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccinations; Immunizations; Immunize; Vaccine shots; Prevention - vaccine ... of the vaccine. VACCINE SCHEDULE The recommended vaccination (immunization) schedule is updated every 12 months by the ...

  4. Adult Immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Coskun

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the many advances in modern medicine, each year thousands of people in the world die from diseases that are easily prevented by safe and effective vaccines. Few measures in preventive medicine are of such proven value and as easy to implement as routine immunization against infectious diseases. Prevention of infection by immunization is a lifelong process. There are a number of vaccines that all adults (¡I18 years require. There are also other vaccines that need to be tailored to meet individual variations in risk resulting from occupation, foreign travel, underlying illness, lifestyle and age. In this study, we tried to review this important subject. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(2.000: 159-166

  5. Cellular immune response in intraventricular experimental neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Vania B L; Lima, Sarah B; Matos-Silva, Hidelberto; Vinaud, Marina C; Loyola, Patricia R A N; Lino, Ruy S

    2016-03-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is considered a neglected parasitic infection of the human central nervous system. Its pathogenesis is due to the host immune response, stage of evolution and location of the parasite. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in situ and systemic immune response through cytokines dosage (IL-4, IL-10, IL-17 and IFN-γ) as well as the local inflammatory response of the experimental NCC with Taenia crassiceps. The in situ and systemic cellular and inflammatory immune response were evaluated through the cytokines quantification at 7, 30, 60 and 90 days after inoculation and histopathological analysis. All cysticerci were found within the cerebral ventricles. There was a discrete intensity of inflammatory cells of mixed immune profile, polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells, at the beginning of the infection and predominance of mononuclear cells at the end. The systemic immune response showed a significant increase in all the analysed cytokines and predominance of the Th2 immune profile cytokines at the end of the infection. These results indicate that the location of the cysticerci may lead to ventriculomegaly. The acute phase of the infection showed a mixed Th1/Th17 profile accompanied by high levels of IL-10 while the late phase showed a Th2 immune profile.

  6. Immunization Schedules for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ACIP Vaccination Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Immunization Schedules for Adults in Easy-to-read Formats ... previous immunizations. View or Print a Schedule Recommended Immunizations for Adults (19 Years and Older) by Age ...

  7. Immune System (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Immune System KidsHealth > For Parents > Immune System Print A A ... lead to illness and infection. About the Immune System The immune system is the body's defense against ...

  8. Deceptive Imprinting and Immune Refocusing in Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    A large number of the world’s most widespread and problematic pathogens evade host immune responses by inducing strain specific immunity to immunodominant epitopes with high mutation rates capable of altering antigenic profiles. The immune system appears to be decoyed into reacting to these immunod...

  9. Long-Term Stability of Membership in a Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children--Third Edition (WISC-III) Subtest Core Profile Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borsuk, Ellen R.; Watkins, Marley W.; Canivez, Gary L.

    2006-01-01

    Although often applied in practice, clinically based cognitive subtest profile analysis has failed to achieve empirical support. Nonlinear multivariate subtest profile analysis may have benefits over clinically based techniques, but the psychometric properties of these methods must be studied prior to their implementation and interpretation. The…

  10. Integrated Circuit Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sketoe, J. G.; Clark, Anthony

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a DOD E3 program overview on integrated circuit immunity. The topics include: 1) EMI Immunity Testing; 2) Threshold Definition; 3) Bias Tee Function; 4) Bias Tee Calibration Set-Up; 5) EDM Test Figure; 6) EMI Immunity Levels; 7) NAND vs. and Gate Immunity; 8) TTL vs. LS Immunity Levels; 9) TP vs. OC Immunity Levels; 10) 7805 Volt Reg Immunity; and 11) Seventies Chip Set. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  11. Multi-scale spatial variation in stable isotope and fatty acid profiles amongst temperate reef species: implications for design and interpretation of trophic studies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    M. A. Guest; A. J. Hirst; P. D. Nichols; S. D. Frusher

    2010-01-01

    .... Understanding at what scale these 2 biochemical tracers vary, and if the scale of variability corresponds between tracers, is crucial for the correct design and interpretation of combined tracers in trophic studies...

  12. Comparison of Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale with Premature Infant Pain Profile for the Assessment of Acute Prolonged Pain in Neonates on Assisted Ventilation: A Prospective Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Saumil Ashvin Desai; Ruchi Nimish Nanavati; Bonny Bipin Jasani; Nandkishor Kabra

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to compare Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS) with Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 of the study, we assessed whether neonates on assisted ventilation experienced acute prolonged pain. In phase 2, the aim was to compare N-PASS with PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation.. Design:...

  13. Intradermal immunization of mice with radiation-attenuated sporozoites of Plasmodium yoelii induces effective protective immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voza, Tatiana; Kebaier, Chahnaz; Vanderberg, Jerome P

    2010-12-15

    Intravenous injection of mice with attenuated Plasmodium berghei sporozoites induces sterile immunity to challenge with viable sporozoites. Non-intravenous routes have been reported to yield poor immunity. Because intravenous immunization has been considered to be unacceptable for large scale vaccination of humans, assessment was made of the results of intradermal immunization of mice with Plasmodium yoelii, a rodent malaria parasite whose infectivity resembles that of human malaria. Mice were immunized with two injections of isolated, radiation-attenuated P. yoelii sporozoites, either by intravenous (IV) or intradermal (ID) inoculation. In an attempt to enhance protective immunogenicity of ID-injections, one group of experimental mice received topical application of an adjuvant, Imiquimod, while another group had their injections accompanied by local "tape-stripping" of the skin, a procedure known to disrupt the stratum corneum and activate local immunocytes. Challenge of immunized and non-immunized control mice was by bite of sporozoite-infected mosquitoes. Degree of protection among the various groups of mice was determined by microscopic examination of stained blood smears. Statistical significance of protection was determined by a one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Two intravenous immunizations produced 94% protection to mosquito bite challenge; intradermal immunization produced 78% protection, while intradermal immunization accompanied by "tape-stripping" produced 94% protection. There were no statistically significant differences in degree of protective immunity between immunizations done by intravenous versus intradermal injection. The use of a sub-microlitre syringe for intradermal injections yielded excellent protective immunity. ID-immunization with large numbers of radiation-attenuated P. yoelii sporozoites led to levels of protective immunity comparable to those achieved by IV-immunization. It remains to be determined whether an adjuvant

  14. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, S.G; Kleinnijenhuis, J; Netea, M.G; Dockrell, H.M

    2017-01-01

    .... A possible mechanism of action of this effect, the induction of trained innate immunity, has been demonstrated when cells from BCG-vaccinated adults are restimulated in vitro with non-related microbial stimuli...

  15. Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Why Immunize? Vaccines: The Basics Instant Childhood Immunization Schedule Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Get ... date. See Disclaimer for additional details. Based on Immunization Schedule for Children 0 through 6 Years of ...

  16. Immune System Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Special Needs Glasses and Contact Lenses Quiz: Immune System KidsHealth > For Kids > Quiz: Immune System Print A A A How much do you know about your immune system? Find out by taking this quiz! About KidsHealth ...

  17. Melatonin, immune function and aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal SR Pandi

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aging is associated with a decline in immune function (immunosenescence, a situation known to correlate with increased incidence of cancer, infectious and degenerative diseases. Innate, cellular and humoral immunity all exhibit increased deterioration with age. A decrease in functional competence of individual natural killer (NK cells is found with advancing age. Macrophages and granulocytes show functional decline in aging as evidenced by their diminished phagocytic activity and impairment of superoxide generation. There is also marked shift in cytokine profile as age advances, e.g., CD3+ and CD4+ cells decline in number whereas CD8+ cells increase in elderly individuals. A decline in organ specific antibodies occurs causing reduced humoral responsiveness. Circulating melatonin decreases with age and in recent years much interest has been focused on its immunomodulatory effect. Melatonin stimulates the production of progenitor cells for granulocytes-macrophages. It also stimulates the production of NK cells and CD4+ cells and inhibits CD8+ cells. The production and release of various cytokines from NK cells and T-helper lymphocytes also are enhanced by melatonin. Melatonin presumably regulates immune function by acting on the immune-opioid network, by affecting G protein-cAMP signal pathway and by regulating intracellular glutathione levels. Melatonin has the potential therapeutic value to enhance immune function in aged individuals and in patients in an immunocompromised state.

  18. Compton profile of tantalum

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    scale-Compton profile is directly related to the momentum distribution of the electrons. The spectral analysis ... proximation, the Compton profile J(q) is the projection of the target's electron momentum distribution, n(p) ... densed matter and serves as a reliable test of the accuracy of the calculated wave functions. Such basic ...

  19. Immunization Action Coalition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... IAC | Contact | A-Z Index | Donate | Shop | SUBSCRIBE Immunization Action Coalition Favorites ACIP Recommendations Package Inserts Additional Immunization Resources Photos Adult Vaccination Screening Checklists Ask the ...

  20. Protective antigens against glanders identified by expression library immunization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Whitlock

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia are highly evolved Gram-negative bacteria that primarily infect solipeds but are transmitted to humans by ingestion and cutaneous or aerosol exposures. Heightened concern over human infections of Burkholderia (B. mallei and the very closely related species B. pseudomallei is due to the pathogens’ proven effectiveness as bioweapons, and to the increased potential for natural opportunistic infections in the growing diabetic and immuno-compromised populations. These Burkholderia species are nearly impervious to antibiotic treatments and no vaccine exists. In this study, the genome of the highly virulent B. mallei ATCC23344 strain was examined by expression library immunization for gene-encoded protective antigens. This protocol for genomic-scale functional screening was customized to accommodate the unusually large complexity of Burkholderia, and yielded 12 new putative vaccine candidates. Five of the candidates were individually tested as protein immunogens and three were found to confer significant partial protection against a lethal pulmonary infection in a murine model of disease. Determinations of peripheral blood cytokine and chemokine profiles following individual protein immunizations show that IL-2 and IL-4 are elicited by the three confirmed candidates, but unexpectedly interferon-and tumor necrosis factor-are not. We suggest that these pathogen components, discovered using genetic immunization and confirmed in a conventional protein format, will be useful toward the development of a safe and effective glanders vaccine.

  1. A large-scale dataset of single and mixed-source short tandem repeat profiles to inform human identification strategies: PROVEDIt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonse, Lauren E; Garrett, Amanda D; Lun, Desmond S; Duffy, Ken R; Grgicak, Catherine M

    2018-01-01

    DNA-based human identity testing is conducted by comparison of PCR-amplified polymorphic Short Tandem Repeat (STR) motifs from a known source with the STR profiles obtained from uncertain sources. Samples such as those found at crime scenes often result in signal that is a composite of incomplete STR profiles from an unknown number of unknown contributors, making interpretation an arduous task. To facilitate advancement in STR interpretation challenges we provide over 25,000 multiplex STR profiles produced from one to five known individuals at target levels ranging from one to 160 copies of DNA. The data, generated under 144 laboratory conditions, are classified by total copy number and contributor proportions. For the 70% of samples that were synthetically compromised, we report the level of DNA damage using quantitative and end-point PCR. In addition, we characterize the complexity of the signal by exploring the number of detected alleles in each profile. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. An item response theory analysis of Harter’s self-perception profile for children or why strong clinical scales should be distrusted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberink, I.J.L.; Meijer, R.R.

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the psychometric properties of the subscales of the Self-Perception Profile for Children with item response theory (IRT) models using a sample of 611 children. Results from a nonparametric Mokken analysis and a parametric IRT approach for boys (n = 268) and girls (n = 343)

  3. Further Empirical Data on the Psychoeducational Profile-Revised (PEP-R): Reliability and Validation with the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Susanna; Micheli, Enrico; Villa, Laura; Pastore, Valentina; Crippa, Alessandro; Molteni, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    The PEP-R (psychoeducational profile revised) is an instrument that has been used in many countries to assess abilities and formulate treatment programs for children with autism and related developmental disorders. To the end to provide further information on the PEP-R's psychometric properties, a large sample (N = 137) of children presenting…

  4. Computational Typologies of Multidimensional End-of-Primary-School Performance Profiles from an Educational Perspective of Large-Scale TIMSS and PIRLS Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unlu, Ali; Schurig, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Recently, performance profiles in reading, mathematics and science were created using the data collectively available in the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) and the Progress in International Reading Literacy Study (PIRLS) 2011. In addition, a classification of children to the end of their primary school years was…

  5. An Item Response Theory Analysis of Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Children or Why Strong Clinical Scales Should Be Distrusted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egberink, Iris J. L.; Meijer, Rob R.

    2011-01-01

    The authors investigated the psychometric properties of the subscales of the Self-Perception Profile for Children with item response theory (IRT) models using a sample of 611 children. Results from a nonparametric Mokken analysis and a parametric IRT approach for boys (n = 268) and girls (n = 343) were compared. The authors found that most scales…

  6. An item response theory analysis of Harter's Self-Perception Profile for Children or why strong clinical scales should be distrusted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Egberink, Iris J. L.; Meijer, Rob R.

    The authors investigated the psychometric properties of the subscales of the Self-Perception Profile for Children with item response theory (IRT) models using a sample of 611 children. Results from a nonparametric Mokken analysis and a parametric IRT approach for boys (n = 268) and girls (n = 343)

  7. Our Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our Immune System A story for children with primary immunodeficiency diseases Written by Sara LeBien IMMUNE DEFICIENCY FOUNDATION A note from ... are immune deficient to better understand their immune system. What is a “ B-cell, ” a “ T-cell, ” ...

  8. Integrated Immune Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crucian, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's Integrated Immune Experiment. The objectives include: 1) Address significant lack of data regarding immune status during flight; 2) Replace several recent immune studies with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling; 3) Determine the in-flight status of immunity, physiological stress, viral immunity/reactivation; 4) Determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight; and 5) Determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  9. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette-Guerin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, S.G.; Kleinnijenhuis, J.; Netea, M.G.; Dockrell, H.M.

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) activates both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The antimycobacterial effects of these responses most likely account for the ability of BCG to protect against childhood forms of tuberculosis (TB). There is also evidence

  10. Reinfection immunity in schistosomiasis. With special reference to immunity induced by radiation attenuated Cercariae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamiya, Haruo

    1987-07-01

    Schistosomiasis is one of the most important parasitic diseases in the world, especially in endemic areas of developing countries. This situation has prompted parasitologist to attempt intensive researches on immune mechanisms, especially those of reinfection immunity associated with eliminating challenge infection. The current knowledge of reinfection immunity against Schistosoma spp. infection was therefore reviewed briefly and discussed with special reference to our data on protective immune responses induced by radiation-attenuated cercarial infection. A recently developed technique of compressed organ autoradiography (COA) has contributed to assessing parasite attrition in immune animals following challenge infection. Our study using COA has demonstrated that major attrition of schistosomula from challenge infection occurs in the skin of CBA/Ca mice vaccinated with 20 Krad gamma radiation-attenuated cercariae of S. mansoni, while in both lungs and liver of similarly vaccinated guinea pig model. Furthermore, gamma-irradiation to cercariae affected their migration potential and surface-antigen profiles. The immunizing stimuli of gamma radiation-attenuated cercariae profoundly affected the expression of responsiveness in vaccinated animals. The change in antigenic profiles and migration potential of those vaccinating population was discussed in relation to the kinetics of reinfection immunity induced in vaccinated amimal models. These works might provide a base line data to develop a practical vaccine for schistosomiasis using defined antigens. It must be emphasized that these vaccines could serve as a practical prophylactic measure for schistosomiasis in the endemic areas, even if the vaccines fail to induce sterilizing immunity. (author). 141 refs.

  11. Immune Responses in Hookworm Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loukas, Alex; Prociv, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Hookworms infect perhaps one-fifth of the entire human population, yet little is known about their interaction with our immune system. The two major species are Necator americanus, which is adapted to tropical conditions, and Ancylostoma duodenale, which predominates in more temperate zones. While having many common features, they also differ in several key aspects of their biology. Host immune responses are triggered by larval invasion of the skin, larval migration through the circulation and lungs, and worm establishment in the intestine, where adult worms feed on blood and mucosa while injecting various molecules that facilitate feeding and modulate host protective responses. Despite repeated exposure, protective immunity does not seem to develop in humans, so that infections occur in all age groups (depending on exposure patterns) and tend to be prolonged. Responses to both larval and adult worms have a characteristic T-helper type 2 profile, with activated mast cells in the gut mucosa, elevated levels of circulating immunoglobulin E, and eosinoophilia in the peripheral blood and local tissues, features also characteristic of type I hypersensitivity reactions. The longevity of adult hookworms is determined probably more by parasite genetics than by host immunity. However, many of the proteins released by the parasites seem to have immunomodulatory activity, presumably for self-protection. Advances in molecular biotechnology enable the identification and characterization of increasing numbers of these parasite molecules and should enhance our detailed understanding of the protective and pathogenetic mechanisms in hookworm infections. PMID:11585781

  12. Immune Dysfunction in Tourette Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ishraga Elamin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between immunity and neurodevelopmental disorders has been extensively investigated in autism, suggesting a potential involvement of both cellular and humoral immunity in the establishment of synaptic connectivity modulation during development. A similar link has been proposed also for Tourette syndrome (TS, a complex, multifactorial disorder, in which the interplay between genetic, environmental, hormonal and immunological factors might be relevant. Lymphocyte subpopulation analysis in TS suggests a possible systemic activation of several T- and B-cell subtypes, whereas the observed decreased numbers of T regulatory lymphocytes might predispose to autoimmunity. Genes related to both cell- and antibody-mediated immune responses may be over-expressed at specific ages in youngsters with TS. Data from cytokine measurements and transcriptomics profiles in TS patients are coherent with the systemic immune activation detected by studies on lymphocyte subpopulations. Moreover, TS patients have exhibited IgG3 and IgA dysgammaglobulinemia, which might predispose to recurrent infections and autoimmunity. To date, the association between TS and autoantibodies has not been demonstrated. Interestingly, however, there is a higher degree of maternal family history of autoimmune diseases among TS patients. Finally, TS patients could be prone to allergic illnesses (asthma, atopic dermatitis, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, but more work is needed in this area.

  13. Humoral and cellular immune responses to modified hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    assay (ELISA), while cellular immune response was investigated by analysis of spleen cytokine profile. (TNFα, IFN γ and IL2) ... Keywords: Hepatitis B virus, Plasmid DNA, Vaccine, Spleen cytokines, Humoral and cellular immune responses. Tropical ..... factors associated with non-response to hepatitis. B vaccine included ...

  14. Regulatory mechanisms of innate immune signaling in zebrafish embryos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanwal, Zakia

    2012-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis has provided new insights into the mechanisms involved in the regulation of innate immune responses in zebrafish embryos. Furthermore, cell-specific transcriptome profiling studies identified novel marker genes for distinguishing immune cell types, which is highly

  15. Whole Blood Profiling of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-Induced Trained Innate Immunity in Infants Identifies Epidermal Growth Factor, IL-6, Platelet-Derived Growth Factor-AB/BB, and Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, SG; Kleinnijenhuis, J; Netea, MG; Dockrell, HM

    2017-01-01

    Vaccination of infants with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) activates both the innate and adaptive arms of the immune response. The antimycobacterial effects of these responses most likely account for the ability of BCG to protect against childhood forms of tuberculosis (TB). There is also evidence for a heterologous protective effect of BCG vaccination against TB-unrelated mortality in low birth weight infants. A possible mechanism of action of this effect, the induction of trained innate imm...

  16. Characteristics of DO, organic matter, and ammonium profile for practical-scale DHS reactor under various organic load and temperature conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomoto, Naoki; Ali, Muntjeer; Jayaswal, Komal; Iguchi, Akinori; Hatamoto, Masashi; Okubo, Tsutomu; Takahashi, Masanobu; Kubota, Kengo; Tagawa, Tadashi; Uemura, Shigeki; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Harada, Hideki

    2017-04-20

    Profile analysis of the down-flow hanging sponge (DHS) reactor was conducted under various temperature and organic load conditions to understand the organic removal and nitrification process for sewage treatment. Under high organic load conditions (3.21-7.89 kg-COD m-3 day-1), dissolved oxygen (DO) on the upper layer of the reactor was affected by organic matter concentration and water temperature, and sometimes reaches around zero. Almost half of the CODCr was removed by the first layer, which could be attributed to the adsorption of organic matter on sponge media. After the first layer, organic removal proceeded along the first-order reaction equation from the second to the fourth layers. The ammoniacal nitrogen removal ratio decreased under high organic matter concentration (above 100 mg L-1) and low DO (less than 1 mg L-1) condition. Ammoniacal nitrogen removal proceeded via a zero-order reaction equation along the reactor height. In addition, the profile results of DO, CODCr, and NH3-N were different in the horizontal direction. Thus, it is thought the concentration of these items and microbial activities were not in a uniform state even in the same sponge layer of the DHS reactor.

  17. Sensitivity and specificity of a brief personality screening instrument in predicting future substance use, emotional, and behavioral problems: 18-month predictive validity of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos-Ryan, Natalie; O'Leary-Barrett, Maeve; Sully, Laura; Conrod, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the validity, sensitivity, and specificity of the Substance Use Risk Profile Scale (SURPS), a measure of personality risk factors for substance use and other behavioral problems in adolescence. The concurrent and predictive validity of the SURPS was tested in a sample of 1,162 adolescents (mean age: 13.7 years) using linear and logistic regressions, while its sensitivity and specificity were examined using the receiver operating characteristics curve analyses. Concurrent and predictive validity tests showed that all 4 brief scales-hopelessness (H), anxiety sensitivity (AS), impulsivity (IMP), and sensation seeking (SS)-were related, in theoretically expected ways, to measures of substance use and other behavioral and emotional problems. Results also showed that when using the 4 SURPS subscales to identify adolescents "at risk," one can identify a high number of those who developed problems (high sensitivity scores ranging from 72 to 91%). And, as predicted, because each scale is related to specific substance and mental health problems, good specificity was obtained when using the individual personality subscales (e.g., most adolescents identified at high risk by the IMP scale developed conduct or drug use problems within the next 18 months [a high specificity score of 70 to 80%]). The SURPS is a valuable tool for identifying adolescents at high risk for substance misuse and other emotional and behavioral problems. Implications of findings for the use of this measure in future research and prevention interventions are discussed. Copyright © 2012 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  18. Cancer-Associated Immune Resistance and Evasion of Immune Surveillance in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Parcesepe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from molecular profiles of tumors and tumor associated cells provide a model in which cancer cells can acquire the capability of avoiding immune surveillance by expressing an immune-like phenotype. Recent works reveal that expression of immune antigens (PDL1, CD47, CD73, CD14, CD68, MAC387, CD163, DAP12, and CD15 by tumor cells “immune resistance,” combined with prometastatic function of nonmalignant infiltrating cells, may represent a strategy to overcome the rate-limiting steps of metastatic cascade through (a enhanced interactions with protumorigenic myeloid cells and escape from T-dependent immune response mediated by CD8+ and natural killer (NK cells; (b production of immune mediators that establish a local and systemic tumor-supportive environment (premetastatic niche; (c ability to survive either in the peripheral blood as circulating tumor cells (CTCs or at the metastatic site forming a cooperative prometastatic loop with foreign “myeloid” cells, macrophages, and neutrophils, respectively. The development of cancer-specific “immune resistance” can be orchestrated either by cooperation with tumor microenvironment or by successive rounds of genetic/epigenetic changes. Recognition of the applicability of this model may provide effective therapeutic avenues for complete elimination of immune-resistant metastatic cells and for enhanced antitumor immunity as part of a combinatorial strategy.

  19. Gene expression profiles in adenosine-treated human mast cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The role of mast cells in allergic diseases and innate immunity has been widely researched and much is known about the expression profiles of immune-related genes in mast cells after bacterial challenges. However, little is known about the gene expression profiles of mast cells in response to adenosine. Herein, we ...

  20. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charles D; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2015-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what 'immunity' means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first 'immune' cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1-3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide 'layers' of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Imbalanced immune homeostasis in immune thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanbakhsh, Karina

    2016-04-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder resulting from low platelet counts caused by inadequate production as well as increased destruction by autoimmune mechanisms. As with other autoimmune disorders, chronic ITP is characterized by perturbations of immune homeostasis with hyperactivated effector cells as well as defective regulatory arm of the adaptive immune system, which will be reviewed here. Interestingly, some ITP treatments are associated with restoring the regulatory imbalance, although it remains unclear whether the immune system is redirected to a state of tolerance once treatment is discontinued. Understanding the mechanisms that result in breakdown of immune homeostasis in ITP will help to identify novel pathways for restoring tolerance and inhibiting effector cell responses. This information can then be translated into developing therapies for averting autoimmunity not only in ITP but also many autoimmune disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Large-scale integration of small molecule-induced genome-wide transcriptional responses, Kinome-wide binding affinities and cell-growth inhibition profiles reveal global trends characterizing systems-level drug action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dusica eVidovic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Library of Integrated Network-based Cellular Signatures (LINCS project is a large-scale coordinated effort to build a comprehensive systems biology reference resource. The goals of the program include the generation of a very large multidimensional data matrix and informatics and computational tools to integrate, analyze, and make the data readily accessible. LINCS data include genome-wide transcriptional signatures, biochemical protein binding profiles, cellular phenotypic response profiles and various other datasets for a wide range of cell model systems and molecular and genetic perturbations. Here we present a partial survey of this data facilitated by data standards and in particular a robust compound standardization workflow; we integrated several types of LINCS signatures and analyzed the results with a focus on mechanism of action and chemical compounds. We illustrate how kinase targets can be related to disease models and relevant drugs. We identified some fundamental trends that appear to link Kinome binding profiles and transcriptional signatures to chemical information and biochemical binding profiles to transcriptional responses independent of chemical similarity. To fill gaps in the datasets we developed and applied predictive models. The results can be interpreted at the systems level as demonstrated based on a large number of signaling pathways. We can identify clear global relationships, suggesting robustness of cellular responses to chemical perturbation. Overall, the results suggest that chemical similarity is a useful measure at the systems level, which would support phenotypic drug optimization efforts. With this study we demonstrate the potential of such integrated analysis approaches and suggest prioritizing further experiments to fill the gaps in the current data.

  3. Mechanistic modeling of thermo-hydrological processes and microbial interactions at pore to profile scales resolve methane emission dynamics from permafrost soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-04-01

    The sensitivity of the Earth's polar regions to raising global temperatures is reflected in rapidly changing hydrological processes with pronounced seasonal thawing of permafrost soil and increased biological activity. Of particular concern is the potential release of large amounts of soil carbon and the stimulation of other soil-borne GHG emissions such as methane. Soil methanotrophic and methanogenic microbial communities rapidly adjust their activity and spatial organization in response to permafrost thawing and a host of other environmental factors. Soil structural elements such as aggregates and layering and hydration status affect oxygen and nutrient diffusion processes thereby contributing to methanogenic activity within temporal anoxic niches (hotspots or hot-layers). We developed a mechanistic individual based model to quantify microbial activity dynamics within soil pore networks considering, hydration, temperature, transport processes and enzymatic activity associated with methane production in soil. The model was the upscaled from single aggregates (or hotspots) to quantifying emissions from soil profiles in which freezing/thawing processes provide macroscopic boundary conditions for microbial activity at different soil depths. The model distinguishes microbial activity in aerate bulk soil from aggregates (or submerged parts of the profile) for resolving methane production and oxidation rates. Methane transport pathways through soil by diffusion and ebullition of bubbles vary with hydration dynamics and affect emission patterns. The model links seasonal thermal and hydrologic dynamics with evolution of microbial community composition and function affecting net methane emissions in good agreement with experimental data. The mechanistic model enables systematic evaluation of key controlling factors in thawing permafrost and microbial response (e.g., nutrient availability, enzyme activity, PH) on long term methane emissions and carbon decomposition rates

  4. Implementing small scale processes at the soil-plant interface – the role of root architectures for calculating root water uptake profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hildebrandt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a stand alone root water uptake model called aRoot, which calculates the sink term for any bulk soil water flow model taking into account water flow within and around a root network. The boundary conditions for the model are the atmospheric water demand and the bulk soil water content. The variable determining the plant regulation for water uptake is the soil water potential at the soil-root interface. In the current version, we present an implementation of aRoot coupled to a 3-D Richards model. The coupled model is applied to investigate the role of root architecture on the spatial distribution of root water uptake. For this, we modeled root water uptake for an ensemble (50 realizations of root systems generated for the same species (one month old Sorghum. The investigation was divided into two Scenarios for aRoot, one with comparatively high (A and one with low (B root radial resistance. We compared the results of both aRoot Scenarios with root water uptake calculated using the traditional Feddes model. The vertical rooting density profiles of the generated root systems were similar. In contrast the vertical water uptake profiles differed considerably between individuals, and more so for Scenario B than A. Also, limitation of water uptake occurred at different bulk soil moisture for different modeled individuals, in particular for Scenario A. Moreover, the aRoot model simulations show a redistribution of water uptake from more densely to less densely rooted layers with time. This behavior is in agreement with observation, but was not reproduced by the Feddes model.

  5. Aging changes in immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004008.htm Aging changes in immunity To use the sharing features ... cells and antibodies that destroy these harmful substances. AGING CHANGES AND THEIR EFFECTS ON THE IMMUNE SYSTEM ...

  6. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arisya Agita; M Thaha Alsagaff

    2017-01-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage...

  7. FastStats: Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Immunization Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... 2015 Related Links National Health Interview Survey National Immunization Survey Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: Vaccines ...

  8. Immune System and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your immune system is a complex network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend against germs. It helps ... to find and destroy them. If your immune system cannot do its job, the results can be ...

  9. Pneumonia - weakened immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... carinii) pneumonia Pneumonia - cytomegalovirus Pneumonia Viral pneumonia Walking pneumonia Causes People whose immune system is not working well ... people. They are also more vulnerable to regular causes of pneumonia , which can affect anyone. Your immune system may ...

  10. Modular and Coordinated Expression of Immune System Regulatory and Signalling Components in the Developing and Adult Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimena eMonzon-Sandoval

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available During development, the nervous system is assembled and sculpted through a concerted series of neurodevelopmental events orchestrated by a complex genetic programme. While neural-specific gene expression plays a critical part in this process, in recent years, a number of immune-related signalling and regulatory components have also been shown to play key physiological roles in the developing and adult nervous system. While the involvement of individual immune-related signalling components in neural functions may reflect their ubiquitous character, it may also reflect a much wider, as yet undescribed, genetic network of immune–related molecules acting as an intrinsic component of the neural-specific regulatory machinery that ultimately shapes the nervous system. In order to gain insights into the scale and wider functional organization of immune-related genetic networks in the nervous system, we examined the large scale pattern of expression of these genes in the brain. Our results show a highly significant correlated expression and transcriptional clustering among immune-related genes in the developing and adult brain, and this correlation was the highest in the brain when compared to muscle, liver, kidney and endothelial cells. We experimentally tested the regulatory clustering of immune system genes by using microarray expression profiling in cultures of dissociated neurons stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, and found a highly significant enrichment of immune system-related genes among the resulting differentially expressed genes. Our findings strongly suggest a coherent recruitment of entire immune-related genetic regulatory modules by the neural-specific genetic programme that shapes the nervous system.

  11. Modular and coordinated expression of immune system regulatory and signaling components in the developing and adult nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzón-Sandoval, Jimena; Castillo-Morales, Atahualpa; Crampton, Sean; McKelvey, Laura; Nolan, Aoife; O’Keeffe, Gerard; Gutierrez, Humberto

    2015-01-01

    During development, the nervous system (NS) is assembled and sculpted through a concerted series of neurodevelopmental events orchestrated by a complex genetic programme. While neural-specific gene expression plays a critical part in this process, in recent years, a number of immune-related signaling and regulatory components have also been shown to play key physiological roles in the developing and adult NS. While the involvement of individual immune-related signaling components in neural functions may reflect their ubiquitous character, it may also reflect a much wider, as yet undescribed, genetic network of immune–related molecules acting as an intrinsic component of the neural-specific regulatory machinery that ultimately shapes the NS. In order to gain insights into the scale and wider functional organization of immune-related genetic networks in the NS, we examined the large scale pattern of expression of these genes in the brain. Our results show a highly significant correlated expression and transcriptional clustering among immune-related genes in the developing and adult brain, and this correlation was the highest in the brain when compared to muscle, liver, kidney and endothelial cells. We experimentally tested the regulatory clustering of immune system (IS) genes by using microarray expression profiling in cultures of dissociated neurons stimulated with the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, and found a highly significant enrichment of immune system-related genes among the resulting differentially expressed genes. Our findings strongly suggest a coherent recruitment of entire immune-related genetic regulatory modules by the neural-specific genetic programme that shapes the NS. PMID:26379506

  12. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1 and apparent moisture sink (Q2 profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5 experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  13. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua; Schumacher, Courtney; Upton, Hannah; Jensen, Michael P.; Johnson, Karen L.; Wang, Meng; Ahlgrimm, Maike; Feng, Zhe; Minnis, Patrick; Thieman, Mandana

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs) that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season) and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season) near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  14. Attachment security and immunity in healthy women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, Angelo; Battisti, Francesca; Tarsitani, Lorenzo; Baldassari, Maurizio; Copertaro, Alfredo; Mocchegiani, Eugenio; Biondi, Massimo

    2007-01-01

    Attachment security is associated with health and possibly autonomic and endocrine reactivity to stress, however the relationship between attachment style and immune function has not yet been investigated. A random sample of 61 female nurses provided a blood sample and completed the Perceived Stress Scale, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and the Experiences in Close Relationships questionnaire. Immune measures included immunophenotypic analysis, lymphocyte proliferative response to Phytohemagglutinin, and NK cell cytotoxicity (NKCC). Statistical analysis focused on the relationship between attachment-related anxiety or avoidance and immune measures. Multiple regression was used to control for perceived stress and support, alexithymia, health-related behaviors possibly influencing immunity, and use of anti-inflammatory drugs, tobacco or alcohol. Attachment-related anxiety was not associated with any immune parameter. Attachment-related avoidance was associated with lower NKCC. This association was independent from the number of circulating NK cells, which suggests a change in cell functionality. Perceived stress was also associated with lower NKCC. This study suggests a link between attachment security and immunity. While our findings should be interpreted with great caution and need replication, they are consistent with previous work suggesting that insecure attachment may be a risk factor for health and may relate to biological processes relevant to health.

  15. The Immune System Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, Kirsten A.; Gibbs, Melissa A.; Friedman, Erich J.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a card game that helps introductory biology students understand the basics of the immune response to pathogens. Students simulate the steps of the immune response with cards that represent the pathogens and the cells and molecules mobilized by the immune system. In the process, they learn the similarities and differences between the…

  16. Fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneities in insecticide resistance profiles of the malaria vector, Anopheles arabiensis in rural south-eastern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matowo, Nancy S.; Munhenga, Givemore; Tanner, Marcel; Coetzee, Maureen; Feringa, Wim F.; Ngowo, Halfan S.; Koekemoer, Lizette L.; Okumu, Fredros O.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Programmatic monitoring of insecticide resistance in disease vectors is mostly done on a large scale, often focusing on differences between districts, regions or countries. However, local heterogeneities in residual malaria transmission imply the need for finer-scale data. This study reports small-scale variations of insecticide susceptibility in Anopheles arabiensis between three neighbouring villages across two seasons in Tanzania, where insecticidal bed nets are extensively used, but malaria transmission persists. Methods: WHO insecticide susceptibility assays were conducted on female and male An. arabiensis from three proximal villages, Minepa, Lupiro, and Mavimba, during dry (June-December 2015) and wet (January-May 2016) seasons. Adults emerging from wild-collected larvae were exposed to 0.05% lambda-cyhalothrin, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.75% permethrin, 4% DDT, 4% dieldrin, 0.1% bendiocarb, 0.1% propoxur, 0.25% pirimiphos-methyl and 5% malathion. A hydrolysis probe assay was used to screen for L1014F ( kdr-w) and L1014S ( kdr-e) mutations in specimens resistant to DDT or pyrethroids. Synergist assays using piperonly butoxide (PBO) and triphenol phosphate (TPP) were done to assess pyrethroid and bendiocarb resistance phenotypes. Results: There were clear seasonal and spatial fluctuations in phenotypic resistance status in An. arabiensis to pyrethroids, DDT and bendiocarb. Pre-exposure to PBO and TPP, resulted in lower knockdown rates and higher mortalities against pyrethroids and bendiocarb, compared to tests without the synergists. Neither L1014F nor L1014S mutations were detected. Conclusions: This study confirmed the presence of pyrethroid resistance in An. arabiensis and showed small-scale differences in resistance levels between the villages, and between seasons. Substantial, though incomplete, reversal of pyrethroid and bendiocarb resistance following pre-exposure to PBO and TPP, and absence of kdr alleles suggest involvement of P450

  17. Fine-scale spatial and temporal heterogeneities in insecticide resistance profiles of the malaria vector, Anopheles arabiensis in rural south-eastern Tanzania [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy S. Matowo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Programmatic monitoring of insecticide resistance in disease vectors is mostly done on a large scale, often focusing on differences between districts, regions or countries. However, local heterogeneities in residual malaria transmission imply the need for finer-scale data. This study reports small-scale variations of insecticide susceptibility in Anopheles arabiensis between three neighbouring villages across two seasons in Tanzania, where insecticidal bed nets are extensively used, but malaria transmission persists. Methods: WHO insecticide susceptibility assays were conducted on female and male An. arabiensis from three proximal villages, Minepa, Lupiro, and Mavimba, during dry (June-December 2015 and wet (January-May 2016 seasons. Adults emerging from wild-collected larvae were exposed to 0.05% lambda-cyhalothrin, 0.05% deltamethrin, 0.75% permethrin, 4% DDT, 4% dieldrin, 0.1% bendiocarb, 0.1% propoxur, 0.25% pirimiphos-methyl and 5% malathion. A hydrolysis probe assay was used to screen for L1014F (kdr-w and L1014S (kdr-e mutations in specimens resistant to DDT or pyrethroids. Synergist assays using piperonly butoxide (PBO and triphenol phosphate (TPP were done to assess pyrethroid and bendiocarb resistance phenotypes. Results: There were clear seasonal and spatial fluctuations in phenotypic resistance status in An. arabiensis to pyrethroids, DDT and bendiocarb. Pre-exposure to PBO and TPP, resulted in lower knockdown rates and higher mortalities against pyrethroids and bendiocarb, compared to tests without the synergists. Neither L1014F nor L1014S mutations were detected. Conclusions: This study confirmed the presence of pyrethroid resistance in An. arabiensis and showed small-scale differences in resistance levels between the villages, and between seasons. Substantial, though incomplete, reversal of pyrethroid and bendiocarb resistance following pre-exposure to PBO and TPP, and absence of kdr alleles suggest involvement of P450

  18. Increased frequency of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T regulatory cells in pulmonary tuberculosis patients undergoing specific treatment and its relationship with their immune-endocrine profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Ariana; Santucci, Natalia; Bongiovanni, Bettina; D'Attilio, Luciano; Massoni, Claudia; Lioi, Susana; Radcliffe, Stella; Dídoli, Griselda; Bottasso, Oscar; Bay, María Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem requiring an appropriate cell immune response (IR) to be controlled. Since regulatory T cells (Tregs) are relevant in IR regulation, we analyzed Tregs variations throughout the course of TB treatment and its relationship with changes in immune-endocrine mediators dealing with disease immunopathology. The cohort was composed of 41 adult patients, 20 of them completing treatment and follow-up. Patients were bled at diagnosis (T0) and at 2 (T2), 4 (T4), 6 (T6), and 9 months following treatment initiation. Twenty-four age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCo) were also included. Tregs (flow cytometry) from TB patients were increased at T0 (versus HCo P < 0.05), showing even higher values at T2 (versus T0 P < 0.01) and T4 (versus T0 P < 0.001). While IL-6, IFN-γ, TGF-β (ELISA), and Cortisol (electrochemiluminescence, EQ) were augmented, DHEA-S (EQ) levels were diminished at T0 with respect to HCo, with cytokines and Cortisol returning to normal values at T9. Tregs correlated positively with IFN-γ (R = 0.868, P < 0.05) at T2 and negatively at T4 (R = -0.795, P < 0.05). Lowered levels of proinflammatory cytokines together with an increased frequency of Tregs of patients undergoing specific treatment might reflect a downmodulatory effect of these cells on the accompanying inflammation.

  19. Increased Frequency of CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T Regulatory Cells in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients Undergoing Specific Treatment and Its Relationship with Their Immune-Endocrine Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariana Díaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is a major health problem requiring an appropriate cell immune response (IR to be controlled. Since regulatory T cells (Tregs are relevant in IR regulation, we analyzed Tregs variations throughout the course of TB treatment and its relationship with changes in immune-endocrine mediators dealing with disease immunopathology. The cohort was composed of 41 adult patients, 20 of them completing treatment and follow-up. Patients were bled at diagnosis (T0 and at 2 (T2, 4 (T4, 6 (T6, and 9 months following treatment initiation. Twenty-four age- and sex-matched healthy controls (HCo were also included. Tregs (flow cytometry from TB patients were increased at T0 (versus HCo P<0.05, showing even higher values at T2 (versus T0 P<0.01 and T4 (versus T0 P<0.001. While IL-6, IFN-γ, TGF-β (ELISA, and Cortisol (electrochemiluminescence, EQ were augmented, DHEA-S (EQ levels were diminished at T0 with respect to HCo, with cytokines and Cortisol returning to normal values at T9. Tregs correlated positively with IFN-γ (R=0.868, P<0.05 at T2 and negatively at T4 (R=-0.795, P<0.05. Lowered levels of proinflammatory cytokines together with an increased frequency of Tregs of patients undergoing specific treatment might reflect a downmodulatory effect of these cells on the accompanying inflammation.

  20. Kidney and innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-03-01

    Innate immune system is an important modulator of the inflammatory response during infection and tissue injury/repair. The kidney as a vital organ with high energy demand plays a key role in regulating the disease related metabolic process. Increasing research interest has focused on the immune pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. However, innate immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages, NK cells and a few innate lymphocytes, as well as the complement system are essential for renal immune homeostasis and ensure a coordinated balance between tissue injury and regeneration. The innate immune response provides the first line of host defense initiated by several classes of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), such as membrane-bound Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs), together with inflammasomes responsible for early innate immune response. Although the innate immune system is well studied, the research on the detailed relationship between innate immunity and kidney is still very limited. In this review, we will focus on the innate immune sensing system in renal immune homeostasis, as well as the corresponding pathogenesis of many kidney diseases. The pivotal roles of innate immunity in renal injury and regeneration with special emphasis on kidney disease related immunoregulatory mechanism are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Triacylglycerol Analysis in Human Milk and Other Mammalian Species: Small-Scale Sample Preparation, Characterization, and Statistical Classification Using HPLC-ELSD Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten-Doménech, Isabel; Beltrán-Iturat, Eduardo; Herrero-Martínez, José Manuel; Sancho-Llopis, Juan Vicente; Simó-Alfonso, Ernesto Francisco

    2015-06-24

    In this work, a method for the separation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) present in human milk and from other mammalian species by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography using a core-shell particle packed column with UV and evaporative light-scattering detectors is described. Under optimal conditions, a mobile phase containing acetonitrile/n-pentanol at 10 °C gave an excellent resolution among more than 50 TAG peaks. A small-scale method for fat extraction in these milks (particularly of interest for human milk samples) using minimal amounts of sample and reagents was also developed. The proposed extraction protocol and the traditional method were compared, giving similar results, with respect to the total fat and relative TAG contents. Finally, a statistical study based on linear discriminant analysis on the TAG composition of different types of milks (human, cow, sheep, and goat) was carried out to differentiate the samples according to their mammalian origin.

  2. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  3. Junction Quality of SnO 2 -Based Perovskite Solar Cells Investigated by Nanometer-Scale Electrical Potential Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Chuanxiao [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Wang, Changlei [The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606, United States; Ke, Weijun [The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606, United States; Gorman, Brian P. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Ye, Jichun [Ningbo Institute of Industrial Technology, Chinese Academy of Science, Ningbo, Zhejiang Province 315201, China; Jiang, Chun-Sheng [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States; Yan, Yanfa [The University of Toledo, Toledo, Ohio 43606, United States; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, United States

    2017-10-24

    Electron-selective layers (ESLs) and hole-selective layers (HSLs) are critical in high-efficiency organic-inorganic lead halide perovskite (PS) solar cells for charge-carrier transport, separation, and collection. We developed a procedure to assess the quality of the ESL/PS junction by measuring potential distribution on cross-section of SnO2-based perovskite solar cells using Kelvin probe force microscopy. Using the potential profiling, we compared three types of cells made of different ESLs but otherwise having identical device structure: 1) cells with PS deposited directly on bare fluorine-doped SnO2 (FTO)-coated glass; 2) cells with an intrinsic SnO2 thin layer on the top of FTO as an effective ESL; and 3) cells with the SnO2 ESL and adding a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of fullerene. The results reveal two major potential drops or electric fields at the ESL/PS and PS/HSL interfaces. The electric-field ratio between the ESL/PS and PS/HSL interfaces increased in devices as follows: FTO < SnO2-ESL < SnO2+SAM; this sequence explains the improvements of fill factor (FF) and open-circuit voltage (Voc). The improvement of FF from the FTO to SnO2-ESL cells may result from the reduction in voltage lose at the PS/HSL back interface and the improvement of Voc from the prevention of hole recombination at the ESL/PS front interface. The further improvements with adding a SAM is caused by the defect passivation at the ESL/PS interface, and hence, improvement of the junction quality. These nanoelectrical findings suggest possibilities for improving the device performance by further optimizing the SnO2-based ESL material quality and the ESL/PS interface.

  4. Expression profiles of the immune genes CD4, CD8β, IFNγ, IL-4, IL-6 and IL-10 in mitogen-stimulated koala lymphocytes (Phascolarctos cinereus by qRT-PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iona E. Maher

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the immune response of the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus is needed urgently, but has been limited by scarcity of species-specific reagents and methods for this unique and divergent marsupial. Infectious disease is an important threat to wild populations of koalas; the most widespread and important of these is Chlamydial disease, caused by Chlamydia pecorum and Chlamydia pneumoniae. In addition, koala retrovirus (KoRV, which is of 100% prevalence in northern Australia, has been proposed as an important agent of immune suppression that could explain the koala’s susceptibility to disease. The correct balance of T regulatory, T helper 1 (Th1 and Th2 lymphocyte responses are important to an individual’s susceptibility or resistance to chlamydial infection. The ability to study chlamydial or KoRV pathogenesis, effects of environmental stressors on immunity, and the response of koalas to vaccines under development, by examining the koala’s adaptive response to natural infection or in-vitro stimulation, has been limited to date by a paucity of species- specific reagents. In this study we have used cytokine sequences from four marsupial genomes to identify mRNA sequences for key T regulatory, Th1 and Th2 cytokines interleukin 4 (IL-4, interleukin 6 (IL-6, interleukin 10 (IL-10 and interferon gamma (IFNγ along with CD4 and CD8β. The koala sequences used for primer design showed >58% homology with grey short-tailed opossum, >71% with tammar wallaby and 78% with Tasmanian devil amino acid sequences. We report the development of real-time RT-PCR assays to measure the expression of these genes in unstimulated cells and after three common mitogen stimulation protocols (phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin, phorbol myristate acetate/phytohemagglutinin and concanavalin A. Phorbol myristate acetate/ionomycin was found to be the most effective mitogen to up-regulate the production of IL-4, IL-10 and IFNγ. IL-6 production was not

  5. Sequential Immune Responses: The Weapons of Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Charles D.; Ley, Klaus; Buchmann, Kurt; Canton, Johnathan

    2016-01-01

    Sequential immune responses (SIR) is a new model that describes what ‘immunity’ means in higher animals. Existing models, such as self/nonself discrimination or danger, focus on how immune responses are initiated. However, initiation is not protection. SIR describes the actual immune responses that provide protection. SIR resulted from a comprehensive analysis of the evolution of immune systems that revealed that several very different types of host innate responses occur (and at different tempos) which together provide host protection. SIR1 uses rapidly activated enzymes like the NADPH oxidases and is present in all animal cells. SIR2 is mediated by the first ‘immune’ cells: macrophage-like cells. SIR3 evolved in animals like invertebrates and provides enhanced protection through advanced macrophage recognition and killing of pathogens and through other innate immune cells such as neutrophils. Finally, in vertebrates, macrophages developed SIR4: the ability to present antigens to T cells. Though much slower than SIR1–3, adaptive responses provide a unique new protection for higher vertebrates. Importantly, newer SIR responses were added on top of older, evolutionarily conserved functions to provide ‘layers’ of host protection. SIR transcends existing models by elucidating the different weapons of immunity that provide host protection in higher animals. PMID:25871013

  6. How Frequently Are Pan-Assay Interference Compounds Active? Large-Scale Analysis of Screening Data Reveals Diverse Activity Profiles, Low Global Hit Frequency, and Many Consistently Inactive Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasial, Swarit; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2017-05-11

    Undetected pan-assay interference compounds (PAINS) with false-positive activities in assays often propagate through medicinal chemistry programs and compromise their outcomes. Although a large number of PAINS have been classified, often on the basis of individual studies or chemical experience, little has been done so far to systematically assess their activity profiles. Herein we report a large-scale analysis of the behavior of PAINS in biological screening assays. More than 23 000 extensively tested compounds containing PAINS substructures were detected, and their hit rates were determined. Many consistently inactive compounds were identified. The hit frequency was low overall, with median values of two to five hits for PAINS tested in hundreds of assays. Only confined subsets of PAINS produced abundant hits. The same PAINS substructure was often found in consistently inactive and frequently active compounds, indicating that the structural context in which PAINS occur modulates their effects.

  7. Rapid whole monoclonal antibody analysis by mass spectrometry: An ultra scale-down study of the effect of harvesting by centrifugation on the post-translational modification profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, C Q; Tait, A; Baldascini, H; Mohindra, A; Racher, A; Bilsborough, S; Smales, C M; Hoare, M

    2010-09-01

    With the trend towards the generation and production of increasing numbers of complex biopharmaceutical (protein based) products, there is an increased need and requirement to characterize both the product and production process in terms of robustness and reproducibility. This is of particular importance for products from mammalian cell culture which have large molecular structures and more often than not complex post-translational modifications (PTMs) that can impact the efficacy, stability and ultimately the safety of the final product. It is therefore vital to understand how the operating conditions of a bioprocess affect the distribution and make up of these PTMs to ensure a consistent quality and activity in the final product. Here we have characterized a typical bioprocess and determined (a) how the time of harvest from a mammalian cell culture and, (b) through the use of an ultra scale-down mimic how the nature of the primary recovery stages, affect the distribution and make up of the PTMs observed on a recombinant IgG(4) monoclonal antibody. In particular we describe the use of rapid whole antibody analysis by mass spectrometry to analyze simultaneously the changes that occur to the cleavage of heavy chain C-terminal lysine residues and the glycosylation pattern, as well as the presence of HL dimers. The time of harvest was found to have a large impact upon the range of glycosylation patterns observed, but not upon C-terminal lysine cleavage. The culture age had a profound impact on the ratio of different glycan moieties found on antibody molecules. The proportion of short glycans increased (e.g., (G0F)(2) 20-35%), with an associated decrease in the proportion of long glycans with culture age (e.g., (G2F)(2) 7-4%, and G1F/G2F from 15.2% to 7.8%). Ultra scale-down mimics showed that subsequent processing of these cultures did not change the post-translational modifications investigated, but did increase the proportion of half antibodies present in the

  8. Effect of locally delivered tetracycline hydrochloride as an adjunct to scaling and root planing on Hba1c, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile in type 2 diabetes: A clinico-biochemical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidya Dodwad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to assess the levels of HbA1c, C-reactive protein, and lipid profile in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus by treating the pockets using collagen impregnated sustained release resorbable tetracycline fiber (periodontal plus AB fiber following scaling and root planing (SRP. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus were randomly distributed into two groups receiving either SRP and tetracycline fiber or SRP alone. Patients were evaluated clinically with gingival index, plaque index, probing depth, and relative attachment level, and bio-chemically with HbA1c, C Reactive Protein, and lipid profile at baseline, 1 month, and 3 months. Results: Significant reduction in all the clinical parameters was seen in the tetracycline group compared to the control group. Bio-chemical analysis also revealed similar results except for cholesterol and High density lipoprotein who did not show any significant reduction. Conclusion: Locally delivered tetracycline as a better treatment modality compared to SRP alone.

  9. Simultaneous immunization against tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elma Z Tchilian

    Full Text Available BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis, provides some protection against disseminated disease in infants but has little effect on prevention of adult pulmonary disease. Newer parenteral immunization prime boost regimes may provide improved protection in experimental animal models but are unproven in man so that there remains a need for new and improved immunization strategies.Mice were immunized parenterally, intranasally or simultaneously by both routes with BCG or recombinant mycobacterial antigens plus appropriate adjuvants. They were challenged with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb and the kinetics of Mtb growth in the lungs measured. We show that simultaneous immunization (SIM of mice by the intranasal and parenteral routes is highly effective in increasing protection over parenteral BCG administration alone. Intranasal immunization induces local pulmonary immunity capable of inhibiting the growth of Mtb in the early phase (the first week of infection, while parenteral immunization has a later effect on Mtb growth. Importantly, these two effects are additive and do not depend on priming and boosting the immune response. The best SIM regimes reduce lung Mtb load by up to 2 logs more than BCG given by either route alone.These data establish SIM as a novel and highly effective immunization strategy for Mtb that could be carried out at a single clinic visit. The efficacy of SIM does not depend on priming and boosting an immune response, but SIM is complementary to prime boost strategies and might be combined with them.

  10. Human immunity to rotavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molyneaux, P J

    1995-12-01

    Rotaviruses are the most important cause of severe gastro-enteritis in infants and young children. However, the determinants of protective immunity are poorly understood. Human immunity to rotavirus can be acquired passively or actively. It may be humoral or cell-mediated, protective or non-protective, homotypic or heterotypic and mucosal or systemic, or any combination of these. Mucosal immunity is protective against rotavirus illness, but not against infection, whereas systemic immunity reflects exposure, but probably has little if any role in protection. Both local and cell-mediated immunity are likely to be important in protection. However, there is no agreement as to a reliable surrogate marker of small intestinal protective immunity, and little is known about small intestinal cell-mediated immunity in man, especially infants. Passive mucosal immunity, but not systemic immunity, may contribute to protection in breast-fed infants, and in those at increased risk of serious illness who have been given oral immunoglobulin, either as prophylaxis or therapeutically. Animal and adult studies may have only limited relevance to those who are at greatest risk of serious illness. However, it is probably from such studies that hypotheses about small intestinal cell-mediated immunity in the protection of infants against rotavirus infection in man remain unclear, and this continues to hinder vaccine research.

  11. Soil properties, strontium isotopic signatures and multi-element profiles to authenticate the origin of vegetables from small-scale regions: illustration with early potatoes from southern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampella, Mariavittoria; Quétel, Christophe R; Paredes, Eduardo; Goitom Asfaha, Daniel; Vingiani, Simona; Adamo, Paola

    2011-10-15

    We propose a method for the authentication of the origin of vegetables grown under similar weather conditions, in sites less than 10 km distance from the sea and distributed over a rather small scale area (58651 km(2)). We studied how the strontium (Sr) isotopic signature and selected elemental concentrations ([Mn], [Cu], [Zn], [Rb], [Sr] and [Cd]) in early potatoes from three neighbouring administrative regions in the south of Italy were related to the geological substrate (alluvial sediments, volcanic substrates and carbonate rocks) and to selected soil chemical properties influencing the bioavailability of elements in soils (pH, cation exchange capacity and total carbonate content). Through multiple-step multivariate statistics (PLS-DA) we could assign 26 potatoes (including two already commercialised samples) to their respective eight sites of production, corresponding to the first two types of geological substrates. The other 12 potatoes from four sites of production had similar characteristics in terms of the geological substrate (third type) and these soil properties could be grouped together. In this case, more discriminative parameters would be required to allow the differentiation between sites. The validation of our models included external prediction tests with data of potatoes harvested the year before and a study on the robustness of the uncertainties of the measurement results. Annual variations between multi-elemental and Sr isotopic fingerprints were observed in potatoes harvested from soils overlying carbonate rocks, stressing the importance of testing long term variations in authentication studies. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. and European Union [2011].

  12. Congruence of Strong and Kuder Interest Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Richard W.

    1971-01-01

    Scores on scales with identical or similar names on the Strong Vocational Interest Blank for Women and the Kuder Occupational Interest Survey were compared by means of both scale and profile analyses. The individual scales were only moderately intercorrelated; however, the total profiles revealed substantial agreement for most subjects. (Author)

  13. More adaptive versus less maladaptive coping: What is more predictive of symptom severity? Development of a new scale to investigate coping profiles across different psychopathological syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, Steffen; Jahns, Anna Katharina; Schröder, Johanna; Berger, Thomas; Lincoln, Tania M; Klein, Jan Philipp; Göritz, Anja S

    2016-02-01

    Lack of adaptive and enhanced maladaptive coping with stress and negative emotions are implicated in many psychopathological disorders. We describe the development of a new scale to investigate the relative contribution of different coping styles to psychopathology in a large population sample. We hypothesized that the magnitude of the supposed positive correlation between maladaptive coping and psychopathology would be stronger than the supposed negative correlation between adaptive coping and psychopathology. We also examined whether distinct coping style patterns emerge for different psychopathological syndromes. A total of 2200 individuals from the general population participated in an online survey. The Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory revised (OCI-R) and the Paranoia Checklist were administered along with a novel instrument called Maladaptive and Adaptive Coping Styles (MAX) questionnaire. Participants were reassessed six months later. MAX consists of three dimensions representing adaptive coping, maladaptive coping and avoidance. Across all psychopathological syndromes, similar response patterns emerged. Maladaptive coping was more strongly related to psychopathology than adaptive coping both cross-sectionally and longitudinally. The overall number of coping styles adopted by an individual predicted greater psychopathology. Mediation analysis suggests that a mild positive relationship between adaptive and certain maladaptive styles (emotional suppression) partially accounts for the attenuated relationship between adaptive coping and depressive symptoms. Results should be replicated in a clinical population. Results suggest that maladaptive and adaptive coping styles are not reciprocal. Reducing maladaptive coping seems to be more important for outcome than enhancing adaptive coping. The study supports transdiagnostic approaches advocating that maladaptive coping is a common factor across different psychopathologies

  14. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity.

  15. Mammalian gut immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassaing, Benoit; Kumar, Manish; Baker, Mark T; Singh, Vishal; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells) and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells) origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a "love-hate relationship." Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases.

  16. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface prof...

  17. [The effect of psychic stress on the immune response].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimecki, Michał; Artym, Jolanta

    2004-03-24

    Linkage between the central nervous system and the immune system is obvious and is accomplished through the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adrenal medullary (SAM) axes. This review focuses on the effects of psychic stress in animals and humans on immune system function. The effects of stress depend on its duration, type, and intensity. Generally, mild stress enhances the immune response. The effects of stress also depend on the animal's behavioral profile, genetic background and preexposure to stressful conditions. Prenatal stress modifies the immune response of the offspring. Stress also modifies autoimmune reactions in animals and humans. Knowledge of the mediators and their receptors involved in the functioning of the HPA and SAM axes allows pharmacological intervention to alleviate the harmful effects of stress on the immune system. Our studies revealed a benefit of oral lactoferrin application in reversing stress-induced changes in the humoral and cellular immune response in mice.

  18. Profile of immune cells in lymph nodes draining human malignant tumors Perfil de las células inmunes en los ganglios linfáticos que drenan tumores malignos humanos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanda Di Girolamo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to characterize and quantify cells involved in immune response in metastasis-free regional lymph nodes (RLNs draining different human epithelial tumors and compare them (by immunohistochemistry with control lymph nodes from patients with non malignant diseases. We showed that T cells number was decreased in RLNs as compared to the controls with reduction in both CD4+ T cells and CD8+ T cells subsets and an inverted ratio (CD4+: CD8+. B lymphocytes and follicular dendritic cells were decreased with respect to the controls. S100+ dendritic cells (DCs and mature DCs were detected in T dependent areas. Their mean number was significantly lower as compared to control. Immature DCs were significantly diminished compared to RLN and control nodes. CD57+ cells, follicular T helper cells and/or NK cells, were localized in the clear zone of germinal centres and their mean number was significantly increased. There were no CD57+ cells in hypoplastic follicles. In this study we show that RLNs draining human cancer present reduction in almost all immune cells, except CD57+ cells. These findings may be related to the deficient anti-tumor immune response in patients with cancer and subsequent tumor progression.El objetivo del trabajo fue caracterizar y cuantificar utilizando inmuno-histoquímica, las células involucradas en la respuesta inmune en ganglios linfáticos regionales (GLRs que drenan distintos tumores epiteliales malignos humanos y compararlas con ganglios controles (GLCs provenientes de pacientes sin enfermedad neoplásica maligna. Determinamos que los GLRs presentaban una marcada depleción de linfocitos B y T, células dendríticas (CD foliculares y CD interdigitantes maduras respecto a los controles. En los linfocitos T, además de estar disminuidos, se observó una inversión de la relación T CD4+: T CD8+, a favor de los T CD8+. La depleción de CD inmaduras fue mayor respecto a las maduras. Las células CD57+, c

  19. Disease Heterogeneity and Immune Biomarkers in Preclinical Mouse Models of Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0525 TITLE: Disease Heterogeneity and Immune Biomarkers in Preclinical Mouse Models of Ovarian Carcinogenesis...Disease Heterogeneity and Immune Biomarkers in Preclinical Mouse Models of Ovarian Carcinogenesis Magee Womens Research Institute 204 Craft Ave...KrasPten mice Aim 2: To profile disease heterogeneity and to identify immune biomarkers of natural and vaccine-induced immune responses in mice with

  20. Health profile and efficiency of fixed-time artificial insemination of cattle herds owned by small-scale producers in the region of Piracicaba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo José Ferreira Melo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the reproductive indices of different cattle herds submitted to a fixed-time artificial insemination program (FTAI in the region of Piracicaba, SP. Twenty herds composed of 10 to 80 crossbred dairy cows were selected to participate in a breeding program through FTAI. First, a survey was conducted to determine the incidence of reproductive system diseases in the herds. For this purpose, blood samples were collected randomly from each herd for the serological diagnosis of brucellosis, leptospirosis, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR, bovine viral diarrhea (BVD, enzootic bovine leukosis (EBL, and neosporosis. The laboratory tests were conducted according to the methods of the World Organisation for Animal Health. All herds had at least one animal that tested positive for one or more reproductive system diseases. Brucellosis was detected in 3/20 (15% herds, IBR and BVD in 19/20 (95%, EBL in 20/20 (100%, neosporosis in 13/20 (65%, and tuberculosis in 8/8 (100%. Six months later, cows (n=203 of the different herds were submitted to hormone treatment consisting of estradiol-progesterone and PGF2α for heat synchronization and ovulation and subsequent FTAI. The data were analyzed by logistic regression and Fisher’s exact test. The pregnancy rates at 30 and 60 days after FTAI were 55.7% and 48.3%, respectively. These rates were not influenced by herd, inseminator, body score, post-calving days, or number of lactations. The calving rate (42.4% differed from the pregnancy rate at 30 (P=0.01, but not at 60 (P=0.27 days after FTAI. The gestation loss until calving was 23.2% (26/112, but no exact cause of this event was identified. Despite the presence (seroreactivity of reproductive diseases, cattle herds owned by small-scale producers exhibit acceptable pregnancy rates after FTAI. However, additional prophylactic measures such as vaccination and improvement of livestock management should be adopted.

  1. Large-scale mRNA expression profiling in the common ice plant, Mesembryanthemum crystallinum, performing C3 photosynthesis and Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John C; Tillett, Richard L; Wood, Joshua A; Branco, Joshua M; Schlauch, Karen A

    2008-01-01

    The common ice plant (Mesembryanthemum crystallinum L.) has emerged as a useful model for molecular genetic studies of Crassulacean acid metabolism (CAM) because CAM can be induced in this species by water deficit or salinity stress. Non-redundant sequence information from expressed sequence tag data was used to fabricate a custom oligonucleotide microarray to compare large-scale mRNA expression patterns in M. crystallinum plants conducting C(3) photosynthesis versus CAM. Samples were collected every 4 h over a 24 h time period at the start of the subjective second day from plants grown under constant light and temperature conditions in order to capture variation in mRNA expression due to salinity stress and circadian clock control. Of 8455 genes, a total of 2343 genes (approximately 28%) showed a significant change as judged by analysis of variance (ANOVA) in steady-state mRNA abundance at one or more time points over the 24 h period. Of these, 858 (10%) and 599 (7%) exhibited a greater than two-fold ratio (TFR) increase or decrease in mRNA abundance, respectively. Functional categorization of these TFR genes revealed that many genes encoding products that function in CAM-related C(4) acid carboxylation/decarboxylation, glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, polysaccharide, polyol, and starch biosynthesis/degradation, protein degradation, transcriptional activation, signalling, stress response, and transport facilitation, and novel, unclassified proteins exhibited stress-induced increases in mRNA abundance. In contrast, salt stress resulted in a significant decrease in transcript abundance for genes encoding photosynthetic functions, protein synthesis, and cellular biogenesis functions. Many genes with CAM-related functions exhibited phase shifts in their putative circadian expression patterns following CAM induction. This report establishes an extensive catalogue of gene expression patterns for future investigations aimed at understanding the complex, transcriptional

  2. Construcción de una escala para medir el perfil motivacional de las matronas hacia los programas de educación maternal Scale building to measure midwives motivational profile towards maternal education programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Fernández y Fernández-Arroyo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Justificación: Describir el perfil motivacional permite investigar el clima de la organización y la calidad de vida profesional percibida. Objetivo: elaborar un instrumento para medir el perfil motivacional de las matronas hacia los programas de educación maternal. Metodología: se estudió una muestra no probabilística de 93 matronas, lo que corresponde al 54,6% de las matronas de atención primaria de Madrid. La escala se compuso de nueve ítems de motivación. Resultados: La escala presentó una fiabilidad de Alfa de Cronbach =0,78, lo que indica una consistencia interna considerable. Del análisis factorial se obtuvo una estructura bifactorial. La consistencia interna de ambas dimensiones es igualmente alta. Esta agrupación resultó coherente con la planteada en la fase de operativización del constructo teórico. Conclusión: La escala diferencia a las matronas en cuanto a sus niveles de motivación hacia los programas de Educación Maternal, por lo que es una herramienta que facilita investigaciones futuras.Rationale: Midwives motivational profile description allows researching organization climate and quality of life perceived. Objectives: Developing an instrument to measure midwives motivational profile towards Maternal Education Programmes. Methodology: A non-probability sample of 93 midwives, which corresponds to 54.6% of midwives primary care in Madrid, has been studied. The scale is composed of nine items of motivation. Results: The scale presented a reliability of Cronbach Alpha = 0.78, indicating a substantial internal consistency. From factorial analysis was obtained a bifactorial structurere. Internal consistency of both dimensions was equally high. This grouping was consistent with the raised stage in the calculation of the theoretical construct. Conclusion: The scale differentiates midwives on their levels of motivation towards Maternal Education Programmes, so it is a tool that facilitates future research.

  3. Comparison of Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale with Premature Infant Pain Profile for the Assessment of Acute Prolonged Pain in Neonates on Assisted Ventilation: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Saumil Ashvin; Nanavati, Ruchi Nimish; Jasani, Bonny Bipin; Kabra, Nandkishor

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS) with Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. This study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 of the study, we assessed whether neonates on assisted ventilation experienced acute prolonged pain. In phase 2, the aim was to compare N-PASS with PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation.. This is a prospective observational study. This study was conducted at a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit for 6 months. Neonates on assisted ventilation for >48 h were selected for this study. Neonates with lethal congenital anomalies and severe encephalopathy were excluded from the study. N-PASS and PIPP tools were used to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Taking PIPP as gold standard and N-PASS as a new test, the correlation coefficient was calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were also computed. The time taken to administer the tools was also computed. The average PIPP score for ventilated neonates was 8.33. The correlation coefficient of N-PASS when compared to PIPP was 0.62. The average time taken to apply the N-PASS scale was 4.42 min as compared to 8.20 min for PIPP scale. In term neonates, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of N-PASS were 75%, 100%, 100%, and 60%, respectively. The corresponding values in preterm neonates were lesser. The study proves that neonates on assisted ventilation experience acute prolonged pain. N-PASS is clinically reliable and valid to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated term neonates. The N-PASS is quicker than PIPP in assessing acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. The modified N-PASS tool (including the gestational age) should be developed.

  4. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas, E-mail: tke@uams.edu [Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute and Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2011-11-11

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  5. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennings, Leah; Artaud, Cecile; Jousheghany, Fariba; Monzavi-Karbassi, Behjatolah; Pashov, Anastas; Kieber-Emmons, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs). To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs) that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I), and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses. PMID:24213131

  6. Carbohydrate Mimetic Peptides Augment Carbohydrate-Reactive Immune Responses in the Absence of Immune Pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kieber-Emmons

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the most challenging of clinical targets for cancer immunotherapy are Tumor Associated Carbohydrate Antigens (TACAs. To augment immune responses to TACA we are developing carbohydrate mimetic peptides (CMPs that are sufficiently potent to activate broad-spectrum anti-tumor reactivity. However, the activation of immune responses against terminal mono- and disaccharide constituents of TACA raises concerns regarding the balance between “tumor destruction” and “tissue damage”, as mono- and disaccharides are also expressed on normal tissue. To support the development of CMPs for clinical trial testing, we demonstrate in preclinical safety assessment studies in mice that vaccination with CMPs can enhance responses to TACAs without mediating tissue damage to normal cells expressing TACA. BALB/c mice were immunized with CMPs that mimic TACAs reactive with Griffonia simplicifolia lectin 1 (GS-I, and tissue reactivity of serum antibodies were compared with the tissue staining profile of GS-I. Tissues from CMP immunized mice were analyzed using hematoxylin and eosin stain, and Luxol-fast blue staining for myelination. Western blots of membranes from murine mammary 4T1 cells, syngeneic with BALB/c mice, were also compared using GS-I, immunized serum antibodies, and naive serum antibodies. CMP immunization enhanced glycan reactivities with no evidence of pathological autoimmunity in any immunized mice demonstrating that tissue damage is not an inevitable consequence of TACA reactive responses.

  7. Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression

    OpenAIRE

    Ie, Amanda Yen Lin

    2014-01-01

    The present research assessed whether levels of depression, anxiety and worry, obsessive-compulsive distress, and psychopathy were differentially related to distinct thought suppression profiles. As a means to achieving this goal, the Profiles of Everyday Thought Suppression (PETS) scale was constructed to measure the frequencies with which various target thoughts are suppressed. The PETS scale demonstrated good internal consistency and test-retest reliability, and scores were positively co...

  8. T cell metabolism and the immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbist, Katherine C; Wang, Ruoning; Green, Douglas R

    2012-12-01

    As T cells respond to pathogens, they must transition from a quiescent, naïve state, to a rapidly proliferating, active effector state, and back again to a quiescent state as they develop into memory cells. Such transitions place unique metabolic demands on the differentiating cells. T cells meet these demands by altering their metabolic profiles, which are, in turn, regulated by distinct signaling cascades and transcriptional programs. Here, we examine the metabolic profiles of T cells during an acute immune response and discuss the signal and transcriptional regulators of these metabolic changes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Differential Protein Network Analysis of the Immune Cell Lineage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Clancy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the Immunological Genome Project (ImmGen completed the first phase of the goal to understand the molecular circuitry underlying the immune cell lineage in mice. That milestone resulted in the creation of the most comprehensive collection of gene expression profiles in the immune cell lineage in any model organism of human disease. There is now a requisite to examine this resource using bioinformatics integration with other molecular information, with the aim of gaining deeper insights into the underlying processes that characterize this immune cell lineage. We present here a bioinformatics approach to study differential protein interaction mechanisms across the entire immune cell lineage, achieved using affinity propagation applied to a protein interaction network similarity matrix. We demonstrate that the integration of protein interaction networks with the most comprehensive database of gene expression profiles of the immune cells can be used to generate hypotheses into the underlying mechanisms governing the differentiation and the differential functional activity across the immune cell lineage. This approach may not only serve as a hypothesis engine to derive understanding of differentiation and mechanisms across the immune cell lineage, but also help identify possible immune lineage specific and common lineage mechanism in the cells protein networks.

  10. Development of immune checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Shigehisa

    2017-01-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors are the most striking innovation in the clinical development of immunotherapy. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) restore and augment the antitumor immune activities of cytotoxic T cells by mainly blocking immune checkpoint molecules on T cells or their ligands on antigen-presenting and tumor cells. Based on preclinical data, many clinical trials have demonstrated the acceptable safety profiles and efficacies of mAb in various cancers. The A first-in-class approved immune checkpoint inhibitor is ipilimumab, which is a fully humanized mAb that blocks the immunosuppressive signal by cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. In 2011, the US Food and Drug Administration approved the use of ipilimumab for the treatment of advanced metastatic melanoma. Then, nivolumab, which is a humanized mAb that blocks programmed death-1 (PD-1), was approved for use in the treatment of advanced melanoma in 2014 and of advanced non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) in 2015 in Japan. Pembrolizumab, which is another anti-PD-1 antibody, was approved for use in the treatment of advanced melanoma and advanced NSCLC as the first-line therapy in 2016 in Japan. Thereafter, nivolumab was also approved for use in the treatment of advanced renal cell cancer in August 2016, of Hodgkin's lymphoma in December 2016, and of head and neck cancer in March 2017 in Japan. Moreover, phase III trials of anti-PD-1 mAb and anti-PD-ligand 1 mAb for use in the treatment of cancers, such as gastric, ovarian, bladder, and esophageal cancers, are ongoing. Several clinical trials have investigated new agents, alone and in combination, for use in the treatment of various cancers. Current advances in tumor immunology have unveiled the importance of immunosuppressive cells, such as regulatory T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells, and tumor-associated macrophages, especially in a tumor microenvironment (TME). Some data from basic research in mouse models and the immunomonitoring of cancer patients

  11. Pulmonary immunity to viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allie, S Rameeza; Randall, Troy D

    2017-07-15

    Mucosal surfaces, such as the respiratory epithelium, are directly exposed to the external environment and therefore, are highly susceptible to viral infection. As a result, the respiratory tract has evolved a variety of innate and adaptive immune defenses in order to prevent viral infection or promote the rapid destruction of infected cells and facilitate the clearance of the infecting virus. Successful adaptive immune responses often lead to a functional state of immune memory, in which memory lymphocytes and circulating antibodies entirely prevent or lessen the severity of subsequent infections with the same virus. This is also the goal of vaccination, although it is difficult to vaccinate in a way that mimics respiratory infection. Consequently, some vaccines lead to robust systemic immune responses, but relatively poor mucosal immune responses that protect the respiratory tract. In addition, adaptive immunity is not without its drawbacks, as overly robust inflammatory responses may lead to lung damage and impair gas exchange or exacerbate other conditions, such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Thus, immune responses to respiratory viral infections must be strong enough to eliminate infection, but also have mechanisms to limit damage and promote tissue repair in order to maintain pulmonary homeostasis. Here, we will discuss the components of the adaptive immune system that defend the host against respiratory viral infections. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. HETEROLOGOUS IMMUNITY BETWEEN VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, Raymond M.; Che, Jenny; Brehm, Michael A.; Selin, Liisa K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Immune memory responses to previously encountered pathogens can sometimes alter the immune response to and the course of infection of an unrelated pathogen by a process known as heterologous immunity. This response can lead to enhanced or diminished protective immunity and altered immunopathology. Here we discuss the nature of T-cell cross-reactivity and describe matrices of epitopes from different viruses eliciting cross-reactive CD8+ T-cell responses. We examine the parameters of heterologous immunity mediated by these cross-reactive T cells during viral infections in mice and humans. We show that heterologous immunity can disrupt T-cell memory pools, alter the complexity of the T-cell repertoire, change patterns of T-cell immunodominance, lead to the selection of viral epitope-escape variants, alter the pathogenesis of viral infections, and, by virtue of the private specificity of T-cell repertoires within individuals, contribute to dramatic variations in viral disease. We propose that heterologous immunity is an important factor in resistance to and variations of human viral infections and that issues of heterologous immunity should be considered in the design of vaccines. PMID:20536568

  13. Behavioral Immunity in Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Lefèvre

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Parasites can dramatically reduce the fitness of their hosts, and natural selection should favor defense mechanisms that can protect hosts against disease. Much work has focused on understanding genetic and physiological immunity against parasites, but hosts can also use behaviors to avoid infection, reduce parasite growth or alleviate disease symptoms. It is increasingly recognized that such behaviors are common in insects, providing strong protection against parasites and parasitoids. We review the current evidence for behavioral immunity in insects, present a framework for investigating such behavior, and emphasize that behavioral immunity may act through indirect rather than direct fitness benefits. We also discuss the implications for host-parasite co-evolution, local adaptation, and the evolution of non-behavioral physiological immune systems. Finally, we argue that the study of behavioral immunity in insects has much to offer for investigations in vertebrates, in which this topic has traditionally been studied.

  14. Evolving meningococcal immunization strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio; Bettinger, Julie A; Maturana, Gabriela Moreno; Enwere, Godwin; Borrow, Ray

    2015-04-01

    Meningococcal disease is a major public health problem and immunization is considered the best strategy for prevention. The introduction of meningococcal C conjugate immunization schedules that targeted adolescents, with catch-up programs in several European countries, Australia and Canada proved to be highly effective, with dramatic reduction in the incidence of serogroup C disease, not only in vaccinated, but also in unvaccinated individuals. Meningococcal quadrivalent (A, C, W, Y) conjugate vaccines are now licensed and are being used in adolescent programs in North America and to control serogroup W disease in South America. In the African meningitis belt, a mass immunization campaign against serogroup A disease using a meningococcal A conjugate vaccine is now controlling the devastating epidemics of meningococcal disease. After introducing new immunization programs, it is of importance to maintain enhanced surveillance for a better understanding of the changing nature of disease epidemiology. This information is crucial for identifying optimal immunization policies.

  15. Acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimachkie, Mazen M; Saperstein, David S

    2014-10-01

    Acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies refer to a group of disorders that share overlapping sensory, motor, and autonomic clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features. It is important to recognize acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies as they are generally responsive to immunosuppressive or immunomodulatory therapies. This article reviews recently developed early prognostic tools in Guillain-Barré syndrome and discusses the evolving understanding of chronic demyelinating phenotypes with differing treatment responsiveness. While weakness and numbness progress over 2 to 4 weeks in Guillain-Barré syndrome, they continue to evolve beyond 8 weeks in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy and over 4 to 8 weeks in subacute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies present uncommonly as variants with predominance of ocular, bulbar, sensory, autonomic, or motor manifestations in addition to regional variants, such as paraparetic acquired immune demyelinating neuropathies. Establishing the correct diagnosis is important as these immune disorders differ in response to corticosteroids and other immunosuppressive therapies.

  16. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploring the Effects of Genetic Variants on Clinical Profiles of Parkinson’s Disease Assessed by the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale and the Hoehn–Yahr Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen; Zheng, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Wang, Chaodong; Zhang, Dabao; Zhang, Min; Chan, Piu; Wang, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Many genetic variants have been linked to familial or sporadic Parkinson’s disease (PD), among which those identified in PARK16, BST1, SNCA, LRRK2, GBA and MAPT genes have been demonstrated to be the most common risk factors worldwide. Moreover, complex gene-gene and gene-environment interactions have been highlighted in PD pathogenesis. Compared to studies focusing on the predisposing effects of genes, there is a relative lack of research investigating how these genes and their interactions influence the clinical profiles of PD. In a cohort consisting of 2,011 Chinese Han PD patients, we selected 9 representative variants from the 6 above-mentioned common PD genes to analyze their main and epistatic effects on the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) and the Hoehn and Yahr (H-Y) stage of PD. With multiple linear regression models adjusting for medication status, disease duration, gender and age at onset, none of the variants displayed significant main effects on UPDRS or the H-Y scores. However, for gene-gene interaction analyses, 7 out of 37 pairs of variants showed significant or marginally significant associations with these scores. Among these, the GBA rs421016 (L444P)×LRRK2 rs33949390 (R1628P) interaction was consistently significant in relation to UPDRS III and UPDRS total (I+II+III), even after controlling for the family-wise error rate using False Discovery Rate (FDR-corrected p values are 0.0481 and 0.0070, respectively). Although the effects of the remaining pairs of variants did not survive the FDR correction, they showed marginally significant associations with either UPDRS or the H-Y stage (raw p<0.05). Our results highlight the importance of epistatic effects of multiple genes on the determination of PD clinical profiles and may have implications for molecular classification and personalized intervention of the disease. PMID:27299523

  18. Influence of clinical practice on nursing students' mental and immune-endocrine functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jie; Jin, Hua; Shen, Simei; Li, Zhiling; Gu, Guixiong

    2015-08-01

    This work aims to evaluate the stressful effects of clinical learning environments on nursing students and to better understand the importance of reducing anxiety. Ninety-two female nursing students were randomly recruited. State Anxiety Inventory (SAI), General Self-Efficacy scale (GSES), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS), General Maladjustment Scale (GM), Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the personal information questionnaire were administered along with an immune-endocrine profile, red blood cells and plasma cortisol. The nursing students' state and trait anxiety scores were significantly higher in clinic than in school. With one-way ANOVA, nursing students from rural areas, not liking nurse work and being pessimistic to employment prospects, and not being assigned in an ideal teaching hospital had higher scores of SAI. High levels of anxiety were associated with low scores of GSES, objective support of SSRS and high scores of GM. Additionally, the subjects' anxiety related to poor sleep quality, and students with high levels of anxiety showed a significantly lower percentage of CD3 and CD4. In conclusion, clinical practice can raise nursing students' State-Trait Anxiety Inventory scores. The level of anxiety is related to some internal and external factors. Severe anxiety not only affects student's physical and mental health and successful practice, but also reduces T lymphocyte immune functions. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. Environmental exposure to lead induces oxidative stress and modulates the function of the antioxidant defense system and the immune system in the semen of males with normal semen profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasperczyk, Aleksandra; Dobrakowski, Michał [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland); Czuba, Zenon P. [Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland); Horak, Stanisław [I-st Chair and Clin. Dept. of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecological Oncology, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Batorego 15, 41-902 Bytom (Poland); Kasperczyk, Sławomir, E-mail: kaslav@mp.pl [Dept. of Biochemistry, School of Medicine with the Division of Dentistry, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Jordana 19, 41-808 Zabrze (Poland)

    2015-05-01

    We investigated the associations between environmental exposure to lead and a repertoire of cytokines in seminal plasma of males with normal semen profile according to the WHO criteria. Based on the median lead concentration in seminal plasma, 65 samples were divided into two groups: low (LE) and high exposure to lead (HE). Differences in semen volume and the pH, count, motility and morphology of sperm cells were not observed between the examined groups. The total oxidant status value and the level of protein sulfhydryl groups as well as the activities of manganese superoxide dismutase and catalase were significantly higher in the HE group, whereas the total antioxidant capacity value and the activities of glutathione reductase and glutathione-S-transferase were depressed. IL-7, IL-10, IL-12, and TNF-α levels were significantly higher in the HE group compared with the LE group. Environmental exposure to lead is sufficient to induce oxidative stress in seminal plasma and to modulate antioxidant defense system. - Highlights: • Lead induces oxidative stress in seminal plasma in human. • Lead modulates antioxidant defense system in seminal plasma in human. • Lead does not change a Th1/Th2 imbalance in seminal plasma in human.

  20. Recent advances in mucosal immunization using virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacher, Gaëlle; Kaeser, Matthias D; Moser, Christian; Gurny, Robert; Borchard, Gerrit

    2013-05-06

    Mucosal immunization offers the promises of eliciting a systemic and mucosal immune response, as well as enhanced patient compliance. Mucosal vaccination using defined antigens such as proteins and peptides requires delivery systems that combine good safety profiles with strong immunogenicity, which may be provided by virus-like particles (VLP). VLP are assembled from viral structural proteins and thus are devoid of any genetic material. They excel by mimicking natural pathogens, therefore providing antigen-protecting particulate nature, inherent immune-cell stimulatory mechanisms, and tissue-specific targeting depending on their parental virus. Nevertheless, despite of promising preclinical results, VLP remain rarely investigated in clinical studies. This review is intended to give an overview of obstacles and promises of VLP-based mucosal immunization as well as to identify strategies to further improve VLP while maintaining a good safety and tolerability profile.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: immune thrombocytopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Immune thrombocytopenia Immune thrombocytopenia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Immune thrombocytopenia is a disorder characterized by a blood abnormality ...

  2. Quadro seroproteico como auxílio diagnóstico na anemia hemolítica imunomediada em cães Serum proteic profile as diagnosis aids in immune-mediated hemolytic anemia in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Mendes Pereira

    2010-04-01

    maior nestes. Tais achados analisados em conjunto agregam informações adicionais úteis à elucidação das AHIMs em cães.This assay aimed to determine the serum protein - via polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, which contained duodecil sodium sulfate (SDS-PAGE - in 120 dogs, with different breeds and ages, seen by the Veterinary Hospital "Governor Laudo Natel." These animals were grouped into five experimental groups: Group 1 - group control with 20 dogs, group 2 - 28 dogs with regenerative anemia; group 3 - 27 dogs with arregenarative; anemia group 4 - 10 dogs with primary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (AHIM 1.rd; group 5 - 35 dogs with secondary immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (AHIM 2.rd. The technique allowed the SDS-PAGE fractionation of 24 protein, whose molecular weights (PM ranged from 18,000 to 165,000 daltons (Da. The dogs with 1st and 2nd AHIM showed 24 protein fractions in their tracks electrophoretic, while other groups of dogs showed 23 fractions of protein, whose molecular protein weight of 68,000Da was not found. Thus, twenty-three proteins were common to proteinograms of the five experimental groups. From these, it was possible to identify eleven protein fractions nominally, and others were identified by their molecular weights. For control dogs, the anemic (groups 2, 3, 4 and 5 showed higher concentrations of serum transferrin and between them, the animals carrying the primary IMHA. All groups of dogs showed anemic levels of serum haptoglobin and phosphorylase significantly higher than the control dogs, while the serum ceruloplasmin was lower in anemic dogs. These findings provide additional information to the elucidation of the AHIMs in dogs.

  3. Immunity in urogenital protozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, N; Goyal, K; Dhanda, R S; Yadav, M

    2014-09-01

    Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in urogenital infections. Innate immunity is provided by the epithelial cells and mucus lining along with acidic pH, which forms a strong physical barrier against the pathogens in female reproductive tract. Cells of innate immune system, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines and adaptive immunity in the reproductive tract are evolved during infection, and a pro-inflammatory response is generated to fight against the invading pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis, a primary urogenital protozoa, the etiological agent of human trichomoniasis, a curable sexually transmitted infection. The involvement of the urogenital tract by other protozoal infections such as P. falciparum, Trypanosoma, Leishmania, Toxoplasma, Entamoeba histolytica and Acanthamoeba infection is rarely reported. Trichomonas induce pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive responses in infected subjects. Multifactorial pathogenic mechanisms including parasite adherence, cysteine proteases, lipophosphoglycan, free radical, cytokine generation and Toll-like receptors appear to interplay with the induction of local and systemic immune responses that ultimately determine the outcome of the infection. However, the involvement of urogenital pathogen-specific immune mechanisms and effect of normal local resident flora on the outcome (symptomatic vs. asymptomatic) of infection are poorly understood. Moreover, immune interactions in trichomoniasis subjects co-infected with bacterial and viral pathogens need to be elucidated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Metabolic Instruction of Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Michael D; Sowell, Ryan T; Kaech, Susan M; Pearce, Erika L

    2017-05-04

    Choices have consequences. Immune cells survey and migrate throughout the body and sometimes take residence in niche environments with distinct communities of cells, extracellular matrix, and nutrients that may differ from those in which they matured. Imbedded in immune cell physiology are metabolic pathways and metabolites that not only provide energy and substrates for growth and survival, but also instruct effector functions, differentiation, and gene expression. This review of immunometabolism will reference the most recent literature to cover the choices that environments impose on the metabolism and function of immune cells and highlight their consequences during homeostasis and disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Immunization promotion activities: are they effective in encouraging mothers to immunize their children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cuevas, R; Reyes, H; Pego, U; Tomé, P; Ceja, K; Flores, S; Gutiérrez, G

    1999-10-01

    Mass media communication is an important strategy for increasing parental uptake and to promote community participation when large-scale immunization activities are carried out. In Mexico, the National Vaccination Council (CONAVA) launches three immunization campaigns every year accompanied by three vaccination promotion campaigns. This study was conducted to assess whether communication activities to promote CONAVA's Second National Health Week (SNHW) were effective in providing information to mothers about the importance of immunizing their children under five years of age and in prompting them to seek immunization services. A probability sample of mothers living in the metropolitan area of Mexico City and having at least one child under five years old was selected for the study. Four outcome variables were defined as measuring the impact of the campaign: (1) mothers' knowledge about the SNHW; (2) mothers' comprehension indicating how well they understood the campaign messages (aware, partly aware and unaware); (3) mothers' motivation, i.e. whether or not they sought out immunizations for their children under the age of five and (4) mothers' opinion of how well they liked the messages. A total of 935 mothers were interviewed; 88.2% knew about the SNHW, 64.3% were aware that the campaign aimed to provide immunizations, and most held a favorable opinion about the messages. Among aware mothers, 87.5% of their children received immunizations. In this group 72.1% were prompted by the information in the campaign to seek immunizations for their children while 27.9% had to be personally invited to participate in the campaign. The latter occurred either when health workers or volunteers visited mothers in their homes or by soliciting mothers' participation as they visited or passed by immunization health posts. In the unaware mothers group, 72.7% of their children received immunizations; 62.5% of the mothers took their children because of information they received through

  6. Comparison of Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale with Premature Infant Pain Profile for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation: A prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumil Ashvin Desai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to compare Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS with Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 of the study, we assessed whether neonates on assisted ventilation experienced acute prolonged pain. In phase 2, the aim was to compare N-PASS with PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation.. Design: This is a prospective observational study. Study Setting and Duration: This study was conducted at a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit for 6 months. Inclusion Criteria: Neonates on assisted ventilation for >48 h were selected for this study. Exclusion Criteria: Neonates with lethal congenital anomalies and severe encephalopathy were excluded from the study. N-PASS and PIPP tools were used to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Taking PIPP as gold standard and N-PASS as a new test, the correlation coefficient was calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were also computed. The time taken to administer the tools was also computed. Results: The average PIPP score for ventilated neonates was 8.33. The correlation coefficient of N-PASS when compared to PIPP was 0.62. The average time taken to apply the N-PASS scale was 4.42 min as compared to 8.20 min for PIPP scale. In term neonates, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of N-PASS were 75%, 100%, 100%, and 60%, respectively. The corresponding values in preterm neonates were lesser. Conclusions: The study proves that neonates on assisted ventilation experience acute prolonged pain. N-PASS is clinically reliable and valid to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated term neonates. The N-PASS is quicker than PIPP in assessing acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Future

  7. Comparison of Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale with Premature Infant Pain Profile for the Assessment of Acute Prolonged Pain in Neonates on Assisted Ventilation: A Prospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Saumil Ashvin; Nanavati, Ruchi Nimish; Jasani, Bonny Bipin; Kabra, Nandkishor

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to compare Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS) with Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 of the study, we assessed whether neonates on assisted ventilation experienced acute prolonged pain. In phase 2, the aim was to compare N-PASS with PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation.. Design: This is a prospective observational study. Study Setting and Duration: This study was conducted at a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit for 6 months. Inclusion Criteria: Neonates on assisted ventilation for >48 h were selected for this study. Exclusion Criteria: Neonates with lethal congenital anomalies and severe encephalopathy were excluded from the study. N-PASS and PIPP tools were used to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Taking PIPP as gold standard and N-PASS as a new test, the correlation coefficient was calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were also computed. The time taken to administer the tools was also computed. Results: The average PIPP score for ventilated neonates was 8.33. The correlation coefficient of N-PASS when compared to PIPP was 0.62. The average time taken to apply the N-PASS scale was 4.42 min as compared to 8.20 min for PIPP scale. In term neonates, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of N-PASS were 75%, 100%, 100%, and 60%, respectively. The corresponding values in preterm neonates were lesser. Conclusions: The study proves that neonates on assisted ventilation experience acute prolonged pain. N-PASS is clinically reliable and valid to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated term neonates. The N-PASS is quicker than PIPP in assessing acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Future Directions: The modified N

  8. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  9. Arginine and immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Popovic, Petar J; Zeh, 3rd, Herbert J; Ochoa, Juan B

    2007-01-01

    .... Considerable controversy, however, exists as to the benefits and indications of dietary arginine due in part to a poor understanding of the role played by this amino acid in maintaining immune function...

  10. Antiviral immunity in amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangchun; Robert, Jacques

    2011-11-01

    Although a variety of virus species can infect amphibians, diseases caused by ranaviruses ([RVs]; Iridoviridae) have become prominent, and are a major concern for biodiversity, agriculture and international trade. The relatively recent and rapid increase in prevalence of RV infections, the wide range of host species infected by RVs, the variability in host resistance among population of the same species and among different developmental stages, all suggest an important involvement of the amphibian immune system. Nevertheless, the roles of the immune system in the etiology of viral diseases in amphibians are still poorly investigated. We review here the current knowledge of antiviral immunity in amphibians, focusing on model species such as the frog Xenopus and the salamander (Ambystoma tigrinum), and on recent progress in generating tools to better understand how host immune defenses control RV infections, pathogenicity, and transmission.

  11. HIV and Immunizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AIDS Drugs Clinical Trials Apps skip to content HIV Treatment Home Understanding HIV/AIDS Fact Sheets HIV ... 4 p.m. ET) Send us an email HIV and Immunizations Last Reviewed: February 6, 2018 Key ...

  12. Training and natural immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Helge, Jørn Wulff; Richter, Erik

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether a carbohydrate-rich versus fat-rich diet influenced the effect of training on the immune system. Ten untrained young men ingested a carbohydrate-rich diet [65 energy percent (E%) carbohydrate] and ten subjects a fat-rich diet (62E% fat) while...... influence natural immunity, and suggest that ingestion of a fat-rich diet during training is detrimental to the immune system compared to the effect of a carbohydrate-rich diet....... endurance training was performed 3-4 times a week for 7 weeks. Maximal oxygen uptake increased by 11% in both groups. Blood samples for immune monitoring were collected before and at the end of the study. Blood samples were also collected, in parallel, from 20 age-matched subjects, and data from...

  13. Immunity of international organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Schrijver, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Immunity rules are part and parcel of the law of international organizations. It has long been accepted that international organizations and their staff need to enjoy immunity from the jurisdiction of national courts. However, it is the application of these rules in practice that increasingly causes controversy. Claims against international organizations are brought before national courts by those who allegedly suffer from their activities. These can be both natural and legal persons such as companies. National courts, in particular lower courts, have often been less willing to recognize the immunity of the organization concerned than the organization s founding fathers. Likewise, public opinion and legal writings frequently criticize international organizations for invoking their immunity and for the lack of adequate means of redress for claimants. It is against this background that an international conference was organized at Leiden University in June 2013. A number of highly qualified academics and practit...

  14. Immunity to parasitic infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lamb, Tracey J

    2012-01-01

    .... Often endemic in developing countries many parasitic diseases are neglected in terms of research funding and much remains to be understood about parasites and the interactions they have with the immune system...

  15. Immune Exhaustion and Transplantation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sanchez‐Fueyo, A; Markmann, J. F

    2016-01-01

    Exhaustion of lymphocyte function through chronic exposure to a high load of foreign antigen is well established for chronic viral infection and antitumor immunity and has been found to be associated...

  16. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  17. Evidence for an intranasal immune response to human respiratory syncytial virus infection in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandin, Clément; Lucas-Hourani, Marianne; Clavel, Marine; Taborik, Fabrice; Vabret, Astrid; Tangy, Frédéric; Contamin, Hugues; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier

    2015-04-01

    There is no large-scale therapy available against human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), a major pathogen responsible for acute respiratory diseases. Macaques represent an interesting animal model to evaluate potential treatments because of their genetic, anatomical and immunological proximity with humans. However, the parameters that influence hRSV growth and control in this model are still poorly understood. We have documented in the following study the influence of age as well as repeated infections on the virological, clinical and immunological parameters of this animal model. Following intranasal inoculation, hRSV replicated in the upper respiratory tract for less than 15 days with no clinical signs regardless of age. Interestingly, we observed the induction of a local immune response at the nasal mucosa as assessed by expression profiles of inflammatory and IFN-stimulated genes. Animals also developed specific antibodies and were immune to reinfection. Thus, we showed that even in infant macaques, intranasal hRSV infection induced both local and systemic immune responses to efficiently control the virus. © 2015 The Authors.

  18. The Innate Immune Database (IIDB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zak Daniel

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of a National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases funded collaborative project, we have performed over 150 microarray experiments measuring the response of C57/BL6 mouse bone marrow macrophages to toll-like receptor stimuli. These microarray expression profiles are available freely from our project web site http://www.innateImmunity-systemsbiology.org. Here, we report the development of a database of computationally predicted transcription factor binding sites and related genomic features for a set of over 2000 murine immune genes of interest. Our database, which includes microarray co-expression clusters and a host of web-based query, analysis and visualization facilities, is available freely via the internet. It provides a broad resource to the research community, and a stepping stone towards the delineation of the network of transcriptional regulatory interactions underlying the integrated response of macrophages to pathogens. Description We constructed a database indexed on genes and annotations of the immediate surrounding genomic regions. To facilitate both gene-specific and systems biology oriented research, our database provides the means to analyze individual genes or an entire genomic locus. Although our focus to-date has been on mammalian toll-like receptor signaling pathways, our database structure is not limited to this subject, and is intended to be broadly applicable to immunology. By focusing on selected immune-active genes, we were able to perform computationally intensive expression and sequence analyses that would currently be prohibitive if applied to the entire genome. Using six complementary computational algorithms and methodologies, we identified transcription factor binding sites based on the Position Weight Matrices available in TRANSFAC. For one example transcription factor (ATF3 for which experimental data is available, over 50% of our predicted binding sites coincide with genome

  19. Comprehensive immune transcriptomic analysis in bladder cancer reveals subtype specific immune gene expression patterns of prognostic relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Runhan; Tyryshkin, Kathrin; Graham, Charles H; Koti, Madhuri; Siemens, D Robert

    2017-09-19

    Recent efforts on genome wide profiling of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) have led to its classification into distinct genomic and transcriptomic molecular subtypes that exhibit variability in prognosis. Evolving evidence from recent immunotherapy trials has demonstrated the significance of pre-existing tumour immune profiles that could guide treatment decisions. To identify immune gene expression patterns associated with the molecular subtypes, we performed a comprehensive in silico immune transcriptomic profiling, utilizing transcriptomic data from 347 MIBC cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). To investigate subtype-associated immune gene expression patterns, we assembled 924 immune response genes and specifically those involved in T-cell cytotoxicity and the Type I/II interferon pathways. A set of 157 ranked genes was able to distinguish the four subtypes in an unsupervised analysis in an original training cohort (n=122) and an expanded, validation cohort (n=225). The most common overrepresented pathways distinguishing the four molecular subtypes, included JAK/STAT signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling, interleukin signaling, and T-cell activation. Some of the most enriched biological processes were responses to IFN-γ, antigen processing and presentation, cytokine mediated signaling, hemopoeisis, cell proliferation and cellular defense response in the TCGA cluster IV. Our novel findings provide further insights into the association between genomic subtypes and immune activation in MIBC and may open novel opportunities for their exploitation towards precise treatment with immunotherapy.

  20. Single Nutrients and Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    cells from the skin donor. Immune tolerance diminish anaphylactic reactions of guinea achieved by donor spleen cell inoculations pigs when bovine serum...those cess of vitamin C for 108 days before virus of control or pair-fed groups. Perla and Mar- inoculation with parainfluenza Ill virus of morston (1...mg/day) mixed in bovine serum albumin to immunize of sodium ascorbate showed the opposite scorbutic guinea pigs. These animals did not changes (80). In

  1. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neu...

  2. Adults Need Immunizations, Too!

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-03-19

    In this podcast, Dr. Andrew Kroger from CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases discusses simple, safe, and effective ways adults can help protect themselves, their family, and their community from serious and deadly diseases.  Created: 3/19/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 3/19/2012.

  3. Immunization alters body odor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Bruce A; Opiekun, Maryanne; Yamazaki, Kunio; Beauchamp, Gary K

    2014-04-10

    Infections have been shown to alter body odor. Because immune activation accompanies both infection and immunization, we tested the hypothesis that classical immunization might similarly result in the alteration of body odors detectable by trained biosensor mice. Using a Y-maze, we trained biosensor mice to distinguish between urine odors from rabies-vaccinated (RV) and unvaccinated control mice. RV-trained mice generalized this training to mice immunized with the equine West Nile virus (WNV) vaccine compared with urine of corresponding controls. These results suggest that there are similarities between body odors of mice immunized with these two vaccines. This conclusion was reinforced when mice could not be trained to directly discriminate between urine odors of RV- versus WNV-treated mice. Next, we trained biosensor mice to discriminate the urine odors of mice treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; a general elicitor of innate immunological responses) from the urine of control mice. These LPS-trained biosensors could distinguish between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and RV-treated mouse urine. Finally, biosensor mice trained to distinguish between the odors of RV-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine did not generalize this training to discriminate between the odors of LPS-treated mouse urine and control mouse urine. From these experiments, we conclude that: (1) immunization alters urine odor in similar ways for RV and WNV immunizations; and (2) immune activation with LPS also alters urine odor but in ways different from those of RV and WNV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Mammalian gut immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoit Chassaing

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian intestinal tract is the largest immune organ in the body and comprises cells from non-hemopoietic (epithelia, Paneth cells, goblet cells and hemopoietic (macrophages, dendritic cells, T-cells origin, and is also a dwelling for trillions of microbes collectively known as the microbiota. The homeostasis of this large microbial biomass is prerequisite to maintain host health by maximizing beneficial symbiotic relationships and minimizing the risks of living in such close proximity. Both microbiota and host immune system communicate with each other to mutually maintain homeostasis in what could be called a "love-hate relationship." Further, the host innate and adaptive immune arms of the immune system cooperate and compensate each other to maintain the equilibrium of a highly complex gut ecosystem in a stable and stringent fashion. Any imbalance due to innate or adaptive immune deficiency or aberrant immune response may lead to dysbiosis and low-grade to robust gut inflammation, finally resulting in metabolic diseases.

  5. [Innate immunity and transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Innate immunity is the first barrier against pathogen infection and has also the important function of activating the adaptive immunity. The receptors of innate immunity, such as toll-like receptors and other receptors, recognize as danger signals the molecular patterns of pathogens as well as those of endogenous molecules released by dying cells. The information is transmitted to adapter proteins that, through a chain of kinases that translate the signal to transcription factors regulating inflammatory genes. In the inflammatory milieu dendritic cells become mature, intercept the antigen and migrate to lymphoid organs where they present the antigen to naïve T cells. Complement also exerts an important role of bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. In donor-deceased kidney transplantation, the innate immunity is triggered in the donor by brain death and is aggravated by the cold ischemia and even more by reperfusion. Once activated, innate immunity produces a local inflammatory environment leading to dendritic cell maturation and complement activation. Dendritic cells present the alloantigen to T cells and induce their differentiation towards effector Th1 and Th17 while inhibiting Th2 and T regulatory cells. A main goal of the current research in transplantation is to obtain an immunological tolerance. Experimental studies showed the possibility of inducing operative tolerance in murine models and even in primates with the infusion of regulatory dendritic cells. However, there are no data with this technique in clinical transplantation.

  6. Tick innate immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopácek, Petr; Hajdusek, Ondrej; Buresová, Veronika; Daffre, Sirlei

    2010-01-01

    Ticks are blood feeding parasites transmitting a wide variety of pathogens to their vertebrate hosts. The vector competence of ticks is tightly linked with their immune system. Despite its importance, our knowledge of tick innate immunity is still inadequate and the limited number of sufficiently characterized immune molecules and cellular reactions are dispersed across numerous tick species. The phagocytosis of microbes by tick hemocytes seems to be coupled with a primitive complement-like system, which possibly involves self/nonself recognition by fibrinogen-related lectins and the action of thioester-containing proteins. Ticks do not seem to possess a pro-phenoloxidase system leading to melanization and also coagulation of tick hemolymph has not been experimentally proven. They are capable of defending themselves against microbial infection with a variety of antimicrobial peptides comprising lysozymes, defensins and molecules not found in other invertebrates. Virtually nothing is known about the signaling cascades involved in the regulation of tick antimicrobial immune responses. Midgut immunity is apparently the decisive factor of tick vector competence. The gut content is a hostile environment for ingested microbes, which is mainly due to the antimicrobial activity of hemoglobin fragments generated by the digestion of the host blood as well as other antimicrobial peptides. Reactive oxygen species possibly also play an important role in the tick-pathogen interaction. The recent release of the Ixodes scapularis genome and the feasibility of RNA interference in ticks promise imminent and substantial progress in tick innate immunity research.

  7. Effects of Pineal Proteins on Biochemical, Enzyme Profile and Non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was conducted to establish the possible relationship between pineal gland, adrenal cortex and immune system under thermal stress in goats. The primary objective of the study was to observe how this relationship modifies the biochemical, enzyme profile and non-specific immune response on the ...

  8. Immune-checkpoint inhibitors in the era of precision medicine: What radiologists should know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; Tirumani, Sree Harsha; Hodi, Frank Stephan Jr; Nishno, Mizuki [Dept. of Radiology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Over the past five years immune-checkpoint inhibitors have dramatically changed the therapeutic landscape of advanced solid and hematologic malignancies. The currently approved immune-checkpoint inhibitors include antibodies to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, programmed cell death (PD-1), and programmed cell death ligand (PD-L1 and PD-L2). Response to immune-checkpoint inhibitors is evaluated on imaging using the immune-related response criteria. Activation of immune system results in a unique toxicity profile termed immune-related adverse events. This article will review the molecular mechanism, clinical applications, imaging of immune-related response patterns and adverse events associated with immune-checkpoint inhibitors.

  9. Immunometabolic circuits in trained immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, R.J.; Joosten, L.A.; Netea, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    The classical view that only adaptive immunity can build immunological memory has recently been challenged. Both in organisms lacking adaptive immunity as well as in mammals, the innate immune system can adapt to mount an increased resistance to reinfection, a de facto innate immune memory termed

  10. Feeding Immunity: Physiological and Behavioral Responses to Infection and Resource Limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A. Budischak

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Resources are a core currency of species interactions and ecology in general (e.g., think of food webs or competition. Within parasite-infected hosts, resources are divided among the competing demands of host immunity and growth as well as parasite reproduction and growth. Effects of resources on immune responses are increasingly understood at the cellular level (e.g., metabolic predictors of effector function, but there has been limited consideration of how these effects scale up to affect individual energetic regimes (e.g., allocation trade-offs, susceptibility to infection, and feeding behavior (e.g., responses to local resource quality and quantity. We experimentally rewilded laboratory mice (strain C57BL/6 in semi-natural enclosures to investigate the effects of dietary protein and gastrointestinal nematode (Trichuris muris infection on individual-level immunity, activity, and behavior. The scale and realism of this field experiment, as well as the multiple physiological assays developed for laboratory mice, enabled us to detect costs, trade-offs, and potential compensatory mechanisms that mice employ to battle infection under different resource conditions. We found that mice on a low-protein diet spent more time feeding, which led to higher body fat stores (i.e., concentration of a satiety hormone, leptin and altered metabolite profiles, but which did not fully compensate for the effects of poor nutrition on albumin or immune defenses. Specifically, immune defenses measured as interleukin 13 (IL13 (a primary cytokine coordinating defense against T. muris and as T. muris-specific IgG1 titers were lower in mice on the low-protein diet. However, these reduced defenses did not result in higher worm counts in mice with poorer diets. The lab mice, living outside for the first time in thousands of generations, also consumed at least 26 wild plant species occurring in the enclosures, and DNA metabarcoding revealed that the consumption of different

  11. Immunity to community: what can immune pathways tell us about disease patterns in corals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlarz, L. D.; Fuess, L.; Pinzon, J. C.; Weil, E.

    2016-02-01

    Predicting species composition and abundances is one of the most fundamental questions in ecology. This question is even more pressing in marine ecology and coral reefs since communities are changing at a rapid pace due to climate-related changes. Increases in disease prevalence and severity are just some of the consequences of these environmental changes. Particularly in coral reef ecosystems, diseases are increasing and driving region-wide population collapses. It has become clear, however, that not all reefs or coral species are affected by disease equally. In fact, the Caribbean is a concentrated area for diseases. The patterns in which disease manifests itself on an individual reef are also proving interesting, as not all coral species are affected by disease equally. Some species are host to different diseases, but seem to successfully fight them reducing mortality. Other species are disproportionately infected on any given reef and experience high mortality due to disease. We are interested in the role immunity can play in directing these patterns and are evaluating coral immunity using several novel approaches. We exposed 4 species of corals with different disease susceptibilities to immune stimulators and quantified of coral immunity using a combination of full transcriptome sequencing and protein activity assays for gene to phenotype analysis. We also mapped gene expression changes onto immune pathways (i.e. melanin-cascade, antimicrobial peptide synthesis, complement cascade, lectin-opsonization) to evaluate expression of immune pathways between species. In our preliminary data we found many immune genes in the disease susceptible Orbicella faveolata underwent changes in gene expression opposite of the predictions and may disply `dysfunctional' patterns of expression. We will present expression data for 4 species of coral and assess how these transcriptional and protein immune responses are related to disease susceptibility in nature, thus scaling up

  12. Invertebrate immune diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Julie; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Smith, L Courtney

    2011-09-01

    The arms race between hosts and pathogens (and other non-self) drives the molecular diversification of immune response genes in the host. Over long periods of evolutionary time, many different defense strategies have been employed by a wide variety of invertebrates. We review here penaeidins and crustins in crustaceans, the allorecognition system encoded by fuhc, fester and Uncle fester in a colonial tunicate, Dscam and PGRPs in arthropods, FREPs in snails, VCBPs in protochordates, and the Sp185/333 system in the purple sea urchin. Comparisons among immune systems, including those reviewed here have not identified an immune specific regulatory "genetic toolkit", however, repeatedly identified sequences (or "building materials" on which the tools act) are present in a broad range of immune systems. These include a Toll/TLR system, a primitive complement system, an LPS binding protein, and a RAG core/Transib element. Repeatedly identified domains and motifs that function in immune proteins include NACHT, LRR, Ig, death, TIR, lectin domains, and a thioester motif. In addition, there are repeatedly identified mechanisms (or "construction methods") that generate sequence diversity in genes with immune function. These include genomic instability, duplications and/or deletions of sequences and the generation of clusters of similar genes or exons that appear as families, gene recombination, gene conversion, retrotransposition, alternative splicing, multiple alleles for single copy genes, and RNA editing. These commonly employed "materials and methods" for building and maintaining an effective immune system that might have been part of that ancestral system appear now as a fragmented and likely incomplete set, likely due to the rapid evolutionary change (or loss) of host genes that are under pressure to keep pace with pathogen diversity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mental resilience, perceived immune functioning, and health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Schrojenstein Lantman M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Marith Van Schrojenstein Lantman,1 Marlou Mackus,1 Leila S Otten,1 Deborah de Kruijff,1 Aurora JAE van de Loo,1,2 Aletta D Kraneveld,1,2 Johan Garssen,1,3 Joris C Verster1,2,4 1Division of Pharmacology, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 2Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences, Utrecht University, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 3Nutricia Research, Utrecht, the Netherlands; 4Centre for Human Psychopharmacology, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia Background: Mental resilience can be seen as a trait that enables an individual to recover from stress and to face the next stressor with optimism. People with resilient traits are considered to have a better mental and physical health. However, there are limited data available assessing the relationship between resilient individuals and their perspective of their health and immune status. Therefore, this study was conducted to examine the relationship between mental resilience, perceived health, and perceived immune status. Methods: A total of 779 participants recruited at Utrecht University completed a questionnaire consisting of demographic characteristics, the brief resilience scale for the assessment of mental resilience, the immune function questionnaire (IFQ, and questions regarding their perceived health and immune status. Results: When correcting for gender, age, height, weight, smoker status, amount of cigarettes smoked per week, alcohol consumption status, amount of drinks consumed per week, drug use, and frequency of past year drug use, mental resilience was significantly correlated with perceived health (r=0.233, p=0.0001, perceived immune functioning (r=0.124, p=0.002, and IFQ score (r=−0.185, p=0.0001. Conclusion: A significant, albeit modest, relationship was found between mental resilience and perceived immune functioning and health. Keywords: mental resilience, immune functioning, health, vitality, quality of life

  14. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Reed

    Full Text Available Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales, social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire, sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and their current health - General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28, and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28. This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol.

  15. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Vile, Rebecca; Osborne, Lisa A.; Romano, Michela; Truzoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales), social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire), sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and their current health – General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28). This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol. PMID:26244339

  16. Problematic Internet Usage and Immune Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Vile, Rebecca; Osborne, Lisa A; Romano, Michela; Truzoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Problematic internet use has been associated with a variety of psychological comorbidities, but it relationship with physical illness has not received the same degree of investigation. The current study surveyed 505 participants online, and asked about their levels of problematic internet usage (Internet Addiction Test), depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales), social isolation (UCLA Loneliness Questionnaire), sleep problems (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), and their current health - General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), and the Immune Function Questionnaire. The results demonstrated that around 30% of the sample displayed mild or worse levels of internet addiction, as measured by the IAT. Although there were differences in the purposes for which males and females used the internet, there were no differences in terms of levels of problematic usage between genders. The internet problems were strongly related to all of the other psychological variables such as depression, anxiety, social-isolation, and sleep problems. Internet addiction was also associated with reduced self-reported immune function, but not with the measure of general health (GHQ-28). This relationship between problematic internet use and reduced immune function was found to be independent of the impact of the co-morbidities. It is suggested that the negative relationship between level of problematic internet use and immune function may be mediated by levels of stress produced by such internet use, and subsequent sympathetic nervous activity, which related to immune-supressants, such as cortisol.

  17. Immune memory in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milutinović, Barbara; Kurtz, Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Evidence for innate immune memory (or 'priming') in invertebrates has been accumulating over the last years. We here provide an in-depth review of the current state of evidence for immune memory in invertebrates, and in particular take a phylogenetic viewpoint. Invertebrates are a very heterogeneous group of animals and accordingly, evidence for the phenomenon of immune memory as well as the hypothesized molecular underpinnings differ largely for the diverse invertebrate taxa. The majority of research currently focuses on Arthropods, while evidence from many other groups of invertebrates is fragmentary or even lacking. We here concentrate on immune memory that is induced by pathogenic challenges, but also extent our view to a non-pathogenic context, i.e. allograft rejection, which can also show forms of memory and can inform us about general principles of specific self-nonself recognition. We discuss definitions of immune memory and a number of relevant aspects such as the type of antigens used, the route of exposure, and the kinetics of reactions following priming. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  19. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisya Agita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  20. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  1. Immune Mechanisms in Epileptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eXu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a chronic brain disorder that affects one percent of the human population worldwide. Immune responses are implicated in seizure induction and the development of epilepsy. Pre-clinical and clinical evidence have accumulated to suggest a positive feedback cycle between brain inflammation and epileptogenesis. Prolonged or recurrent seizures and brain injuries lead to upregulation of proinflammatory cytokines and activated immune responses to further increase seizure susceptibility, promote neuronal excitability, and induce blood-brain barrier (BBB breakdown. This review focuses on the potential role of innate and adaptive immune responses in the pathogenesis of epilepsy. Both human studies and animal models that help delineate the contributions of brain inflammation in epileptogenesis will be discussed. We highlight the critical role of brain-resident immune mediators and emphasize the contribution of brain-infiltrating peripheral leukocytes. Additionally, we propose possible immune mechanisms that underlie epileptogenesis. Several proinflammatory pathways are discussed, including the interleukin-1 receptor/ toll-like receptor signaling cascade, the pathways activated by danger-associated molecular patterns, and the cyclooxygenase-2 / prostaglandin pathway. Finally, development of better therapies that target the key constituents and processes identified in these mechanisms are considered, for instance, engineering antagonizing agents that effectively block these pathways in an antigen-specific manner.

  2. Immunotherapy comes of age: Immune aging & checkpoint inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Rawad; Karantanos, Theodoros; Sira, Elizabeth; Hartshorn, Kevan L

    2017-05-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICIs) are based on the understanding that there are multilayered checks and balances which can be manipulated to unleash already existing, but paralyzed, immune responses to cancer. These agents are safer and more efficacious than classic cytotoxic drugs making them a very attractive therapeutic option, especially in older adults. Current available data do not suggest significant age-associated differences in the clinical profile of ICIs. It must be noted, however, that there is still relatively little information on the use of ICIs in adults over 75years of age and aging is associated with a decline in the immune system or "immunosenescence" which theoretically can reduce the efficacy of these immune based therapies. In this paper, we review the mechanism of action of ICIs, current clinical data on their use in older adults, and age-associated immune changes that might have a direct impact on their activity in this population. We chose to focus on mainly adaptive cellular immunity, and especially on components of the immune system that are implicated directly in the immune checkpoint process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Immunomodulator-based enhancement of anti smallpox immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Osmarie; Miranda, Eric; Ramírez, Maite; Santos, Saritza; Rivera, Carlos; Vázquez, Luis; Sánchez, Tomás; Tremblay, Raymond L; Ríos-Olivares, Eddy; Otero, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    The current live vaccinia virus vaccine used in the prevention of smallpox is contraindicated for millions of immune-compromised individuals. Although vaccination with the current smallpox vaccine produces protective immunity, it might result in mild to serious health complications for some vaccinees. Thus, there is a critical need for the production of a safe virus-free vaccine against smallpox that is available to everyone. For that reason, we investigated the impact of imiquimod and resiquimod (Toll-like receptors agonists), and the codon-usage optimization of the vaccinia virus A27L gene in the enhancement of the immune response, with intent of producing a safe, virus-free DNA vaccine coding for the A27 vaccinia virus protein. We analyzed the cellular-immune response by measuring the IFN-γ production of splenocytes by ELISPOT, the humoral-immune responses measuring total IgG and IgG2a/IgG1 ratios by ELISA, and the TH1 and TH2 cytokine profiles by ELISA, in mice immunized with our vaccine formulation. The proposed vaccine formulation enhanced the A27L vaccine-mediated production of IFN-γ on mouse spleens, and increased the humoral immunity with a TH1-biased response. Also, our vaccine induced a TH1 cytokine milieu, which is important against viral infections. These results support the efforts to find a new mechanism to enhance an immune response against smallpox, through the implementation of a safe, virus-free DNA vaccination platform.

  4. Memorizing innate instructions requires a sufficiently specific adaptive immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghans, José A M; De Boer, Rob J

    2002-05-01

    During its primary encounter with a pathogen, the immune system has to decide which type of immune response is most appropriate. Based on signals from the innate immune system and the immunological context in which the pathogen is presented, responding lymphocytes will adopt a particular phenotype, e.g. secrete a particular profile of cytokines. Once stimulated, lymphocytes store the appropriate type of response by differentiating from a naive to a memory phenotype. This allows the appropriate type of immune reaction to be regenerated upon re-stimulation of those memory clones. We developed a computer simulation model in which cross-reacting effector/memory clones contribute to the immunological context of pathogens. If a pathogen is recognized by both naive clones and pre-existing effector/memory clones, the naive lymphocytes adopt the effector mechanism of the memory clone. The adaptive immune system thereby stores immunological decisions and somatically learns to induce the right type of immune response to pathogens sharing epitopes. The influence of effector/memory lymphocytes may be detrimental when they cross-react to new pathogens that require a different kind of immune response. Here, we show that the immune system needs to be sufficiently specific to avoid such mistakes and to profit from the information that is stored in effector/memory lymphocytes. Repertoire diversity is required to reconcile this specificity with reactivity against many pathogens.

  5. Systemic immune suppression in glioblastoma: the interplay between CD14+HLA-DRlo/neg monocytes, tumor factors, and dexamethasone

    OpenAIRE

    Gustafson, Michael P.; Lin, Yi; New, Kent C.; Bulur, Peggy A.; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Gastineau, Dennis A.; Dietz, Allan B.

    2010-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma (GBM) exhibit profound systemic immune defects that affect the success of conventional and immune-based treatments. A better understanding of the contribution of the tumor and/or therapy on systemic immune suppression is necessary for improved therapies, to monitor negative effects of novel treatments, to improve patient outcomes, and to increase understanding of this complex system. To characterize the immune profile of GBM patients, we phenotyped peripheral blood ...

  6. Fully immunized child

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutua, Martin Kavao; Kimani-Murage, Elizabeth; Ngomi, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background: More efforts have been put in place to increase full immunization coverage rates in the last decade. Little is known about the levels and consequences of delaying or vaccinating children in different schedules. Vaccine effectiveness depends on the timing of its administration......, and it is not optimal if given early, delayed or not given as recommended. Evidence of non-specific effects of vaccines is well documented and could be linked to timing and sequencing of immunization. This paper documents the levels of coverage, timing and sequencing of routine childhood vaccines. Methods: The study...... was conducted between 2007 and 2014 in two informal urban settlements in Nairobi. A total of 3856 children, aged 12-23 months and having a vaccination card seen were included in analysis. Vaccination dates recorded from the cards seen were used to define full immunization coverage, timeliness and sequencing...

  7. TSLP and Immune Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanabuchi, Shino; Watanabe, Norihiko; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2013-01-01

    In an immune system, dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) as well as powerful sensors of danger signals. When DCs receive signals from infection and tissue stress, they immediately activate and instruct the initiation of appropriate immune responses to T cells. However, it has remained unclear how the tissue microenvironment in a steady state shapes the function of DCs. Recent many works on thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP), an epithelial cell-derived cytokine that has the strong ability to activate DCs, provide evidence that TSLP mediates crosstalk between epithelial cells and DCs, involving in DC-mediated immune homeostasis. Here, we review recent progress made on how TSLP expressed within the thymus and peripheral lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues regulates DC-mediated T-cell development in the thymus and T-cell homeostasis in the periphery. PMID:22270070

  8. Immune Therapies for Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navid, Fariba; Armstrong, Michael; Barfield, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, a solid tumor arising from developing cells of the sympathetic nervous system, is the most common extracranial tumor in children. The prognosis for high-risk neuroblastoma remains poor with conventional treatment, and new approaches are therefore being explored to treat this disease. One such alternative therapy that holds promise is immune therapy. We review here the recent advances in 4 types of immune therapy – cytokine, vaccine, antibody, and cellular therapy – to treat neuroblastoma. We present preclinical research and clinical trials on several promising candidates such as IL-12, dendritic cell vaccines, anti-GD2 antibodies, and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. An optimal treatment plan for neuroblastoma will most likely involve multimodal approaches and combinations of immune therapies. PMID:19342881

  9. Correlates of immune defenses in golden eagle nestlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacColl, Elisabeth; Vanesky, Kris; Buck, Jeremy A.; Dudek, Benjamin; Eagles-Smith, Collin A.; Heath, Julie A.; Herring, Garth; Vennum, Chris; Downs, Cynthia J.

    2017-01-01

    An individual's investment in constitutive immune defenses depends on both intrinsic and extrinsic factors. We examined how Leucocytozoon parasite presence, body condition (scaled mass), heterophil-to-lymphocyte (H:L) ratio, sex, and age affected immune defenses in golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) nestlings from three regions: California, Oregon, and Idaho. We quantified hemolytic-complement activity and bacterial killing ability, two measures of constitutive immunity. Body condition and age did not affect immune defenses. However, eagles with lower H:L ratios had lower complement activity, corroborating other findings that animals in better condition sometimes invest less in constitutive immunity. In addition, eagles with Leucocytozoon infections had higher concentrations of circulating complement proteins but not elevated opsonizing proteins for all microbes, and eagles from Oregon had significantly higher constitutive immunity than those from California or Idaho. We posit that Oregon eagles might have elevated immune defenses because they are exposed to more endoparasites than eagles from California or Idaho, and our results confirmed that the OR region has the highest rate of Leucocytozoon infections. Our study examined immune function in a free-living, long-lived raptor species, whereas most avian ecoimmunological research focuses on passerines. Thus, our research informs a broad perspective regarding the evolutionary and environmental pressures on immune function in birds.

  10. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Section: Chemistry. Narasimhan, Prof. Palliakaranai Thirumalai Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 28 July 1928. Date of death: 3 May 2013. Specialization: Theoretical Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Last known address: 1013, Lupine Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, USA. YouTube ...

  11. Pentraxins and immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Nagar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 is a multifactorial protein involved in immunity and inflammation, which is rapidly produced and released by several cell types in response to inflammatory signals. It may be suggested that PTX3 is related to periodontal tissue inflammation. Its salivary concentrations may have a diagnostic potential. Pentraxin-3 (PTX3 is an ancient family of multifactorial proteins involved in immunity and inflammation. They are rapidly produced and released by various types of cells when there are indications of inflammation. PTX3 is related to inflammation in the periodontal tissue and it can be suggested that salivary concentrations may be used for diagnosing the same.

  12. Vaccines and Immunization Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D; Meador, Anna E

    2016-03-01

    Vaccines are among most cost-effective public health strategies. Despite effective vaccines for many bacterial and viral illnesses, tens of thousands of adults and hundreds of children die each year in the United States from vaccine-preventable diseases. Underutilization of vaccines requires rethinking the approach to incorporating vaccines into practice. Arguably, immunizations could be a part all health care encounters. Shared responsibility is paramount if deaths are to be reduced. This article reviews the available vaccines in the US market, as well as practice recommendations of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Tuberculosis Immunity: Opportunities from Studies with Cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Ray Waters

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis share >99% genetic identity and induce similar host responses and disease profiles upon infection. There is a rich history of codiscovery in the development of control measures applicable to both human and bovine tuberculosis (TB including skin-testing procedures, M. bovis BCG vaccination, and interferon-γ release assays. The calf TB infection model offers several opportunities to further our understanding of TB immunopathogenesis. Recent observations include correlation of central memory immune responses with TB vaccine efficacy, association of SIRPα+ cells in ESAT-6:CFP10-elicited multinucleate giant cell formation, early γδ T cell responses to TB, antimycobacterial activity of memory CD4+ T cells via granulysin production, association of specific antibody with antigen burden, and suppression of innate immune gene expression in infected animals. Partnerships teaming researchers with veterinary and medical perspectives will continue to provide mutual benefit to TB research in man and animals.

  14. Normal range MMPI-A profiles among psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilts, Darolyn; Moore, James M

    2003-09-01

    The present study examined the base rates of normal range Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) profiles in an inpatient sample and examined the differences between adolescents with apparently valid normal range profiles (all clinical scale T-scores MMPI-A validity scale scores and other indexes of underreporting. Normal range profiles cannot be adequately explained by a less pathological history prior to hospitalization or by defensiveness. Thirty percent of male and 25% of female adolescents produced valid MMPI-A profiles in which none of the clinical scales were elevated. Both male and female adolescents with normal range profiles were generally less likely to report internalizing symptoms than those with elevated profiles, but both groups report externalizing symptoms. Neither the standard MMPI-A validity scales nor additional validity scales discriminated between profile groups. Clinicians should not assume that normal range profiles indicate an absence of problems.

  15. TLR4 links podocytes with the innate immune system to mediate glomerular injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Miriam C; Banas, Bernhard; Hudkins, Kelly L

    2008-01-01

    profile of chemokines. In conclusion, it was demonstrated that TLR4 is constitutively expressed by podocytes and is upregulated in MPGN, where it may mediate glomerular injury by modulating expression of chemokines; therefore, TLR4 may link podocytes with the innate immune system to mediate MPGN triggered...... by the deposition of immune complexes....

  16. Differential expression of immune and stress genes in the skin of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caipang, C.M.A.; Lazado, C.C.; Brinchmann, M.; Rombout, J.H.W.M.; Kiron, V.

    2011-01-01

    The present study describes the transcriptional profiles of selected immune and stress genes with putative important roles in the cutaneous immune defense of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). In addition it shows differential expression of many genes at the dorsal and ventral sides of fish, in general

  17. Acute Phase Reactants in Immune-Related Inner Ear Disease ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, the clinical profile of patients with immune-related inner ear disease (IRIED) was correlated with the laboratory results of acute phase reactants and quantitative immunoglobulin as ... The predisposing factor was presumed to be autoimmune in 7(48%), allergy in 6(40%) and one patient had trauma in addition.

  18. Neuroendocrine-immune interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemenade, van Lidy; Cohen, Nicholas; Chadzinska, Magdalena

    2017-01-01

    It has now become accepted that the immune system and neuroendocrine system form an integrated part of our physiology. Immunological defense mechanisms act in concert with physiological processes like growth and reproduction, energy intake and metabolism, as well as neuronal development. Not only

  19. Cuba's National Immunization Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Gail; Galindo, Miguel A

    2008-10-01

    The National Immunization Program (NIP) begun in 1962 has considerably reduced the infectious disease burden in Cuba over the years, especially among children. The Ministry of Public Health estimates that some 560,000 children would have contracted these diseases, some with fatal outcomes, had it not been for the aggressive vaccination strategy begun 45 years ago and developed since then.

  20. Immunizations: Active vs. Passive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... immunizations for hepatitis A (gamma globulin) may be helpful for people traveling to a part of the world where hepatitis A is common. They are typically given before children or adults leave on their trip. These are used less now that there is a vaccine for hepatitis A. If there is enough time, ...

  1. Immune recovery vitritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujić Mirjana

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Immune recovery vitritis (IRV is symptomatic vitritis of > 1+ severity associated with inactive cytomegalovirus (CMV retinitis. It is an opportunistic infection of the eye, in the patients who suffer from AIDS, and is treated with a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. As a result of this therapy, there is an immune reconstitution in the body and inflammation of the vitreous body. Objective The aim of the study was to show the incidence of IRV in patients treated with HAART. Method A retrospective study was conducted in patients who suffered from CMV retinitis. Twenty-one were treated with HAART and had the diagnosis of CMV retinitis, as well. All of them were examined by the same ophthalmologist who peformed slit lamp examination with mydriasis and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Results Nine of 21 patients developed IRV as a complication of HAART, two had cystoid macular edema (CMO. Conclusion CMV retinitis develops when the number of CD4+ T lymphocytes drops below 50/mm3. This results in necrotic retinitis which, if untreated, leads to complete loss of vision. With the introduction of HAART, we learned that the reconstitution of immune status was achieved as well as life expectancy, but there was a dramatic decline in the opportunistic infection, including CMV retinitis, as well. With the immune reconstitution, the inflammation develops in the eye, known as IRV. Sometimes, it is necessary to treat this condition, but in the case of our patients, the inflammation was mild, and no treatment was necessary.

  2. Lymphoma: Immune Evasion Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Upadhyay, Ranjan; Hammerich, Linda; Peng, Paul [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Brown, Brian [Department of Genetics and Genomic Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Merad, Miriam [Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States); Brody, Joshua D., E-mail: joshua.brody@mssm.edu [Division of Hematology and Medical Oncology, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2015-04-30

    While the cellular origin of lymphoma is often characterized by chromosomal translocations and other genetic aberrations, its growth and development into a malignant neoplasm is highly dependent upon its ability to escape natural host defenses. Neoplastic cells interact with a variety of non-malignant cells in the tumor milieu to create an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The resulting functional impairment and dysregulation of tumor-associated immune cells not only allows for passive growth of the malignancy but may even provide active growth signals upon which the tumor subsequently becomes dependent. In the past decade, the success of immune checkpoint blockade and adoptive cell transfer for relapsed or refractory lymphomas has validated immunotherapy as a possible treatment cornerstone. Here, we review the mechanisms by which lymphomas have been found to evade and even reprogram the immune system, including alterations in surface molecules, recruitment of immunosuppressive subpopulations, and secretion of anti-inflammatory factors. A fundamental understanding of the immune evasion strategies utilized by lymphomas may lead to better prognostic markers and guide the development of targeted interventions that are both safer and more effective than current standards of care.

  3. Amyloid and immune homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yu-Gen

    2017-10-16

    Extracellular amyloid deposition defines a range of amyloidosis and amyloid-related disease. Addition to primary and secondary amyloidosis, amyloid-related disease can be observed in different tissue/organ that sharing the common pathogenesis based on the formation of amyloid deposition. Currently, both Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes can be diagnosed with certainly only based on the autopsy results, by which amyloidosis of the associative tissue/organ is observed. Intriguingly, since it demonstrated that amyloid deposits trigger inflammatory reaction through the activation of cascaded immune response, wherein several lines of evidence implies a protective role of amyloid in preventing autoimmunity. Furthermore, attempts for preventing amyloid formation and/or removing amyloid deposits from the brain have caused meningoencephalitis and c