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Sample records for scale heterogeneous translational

  1. Open access to large scale datasets is needed to translate knowledge of cancer heterogeneity into better patient outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew H Beck

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In this guest editorial, Andrew Beck discusses the importance of open access to big data for translating knowledge of cancer heterogeneity into better outcomes for cancer patients.

  2. Mining the mind research network: a novel framework for exploring large scale, heterogeneous translational neuroscience research data sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Jeremy Bockholt

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A neuroinformatics (NI system is critical to brain imaging research in order to shorten the time between study conception and results. Such a NI system is required to scale well when large numbers of subjects are studied. Further, when multiple sites participate in research projects organizational issues become increasingly difficult. Optimized NI applications mitigate these problems. Additionally, NI software enables coordination across multiple studies, leveraging advantages potentially leading to exponential research discoveries. The web-based, Mind Research Network (MRN, database system has been designed and improved through our experience with 200 research studies and 250 researchers from 7 different institutions. The MRN tools permit the collection, management, reporting and efficient use of large scale, heterogeneous data sources, e.g., multiple institutions, multiple principal investigators, multiple research programs and studies, and multimodal acquisitions. We have collected and analyzed data sets on thousands of research participants and have set up a framework to automatically analyze the data, thereby making efficient, practical data mining of this vast resource possible. This paper presents a comprehensive framework for capturing and analyzing heterogeneous neuroscience research data sources that has been fully optimized for end-users to perform novel data mining.

  3. Scales of mantle heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. C.; Akber-Knutson, S.; Konter, J.; Kellogg, J.; Hart, S.; Kellogg, L. H.; Romanowicz, B.

    2004-12-01

    A long-standing question in mantle dynamics concerns the scale of heterogeneity in the mantle. Mantle convection tends to both destroy (through stirring) and create (through melt extraction and subduction) heterogeneity in bulk and trace element composition. Over time, these competing processes create variations in geochemical composition along mid-oceanic ridges and among oceanic islands, spanning a range of scales from extremely long wavelength (for example, the DUPAL anomaly) to very small scale (for example, variations amongst melt inclusions). While geochemical data and seismic observations can be used to constrain the length scales of mantle heterogeneity, dynamical mixing calculations can illustrate the processes and timescales involved in stirring and mixing. At the Summer 2004 CIDER workshop on Relating Geochemical and Seismological Heterogeneity in the Earth's Mantle, an interdisciplinary group evaluated scales of heterogeneity in the Earth's mantle using a combined analysis of geochemical data, seismological data and results of numerical models of mixing. We mined the PetDB database for isotopic data from glass and whole rock analyses for the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) and the East Pacific Rise (EPR), projecting them along the ridge length. We examined Sr isotope variability along the East Pacific rise by looking at the difference in Sr ratio between adjacent samples as a function of distance between the samples. The East Pacific Rise exhibits an overall bowl shape of normal MORB characteristics, with higher values in the higher latitudes (there is, however, an unfortunate gap in sampling, roughly 2000 km long). These background characteristics are punctuated with spikes in values at various locations, some, but not all of which are associated with off-axis volcanism. A Lomb-Scargle periodogram for unevenly spaced data was utilized to construct a power spectrum of the scale lengths of heterogeneity along both ridges. Using the same isotopic systems (Sr, Nd

  4. Scale Reliability Evaluation with Heterogeneous Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raykov, Tenko; Marcoulides, George A.

    2015-01-01

    A latent variable modeling approach for scale reliability evaluation in heterogeneous populations is discussed. The method can be used for point and interval estimation of reliability of multicomponent measuring instruments in populations representing mixtures of an unknown number of latent classes or subpopulations. The procedure is helpful also…

  5. Heterogeneity and Scaling in Geologic Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory N. Boitnott; Gilles Y. Bussod; Paul N. Hagin; Stephen R. Brown

    2005-04-18

    The accurate characterization and remediation of contaminated subsurface environments requires the detailed knowledge of subsurface structures and flow paths. Enormous resources are invested in scoping and characterizing sites using core sampling, 3-D geophysical surveys, well tests, etc.... Unfortunately, much of the information acquired is lost to compromises and simplifications made in constructing numerical grids for the simulators used to predict flow and transport from the contaminated area to the accessible environment. In rocks and soils, the bulk geophysical and transport properties of the matrix and of fracture systems are determined by the juxtaposition of geometric features at many length scales. In the interest of computational efficiency, recognized heterogeneities are simplified, averaged out, or entirely ignored in spite of recent studies that recognize that: (1) Structural and lithologic heterogeneities exist on all scales in rocks. (2) Small heterogeneities influence, and can control the physical and chemical properties of rocks. In this work we propose a physically based approach for the description and treatment of heterogeneities, that highlights the use of laboratory equipment designed to measure the effect on physical properties of fine scale heterogeneities observed in rocks and soils. We then discuss the development of an integration methodology that uses these measurements to develop and upscale flow and transport models. Predictive simulations are 'calibrated' to the measured heterogeneity data, and subsequently upscaled in a way that is consistent with the transport physics and the efficient use of environmental geophysics. This methodology provides a more accurate interpretation and representation of the subsurface for both environmental engineering and remediation. We show through examples, (i) the important influence of even subtle heterogeneity in the interpreting of geophysical data, and (ii) how physically based upscaling

  6. Heterogeneous multidimensional scaling for complex networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Qi; Ma, Xiaodi; Fu, Chenbo; Dong, Hui; Zhang, Guijun; Yu, Li

    2015-07-01

    Many real-world networks are essentially heterogeneous, where the nodes have different abilities to gain connections. Such networks are difficult to be embedded into low-dimensional Euclidean space if we ignore the heterogeneity and treat all the nodes equally. In this paper, based on a newly defined heterogeneous distance and a generalized network distance under the constraints of network and triangle inequalities, respectively, we propose a new heterogeneous multidimensional scaling method (HMDS) to embed different networks into proper Euclidean spaces. We find that HMDS behaves much better than the traditional multidimensional scaling method (MDS) in embedding different artificial and real-world networks into Euclidean spaces. Besides, we also propose a method to estimate the appropriate dimensions of Euclidean spaces for different networks, and find that the estimated dimensions are quite close to the real dimensions for those geometrical networks under study. These methods thus can help to better understand the evolution of real-world networks, and have practical importance in network visualization, community detection, link prediction and localization of wireless sensors.

  7. Difficulties in translation of personality scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses translations of tests and questionnaires from a psychological perspective: A distinction is drawn between linguistic and psychometric considerations, and procedures from both areas are briefly described. Back-translations and simple psychometric procedures are used to illustr...

  8. A conceptual translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis: homogeneous-like heterogeneous gold nanoparticle catalyst induced by ceria supporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen-Xing; Xue, Wei; Guan, Bing-Tao; Shi, Fu-Bo; Shi, Zhang-Jie; Jiang, Hong; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2013-02-07

    Translation of homogeneous catalysis into heterogeneous catalysis is a promising solution to green and sustainable development in chemical industry. For this purpose, noble metal nanoparticles represent a new frontier in catalytic transformations. Many challenges remain for researchers to transform noble metal nanoparticles of heterogeneous catalytic active sites into ionic species of homogeneous catalytic active sites. We report here a successful design on translating homogeneous gold catalysis into a heterogeneous system with a clear understanding of the catalytic pathway. This study initiates a novel concept to immobilize a homogeneous catalyst based on electron transfer between supporting base and supported nanoparticles. Meanwhile, on the basis of theoretical calculation, it has deepened the understanding of the interactions between noble metal nanoparticles and the catalyst support.

  9. Serbian translation of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale: psychometric properties and the new methodological approach in translating scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trajanović, Nikola N; Djurić, Vladimir; Latas, Milan; Milovanović, Srdjan; Jovanović, Aleksandar A; Djurić, Dusan

    2013-01-01

    Since inception of the alexithymia construct in 1970's, there has been a continuous effort to improve both its theoretical postulates and the clinical utility through development, standardization and validation of assessment scales. The aim of this study was to validate the Serbian translation of the 20-item Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) and to propose a new method of translation of scales with a property of temporal stability. The scale was expertly translated by bilingual medical professionals and a linguist, and given to a sample of bilingual participants from the general population who completed both the English and the Serbian version of the scale one week apart. The findings showed that the Serbian version of the TAS-20 had a good internal consistency reliability regarding total scale (alpha=0.86), and acceptable reliability of the three factors (alpha=0.71-0.79). The analysis confirmed the validity and consistency of the Serbian translation of the scale, with observed weakness of the factorial structure consistent with studies in other languages. The results also showed that the method of utilizing a self-control bilingual subject is a useful alternative to the back-translation method, particularly in cases of linguistically and structurally sensitive scales, or in cases where a larger sample is not available. This method, dubbed as 'forth-translation' could be used to translate psychometric scales measuring properties which have temporal stability over the period of at least several weeks.

  10. Micro-scale heterogeneity of spiders (Arachnida: Araneae) in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Coarse-scale studies that focus on species distributions and richness neglect heterogeneity that may be present at finer scales. Studies of arthropod assemblage structure at fine (1 × 1 km) scales are rare, but important, because these are the spatial levels at which real world applications are viable. Here we investigate ...

  11. An Investigation into the Factors Influencing Extreme-Response Style: Improving Meaning of Translated and Culturally Adapted Rating Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.

    2006-01-01

    Translation and cultural adaptation of rating scales are two critical components in testing culturally and/or linguistically heterogeneous populations. Despite the proper use of these scales, challenges typically arise from respondents' language, culture, ratiocination, and characteristics of measurement processes. This study investigated factors…

  12. Heterogeneous Ribosomes Preferentially Translate Distinct Subpools of mRNAs Genome-wide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhen; Fujii, Kotaro; Kovary, Kyle M; Genuth, Naomi R; Röst, Hannes L; Teruel, Mary N; Barna, Maria

    2017-07-06

    Emerging studies have linked the ribosome to more selective control of gene regulation. However, an outstanding question is whether ribosome heterogeneity at the level of core ribosomal proteins (RPs) exists and enables ribosomes to preferentially translate specific mRNAs genome-wide. Here, we measured the absolute abundance of RPs in translating ribosomes and profiled transcripts that are enriched or depleted from select subsets of ribosomes within embryonic stem cells. We find that heterogeneity in RP composition endows ribosomes with differential selectivity for translating subpools of transcripts, including those controlling metabolism, cell cycle, and development. As an example, mRNAs enriched in binding to RPL10A/uL1-containing ribosomes are shown to require RPL10A/uL1 for their efficient translation. Within several of these transcripts, this level of regulation is mediated, at least in part, by internal ribosome entry sites. Together, these results reveal a critical functional link between ribosome heterogeneity and the post-transcriptional circuitry of gene expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Large-scale Heterogeneous Network Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-31

    Information Diffusion over Crowds with Social Network.” ACM SIGGRAPH 2012. (poster)  Wan-Yu Lin, Nanyun Peng, Chun-Chao Yen, Shou-De Lin. “Online Plagiarism ...Abstract: Large-scale network is a powerful data structure allowing the depiction of relationship information between entities. Recent...we propose an unsupervised tensor-based mechanism, considering higher-order relational information , to model the complex semantics of nodes. The

  14. Strong, Multi-Scale Heterogeneity in Earth's Lowermost Mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkalčić, Hrvoje; Young, Mallory; Muir, Jack B; Davies, D Rhodri; Mattesini, Maurizio

    2015-12-17

    The core mantle boundary (CMB) separates Earth's liquid iron outer core from the solid but slowly convecting mantle. The detailed structure and dynamics of the mantle within ~300 km of this interface remain enigmatic: it is a complex region, which exhibits thermal, compositional and phase-related heterogeneity, isolated pockets of partial melt and strong variations in seismic velocity and anisotropy. Nonetheless, characterising the structure of this region is crucial to a better understanding of the mantle's thermo-chemical evolution and the nature of core-mantle interactions. In this study, we examine the heterogeneity spectrum from a recent P-wave tomographic model, which is based upon trans-dimensional and hierarchical Bayesian imaging. Our tomographic technique avoids explicit model parameterization, smoothing and damping. Spectral analyses reveal a multi-scale wavelength content and a power of heterogeneity that is three times larger than previous estimates. Inter alia, the resulting heterogeneity spectrum gives a more complete picture of the lowermost mantle and provides a bridge between the long-wavelength features obtained in global S-wave models and the short-scale dimensions of seismic scatterers. The evidence that we present for strong, multi-scale lowermost mantle heterogeneity has important implications for the nature of lower mantle dynamics and prescribes complex boundary conditions for Earth's geodynamo.

  15. Micro-scale heterogeneity in water temperature | Dallas | Water SA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Micro-scale heterogeneity in water temperature was examined in 6 upland sites in the Western Cape, South Africa. Hourly water temperature data converted to daily data showed that greatest differences were apparent in daily maximum temperatures between shallow- and deep-water biotopes during the warmest period of ...

  16. Interactions of multi-scale heterogeneity in the lithosphere: Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennett, B. L. N.; Yoshizawa, K.; Furumura, T.

    2017-10-01

    Understanding the complex heterogeneity of the continental lithosphere involves a wide variety of spatial scales and the synthesis of multiple classes of information. Seismic surface waves and multiply reflected body waves provide the main constraints on broad-scale structure, and bounds on the extent of the lithosphere-asthenosphere transition (LAT) can be found from the vertical gradients of S wavespeed. Information on finer-scale structures comes through body wave studies, including detailed seismic tomography and P-wave reflectivity extracted from stacked autocorrelograms of continuous component records. With the inclusion of deterministic large-scale structure and realistic medium-scale stochastic features fine-scale variations are subdued. The resulting multi-scale heterogeneity model for the Australian region gives a good representation of the character of observed seismograms and their geographic variations and matches the observations of P-wave reflectivity. P reflections in the 0.5-3.0 Hz band in the uppermost mantle suggest variations on vertical scales of a few hundred metres with amplitudes of the order of 1%. Interference of waves reflected or converted at sequences of such modest variations in physical properties produce relatively simple behaviour for lower frequencies, which can suggest simpler structures than are actually present. Vertical changes in the character of fine-scale heterogeneity can produce apparent discontinuities. In Central Australia a 'mid-lithospheric discontinuity' can be tracked via changes in frequency content of station reflectivity, with links to the broad-scale pattern of wavespeed gradients and, in particular, the gradients of radial anisotropy. Comparisons with xenolith results from southeastern Australia indicate a strong tie between geochemical stratification and P-wave reflectivity.

  17. Quantifying seismic anisotropy induced by small-scale chemical heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alder, C.; Bodin, T.; Ricard, Y.; Capdeville, Y.; Debayle, E.; Montagner, J. P.

    2017-12-01

    Observations of seismic anisotropy are usually used as a proxy for lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of anisotropic minerals in the Earth's mantle. In this way, seismic anisotropy observed in tomographic models provides important constraints on the geometry of mantle deformation associated with thermal convection and plate tectonics. However, in addition to LPO, small-scale heterogeneities that cannot be resolved by long-period seismic waves may also produce anisotropy. The observed (i.e. apparent) anisotropy is then a combination of an intrinsic and an extrinsic component. Assuming the Earth's mantle exhibits petrological inhomogeneities at all scales, tomographic models built from long-period seismic waves may thus display extrinsic anisotropy. In this paper, we investigate the relation between the amplitude of seismic heterogeneities and the level of induced S-wave radial anisotropy as seen by long-period seismic waves. We generate some simple 1-D and 2-D isotropic models that exhibit a power spectrum of heterogeneities as what is expected for the Earth's mantle, that is, varying as 1/k, with k the wavenumber of these heterogeneities. The 1-D toy models correspond to simple layered media. In the 2-D case, our models depict marble-cake patterns in which an anomaly in shear wave velocity has been advected within convective cells. The long-wavelength equivalents of these models are computed using upscaling relations that link properties of a rapidly varying elastic medium to properties of the effective, that is, apparent, medium as seen by long-period waves. The resulting homogenized media exhibit extrinsic anisotropy and represent what would be observed in tomography. In the 1-D case, we analytically show that the level of anisotropy increases with the square of the amplitude of heterogeneities. This relation is numerically verified for both 1-D and 2-D media. In addition, we predict that 10 per cent of chemical heterogeneities in 2-D marble-cake models can

  18. Application of machine learning and visualization of heterogeneous datasets to uncover relationships between translation and developmental stage expression of C. elegans mRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trutschl, Marjan; Dinkova, Tzvetanka D; Rhoads, Robert E

    2005-04-14

    The relationships between genes in neighboring clusters in a self-organizing map (SOM) and properties attributed to them are sometimes difficult to discern, especially when heterogeneous datasets are used. We report a novel approach to identify correlations between heterogeneous datasets. One dataset, derived from microarray analysis of polysomal distribution, contained changes in the translational efficiency of Caenorhabditis elegans mRNAs resulting from loss of specific eIF4E isoform. The other dataset contained expression patterns of mRNAs across all developmental stages. Two algorithms were applied to these datasets: a classical scatter plot and an SOM. The outputs were linked using a two-dimensional color scale. This revealed that an mRNA's eIF4E-dependent translational efficiency is strongly dependent on its expression during development. This correlation was not detectable with a traditional one-dimensional color scale.

  19. Earthquake scaling laws for rupture geometry and slip heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingbaijam, Kiran K. S.; Mai, P. Martin; Goda, Katsuichiro

    2016-04-01

    We analyze an extensive compilation of finite-fault rupture models to investigate earthquake scaling of source geometry and slip heterogeneity to derive new relationships for seismic and tsunami hazard assessment. Our dataset comprises 158 earthquakes with a total of 316 rupture models selected from the SRCMOD database (http://equake-rc.info/srcmod). We find that fault-length does not saturate with earthquake magnitude, while fault-width reveals inhibited growth due to the finite seismogenic thickness. For strike-slip earthquakes, fault-length grows more rapidly with increasing magnitude compared to events of other faulting types. Interestingly, our derived relationship falls between the L-model and W-model end-members. In contrast, both reverse and normal dip-slip events are more consistent with self-similar scaling of fault-length. However, fault-width scaling relationships for large strike-slip and normal dip-slip events, occurring on steeply dipping faults (δ~90° for strike-slip faults, and δ~60° for normal faults), deviate from self-similarity. Although reverse dip-slip events in general show self-similar scaling, the restricted growth of down-dip fault extent (with upper limit of ~200 km) can be seen for mega-thrust subduction events (M~9.0). Despite this fact, for a given earthquake magnitude, subduction reverse dip-slip events occupy relatively larger rupture area, compared to shallow crustal events. In addition, we characterize slip heterogeneity in terms of its probability distribution and spatial correlation structure to develop a complete stochastic random-field characterization of earthquake slip. We find that truncated exponential law best describes the probability distribution of slip, with observable scale parameters determined by the average and maximum slip. Applying Box-Cox transformation to slip distributions (to create quasi-normal distributed data) supports cube-root transformation, which also implies distinctive non-Gaussian slip

  20. Battlespace Awareness: Heterogeneous Sensor Maps of Large Scale, Complex Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-13

    Simple Way to Prevent Neural Networks from Overfitting.” In: Journal of Machine Learning Research 15.1 (2014), pp. 1929–1958. [133] Art B Owen. “A robust...Awareness: Heterogeneous Sensor Maps of Large-Scale, Complex Sb. GRANT NUMBER Environments Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Sd. PROJECT NUMBER... environment . Until recently, these maps were restricted to sparse, 2D representations due to computational, memory, and sensor limitations. With the

  1. Rehabilitation Complexity Scale: Italian translation and transcultural validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galletti, Lisa; Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Maselli, Serena; Zanoli, Gustavo; Pignotti, Elettra; Iovine, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was translation, cultural adaption and validation of the extended version 12 of the Rehabilitation Complexity Scale (RCS-E) in a sample of patients with stroke and total hip replacement. The cross-cultural validation required RCS-E forward-backward translation, revision by an expert committee and its application in an Intensive Rehabilitation setting through a retrospective collection of data from clinical records. The evaluation of the psychometric properties was carried out by analyzing the correlations between RCS-E score and other measures (Functional Independence Measure, Braden, Morse, Cumulative Illness Rating Scale) and the assessment of reliability in terms of reproducibility (inter-observer agreement) and repeatability (intra-observer agreement). The backward and forward processes of translation of the scale did not create problems of interpretation of terms. Some adaptation was required for the items nursing (N), medical care (M) and therapeutic intensity (TI) due to differences on the national health system structure. The Italian version of the scale proved to be valid, reliable with high reproducibility and repeatability. The Italian version RCS-E has been successfully validated, showing good psychometric properties, which partly reproduce the results obtained for the original version. However, some assumption was made for some items thus preventing possible comparison with other countries. Admittance at an Intensive Rehabilitation care setting in Italy requires to evaluate the complexity of rehabilitation needs. The Rehabilitation Complexity Scale (RCS-E) has proved to be reliable for assessing clinical complexity and consequently for planning rehabilitation needs. The Italian version of RCS-E has been successfully validated, showing good psychometric properties, which reproduce the results obtained for the original version. The items included in the therapy intensity subscale do not fit the Italian health system rules for

  2. Scaling of flow and transport behavior in heterogeneous groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Timothy; Yabusaki, Steven

    1998-11-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations using a detailed synthetic hydraulic conductivity field developed from geological considerations provide insight into the scaling of subsurface flow and transport processes. Flow and advective transport in the highly resolved heterogeneous field were modeled using massively parallel computers, providing a realistic baseline for evaluation of the impacts of parameter scaling. Upscaling of hydraulic conductivity was performed at a variety of scales using a flexible power law averaging technique. A series of tests were performed to determine the effects of varying the scaling exponent on a number of metrics of flow and transport behavior. Flow and transport simulation on high-performance computers and three-dimensional scientific visualization combine to form a powerful tool for gaining insight into the behavior of complex heterogeneous systems. Many quantitative groundwater models utilize upscaled hydraulic conductivity parameters, either implicitly or explicitly. These parameters are designed to reproduce the bulk flow characteristics at the grid or field scale while not requiring detailed quantification of local-scale conductivity variations. An example from applied groundwater modeling is the common practice of calibrating grid-scale model hydraulic conductivity or transmissivity parameters so as to approximate observed hydraulic head and boundary flux values. Such parameterizations, perhaps with a bulk dispersivity imposed, are then sometimes used to predict transport of reactive or non-reactive solutes. However, this work demonstrates that those parameters that lead to the best upscaling for hydraulic conductivity and head do not necessarily correspond to the best upscaling for prediction of a variety of transport behaviors. This result reflects the fact that transport is strongly impacted by the existence and connectedness of extreme-valued hydraulic conductivities, in contrast to bulk flow which depends more strongly on

  3. Viscoelastic relaxations of high alcohols and alkanes: Effects of heterogeneous structure and translation-orientation coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2017-03-01

    The frequency-dependent shear viscosity of high alcohols and linear alkanes, including 1-butanol, 1-octanol, 1-dodecanol, n-hexane, n-decane, and n-tetradecane, was calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. The relaxation of all the liquids was bimodal. The correlation functions of the collective orientation were also evaluated. The analysis of these functions showed that the slower relaxation mode of alkanes is assigned to the translation-orientation coupling, while that of high alcohols is not. The X-ray structure factors of all the alcohols showed prepeaks, as have been reported in the literature, and the intermediate scattering functions were calculated at the prepeak. Comparing the intermediate scattering function with the frequency-dependent shear viscosity based on the mode-coupling theory, it was demonstrated that the slower viscoelastic relaxation of the alcohols is assigned to the relaxation of the heterogeneous structure described by the prepeak.

  4. Health service quality scale: Brazilian Portuguese translation, reliability and validity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocha Luiz Roberto Martins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Health Service Quality Scale is a multidimensional hierarchical scale that is based on interdisciplinary approach. This instrument was specifically created for measuring health service quality based on marketing and health care concepts. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the Health Service Quality Scale into Brazilian Portuguese and to assess the validity and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study, with public health system patients in a Brazilian university hospital. Validity was assessed using Pearson’s correlation coefficient to measure the strength of the association between the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument and the SERVQUAL scale. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient; the intraclass (ICC and Pearson’s correlation coefficients were used for test-retest reliability. Results One hundred and sixteen consecutive postoperative patients completed the questionnaire. Pearson’s correlation coefficient for validity was 0.20. Cronbach's alpha for the first and second administrations of the final version of the instrument were 0.982 and 0.986, respectively. For test-retest reliability, Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.89 and ICC was 0.90. Conclusions The culturally adapted, Brazilian Portuguese version of the Health Service Quality Scale is a valid and reliable instrument to measure health service quality.

  5. Health Service Quality Scale: Brazilian Portuguese translation, reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Luiz Roberto Martins; Veiga, Daniela Francescato; e Oliveira, Paulo Rocha; Song, Elaine Horibe; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2013-01-17

    The Health Service Quality Scale is a multidimensional hierarchical scale that is based on interdisciplinary approach. This instrument was specifically created for measuring health service quality based on marketing and health care concepts. The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the Health Service Quality Scale into Brazilian Portuguese and to assess the validity and reliability of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study, with public health system patients in a Brazilian university hospital. Validity was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient to measure the strength of the association between the Brazilian Portuguese version of the instrument and the SERVQUAL scale. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient; the intraclass (ICC) and Pearson's correlation coefficients were used for test-retest reliability. One hundred and sixteen consecutive postoperative patients completed the questionnaire. Pearson's correlation coefficient for validity was 0.20. Cronbach's alpha for the first and second administrations of the final version of the instrument were 0.982 and 0.986, respectively. For test-retest reliability, Pearson's correlation coefficient was 0.89 and ICC was 0.90. The culturally adapted, Brazilian Portuguese version of the Health Service Quality Scale is a valid and reliable instrument to measure health service quality.

  6. Translation and validation of the Cardiac Depression Scale to Arabic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasavvas, T; Al-Amin, H; Ghabrash, H F; Micklewright, D

    2016-08-01

    The Cardiac Depression Scale (CDS) has been designed to measure depressive symptoms in patients with heart disease. There is no Arabic version of the CDS. We translated and validated the CDS in an Arabic sample of patients with heart disease. Forward and back translation of the CDS was followed by assessment of cultural relevance and content validity. The Arabic version of the CDS (A-CDS) and the Arabic version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (A-HADS) were then administered to 260 Arab in-patients with heart disease from 18 Arabic countries. Construct validity was assessed using exploratory factor analysis with polychoric correlations. Internal consistency was assessed using ordinal reliability alpha and item-to-factor polychoric correlations. Concurrent validity was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient between the A-CDS and the depression subscale of the A-HADS (A-HADS-D). Cultural relevance and content validity of the A-CDS were satisfactory. Exploratory factor analysis revealed three robust factors, without cross-loadings, that formed a single dimension. Internal consistency was high (ordinal reliability alpha for the total scale and the three factors were .94, .91, .86, and .87, respectively; item-to-factor correlations ranged from .77 to .91). Concurrent validity was high (r=.72). The A-CDS demonstrated a closer to normal distribution of scores than the A-HADS-D. Sensitivity and specificity of the A-CDS were not objectively assessed. The A-CDS appears to be a valid and reliable instrument to measure depressive symptoms in a representative sample of Arab in-patients with heart disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Translation and validation of Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDREA YASBEK MONTEIRO VARELLA

    Full Text Available SUMMARY Introduction The evaluation of patients with hyperhidrosis (HH can be accomplished, among other ways, through questionnaires and scales. The Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS has been used as a simple and quick tool to perform this evaluation. Although HDSS has been well established in several languages, it has not been translated into Portuguese, restricting its specific use for Brazilian patients. The aim of this study was to translate HDSS into Portuguese and validate it in a sample of Brazilian subjects. Method 290 Brazilian patients (69% women, with a mean age of 28.7±9.6 years and BMI 22.4±3.9 kg/m2 diagnosed with HH were evaluated using HDSS, Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ and Sweating Evolution Questionnaire (SEQ before and after a five-week oxybutynin treatment. Regarding validation, an association between HDSS results and two other questionnaires was performed. To analyze HDSS sensitivity, evaluation of effects pre- and post-treatment with oxybutynin was conducted. Furthermore, HDSS reproducibility was analyzed in a subsample in which the scale was applied again after 7 days of the first follow-up appointment. Results There was statistical correlation between HDSS and QLQ and between HDSS and SEQ before treatment and after 5 weeks. Additionally, HDSS was reproducible and sensitive to clinical changes after the treatment period. Conclusion The Portuguese version of HDSS has been validated and shown to be reproducible in a Brazilian sample. Therefore it can be used as a tool to improve medical assistance in patients with HH.

  8. Coordinated SLNR based Precoding in Large-Scale Heterogeneous Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Boukhedimi, Ikram

    2017-03-06

    This work focuses on the downlink of large-scale two-tier heterogeneous networks composed of a macro-cell overlaid by micro-cell networks. Our interest is on the design of coordinated beamforming techniques that allow to mitigate the inter-cell interference. Particularly, we consider the case in which the coordinating base stations (BSs) have imperfect knowledge of the channel state information. Under this setting, we propose a regularized SLNR based precoding design in which the regularization factor is used to allow better resilience with respect to the channel estimation errors. Based on tools from random matrix theory, we provide an analytical analysis of the SINR and SLNR performances. These results are then exploited to propose a proper setting of the regularization factor. Simulation results are finally provided in order to validate our findings and to confirm the performance of the proposed precoding scheme.

  9. Theoretical Heterogeneous Catalysis: Scaling Relationships and Computational Catalyst Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Jeffrey

    2016-06-07

    Scaling relationships are theoretical constructs that relate the binding energies of a wide variety of catalytic intermediates across a range of catalyst surfaces. Such relationships are ultimately derived from bond order conservation principles that were first introduced several decades ago. Through the growing power of computational surface science and catalysis, these concepts and their applications have recently begun to have a major impact in studies of catalytic reactivity and heterogeneous catalyst design. In this review, the detailed theory behind scaling relationships is discussed, and the existence of these relationships for catalytic materials ranging from pure metal to oxide surfaces, for numerous classes of molecules, and for a variety of catalytic surface structures is described. The use of the relationships to understand and elucidate reactivity trends across wide classes of catalytic surfaces and, in some cases, to predict optimal catalysts for certain chemical reactions, is explored. Finally, the observation that, in spite of the tremendous power of scaling relationships, their very existence places limits on the maximum rates that may be obtained for the catalyst classes in question is discussed, and promising strategies are explored to overcome these limitations to usher in a new era of theory-driven catalyst design.

  10. Heterogeneity and scale of sustainable development in cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brelsford, Christa; Lobo, José; Hand, Joe; Bettencourt, Luís M A

    2017-08-22

    Rapid worldwide urbanization is at once the main cause and, potentially, the main solution to global sustainable development challenges. The growth of cities is typically associated with increases in socioeconomic productivity, but it also creates strong inequalities. Despite a growing body of evidence characterizing these heterogeneities in developed urban areas, not much is known systematically about their most extreme forms in developing cities and their consequences for sustainability. Here, we characterize the general patterns of income and access to services in a large number of developing cities, with an emphasis on an extensive, high-resolution analysis of the urban areas of Brazil and South Africa. We use detailed census data to construct sustainable development indices in hundreds of thousands of neighborhoods and show that their statistics are scale-dependent and point to the critical role of large cities in creating higher average incomes and greater access to services within their national context. We then quantify the general statistical trajectory toward universal basic service provision at different scales to show that it is characterized by varying levels of inequality, with initial increases in access being typically accompanied by growing disparities over characteristic spatial scales. These results demonstrate how extensions of these methods to other goals and data can be used over time and space to produce a simple but general quantitative assessment of progress toward internationally agreed sustainable development goals.

  11. A generalized 2D pencil beam scaling algorithm for proton dose calculation in heterogeneous slab geometries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerly, David C; Mo, Xiaohu; Tomé, Wolfgang A; Mackie, Thomas R; DeLuca, Paul M

    2013-06-01

    MeV proton beam in homogeneous water. This translates into a 32% dose discrepancy for a 5 mm Gaussian proton beam. Similar trends were observed for calculations made in heterogeneous slab phantoms where it was also noted that errors tend to increase with greater beam penetration. The generalized 2D scaling model performs well in all situations, with a maximum dose error of 0.3% at the Bragg peak in a heterogeneous phantom containing 3 cm of hard bone. The authors have derived a generalized form of 2D pencil beam scaling which is independent of the proton scattering power model and robust to the functional form of the radial kernel width in water used for the calculations. Sample calculations made with this model show excellent agreement with expected values in both homogeneous water and heterogeneous phantoms.

  12. Neighborhood walkability scale (News - Brazil: Back translation and Reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Both

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Existem, no Brasil, poucos instrumentos para avaliar a relação entre o ambiente físico e a prática de atividades físicas. O objetivo do estudo foi analisar a tradução, a retradução e a reprodutibilidade do questionário NEWS (Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale para o português do Brasil. Os procedimentos metodológicos foram estruturados em duas etapas. Primeiramente, efetuou-se a tradução e a retradução do NEWS com o intuito de verificar a linguagem do instrumento. Em seguida, realizou-se a reprodutibilidade do questionário por meio de teste e re-teste. A amostra desta pesquisa teve a participação de 75 pessoas (45 mulheres e 30 homens, com média de 33 ± 15 anos. A correlação intraclasse, a fidedignidade para as dimensões, o teste de correlação de Spearman e a correlação intraclasse para os indicadores de cada dimensão deste instrumento foram analisados com o auxílio do pacote estatístico SPSS (versão 11.0. O nível de significância adotado foi de p ABSTRACT In Brazil, there are few validated scales that establish the relationship between environmental barriers and physical activity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the translation, back translation and reliability of the Neighborhood Environment Walkability Scale (NEWS into Brazilian Portuguese. The methodological procedures were structured in two phases. The first phase was to translate and back translate NEWS to verify the instrument language. The second phase was he test and re-test reliability of the questionnaire. The sample was composed of 75 people (45 women and 30 men, mean age of 33 ± 15 years. The statistical analyses to verify the Brazilian NEWS were performed with the SPSS program (version 11.0 for intra-class correlation and reliability for the dimensions; Spearman correlation test and intra-class correlation for all indicators from this questionnaire. The significance level adopted in this survey was p<0.05. The results in

  13. Evaluation of the German translation of the Stroke Impact Scale using Rasch analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geyh, Szilvia; Cieza, Alarcos; Stucki, Gerold

    2009-08-01

    To assess the complex and heterogeneous consequences of stroke, currently comprehensive patient-centered measures, like the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), are increasingly being developed. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the German translation of the SIS using Rasch analyses. A total of 196 patients with stroke from 16 study centers participated in the study. In tests for item fit, 7 of the 64 items displayed model misfit. Response categories of 25 items showed threshold disordering. Person separation reliability lay above.80 in six domains. No differential item functioning was detected with respect to age, gender, disability severity, and setting. The results provide support for validity and reliability of the SIS, and also point out issues for further improvement and adaptation of the SIS.

  14. Changing the scale of hydrogeophysical aquifer heterogeneity characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Tremblay, Laurie; Ruggeri, Paolo; Brunet, Patrick; Fabien-Ouellet, Gabriel; Gloaguen, Erwan; Holliger, Klaus; Irving, James; Molson, John; Lefebvre, Rene

    2015-04-01

    Contaminant remediation and management require the quantitative predictive capabilities of groundwater flow and mass transport numerical models. Such models have to encompass source zones and receptors, and thus typically cover several square kilometers. To predict the path and fate of contaminant plumes, these models have to represent the heterogeneous distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K). However, hydrogeophysics has generally been used to image relatively restricted areas of the subsurface (small fractions of km2), so there is a need for approaches defining heterogeneity at larger scales and providing data to constrain conceptual and numerical models of aquifer systems. This communication describes a workflow defining aquifer heterogeneity that was applied over a 12 km2 sub-watershed surrounding a decommissioned landfill emitting landfill leachate. The aquifer is a shallow, 10 to 20 m thick, highly heterogeneous and anisotropic assemblage of littoral sand and silt. Field work involved the acquisition of a broad range of data: geological, hydraulic, geophysical, and geochemical. The emphasis was put on high resolution and continuous hydrogeophysical data, the use of direct-push fully-screened wells and the acquisition of targeted high-resolution hydraulic data covering the range of observed aquifer materials. The main methods were: 1) surface geophysics (ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity); 2) direct-push operations with a geotechnical drilling rig (cone penetration tests with soil moisture resistivity CPT/SMR; full-screen well installation); and 3) borehole operations, including high-resolution hydraulic tests and geochemical sampling. New methods were developed to acquire high vertical resolution hydraulic data in direct-push wells, including both vertical and horizontal K (Kv and Kh). Various data integration approaches were used to represent aquifer properties in 1D, 2D and 3D. Using relevant vector machines (RVM), the mechanical and

  15. Scaling behavior of thin films on chemically heterogeneous walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malijevský, Alexandr; Parry, Andrew O.; Pospíšil, Martin

    2017-09-01

    We study the adsorption of a fluid in the grand canonical ensemble occurring at a planar heterogeneous wall which is decorated with a chemical stripe of width L . We suppose that the material of the stripe strongly preferentially adsorbs the liquid in contrast to the outer material which is only partially wet. This competition leads to the nucleation of a droplet of liquid on the stripe, the height hm and shape of which (at bulk two-phase coexistence) has been predicted previously using mesoscopic interfacial Hamiltonian theory. We test these predictions using a microscopic Fundamental Measure Density Functional Theory which incorporates short-ranged fluid-fluid and fully long-ranged wall-fluid interactions. Our model functional accurately describes packing effects not captured by the interfacial Hamiltonian but still we show that there is excellent agreement with the predictions hm≈L1 /2 and for the scaled circular shape of the drop even for L as small as 50 molecular diameters. For smaller stripes the droplet height is considerably lower than that predicted by the mesoscopic interfacial theory. Phase transitions for droplet configurations occurring on substrates with multiple stripes are also discussed.

  16. Heterogeneous Graph Propagation for Large-Scale Web Image Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Lingxi; Tian, Qi; Zhou, Wengang; Zhang, Bo

    2015-11-01

    State-of-the-art web image search frameworks are often based on the bag-of-visual-words (BoVWs) model and the inverted index structure. Despite the simplicity, efficiency, and scalability, they often suffer from low precision and/or recall, due to the limited stability of local features and the considerable information loss on the quantization stage. To refine the quality of retrieved images, various postprocessing methods have been adopted after the initial search process. In this paper, we investigate the online querying process from a graph-based perspective. We introduce a heterogeneous graph model containing both image and feature nodes explicitly, and propose an efficient reranking approach consisting of two successive modules, i.e., incremental query expansion and image-feature voting, to improve the recall and precision, respectively. Compared with the conventional reranking algorithms, our method does not require using geometric information of visual words, therefore enjoys low consumptions of both time and memory. Moreover, our method is independent of the initial search process, and could cooperate with many BoVW-based image search pipelines, or adopted after other postprocessing algorithms. We evaluate our approach on large-scale image search tasks and verify its competitive search performance.

  17. The translation and evaluation of an Urdu version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, D B; Tareen, I A; Bajwa, M A; Bhatti, M R; Karim, R

    1991-02-01

    The translation of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) into Urdu was undertaken by the authors in committee. After examining initial drafts by 6 independent translators, an agreed Urdu text was given to 6 back-translators, and subsequently modified further. The evaluation of the new translation was performed in 3 stages: evaluation of linguistic equivalence of items in a bilingual population; evaluation of conceptual equivalence by examining item-subscale correlations: and evaluation of scale equivalence by 2-way classification of high and low scorers. Satisfactory results at each stage suggest that the Urdu version is a reliable and valid translation of the HADS for use in Pakistan.

  18. Translation and cross cultural adaptation of the Pediatric Motor Activity Log-Revised scale

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriela da Silva Matuti; Juliana Firmo dos Santos; Ana Carolina Rodrigues da Silva; Rafael Eras-Garcia; Gitendra Uswatte; Edward Taub

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The standardized instrument developed to assess the use of the affected upper limb in children with cerebral palsy (CP) is the Pediatric Motor Activity Log Revised (PMAL-R). Objectives To translate PMAL-R and adapt for the Brazilian culture; analyze the reliability and the internal consistency of the Brazilian version. Method Translation of PMAL-R to the Portuguese-Brazil and back translation. The back-translated version was revised by the authors of the scale. The final version ...

  19. English to Arabic Translation of the Composite Abuse Scale (CAS): A Multi-Method Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Samia Alhabib; Gene Feder; Jeremy Horwood

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The composite abuse scale (CAS) is a comprehensive tool used to measure intimate partner violence (IPV). The aim of the present study is to translate the CAS from English to Arabic. METHODS: The translation of the CAS was conducted in four stages using a multi-method approach: 1) preliminary forward translation, 2) discussion with a panel of bilingual experts, 3) focus groups discussion, and 4) back-translation of the CAS. The discussion included a linguistic validation by a compa...

  20. Small length scale heterogeneity beneath the East Pacific Rise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallick, S.; Salters, V. J.; Perfit, M. R.

    2009-12-01

    We found two areas (~1.80°N and Siqueiros Transform Fault, STF) on the East Pacific Rise (EPR) where ridge basalts show large variation in chemical and isotope compositions compared to the other EPR basalts. Samples from ~1.80°N have relatively large ranges in trace element abundances(Ba/Zr = 0.11-0.80, Ce/Yb = 2.64-7.77) and isotope ratios 87Sr/86Sr = 0.70226-0.70282, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.513070-0.513275, 176Hf/177Hf = 0.283105-0.283281, 206Pb/204Pb = 17.54-18.62) encompassing ~70% of the variability shown by EPR ridge basalts though they are collected from 2 higher than most EPR basalts but with 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd similar to EPR basalts. The second group has incompatible trace elements similar to average EPR basalts but are among the most depleted in isotope ratios and similar to the Garrett FZ lavas from SEPR. The degree of isotopic variation observed along this 25km ridge segments is similar in amplitude as the variations observed in EPR seamounts. The large variation in a small area indicates there are significant small-scale heterogeneities in the sub-ridge mantle and that ridge basalts average melts from a smaller area of a mantle than the proposed length scale of melting (100km) and points at efficient melt extraction and inefficient mixing of melts. Samples from STF also show a wide range in chemical compositions (Ba/Zr = 0.03-0.79, Ce/Yb = 1.83-11.65) and isotope ratios (87Sr/86Sr= 0.70233-0.70285, 143Nd/144Nd = 0.513011-0.513189, 176Hf/177Hf = 0.283043-0.283225, 206Pb/204Pb=18.12-18.66) within the compositional range found in NEPR basalts, but lacking samples with depleted isotopic composition as observed at ~1.80°N and at the Garrett FZ. Previous studies have shown that the STF basalts are derived from the shallow mantle (<1GPa).This suggests that this shallow mantle must have been able to either retain or regain its more fertile composition during melting beneath the ridge. Basalts from west part of the STF have isotopic compositions similar to

  1. Random Heterogeneity Scales and Probabilistic Description of the Long-Lifetime Regime of Fatigue (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jha, S. K; Larsen, James M

    2007-01-01

    .... We associate these mechanisms with the development of a ranking of heterogeneity scales in the material, with decreasing probability of occurrence in the order of increasing scale, at any given loading condition...

  2. Population heterogeneity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli lab scale cultivations simulating industrial scale bioprocesses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena

    . This thesis aimed at reaching a deeper understanding of how microbial physiology and cell dynamics are affected by the spatial heterogeneity in a bioreactor. Therefore large scale fermentation was simulated in laboratory scale using two of the most industrially relevant organisms E. coli and S. cerevisiae....... Single cell distributions of cell size and fluorescence - originating from growth, cell membrane robustness and ethanol reporter strains or different fluorescence stains (for e.g. viability and metabolic activity) - were thereby followed by applying flow cytometry. Cell responses were studied...... in different cultivations modes, in steady state at different growth rates and in response to glucose perturbation in continuous culture, simulating the feeding zone of a large scale fed-batch fermentation and in batch culture to characterise the single cell behaviour in a dynamic environment. Furthermore...

  3. Translation, cultural adaptation and validation of Kidney Disease Loss Scale to the Brazilian context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Ottaviani

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: Losses can be conceptualized as cognitive and affective responses to individual sorrows, characterized by brooding, yearning, disbelief and stunned feelings, being clinically significant in chronic diseases. Objective: The aim of the study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Kidney Disease Loss Scale into Portuguese. Methods: Validation study involving the steps recommended in the literature for healthcare instruments: initial translation, synthesis of translations, back translation, review by a committee of judges and pretest. Results: The scale was translated and adapted to the Portuguese language, being quick and easy to application. The reliability and reproducibility showed satisfactory values. Factor analysis indicated a factor that explains 59.7% of the losses construct. Conclusion: The Kidney Disease Loss Scale was translated, adapted and validated for the Brazilian context, allowing future studies of losses and providing tools for the professionals working in dialysis centers for assistance to people with chronic kidney disease.

  4. Cross-cultural adaptation: translation and Portuguese language content validation of the Tripartite Influence Scale for body dissatisfaction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Conti, Maria Aparecida; Scagliusi, Fernanda; Queiroz, Gisele Kawamura de Oliveira; Hearst, Norman; Cordás, Táki Athanássios

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to translate and adapt the Tripartite Influence Scale to the Portuguese language and evaluate its content validity and internal consistency. Six steps included: (1) translation; (2) back-translation; (3...

  5. Mapping Smallholder Yield Heterogeneity at Multiple Scales in Eastern Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenong Jin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accurate measurements of crop production in smallholder farming systems are critical to the understanding of yield constraints and, thus, setting the appropriate agronomic investments and policies for improving food security and reducing poverty. Nevertheless, mapping the yields of smallholder farms is challenging because of factors such as small field sizes and heterogeneous landscapes. Recent advances in fine-resolution satellite sensors offer promise for monitoring and characterizing the production of smallholder farms. In this study, we investigated the utility of different sensors, including the commercial Skysat and RapidEye satellites and the publicly accessible Sentinel-2, for tracking smallholder maize yield variation throughout a ~40,000 km2 western Kenya region. We tested the potential of two types of multiple regression models for predicting yield: (i a “calibrated model”, which required ground-measured yield and weather data for calibration, and (ii an “uncalibrated model”, which used a process-based crop model to generate daily vegetation index and end-of-season biomass and/or yield as pseudo training samples. Model performance was evaluated at the field, division, and district scales using a combination of farmer surveys and crop cuts across thousands of smallholder plots in western Kenya. Results show that the “calibrated” approach captured a significant fraction (R2 between 0.3 and 0.6 of yield variations at aggregated administrative units (e.g., districts and divisions, while the “uncalibrated” approach performed only slightly worse. For both approaches, we found that predictions using the MERIS Terrestrial Chlorophyll Index (MTCI, which included the red edge band available in RapidEye and Sentinel-2, were superior to those made using other commonly used vegetation indices. We also found that multiple refinements to the crop simulation procedures led to improvements in the “uncalibrated” approach. We

  6. [Morse Fall Scale: translation and transcultural adaptation for the Portuguese language].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Urbanetto, Janete Souza; Creutzberg, Marion; Franz, Flávia; Ojeda, Beatriz Sebben; da Gustavo, Andreia Silva; Bittencourt, Hélio Radke; Steinmetz, Quézia Lidiane; Farina, Veronica Alacarini

    2013-06-01

    The study aimed to translate and adapt the Morse Fall Scale from English into the Portuguese language. This was performed in seven steps: authorization by the author of the scale; translation into Portuguese; evaluation and structuring of the translated scale; reverse translation into English; evaluation and validation of the scale by a committee of experts; evaluation of clarity of items and operational definitions with 45 professionals; evaluation of agreement between raters and the reliability of reproducibility, related to data from the evaluation of 90 patients, performed by four evaluators/judges. The clarity of the scale was considered very satisfactory, with a confidence interval of 73.0% to 100% in the option very clear. For the concordance of responses, the results showed Kappa coefficients of approximately 0.80 or higher. It was concluded that the adaptation of the scale was successful, indicating that its use is appropriate for the population of Brazilian patients.

  7. Fine-Scale Habitat Heterogeneity Influences Occupancy in Terrestrial Mammals in a Temperate Region of Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Stirnemann

    Full Text Available Vegetation heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most ecosystems, characterises the structure of habitat, and is considered an important driver of species distribution patterns. However, quantifying fine-scale heterogeneity of vegetation cover can be time consuming, and therefore it is seldom measured. Here, we determine if heterogeneity is worthwhile measuring, in addition to the amount of cover, when examining species distribution patterns. Further, we investigated the effect of the surrounding landscape heterogeneity on species occupancy. We tested the effect of cover and heterogeneity of trees and shrubs, and the context of the surrounding landscape (number of habitats and distance to an ecotone on site occupancy of three mammal species (the black wallaby [Wallabia bicolor], the long-nosed bandicoot [Perameles nasuta], and the bush rat [Rattus fuscipes] within a naturally heterogeneous landscape in a temperate region of Australia. We found that fine-scale heterogeneity of vegetation attributes is an important driver of mammal occurrence of two of these species. Further, we found that, although all three species responded positively to vegetation heterogeneity, different mammals vary in their response to different types of vegetation heterogeneity measurement. For example, the black wallaby responded to the proximity of an ecotone, and the bush rat and the long-nosed bandicoot responded to fine-scale heterogeneity of small tree cover, whereas none of the mammals responded to broad scale heterogeneity (i.e., the number of habitat types. Our results highlight the influence of methodological decisions, such as how heterogeneity vegetation is measured, in quantifying species responses to habitat structures. The findings confirm the importance of choosing meaningful heterogeneity measures when modelling the factors influencing occupancy of the species of interest.

  8. Fine-Scale Habitat Heterogeneity Influences Occupancy in Terrestrial Mammals in a Temperate Region of Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnemann, Ingrid; Mortelliti, Alessio; Gibbons, Philip; Lindenmayer, David B

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation heterogeneity is an inherent feature of most ecosystems, characterises the structure of habitat, and is considered an important driver of species distribution patterns. However, quantifying fine-scale heterogeneity of vegetation cover can be time consuming, and therefore it is seldom measured. Here, we determine if heterogeneity is worthwhile measuring, in addition to the amount of cover, when examining species distribution patterns. Further, we investigated the effect of the surrounding landscape heterogeneity on species occupancy. We tested the effect of cover and heterogeneity of trees and shrubs, and the context of the surrounding landscape (number of habitats and distance to an ecotone) on site occupancy of three mammal species (the black wallaby [Wallabia bicolor], the long-nosed bandicoot [Perameles nasuta], and the bush rat [Rattus fuscipes]) within a naturally heterogeneous landscape in a temperate region of Australia. We found that fine-scale heterogeneity of vegetation attributes is an important driver of mammal occurrence of two of these species. Further, we found that, although all three species responded positively to vegetation heterogeneity, different mammals vary in their response to different types of vegetation heterogeneity measurement. For example, the black wallaby responded to the proximity of an ecotone, and the bush rat and the long-nosed bandicoot responded to fine-scale heterogeneity of small tree cover, whereas none of the mammals responded to broad scale heterogeneity (i.e., the number of habitat types). Our results highlight the influence of methodological decisions, such as how heterogeneity vegetation is measured, in quantifying species responses to habitat structures. The findings confirm the importance of choosing meaningful heterogeneity measures when modelling the factors influencing occupancy of the species of interest.

  9. Translation of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale into an Equivalent Spanish Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collazo, Andres A.

    2005-01-01

    A Spanish version of the Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS) was developed by applying a method derived from the cross-cultural and psychometric literature. The method included five sequenced studies: (a) translation and back-translation, (b) comprehension assessment, (c) psychometric equivalence study of two mixed-language versions,…

  10. Translation and adaptation to Brazilian Portuguese of the Lymphedema Rating Scale in Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queija, Débora Dos Santos; Arakawa-Sugueno, Lica; Chamma, Bruna Mello; Kulcsar, Marco Aurélio Vamondes; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido

    2017-12-18

    Translate to brazilian portuguese, culturally adapt and test the rating and classification scales of cervicofacial lymphedema of the MD Anderson Cancer Center Head and Neck Lymphedema Protocol (MDACC HNL) in patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer. The process followed international guidelines and translation stages by two head and neck surgeons, and back translation independently by two native Americans. The test of final version was based on the evaluation of 18 patients by one speech pathologist and one physical therapist who applied the scales in Portuguese. The translation of the three scales was carried out independently and the translators reached a consensus for the final version. Minor modifications were made by translating two terms into the Assessment of the Face. Versions of back-translation were similar to each other. The instrument was successfully applied to patients independently. The translation and cultural adaptation of the assessment and rating scale of the cervicofacial lymphedema of the MD Anderson Cancer Center Head and Neck Lymphedema Protocol to the Brazilian Portuguese were successful.

  11. Scale, heterogeneity and secondary production in tropical rangelands

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper will review our current understanding of scale-related effects on livestock production in tropical rangelands and herbivore-plant interactions at patch to landscape scales. We use published information and results from recent empirical studies in northern Australia and elsewhere to elucidate scale-related effects ...

  12. Field scale heterogeneity of redox conditions in till-upscaling to a catchment nitrate model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.R.; Erntsen, V.; Refsgaard, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Point scale studies in different settings of glacial geology show a large local variation of redox conditions. There is a need to develop an upscaling methodology for catchment scale models. This paper describes a study of field-scale heterogeneity of redox-interfaces in a till aquitard within an...

  13. [Brazilian version of the Perceived Stress Scale: translation and validation for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, Caroline Di Bernardi; Sanches, Sabrina de Oliveira; Mazo, Giovana Zarpellon; Andrade, Alexandro

    2007-08-01

    To translate the Perceived Stress Scale into Brazilian Portuguese, and to assess its validity for measuring perceived stress of Brazilian elderly. The scale was translated and tested in its full version including 14 questions and in a shortened version including ten questions. The whole translation process consisted of translation, back-translation and committee review. The translated version was applied, by means of interview, to 76 elders aged on average 70.04 years (SD=6.34; range: 60-84). The internal consistency was verified by means of the Cronbach's alpha coefficient and the construct validity was analyzed by means of factorial exploratory analysis with varimax rotation. Full and shortened score means were analyzed comparing the perceived stress in terms of self-assessment of health, perceived socioeconomic condition, marital status, and living conditions, among others. As for reliability, the full version has showed similar internal consistency (r=0.82) compared to the shortened one (r=0.83). The factorial analysis found two factors for the full and one factor for the shortened scale. Question 12 showed the lowest factorial loads. When analyzing PSS likelihood of differentiating the perceived stress in terms of the study variables, it was found the full scale had greater differences in perceived stress than the shortened scale. The Perceived Stress Scale proved to be a clear and reliable tool to measure the perceived stress of Brazilian elderly, showing suitable psychometric performance.

  14. Scale-specific correlations between habitat heterogeneity and soil fauna diversity along a landscape structure gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanbergen, Adam J; Watt, Allan D; Mitchell, Ruth; Truscott, Anne-Marie; Palmer, Stephen C F; Ivits, Eva; Eggleton, Paul; Jones, T Hefin; Sousa, José Paulo

    2007-09-01

    Habitat heterogeneity contributes to the maintenance of diversity, but the extent that landscape-scale rather than local-scale heterogeneity influences the diversity of soil invertebrates-species with small range sizes-is less clear. Using a Scottish habitat heterogeneity gradient we correlated Collembola and lumbricid worm species richness and abundance with different elements (forest cover, habitat richness and patchiness) and qualities (plant species richness, soil variables) of habitat heterogeneity, at landscape (1 km(2)) and local (up to 200 m(2)) scales. Soil fauna assemblages showed considerable turnover in species composition along this habitat heterogeneity gradient. Soil fauna species richness and turnover was greatest in landscapes that were a mosaic of habitats. Soil fauna diversity was hump-shaped along a gradient of forest cover, peaking where there was a mixture of forest and open habitats in the landscape. Landscape-scale habitat richness was positively correlated with lumbricid diversity, while Collembola and lumbricid abundances were negatively and positively related to landscape spatial patchiness. Furthermore, soil fauna diversity was positively correlated with plant diversity, which in turn peaked in the sites that were a mosaic of forest and open habitat patches. There was less evidence that local-scale habitat variables (habitat richness, tree cover, plant species richness, litter cover, soil pH, depth of organic horizon) affected soil fauna diversity: Collembola diversity was independent of all these measures, while lumbricid diversity positively and negatively correlated with vascular plant species richness and tree canopy density. Landscape-scale habitat heterogeneity affects soil diversity regardless of taxon, while the influence of habitat heterogeneity at local scales is dependent on taxon identity, and hence ecological traits, e.g. body size. Landscape-scale habitat heterogeneity by providing different niches and refuges, together

  15. Lagrangian scheme to model subgrid-scale mixing and spreading in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, P. A.; Cortínez, J. M.; Valocchi, A. J.

    2017-04-01

    Small-scale heterogeneity of permeability controls spreading, dilution, and mixing of solute plumes at large scale. However, conventional numerical simulations of solute transport are unable to resolve scales of heterogeneity below the grid scale. We propose a Lagrangian numerical approach to implement closure models to account for subgrid-scale spreading and mixing in Darcy-scale numerical simulations of solute transport in mildly heterogeneous porous media. The novelty of the proposed approach is that it considers two different dispersion coefficients to account for advective spreading mechanisms and local-scale dispersion. Using results of benchmark numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed approach is able to model subgrid-scale spreading and mixing provided there is a correct choice of block-scale dispersion coefficient. We also demonstrate that for short travel times it is only possible to account for spreading or mixing using a single block-scale dispersion coefficient. Moreover, we show that it is necessary to use time-dependent dispersion coefficients to obtain correct mixing rates. On the contrary, for travel times that are large in comparison to the typical dispersive time scale, it is possible to use a single expression to compute the block-dispersion coefficient, which is equal to the asymptotic limit of the block-scale macrodispersion coefficient proposed by Rubin et al. (1999). Our approach provides a flexible and efficient way to model subgrid-scale mixing in numerical models of large-scale solute transport in heterogeneous aquifers. We expect that these findings will help to better understand the applicability of the advection-dispersion-equation (ADE) to simulate solute transport at the Darcy scale in heterogeneous porous media.

  16. The enigma of soil animal species diversity revisited: the role of small-scale heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Uffe N; Osler, Graham H R; Campbell, Colin D; Neilson, Roy; Burslem, David F R P; van der Wal, René

    2010-07-13

    "The enigma of soil animal species diversity" was the title of a popular article by J. M. Anderson published in 1975. In that paper, Anderson provided insights on the great richness of species found in soils, but emphasized that the mechanisms contributing to the high species richness belowground were largely unknown. Yet, exploration of the mechanisms driving species richness has focused, almost exclusively, on above-ground plant and animal communities, and nearly 35 years later we have several new hypotheses but are not much closer to revealing why soils are so rich in species. One persistent but untested hypothesis is that species richness is promoted by small-scale environmental heterogeneity. To test this hypothesis we manipulated small-scale heterogeneity in soil properties in a one-year field experiment and investigated the impacts on the richness of soil fauna and evenness of the microbial communities. We found that heterogeneity substantially increased the species richness of oribatid mites, collembolans and nematodes, whereas heterogeneity had no direct influence on the evenness of either the fungal, bacterial or archaeal communities or on species richness of the large and mobile mesostigmatid mites. These results suggest that the heterogeneity-species richness relationship is scale dependent. Our results provide direct evidence for the hypothesis that small-scale heterogeneity in soils increase species richness of intermediate-sized soil fauna. The concordance of mechanisms between above and belowground communities suggests that the relationship between environmental heterogeneity and species richness may be a general property of ecological communities.

  17. Complexity in earthquake sequences controlled by multi-scale heterogeneity in fault fracture energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aochi, H.; Ide, S.

    2008-12-01

    A series of dynamic rupture events under constant tectonic loading is simulated on a fault with multi-scale heterogeneity and a stochastic rupture initiation process. The fracture energy of the fault plane is assumed to have multi-scale heterogeneous distribution using fractal circular patches. The stochastic rupture initiation process with a function of the accumulated stress is introduced in order to take account for unknown smaller- scale heterogeneity and incertitude. Five realizations of a statistical spatial distribution of fracture energy (fault heterogeneity maps) are tested for the simulations of earthquake sequences during a few seismic cycles. The diversity of earthquake sequences is principally controlled by the spatial distribution of the patches. The effect of dynamic rupture appears in the residual stress after the characteristic events due to their directivity and this localizes the subsequent sequences. Although the characteristic earthquakes occur rather regularly in time and similarly in different seismic cycles, some irregular behaviors are found, based on the heterogeneity maps and the randomness of the preceding earthquake sequence, leading to a visible anomaly in the seismicity. Such anomaly is not predicable, but understandable through the analysis of the concerned earthquakes during the cycle. The similarity and the diversity simulated in this study, governed by the structure of an inherent distribution of multi-scale heterogeneity, suggests the importance of pre-existing heterogeneity field along the fault for the appearance of earthquake sequences, including those that are characteristic.

  18. Decoding intratumoral heterogeneity of breast cancer by multiparametric in vivo imaging: A translational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Jennifer; Schwab, Julian; Schwenck, Johannes; Chen, Qian; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Hahn, Markus; Wietek, Beate; Schwenzer, Nina; Staebler, Annette; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Aina, Olulanu H.; Hubbard, Neil E.; Reischl, Gerald; Borowsky, Alexander D.; Brucker, Sara; Nikolaou, Konstantin; la Fougère, Christian; Cardiff, Robert D.; Pichler, Bernd J.; Schmid, Andreas M.

    2016-01-01

    Differential diagnosis and therapy of heterogeneous breast tumors poses a major clinical challenge. To address the need for a comprehensive, non-invasive strategy to define the molecular and functional profiles of tumors in vivo, we investigated a novel combination of metabolic positron emission tomography (PET) and diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the polyoma virus middle T transgenic mouse model of breast cancer. The implementation of a voxelwise analysis for the clustering of intra- and intertumoral heterogeneity in this model resulted in a multiparametric profile based on [18F]FDG-PET and DW-MRI which identified 3 distinct tumor phenotypes in vivo, including solid acinar and solid nodular malignancies as well as cystic hyperplasia. To evaluate the feasibility of this approach for clinical use, we examined estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) and progesterone receptor-positive (PR+) breast tumors from 5 patient cases using DW-MRI and [18F]FDG-PET in a simultaneous PET/MRI system. The post-surgical in vivo PET/MRI data was correlated to whole-slide histology using the latter traditional diagnostic standard to define phenotype. By this approach, we showed how molecular, structural (microscopic, anatomic) and functional information could be simultaneously obtained non-invasively to identify precancerous and malignant subtypes within heterogeneous tumors. Combined with an automatized analysis, our results suggest that multiparametric molecular and functional imaging may be capable of providing comprehensive tumor profiling for non-invasive cancer diagnostics. PMID:27466286

  19. Resource heterogeneity and foraging behaviour of cattle across spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Santiago A; Cangiano, Carlos A; Galli, Julio R; McEachern, Mary B; Demment, Montague W; Laca, Emilio A

    2009-04-24

    Understanding the mechanisms that influence grazing selectivity in patchy environments is vital to promote sustainable production and conservation of cultivated and natural grasslands. To better understand how patch size and spatial dynamics influence selectivity in cattle, we examined grazing selectivity under 9 different treatments by offering alfalfa and fescue in patches of 3 sizes spaced with 1, 4, and 8 m between patches along an alley. We hypothesized that (1) selectivity is driven by preference for the forage species that maximizes forage intake over feeding scales ranging from single bites to patches along grazing paths, (2) that increasing patch size enhances selectivity for the preferred species, and that (3) increasing distances between patches restricts selectivity because of the aggregation of scale-specific behaviours across foraging scales. Cows preferred and selected alfalfa, the species that yielded greater short-term intake rates (P < 0.0001) and greater daily intake potential. Selectivity was not affected by patch arrangement, but it was scale dependent. Selectivity tended to emerge at the scale of feeding stations and became strongly significant at the bite scale, because of differences in bite mass between plant species. Greater distance between patches resulted in longer patch residence time and faster speed of travel but lower overall intake rate, consistent with maximization of intake rate. Larger patches resulted in greater residence time and higher intake rate. We conclude that patch size and spacing affect components of intake rate and, to a lesser extent, the selectivity of livestock at lower hierarchies of the grazing process, particularly by enticing livestock to make more even use of the available species as patches are spaced further apart. Thus, modifications in the spatial pattern of plant patches along with reductions in the temporal and spatial allocation of grazing may offer opportunities to improve uniformity of grazing by

  20. Translating Research into Clinical Scale Manufacturing of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

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    Karen Bieback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It sounds simple to obtain sufficient numbers of cells derived from fetal or adult human tissues, isolate and/or expand the stem cells, and then transplant an appropriate number of these cells into the patient at the correct location. However, translating basic research into routine therapies is a complex multistep process which necessitates product regulation. The challenge relates to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks and to balance the fast move to clinical trials with time-consuming cautious risk assessment. This paper will focus on the definition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, and challenges and achievements in the manufacturing process enabling their use in clinical studies. It will allude to different cellular sources, special capacities of MSCs, but also to current regulations, with a special focus on accessory material of human or animal origin, like media supplements. As cellular integrity and purity, formulation and lot release testing of the final product, validation of all procedures, and quality assurance are of utmost necessity, these topics will be addressed.

  1. [French translation, validation and adaptation of the Stigma Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, S; Gibellini Manetti, S; Zimmermann, G; Favrod, J; Chanachev, A; Monnat, M; Bonsack, C

    2013-12-01

    People suffering from mental illness are exposed to stigma. However, only few tools are available to assess stigmatization as perceived from the patient's perspective. The aim of this study is to adapt and validate a French version of the Stigma Scale (King et al., 2007 [8]). This self-report questionnaire has a three-factor structure: discrimination, disclosure and positive aspects of mental illness. Discrimination subscale refers to perceived negative reactions of others. Disclosure subscale refers mainly to managing disclosure to avoid discrimination and finally positive aspects subscale taps into how patients are becoming more accepting, more understanding toward their illness. In the first step, internal consistency, convergent validity and test-retest reliability of the French adaptation of the 28-item scale were assessed in a sample of 183 patients. Results of confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) did not confirm the hypothesized structure. In the light of the failed attempts to validate the original version, an alternative 9-item short-form version of the Stigma Scale, maintaining the integrity of the original model, was developed based on results of exploratory factor analyses in the first sample and cross-validated in a new sample of 234 patients. Results of CFA did not confirm that the data fitted well to the three-factor model of the 28-item Stigma Scale (χ(2)/df=2.02, GFI=0.77, AGFI=0.73, RMSEA=0.07, CFI=0.77 and NNFI=0.75). Cronbach's α was excellent for discrimination (0.84) and disclosure (0.83) subscales but poor for potential positive aspects (0.46). External validity was satisfactory. Overall Stigma Scale total score was negatively correlated with the score on Rosenberg's Self-Esteem Scale (r=-0.49), and each subscale was significantly correlated with a visual analogue scale that referred to the specific aspect of stigma (0.43≤|r|≤0.60). Intraclass correlation coefficients between 0.68 and 0.89 indicated good test-retest reliability. The

  2. Dynamical links between small- and large-scale mantle heterogeneity: Seismological evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Daniel A.; Garnero, Edward J.; Rost, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    We identify PKP • PKP scattered waves (also known as P‧ •P‧) from earthquakes recorded at small-aperture seismic arrays at distances less than 65°. P‧ •P‧ energy travels as a PKP wave through the core, up into the mantle, then scatters back down through the core to the receiver as a second PKP. P‧ •P‧ waves are unique in that they allow scattering heterogeneities throughout the mantle to be imaged. We use array-processing methods to amplify low amplitude, coherent scattered energy signals and resolve their incoming direction. We deterministically map scattering heterogeneity locations from the core-mantle boundary to the surface. We use an extensive dataset with sensitivity to a large volume of the mantle and a location method allowing us to resolve and map more heterogeneities than have previously been possible, representing a significant increase in our understanding of small-scale structure within the mantle. Our results demonstrate that the distribution of scattering heterogeneities varies both radially and laterally. Scattering is most abundant in the uppermost and lowermost mantle, and a minimum in the mid-mantle, resembling the radial distribution of tomographically derived whole-mantle velocity heterogeneity. We investigate the spatial correlation of scattering heterogeneities with large-scale tomographic velocities, lateral velocity gradients, the locations of deep-seated hotspots and subducted slabs. In the lowermost 1500 km of the mantle, small-scale heterogeneities correlate with regions of low seismic velocity, high lateral seismic gradient, and proximity to hotspots. In the upper 1000 km of the mantle there is no significant correlation between scattering heterogeneity location and subducted slabs. Between 600 and 900 km depth, scattering heterogeneities are more common in the regions most remote from slabs, and close to hotspots. Scattering heterogeneities show an affinity for regions close to slabs within the upper 200 km of the

  3. Measuring social alienation in adolescence: translation and validation of the Jessor and Jessor Social Alienation Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safipour, Jalal; Tessma, Mesfin Kassaye; Higginbottom, Gina; Emami, Azita

    2010-12-01

    The objective of the study is to translate and examine the reliability and validity of the Jessor and Jessor Social Alienation Scale for use in a Swedish context. The study involved four phases of testing: (1) Translation and back-translation; (2) a pilot test to evaluate the translation; (3) reliability testing; and (4) a validity test. Main participants of this study were 446 students (Age = 15-19, SD = 1.01, Mean = 17). Results from the reliability test showed high internal consistency and stability. Face, content and construct validity were demonstrated using experts and confirmatory factor analysis. The results of testing the Swedish version of the alienation scale revealed an acceptable level of reliability and validity, and is appropriate for use in the Swedish context. © 2010 The Authors. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology © 2010 The Scandinavian Psychological Associations.

  4. Resource heterogeneity and foraging behaviour of cattle across spatial scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demment Montague W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the mechanisms that influence grazing selectivity in patchy environments is vital to promote sustainable production and conservation of cultivated and natural grasslands. To better understand how patch size and spatial dynamics influence selectivity in cattle, we examined grazing selectivity under 9 different treatments by offering alfalfa and fescue in patches of 3 sizes spaced with 1, 4, and 8 m between patches along an alley. We hypothesized that (1 selectivity is driven by preference for the forage species that maximizes forage intake over feeding scales ranging from single bites to patches along grazing paths, (2 that increasing patch size enhances selectivity for the preferred species, and that (3 increasing distances between patches restricts selectivity because of the aggregation of scale-specific behaviours across foraging scales. Results Cows preferred and selected alfalfa, the species that yielded greater short-term intake rates (P Conclusion We conclude that patch size and spacing affect components of intake rate and, to a lesser extent, the selectivity of livestock at lower hierarchies of the grazing process, particularly by enticing livestock to make more even use of the available species as patches are spaced further apart. Thus, modifications in the spatial pattern of plant patches along with reductions in the temporal and spatial allocation of grazing may offer opportunities to improve uniformity of grazing by livestock and help sustain biodiversity and stability of plant communities.

  5. Validation of an Arabic translation of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Russel; Al Saif, Abdulaziz; el-din Mohamed, Gamal

    2005-01-01

    Depression is a common condition in primary care medicine in all population groups. We wanted to validate an Arabic translation Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for Arabic speakers as it has been validated in a number of other languages. The hospital translation service translated the English version into Arabic, which was verified by back translation. This version was tested in a pilot study with 40 bilingual Arabic-English clinicians and Arabic linguistic experts. Revised questions were subjected to another translation-back translation and the final version tested in a clinical trial with 240 consenting bilingual English-Arabic speakers. The subjects were randomly assigned to answer either the English or Arabic version of the Zung questionnaire first, ensuring that subjects had no access to previous answers when answering the questionnaire in the other language. The scores obtained were tested for agreement using the kappa statistic. We found substantial agreement between the scores obtained from the two questionnaires. The kappa measurement of agreement was 0.652 (95% confidence interval, 0.571-0.732) We believe the Arabic translation of the English Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale is valid and reliable, and will be useful to practitioners who would like to use this tool in Arabic-speaking patients.

  6. Translation, cultural adaptation and reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire for Brazil

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    Aline Chiari

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To translate, to perform a cultural adaptation of and to test the reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire for Brazil. METHODS: First, the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire was translated into Portuguese and was then back-translated into French. These translations were reviewed by a committee to establish a Brazilian version of the questionnaire to be tested. The validity and reproducibility of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale questionnaire was evaluated. Patients of both sexes, who were aged 18 to 60 years and presented with rheumatoid arthritis affecting their hands, were interviewed. The patients were initially interviewed by two observers and were later interviewed by a single rater. First, the Visual Analogue Scale for hand pain, the Arm, Shoulder and Hand Disability questionnaire and the Health Assessment Questionnaire were administered. The third administration of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale was performed fifteen days after the first administration. Ninety patients were assessed in the present study. RESULTS: Two questions were modified as a result of the assessment of cultural equivalence. The Cronbach's alpha value for this assessment was 0.93. The intraclass intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients were 0.76 and 0.96, respectively. The Spearman's coefficient indicated that there was a low level of correlation between the Cochin Hand Functional Scale and the Visual Analogue Scale for pain (0.46 and that there was a moderate level of correlation of the Cochin Scale with the Health Assessment Questionnaire (0.66 and with the Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (0.63. The average administration time for the Cochin Scale was three minutes. CONCLUSION: The Brazilian version of the Cochin Hand Functional Scale was successfully translated and adapted, and this version exhibited good internal consistency, reliability and construct validity.

  7. English to Arabic translation of the Composite Abuse Scale (CAS): a multi-method approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabib, Samia; Feder, Gene; Horwood, Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The composite abuse scale (CAS) is a comprehensive tool used to measure intimate partner violence (IPV). The aim of the present study is to translate the CAS from English to Arabic. The translation of the CAS was conducted in four stages using a multi-method approach: 1) preliminary forward translation, 2) discussion with a panel of bilingual experts, 3) focus groups discussion, and 4) back-translation of the CAS. The discussion included a linguistic validation by a comparison of the Arabic translation with the original English by assessing conceptual and content equivalence. In all the stages of translation, there was an agreement to remove the question from the CAS that asked women about the use of objects in the vagina. Wording, format and order of the items were refined according to comments and suggestions made by the experts' panel and focus groups' members. The back-translated CAS showed similar wording and language of the original English version. The Arabic version of the CAS will help to measure the problem of IPV among Saudi women and possibly other Arabic-speaking women in future studies. This is important, particularly, in longitudinal studies or intervention studies among abused women and it allows a comparison of the results of studies from different cultures. However, further validations studies are needed to ensure accurate and equivalent Arabic translation of the CAS.

  8. Translation and transcultural adaptation of Pain Quality Assessment Scale (PQAS) to Brazilian version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Anamada Barros; Garcia, João Batista Santos; Silva, Thayanne Kelly Muniz; Ribeiro, João Victor Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer patients are treated with chemotherapy, and peripheral neuropathy is a serious and common clinical problem affecting patients undergoing cancer treatment. However, the symptoms are subjective and underdiagnosed by health professionals. Thus, it becomes necessary to develop self-report instruments to overcome this limitation and improve the patient's perception about his medical condition or treatment. Translate and culturally adapt the Brazilian version of the Pain Quality Assessment Scale, constituting a useful tool for assessing the quality of neuropathic pain in cancer patients. The procedure followed the steps of translation, back translation, analysis of Portuguese and English versions by a committee of judges, and pretest. Pretest was conducted with 30 cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy following internationally recommended standards, and the final versions were compared and evaluated by a committee of researchers from Brazil and MAPI Research Trust, the scale's creators. Versions one and two showed 100% semantic equivalence with the original version. Back-translation showed difference between the linguistic translation and the original version. After evaluation by the committee of judges, a flaw was found in the empirical equivalence and idiomatic equivalence. In pretest, two people did not understand the item 12 of the scale, without interfering in the final elaboration. The translated and culturally adapted instrument is now presented in this publication, and currently it is in the process of clinical validation in Brazil. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. [Jefferson scale of physician lifelong learning: translation and adaptation for the portuguese medical population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgueira, Ana Paula; Frada, Tiago; Aguiar, Pedro; Costa, Manuel João

    2009-01-01

    The competence and professionalism of doctors depend on the process of Lifelong Learning (LLL). In the Portuguese settings, in which the re-certification of physicians' skills or knowledge is currently not required, the exercise of LLL is left to personal motivation and initiative. The importance of LLL has been highlighted in numerous international recommendations and has already led, in the United States, to the development and validation of a scale for measuring physician LLL - the Jefferson Scale of Physician Life Long Learning (JSPLL). The lack of valid instruments to measure LLL adapted to the Portuguese contexts was the basis for this work, which presents the translation and adaptation of JSPLL, and the subsequent validation of the translated version to the Portuguese medical community. The translation and validation of the English version of JSPLL (JSPLL-VP) was conducted with physicians of Health Care institutions in the District of Braga, Portugal, in 2007. Methods of both qualitative (translation, assessment of the translation, retro translation) and quantitative nature (internal consistency analysis, factor analysis and analysis of response frequencies) resulted in a factor analysis that replicated, with the exception of three items, the distribution of the original scale by four factors: professional learning beliefs and motivation, scholarly activities, attention to learning opportunities and technical skills in seeking information. The results show that the JSPLL-VP is a valid Scale fit for purpose. Cronbach's alpha coefficients for the whole scale (.89) and for each factor, confirmed the internal consistency of the Scale. Additionally, differences were found between mean and standard deviations for different Scale factors. In summary, this work provides a new validated tool to monitor physician's LLL in Portugal. The transversal characterization of LLL of specific medical professionals - by specialty or by type of institution - or longitudinal

  10. Translation and adaptation of the Radiotherapy Edema Rating Scale to Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queija, Débora Dos Santos; Arakawa-Sugueno, Lica; Chamma, Bruna Mello; Kulcsar, Marco Aurélio Vamondes; Dedivitis, Rogério Aparecido

    2017-05-09

    Internal lymphedema is one of the sequelae of head and neck cancer treatment that can lead to varying degrees of swallowing, speech, and respiration alterations. The Radiotherapy Edema Rating Scale, developed by Patterson et al., is a tool used to evaluate pharyngeal and laryngeal edema. To translate into Brazilian Portuguese, to culturally adapt and test this scale in patients undergoing treatment for head and neck cancer. The process followed the international guidelines and translation steps by two head and neck surgeons and back-translation performed independently by two North-American natives. The final version of the test was evaluated based on the assessment of 18 patients by two head and neck surgeons and two speech therapists using the scales in Brazilian Portuguese. The translation and cultural adaptation were satisfactorily performed by the members of the committee in charge. The translation and adaptation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Radiotherapy Edema Rating Scale was successfully performed and showed to be easy to apply. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  11. Translation and Cross-Cultural Adaptation of the Manchester Orofacial Pain Disability Scale

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    Monira Samaan Kallás

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the present study was to translate and perform a cross-cultural adaptation of Manchester Orofacial Pain Disability Scale to the Portuguese language. Material and Methods: A synthesis of two independent translations done by bilingual translators whose mother tongue was the Portuguese language began the process of translation. From the synthesis of the translated version and totally blind to the original version, two different non-native English language teachers without dental knowledge translated the questionnaire back to English. The pre-final version was done by an Expert committee: the researchers, two other non-native English language teachers and one native English language speaker. The new questionnaire was then piloted among 8 patients from the target setting that were interviewed to probe it on their perceived meaning of each question. The Manchester Orofacial Pain Disability Scale (MOPDS thus translated was called Brasil-MOPDS and was validated in 50 patients with Orofacial pain from TMJ and Occlusion clinic ambulatory of São Paulo University School of Dentistry. The Brasil-MOPDS was administered twice by an interviewer (15 - 20 day interval and once by a second independent interviewer. The Brazilian version of the short form oral health impact profile (OHIP-14 questionnaire and the visual analogue pain scale (VAS were applied on the same day. Results: Internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.9, inter-observer (ICC = 0.92 and intra-observer (ICC = 0.98 correlations presented high scores. Validity of Brasil-MOPDS compared to OHIP-14 (r = 0.85 and VAS (r = 0.75 shown high correlations. Conclusions: Brasil-MOPDS was successfully translated and adapted to be applied to Brazilian patients, with satisfactory internal and external reliability.

  12. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the manchester orofacial pain disability scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallás, Monira Samaan; Crosato, Edgard Michel; Biazevic, Maria Gabriela Haye; Mori, Matsuyoshi; Aggarwal, Vishal R

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to translate and perform a cross-cultural adaptation of Manchester Orofacial Pain Disability Scale to the Portuguese language. A synthesis of two independent translations done by bilingual translators whose mother tongue was the Portuguese language began the process of translation. From the synthesis of the translated version and totally blind to the original version, two different non-native English language teachers without dental knowledge translated the questionnaire back to English. The pre-final version was done by an Expert committee: the researchers, two other non-native English language teachers and one native English language speaker. The new questionnaire was then piloted among 8 patients from the target setting that were interviewed to probe it on their perceived meaning of each question. The Manchester Orofacial Pain Disability Scale (MOPDS) thus translated was called Brasil-MOPDS and was validated in 50 patients with Orofacial pain from TMJ and Occlusion clinic ambulatory of São Paulo University School of Dentistry. The Brasil-MOPDS was administered twice by an interviewer (15 - 20 day interval) and once by a second independent interviewer. The Brazilian version of the short form oral health impact profile (OHIP-14) questionnaire and the visual analogue pain scale (VAS) were applied on the same day. Internal consistency (Cronbach's α = 0.9), inter-observer (ICC = 0.92) and intra-observer (ICC = 0.98) correlations presented high scores. Validity of Brasil-MOPDS compared to OHIP-14 (r = 0.85) and VAS (r = 0.75) shown high correlations. Brasil-MOPDS was successfully translated and adapted to be applied to Brazilian patients, with satisfactory internal and external reliability.

  13. Content Validity and Reliability of Multiple Intelligences Developmental Assessment Scales (MIDAS Translated into Persian

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    Mahnaz Saeidi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to translate MIDAS questionnaire from English into Persian and determine its content validity and reliability. MIDAS was translated and validated on a sample (N = 110 of Iranian adult population. The participants were both male and female with the age range of 17-57. They were at different educational levels and from different ethnic groups in Iran. A translating team, consisting of five members, bilingual in English and Persian and familiar with multiple intelligences (MI theory and practice, were involved in translating and determining content validity, which included the processes of forward translation, back-translation, review, final proof-reading, and testing. The statistical analyses of inter-scale correlation were performed using the Cronbach's alpha coefficient. In an intra-class correlation, the Cronbach's alpha was high for all of the questions. Translation and content validity of MIDAS questionnaire was completed by a proper process leading to high reliability and validity. The results suggest that Persian MIDAS (P-MIDAS could serve as a valid and reliable instrument for measuring Iranian adults MIs.

  14. Translation of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scales for Users of American Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samady, Waheeda; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Nakaji, Melanie; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Trybus, Raymond; Athale, Ninad

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the translation of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scales into American Sign Language (ASL). Translation is an essential first step toward validating the instrument for use in the Deaf community, a commonly overlooked minority community. This translated MHLC/ASL can be utilized by public health nurses researching the Deaf community to create and evaluate targeted health interventions. It can be used in clinical settings to guide the context of the provider-patient dialogue. The MHLC was translated using focus groups, following recommended procedures. Five bilingual participants translated the MHLC into ASL; five others back-translated the ASL version into English. Both focus groups identified and addressed language and cultural problems before the final ASL version of the MHLC was permanently captured on by motion picture photography for consistent administration. Nine of the 24 items were directly translatable into ASL. The remaining items required further discussion to achieve cultural equivalence with ASL expressions. The MHLC/ASL is now ready for validation within the Deaf community. PMID:18816365

  15. Translation of the multidimensional health locus of control scales for users of American sign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samady, Waheeda; Samady, Waheedy; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Nakaji, Melanie; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Trybus, Raymond; Athale, Ninad

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the translation of the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC) scales into American Sign Language (ASL). Translation is an essential first step toward validating the instrument for use in the Deaf community, a commonly overlooked minority community. This translated MHLC/ASL can be utilized by public health nurses researching the Deaf community to create and evaluate targeted health interventions. It can be used in clinical settings to guide the context of the provider-patient dialogue. The MHLC was translated using focus groups, following recommended procedures. 5 bilingual participants translated the MHLC into ASL; 5 others back-translated the ASL version into English. Both focus groups identified and addressed language and cultural problems before the final ASL version of the MHLC was permanently captured by motion picture photography for consistent administration. Nine of the 24 items were directly translatable into ASL. The remaining items required further discussion to achieve cultural equivalence with ASL expressions. The MHLC/ASL is now ready for validation within the Deaf community.

  16. Translation and psychometric evaluation of Persian versions of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety Scale and Impact of Event Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezeljeh, Tahereh Najafi; Ardebili, Fatimah Mohades; Rafii, Forough; Hagani, Hamid

    2013-09-01

    Burn as a traumatic life incident manifests severe pain and psychological problems. Specific instruments are needed to evaluate burn patients' psychological issues related to the injury. The aim of this study was to translate and evaluate the reliability and validity of the Persian versions of Impact of Burn Specific Pain Anxiety scale (BSPAS) and Impact of Event Scale (IES). In this cross-sectional study, convenience sampling method was utilized to select 55 Iranian hospitalized burn patients. Combined translation was utilized for translating scales. Alpha cronbach, item-total correlation, convergent and discriminative validity were evaluated. The Cronbach's α for both BSPAS- and IES-Persian version was 0.96. Item-total correlation coefficients ranged from 0.70 to 0.90. Convergent construct validity was confirmed by indicating high correlation between the scales designed to measure the same concepts. The mean score of BSPAS- and IES-Persian version was lower for individuals with a lower TBSA burn percentage which assessed discriminative construct validity of scales. BSPAS- and IES-Persian version showed high internal consistency and good validity for the assessment of burn psychological outcome in hospitalized burn patients. Future studies are needed to determine repeatability, factor structure, sensitivity and specificity of the scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  17. The enigma of soil animal species diversity revisited: the role of small-scale heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uffe N Nielsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: "The enigma of soil animal species diversity" was the title of a popular article by J. M. Anderson published in 1975. In that paper, Anderson provided insights on the great richness of species found in soils, but emphasized that the mechanisms contributing to the high species richness belowground were largely unknown. Yet, exploration of the mechanisms driving species richness has focused, almost exclusively, on above-ground plant and animal communities, and nearly 35 years later we have several new hypotheses but are not much closer to revealing why soils are so rich in species. One persistent but untested hypothesis is that species richness is promoted by small-scale environmental heterogeneity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis we manipulated small-scale heterogeneity in soil properties in a one-year field experiment and investigated the impacts on the richness of soil fauna and evenness of the microbial communities. We found that heterogeneity substantially increased the species richness of oribatid mites, collembolans and nematodes, whereas heterogeneity had no direct influence on the evenness of either the fungal, bacterial or archaeal communities or on species richness of the large and mobile mesostigmatid mites. These results suggest that the heterogeneity-species richness relationship is scale dependent. CONCLUSIONS: Our results provide direct evidence for the hypothesis that small-scale heterogeneity in soils increase species richness of intermediate-sized soil fauna. The concordance of mechanisms between above and belowground communities suggests that the relationship between environmental heterogeneity and species richness may be a general property of ecological communities.

  18. Translation and cross cultural adaptation of the Pediatric Motor Activity Log-Revised scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuti, Gabriela da Silva; Santos, Juliana Firmo Dos; Silva, Ana Carolina Rodrigues da; Eras-Garcia, Rafael; Uswatte, Gitendra; Taub, Edward

    2016-07-01

    To translate PMAL-R and adapt for the Brazilian culture; analyze the reliability and the internal consistency of the Brazilian version. Translation of PMAL-R to the Portuguese-Brazil and back translation. The back-translated version was revised by the authors of the scale. The final version was administered to a sample of 24 patients with spastic hemiparesis CP between 2-8 years. The reliability intra and inter-rater were suitable (how often = 0.97 and 0.98, how well = 0.98 and 0.99 respectively) and so the internal consistency (0.98). The Brazilian version of PMAL-R has adequate internal consistency, reliability intra and inter raters and can be used to assess the spontaneous use of the upper limb of children with CP type spastic hemiparesis, aged 2-8 years.

  19. Urdu Translation and Validation of Short Muslim Practice and Belief Scale in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayas, Saba; Batool, Syeda Shahida

    2016-05-11

    The present study was conducted to translate and validate the Short Muslim Practice and Belief Scale (SMPBS) (AlMarri, Oei, & Al-Adawi, 2009) to have a culturally equivalent and linguistically accurate Urdu version for use in Pakistan. Forward backward translation method was used for translation followed by tryout of the scale. Urdu translated version of the scale was completed by 500 participants of different age groups (M = 36.5, SD = 10.1). Based on a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), results confirmed that a two-factor model with the factors practice and belief provided an excellent fit to the data with chi square 55.96 (df = 26, p > .05), CFI =.96, GFI = .97, and RMSEA = .04. Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient was .78. Cross-language validation determined on a sample of 60 participants was satisfactory. Convergent validity of the scale was established by finding its significant positive correlation with religious practice and belief scale (r = .64, p < .001) and significant negative correlation with depression (r = -.18, p < .001) revealed its divergent validity.

  20. Validation of Hindi Translation of SRPB Facets of WHOQOL-SRPB Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Shah, Ruchita; Kulhara, Parmanand

    2013-10-01

    World Health Organization's Quality of Life - Spirituality, Religiousness and Personal Beliefs Scale (WHOQOL SRPB) is a valuable instrument for assessing spirituality and religiousness. The absence of this self-administered instrument in Hindi, which is a major language in India, is an important limitation in using this scale. To translate the English version of the SRPB facets of WHOQOL-SRPB scale to Hindi and evaluate its psychometric properties. The SRPB facets were translated into Hindi using the World Health Organisation's translation methodology. The translated Hindi version was evaluated for cross-language equivalence, test-retest reliability, internal consistency, and split half reliability. Hindi version was found to have good cross-language equivalence and test-retest reliability at the level of facets. Twenty-six of the 32 items and 30 of the 32 items had a significant correlation (ρHindi version of SRPB. The present study shows that cross-language equivalence, internal consistency, split-half reliability, and test-retest reliability of the Hindi version of SRPB (of WHOQOL-SRPB) are excellent. Thus, the Hindi version of WHOQOL-SRPB as translated in this study is a valid instrument.

  1. The influence of small-scale interlayer heterogeneity on DDT removal efficiency for flushing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Chen, Jiajun

    2017-06-01

    With an aim to investigate the influence of small-scale interlayer heterogeneity on DDT removal efficiency, batch test including surfactant-stabilized foam flushing and solution flushing were carried out. Two man-made heterogeneous patterns consisting of coarse and fine quartz sand were designed to reveal the influencing mechanism. Moreover, the removal mechanism and the corresponding contribution by foam flushing were quantitatively studied. Compared with surfactant solution flushing, the DDT removal efficiency by surfactant-stabilized foam flushing increased by 9.47% and 11.28% under heterogeneous patterns 1 and 2, respectively. The DDT removal contributions of improving sweep efficiency for heterogeneous patterns 1 and 2 by foam flushing were 40.82% and 45.98%, and the contribution of dissolving capacity were 59.18% and 54.02%, respectively. The dissolving capacity of DDT played a major role in DDT removal efficiency by foam flushing under laboratory conditions. And the DDT removal contribution of significant improving sweep efficiency was higher than that of removal decline caused by weak solubilizing ability of foam film compared with solution flushing. The obtained results indicated that the difference of DDT removal efficiency by foam flushing was decreased under two different heterogeneous patterns with the increase of the contribution of improving foam flushing sweep efficiency. It suggested that foam flushing can reduce the disturbance from interlayer heterogeneity in remediating DDT contaminated heterogeneous medium.

  2. The influence of small-scale interlayer heterogeneity on DDT removal efficiency for flushing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xingwei; Chen, Jiajun

    2017-06-01

    With an aim to investigate the influence of small-scale interlayer heterogeneity on DDT removal efficiency, batch test including surfactant-stabilized foam flushing and solution flushing were carried out. Two man-made heterogeneous patterns consisting of coarse and fine quartz sand were designed to reveal the influencing mechanism. Moreover, the removal mechanism and the corresponding contribution by foam flushing were quantitatively studied. Compared with surfactant solution flushing, the DDT removal efficiency by surfactant-stabilized foam flushing increased by 9.47% and 11.28% under heterogeneous patterns 1 and 2, respectively. The DDT removal contributions of improving sweep efficiency for heterogeneous patterns 1 and 2 by foam flushing were 40.82% and 45.98%, and the contribution of dissolving capacity were 59.18% and 54.02%, respectively. The dissolving capacity of DDT played a major role in DDT removal efficiency by foam flushing under laboratory conditions. And the DDT removal contribution of significant improving sweep efficiency was higher than that of removal decline caused by weak solubilizing ability of foam film compared with solution flushing. The obtained results indicated that the difference of DDT removal efficiency by foam flushing was decreased under two different heterogeneous patterns with the increase of the contribution of improving foam flushing sweep efficiency. It suggested that foam flushing can reduce the disturbance from interlayer heterogeneity in remediating DDT contaminated heterogeneous medium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of pore-scale dispersion, degree of heterogeneity, sampling size, and source volume on the concentration moments of conservative solutes in heterogeneous formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniele Tonina; Alberto Bellin

    2008-01-01

    Pore-scale dispersion (PSD), aquifer heterogeneity, sampling volume, and source size influence solute concentrations of conservative tracers transported in heterogeneous porous formations. In this work, we developed a new set of analytical solutions for the concentration ensemble mean, variance, and coefficient of variation (CV), which consider the effects of all these...

  4. Scaling impacts on environmental controls and spatial heterogeneity of soil organic carbon stocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, U.; Riley, W. J.

    2015-07-01

    The spatial heterogeneity of land surfaces affects energy, moisture, and greenhouse gas exchanges with the atmosphere. However, representing the heterogeneity of terrestrial hydrological and biogeochemical processes in Earth system models (ESMs) remains a critical scientific challenge. We report the impact of spatial scaling on environmental controls, spatial structure, and statistical properties of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks across the US state of Alaska. We used soil profile observations and environmental factors such as topography, climate, land cover types, and surficial geology to predict the SOC stocks at a 50 m spatial scale. These spatially heterogeneous estimates provide a data set with reasonable fidelity to the observations at a sufficiently high resolution to examine the environmental controls on the spatial structure of SOC stocks. We upscaled both the predicted SOC stocks and environmental variables from finer to coarser spatial scales (s = 100, 200, and 500 m and 1, 2, 5, and 10 km) and generated various statistical properties of SOC stock estimates. We found different environmental factors to be statistically significant predictors at different spatial scales. Only elevation, temperature, potential evapotranspiration, and scrub land cover types were significant predictors at all scales. The strengths of control (the median value of geographically weighted regression coefficients) of these four environmental variables on SOC stocks decreased with increasing scale and were accurately represented using mathematical functions (R2 = 0.83-0.97). The spatial structure of SOC stocks across Alaska changed with spatial scale. Although the variance (sill) and unstructured variability (nugget) of the calculated variograms of SOC stocks decreased exponentially with scale, the correlation length (range) remained relatively constant across scale. The variance of predicted SOC stocks decreased with spatial scale over the range of 50 m to ~ 500 m, and remained

  5. Translation and Cultural Adaptation of the Supports Intensity Scale in French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamoureux-Hebert, Melanie; Morin, Diane

    2009-01-01

    The Supports Intensity Scale (SIS) was translated into French. The French version was then validated using a sample of 245 persons with intellectual disabilities between the ages of 16 and 75 years. The internal consistency was excellent (0.98). Correlations with age and levels of intellectual disabilities were evidence of good construct validity.…

  6. Psychometric Properties of a Korean Translation of the "Scales of Independent Behavior--Revised"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Su-Je; Paik, Eunhee; Lee, Byoung-In; Yi, Joonsuk

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the psychometric properties of data drawn from the Korean translation of the full "Scales of Independent Behavior--Revised" (SIB-R). In addition, semantic, content, conceptual, and technical equivalence are examined. The participants include 2,763 typically developing children and 406 children with intellectual…

  7. Validation of the Urdu Translation of the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Nailah

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed at developing an Urdu version of the Beck Scale for Suicide Ideation (BSI) for use with Pakistani adolescents and young adults. For this purpose, the English BSI was translated into Urdu and tested for psychometric properties. The analyses were carried out with data from a sample of 904 adolescents and young adults from eight…

  8. [Translation and validation in italian of the Moral Distress Scale for psychiatric nurses (MDS-P)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canciani, Eleonora; Spotti, Daniela; Bonetti, Loris

    2016-01-01

    Moral distress (MD) is a painful feeling and/or psychological disequilibrium, which may lead to negative consequences into the wellness of a nurse's working life. Nurses who work in psychiatry are more likely to experience a different type of MD compared with nurses of other contexts. In Italy a tool to evaluate MD in nurses who work in psychiatry doesn't exist. The aim of this study is to validate the Moral Distress Scale for Psychiatric Nurses (MDS-P) in Italian language. For translation the forward and back-translation has been used; the effectiveness regarding content and face validity of the translated scale has been analyzed through a focus group with experts of the field. In order to check the reliability of the scale the test-retest method has been used, by means of the determination of Spearman's correlation coefficient, Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach's alpha. The forward and back-translation process was successful. During the focus group analysis, 8 items were added to the 15 items of the original scale, due to experts suggestions. 32 nurses took part in the test-retest phase. Spearman's correlation coefficient resulted to be 0,91, ICC > 0,9, Cronbach's alpha calculated on test and retest, was always >0,9. The Italian version of the MDS-P proves to be an effective, appropriate and reliable instrument to measure the MD phenomenon within the population of nurses who work in the psychia- tric field in Italy.

  9. Do rabbits eat voles? Apparent competition, habitat heterogeneity and large-scale coexistence under mink predation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Matthew; Luque-Larena, Juan José; Lambin, Xavier

    2009-11-01

    Habitat heterogeneity is predicted to profoundly influence the dynamics of indirect interspecific interactions; however, despite potentially significant consequences for multi-species persistence, this remains almost completely unexplored in large-scale natural landscapes. Moreover, how spatial habitat heterogeneity affects the persistence of interacting invasive and native species is also poorly understood. Here we show how the persistence of a native prey (water vole, Arvicola terrestris) is determined by the spatial distribution of an invasive prey (European rabbit, Oryctolagus cuniculus) and directly infer how this is defined by the mobility of a shared invasive predator (American mink, Neovison vison). This study uniquely demonstrates that variation in habitat connectivity in large-scale natural landscapes creates spatial asynchrony, enabling coexistence between apparent competitive native and invasive species. These findings highlight that unexpected interactions may be involved in species declines, and also that in such cases habitat heterogeneity should be considered in wildlife management decisions.

  10. Translating chimpanzee personality to humans: Investigating the transportability of chimpanzee-derived personality scales to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D; Sauvigné, Katheryn C; Hopkins, William D

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of personality in chimpanzees with repeated findings of a similar structure of personality in apes to that found in humans. To date, however, the direct translational value of instruments used to assess chimpanzee personality to humans has yet to be explicitly tested. As such, in the current study we sought to determine the transportability of factor analytically-derived chimpanzee personality scales to humans in a large human sample (N = 301). Human informants reporting on target individuals they knew well completed chimpanzee-derived and human-derived measures of personality from the two most widely studied models of human personality: Big Five and Big Three. The correspondence between informant-reported chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales was then investigated. Results indicated high convergence for corresponding scales across most chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales. Findings from the current study provide evidence that chimpanzee-derived scales translate well to humans and operate quite similarly to the established human-derived personality scales in a human sample. This evidence of transportability lends support to the translational nature of chimpanzee personality research suggesting clear relevance of this growing literature to humans. Am. J. Primatol. 78:601-609, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Rating Scale for Countertransference (RSCT) to American English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondrzak, Rafael; Reinert, Camila; Sandri, Andreia; Spanemberg, Lucas; Nogueira, Eduardo L; Bertoluci, Mirella; Eizirik, Claudio Laks; Furtado, Nina Rosa

    2016-01-01

    The Rating Scale for Countertransference (RSCT) - originally, Escala para Avaliação de Contratransferência (EACT) - is a self-administered instrument comprising questions that assess 23 feelings (divided into three blocs, closeness, distance, and indifference) that access conscious countertransferential emotions and sentiments. This paper describes the process of translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the RSCT into American English. This study employed the guidelines proposed by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Task Force for Translation and Cultural Adaptation which define 10 steps for translation and cross-cultural adaptation of self-report instruments. Additionally, semantic equivalence tools were employed to select the final versions of terms used. The author of the RSCT gave permission for translation and took part in the process. The instrument is available for use free of charge. Analysis of the back-translation showed that just seven of the 23 terms needed to be adjusted to arrive at the final version in American English. This study applied rigorous standards to construct a version of the RSCT in American English. This version of the RSCT translated and adapted into American English should be of great use for accessing and researching countertransferential feelings that are part of psychodynamic treatment.

  12. Genome-Scale Analysis of Translation Elongation with a Ribosome Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilijson, Isaac; Kupiec, Martin; Ruppin, Eytan

    2011-01-01

    We describe the first large scale analysis of gene translation that is based on a model that takes into account the physical and dynamical nature of this process. The Ribosomal Flow Model (RFM) predicts fundamental features of the translation process, including translation rates, protein abundance levels, ribosomal densities and the relation between all these variables, better than alternative (‘non-physical’) approaches. In addition, we show that the RFM can be used for accurate inference of various other quantities including genes' initiation rates and translation costs. These quantities could not be inferred by previous predictors. We find that increasing the number of available ribosomes (or equivalently the initiation rate) increases the genomic translation rate and the mean ribosome density only up to a certain point, beyond which both saturate. Strikingly, assuming that the translation system is tuned to work at the pre-saturation point maximizes the predictive power of the model with respect to experimental data. This result suggests that in all organisms that were analyzed (from bacteria to Human), the global initiation rate is optimized to attain the pre-saturation point. The fact that similar results were not observed for heterologous genes indicates that this feature is under selection. Remarkably, the gap between the performance of the RFM and alternative predictors is strikingly large in the case of heterologous genes, testifying to the model's promising biotechnological value in predicting the abundance of heterologous proteins before expressing them in the desired host. PMID:21909250

  13. Measuring Scale Economies in a Heterogeneous Industry: The Case of European Settlement Institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Cayseele, P.J.G.; Wuyts, C.

    2006-01-01

    We examine whether the European settlement institutions are technically efficient. This is done by means of estimating a translog cost function, and investigating whether scale economies are fully exploited. Since the sample is quite heterogeneous, fixed effects regression is introduced. From the

  14. Full-Scale Continuous Mini-Reactor Setup for Heterogeneous Grignard Alkylation of a Pharmaceutical Intermediate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Jønch; Holm, Thomas; Rahbek, Jesper P.

    2013-01-01

    A reactor setup consisting of two reactors in series has been implemented for a full-scale, heterogeneous Grignard alkylation. Solutions pass from a small filter reactor into a static mixer reactor with multiple side entries, thus combining continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) and plug flow...

  15. Assessing heterogeneity in soil nitrogen cycling: a plot-scale approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter Baas; Jacqueline E. Mohan; David Markewitz; Jennifer D. Knoepp

    2014-01-01

    The high level of spatial and temporal heterogeneity in soil N cycling processes hinders our ability to develop an ecosystem-wide understanding of this cycle. This study examined how incorporating an intensive assessment of spatial variability for soil moisture, C, nutrients, and soil texture can better explain ecosystem N cycling at the plot scale. Five sites...

  16. Translation and adaption of the Genetic Counseling Outcome Scale (GCOS-24) to Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Birgitte Rode; Overbeck, Gritt; Duelund, T.

    2013-01-01

    Background and aim: The ability to measure patient outcomes from genetic counselling is a prerequisite for evidencebased development of practice. The Genetic Counselling Outcome Scale (GCOS-24) is a recently developed patient reported outcome measure. The aim of this project was to develop a Danish...... perception of genetic counseling and genetic conditions and led to adjustments of the original translation, leading to development of a tool better-suited to the target population. We would recommend the described approach when attempting translation of patient reported outcome measures...

  17. Translation and validation of the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS) into Brazilian Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felden, Érico P G; Carniel, Joana D; Andrade, Rubian D; Pelegrini, Andreia; Anacleto, Tâmile S; Louzada, Fernando M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to translate and validate the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS) into Brazilian Portuguese. The translation/validation process was carried out through translation, back translation, technical review, assessment of verbal comprehension/clarity of the scale by experts and a focus group, test-retest, and application of the tool. The reproducibility analysis was performed by applying the PDSS in test-retest; internal consistency was verified by applying the scale in 90 children and adolescents. The mean score of the sum of PDSS questions was 15.6 (SD=5.0) points. The PDSS showed appropriate indicators of content validation and clarity for the Brazilian Portuguese version. The internal consistency analysis showed a Cronbach's alpha of 0.784. The PDSS showed adequate reproducibility. The PDSS scores showed a significant and negative correlation with time spent in bed (r=-0.214; p=0.023). The Brazilian Portuguese version of the PDSS shows satisfactory indicators of validity and can be applied in clinical practice and scientific research. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Translation and validation of International Restless Leg Syndrome Study Group rating scale in Hindi language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ravi; Lahan, Vivekananda; Goel, Deepak

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study is to translate and validate the International Restless Leg Syndrome Study Group rating scale (IRLS) in Hindi language. Thirty one consecutive patients diagnosed of Restless Leg Syndrome (RLS) were included in the study. Control group comprised of 31 subjects not having any symptom of RLS. The scale was procured from MAPI research trust; and, permission for the translation was sought. The translation was done according to the guidelines provided by the publisher. After translation, final version of the scale was applied in both the groups to find out the reliability and clinical validity. RLS group had a predominance of females, and they were younger than the male counterparts (Age=36.80 ± 10.46 years vs 45.18 ± 8.34 years; t=2.28; P=0.03). There was no difference in the mean age between groups (RLS=39.77 ± 10.44 years vs Non RLS=38.29 ± 11.29 years; t=-0.53; P=0.59). IRLS scores were significantly different between both groups on all items (PHindi version of IRLS is reliable and a clinically valid tool that can be applied in Hindi speaking population.

  19. A Combined Parameter Scaling and Inverse Technique to Upscale the Unsaturated Hydraulic Parameters for Heterogeneous Soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

    2004-08-01

    Determination of large number of soil hydraulic parameters of heterogeneous soils remains a challenge since inverting for too many parameters can lead to the non-uniqueness of parameter values and may need very long simulation time, for example, months or more. In this research, a combined parameter scaling and inverse technique (CPSIT) was proposed to upscale hydraulic parameters from local scale to field scale. The CPSIT approach includes two steps. Step 1, the number of parameters to be estimated at field scale (FS) is reduced by applying parameter scaling [Zhang et al., 2003]. A heterogeneous soil is treated as a composition of multiple equivalent homogeneous media (EHM) and a reference EHM is chosen. Each parameter is assigned a scaling factor that is defined as the ratio of the parameter of an EHM to the corresponding parameter of the reference EHM. These scaling factors are determined using local-scale parameter values. Step 2, the FS parameters of the reference EHM are determined using the inverse technique and well-designed field experiments. Then, the FS parameters of each of the EHMs is determined by multiplying the FS parameter value by the corresponding scaling factor. The advantages of the CPSIT approach are that the number of parameters to be inverted is reduced by a factor of the number of EHMs (M) and the simulation time is reduced by a factor of about the square of M. The CPSIT approach was tested by upscaling the hydraulic parameter using a field injection experiment in a heterogeneous soil at the Hanford’s Sisson and Lu site, which has the horizontal dimension of 16 m and vertical dimension of 18 m. The results show that, when the CPSIT upscaled parameters were used to simulated flow, the mean squared residual was reduced by 86% relative to that when the local-scale parameters were used.

  20. A Dynamical Context for Small-scale Heterogeneity Throughout the Mantle Beneath Subduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, D. A.; Rost, S.; Garnero, E.

    2014-12-01

    Subduction zones are a source for mantle heterogeneity within the convection system and there is mounting evidence that seismic signatures can be used to track slabs down from the surface throughout the mantle. Seismic studies of the mantle beneath Central America demonstrate that subducted slab material reaches the Core-Mantle Boundary (CMB). The lowermost mantle beneath this convergent margin shows strong seismic evidence for heterogeneity. Tomographic models characterise subduction zones to be underlain by increased seismic velocities over 100s-1000s km laterally, in association with D'´ discontinuities 100-300 km above the CMB, consistent with phase transitions in the Bridgmanite system. Recent analyses have found evidence for isolated Ultra Low Velocity Zones in addition to prevalent fine-scale heterogeneity, on the order of 1-10 km, scattering high frequency waves. These techniques indicate thermal and/or chemical anomalies within the mantle on a range of scales. Numerical geodynamical simulations suggest small-scale mechanical mixing of initially coherent compositionally anomalous subducted material separating into entities of various sizes consistent with the range of heterogeneity sizes observed in the lower mantle.Investigating seismic scattering, the re-radiation of a wavefront due to interaction with a sharply contrasting volumetric anomaly, is an effective method for studying small-scale elastic heterogeneities in the Earth's mantle. Studies commonly record structure with scale lengths of about 10 km. Here we analyse scattered energy related to PKPPKP — PKP•PKP (the • indicates the scattering location along the raypath) — sampling a large volume of the mantle beneath Central America. We reveal the character of heterogeneity in various frequency bands within the whole mantle using both broadband and short-period data. These observations will be placed in context with other studies in this region illustrating the large-scale background structure

  1. RELIABILITY, VALIDITY, AND PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF THE GREEK TRANSLATION OF THE CAMBRIDGE DEPERSONALIZATION SCALE (CDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Poulakou, Garyfalia; Protopapas, Konstantinos; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Sakka, Vissaria; Kavatha, Dimitra; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C

    2016-10-01

    The Cambridge Depersonalisation Scale is meant to capture the frequency and duration of depersonalisation symptoms over the 'last 6 months'. In order to develop a Greek version of CDS scale, the CDS scale was translated in Greek by 2 psychiatrists. Then, the Greek version of CDS scale was back-translated by a person who did not knew the original English version. The back-translated version was reviewed in order to establish whether is consistent with the original English version. After this procedure we administered the Greek version of CDS scale to a sample of 294 Greeks in order to assess the reliability and the validity of the Greek version of scale. The five components solution accounted for 58.204% of the total variation. Initial eigenvalues of the five components were: factor 1=11.555, factor 2=1.564, factor 3=1.356, factor 4=1.247 and factor 5=1.157. Six items did not load on any factor. Correlations between factors were low ranged from 0.134 to 0.314 and no complex variables were found. Cronbach's alpha and Guttman split-half coefficient were used to evaluate interval consistency of CDS scale in 294 individuals. The alpha coefficients and Guttman split-half coefficient of the CDS scale were 0.938 and 0.921, respectively. The test-retest reliability proved to be satisfactory. The intraclass correlation coefficients for the total CDS score was very good and equal to 0,883. The CDS scale correlated highly with the SCL-90 and all subscales (p-value<0.0001). The psychometric strength of CDS - Greek its reliable for its future use, particularly for screening for subjects with possible diagnosis of CDS.

  2. [Translation and Development of the Chinese-Version Patient Privacy Scale].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Feng, Xian-Qiong; Yang, Xiao-Li; Li, Luo-Hong

    2017-06-01

    The unauthorized releasing of confidential patient information is a serious problem worldwide. Nurses, the healthcare professionals who are in most frequent contact with patients, have access to a significant amount of confidential patient information and play a key role in protecting patient privacy. However, currently, there is no proper tool to measure the level to which clinical nurses protect the privacy of their patients in China. To translate the patient privacy scale (PPS) into Chinese and to test the reliability and validity of this Chinese version. The original scale was developed by Özturk, Bahcecik, and Özçelik (2014) to identify whether nurses protect or violate patient privacy in the workplace. This study used the "back translation" method to translate the scale. A total of 616 nurses in two tertiary hospitals in the Western region of China were enrolled to test the internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and construct validity of the translated scale. The Cronbach's coefficients of the total scale and its 5 factors ranged from .84 to .94; the split half reliability was .91; the test-retest reliability was .82; and the content validity index was .95. Explanatory factor analysis revealed that the 5 factors explained 64.98% of the total variance. The Chinese version of the PPS is reliable and valid, and may be used to reliably assess the behaviors of nurses with regard to protecting the privacy of their patients. The scale may also be used to evaluate the effects of training on patient privacy protection.

  3. A continuous time random walk model for Darcy-scale anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Hakoun, Vivien; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Achieving the understanding of the process of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is of crucial importance for several environmental and social purposes, ranging from aquifers contamination and remediation, to risk assessment in nuclear waste repositories. The complexity of this aim is mainly ascribable to the heterogeneity of natural media, which can be observed at all the scales of interest, from pore scale to catchment scale. In fact, the intrinsic heterogeneity of porous media is responsible for the arising of the well-known non-Fickian footprints of transport, including heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, non-Gaussian spatial density profiles and the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement. Several studies investigated the processes through which heterogeneity impacts the transport properties, which include local modifications to the advective-dispersive motion of solutes, mass exchanges between some mobile and immobile phases (e.g. sorption/desorption reactions or diffusion into solid matrix) and spatial correlation of the flow field. In the last decades, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model has often been used to describe solute transport in heterogenous conditions and to quantify the impact of point heterogeneity, spatial correlation and mass transfer on the average transport properties [1]. Open issues regarding this approach are the possibility to relate measurable properties of the medium to the parameters of the model, as well as its capability to provide predictive information. In a recent work [2] the authors have shed new light on understanding the relationship between Lagrangian and Eulerian dynamics as well as on their evolution from arbitrary initial conditions. On the basis of these results, we derive a CTRW model for the description of Darcy-scale transport in d-dimensional media characterized by spatially random permeability fields. The CTRW approach models particle velocities as a spatial Markov process, which is

  4. Translatability of family concepts into the Japanese culture: using the Family Environment Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, S; Nomura, N; Noguchi, Y; Tezuka, I

    1996-06-01

    Family concepts and their measurements interest many family researchers. There is a question about the extent to which family concepts are universal or influenced by the culture in which the instrument originated. Using the Family Environment Scale (FES), the authors examine the translatability of family concepts into the Japanese culture. Forward- and back-translation processes and cross-cultural assessment of reliability and validity are discussed. We suggest that there may be different degrees of translatability for each of the family concepts used in the FES and that evaluation of families in different societies necessitates culturally appropriate constructs and instruments. The discussion is built around Japanese data, which are compared to the American results.

  5. The Benefits of Latent Variable Modeling to Develop Norms for a Translated Version of a Standardized Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyojeong; Shaw, Leslie A.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Lang, Kyle M.; Little, Todd D.

    2017-01-01

    This article demonstrates the use of structural equation modeling to develop norms for a translated version of a standardized scale, the Supports Intensity Scale-Children's Version (SIS-C). The latent variable norming method proposed is useful when the standardization sample for a translated version is relatively small to derive norms…

  6. Translation and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version of the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brett; Lynch, Marty; Olaussen, Alex; Lachmann, Hanna; Kalén, Susanne; Ponzer, Sari

    2017-10-23

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is widely accepted worldwide, as a key part of training for health professionals and critical to an effective, patient-centred healthcare system. Several tools have been developed to evaluate IPE programmes and interventions globally. Many of the widely-used tools have been successfully adapted to suit specific cohorts and different languages; the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS), however, has not yet been translated and validated for use in Sweden. The aim of this study was to translate the IEPS into Swedish and validate the psychometric properties of this new version. The 12-item IEPS underwent translation into Swedish and back-translation into English by suitable independent translators to ensure items retained their meaning. The new Swedish version was completed by 164 medical and nursing, occupational therapy and physiotherapy students on clinical placements in Stockholm. Principal Axis Factoring (PAF) and Oblique Oblimin Rotation confirmed a three-factor structure, that explained 77.4% of variance. The new 10-item Swedish version IEPS displayed good internal consistency with an overall Cronbach's alpha of a = .88 and subscale values of .89, .88 and .66. The exclusion of two-items limits the transferability of this scale; however, the factor makeup was very similar to the original 12-item English version. It is suspected that minor differences were due to unavoidable deviations in meaning following translation (i.e. certain English words have no equivalent in Swedish). Nevertheless, the results imply that the Swedish version of the IEPS is a valid and reliable tool for assessing students' perceptions and attitudes towards IPE within the Swedish health education system.

  7. [Multi-scale spatial heterogeneity of urban wetland water quality in east suburb of Nanjing City].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jing-feng; Liu, Hong-yu; Hu, Jun-na; An, Jing

    2010-07-01

    An investigation was made on the water quality and plant community in 17 urban wetlands in east suburb of Nanjing City, and the spatial heterogeneity of the water quality was analyzed at ecosystem scale, catchment scale, and functional landscape scale. Wetland type and the characteristics of plant community were the main factors affecting the water quality at ecosystem scale. Primitive wetland had the best water quality, followed by reconstructed wetland, and secondary wetland. The higher plant coverage the wetland had, the better the water quality was. Land use type was the main factor affecting the water quality at catchment scale. Constructive land had greater effects on water nutrients content, while woodland mainly affected water dissolved oxygen. Human activity was the main factor affecting the water quality at functional landscape scale, and the effects differed with different water quality indices.

  8. Fine scale heterogeneity in the Earth's upper mantle - observation and interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans

    2014-01-01

    station spacing and at high frequency, e.g. from the Russian Peaceful Nuclear Explosion (PNE) data set and array recordings of waves from natural seismic sources. Mantle body waves indicate pronounced heterogeneity at three depth levels whereas other depth intervals appear transparent, at least...... in the frequency band of 0.5-15 Hz: (1) The Mantle Low-Velocity Zone (LVZ) is a global feature which has been detected in more than 50 long-range seismic profiles (Thybo and Perchuc, Science, 1997). Since then numerous studies based on receiver functions, surface waves, and controlled source seismology have......) Heterogeneity arising from subducted slabs that have equilibrated around the Transition Zone. We model characteristic scale lengths and velocity contrasts of the mantle heterogeneity by application of 2D Finite Difference simulation of seismic wave propagation. Unfortunately the seismic data does not allow...

  9. Translation and validation of the Greek version of the hypertension knowledge-level scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatziefstratiou, Anastasia A; Giakoumidakis, Konstantinos; Fotos, Nikolaos V; Baltopoulos, George; Brokalaki-Pananoudaki, Hero

    2015-12-01

    To translate and validate a Greek version of the Hypertension Knowledge-Level Scale. The major barrier in the management of hypertension is the lack of adherence to medications and lifestyle adjustments. Patients' knowledge of the nature of hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors is a significant factor affecting individuals' adherence. However, few instruments have been developed to assess patients' knowledge level and no one has been translated into Greek. This study used a case control study design. Data collection for this research occurred between February 7, 2013 and March 10, 2013. The sample included both hypertensives and non-hypertensives. Participants simultaneously completed the version of the Hypertension Knowledge-Level Scale. A total of 68 individuals completed the questionnaire. Coefficient alpha was 0·66 for hypertensives and 0·79 for non-hypertensives. The difference for the mean scores in the entire scale between the two samples was statistically significant. In addition, significant differences were observed in many sub-dimensions and no correlation was found between level, knowledge and age, gender and education level. Findings provide support for the validity of the Greek version of the Hypertension Knowledge-Level Scale. The translation and validation of an instrument evaluating the level of knowledge of hypertension contribute to assessing the provided educational intervention. Low knowledge level should lead to the development of new methods of education, therefore nurses will have the opportunity to amplify their role in patients' education and develop relationships based on honesty and respect. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Translation and adaptation of the Disability Assessment for Dementia scale in the Spanish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Pérez, Alicia; López-Roig, Sofia; Pampliega Pérez, Ana; Peral Gómez, Paula; Pastor, María Ángeles; Hurtado-Pomares, Miriam

    2017-09-20

    Functional assessment is especially relevant in patients with cognitive impairment (CI). The Disability Assessment for Dementia (DAD) scale assesses functional ability and its use is becoming increasingly popular. This study aims to perform the translation and cultural adaptation of the DAD scale in order to create a Spanish version: DAD-E. A double translation/back-translation process was developed, as well as a pilot study with 14 caregivers of patients with CI, and 3 review meetings to achieve general agreement. The DAD-E includes the 40 original items. Four response options and 8 scores were added in order to detect functional disability induced by CI independently of other possible causes. More detailed instructions for administration and scoring of the scale have been provided in order to improve the reliability of the content. The DAD-E was shown to be a cultural and linguistic adaptation equivalent of the original scale, which allows it to be applied to the Spanish population. It may be a useful instrument in clinical practice since it provides a more accurate assessment of functional disability due to cognitive impairment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. TRANSLATION AND VALIDATION OF THE FOOD NEOPHOBIA SCALE (FNS) TO THE BRAZILIAN PORTUGUESE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro de Andrade Previato, Helena Dória; Herman Behrens, Jorge

    2015-08-01

    The Food Neophobia Scale (FNS), originally developed in English, has been widely used in different studies to assess the individual's willingness to try new foods. However, a process of translation and cultural adaptation is required to enable the use of FNS in other countries. to translate and to validate the FNS into Brazilian Portuguese. the FNS was translated into Brazilian Portuguese by three English teachers independently and back-translated into English by other three professionals. After that, both the English and Brazilian Portuguese FNS versions were administered to a sample of 40 graduate students of the University of Campinas, São Paulo, Brazil, between September and October 2014. The reproducibility between the instruments was assessed by the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The internal reliability of the scale was evaluated by Cronbach's Alpha coefficient. The FNS total score ranged from 10-70 and the respondents were classified as food neophilic (≤ 16.4), neutral (16.5-38.5) and food neophobic (≥ 38.6). the ICC between the items of the original FNS and the Brazilian FNS ranged between 0.266 and 0.815 (P Brazilian version of the FNS proved to be an adequate and reliable tool to measure food neophobia. Yet, further research is required to investigate the presence of food neophobia in Brazilian population and to analyse its impact on food behavior. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  12. Scaling Effects of Cr(VI) Reduction Kinetics. The Role of Geochemical Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Li, Li [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-10-22

    The natural subsurface is highly heterogeneous with minerals distributed in different spatial patterns. Fundamental understanding of how mineral spatial distribution patterns regulate sorption process is important for predicting the transport and fate of chemicals. Existing studies about the sorption was carried out in well-mixed batch reactors or uniformly packed columns, with few data available on the effects of spatial heterogeneities. As a result, there is a lack of data and understanding on how spatial heterogeneities control sorption processes. In this project, we aim to understand and develop modeling capabilities to predict the sorption of Cr(VI), an omnipresent contaminant in natural systems due to its natural occurrence and industrial utilization. We systematically examine the role of spatial patterns of illite, a common clay, in determining the extent of transport limitation and scaling effects associated with Cr(VI) sorption capacity and kinetics using column experiments and reactive transport modeling. Our results showed that the sorbed mass and rates can differ by an order of magnitude due to of the illite spatial heterogeneities and transport limitation. With constraints from data, we also developed the capabilities of modeling Cr(VI) in heterogeneous media. The developed model is then utilized to understand the general principles that govern the relationship between sorption and connectivity, a key measure of the spatial pattern characteristics. This correlation can be used to estimate Cr(VI) sorption characteristics in heterogeneous porous media. Insights gained here bridge gaps between laboratory and field application in hydrogeology and geochemical field, and advance predictive understanding of reactive transport processes in the natural heterogeneous subsurface. We believe that these findings will be of interest to a large number of environmental geochemists and engineers, hydrogeologists, and those interested in contaminant fate and transport

  13. Turkish translation and adaptation of Champion's Health Belief Model Scales for breast cancer mammography screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Meryem; Sayin, Yazile Yazici

    2014-07-01

    To examine the translation and adaptation process from English to Turkish and the validity and reliability of the Champion's Health Belief Model Scales for Mammography Screening. Its aim (1) is to provide data about and (2) to assess Turkish women's attitudes and behaviours towards mammography. The proportion of women who have mammography is lower in Turkey. The Champion's Health Belief Model Scales for Mammography Screening-Turkish version can be helpful to determine Turkish women's health beliefs, particularly about mammography. Cross-sectional design was used to collect survey data from Turkish women: classical measurement method. The Champion's Health Belief Model Scales for Mammography Screening was translated from English to Turkish. Again, it was back translated into English. Later, the meaning and clarity of the scale items were evaluated by a bilingual group representing the culture of the target population. Finally, the tool was evaluated by two bilingual professional researchers in terms of content validity, translation validity and psychometric estimates of the validity and reliability. The analysis included a total of 209 Turkish women. The validity of the scale was confirmed by confirmatory factor analysis and criterion-related validity testing. The Champion's Health Belief Model Scales for Mammography Screening aligned to four factors that were coherent and relatively independent of each other. There was a statistically significant relationship among all of the subscale items: the positive and high correlation of the total item test score and high Cronbach's α. The scale has a strong stability over time: the Champion's Health Belief Model Scales for Mammography Screening demonstrated acceptable preliminary values of reliability and validity. The Champion's Health Belief Model Scales for Mammography Screening is both a reliable and valid instrument that can be useful in measuring the health beliefs of Turkish women. It can be used to provide data

  14. The Newcastle Pediatric Mitochondrial Disease Scale: translation and cultural adaptation for use in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campolina-Sampaio, Gabriela Palhares; Lasmar, Laura Maria de Lima Belizário Facury; Ribeiro, Beatriz Silva Vilela; Giannetti, Juliana Gurgel

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to translate and adapt the Newcastle Paediatric Mitochondrial Disease Scale (NPMDS) to Portuguese for use in Brazil. The scale was applied in 20 pediatric patients with mitochondrial disease, in three groups: myopathy (n = 4); Leigh syndrome (n = 8); and encephalomyopathy (n = 8). Scores were obtained for the various dimensions of the NPMDS, and comparisons were drawn between the groups. There was a statistically significant difference between the myopathy group and the Leigh syndrome group (p = 0.0085), as well as between the myopathy and encephalomyopathy groups (p = 0.01). The translation of the NPMDS, and its adaptation to the socioeconomic and cultural conditions in Brazil, make the NPMDS score useful as an additional parameter in the evaluation and monitoring of pediatric patients with MD in Brazil.

  15. Translation and validation of the Arabic version of generic medicines scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alefan, Qais; Karasneh, Aseel; El-Dahiyat, Faris; Alshara, Mohd; Abu-Naser, Dania

    Generic drugs are considered the best alternative for the originator brand drugs because they have the same quality, safety, and efficacy yet offered at considerbaly lower cost. Prior research has developed instrumentation to assess patients' perceptions of generic drugs; however, little has been done to translate these measures in other languages. This study's aim was to translate and validate an Arabic version of the generic drug scale (GMS) in a Jordanian sample. This was a cross-sectional study. The English version of the GMS was translated to an Arabic version using the standard "forward-backward" procedure of translation. The questionnaire was distributed to 225 patients. The translated version was then validated in a sample of patients. Face validity of the translated GMS was confirmed with pilot testing. Content validity of the translated GMS was evaluated by a number of pharmacists and academicians. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to test a pre-specified relationship of observed measures. The GMS consisted of two subscales: efficacy, and similarity of generic drugs to originator brand drugs. The efficacy subscale consisted of ten items while the similarity subscale consisted of six. The responses to the items were framed on five-point, Likert-type scales. The instrument demonstrated good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.83). The range model fit was good for some fit indices. The RMSEA value was 0.08, which indicates good fit. Also, CMIN/DF indicated a good fit model with a value of 2.7, as well as GFI and CFI values of 0.95 and 0.91, respectively. NFI and CFI values were 0.92 and 0.93, respectively. Factor loadings were over 0.30 for all items, which means the scale has CFA validity indictors. The Arabic version of GMS was proved to be a reliable and valid measure to investigate patients' belief regarding generic drugs as it showed acceptable, internal consistency reliability, face and content validity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier

  16. A two-scale finite element formulation for the dynamic analysis of heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ionita, Axinte [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    In the analysis of heterogeneous materials using a two-scale Finite Element Method (FEM) the usual assumption is that the Representative Volume Element (RVE) of the micro-scale is much smaller than the finite element discretization of the macro-scale. However there are situations in which the RVE becomes comparable with, or even bigger than the finite element. These situations are considered in this article from the perspective of a two-scale FEM dynamic analysis. Using the principle of virtual power, new equations for the fluctuating fields are developed in terms of velocities rather than displacements. To allow more flexibility in the analysis, a scaling deformation tensor is introduced together with a procedure for its determination. Numerical examples using the new approach are presented.

  17. Multiple scales of patchiness and patch structure: a hierarchical framework for the study of heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotliar, Natasha B.; Wiens, John A.

    1990-01-01

    We develop a hierarchical model of heterogeneity that provides a framework for classifying patch structure across a range of scales. Patches at lower levels in the hierarchy are more simplistic and correspond to the traditional view of patches. At levels approaching the upper bounds of the hierarchy the internal structure becomes more heterogeneous and boundaries more ambiguous. At each level in the hierarchy, patch structure will be influenced by both contrast among patches as well as the degree of aggregation of patches at lower levels in the hierarchy. We apply this model to foraging theory, but it has wider applications as in the study of habitat selection, population dynamics, and habitat fragmentation. It may also be useful in expanding the realm of landscape ecology beyond the current focus on anthropocentric scales.

  18. Stochastic analysis of field-scale heat advection in heterogeneous aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-M. Chang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the analogy between the solute and heat transport processes, it can be expected that the rate of growth of the spatial second moments of the heat flux in a heterogeneous aquifer over relatively large space scales is greater than that predicted by applying the classical heat transport model. The motivation of stochastic analysis of heat transport at the field scale is therefore to quantify the enhanced growth of the field-scale second moments caused by the spatially varying specific discharge field. Within the framework of stochastic theory, an effective advection-dispersion equation containing effective parameters (namely, the macrodispersion coefficients is developed to model the mean temperature field. The rate of growth of the field-scale spatial second moments of the mean temperature field in the principal coordinate directions is described by the macrodispersion coefficient. The variance of the temperature field is also developed to characterize the reliability to be anticipated in applying the mean heat transport model. It is found that the heterogeneity of the medium and the correlation length of the log hydraulic conductivity are important in enhancing the field-scale heat advection, while the effective thermal conductivity plays the role in reducing the field-scale heat advection.

  19. Detecting Local Drivers of Fire Cycle Heterogeneity in Boreal Forests: A Scale Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Claude Bélisle

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Severe crown fires are determining disturbances for the composition and structure of boreal forests in North America. Fire cycle (FC associations with continental climate gradients are well known, but smaller scale controls remain poorly documented. Using a time since fire map (time scale of 300 years, the study aims to assess the relative contributions of local and regional controls on FC and to describe the relationship between FC heterogeneity and vegetation patterns. The study area, located in boreal eastern North America, was partitioned into watersheds according to five scales going from local (3 km2 to landscape (2800 km2 scales. Using survival analysis, we observed that dry surficial deposits and hydrography density better predict FC when measured at the local scale, while terrain complexity and slope position perform better when measured at the middle and landscape scales. The most parsimonious model was selected according to the Akaike information criterion to predict FC throughout the study area. We detected two FC zones, one short (159 years and one long (303 years, with specific age structures and tree compositions. We argue that the local heterogeneity of the fire regime contributes to ecosystem diversity and must be considered in ecosystem management.

  20. Translation, cultural adaptation and validation of Kidney Disease Loss Scale to the Brazilian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottaviani, Ana Carolina; Orlandi, Fabiana de Souza

    2016-01-01

    Losses can be conceptualized as cognitive and affective responses to individual sorrows, characterized by brooding, yearning, disbelief and stunned feelings, being clinically significant in chronic diseases. The aim of the study was to translate, culturally adapt and validate the Kidney Disease Loss Scale into Portuguese. Validation study involving the steps recommended in the literature for healthcare instruments: initial translation, synthesis of translations, back translation, review by a committee of judges and pretest. The scale was translated and adapted to the Portuguese language, being quick and easy to application. The reliability and reproducibility showed satisfactory values. Factor analysis indicated a factor that explains 59.7% of the losses construct. The Kidney Disease Loss Scale was translated, adapted and validated for the Brazilian context, allowing future studies of losses and providing tools for the professionals working in dialysis centers for assistance to people with chronic kidney disease. As perdas podem ser conceituadas como respostas cognitivas e afetivas para tristezas individuais, caracterizadas pelo remoer, anseio, descrença e sentimentos atordoados, sendo clinicamente significativa em doenças crônicas. O objetivo do estudo foi traduzir, adaptar culturalmente e validar o Kidney Disease Loss Scale para a língua portuguesa. Estudo de validação envolveu as etapas preconizadas na literatura internacional para instrumentos da área de saúde: tradução inicial, síntese das traduções, retrotradução, revisão por um comitê de juízes, pré-teste e avaliação das propriedades psicométricas. A escala foi traduzida e adaptada para o idioma português, sendo de fácil e rápida aplicação. A confiabilidade e a reprodutibilidade apresentaram valores satisfatórios. A análise fatorial indicou um fator que explica 59,7% do constructo de perdas. A Escala de Perdas referente à Doença Renal foi traduzida, adaptada e validada para o

  1. Translation and Psychometric Properties of Persian Version of Independent Living Scale in Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalafbeigi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Independent living skills are major targets for rehabilitation in patients with schizophrenia. So, assessment of their performance is required to obtain valuable information for planning intervention. The independent living scale (ILS is a useful assessment tool for this population. Objectives The aims of this study were to translate the three of five subscales of ILS (“memory/orientation”, “health and safety” and “social adjustment” into Persian language and evaluate their validity. The remaining two subscales of ILS (“money management”, “home management and transportation” have already been translated to Persian language by other researchers in Iran. In addition, the reliability of whole Persian version of ILS subscales was evaluated to be used for patients with Schizophrenia. Methods The three subscales of ILS were translated from English into Persian according to the international quality of life assessment (IQOLA approach. The translation of the three subscales: memory/orientation, health and safety and social adjustment, were analyzed by experts to develop the final version of each subscale. After translation, face and content validity of scale were performed. In face validity evaluation, the scale was investigated by 6 occupational therapists in terms of simplicity, mastery, relationship and clarity or transparency for each of the items. To assess the validity of content, scale was examined by 15 occupational therapists and content validity ratio (CVR and content validity index (CVI of each item were calculated. To assess the reliability of the subscales, test-retest reliability techniques (intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC and standard error of measure (SEM were utilized. Results The simplicity, relevance, clarity and necessity of the translated items were acceptable, according to the CVI and CVR scores. Face validity was also acceptable with respect to agreement rate (> 80%. Test-retest reliability

  2. French Translation and Validation of Three Scales Evaluating Stigma in Mental Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Garcia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveThe concept of stigma refers to problems of knowledge (ignorance, attitudes (prejudice, and behavior (discrimination. Stigma may hinder access to care, housing, and work. In the context of implementation of programs such as “housing first” or “individual placement and support” in French speaking regions, validated instruments measuring stigma are necessary. “Attitudes to Mental Illness 2011” is a questionnaire that includes three scales measuring stigma through these three dimensions. This study aimed to translate, adapt, and validate these three scales in French.MethodsThe “Attitudes to Mental Illness 2011” questionnaire was translated into French and back-translated into English by an expert. Two hundred and sixty-eight nursing students completed the questionnaire. Content validity, face validity, internal validity, and convergent validity were assessed. Long-term reliability was also estimated over a three-month period.ResultsExperts and participants found that the questionnaire’s content validity and face validity were appropriate. The internal validities of the three scales were also considered adequate. Convergent validity indicated that the scales did indeed measure what they were supposed to. Long-term stability estimates were moderate; this pattern of results suggested that the construct targeted by the three scales is adequately measured but does not necessarily represent stable and enduring traits.ConclusionBecause of their good psychometric properties, these three scales can be used in French, either separately, to measure one specific dimension of stigma, or together, to assess stigma in its three dimensions. This would seem of paramount importance in evaluating campaigns against stigma since it allows measures to be adapted according to campaign goals and the target population.

  3. Stochastic fields method for sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion models

    OpenAIRE

    M. Cassiani; Vinuesa, J.F.; Galmarini, S.; Denby, B

    2010-01-01

    The stochastic fields method for turbulent reacting flows has been applied to the issue of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in a mesoscale model. This method is a solution technique for the probability density function (PDF) transport equation and can be seen as a straightforward extension of currently used mesoscale dispersion models. It has been implemented in an existing mesoscale model and the results are compared with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) data devised to test specifically the...

  4. The amplitude of the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy created by small-scale heterogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maupin, Valérie

    2002-07-01

    At global as well as at regional scale, the lithosphere appears faster to Love waves than to Rayleigh waves. This Love-Rayleigh discrepancy can be modelled by introducing transverse isotropy in the upper mantle. In some regions however, it is so large that the question arises as to whether part of it could be an artefact related to the presence of heterogeneities in the lithosphere. Using a multiple-scattering scheme to model surface waves in 3-D structures, we analyse the influence of small-scale heterogeneities in the lithosphere on the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy in the period range 25 to 60 s. Small-scale heterogeneities tend to lower the apparent phase velocity of the surface waves, and have a larger effect on the Love waves than on the Rayleigh waves. This is not due to mode-coupling, which plays a negligible role here, but to the interference of the primary field with the one backscattered twice. For models with S-wave velocity variations of rms 2.5 per cent, and spatial correlations at distances of 20 to 100 km, we find that the Love waves are on average and at most 0.1 per cent slower than the Rayleigh waves. This apparent Love-Rayleigh discrepancy varies linearly with the variance of S-wave velocity variation in the structure. We conclude that small-scale heterogeneities do not contribute significantly to the large Love-Rayleigh discrepancies of 4 to 9 per cent observed in some regions, since they produce an apparent discrepancy which is negligible in comparison, and which even has the opposite sign.

  5. Factors associated with high heterogeneity of malaria at fine spatial scale in the Western Kenyan highlands.

    OpenAIRE

    Baidjoe, A.Y.; Stevenson, J.; Knight, P; Stone, W.J.R.; Stresman, G.; Osoti, V; Makori, E; OWAGA, C.; Odongo, W; China, P; Shagari, S; Kariuki, S; Drakeley, C; Cox, J; Bousema, T.

    2016-01-01

    Background The East African highlands are fringe regions between stable and unstable malaria transmission. What factors contribute to the heterogeneity of malaria exposure on different spatial scales within larger foci has not been extensively studied. In a comprehensive, community-based cross-sectional survey an attempt was made to identify factors that drive the macro- and micro epidemiology of malaria in a fringe region using parasitological and serological outcomes. Methods A large cross-...

  6. An Arabic version of the perceived stress scale: translation and validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almadi, Tawfiq; Cathers, Ian; Hamdan Mansour, Ayman M; Chow, Chin Moi

    2012-01-01

    The Perceived Stress Scale has been designed to measure the degree to which situations in a person's life are perceived as stressful. The paper describes the development of an Arabic version of the Perceived Stress Scale. A translation process with cross-cultural considerations was employed to produce an Arabic version of the Perceived Stress Scale. Participants were asked to complete the Arabic version Perceived Stress Scale twice in their homes. The Jordanian study population for the Arabic version Perceived Stress Scale validation consisted of 126 volunteers (74 male, 52 female). Ninety participants completed the scale twice (55 male, 35 female), of whom 58 were high schools teachers and 32 technical workers. Arabic was the first language of all participants and all gave informed consent. The Arabic version Perceived Stress Scale reliability and validity were evaluated. Prior to an exploratory factor analysis, the suitability of data for factor analysis was assessed with acceptable results. The exploratory factor analysis showed two factors with eigenvalues greater than 1.0 (45.0% of variance). The Cronbach's alpha coefficients were 0.74 (Factor 1), 0.77 (Factor 2) and 0.80 for the Arabic version Perceived Stress Scale overall. The test-retest reliability had an intra-correlation coefficient of 0.90. The Arabic version Perceived Stress Scale showed an adequate reliability and validity. Therefore, the Arabic Perceived Stress Scale is considered a suitable instrument to assess perceived stress in Arabic people. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modeling Solute Diffusion in the Presence of Pore-Scale Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FLEMING,SEAN W.; HAGGERTY,ROY

    1999-10-21

    A range of pore diffusivities, D{sub p}, is implied by the high degree of pore-scale heterogeneity observed in core samples of the Culebra (dolomite) Member of the Rustler formation, NM. Earlier tracer tests in the culebra at the field-scale have confirmed significant heterogeneity in diffusion rate coefficients (the combination of D{sub p} and matrix block size). In this study, expressions for solute diffusion in the presence of multiple simultaneous matrix diffusivities are presented and used to model data from eight laboratory-scale diffusion experiments performed on five Culebra samples. A lognormal distribution of D{sub p} is assumed within each of the lab samples. The estimated standard deviation ({sigma}{sub d}) of In(D{sub p}) within each sample ranges from 0 to 1, with most values lying between 0.5 and 1. The variability over all samples leads to a combined {sigma}{sub d} in the range of 1.0 to 1.2, which appears to be consistent with a best-fit statistical distribution of formation factor measurements for similar Culebra samples. A comparison of the estimation results to other rock properties suggests that, at the lab-scale, the geometric mean of D{sub p} increases with bulk porosity and the quantity of macroscopic features such as vugs and fractures. However, {sigma}{sub d} appears to be determined by variability within such macroscopic features and/or by micropore-scale heterogeneity. In addition, comparison of these experiments to those at larger spatial scales suggests that increasing sample volume results in an increase in {sigma}{sub d}.

  8. A generic library for large scale solution of PDEs on modern heterogeneous architectures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glimberg, Stefan Lemvig; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2012-01-01

    Adapting to new programming models for modern multi- and many-core architectures requires code-rewriting and changing algorithms and data structures, in order to achieve good efficiency and scalability. We present a generic library for solving large scale partial differential equations (PDEs......), capable of utilizing heterogeneous CPU/GPU environments. The library can be used for fast proto-typing of PDE solvers, based on finite difference approximations of spatial derivatives in one, two, or three dimensions. In order to efficiently solve large scale problems, we keep memory consumption...

  9. The Self-Stigma of Depression Scale: Translation and Validation of the Arabic Version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darraj, Hussain Ahmed; Mahfouz, Mohamed Salih; Al Sanosi, Rashad Mohamed; Badedi, Mohammed; Sabai, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Self-stigma may feature strongly and be detrimental for people with depression, but the understanding of its nature and prevalence is limited by the lack of psychometrically validated measures. This study is aimed to validate the Arabic version self-stigma of depression scale (SSDS) among adolescents. A cross-sectional study involved 100 adolescents randomly selected. The analyses include face validation, factor analysis, and reliability testing. A test-retest was conducted within a 2-week interval. The mean score for self-stigma of depression among study participants was 68.9 (Standard deviation = 8.76) median equal to 71 and range was 47. Descriptive analysis showed that the percentage of those who scored below the mean score (41.7%) is shown less than those who scored above the mean score (58.3%). Preliminary construct validation analysis confirmed that factor analysis was appropriate for the Arabic-translated version of the SSDS. Furthermore, the factor analysis showed similar factor loadings to the original English version. The total internal consistency of the translated version, which was measured by Cronbach's alphas ranged from 0.70 to 0.77 for the four subscales and 0.84 for the total scale. Test-retest reliability was assessed in 65 respondents after 2 weeks. Cronbach's alphas ranged from 0.70 to 0.77 for the four subscales and 0.84 for the total scale. Face validity, construct validity, and reliability analysis were found satisfactory for the Arabic-translated version of the SSDS. The Arabic-translated version of the SSDS was found valid and reliable to be used in future studies, with comparable properties to the original version and to previous studies.

  10. The self-stigma of depression scale: Translation and validation of the Arabic version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussain Ahmed Darraj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-stigma may feature strongly and be detrimental for people with depression, but the understanding of its nature and prevalence is limited by the lack of psychometrically validated measures. This study is aimed to validate the Arabic version self-stigma of depression scale (SSDS among adolescents. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study involved 100 adolescents randomly selected. The analyses include face validation, factor analysis, and reliability testing. A test–retest was conducted within a 2-week interval. Results: The mean score for self-stigma of depression among study participants was 68.9 (Standard deviation = 8.76 median equal to 71 and range was 47. Descriptive analysis showed that the percentage of those who scored below the mean score (41.7% is shown less than those who scored above the mean score (58.3%. Preliminary construct validation analysis confirmed that factor analysis was appropriate for the Arabic-translated version of the SSDS. Furthermore, the factor analysis showed similar factor loadings to the original English version. The total internal consistency of the translated version, which was measured by Cronbach's alphas ranged from 0.70 to 0.77 for the four subscales and 0.84 for the total scale. Test–retest reliability was assessed in 65 respondents after 2 weeks. Cronbach's alphas ranged from 0.70 to 0.77 for the four subscales and 0.84 for the total scale. Conclusions: Face validity, construct validity, and reliability analysis were found satisfactory for the Arabic-translated version of the SSDS. The Arabic-translated version of the SSDS was found valid and reliable to be used in future studies, with comparable properties to the original version and to previous studies.

  11. Noise analysis of genome-scale protein synthesis using a discrete computational model of translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Racle, Julien; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily, E-mail: vassily.hatzimanikatis@epfl.ch [Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics (SIB), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Stefaniuk, Adam Jan [Laboratory of Computational Systems Biotechnology, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2015-07-28

    Noise in genetic networks has been the subject of extensive experimental and computational studies. However, very few of these studies have considered noise properties using mechanistic models that account for the discrete movement of ribosomes and RNA polymerases along their corresponding templates (messenger RNA (mRNA) and DNA). The large size of these systems, which scales with the number of genes, mRNA copies, codons per mRNA, and ribosomes, is responsible for some of the challenges. Additionally, one should be able to describe the dynamics of ribosome exchange between the free ribosome pool and those bound to mRNAs, as well as how mRNA species compete for ribosomes. We developed an efficient algorithm for stochastic simulations that addresses these issues and used it to study the contribution and trade-offs of noise to translation properties (rates, time delays, and rate-limiting steps). The algorithm scales linearly with the number of mRNA copies, which allowed us to study the importance of genome-scale competition between mRNAs for the same ribosomes. We determined that noise is minimized under conditions maximizing the specific synthesis rate. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of the stochastic system revealed the importance of the elongation rate in the resultant noise, whereas the translation initiation rate constant was more closely related to the average protein synthesis rate. We observed significant differences between our results and the noise properties of the most commonly used translation models. Overall, our studies demonstrate that the use of full mechanistic models is essential for the study of noise in translation and transcription.

  12. Noise analysis of genome-scale protein synthesis using a discrete computational model of translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racle, Julien; Stefaniuk, Adam Jan; Hatzimanikatis, Vassily

    2015-07-28

    Noise in genetic networks has been the subject of extensive experimental and computational studies. However, very few of these studies have considered noise properties using mechanistic models that account for the discrete movement of ribosomes and RNA polymerases along their corresponding templates (messenger RNA (mRNA) and DNA). The large size of these systems, which scales with the number of genes, mRNA copies, codons per mRNA, and ribosomes, is responsible for some of the challenges. Additionally, one should be able to describe the dynamics of ribosome exchange between the free ribosome pool and those bound to mRNAs, as well as how mRNA species compete for ribosomes. We developed an efficient algorithm for stochastic simulations that addresses these issues and used it to study the contribution and trade-offs of noise to translation properties (rates, time delays, and rate-limiting steps). The algorithm scales linearly with the number of mRNA copies, which allowed us to study the importance of genome-scale competition between mRNAs for the same ribosomes. We determined that noise is minimized under conditions maximizing the specific synthesis rate. Moreover, sensitivity analysis of the stochastic system revealed the importance of the elongation rate in the resultant noise, whereas the translation initiation rate constant was more closely related to the average protein synthesis rate. We observed significant differences between our results and the noise properties of the most commonly used translation models. Overall, our studies demonstrate that the use of full mechanistic models is essential for the study of noise in translation and transcription.

  13. Translation and cross cultural adaptation of the Pediatric Motor Activity Log-Revised scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela da Silva Matuti

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The standardized instrument developed to assess the use of the affected upper limb in children with cerebral palsy (CP is the Pediatric Motor Activity Log Revised (PMAL-R. Objectives To translate PMAL-R and adapt for the Brazilian culture; analyze the reliability and the internal consistency of the Brazilian version. Method Translation of PMAL-R to the Portuguese-Brazil and back translation. The back-translated version was revised by the authors of the scale. The final version was administered to a sample of 24 patients with spastic hemiparesis CP between 2–8 years. Results The reliability intra and inter-rater were suitable (how often = 0.97 and 0.98, how well = 0.98 and 0.99 respectively and so the internal consistency (0.98. Conclusion The Brazilian version of PMAL-R has adequate internal consistency, reliability intra and inter raters and can be used to assess the spontaneous use of the upper limb of children with CP type spastic hemiparesis, aged 2–8 years.

  14. A Japanese version of the Perceived Stress Scale: cross-cultural translation and equivalence assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimura Chizu

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper describes the development of a Japanese version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS, and examines the equivalence between the original and translated version. The PSS is one of the few instruments to measure a global level of perceived stress, and has been widely used in a range of clinical and research settings. The PSS has already been translated into several languages, but there is no validated Japanese version. Methods A forward-backward procedure was implemented. Multiple forward and backward translations were produced, and a panel of reviewers verified conceptual and semantic equivalence between the source and final versions. Non-professional translators who were not brought up in bilingual families were used in order to enhance representativeness of language in the target populations. The PSS was administered to 222 native English speakers and the Japanese version (PSS-J to 1320 native Japanese speakers. Results Factor analysis showed similar factor loadings of the items and satisfactory factorial agreement between the PSS and PSS-J. Cronbach's alpha coefficient was high for both versions and for each factor. Conclusion It is concluded that the PSS and PSS-J are substantially equivalent and suited for use in comparative cross-cultural studies.

  15. A rule driven bi-directional translation system for remapping queries and result sets between a mediated schema and heterogeneous data sources.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaker, R.; Mork, P.; Barclay, M; Tarczy-Hornoch, P.

    2002-01-01

    As the number of online biomedical data sources increases, so too do the number of ways to access such data. The research described herein focuses on creating a data access system that provides bi-directional translation and mapping of data between heterogeneous databases and a mediated schema. Semantic mapping rules stored in a knowledge base are used by our generalized software to convert XML query results obtained from each data source to a common schema representing a single ontology. We ...

  16. Translation and validation of the Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale in Nepali language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sharmila; Adachi, Kumiko; Shrestha, Sarita

    2016-05-01

    a mother׳s lack of confidence in the early postnatal period may negatively influence their ability to care for their infant. Parenting confidence contributes to the parent-infant relationship and other aspects of infant development. The Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale is a 15-item self-report questionnaire designed to measure parents' subjective confidence in their parenting abilities, or 'perceived parenting self-efficacy', and is designed for mothers with infants aged 0-12 months. to translate the Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale into Nepali language and assess the validity and reliability among Nepalese postnatal mothers. cross-sectional study. outpatient department of maternity and women׳s hospital in Kathmandu, Nepal. one hundred postnatal mothers within 5-6 weeks of childbirth were recruited using the convenience sampling method. following back-translation procedures, mothers completed questionnaires during follow-up visit at immunisation/postnatal clinics. For the validity and reliability have been assessed internal consistency, discriminant validity, and construct validity. the translated Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale mean score was 35.47±5.48, ranging from 32 to 42. Cronbach׳s alpha coefficient for internal consistency was 0.87. A difference was found between primiparous and multiparous mothers׳ confidence scores. There was a significant correlation between maternal confidence and anxiety scores. Demographic response patterns suggest that the maternal confidence level was affected by education level. the Nepali version of Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale showed adequate reliability and validity. Therefore, the Nepali Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale is considered a suitable instrument to assess maternal confidence in Nepali postnatal mothers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. FOREWORD: Heterogenous nucleation and microstructure formation—a scale- and system-bridging approach Heterogenous nucleation and microstructure formation—a scale- and system-bridging approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmerich, H.

    2009-11-01

    Scope and aim of this volume. Nucleation and initial microstructure formation play an important role in almost all aspects of materials science [1-5]. The relevance of the prediction and control of nucleation and the subsequent microstructure formation is fully accepted across many areas of modern surface and materials science and technology. One reason is that a large range of material properties, from mechanical ones such as ductility and hardness to electrical and magnetic ones such as electric conductivity and magnetic hardness, depend largely on the specific crystalline structure that forms in nucleation and the subsequent initial microstructure growth. A very demonstrative example for the latter is the so called bamboo structure of an integrated circuit, for which resistance against electromigration [6] , a parallel alignment of grain boundaries vertical to the direction of electricity, is most favorable. Despite the large relevance of predicting and controlling nucleation and the subsequent microstructure formation, and despite significant progress in the experimental analysis of the later stages of crystal growth in line with new theoretical computer simulation concepts [7], details about the initial stages of solidification are still far from being satisfactorily understood. This is in particular true when the nucleation event occurs as heterogenous nucleation. The Priority Program SPP 1296 'Heterogenous Nucleation and Microstructure Formation—a Scale- and System-Bridging Approach' [8] sponsored by the German Research Foundation, DFG, intends to contribute to this open issue via a six year research program that enables approximately twenty research groups in Germany to work interdisciplinarily together following this goal. Moreover, it enables the participants to embed themselves in the international community which focuses on this issue via internationally open joint workshops, conferences and summer schools. An outline of such activities can be found

  18. Solute transport in periodical heterogeneous porous media: Importance of observation scale and experimental sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalani, S.; Chazarin, J. P.; Delenne, C.; Guinot, V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of the observation scale and sampling on the dispersion of tracers in periodical heterogeneous porous media. A Model Heterogeneous Porous Medium (MHPM) with a high degree of heterogeneity was built. It consists of a preferential flow path surrounded by glass beads. 44 tracer experiments were carried out on several series of periodic MHPM to investigate the effect of the observation scale on solute dispersion. Each series was replicated several times, allowing for a statistical description of the unit transfer function of the MHPM. No significant trend was found for the dispersion coefficient as a function of the size of the MHPM. However, given the variability of the breakthrough curves from one experiment replicate to another, under-sampling might easily lead to conclude that the dispersion coefficient is variable with distance. Depending on the samples used, it would be as easy to (wrongly) detect an increasing trend as to detect a decreasing one. A confidence interval analysis of the experimental breakthrough curves in the Laplace space shows that (i) there exists a model with scale independent parameters that can describe the experimental breakthrough curves within the limits of experimental uncertainty, (ii) this model is not the advection-dispersion (AD) model, (iii) the modelling error of the AD model decreases with the number of periods, (iv) the size of the Reference Elementary Volume for the dispersion coefficient is between 10 and 20 periods. The effects of sampling prove to override those of scaling. This, with the invalidity of the AD model, leads to question attempts to calibrate and/or identify trends in the dispersion coefficient at intermediate scales from a limited number of experiment replicates.

  19. Impact of aquifer heterogeneity structure and local-scale dispersion on solute concentration uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srzic, Veljko; Cvetkovic, Vladimir; Andricevic, Roko; Gotovac, Hrvoje

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of high log-conductivity variance (σY2) and local-scale dispersion on the first two concentration moments as well as on higher-order moments, skewness, and kurtosis, in a 2-D heterogeneous aquifer. Three different heterogeneity structures are considered, defined with one and the same global isotropic Gaussian variogram. The three structures differ in terms of spatial connectivity patterns at extreme log-conductivity values. Our numerical approach to simulate contaminant transport through heterogeneous porous media is based on the Lagrangian framework with a reverse tracking formulation. Advection and local-scale dispersion are two competing and controlling mechanisms, with a relative ratio defined by the Peclet number (Pe); hydraulic log-conductivity variance σY2 in the simulations is assumed to be one or eight. The term local-scale dispersion is used as a combined effect of molecular diffusion and mechanical dispersion. Uncertainty of the concentration field is quantified by the second-order moment, or the coefficient of variation (CVC) as a function of the sampling position along a centerline, Peclet number, and σY2, as well as by higher-order moments, i.e., skewness and kurtosis. The parameter σY2 shows a strong influence on the concentration statistics, while the three different structures have a minor impact in the case of low heterogeneity. The results also indicate that for σY2=8, the influence of local-scale dispersion is significant after five integral scales (IY) from the source for the connected (CN) field, while in case of a disconnected field, the local-scale dispersion effect is observed after 20IY from the source. In the case of unit σY2, local-scale dispersion acts very slowly affecting concentration uncertainty at distances higher than 20IY from the source. Our inspection of Monte Carlo concentration skewness and kurtosis with the ones obtained from the Beta distribution show the discrepancies for high

  20. Coarse Scale In Situ Albedo Observations over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces and Validation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Q.; Wu, X.; Wen, J.; BAI, J., Sr.

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate and improve the quality of coarse-pixel land surface albedo products, validation with ground measurements of albedo is crucial over the spatially and temporally heterogeneous land surface. The performance of albedo validation depends on the quality of ground-based albedo measurements at a corresponding coarse-pixel scale, which can be conceptualized as the "truth" value of albedo at coarse-pixel scale. In Huailai Remote Sensing test site, a long-term remote sensing monitoring network was established on the ecological, energy and hydrological processes in KM satellite pixel-scale by ground wireless network. The WSN nodes are distributed in an optimal layout that is determined using a sequential selection method based on the representativeness of the sensors. The combined observations from the selected nodes were able to capture the subpixel heterogeneity of the surface albedo. The WSN dataset within the coarse-pixel covers 6 nodes, providing continuous observation from July 18, 2013. The reference value of albedo at coarse-pixel scale can be obtained through an upscaling transform function based on all of the observations for that pixel. The upscaling weights for each node are calculated with the ordinary least squares (OLS) linear regression method using the historical HJ albedo from 2010-2012. The upscaling weight coefficients were evaluated and shown to be effective for WSN node measurements of albedo on spatial and temporal scales. The validation strategy focuses on the acquisition of coarse-scale albedo "truth" by upscaling the albedo observed by WSN nodes at a fine scale. Compared with the multiple scale validation strategy, the dataset of WSN albedo "truth" at the coarse-pixel scale reveals a good quality both in stability and continuity, and thus can be used as reference data for coarse-pixel albedo product validation. Application of this strategy is exemplified by validation of the MODIS 1 km albedo product. Keywords: Remote sensing; Albedo

  1. Arabic translation and cultural adaptation of the stigma-devaluation scale in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalky, Heyam F

    2012-02-01

    A review of the literature on measuring the concept of stigma related to caring for a relative with mental illness yielded no instrument appropriate for use in Jordan. To translate and culturally modify the stigma-devaluation scale (SDS) into Arabic, and to test the reliability, content and construct validity of the Arabic version of the SDS. The SDS was translated into the Arabic language, modified and culturally adapted by a translation model. Estimation of internal consistency was used to assess the reliability of the SDS. Construct validity was determined by confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). Measurements of content validity and reading level of the Arabic SDS were included. The Arabic SDS was evaluated in a sample of 164 family caregivers in Jordan. Content validity index was determined to be 1.0. Reading level of the Arabic SDS was deemed to be at a sixth grade level or higher. Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the Arabic SDS total scale was 0.87. The results of the CFA revealed that the factor structure of the SDS had a satisfactory fit. This study provided psychometric evidence that the modified Arabic SDS is valid and conceptually consistent with the content of the original English SDS.

  2. Effect of scalings and translations on the supersymmetric quantum mechanical structure of soliton systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arancibia, Adrián; Guilarte, Juan Mateos; Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2013-02-01

    We investigate a peculiar supersymmetry of the pairs of reflectionless quantum mechanical systems described by n-soliton potentials of a general form that depends on n scaling and n translation parameters. We show that if all the discrete energy levels of the subsystems are different, the superalgebra, being insensitive to translation parameters, is generated by two supercharges of differential order 2n, two supercharges of order 2n+1, and two bosonic integrals of order 2n+1 composed from Lax integrals of the partners. The exotic supersymmetry undergoes a reduction when r discrete energy levels of one subsystem coincide with any r discrete levels of the partner; the total order of the two independent intertwining generators reduces then to 4n-2r+1, and the nonlinear superalgebraic structure acquires a dependence on r relative translations. For a complete pairwise coincidence of the scaling parameters which control the energies of the bound states and the transmission scattering amplitudes, the emerging isospectrality is detected by a transmutation of one of the Lax integrals into a bosonic central charge. Within the isospectral class, we reveal a special case giving a new family of finite-gap first order Bogoliubov-de Gennes systems related to the Ablowitz-Kaup-Newell-Segur integrable hierarchy.

  3. Translation and cultural adaptation into Brazilian culture of type 1 diabetes distress scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, M S V M; Bovi, T G; Oliveira, P F; Pavin, E J; Fisher, L

    2017-01-01

    Diabetes related distress is common in type 1 diabetes patients (T1D). High levels of diabetes distress are related to poor metabolic control. An instrument to evaluate diabetes distress in T1D patients is "type 1 diabetes scale-T1DDS". The aim of this study was to translate and culturally adapt the T1DDS into Brazilian culture. T1DDS scale was translated into Portuguese. Back translation was performed and evaluated by a specialists committee. Pre-test was performed with 40 T1D outpatients at State University of Campinas hospital. Internal consistency, external consistency and re-test were performed. 72% women, mean age: 32, 1 ± 9, 7 years, mean diabetes duration: 15, 8 ± 9, 1 years, mean scholarity: 11, 5 ± 3, 6, glycosylated hemoglobin mean: 9 ± 2%. Internal consistency: Cronbach alpha of T1DDS Brazilian version was 0.93. External consistency: Spearman's coefficient between T1DDS and PAID, Brazilian version, was 0.7781; (p < 0.0001). The T1DDS Brazilian version is a reliable tool to evaluate diabetes distress in T1D patients in the Brazilian Population. This tool can be useful in clinical care and to identify patiens at risk and in need for psychosocial intervention.

  4. The Ostomy Adjustment Scale: translation into Norwegian language with validation and reliability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrebø, Kirsten Lerum; Andersen, John Roger; Natvig, Gerd Karin

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to adapt the Ostomy Adjustment Scale to a Norwegian version and to assess its construct validity and 2 components of its reliability (internal consistency and test-retest reliability). One hundred fifty-eight of 217 patients (73%) with a colostomy, ileostomy, or urostomy participated in the study. Slightly more than half (56%) were men. Their mean age was 64 years (range, 26-91 years). All respondents had undergone ostomy surgery at least 3 months before participation in the study. The Ostomy Adjustment Scale was translated into Norwegian according to standard procedures for forward and backward translation. The questionnaire was sent to the participants via regular post. The Cronbach alpha and test-retest were computed to assess reliability. Construct validity was evaluated via correlations between each item and score sums; correlations were used to analyze relationships between the Ostomy Adjustment Scale and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, the Quality of Life Scale, the Hospital Anxiety & Depression Scale, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale. The Cronbach alpha was 0.93, and test-retest reliability r was 0.69. The average correlation quotient item to sum score was 0.49 (range, 0.31-0.73). Results showed moderate negative correlations between the Ostomy Adjustment Scale and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (-0.37 and -0.40), and moderate positive correlations between the Ostomy Adjustment Scale and the 36-item Short Form Health Survey, the Quality of Life Scale, and the General Self-Efficacy Scale (0.30-0.45) with the exception of the pain domain in the Short Form 36 (0.28). Regression analysis showed linear associations between the Ostomy Adjustment Scale and sociodemographic and clinical variables with the exception of education. The Norwegian language version of the Ostomy Adjustment Scale was found to possess construct validity, along with internal consistency and test-retest reliability. The instrument is

  5. Large-scale model of flow in heterogeneous and hierarchical porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabanon, Morgan; Valdés-Parada, Francisco J.; Ochoa-Tapia, J. Alberto; Goyeau, Benoît

    2017-11-01

    Heterogeneous porous structures are very often encountered in natural environments, bioremediation processes among many others. Reliable models for momentum transport are crucial whenever mass transport or convective heat occurs in these systems. In this work, we derive a large-scale average model for incompressible single-phase flow in heterogeneous and hierarchical soil porous media composed of two distinct porous regions embedding a solid impermeable structure. The model, based on the local mechanical equilibrium assumption between the porous regions, results in a unique momentum transport equation where the global effective permeability naturally depends on the permeabilities at the intermediate mesoscopic scales and therefore includes the complex hierarchical structure of the soil. The associated closure problem is numerically solved for various configurations and properties of the heterogeneous medium. The results clearly show that the effective permeability increases with the volume fraction of the most permeable porous region. It is also shown that the effective permeability is sensitive to the dimensionality spatial arrangement of the porous regions and in particular depends on the contact between the impermeable solid and the two porous regions.

  6. The Kessler psychological distress scale: translation and validation of an Arabic version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, Scott D; Safadi, Najwa S; Wang, Yihan; Hasson, Robert G

    2017-10-27

    The Kessler Psychological Distress Scale has been widely used in assessing psychological distress among general and clinical populations from different cultural backgrounds. To our knowledge, however, researchers have not yet validated any translated versions in Arabic. The purpose of this study was to test the reliability and validity of Arabic translations of the ten item (K10) and six item (K6) versions among public sector employees in the Occupied Palestinian Territories. As part of a larger research project on life satisfaction, researchers collected data from 234 Palestinian social workers in June and July of 2016. The survey included several mental health measures, including the K10, which were translated from English to Arabic by an experienced language expert. In the current study, we tested reliability by measuring internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Next, we assessed factor structure using variance-covariance matrix with maximum likelihood estimation. Confirmatory factor analysis was performed to examine three competing models: unidimensional K10 model, unidimensional K6 model and two-factor K6 model. Fit indices and parameter estimates were reported. Last, convergent validity was examined by assessing correlations with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) and Somatic Symptoms Scale (SSS-8). The mean scores for the K6 and K10 were, respectively, 12.87 (SD = 4.02) and 21.8 (SD = 6.7), indicative of mild to moderate levels of distress. Scale reliability analysis showed satisfactory results on both K6 and K10 versions (Cronbach's α = .81 (K6) and .88 (K10)). Among three competing models, the two-factor K6 scale demonstrated the best model fit with high factorial correlations (r = .60, p Arabic-speaking populations.

  7. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. 1993 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-05-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Compositional and first-contact miscable simulations of viscous fingering and gravity segregation are compared to show that the two techniques can give very different results. Also, analyzed are two-dimensional and three-dimensional flows in which gravity segregation and viscous fingering interact. The simulations show that 2D and 3D flows can differ significantly. A comparison of analytical solutions for three-component two-phase flow with experimental results for oil/water/alcohol systems is reported. While the experiments and theory show reasonable agreement, some differences remain to be explained. The scaling behavior of the interaction of gravity segregation and capillary forces is investigated through simulations and through scaling arguments based on analysis of the differential equations. The simulations show that standard approaches do not agree well with results of low IFT displacements. The scaling analyses, however, reveal flow regimes where capillary, gravity, or viscous forces dominate the flow.

  8. Translation, adaptation and validation of the Moroccan version of the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendeddouche, Imad; Rostom, Samira; Bahiri, Rachid; Boudali, Aziza; Srifi, Najlaa; Mawani, Nada; Mengat, Mariam; El Badri, Dalal; Lazrak, Noufissa; Abouqal, Redouane; Allali, Fadoua; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2012-06-01

    This study aims to translate and cross-culturally adapt the Moroccan version of the Quebec Back Pain Disability Scale (QDS) and to investigate its reliability and validity in Moroccan patients with low back pain (LBP). The translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the QDS were developed in agreement with published guidelines. The QDS was translated by use of the forward and backward translation procedure. After pretest, it was validated in 64 Moroccan patients with LBP. The QDS was recorded twice, at baseline visit and 72 h later. Reproducibility was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and Bland and Altman method. Internal consistency was measured by Cronbach α coefficient. Ceiling and floor effects were assessed. Validity was measured by correlating the scores of the Moroccan QDS with visual analogue scale (VAS) for Pain, Disability VAS, Schober test, fingertip-floor measurement and the Moroccan version of the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) by means of the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Association with gender and education level was also studied. Reliability was excellent with an ICC (type 2.1) of 0.959 (CI 95%: 0.934-0.975). The internal consistency was high with a Cronbach α of 0.979. The Bland and Altman method showed homogenous distribution of the differences, with no systematic trend. There were no floor or ceiling effects. The correlation between QDS and RMDQ was very good (r = 0.664; p ≤ 0.001). There was no correlation between QDS and the other variables. Accordingly, the Moroccan version of QDS has good reproducibility, internal consistency and validity for the assessment of disability in Moroccan-speaking patients with LBP.

  9. [Reliability and validity of the Japanese translation of Brief Self-Control Scale (BSCS-J)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Yuka; Goto, Takayuki; Kobayashi, Mai; Kutsuzawa, Gaku

    2016-06-01

    Self-control refers to the ability to execute goal-oriented behavior despite the presence of temptation(s) to do otherwise. Since self-control has a wide-range impact on our daily lives, it is of critical importance to assess individual differences of self-control with a highly reliable and valid, yet simple, measure. Toward this end, three studies were conducted to test reliability and validity of the Japanese-translated version of Brief Self-Control Scale (Tangney, Baumeister, & Boone, 2004). The scale showed good internal consistency (Study 1) and retest reliability (Study 2). The. total score of the scale was correlated with the self-reported indices of self-control (e.g., daily experience of ego-depletion, study hours) and performance in the Stop Signal Task (Study 3), indicating its high converging validity.

  10. Self-Compassion Scale: IRT Psychometric Analysis, Validation, and Factor Structure – Slovak Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Júlia Halamová

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study verifies the psychometric properties of the Slovak version of the Self-Compassion Scale through item response theory, factor-analysis, validity analyses and norm development. The surveyed sample consisted of 1,181 participants (34% men and 66% women with a mean age of 30.30 years (SD = 12.40. Two general factors (Self-compassionate responding and Self-uncompassionate responding were identified, whereas there was no support for a single general factor of the scale and six subscales. The results of the factor analysis were supported by an independent sample of 676 participants. Therefore, the use of total score for the whole scale would be inappropriate. In Slovak language the Self-Compassion Scale should be used in the form of two general subscales (Self-compassionate responding and Self-uncompassionate responding. In line with our theoretical assumptions, we obtained relatively high Spearman’s correlation coefficients between the Self-Compassion Scale and related external variables, demonstrating construct validity for the scale. To sum up, the Slovak translation of The Self-Compassion Scale is a reliable and valid instrument that measures Self-compassionate responding and Self-uncompassionate responding.

  11. Optimization of large-scale heterogeneous system-of-systems models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parekh, Ojas; Watson, Jean-Paul; Phillips, Cynthia Ann; Siirola, John; Swiler, Laura Painton; Hough, Patricia Diane (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Lee, Herbert K. H. (University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA); Hart, William Eugene; Gray, Genetha Anne (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Woodruff, David L. (University of California, Davis, Davis, CA)

    2012-01-01

    Decision makers increasingly rely on large-scale computational models to simulate and analyze complex man-made systems. For example, computational models of national infrastructures are being used to inform government policy, assess economic and national security risks, evaluate infrastructure interdependencies, and plan for the growth and evolution of infrastructure capabilities. A major challenge for decision makers is the analysis of national-scale models that are composed of interacting systems: effective integration of system models is difficult, there are many parameters to analyze in these systems, and fundamental modeling uncertainties complicate analysis. This project is developing optimization methods to effectively represent and analyze large-scale heterogeneous system of systems (HSoS) models, which have emerged as a promising approach for describing such complex man-made systems. These optimization methods enable decision makers to predict future system behavior, manage system risk, assess tradeoffs between system criteria, and identify critical modeling uncertainties.

  12. Exploring diversity in soil fertility management of smallholder farms in western Kenya I. Heterogeneity at region and farm scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tittonell, P.A.; Vanlauwe, B.; Leffelaar, P.A.; Rowe, E.C.; Giller, K.E.

    2005-01-01

    The processes of nutrient depletion and soil degradation that limit productivity of smallholder African farms are spatially heterogeneous. Causes of variability in soil fertility management at different scales of analysis are both biophysical and socio-economic. Such heterogeneity is categorised in

  13. The translation and psychometric assessment of the persian version of the sheehan disability scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Amin-Esmaeili

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS assesses disability in four domains of home management, work responsibilities, close relationships and social life. The main objective of this study was to develop the Persian version of the SDS.Two steps of field work followed the Persian translation and cultural adaptation of the tool: First, the internal consistency and convergent validity was examined in 104 clinical cases recruited from inpatient and outpatient psychiatric services, using 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36 and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. Then 88 individuals were randomly selected from the adult general population to assess internal consistency, inter-rater reliability and known group validity.In the clinical settings, Cronbach's α coefficient was 0.88 and item-total correlation ranged from 0.71 to 0.78 in various domains. The correlation between SDS and SF-36 (P< 0.001 was significant in all the areas of the performance; and neither of the correlations was statistically significant when SDS and GAF were compared. In the general population study, the SDS met a good internal consistency (α = 0.81 and known group validity, and the inter-rater reliability was perfect for "school/work responsibility ."The Persian translation of the SDS is a simple and short scale, and it seems to be a valid scale for the measurement of disability in clinical settings and in the Iranian general population.

  14. Investigating with IRT and MDS Approaches Translation and Adaptation of Rating Scales for Spanish-Speaking Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study is to investigate how features of a rating scale developed for English-speaking populations interact with Spanish-speaking respondents' response styles and functional categories of judgment. A sample of 400 Spanish-speaking students took a translated scale and a scaling task developed to measure response sets and functional…

  15. A Ranking Approach on Large-Scale Graph With Multidimensional Heterogeneous Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Gao, Bin; Liu, Tie-Yan; Wang, Taifeng; Li, Guohui; Li, Hang

    2016-04-01

    Graph-based ranking has been extensively studied and frequently applied in many applications, such as webpage ranking. It aims at mining potentially valuable information from the raw graph-structured data. Recently, with the proliferation of rich heterogeneous information (e.g., node/edge features and prior knowledge) available in many real-world graphs, how to effectively and efficiently leverage all information to improve the ranking performance becomes a new challenging problem. Previous methods only utilize part of such information and attempt to rank graph nodes according to link-based methods, of which the ranking performances are severely affected by several well-known issues, e.g., over-fitting or high computational complexity, especially when the scale of graph is very large. In this paper, we address the large-scale graph-based ranking problem and focus on how to effectively exploit rich heterogeneous information of the graph to improve the ranking performance. Specifically, we propose an innovative and effective semi-supervised PageRank (SSP) approach to parameterize the derived information within a unified semi-supervised learning framework (SSLF-GR), then simultaneously optimize the parameters and the ranking scores of graph nodes. Experiments on the real-world large-scale graphs demonstrate that our method significantly outperforms the algorithms that consider such graph information only partially.

  16. Stochastic fields method for sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in mesoscale atmospheric dispersion models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cassiani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The stochastic fields method for turbulent reacting flows has been applied to the issue of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity in a mesoscale model. This method is a solution technique for the probability density function (PDF transport equation and can be seen as a straightforward extension of currently used mesoscale dispersion models. It has been implemented in an existing mesoscale model and the results are compared with Large-Eddy Simulation (LES data devised to test specifically the effect of sub-grid scale emission heterogeneity on boundary layer concentration fluctuations. The sub-grid scale emission variability is assimilated in the model as a PDF of the emissions. The stochastic fields method shows excellent agreement with the LES data without adjustment of the constants used in the mesoscale model. The stochastic fields method is a stochastic solution of the transport equations for the concentration PDF of dispersing scalars, therefore it possesses the ability to handle chemistry of any complexity without the need to introduce additional closures for the high order statistics of chemical species. This study shows for the first time the feasibility of applying this method to mesoscale chemical transport models.

  17. Heterogeneous grain-scale response in ferroic polycrystals under electric field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daniels, John E.; Majkut, Marta; Cao, Qingua

    2016-01-01

    -ray diffraction (3D-XRD) is used to resolve the non-180° ferroelectric domain switching strain components of 191 grains from the bulk of a polycrystalline electro-ceramic that has undergone an electric-field-induced phase transformation. It is found that while the orientation of a given grain relative...... to the field direction has a significant influence on the phase and resultant domain texture, there are large deviations from the average behaviour at the grain scale. It is suggested that these deviations arise from local strain and electric field neighbourhoods being highly heterogeneous within the bulk...

  18. Modeling fine-scale geological heterogeneity-examples of sand lenses in tills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessler, Timo Christian; Comunian, Alessandro; Oriani, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    block. The identification of flow paths through a network of elongated sand lenses and the impact on the equivalent permeability in tills are essential to perform solute transport modeling in the low-permeability sediments. © 2012, The Author(s) © 2012, National GroundWater Association.......Sand lenses at various spatial scales are recognized to add heterogeneity to glacial sediments. They have high hydraulic conductivities relative to the surrounding till matrix and may affect the advective transport of water and contaminants in clayey till settings. Sand lenses were investigated...

  19. [Cross-cultural adaptation: translation and Portuguese language content validation of the Tripartite Influence Scale for body dissatisfaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, Maria Aparecida; Scagliusi, Fernanda; Queiroz, Gisele Kawamura de Oliveira; Hearst, Norman; Cordás, Táki Athanássios

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to translate and adapt the Tripartite Influence Scale to the Portuguese language and evaluate its content validity and internal consistency. Six steps included: (1) translation; (2) back-translation; (3) technique revision and semantic evaluation; (4) conduct validation by professional experts (judges); (5) assessment of comprehensibility by the target population, using a verbal rating scale; and (6) evaluation of the internal consistency using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The 43 questions were translated and adapted to the Portuguese language. The final version consisted of 39 items, with content validity for three constructs (media, family, and friends), clarity and easy understanding, and good internal agreement (Cronbach's alpha coefficients > 0.80). The instrument was successfully translated and adapted to Portuguese and showed good content validity, verbal comprehensibility, and internal consistency. Further analysis of external validity, equivalence of measurement, and reproducibility are necessary.

  20. Delirium assessment in hospitalized elderly patients: Italian translation and validation of the nursing delirium screening scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spedale, Valentina; Di Mauro, Stefania; Del Giorno, Giulia; Barilaro, Monica; Villa, Candida E; Gaudreau, Jean D; Ausili, Davide

    2017-08-01

    Delirium has a high incidence pathology associated with negative outcomes. Although highly preventable, half the cases are not recognized. One major cause of delirium misdiagnosis is the absence of a versatile instrument to measure it. Our objective was to translate the nursing delirium screening scale (Nu-DESC) and evaluate its performance in Italian settings. This was a methodological study conducted in two sequential phases. The first was the Italian translation of Nu-DESC through a translation and back-translation process. The second aimed to test the inter-rater reliability, the sensibility and specificity of the instrument on a convenience sample of 101 hospitalized elderly people admitted to relevant wards of the San Gerardo Hospital in Monza. To evaluate the inter-rater reliability, two examiners tested Nu-DESC on 20 patients concurrently without comparison. To measure the sensibility and specificity of Nu-DESC, the confusion assessment method was used as a gold standard measure. The inter-rater reliability (Cohen Kappa) was 0.87-an excellent agreement between examiners. The study of the ROC curve showed an AUC value of 0.9461 suggesting high test accuracy. Using 3 as a cut-off value, Nu-DESC showed 100 % sensibility and 76 % specificity. Further research is needed to test Nu-DESC on a larger sample. However, based on our results, Nu-DESC can be used in research and clinical practice in Italian settings because of its very good and similar performances to previous validation studies. The value of 3 appears to be the optimal cut-off in the Italian context.

  1. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. M.; Chen, X.; Ju, W.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs) for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP) estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI) is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE) in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m-2 yr-1 to 4.8 g C m-2 yr-1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m-2 yr-1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI) and elevation have small and additive effects on improving the spatial scaling

  2. Effects of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography on spatial scaling of net primary productivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Chen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the heterogeneous nature of the land surface, spatial scaling is an inevitable issue in the development of land models coupled with low-resolution Earth system models (ESMs for predicting land-atmosphere interactions and carbon-climate feedbacks. In this study, a simple spatial scaling algorithm is developed to correct errors in net primary productivity (NPP estimates made at a coarse spatial resolution based on sub-pixel information of vegetation heterogeneity and surface topography. An eco-hydrological model BEPS-TerrainLab, which considers both vegetation and topographical effects on the vertical and lateral water flows and the carbon cycle, is used to simulate NPP at 30 m and 1 km resolutions for a 5700 km2 watershed with an elevation range from 518 m to 3767 m in the Qinling Mountain, Shanxi Province, China. Assuming that the NPP simulated at 30 m resolution represents the reality and that at 1 km resolution is subject to errors due to sub-pixel heterogeneity, a spatial scaling index (SSI is developed to correct the coarse resolution NPP values pixel by pixel. The agreement between the NPP values at these two resolutions is improved considerably from R2 = 0.782 to R2 = 0.884 after the correction. The mean bias error (MBE in NPP modelled at the 1 km resolution is reduced from 14.8 g C m−2 yr−1 to 4.8 g C m−2 yr−1 in comparison with NPP modelled at 30 m resolution, where the mean NPP is 668 g C m−2 yr−1. The range of spatial variations of NPP at 30 m resolution is larger than that at 1 km resolution. Land cover fraction is the most important vegetation factor to be considered in NPP spatial scaling, and slope is the most important topographical factor for NPP spatial scaling especially in mountainous areas, because of its influence on the lateral water redistribution, affecting water table, soil moisture and plant growth. Other factors including leaf area index (LAI and elevation have small and additive effects on improving

  3. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Second annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Progress is reported for a comprehensive investigation of the scaling behavior of gas injection processes in heterogeneous reservoirs. The interplay of phase behavior, viscous fingering, gravity segregation, capillary imbibition and drainage, and reservoir heterogeneity is examined in a series of simulations and experiments. Use of streamtube to model multiphase flow is demonstrated to be a fast and accurate approach for displacements that are dominated by reservoir heterogeneity. The streamtube technique is particularly powerful for multiphase compositional displacements because it represents the effects of phase behavior with a one-dimensional flow and represents the effects of heterogeneity through the locations of streamtubes. A new approach for fast calculations of critical tie-lines directly from criticality conditions is reported. A global triangular structure solution for four-component flow systems, whose tie-lies meet at the edge of a quaternary phase diagram or lie in planes is presented. Also demonstrated is the extension of this solution to multicomponent systems under the same assumptions. The interplay of gravity, capillary and viscous forces on final residual oil saturation is examined experimentally and theoretically. The analysis of vertical equilibrium conditions for three-phase gravity drainage shows that almost all oil can be recovered from the top part of a reservoir. The prediction of spreading and stability of thin film is performed to investigate three-phase gravity drainage mechanisms. Finally, experimental results from gravity drainage of crude oil in the presence of CO{sub 2} suggest that gravity drainage could be an efficient oil recovery process for vertically fractured reservoirs.

  4. The translation of the Vertigo Symptom Scale into Afrikaans: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Christine; de Wet, Jacques; Gina, Ayanda; Louw, Ladine; Makhoba, Musa; Tacon, Lee

    2011-10-01

    Dizziness is a common clinical problem that is challenging to diagnose and treat. One of a subset of symptoms that fall under the encompassing term of dizziness is vertigo, which is the subjective experience of hallucination of movement, often associated with vestibular disorders. While dizziness has a broad range of causes, the association between vestibular disturbance, and its attendant vertigo, and anxiety is well established. The Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS) is a questionnaire that assesses aspects of vertigo and vertigo-related anxiety. The aim of this study was twofold. In phase 1, a translation of the VSS into Afrikaans was evaluated using the Delphi consensus technique and two panels of participants. Panel 1 comprised first-language Afrikaans speakers who commented on the language, grammar and vocabulary of the items. Panel 2 were bilingual health care practitioners with either a psychology background or a special interest in vertigo. After two rounds of consultation, consensus was achieved and the final translation of the Afrikaans Vertigo Symptom Scale (AVSS) was agreed upon, as well as a list of Afrikaans words descriptive of vertigo. Phase 2 used a descriptive, correlational design. The aim was to pilot the AVSS with a sample of vertiginous and control participants to establish its ability to differentiate between the two groups and to explore experiences of vertigo and anxiety within the two embedded subscales. The results of the pilot study yielded significant statistical differences (p < 0.001) between the groups on both subscales of the tool. Preliminary results suggest that the AVSS is able to identify patients with vertiginous disturbance and anxiety. The AVSS presents with good sensitivity and specificity as measured by the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Afrikaans is the home language of almost 6 million people in South Africa. The translation of the VSS into Afrikaans presents health care professionals with a tool with which to

  5. The Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale: translation and validation in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Albo, José; Núñiez, Juan L; Navarro, José G; Grijalvo, Fernando

    2007-11-01

    The aim of this study was to translate into Spanish and to validate the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES), completed by 420 university students. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the model that best fit the data, both in the total sample and in the male and female subsamples, was the one-factor structure with method effects associated with positively worded items. The results indicated high, positive correlations between self-esteem and the five dimensions of self-concept. The scale showed satisfactory levels of internal consistency and temporal stability over a four-week period. Lastly, gender differences were obtained. These findings support the use of the RSES for the assessment of self-esteem in higher education.

  6. The adolescent Religious Coping Questionnaire. Translation and cultural adaptation of Pargament's RCOPE Scale for Polish adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talik, Elżbieta B

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents the process of translation and cultural adaptation of the Religious Coping Questionnaire (the RCOPE) by Pargament et al. (2000) for Polish adolescents. The work was driven by the necessity to obtain a structural and measurement equivalence between the American and Polish versions of the instrument. The Polish version was created at the Department of Clinical Psychology of Children and Adolescents at The John Paul II Catholic University of Lublin, Poland. The exploratory factor analysis with the Oblimin oblique rotation was carried out. The principal components method was used as an extraction method of common factors. The results provided input for constructing the scales. The Adolescent Religious Coping Questionnaire consists of 105 items, grouped in 16 scales, which reflects positive and negative religious coping strategies.

  7. Neuronal dynamics and neuropsychiatric disorders: toward a translational paradigm for dysfunctional large-scale networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhlhaas, Peter J; Singer, Wolf

    2012-09-20

    In recent years, numerous studies have tested the relevance of neural oscillations in neuropsychiatric conditions, highlighting the potential role of changes in temporal coordination as a pathophysiological mechanism in brain disorders. In the current review, we provide an update on this hypothesis because of the growing evidence that temporal coordination is essential for the context and goal-dependent, dynamic formation of large-scale cortical networks. We shall focus on issues that we consider particularly promising for a translational research program aimed at furthering our understanding of the origins of neuropsychiatric disorders and the development of effective therapies. We will focus on schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) to highlight important issues and challenges for the implementation of such an approach. Specifically, we will argue that deficits in temporal coordination lead to a disruption of functional large-scale networks, which in turn can account for several specific dysfunctions associated with these disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Translation and psychometric evaluation of a Standard Chinese version of the Body Appreciation Scale-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; Ng, Siu-Kuen; Barron, David

    2016-09-01

    The present study examined the factorial and construct validity of a Standard Chinese translation of the Body Appreciation Scale (BAS-2; Tylka & Wood-Barcalow, 2015b). Participants were 191 women and 154 men from mainland China who were resident in Hong Kong at the time of recruitment. Results of confirmatory factor analysis indicated that the one-dimensional model of the BAS-2, in which all 10 items loaded onto the same factor, had adequate fit, and was invariant across sex. Body appreciation scores had good internal consistency and were significantly correlated with self-esteem and life satisfaction, and, in women, with weight discrepancy and body mass index. There were no significant differences in body appreciation scores between women and men. The present findings suggest that the Standard Chinese translation of the BAS-2 has the same one-dimensional factor structure as its parent scale and may facilitate cross-cultural studies of positive body image. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Translation and validation into Brazilian Portuguese of the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale (SPRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katiane R. Servelhere

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSP are characterized by progressive lower limb weakness and spasticity. There are no validated instruments to quantify disease severity in Portuguese. Objective To translate and validate the Spastic Paraplegia Rating Scale (SPRS into Brazilian-Portuguese. Method Two experienced and English-fluent neurologists translated SPRS into Portuguese, creating SPRS-BR. We then assessed inter and intra-rater reliability of this version using coefficients of correlation and variability in a cohort of 30 patients. Results Mean age of patients and disease duration were 47.7 ± 10.5 and 17.0 ± 10.6 years, respectively. Twenty-one had pure HSP and SPG4 was the most frequent genotype. Mean Rankin and SPRS-BR scores were 2.2 ± 0.9 and 19.9 ± 9.9, respectively. Mean intra and inter-rater correlation coefficients of SPRS-BR scores were 0.951 and 0.934, whereas coefficients of variation were 11.5% (inter-rater and 9.9% (intra-rater. Cronbach’s alpha for the whole SPRS-BR scale was 0.873. Conclusion SPRS-BR is a useful, reliable and valid clinical instrument.

  10. Reliability, Validity and Psychometric Properties of the Greek Translation of the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontoangelos, Konstantinos; Tsiori, Sofia; Poulakou, Garyfalia; Protopapas, Konstantinos; Katsarolis, Ioannis; Sakka, Vissaria; Kavatha, Dimitra; Papadopoulos, Antonios; Antoniadou, Anastasia; Papageorgiou, Charalambos C

    2017-03-22

    The Greek version of the Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS) was developed to respond to the need of Greek-speaking individuals. The translated questionnaire was administered to 128 HIV outpatients (aged 37.1±9.1) and 166 control patients (aged 32.4±13.4). In addition to the DTS Greek scale, subjects were assessed with two other scales useful for assessing validity. For each factor analyses two components were extracted, based on Cattell's scree test. The two components solution accounted for 55.34% of the total variation in case of frequency variables and 61.45% in case of severity variables. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient and Guttman split-half coefficient of the DTS scale were 0.93 and 0.88 respectively. The test-retest reliability of the Greek version of DTS scale proved to be satisfactory. Individual items had good intra-class correlation coefficients higher than 0.5, which means that all questions have high levels of external validity. The psychometric strength of interview for posttraumatic stress disorder-Greek version it's reliable for its future use, particularly for screening subjects with possible diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder.

  11. [Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the newcastle satisfaction with nursing scales into the Brazilian culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorigan, Gisele Hespanhol; de Guirardello, Edinêis Brito

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to translate and culturally adapt the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales for use in Brazil, and to assess its usability. The instrument contains two scales and aims to assess the patient's experiences and level of satisfaction with nursing care. The methodological procedure of cultural adaptation followed the steps: translation, synthesis, back-translation, assessment by an expert committee, and pre-test. The process of translation and cultural adaptation was considered adequate. The committee assessment resulted in simple grammatical modifications for most of the items, and 40 subjects were considered for the pre-test. The Brazilian version of the Newcastle Satisfaction with Nursing Scales demonstrated adequate content validity and was easily understood by the group of subjects. However, this is a study that precedes the evaluation of the psychometric properties of the instrument, whose results will be presented in a later publication.

  12. Spatial heterogeneity and scale-dependent habitat selection for two sympatric raptors in mixed-grass prairie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atuo, Fidelis Akunke; O'Connell, Timothy John

    2017-08-01

    Sympatric predators are predicted to partition resources, especially under conditions of food limitation. Spatial heterogeneity that influences prey availability might play an important role in the scales at which potential competitors select habitat. We assessed potential mechanisms for coexistence by examining the role of heterogeneity in resource partitioning between sympatric raptors overwintering in the southern Great Plains. We conducted surveys for wintering Red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) and Northern Harrier (Circus cyanea) at two state wildlife management areas in Oklahoma, USA. We used information from repeated distance sampling to project use locations in a GIS. We applied resource selection functions to model habitat selection at three scales and analyzed for niche partitioning using the outlying mean index. Habitat selection of the two predators was mediated by spatial heterogeneity. The two predators demonstrated significant fine-scale discrimination in habitat selection in homogeneous landscapes, but were more sympatric in heterogeneous landscapes. Red-tailed hawk used a variety of cover types in heterogeneous landscapes but specialized on riparian forest in homogeneous landscapes. Northern Harrier specialized on upland grasslands in homogeneous landscapes but selected more cover types in heterogeneous landscapes. Our study supports the growing body of evidence that landscapes can affect animal behaviors. In the system we studied, larger patches of primary land cover types were associated with greater allopatry in habitat selection between two potentially competing predators. Heterogeneity within the scale of raptor home ranges was associated with greater sympatry in use and less specialization in land cover types selected.

  13. Small scale spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration in an old growth temperate deciduous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, A.; Jurasinski, G.; Glatzel, S.

    2009-10-01

    The large scale spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration caused by differences in site conditions is quite well understood. However, comparably little is known about the micro scale heterogeneity within forest ecosystems on homogeneous soils. Forest age, soil texture, topographic position, micro topography and stand structure may influence soil respiration considerably within short distance. In the present study within site spatial heterogeneity of soil respiration has been evaluated. To do so, an improvement of available techniques for interpolating soil respiration data via kriging was undertaken. Soil respiration was measured with closed chambers biweekly from April 2005 to April 2006 using a nested design (a set of stratified random plots, supplemented by 2 small and 2 large nested groupings) in an unmanaged, beech dominated old growth forest in Central Germany (Hainich, Thuringia). A second exclusive randomized design was established in August 2005 and continually sampled biweekly until July 2007. The average soil respiration values from the random plots were standardized by modeling soil respiration data at defined soil temperature and soil moisture values. By comparing sampling points as well as by comparing kriging results based on various sampling point densities, we found that the exclusion of local outliers was of great importance for the reliability of the estimated fluxes. Most of this information would have been missed without the nested groupings. The extrapolation results slightly improved when additional parameters like soil temperature and soil moisture were included in the extrapolation procedure. Semivariograms solely calculated from soil respiration data show a broad variety of autocorrelation distances (ranges) from a few centimeters up to a few tens of meters. The combination of randomly distributed plots with nested groupings plus the inclusion of additional relevant parameters like soil temperature and soil moisture data permits an

  14. Scale-up of two-phase flow in heterogeneous chalk. Matrix properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    This investigation presents scale-up of a detailed heterogeneous geostatistical model to a full field reservoir simulation model, considering both single and two-phase flow properties. The model represents a typical low permeability Danish North Sea chalk reservoir and includes capillary pressure and saturation end-point variations. Two new up-scaling methods has been investigated, all based on fine scale simulation on a cross section of the geomodel. The first methods assumes piston style behaviour and a coupled viscosity is introduced into the basic Darcy`s equations. The second method is a modification of the JBN method traditionally applied in analysing results from core flooding experiments, which emerged as the most successful and therefore also the recommended method. 1. In addition to the up scaling work we review the Equivalent Radius Method for capillary pressure normalisation with explicit derivation of type functions for Maastrichtian and Danian chalk types. Implementation of the Equivalent Radiuo Method in the COSI reservoir simulator by an optikal set of key-words. There are six specific results from this work: 1. The equivalent radius method is robust to changes of scale and yields model initialisations by initial and irreducible water saturations on a full field simulation scale that agree well with values derived from averaging on a fine-scale. 2. The residual oil saturations are strongly scale dependent and the description of the residual oil as a function of the irreducible water is not applicable on a full field scale and will lead to an overestimation of the residual oil present in the reservoir. The effective residual oil saturations on a full field-scale must be considered functions of the effective initial water saturations, in order to take into account fine-scale variations in the oil/water contacts. 3. The effective permeability as calculated by statistical averages does not differ seriously from results obtained by fine-grid numerical

  15. Quantifying Mixing and Scales of Heterogeneity in 2-D Numerical Models of Chaotic Mantle Mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A. C.; Naliboff, J.; Prytulak, J.; Vanacore, E.; Cooper, K. M.; Hart, S.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2006-12-01

    Fundamental to our understanding of geochemical reservoirs within the Earth's mantle is the concept of the scale and distribution of heterogeneity. Although many studies approach this concept qualitatively few have attempted a quantitative assessment. Through a collaborative effort at the CIDER (Cooperative Institute for Deep Earth Research) 2006 summer workshop, we applied a 2-D/1-D power spectral and statistical analysis, respectively, to the temperature field and passive tracer distribution within a 2-D numerical model of mantle convection. The resultant data provides a means to objectively describe the scales of mixing and heterogeneity within various model scenarios. The dynamic models used had a 1x10 aspect ratio, included temperature- and pressure-dependent viscosity, had a Rayleigh number of 10^7, and had both internal and basal heating. One end member case includes a layered structure for viscosity and thermal conductivity, with a sharp increase in the mid-mantle. Spectral analysis of the temperature fields indicates that power near the upper and lower boundary layers is concentrated in long-wavelength structures while in the mid-mantle the spectrum is broader. Layering the viscosity structure enhances this dichotomy, but does not isolate the upper from the lower mantle and does not necessarily lead to decreased mixing rates or efficiency. Preliminary results demonstrate that the overall particle distribution, measured as a function of the distance between particles, is not necessarily unimodal. Furthermore, at a given time step this distribution may become multimodal.

  16. Atomic-scale structural signature of dynamic heterogeneities in metallic liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasturel, Alain; Jakse, Noel

    2017-08-01

    With sufficiently high cooling rates, liquids will cross their equilibrium melting temperatures and can be maintained in a metastable undercooled state before solidifying. Studies of undercooled liquids reveal several intriguing dynamic phenomena and because explicit connections between liquid structure and liquids dynamics are difficult to identify, it remains a major challenge to capture the underlying structural link to these phenomena. Ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations are yet especially powerful in providing atomic-scale details otherwise not accessible in experiments. Through the AIMD-based study of Cr additions in Al-based liquids, we evidence for the first time a close relationship between the decoupling of component diffusion and the emergence of dynamic heterogeneities in the undercooling regime. In addition, we demonstrate that the origin of both phenomena is related to a structural heterogeneity caused by a strong interplay between chemical short-range order (CSRO) and local fivefold topology (ISRO) at the short-range scale in the liquid phase that develops into an icosahedral-based medium-range order (IMRO) upon undercooling. Finally, our findings reveal that this structural signature is also captured in the temperature dependence of partial pair-distribution functions which opens up the route to more elaborated experimental studies.

  17. Meter Scale Heterogeneities in the Oceanic Mantle Revealed in Ophiolites Peridotites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, M. B.; Walker, R. J.; Day, J. M.; O'Driscoll, B.; Daly, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge basalts and other oceanic mantle-derived rocks do not capture the depleted endmember isotopic compositions present in oceanic peridotites. Ophiolites are especially useful in interrogating this issue as field-based observations can be paired with geochemical investigations over a wide range of geologic time. Grid sampling methods (3m x 3m) at the 497 Ma Leka Ophiolite Complex (LOC), Norway, and the 1.95 Ga Jormua Ophiolite Complex (JOC), Finland, offer an opportunity to study mantle domains at the meter and kilometer scale, and over a one billion year timespan. The lithology of each locality predominately comprises harzburgite, hosting layers and lenses of dunite and pyroxenite. Here, we combine highly siderophile elements (HSE) and Re-Os isotopic analysis of these rocks with major and trace element measurements. Harzburgites at individual LOC grid sites show variations in γOs(497 Ma) (-2.1 to +2.2) at the meter scale. Analyses of adjacent, more radiogenic dunites within the same LOC grid, reveal that dunites may either have similar γOs to their host harzburgite, or different, implying interactions between spatially associated rock types may differ at the meter scale. Averaged γOs values between the mantle sections of two LOC grid sites (+1.3 and -0.4) separated by 5 km indicate km-scale heterogeneity in the convecting upper mantle. Pd/Ir and Ru/Ir ratios are scattered and do not obviously correlate with γOs values. Analyses of pyroxenites within LOC grid sections, thin section observations of relict olivine grains, and whole rock major and trace element data are also examined to shed light on the causes of the isotopic heterogeneities in the LOC. Data from JOC grid sampling will be presented as well.

  18. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy Scale to Portuguese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira-Silva, Luís; Sá-Sousa, Ana; Lima, Maria João; Monteiro, Agostinho; Dennison-Himmelfarb, Cheryl; Fonseca, João A

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension is an extremely prevalent disease worldwide and hypertension control rates remain low. Lack of adherence contributes to poor control and to cardiovascular events. No questionnaire in Portuguese is readily available for the assessment of adherence to antihypertensive drugs. We aimed to perform a translation and cultural adaptation to Portuguese of the Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy Scale, a validated instrument to measure adherence in hypertensive patients. A formal process was employed, consisting of a forward translation by two independent translators and a back translation by a third translator. Discrepancies were resolved after each step. Hypertensive patients were involved to identify and resolve phrasing and wording difficulties and misunderstandings. The forward and back translation did not produce significant discrepancies. However, important issues were identified when the questionnaire was presented to patients, which led to changes in the wording of the questions and in the format of the questionnaire. Questionnaires are important instruments to assess adherence to therapy, particularly in hypertension. A formal translation and cultural adaptation process ensures that the new version maintains the same concepts as the original. After translation, several changes were necessary to ensure that the questionnaire was understandable by elderly, low literacy patients, such as the majority of hypertensive patients. We propose a Portuguese version of the Hill-Bone Compliance Scale, which will require validation in further studies. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  19. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Diabetes Empowerment Scale – Short Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Figueredo Chaves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To translate, cross-culturally adapt and validate the Diabetes Empowerment Scale – Short Form for assessment of psychosocial self-efficacy in diabetes care within the Brazilian cultural context. METHODS Assessment of the instrument’s conceptual equivalence, as well as its translation and cross-cultural adaptation were performed following international standards. The Expert Committee’s assessment of the translated version was conducted through a web questionnaire developed and applied via the web tool e-Surv. The cross-culturally adapted version was used for the pre-test, which was carried out via phone call in a group of eleven health care service users diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pre-test results were examined by a group of experts, composed by health care consultants, applied linguists and statisticians, aiming at an adequate version of the instrument, which was subsequently used for test and retest in a sample of 100 users diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus via phone call, their answers being recorded by the web tool e-Surv. Internal consistency and reproducibility of analysis were carried out within the statistical programming environment R. RESULTS Face and content validity were attained and the Brazilian Portuguese version, entitled Escala de Autoeficácia em Diabetes – Versão Curta, was established. The scale had acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach’s alpha of 0.634 (95%CI 0.494– 0.737, while the correlation of the total score in the two periods was considered moderate (0.47. The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.50. CONCLUSIONS The translated and cross-culturally adapted version of the instrument to spoken Brazilian Portuguese was considered valid and reliable to be used for assessment within the Brazilian population diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The use of a web tool (e-Surv for recording the Expert Committee responses as well as the responses in the

  20. The translation of the Vertigo Symptom Scale into Afrikaans: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Rogers

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo is a common clinical problem that is challenging to diagnose and treat. While it has a broad range of aetiologies, the association between vestibular disturbance and anxiety is well established. The Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS is a questionnaire that assesses both dizziness and dizziness-related anxiety. The aim of this study was twofold. First, a translation of the VSS into Afrikaans was evaluated using the Delphi technique. Consensus was achieved within the Delphi rounds and a final tool was agreed upon. Second, the Afrikaans Vertigo Symptom Scales (AVSS was piloted on a sample of vertiginous and control participants. The results of the pilot study yielded significant statistical differences between the groups on both subscales of the tool (vertigo symptom scale and anxiety and autonomic symptom scale. Results suggest that the AVSS is able to identify patients with vertiginous disturbance and anxiety. The AVSS presents with good sensitivity and specificity as measured by the ROC curve. Clinical implications are discussed.

  1. Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12, translation, adaptation and validation for the Persian language population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhostin Ansari, Noureddin; Naghdi, Soofia; Mohammadi, Roghaye; Hasson, Scott

    2015-02-01

    The Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale-12 (MSWS-12) is a multi-item rating scale used to assess the perspectives of patients about the impact of MS on their walking ability. The aim of this study was to examine the reliability and validity of the MSWS-12 in Persian speaking patients with MS. The MSWS-12 questionnaire was translated into Persian language according to internationally adopted standards involving forward-backward translation, reviewed by an expert committee and tested on the pre-final version. In this cross-sectional study, 100 participants (50 patients with MS and 50 healthy subjects) were included. The MSWS-12 was administered twice 7 days apart to 30 patients with MS for test and retest reliability. Internal consistency reliability was Cronbach's α 0.96 for test and 0.97 for retest. There were no significant floor or ceiling effects. Test-retest reliability was excellent (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] agreement of 0.98, 95% CI, 0.95-0.99) confirming the reproducibility of the Persian MSWS-12. Construct validity using known group methods was demonstrated through a significant difference in the Persian MSWS-12 total score between the patients with MS and healthy subjects. Factor analysis extracted 2 latent factors (79.24% of the total variance). A second factor analysis suggested the 9-item Persian MSWS as a unidimensional scale for patients with MS. The Persian MSWS-12 was found to be valid and reliable for assessing walking ability in Persian speaking patients with MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Validity and Psychometric Properties of Malay Translated Religious Orientation Scale-Revised among Malaysian Adult Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Rahim Kamaluddin

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Religious Orientation Scale-Revised (ROS-R has been used increasingly as an important measure in psychology of religion based researches and widely administered in cross-cultural settings. Unfortunately, there is no valid and reliable ROS-R available in Malay language to assess religious orientations among Malaysians. With that in mind, the present study aims to validate and document the psychometric properties of Malay translated ROS-R (henceforth, M-ROS-R among sample of Malaysian adults. This study commenced with Forward-Backward translations and was followed by content and face validities. Subsequently, a cross-sectional study was conducted among Malaysian adults (n = 226 using convenience sampling method for the purpose of construct and factorial validations. Later, construct and factorial validity was performed via Exploratory Factor Analysis using Principal Component Analysis with Varimax rotation. Finally, reliability testing was performed to determine the internal consistency of the items which was achieved using Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient method (α. The factor loading consisted of three factors with a total variance of 64.76%. The final version of M-ROS-R consisted of 14 items with Factor 1 (Intrinsic Orientation comprised of 8 items, Factor 2 (Extrinsic-Socially Orientated with 3 items while Factor 3 (Extrinsic-Personally Orientated constituted 3 items. The internal consistency values of the factors ranged between 0.68 and 0.86, indicating the scale is reliable. The intercorrelations between factors were also significant with each other. M-ROS-R was concluded as a valid and reliable scale to measure and assess religious orientations among Malaysians.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics in a heterogeneous duopoly game with adjusting players and diseconomies of scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubiel-Teleszynski, Tomasz

    2011-01-01

    A repeated, discrete time, heterogeneous Cournot duopoly game with bounded rational and adaptive players adjusting the quantities of production is subject of investigation. Linear inverse demand function and quadratic cost functions reflecting decreasing returns to scale are assumed. The game is modeled with a system of two difference equations. Evolution of outputs over time is obtained by iteration of a two dimensional nonlinear map. Existing equilibria and their stability are analyzed. In face of diseconomies of scale, bounded rational and adaptive duopolists are shown to experience a decrease in the latitude of their output adjustment decisions with respect to the market stability compared to constant returns to scale and ceteris paribus. Chaotic dynamics is confirmed to depend mainly on the adjustment behavior of the bounded rational player, who if overshoots leaves the adaptive player with limited opportunities to stabilize the market again, hence industries facing diseconomies of scale are found to be less stable than those with constant marginal costs. Complexity of the dynamical system is examined by means of numerical simulations, where the paper extends the results of other authors who considered analogous games assuming linear cost functions. Intermittent transition to chaos and attractor merging crisis are shown among others.

  4. Finite-size scaling in the system of coupled oscillators with heterogeneity in coupling strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyunsuk

    2017-07-01

    We consider a mean-field model of coupled phase oscillators with random heterogeneity in the coupling strength. The system that we investigate here is a minimal model that contains randomness in diverse values of the coupling strength, and it is found to return to the original Kuramoto model [Y. Kuramoto, Prog. Theor. Phys. Suppl. 79, 223 (1984)10.1143/PTPS.79.223] when the coupling heterogeneity disappears. According to one recent paper [H. Hong, H. Chaté, L.-H. Tang, and H. Park, Phys. Rev. E 92, 022122 (2015)10.1103/PhysRevE.92.022122], when the natural frequency of the oscillator in the system is "deterministically" chosen, with no randomness in it, the system is found to exhibit the finite-size scaling exponent ν[over ¯]=5/4. Also, the critical exponent for the dynamic fluctuation of the order parameter is found to be given by γ=1/4, which is different from the critical exponents for the Kuramoto model with the natural frequencies randomly chosen. Originally, the unusual finite-size scaling behavior of the Kuramoto model was reported by Hong et al. [H. Hong, H. Chaté, H. Park, and L.-H. Tang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 184101 (2007)10.1103/PhysRevLett.99.184101], where the scaling behavior is found to be characterized by the unusual exponent ν[over ¯]=5/2. On the other hand, if the randomness in the natural frequency is removed, it is found that the finite-size scaling behavior is characterized by a different exponent, ν[over ¯]=5/4 [H. Hong, H. Chaté, L.-H. Tang, and H. Park, Phys. Rev. E 92, 022122 (2015)10.1103/PhysRevE.92.022122]. Those findings brought about our curiosity and led us to explore the effects of the randomness on the finite-size scaling behavior. In this paper, we pay particular attention to investigating the finite-size scaling and dynamic fluctuation when the randomness in the coupling strength is considered.

  5. Translation and validation of the De Jong Gierveld loneliness scale among older migrants living in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uysal-Bozkir, Ö; Fokkema, T.; MacNeil-Vroomen, J.L.; van Tilburg, T.G.; de Rooij, S.E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. We validate a translated version of the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale (DJGLS) for use among older migrants from Turkish and Moroccan descent and validate the original Dutch version of the same scale for Surinamese migrants in the Netherlands. Method. The data were derived from a

  6. Translation and Validation of the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale Among Older Migrants Living in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uysal-Bozkir, Ozgul; Fokkema, Tineke; MacNeil-Vroomen, Janet L.; Tilburg, Theo G. van; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: We validate a translated version of the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale (DJGLS) for use among older migrants from Turkish and Moroccan descent and validate the original Dutch version of the same scale for Surinamese migrants in the Netherlands. Method: The data were derived from a

  7. Error propagation in a forest succession model: The role of fine-scale heterogeneity in light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deutschman, D.H.; Levin, S.A.; Pacala, S.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

    1999-09-01

    A central challenge in ecology is understanding the emergence of broad-scale community and ecosystem patterns as the result of interactions among individuals. The authors identify the role of fine-scale light heterogeneity in controlling broad-scale community behavior in SORTIE, an empirically derived, stochastic forest simulation model. SORTIE employs a very detailed measure of local light based on a 216-point sample around every tree. They test the importance of this fine-scale description of local light by reformulating SORTIE with less detail in this algorithm. Predicted forests are compared at several scales from total tree biomass and patterns of forest succession to the local spatial pattern of light availability at the forest floor. SORTIE is surprisingly insensitive to the amount of detail used in the calculation of the local resource, light. In all simulations, 48- and 16-point samples accurately reproduce the local light environment and thus predict forest development without appreciable error. A one-point sample of light significantly alters the estimates of the local light environment, but the emergent forest dynamics are insensitive to these alterations. The robustness of the forest model to the altered light environment stems from two very different mechanisms. First, the alterations of the light environment have very short correlation lengths in time and space. This allows fine-scale averaging to occur on the landscape. Second, the functional relationships among light availability, growth rate, and mortality risk in several key species tend to prevent the altered light environment from affecting individual tree performance.

  8. Translation and equivalence assessment for a Japanese version of the modified Parental Nurturance Scale: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Griffiths Peter

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper reports on the modification of the Parental Nurturance Scale (PNS, translation of the modified version (PNSM from English to Japanese, and equivalence assessment between the PNSM and the translated version (PNSM-J. The PNS was modified so as to enable its use in nurturance studies where the prime source of nurturance might vary between respondents. Method It was translated into Japanese through the forward-backward translation procedure. With attempting to enhance representativeness of language in the target populations, translators used were married couples that consisted of a native English speaker and a native Japanese speaker. Multiple translations were produced and used to make a single Japanese version. A panel of reviewers identified problems in conceptual and semantic equivalence between the original and the translated versions. The Japanese version was altered accordingly with reference to alternate Japanese forms from the original English to Japanese translations. The altered translation was again re-translated into English and problematic differences were checked. This forward-backward process was repeated until satisfactory agreement was attained. The PNSM was administered to 222 native English speakers and the PNSM-J to 1320 native Japanese speakers. Results Factor analysis and target rotation revealed a nearly identical factor structure and factor loadings of the items of the PNSM and PNSM-J between the different cultural groups. High Cronbach's alpha coefficient supported the reliability of the test scores on both versions. Conclusion The equivalence between the two scales was supported. It is suggested that the PNSM and PNSM-J are suitable tools for comparative cross-cultural studies.

  9. Time scales in epigenetic dynamics and phenotypic heterogeneity of embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Sasai

    Full Text Available A remarkable feature of the self-renewing population of embryonic stem cells (ESCs is their phenotypic heterogeneity: Nanog and other marker proteins of ESCs show large cell-to-cell variation in their expression level, which should significantly influence the differentiation process of individual cells. The molecular mechanism and biological implication of this heterogeneity, however, still remain elusive. We address this problem by constructing a model of the core gene-network of mouse ESCs. The model takes account of processes of binding/unbinding of transcription factors, formation/dissolution of transcription apparatus, and modification of histone code at each locus of genes in the network. These processes are hierarchically interrelated to each other forming the dynamical feedback loops. By simulating stochastic dynamics of this model, we show that the phenotypic heterogeneity of ESCs can be explained when the chromatin at the Nanog locus undergoes the large scale reorganization in formation/dissolution of transcription apparatus, which should have the timescale similar to the cell cycle period. With this slow transcriptional switching of Nanog, the simulated ESCs fluctuate among multiple transient states, which can trigger the differentiation into the lineage-specific cell states. From the simulated transitions among cell states, the epigenetic landscape underlying transitions is calculated. The slow Nanog switching gives rise to the wide basin of ESC states in the landscape. The bimodal Nanog distribution arising from the kinetic flow running through this ESC basin prevents transdifferentiation and promotes the definite decision of the cell fate. These results show that the distribution of timescales of the regulatory processes is decisively important to characterize the fluctuation of cells and their differentiation process. The analyses through the epigenetic landscape and the kinetic flow on the landscape should provide a guideline to

  10. Pore-scale modelling of the combined effect of physical and chemical heterogeneity on reactive flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, T. D. S.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2016-12-01

    We perform direct numerical simulations to study the combined impact of physical and chemical heterogeneity in subsurface rock to provide insights into the source of the discrepancy observed between mineral dissolution rates observed in laboratory experiments and in field-scale natural systems. The ultimate goal of this work is to use pore-scale simulation to compute upscaled properties - such as effective reaction rate - for use in larger-scale models.We present a methodology to simulate multispecies reactive flow through pore-space images obtained from micro-tomography. Using the sequential non-iterative approach, we couple the simulation of the transport equations with an advanced geochemical solver designed specifically for applications that require sequential equilibrium calculations. This geochemical solver uses novel numerical methods for the solution of multiphase chemical equilibrium and kinetics problems in a well-stirred batch model. Our model assumes that reactions can be classified into fast reactions, which are considered to be in equilibrium, and slow reactions, considered to be controlled by kinetics. This assumption of partial equilibrium simplifies the problem by replacing differential equations with algebraic ones. We allow for chemical heterogeneity of the solid phase by associating each voxel to a different mineral and reaction rate. A steady-state flow problem is solved in the pore space using a finite volume method to calculate the velocity field. Then we solve an advection-diffusion equation for the concentration and, modelling each liquid voxel as a well-mixed batch with a solid wall where applicable, we calculate reaction using the aforementioned geochemical solver. Both fluid-fluid and fluid-solid reactions are considered, geometry changes due to dissolution and precipitation are taken into account, and the velocity field is updated. We present the validation tests for acidic brine injected into rock for a range of transport (P

  11. Translatome profiling: methods for genome-scale analysis of mRNA translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Helen A; Gerber, André P

    2016-01-01

    During the past decade, there has been a rapidly increased appreciation of the role of translation as a key regulatory node in gene expression. Thereby, the development of methods to infer the translatome, which refers to the entirety of mRNAs associated with ribosomes for protein synthesis, has facilitated the discovery of new principles and mechanisms of translation and expanded our view of the underlying logic of protein synthesis. Here, we review the three main methodologies for translatome analysis, and we highlight some of the recent discoveries made using each technique. We first discuss polysomal profiling, a classical technique that involves the separation of mRNAs depending on the number of bound ribosomes using a sucrose gradient, and which has been combined with global analysis tools such as DNA microarrays or high-throughput RNA sequencing to identify the RNAs in polysomal fractions. We then introduce ribosomal profiling, a recently established technique that enables the mapping of ribosomes along mRNAs at near-nucleotide resolution on a global scale. We finally refer to ribosome affinity purification techniques that are based on the cell-type-specific expression of tagged ribosomal proteins, allowing the capture of translatomes from specialized cells in organisms. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of these three main techniques in the pursuit of defining the translatome, and we speculate about future developments. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. [Spanish translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the ARMS-scale for measuring medication adherence in polypathological patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Bueno, Javier; Calvo-Cidoncha, Elena; Sevilla-Sánchez, Daniel; Espaulella-Panicot, Joan; Codina-Jané, Carles; Santos-Ramos, Bernardo

    2017-10-01

    Translate the ARMS scale into Spanish ensuring cross-cultural equivalence for measuring medication adherence in polypathological patients. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and pilot testing. Secondary hospital. (i)Forward and blind-back translations followed by cross-cultural adaptation through qualitative methodology to ensure conceptual, semantic and content equivalence between the original scale and the Spanish version. (ii)Pilot testing in non-institutionalized polypathological patients to assess the instrument for clarity. The Spanish version of the ARMS scale has been obtained. Overall scores from translators involved in forward and blind-back translations were consistent with a low difficulty for assuring conceptual equivalence between both languages. Pilot testing (cognitive debriefing) in a sample of 40 non-institutionalized polypathological patients admitted to an internal medicine department of a secondary hospital showed an excellent clarity. The ARMS-e scale is a Spanish-adapted version of the ARMS scale, suitable for measuring adherence in polypathological patients. Its structure enables a multidimensional approach of the lack of adherence allowing the implementation of individualized interventions guided by the barriers detected in every patient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanical measurements of heterogeneity and length scale effects in PEG-based hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Brian G.; Shapiro, Jenna M.; DelRio, Frank W.; Cook, Robert F.; Oyen, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal-probe spherical indentation load-relaxation experiments with a probe radius of 3 μm are conducted on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel materials to quantify their steady-state mechanical properties and time-dependent transport properties via a single experiment. PEG-based hydrogels are shown to be heterogeneous in both morphology and mechanical stiffness at this scale; a linear-harmonic interpolation of hyperelastic Mooney-Rivlin and Boussinesq flat-punch indentation models was used to describe the steady-state response of the hydrogels and determine upper and lower bounds for indentation moduli. Analysis of the transient load-relaxation response during displacement-controlled hold periods provides a means of extracting two time constants τ1 and τ2, where τ1 and τ2 are assigned to the viscoelastic and poroelastic properties, respectively. Large τ2 values at small indentation depths provide evidence of a non-equilibrium state characterized by a phenomenon that restricts poroelastic fluid flow through the material; for larger indentations, the variability in τ2 values decreases and pore sizes estimated from τ2 via indentation approach those measured via macroscopic swelling experiments. The contact probe methodology developed here provides a means of assessing hydrogel heterogeneity, including time-dependent mechanical and transport properties, and has potential implications in hydrogel biomedical and engineering applications. PMID:26255839

  14. Flow Kinematics and Lagrangian Mixing Dynamics in a Darcy Scale Heterogeneous Porous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, M.; de Barros, F.; Le Borgne, T.

    2013-12-01

    We study the mixing behavior of a solute blob that is transported through a two-dimensional Darcy scale heterogeneous porous medium. Flow heterogeneity is induced by spatial variability in hydraulic conductivity. The fundamental mechanism governing the evolution of the solute blob are the competition of the stretching and compression action within a fluid element, and diffusion. We formulate the transport problem in a Lagrangian framework and consider the motion of solute particles that form the blob, in the coordinate system attached to the fluid element on which it originates. The blob evolution is fully characterized by the time series of stretching and shear rates of the material segment in its own coordinate system. Associated stirring protocols, or spreading protocols may be different from the ones encountered in chaotic and turbulent flow and can be related to the evolution of center of mass velocities of an ensemble of solute blobs. The permeability variability is modeled using a stochastic approach, which renders the stretching and shear rate time series as stochastic processes. Theses stochastic series are investigated numerically using random walk particle tracking simulations, and quantified analytically in terms of multiplicative and additive stochastic processes for the strip elongation and shear deformation. In this stochastic framework, we study the ensemble concentration PDF, concentration entropy and scalar dissipation rate. We relate the mixing properties to the appearance of coherent structures as quantified by the Okubo-Weiss measure and its Lagrangian counterpart.

  15. Status of large-scale analysis of post-translational modifications by mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Cellular function can be controlled through the gene expression program but often protein post translations modifications (PTMs) provide a more precisely and elegant mechanism. Key functional roles of specific modification events for instance during the cell cycle have been known for decades......, with label-free methods showing particular promise. It is also becoming possible to determine the absolute occupancy or stoichiometry of PTMS sites on a large scale. Powerful software for the bioinformatic analysis of thousands of PTM sites has been developed. However, a complete inventory of sites has...... not been established for any PTM and this situation will persist into the foreseeable future. Furthermore, although PTM coverage by MS-based methods is impressive, it still needs to be improved, especially in tissues and in clinically relevant systems. The central challenge for the field is to develop...

  16. Translation and validation of the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) for use in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimori, Mina; Moerman, Nelly; Fukuhara, Shunichi; van Dam, F S A M; Muller, M J; Hanaoka, Kazuo; Yamada, Yoshitsugu

    2002-06-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a very common phenomenon that adversely affects a patient's physical and psychological outcome. To evaluate subjective complaints such as anxiety, use of a validated psychological instrument is essential. In this study, we translated, culturally adapted and validated the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) for use in Japan. One hundred and twenty-six preoperative patients participated in this cross-sectional study. The psychometric properties of the APAIS evaluated by factor analysis, correlation with the state-trait anxiety inventory (STAI) and Cronbach's alpha were very similar to those of the original Dutch and English versions. Female gender and a high information requirement were associated with high preoperative anxiety. In conclusion, the Japanese version of the APAIS is a valid and reliable instrument for screening Japanese patients for preoperative anxiety and information requirements. Female gender and high information requirement may be associated with high preoperative anxiety.

  17. Pore-scale simulations of concentration tails in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Palma, Paolo Roberto; Parmigiani, Andrea; Huber, Christian; Guyennon, Nicolas; Viotti, Paolo

    2017-10-01

    The retention of contaminants in the finest and less-conductive regions of natural aquifer is known to strongly affect the decontamination of polluted aquifers. In fact, contaminant transfer from low to high mobility regions at the back end of a contaminant plume (i.e. back diffusion) is responsible for the long-term release of contaminants during remediation operation. In this paper, we perform pore-scale calculations for the transport of contaminant through heterogeneous porous media composed of low and high mobility regions with two objectives: (i) study the effect of permeability contrast and solute transport conditions on the exchange of solutes between mobile and immobile regions and (ii) estimate the mass of contaminants sequestered in low mobility regions based on concentration breakthrough curves.

  18. Nanometer-Scale Heterogeneities of the Structure of Zirconium-Based Bulk Metallic Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor M. Mikhailovskij

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Structure of amorphous alloys ZrTiCuNiBe and ZrTiCuNiAl is studied by means of low-field ion and combined field-emission microscopy. In both alloys the structural heterogeneities of nanometer-scale are clearly revealed. The surface layers formed by field evaporation possess a cellular structure. The cells have polygonal shape with transverse size ranging from 2 nm to 20 nm. It is established that variance of the local energy of field evaporation is of 0%–5% in the cell body. A local minimum of the field evaporation energy is observed within the cell boundaries (intercluster boundaries. In the minimum the depth is measured to be of 0.8 eV.

  19. Uniform sampling of steady states in metabolic networks: heterogeneous scales and rounding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele De Martino

    Full Text Available The uniform sampling of convex polytopes is an interesting computational problem with many applications in inference from linear constraints, but the performances of sampling algorithms can be affected by ill-conditioning. This is the case of inferring the feasible steady states in models of metabolic networks, since they can show heterogeneous time scales. In this work we focus on rounding procedures based on building an ellipsoid that closely matches the sampling space, that can be used to define an efficient hit-and-run (HR Markov Chain Monte Carlo. In this way the uniformity of the sampling of the convex space of interest is rigorously guaranteed, at odds with non markovian methods. We analyze and compare three rounding methods in order to sample the feasible steady states of metabolic networks of three models of growing size up to genomic scale. The first is based on principal component analysis (PCA, the second on linear programming (LP and finally we employ the Lovazs ellipsoid method (LEM. Our results show that a rounding procedure dramatically improves the performances of the HR in these inference problems and suggest that a combination of LEM or LP with a subsequent PCA perform the best. We finally compare the distributions of the HR with that of two heuristics based on the Artificially Centered hit-and-run (ACHR, gpSampler and optGpSampler. They show a good agreement with the results of the HR for the small network, while on genome scale models present inconsistencies.

  20. Field testing the role of heterogeneity at the inter-well scale during two phase flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovorka, S. D.; Gulf Coast Carbon Center; Geoseq

    2011-12-01

    relative permeability evolution guide flow. Plume evolution was highly non-linear, demonstration dominance of preferential flow though fast paths. CO2 continued to access new flow paths as rate increased and through time; pressure was not linear with injection rate. Over a one year test period at the inter-well test scale, reservoir properties seem more important than either pressure or buoyancy in controlling plume evolution. Three intensively monitored two-phase injection experiments across ranges of inter-well reservoir heterogeneity and flow rate provide data to explore methods for bounding uncertainty. More than 20 fluid flow models from these tests have been or are being built to test approaches to history matching.

  1. Heterogeneity in ragweed pollen exposure is determined by plant composition at small spatial scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel S W; Carey, Tiffany S

    2014-07-01

    Pollen allergies are one of the most common health problems in the United States and over 20% of Americans are sensitized to the pollen produced by common ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia L.). Despite the importance of allergenic pollen to public health, no research has linked land use and plant populations to spatial heterogeneity in airborne pollen concentrations. In order to quantify these relationships and elucidate the processes which lead to pollen exposure, we surveyed ragweed stem density in Detroit (Michigan, USA) as a function of land use. We then deployed 34 pollen collectors throughout the city and recorded ragweed cover in the immediate vicinity of each pollen collector. We found that ragweed populations were highest in vacant lots, a common land cover type in Detroit. Because ragweed population density was so strongly correlated to vacant lots, for which spatially explicit data were available, we were able to investigate whether observed ragweed pollen concentrations were a function of land use at the spatial scales of 10 m and 1 km. Both relationships were significant, and the combination of these two variables predicts a large portion of airborne ragweed pollen concentrations (R(2)=0.48). These results emphasize the important role of pollen production within the urban environment and show that management of allergenic pollen producing plants must be considered at multiple spatial scales. Our findings also demonstrate that there is too much spatial heterogeneity for a pollen collector at any given site to portray the allergenic pollen load experienced by different individuals within the same city. Finally, we discuss how spatial correlations between socio-economic status, vacant lots, and ragweed could help to explain the disproportionate amount of allergies and ragweed sensitization experienced by low income and minority populations in Detroit. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effects of heterogeneity in site-site couplings for tight-binding models on scale-invariant structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bingjia; Xie, Pinchen; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2017-11-01

    We studied the thermodynamic behaviors of non-interacting bosons and fermions trapped by a scale-invariant branching structure of adjustable degree of heterogeneity. The full energy spectrum in tight-binding approximation was analytically solved. We found that the log-periodic oscillation of the specific heat for Fermi gas depended on the heterogeneity of hopping. Also, low dimensional Bose-Einstein condensation occurred only for non-homogeneous setup.

  3. Spatial heterogeneity and scale?dependent habitat selection for two sympatric raptors in mixed?grass prairie

    OpenAIRE

    Atuo, Fidelis Akunke; O'Connell, Timothy John

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Sympatric predators are predicted to partition resources, especially under conditions of food limitation. Spatial heterogeneity that influences prey availability might play an important role in the scales at which potential competitors select habitat. We assessed potential mechanisms for coexistence by examining the role of heterogeneity in resource partitioning between sympatric raptors overwintering in the southern Great Plains. We conducted surveys for wintering Red?tailed hawk (B...

  4. The Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE: translation and validation study of the Iranian version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaedi Gholam

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE is a commonly used instrument to measure social anxiety. This study aimed to translate and to test the reliability and validity of the BFNE in Iran. Methods The English language version of the BFNE was translated into Persian (Iranian language and was used in this study. The questionnaire was administered to a consecutive sample of 235 students with (n = 33, clinical group and without social phobia (n = 202, non-clinical group. In addition to the BFNE, two standard instruments were used to measure social phobia severity: the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN, and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS. All participants completed a brief background information questionnaire, the SPIN, the SIAS and the BFNE scales. Statistical analysis was performed to test the reliability and validity of the BFNE. Results In all 235 students were studied (111 male and 124 female. The mean age for non-clinical group was 22.2 (SD = 2.1 years and for clinical sample it was 22.4 (SD = 1.8 years. Cronbach's alpha coefficient (to test reliability was acceptable for both non-clinical and clinical samples (α = 0.90 and 0.82 respectively. In addition, 3-week test-retest reliability was performed in non-clinical sample and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was quite high (ICC = 0.71. Validity as performed using convergent and discriminant validity showed satisfactory results. The questionnaire correlated well with established measures of social phobia such as the SPIN (r = 0.43, p Conclusion This validation study of the Iranian version of BFNE proved that it is an acceptable, reliable and valid measure of social phobia. However, since the scale showed a two-factor structure and this does not confirm to the theoretical basis for the BFNE, thus we suggest the use of the BFNE-II when it becomes available in Iran. The validation study of the BFNE-II is in progress.

  5. The Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE): translation and validation study of the Iranian version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavoli, Azadeh; Melyani, Mahdiyeh; Bakhtiari, Maryam; Ghaedi, Gholam Hossein; Montazeri, Ali

    2009-01-01

    Background The Brief Fear of Negative Evaluation Scale (BFNE) is a commonly used instrument to measure social anxiety. This study aimed to translate and to test the reliability and validity of the BFNE in Iran. Methods The English language version of the BFNE was translated into Persian (Iranian language) and was used in this study. The questionnaire was administered to a consecutive sample of 235 students with (n = 33, clinical group) and without social phobia (n = 202, non-clinical group). In addition to the BFNE, two standard instruments were used to measure social phobia severity: the Social Phobia Inventory (SPIN), and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS). All participants completed a brief background information questionnaire, the SPIN, the SIAS and the BFNE scales. Statistical analysis was performed to test the reliability and validity of the BFNE. Results In all 235 students were studied (111 male and 124 female). The mean age for non-clinical group was 22.2 (SD = 2.1) years and for clinical sample it was 22.4 (SD = 1.8) years. Cronbach's alpha coefficient (to test reliability) was acceptable for both non-clinical and clinical samples (α = 0.90 and 0.82 respectively). In addition, 3-week test-retest reliability was performed in non-clinical sample and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was quite high (ICC = 0.71). Validity as performed using convergent and discriminant validity showed satisfactory results. The questionnaire correlated well with established measures of social phobia such as the SPIN (r = 0.43, p social phobia in the expected direction. Factor analysis supported a two-factor solution corresponding to positive and reverse-worded items. Conclusion This validation study of the Iranian version of BFNE proved that it is an acceptable, reliable and valid measure of social phobia. However, since the scale showed a two-factor structure and this does not confirm to the theoretical basis for the BFNE, thus we suggest the use of the

  6. Effect of small-scale heterogeneities on interpretation of crustal compositions exemplified by a layered anorthosite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprich, J.; Vrijmoed, J. C.

    2015-02-01

    The composition of the lower crust has a significant effect on geodynamic processes because it influences physical rock properties such as densities and seismic velocities. Compositional differences in lower crustal rocks are potentially large and exist on the scales of centimeters up to kilometers resulting in non-unique seismic and gravity data. While larger heterogeneities can be detected as reflections on seismic profiles, irregular small-scale compositional variations are not likely to be discovered, but will influence the averaged seismic velocities and densities of an area. The extent and effects of such small-scale heterogeneities are explored on an exposed high-grade layered anorthositic body by providing a detailed field map, petrological descriptions, pycnometry measurements as well as whole rock and mineral analyses combined with thermodynamic phase equilibria calculations. To evaluate the results of our thermodynamic calculations, densities and mineral modes obtained from the modeled phase equilibria are compared to measured densities and estimated mineral modes from rock samples. The proportion of mafic to ultramafic (plagioclase-poor) rocks in the mapped field area amounts to 10-15% but higher proportions of these rock types in the lower crust are feasible. To further study the effects of compositional variations, we have generated mixtures of mafic to ultramafic and anorthositic/intermediate rocks until the average properties of these mixtures are comparable to those of mafic granulites (3000-3100 kg/m3; 7.1-7.3 km/s). Mixtures of anorthosite with 40-45% and of tonalite with 50-60% high-grade mafic to ultramafic rocks yield average densities and seismic velocities similar to mafic granulites although they still contain 50-60 vol.% plagioclase. Hence small-scale mixing of certain rock types may result in the overestimation of the proportion of mafic (garnet) granulites in the lithologic interpretation of crustal compositions from seismic data. Since

  7. Spatial heterogeneity of Cs-137 soil contamination at the landscape scale of the Bryansk Region (Russia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, Alexander; Sokolov, Anton; Linnik, Vitaly

    2016-04-01

    The passage of the Chernobyl plume over the Bryansk region (Russia) in the end of April 1986 led to the deposition of radionuclides on the ground by wet and dry deposition processes. According to the results of the Cs-137 air gamma survey (AGS, grid size: 100 m x100 m), which was conducted in summer 1993, it was shown that the processes of Cs-137 lateral migration took place due to nearly a fourfold increase of Cs-137 in the lower slope as compared to the upper part of the slope during a seven-year period after the Chernobyl accident. The variability patterns of Cs-137 could be described by a stochastic or a deterministic function of the measurement location. The patterns variations could be associated with the nonlinear response of many interacting variables within the landscape system. In the test area located at a distance of about 280 km from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cs-137 surface activity typically ranges from below 7 kBq/m2 to approximately 50-60 kBq/m2 reflecting the combination of deposition due to global fallout from the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, and the relatively low levels of Chernobyl deposition to the area. To model the Cs-137 distribution depending on complex landscape attributes the following information layers were used: 1) the soil map at the scale of 1:50,000; 2) SRTM elevation data acquired from the Global Land Cover Facility at a 3 arc second resolution. Fundamental difficulties in distributed erosion modelling arise from the natural complexity of landscape systems and Cs-137 spatial heterogeneity. The SRTM DEM of the test site has a grid size about 90 m, which is not sufficient for distributed hydrological modelling at the landscape scale. The scaling problem arises because of the mismatch between SRTM DEM pixel dimensions and the size of erosion network (width about 10-50 m) that concentrates Cs-137 run-off from the overlying slopes and watershed areas. To build a hydrologically correct local drain direction (LDD) with

  8. Pore-scale investigation on the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in heterogeneous soils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Liu, Chongxuan; Todd-Brown, Katherine E.; Liu, Yuanyuan; Bond-Lamberty, Ben; Bailey, Vanessa L.

    2016-11-15

    The relationship between microbial respiration rate and soil moisture content is an important property for understanding and predicting soil organic carbon degradation, CO2 production and emission, and their subsequent effects on climate change. This paper reports a pore-scale modeling study to investigate the response of heterotrophic respiration to moisture conditions in soils and to evaluate various factors that affect this response. X-ray computed tomography was used to derive soil pore structures, which were then used for pore-scale model investigation. The pore-scale results were then averaged to calculate the effective respiration rates as a function of water content in soils. The calculated effective respiration rate first increases and then decreases with increasing soil water content, showing a maximum respiration rate at water saturation degree of 0.75 that is consistent with field and laboratory observations. The relationship between the respiration rate and moisture content is affected by various factors, including pore-scale organic carbon bioavailability, the rate of oxygen delivery, soil pore structure and physical heterogeneity, soil clay content, and microbial drought resistivity. Simulations also illustrates that a larger fraction of CO2 produced from microbial respiration can be accumulated inside soil cores under higher saturation conditions, implying that CO2 flux measured on the top of soil cores may underestimate or overestimate true soil respiration rates under dynamic moisture conditions. Overall, this study provides mechanistic insights into the soil respiration response to the change in moisture conditions, and reveals a complex relationship between heterotrophic microbial respiration rate and moisture content in soils that is affected by various hydrological, geochemical, and biophysical factors.

  9. Scale dependent importance of spatial heterogeneity in biogeochemical cycling at aquifer-river interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Stefan; Blaen, Phillip; Hannah, David; Romejn, Paul; Gomez, Jesus; Kurz, Marie; Fleckenstein, Jan; Schmidt, Christian; Zarnetske, Jay; Cullin, Joe; Ward, Adam; Marti, Eugenia; Drummond, Jennifer; Schmadel, Noah; Knapp, Julia; Klaar, Megan; Mendoza, Clara

    2016-04-01

    The transport and transformation of carbon and nitrogen across aquifer - river interfaces are significantly altered along the streambed passage. Recent investigations have substantially improved the understanding of controls on streambed biogeochemical cycling, outlining a critical impact of exchange fluxes, temporal and spatial coincidence of reaction partners and streambed residence time distributions. Still, there is little understanding of the drivers of the widely observed strong spatial and temporal variability of interlinked carbon and nitrogen turnover at aquifer-river interfaces, including hotspots (locations) and hot moments (time periods) of increased reactivity. Previous research, predominantly with a surface water perspective, has mainly focused on the impact of bedform controlled hyporheic exchange fluxes and the chemical transformation of surface solutes transported along a hyporheic flow path. While such studies may explain nutrient turnover in the hyporheic zones of low-order streams in rather pristine headwater catchments, they fail to explain observations of spatially and temporally more variable nutrient turnover in streambeds with higher structural heterogeneity and relevant concentrations of autochthonous carbon and nitrogen. Here we combine laboratory, field and numerical modeling experiments from plot to stream reach/subcatchment scales to quantify the impacts of variability in physical and biogeochemical streambed properties on hyporheic nutrient (C, N, O) cycling. At the plot scale, hotspots of biogeochemical cycling have been found to be associated with peat and clay layers within streambed sediments, representing areas of significantly increased residence times and oxygen consumption what results in enhanced microbial metabolic activity and nitrogen removal capacity. We present distributed sensor network based up-scaling methods that allow identification of such features at larger reach scale. Numerical modeling based generalization

  10. Gravity-destabilized nonwetting phase invasion in macro-heterogeneous porous media: Experimental observations of invasion dynamics and scale analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.; CONRAD,STEPHEN H.; PEPLINSKI,WILLIAM J.

    1999-02-16

    The authors designed and conducted experiments in a heterogeneous sand pack where gravity-destabilized nonwetting phase invasion (CO{sub 2} and TCE) could be recorded using high resolution light transmission methods. The heterogeneity structure was designed to be reminiscent of fluvial channel lag cut-and-fill architecture and contain a series of capillary barriers. As invasion progressed, nonwetting phase structure developed a series of fingers and pools; behind the growing front they found nonwetting phase saturation to pulsate in certain regions when viscous forces were low. Through a scale analysis, they derive a series of length scales that describe finger diameter, pool height and width, and regions where pulsation occurs within a heterogeneous porous medium. In all cases, they find that the intrinsic pore scale nature of the invasion process and resulting structure must be incorporated into the analysis to explain experimental results. The authors propose a simple macro-scale structural growth model that assembles length scales for sub-structures to delineate nonwetting phase migration from a source into a heterogeneous domain. For such a model applied at the field scale for DNAPL migration, they expect capillary and gravity forces within the complex subsurface lithology to play the primary roles with viscous forces forming a perturbation on the inviscid phase structure.

  11. Fine-Scale Spatial Heterogeneity in the Distribution of Waterborne Protozoa in a Drinking Water Reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnet, Jean-Baptiste; Ogorzaly, Leslie; Penny, Christian; Cauchie, Henry-Michel

    2015-09-23

    The occurrence of faecal pathogens in drinking water resources constitutes a threat to the supply of safe drinking water, even in industrialized nations. To efficiently assess and monitor the risk posed by these pathogens, sampling deserves careful design, based on preliminary knowledge on their distribution dynamics in water. For the protozoan pathogens Cryptosporidium and Giardia, only little is known about their spatial distribution within drinking water supplies, especially at fine scale. Two-dimensional distribution maps were generated by sampling cross-sections at meter resolution in two different zones of a drinking water reservoir. Samples were analysed for protozoan pathogens as well as for E. coli, turbidity and physico-chemical parameters. Parasites displayed heterogeneous distribution patterns, as reflected by significant (oo)cyst density gradients along reservoir depth. Spatial correlations between parasites and E. coli were observed near the reservoir inlet but were absent in the downstream lacustrine zone. Measurements of surface and subsurface flow velocities suggest a role of local hydrodynamics on these spatial patterns. This fine-scale spatial study emphasizes the importance of sampling design (site, depth and position on the reservoir) for the acquisition of representative parasite data and for optimization of microbial risk assessment and monitoring. Such spatial information should prove useful to the modelling of pathogen transport dynamics in drinking water supplies.

  12. Fine-Scale Spatial Heterogeneity in the Distribution of Waterborne Protozoa in a Drinking Water Reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Burnet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The occurrence of faecal pathogens in drinking water resources constitutes a threat to the supply of safe drinking water, even in industrialized nations. To efficiently assess and monitor the risk posed by these pathogens, sampling deserves careful design, based on preliminary knowledge on their distribution dynamics in water. For the protozoan pathogens Cryptosporidium and Giardia, only little is known about their spatial distribution within drinking water supplies, especially at fine scale. Methods: Two-dimensional distribution maps were generated by sampling cross-sections at meter resolution in two different zones of a drinking water reservoir. Samples were analysed for protozoan pathogens as well as for E. coli, turbidity and physico-chemical parameters. Results: Parasites displayed heterogeneous distribution patterns, as reflected by significant (oocyst density gradients along reservoir depth. Spatial correlations between parasites and E. coli were observed near the reservoir inlet but were absent in the downstream lacustrine zone. Measurements of surface and subsurface flow velocities suggest a role of local hydrodynamics on these spatial patterns. Conclusion: This fine-scale spatial study emphasizes the importance of sampling design (site, depth and position on the reservoir for the acquisition of representative parasite data and for optimization of microbial risk assessment and monitoring. Such spatial information should prove useful to the modelling of pathogen transport dynamics in drinking water supplies.

  13. Basin-scale heterogeneity in Antarctic precipitation and its impact on surface mass variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Fyke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Annually averaged precipitation in the form of snow, the dominant term of the Antarctic Ice Sheet surface mass balance, displays large spatial and temporal variability. Here we present an analysis of spatial patterns of regional Antarctic precipitation variability and their impact on integrated Antarctic surface mass balance variability simulated as part of a preindustrial 1800-year global, fully coupled Community Earth System Model simulation. Correlation and composite analyses based on this output allow for a robust exploration of Antarctic precipitation variability. We identify statistically significant relationships between precipitation patterns across Antarctica that are corroborated by climate reanalyses, regional modeling and ice core records. These patterns are driven by variability in large-scale atmospheric moisture transport, which itself is characterized by decadal- to centennial-scale oscillations around the long-term mean. We suggest that this heterogeneity in Antarctic precipitation variability has a dampening effect on overall Antarctic surface mass balance variability, with implications for regulation of Antarctic-sourced sea level variability, detection of an emergent anthropogenic signal in Antarctic mass trends and identification of Antarctic mass loss accelerations.

  14. Population genomics reveals chromosome-scale heterogeneous evolution in a protoploid yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Anne; Jung, Paul; Reisser, Cyrielle; Fischer, Gilles; Schacherer, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Yeast species represent an ideal model system for population genomic studies but large-scale polymorphism surveys have only been reported for species of the Saccharomyces genus so far. Hence, little is known about intraspecific diversity and evolution in yeast. To obtain a new insight into the evolutionary forces shaping natural populations, we sequenced the genomes of an expansive worldwide collection of isolates from a species distantly related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Lachancea kluyveri (formerly S. kluyveri). We identified 6.5 million single nucleotide polymorphisms and showed that a large introgression event of 1 Mb of GC-rich sequence in the chromosomal arm probably occurred in the last common ancestor of all L. kluyveri strains. Our population genomic data clearly revealed that this 1-Mb region underwent a molecular evolution pattern very different from the rest of the genome. It is characterized by a higher recombination rate, with a dramatically elevated A:T → G:C substitution rate, which is the signature of an increased GC-biased gene conversion. In addition, the predicted base composition at equilibrium demonstrates that the chromosome-scale compositional heterogeneity will persist after the genome has reached mutational equilibrium. Altogether, the data presented herein clearly show that distinct recombination and substitution regimes can coexist and lead to different evolutionary patterns within a single genome. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS). Translation and validation in Spanish language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Noemí; Ciaravino, Octavio; Zambrano, Olga; Villena, Rita; Beltran-Aguilar, Eugenio; Squassi, Aldo

    2012-01-01

    Health is currently recognized as lying in the individual process rooted in genes, personal habits, the social model and the understanding of the ideological standpoint from which it is viewed. The aim of this study was to validate the Early Childhood Oral Health Impact Scale (ECOHIS) for use in Latin American communities, in order to demonstrate its efficacy for determining the impact of dental condition on children under 5 years of age and their families. The ECOHIS explores two domains: impact on children (9 questions) and on families (4 questions). Validation in Spanish was done in four stages. Stage I included translation and back-translation of the questionnaire (English-Spanish-English). Stage II was a pilot test on families in Venezuela to test stability (test-retest) and make semantic adjustments. Stage III included validation of the questionnaire applied to a Venezuelan sample (n = 50) and two Argentine samples (A and B, made up of families with and without social risk, respectively; n = 95), and consisted of statistical analysis to check the questionnaire's internal consistency and discriminant capacity. In the final stage, parents were given feedback on the results and significance of each domain in the questionnaire. From the results of this study it may be concluded that the Spanish version of the ECOHIS was reliable and valid for administering to populations with homogeneous social risk, and that parents without social risk factors (AC/B) have significantly greater perception of the impact of oral health on the family's quality of life. The trends recorded suggest that (a) larger samples should be used, including variables for diagnosing social vulnerability or general risk, (b) the association with dental condition should be established by applying indicators to discriminate distinct cut-off points in the dental caries process and (c) it should be ascertained whether there are changes in perception of the impact on quality of life before and after

  16. Up scaling two-phase flow in heterogeneous porous media; Mise a l'echelle des ecoulements diphasiques dans les milieux poreux heterogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artus, V.

    2003-11-01

    For two-phase flow in heterogeneous media, the emergence of different flow regimes at large-scale is driven by local interactions between the viscous coupling and the heterogeneity. In particular, when the viscosity ratio is favorable, viscous effects induce a transverse flow that stabilizes the front while flooding. However, most of recent stochastic models neglect the influence of the viscous coupling. We developed a stochastic model for the dynamics of the front, taking the viscous coupling into account. For stable cases, this model relates the statistical properties of the front to the statistical properties of the permeability field. For stable flow in stratified media, we show that the front is stationary by parts in the reservoir. These parts can be identified as large-scale hydrodynamic layers and separately coarsened in the large-scale simulation model. For flows with favorable viscosity ratios in isotropic reservoirs, we show that a stationary front occurs, in a statistical sense. For unfavorable viscosity ratios, the flow is driven by the development of viscous fingering. These different regimes lead to different large-scale saturation profiles that can be matched with a macro-dispersion equation, if the effective convective flux is modified to take into account stabilizing or destabilizing viscous effects. (author)

  17. [Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12) into Brazilian Portuguese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Leandro Alberto Calazans; Baitelli, Carolinne; Alvarenga, Regina Maria Papais; Thuler, Luiz Claudio Santos

    2012-05-01

    Poor walking performance is predictive of heart disease and osteoporosis and increases the risk of death in the elderly. Gait and vision have been identified as the most valuable physical functions according to multiple sclerosis patients' perceptions. The objective of this study was to perform a translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale (MSWS-12) into Brazilian Portuguese. A study of cross-cultural adaptation was conducted in ten steps. Participation in the study included four translators, two back-translators, twelve medical experts, twelve patients, twelve healthy subjects, and a Portuguese language expert. Only the question "Did standing make it more difficult to do things?" posed difficulty in the translation process. Maximum time for completion was less than three minutes (171 seconds). Internal consistency analyses showed high reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.94). The content validation and internal consistency stages were completed satisfactorily.

  18. Factors associated with high heterogeneity of malaria at fine spatial scale in the Western Kenyan highlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baidjoe, Amrish Y; Stevenson, Jennifer; Knight, Philip; Stone, William; Stresman, Gillian; Osoti, Victor; Makori, Euniah; Owaga, Chrispin; Odongo, Wycliffe; China, Pauline; Shagari, Shehu; Kariuki, Simon; Drakeley, Chris; Cox, Jonathan; Bousema, Teun

    2016-06-04

    The East African highlands are fringe regions between stable and unstable malaria transmission. What factors contribute to the heterogeneity of malaria exposure on different spatial scales within larger foci has not been extensively studied. In a comprehensive, community-based cross-sectional survey an attempt was made to identify factors that drive the macro- and micro epidemiology of malaria in a fringe region using parasitological and serological outcomes. A large cross-sectional survey including 17,503 individuals was conducted across all age groups in a 100 km(2) area in the Western Kenyan highlands of Rachuonyo South district. Households were geo-located and prevalence of malaria parasites and malaria-specific antibodies were determined by PCR and ELISA. Household and individual risk-factors were recorded. Geographical characteristics of the study area were digitally derived using high-resolution satellite images. Malaria antibody prevalence strongly related to altitude (1350-1600 m, p malaria infections were apparently asymptomatic. Malaria parasite prevalence was associated with age, bed net use, house construction features, altitude and topographical wetness index. Antibody prevalence was associated with all these factors and distance to the nearest water body. Altitude was a major driver of malaria transmission in this study area, even across narrow altitude bands. The large proportion of asymptomatic parasite carriers at all altitudes and the age-dependent acquisition of malaria antibodies indicate stable malaria transmission; the strong correlation between current parasite carriage and serological markers of malaria exposure indicate temporal stability of spatially heterogeneous transmission.

  19. Base Station Placement Algorithm for Large-Scale LTE Heterogeneous Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungseob Lee

    Full Text Available Data traffic demands in cellular networks today are increasing at an exponential rate, giving rise to the development of heterogeneous networks (HetNets, in which small cells complement traditional macro cells by extending coverage to indoor areas. However, the deployment of small cells as parts of HetNets creates a key challenge for operators' careful network planning. In particular, massive and unplanned deployment of base stations can cause high interference, resulting in highly degrading network performance. Although different mathematical modeling and optimization methods have been used to approach various problems related to this issue, most traditional network planning models are ill-equipped to deal with HetNet-specific characteristics due to their focus on classical cellular network designs. Furthermore, increased wireless data demands have driven mobile operators to roll out large-scale networks of small long term evolution (LTE cells. Therefore, in this paper, we aim to derive an optimum network planning algorithm for large-scale LTE HetNets. Recently, attempts have been made to apply evolutionary algorithms (EAs to the field of radio network planning, since they are characterized as global optimization methods. Yet, EA performance often deteriorates rapidly with the growth of search space dimensionality. To overcome this limitation when designing optimum network deployments for large-scale LTE HetNets, we attempt to decompose the problem and tackle its subcomponents individually. Particularly noting that some HetNet cells have strong correlations due to inter-cell interference, we propose a correlation grouping approach in which cells are grouped together according to their mutual interference. Both the simulation and analytical results indicate that the proposed solution outperforms the random-grouping based EA as well as an EA that detects interacting variables by monitoring the changes in the objective function algorithm in terms

  20. Base Station Placement Algorithm for Large-Scale LTE Heterogeneous Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungseob; Lee, SuKyoung; Kim, Kyungsoo; Kim, Yoon Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Data traffic demands in cellular networks today are increasing at an exponential rate, giving rise to the development of heterogeneous networks (HetNets), in which small cells complement traditional macro cells by extending coverage to indoor areas. However, the deployment of small cells as parts of HetNets creates a key challenge for operators' careful network planning. In particular, massive and unplanned deployment of base stations can cause high interference, resulting in highly degrading network performance. Although different mathematical modeling and optimization methods have been used to approach various problems related to this issue, most traditional network planning models are ill-equipped to deal with HetNet-specific characteristics due to their focus on classical cellular network designs. Furthermore, increased wireless data demands have driven mobile operators to roll out large-scale networks of small long term evolution (LTE) cells. Therefore, in this paper, we aim to derive an optimum network planning algorithm for large-scale LTE HetNets. Recently, attempts have been made to apply evolutionary algorithms (EAs) to the field of radio network planning, since they are characterized as global optimization methods. Yet, EA performance often deteriorates rapidly with the growth of search space dimensionality. To overcome this limitation when designing optimum network deployments for large-scale LTE HetNets, we attempt to decompose the problem and tackle its subcomponents individually. Particularly noting that some HetNet cells have strong correlations due to inter-cell interference, we propose a correlation grouping approach in which cells are grouped together according to their mutual interference. Both the simulation and analytical results indicate that the proposed solution outperforms the random-grouping based EA as well as an EA that detects interacting variables by monitoring the changes in the objective function algorithm in terms of system

  1. A greater foraging scale, not a higher foraging precision, may facilitate invasion by exotic plants in nutrient-heterogeneous conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bao-Ming; Su, Jin-Quan; Liao, Hui-Xuan; Peng, Shao-Lin

    2017-12-22

    Soil nutrient heterogeneity has been proposed to influence competitive outcomes among different plant species. Thus, it is crucial to understand the effects of environmental heterogeneity on competition between exotic invasive and native species. However, the effects of soil nutrient heterogeneity on the competition between invasive and native plants have rarely been linked to root foraging behaviour. In this study, a competition experiment was performed with two invasive-native species pairs (BP-VC, Bidens pilosa vs. Vernonia cinerea; MM-PS, Mikania micrantha vs. Paederia scandens) grown under homogeneous and heterogeneous conditions in a common greenhouse environment. Root activity was assessed by determining the amount of strontium (Sr) taken up by the shoot of each species. The invasive species exhibited a greater foraging scale, whereas the native species exhibited a higher foraging precision. A trade-off between foraging scale and precision was observed within each pair of invasive-native species. Compared with soil homogeneity, soil heterogeneity significantly increased the biomass of the two invasive species, B. pilosa and M. micrantha, under competitive conditions. Within each pair, the invasive species exhibited greater relative competitive ability with respect to shoot mass, and considerably more Sr taken up by the invasive species compared with the native species. The Sr acquisition results indicate that nutrient-poor conditions may facilitate the competitive ability of the native species V. cinerea, whereas M. micrantha may possess a stronger competitive ability regardless of soil nutrient conditions. Soil nutrient heterogeneity has the potential to promote the invasion of these two exotic species due to their larger foraging scale, stronger competitive ability and greater root activity relative to their counterpart native species. The present work highlights the importance of soil heterogeneity in plant invasion, particularly with regards to root

  2. The Forgotten Half of Program Evaluation: A Focus on the Translation of Rating Scales for Use with Hispanic Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Shannon J.; Sitnick, Stephanie L.; Onati, Lenna L.

    2012-01-01

    Extension professionals often work with diverse clientele; however, most assessment tools have been developed and validated with English-speaking samples. There is little research and practical guidance on the cultural adaptation and translation of rating scales. The purpose of this article is to summarize the methodological work in this area as…

  3. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and applicability of the Brazilian version of the Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Bento Lima-Silva

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Background: Staging scales for dementia have been devised for grading Alzheimer's disease (AD but do not include the specific symptoms of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. Objective: To translate and adapt the Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS to Brazilian Portuguese. Methods: The cross-cultural adaptation process consisted of the following steps: translation, back-translation (prepared by independent translators, discussion with specialists, and development of a final version after minor adjustments. A pilot application was carried out with 12 patients diagnosed with bvFTD and 11 with AD, matched for disease severity (CDR=1.0. The evaluation protocol included: Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination-Revised (ACE-R, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE, Executive Interview (EXIT-25, Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI, Frontotemporal Dementia Rating Scale (FTD-FRS and Clinical Dementia Rating scale (CDR. Results: The Brazilian version of the FTD-FRS seemed appropriate for use in this country. Preliminary results revealed greater levels of disability in bvFTD than in AD patients (bvFTD: 25% mild, 50% moderate and 25% severe; AD: 36.36% mild, 63.64% moderate. It appears that the CDR underrates disease severity in bvFTD since a relevant proportion of patients rated as having mild dementia (CDR=1.0 in fact had moderate or severe levels of disability according to the FTD-FRS. Conclusion: The Brazilian version of the FTD-FRS seems suitable to aid staging and determining disease progression.

  4. Translation, Revision, and Validation of the Diabetes Distress Scale for Indonesian Type 2 Diabetic Outpatients with Various Types of Complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arifin, Bustanul; Perwitasari, Dyah Aryani; Thobari, Jarir At; Cao, Qi; Krabbe, Paul F M; Postma, Maarten J

    OBJECTIVES: To translate, revise, and validate the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS) instrument for Indonesian type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) outpatients with various complications. METHODS: Participants were recruited from four hospitals and two primary health care centers. The study was performed

  5. Translation, adaptation and validation of the diabetes distress scale for Indonesian diabetic outpatients with various types of complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arifin, B.; Perwitasari, D.; Atthobari, J.; Cao, Q.; Krabbe, P.F.; Postma, M.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To translate, adapt and validate the Diabetes Distress Scale (DDS) instrument for Indonesian type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) outpatients with various types of complications. Methods: Participants were recruited from four hospitals and two primary healthcare facilities. The procedure of

  6. Translating Inclusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fallov, Mia Arp; Birk, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to explore how practices of translation shape particular paths of inclusion for people living in marginalized residential areas in Denmark. Inclusion, we argue, is not an end-state, but rather something which must be constantly performed. Active citizenship, today......, is not merely a question of participation, but of learning to become active in all spheres of life. The paper draws on empirical examples from a multi-sited field work in 6 different sites of local community work in Denmark, to demonstrate how different dimensions of translation are involved in shaping active...... citizenship. We propose the following different dimensions of translation: translating authority, translating language, translating social problems. The paper takes its theoretical point of departure from assemblage urbanism, arguing that cities are heterogeneous assemblages of socio-material interactions...

  7. The Persian version of Trinity Amputation and Prosthetics Experience Scale: translation, factor structure, reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazaheri, Masood; Fardipour, Shima; Salavati, Mahyar; Hadadi, Mohammad; Negahban, Hossein; Bahramizadeh, Mahmood; Khosrozadeh, Fatemeh

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to translate the Trinity Amputation and Prosthetics Experience Scale (TAPES) into Persian and to investigate its psychometric properties. A sample of 182 Persian-speaker individuals with lower limb amputation completed the TAPES questionnaire, of whom 103 individuals completed the Short Form 36 Health survey as well. The TAPES was re-administered to 41 participants in the retest session, with an interval of 5-7 days between the two sessions. Internal consistency, test-retest reproducibility, dimensionality, item internal consistency and discriminant validity and construct validity were assessed. Cronbach's α's were greater than the cut-off point of 0.70 for all subscales with the exception of social adjustment subscale. Minimum intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.70 was exceeded by all subscales with the exception of social activity subscale. Principle component analysis performed on each section of the TAPES revealed loading of all items on their corresponding factors. The exceptions were item 4 of social adjustment subscale and the single item of weight subscale. Most items were stronger measures of their hypothesised subscale than the other subscales. In terms of construct validity, 75% of a priori hypotheses were confirmed. The Persian version of TAPES seems to be a reliable and valid measure of psychological adaptation to artificial limb.

  8. Meso-Scale Modeling of Spall in a Heterogeneous Two-Phase Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Springer, Harry Keo [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2008-07-11

    The influence of the heterogeneous second-phase particle structure and applied loading conditions on the ductile spall response of a model two-phase material was investigated. Quantitative metallography, three-dimensional (3D) meso-scale simulations (MSS), and small-scale spall experiments provided the foundation for this study. Nodular ductile iron (NDI) was selected as the model two-phase material for this study because it contains a large and readily identifiable second- phase particle population. Second-phase particles serve as the primary void nucleation sites in NDI and are, therefore, central to its ductile spall response. A mathematical model was developed for the NDI second-phase volume fraction that accounted for the non-uniform particle size and spacing distributions within the framework of a length-scale dependent Gaussian probability distribution function (PDF). This model was based on novel multiscale sampling measurements. A methodology was also developed for the computer generation of representative particle structures based on their mathematical description, enabling 3D MSS. MSS were used to investigate the effects of second-phase particle volume fraction and particle size, loading conditions, and physical domain size of simulation on the ductile spall response of a model two-phase material. MSS results reinforce existing model predictions, where the spall strength metric (SSM) logarithmically decreases with increasing particle volume fraction. While SSM predictions are nearly independent of applied load conditions at lower loading rates, which is consistent with previous studies, loading dependencies are observed at higher loading rates. There is also a logarithmic decrease in SSM for increasing (initial) void size, as well. A model was developed to account for the effects of loading rate, particle size, matrix sound-speed, and, in the NDI-specific case, the probabilistic particle volume fraction model. Small-scale spall experiments were designed

  9. Genetic Analyses Benefit From Using Less Heterogeneous Phenotypes: An Illustration With the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laurin, C.A.; Hottenga, J.J.; Willemsen, G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Lubke, G.H.

    2015-01-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of depression has been cited as one of the causes of the limited success to detect genetic variants in genome-wide studies. The 7-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) was developed to detect depression in individuals with physical health problems. An initial

  10. The importance of landscape diversity for carbon fluxes at the landscape level: small-scale heterogeneity matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrin Premke; Katrin Attermeyer; Jurgen Augustin; Alvaro Cabezas; Peter Casper; Detlef Deumlich; Jorg Gelbrecht; Horst H. Gerke; Arthur Gessler; Hans-Peter Grossart; Sabine Hilt; Michael Hupfer; Thomas Kalettka; Zachary Kayler; Gunnar Lischeid; Michael Sommer; Dominik Zak

    2016-01-01

    Landscapes can be viewed as spatially heterogeneous areas encompassing terrestrial and aquatic domains. To date, most landscape carbon (C) fluxes have been estimated by accounting for terrestrial ecosystems, while aquatic ecosystems have been largely neglected. However, a robust assessment of C fluxes on the landscape scale requires the estimation of fluxes within and...

  11. Evaluation of regional acid sensitivity predictions using field data: issues of scale and heterogeneity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Reynolds

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An acid waters sensitivity map has been widely used as a background resource for assessing potential impacts of forest management on stream water acidity within Wales. The validity of this approach has been explored by comparing predicted acid sensitivity with the observed acid neutralisation capacity (ANC in stream runoff using data sets from two regional surveys of a major area of acidification concern in Wales. For catchments in excess of 20 ha, the acid sensitivity predictions are generally upheld, although biologically important extremes of acidity are not predicted. For smaller catchments of 2 to 5 ha area, the large observed variations in ANC are poorly predicted from the acid sensitivity map; there is no statistically significant relationship between predicted sensitivity and measured baseflow and stormflow ANC values for the catchments. This reflects the high degree of heterogeneity within catchments and the complexity of soil and groundwater interactions. The maps offer a starting point for assessing sensitivity. However, they provide no more than a very crude indication at the scale of interest to forestry managers. It is concluded that a more appropriate route for assessing sensitivity is via field measurement and the direct use of water quality and biological information. Keywords: streams, forestry, acidification, acid sensitivity mapping, ANC, Wales

  12. Dynamic hydrophobicity of heterogeneous pillared surfaces at the nano-scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae Woo; Ha, Man Yeong; Jang, Joon Kyoung [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ambrosia, Matthew Stanley [Catholic University of Pusan, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-15

    In this study, the static and dynamic behaviors of nano-scale water droplets on heterogeneous surfaces were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations. The surface consisted of a flat plate and pillar structures. The surface was designed with four pillar heights and three pillar characteristic energies. Simulations were first run so that the water droplet reached the static equilibrium state. Once the static water droplets were in Cassie-Baxter state, increasing the pillar height had very little effect on the contact angle. Droplets on the surface with the strongest pillar characteristic energy never reached the Cassie-Baxter state and contact angles tended to decrease with increasing pillar height. Then five forces were applied to the water droplets parallel to the surface to observe the dynamic behavior of the droplets. Then, the effect of the pillar characteristic energy on the behavior of the dynamic water droplet was discussed using the contact angle hysteresis ( cosθ{sub Re} - cosθ{sub Ad}) as the pillar height and the magnitude of the applied force varied. When compared to the homogeneous cases, it was found that except at the lowest pillar height all of the lower pillar characteristic energy cases were hydrophobic and did not depend much on pillar height or magnitude of force. Whereas the higher pillar characteristic energy cases were generally hydrophilic and the hydrophobicity depended greatly on the magnitude of the force.

  13. An empirical evaluation of the translation to Brazilian Portuguese of the Loss of Control over Eating Scale (LOCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Q. da Luz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Loss of control over eating is a key feature of the most prevalent eating disorders. The Loss of Control over Eating Scale (LOCES enables a thorough assessment of loss of control over eating. Objective This study empirically evaluated the translation of the LOCES from English to Brazilian Portuguese. Methods The scale was translated to Brazilian Portuguese and back translated to English in order to check accuracy of the translation. Two hundred and ninety-three medicine and nursing students, 60 males and 233 females, 18-55 years old, with mean body mass index (BMI 23.2 kg/m2 (SD 4.1, recruited between August and December 2014, answered the Brazilian Portuguese LOCES. An exploratory factor analysis was performed. Results Exploratory factor analysis of the Brazilian Portuguese LOCES showed three distinct factors of the loss of control over eating (disgust/negative sensations, cognitive experiences/dissociation, and “positive” effects as well as moderate consistency with previous reports of exploratory factor analysis of the English version. Discussion This study showed satisfactory translation of the LOCES from English to Brazilian Portuguese, which is now ready for further validation.

  14. Variations in hydraulic conductivity with scale of measurement during aquifer tests in heterogeneous, porous carbonate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze-Makuch, Dirk; Cherkauer, Douglas S.

    Previous studies have shown that hydraulic conductivity of an aquifer seems to increase as the portion of the aquifer tested increases. To date, such studies have all relied on different methods to determine hydraulic conductivity at each scale of interest, which raises the possibility that the observed increase in hydraulic conductivity is due to the measurement method, not to the scale. This study analyzes hydraulic conductivity with respect to scale during individual aquifer tests in porous, heterogeneous carbonate rocks in southeastern Wisconsin, USA. Results from this study indicate that hydraulic conductivity generally increases during an individual test as the volume of aquifer impacted increases, and the rate of this increase is the same as the rate of increase determined by using different measurement methods. Thus, scale dependence of hydraulic conductivity during single tests does not depend on the method of measurement. This conclusion is supported by 22 of 26 aquifer tests conducted in porous-flow-dominated carbonate units within the aquifer. Instead, scale dependency is probably caused by heterogeneities within the aquifer, a conclusion supported by digital simulation. All of the observed types of hydraulic-conductivity variations with scale during individual aquifer tests can be explained by a conceptual model of a simple heterogeneous aquifer composed of high-conductivity zones within a low-conductivity matrix. Résumé Certaines études ont montré que la conductivité hydraulique d'un aquifère semble augmenter en même temps que la partie testée de l'aquifère s'étend. Jusqu'à présent, ces études ont toutes reposé sur des méthodes de détermination de la conductivité hydraulique différentes pour chaque niveau d'échelle, ce qui a conduit à penser que l'augmentation observée de la conductivité hydraulique pouvait être due aux méthodes de mesure et non à l'effet d'échelle. Cette étude analyse la conductivité hydraulique par

  15. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Diabetes Empowerment Scale - Short Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Fernanda Figueredo; Reis, Ilka Afonso; Pagano, Adriana Silvina; Torres, Heloísa de Carvalho

    2017-03-23

    To translate, cross-culturally adapt and validate the Diabetes Empowerment Scale - Short Form for assessment of psychosocial self-efficacy in diabetes care within the Brazilian cultural context. Assessment of the instrument's conceptual equivalence, as well as its translation and cross-cultural adaptation were performed following international standards. The Expert Committee's assessment of the translated version was conducted through a web questionnaire developed and applied via the web tool e-Surv. The cross-culturally adapted version was used for the pre-test, which was carried out via phone call in a group of eleven health care service users diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pre-test results were examined by a group of experts, composed by health care consultants, applied linguists and statisticians, aiming at an adequate version of the instrument, which was subsequently used for test and retest in a sample of 100 users diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus via phone call, their answers being recorded by the web tool e-Surv. Internal consistency and reproducibility of analysis were carried out within the statistical programming environment R. Face and content validity were attained and the Brazilian Portuguese version, entitled Escala de Autoeficácia em Diabetes - Versão Curta, was established. The scale had acceptable internal consistency with Cronbach's alpha of 0.634 (95%CI 0.494- 0.737), while the correlation of the total score in the two periods was considered moderate (0.47). The intraclass correlation coefficient was 0.50. The translated and cross-culturally adapted version of the instrument to spoken Brazilian Portuguese was considered valid and reliable to be used for assessment within the Brazilian population diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The use of a web tool (e-Surv) for recording the Expert Committee responses as well as the responses in the validation tests proved to be a reliable, safe and innovative method. Traduzir

  16. Genetic Geostatistical Framework for Spatial Analysis of Fine-Scale Genetic Heterogeneity in Modern Populations: Results from the KORA Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Diaz-Lacava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to investigate fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity in modern humans from a geographic perspective, a genetic geostatistical approach framed within a geographic information system is presented. A sample collected for prospective studies in a small area of southern Germany was analyzed. None indication of genetic heterogeneity was detected in previous analysis. Socio-demographic and genotypic data of German citizens were analyzed (212 SNPs; n=728. Genetic heterogeneity was evaluated with observed heterozygosity (HO. Best-fitting spatial autoregressive models were identified, using socio-demographic variables as covariates. Spatial analysis included surface interpolation and geostatistics of observed and predicted patterns. Prediction accuracy was quantified. Spatial autocorrelation was detected for both socio-demographic and genetic variables. Augsburg City and eastern suburban areas showed higher HO values. The selected model gave best predictions in suburban areas. Fine-scale patterns of genetic heterogeneity were observed. In accordance to literature, more urbanized areas showed higher levels of admixture. This approach showed efficacy for detecting and analyzing subtle patterns of genetic heterogeneity within small areas. It is scalable in number of loci, even up to whole-genome analysis. It may be suggested that this approach may be applicable to investigate the underlying genetic history that is, at least partially, embedded in geographic data.

  17. Scaling of compensatory eye movements during translations: Virtual versus real depth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Dits (Joyce); W.M. King; J. van der Steen (Hans)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractVestibulo-ocular reflexes are the fastest compensatory reflex systems. One of these is the translational vestibulo-ocular reflex (TVOR) which stabilizes the gaze at a given fixation point during whole body translations. For a proper response of the TVOR the eyes have to counter rotate in

  18. Integrated modeling and up-scaling of landfill processes and heterogeneity using stochastic approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bun, A.; Heimovaara, T.J.; Baviskar, S.M.; van Turnhout, A.G.; Konstantaki, L.A.

    2012-01-01

    Municipal solid waste landfills are a very complex and heterogeneous systems. The waste in a landfill body is a heterogeneous mixture of a wide range of materials containing high levels of organic matter, high amounts of salts and a wide range of different organic and inorganic substances, such as

  19. Application of Heterogeneous Catalysis in Small-Scale Biomass Combustion Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Thiel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Combustion of solid biomass fuels for heat generation is an important renewable energy resource. The major part among biomass combustion applications is being played by small-scale systems like wood log stoves and small wood pellet burners, which account for 75% of the overall biomass heat production. Despite an environmentally friendly use of renewable energies, incomplete combustion in small-scale systems can lead to the emission of environmental pollutants as well as substances which are hazardous to health. Besides particles of ash and soot, a wide variety of gaseous substances can also be emitted. Among those, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH and several organic volatile and semi-volatile compounds (VOC are present. Heterogeneous catalysis is applied for the reduction of various gaseous compounds as well as soot. Some research has been done to examine the application of catalytic converters in small-scale biomass combustion systems. In addition to catalyst selection with respect to complete oxidation of different organic compounds, parameters such as long-term stability and durability under flue gas conditions are considered for use in biomass combustion furnaces. Possible catalytic procedures have been identified for investigation by literature and market research. Experimental studies with two selected oxidation catalysts based on noble metals have been carried out on a wood log stove with a retrofit system. The measurements have been performed under defined conditions based on practical mode of operation. The measurements have shown that the catalytic flue gas treatment is a promising method to reduce carbon monoxide and volatile organic compounds. Even a reduction of particulate matter was observed, although no filtering effect could be detected. Therefore, the oxidation of soot or soot precursors can be assumed. The selected catalysts differed in their activity, depending on the compound to be oxidized. Examinations showed that

  20. Using Online Methods to Develop and Examine the Hong Kong Chinese Translation of the Dissociative Experiences Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chitat; Fung, Hong Wang; Choi, Tat Ming; Ross, Colin A

    2017-01-01

    Identifying dissociation is important for mental health services because it could fundamentally affect one's diagnosis and treatment plan. The Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES) is a widely-used self-report scale for measuring dissociative experiences. It has been translated into many languages and used in many countries. However, there is no validated Hong Kong Chinese version of the DES available in the field, and there is no other validated Hong Kong Chinese instrument for assessing dissociative disorders. This pilot study used online methods to translate the DES to Hong Kong Chinese (HKC-DES). The results indicated that the HKC-DES has excellent internal consistency (α = .953) and very good test-retest reliability (r = .797). Bilingual participants' responses to the DES and HKC-DES indicated high similarity, and were significantly correlated (r = .960). These results initially verified the reliability and cross-language equivalence of the scale. Implications for healthcare practice and research are discussed.

  1. Arabic translation, cultural adaptation, and validation study of Knee Outcome Survey: Activities of Daily Living Scale (KOS-ADLS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algarni, Abdulrahman D; Alrabai, Hamza M; Al-Ahaideb, Abdulaziz; Kachanathu, Shaji John; AlShammari, Sulaiman A

    2017-09-01

    Knee complaints and their accompanying functional impairments are frequent problems encountered by healthcare practitioners worldwide. Plenty of functional scoring systems were developed and validated to give a relative estimation about the knee function. Despite the wide geographic distribution of Arabic language in the Middle East and North Africa, it is rare to find a validated knee function scale in Arabic. The present study is aimed to translate, validate, and culturally adjust the Knee Outcome Survey: Activities of Daily Living Scale (KOS-ADLS) into Arabic language for future use among Arabic-speaking patients. Permission for translation was obtained from the copyrights holder. Two different teams of high-level clinical and linguistic expertise conducted translation process blindly. Forward-backward translation technique was implemented to ensure preservation of the main conceptual content. Main study consisted of 280 subjects. Reliability was examined by test-retest pilot study. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Get Up and Go (GUG) Test, Ascending/Descending Stairs (A/D Stairs), and Subjective Assessment of Function (SAF) were conducted concurrently to show the validity of Arabic KOS-ADLS statistically in relation to these scales. Final translated version showed no significant discrepancies. Minor adaptive adjustment was required to fit Arabian cultural background. Internal consistency was favourable (Cronbach's alpha 0.90). Patients' scoring on Arabic KOS-ADLS appeared relatively consistent with their scoring on VAS, GUG, A/D Stairs, and SAF. A significant linear relationship was demonstrated between SAF and total KOS-ADLS scores on regression analysis (adj. R 2 = 0.548). Arabic KOS-ADLS, as its English counterpart, was found to be a simple, valid, and useful instrument for knee function evaluation. Arabic version of KOS-ADLS represents a promising candidate for unconditional use among Arabic-speaking patients with knee complaints.

  2. Translation and psychometric testing of the Korean Versions of the Spiritual Perspective Scale and the Self-transcendence Scale in Korean elders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suk Sun; Reed, Pamela G; Kang, Youngmi; Oh, Jina

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to translate the Spiritual Perspective Scale (SPS) and Self-transcendence Scale (STS) into Korean and test the psychometric properties of the instruments with Korean elders. A cross-sectional survey design was used to implement the three stages of the study. Stage I consisted of translating and reviewing the scales by six experts. In Stage II, equivalence was tested by comparing the responses between the Korean and English versions among 71 bilingual adults. Stage III established the psychometric properties of the Korean versions SPS-K and STS-K among 154 Korean elders. Cronbach's alpha of the SPS-K and the STS-K .97, and .85 respectively with Korean elders. Factor analysis showed that the SPS-K had one factor; the STS-K had four factors with one factor clearly representing self-transcendence as theorized. Both scales showed good reliability and validity for the translated Korean versions. However, continued study of the construct validity of the STS-K is needed. Study findings indicate that the SPS-K and the STS-K could be useful for nurses and geriatric researchers to assess a broadly defined spirituality, and to conduct research on spirituality and health among Korean elders. Use of these scales within a theory-based study may contribute to further knowledge about the role of spirituality in the health and well-being of Korean people facing health crises.

  3. Urdu translation of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression: Results of a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashmi, Ali M; Naz, Shahana; Asif, Aftab; Khawaja, Imran S

    2016-01-01

    To develop a standardized validated version of the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAM-D) in Urdu. After translation of the HAM-D into the Urdu language following standard guidelines, the final Urdu version (HAM-D-U) was administered to 160 depressed outpatients. Inter-item correlation was assessed by calculating Cronbach alpha. Correlation between HAM-D-U scores at baseline and after a 2-week interval was evaluated for test-retest reliability. Moreover, scores of two clinicians on HAM-D-U were compared for inter-rater reliability. For establishing concurrent validity, scores of HAM-D-U and BDI-U were compared by using Spearman correlation coefficient. The study was conducted at Mayo Hospital, Lahore, from May to December 2014. The Cronbach alpha for HAM-D-U was 0.71. Composite scores for HAM-D-U at baseline and after a 2-week interval were also highly correlated with each other (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.83, p-value < 0.01) indicating good test-retest reliability. Composite scores for HAM-D-U and BDI-U were positively correlated with each other (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.85, p < 0.01) indicating good concurrent validity. Scores of two clinicians for HAM-D-U were also positively correlated (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.82, p-value < 0.01) indicated good inter-rater reliability. The HAM-D-U is a valid and reliable instrument for the assessment of Depression. It shows good inter-rater and test-retest reliability. The HAM-D-U can be a tool either for clinical management or research.

  4. Translation and evaluation of the Cultural Awareness Scale for Korean nursing students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyunjin; Lee, Jung-ah; Schepp, Karen G

    2015-02-20

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a curriculum for achieving high levels of cultural competence, we need to be able to assess education intended to enhance cultural competency skills. We therefore translated the Cultural Awareness Scale (CAS) into Korean (CAS-K). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cross-cultural applicability and psychometric properties of the CAS-K, specifically its reliability and validity. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to conduct the evaluation. A convenience sample of 495 nursing students was recruited from four levels of nursing education within four universities in the city of Daejeon, South Korea. This study provided beginning evidence of the validity and reliability of the CAS-K and the cross-cultural applicability of the concepts underlying this instrument. Cronbach's alpha ranged between 0.59 and 0.86 (overall 0.89) in the tests of internal consistency. Cultural competency score prediction of the experience of travel abroad (r=0.084) and the perceived need for cultural education (r=0.223) suggested reasonable criterion validity. Five factors with eigenvalues >1.0 were extracted, accounting for 55.58% of the variance; two retained the same items previously identified for the CAS. The CAS-K demonstrated satisfactory validity and reliability in measuring cultural awareness in this sample of Korean nursing students. The revised CAS-K should be tested for its usability in curriculum evaluation and its applicability as a guide for teaching cultural awareness among groups of Korean nursing students.

  5. Spatial heterogeneity regulates plant-pollinator networks across multiple landscape scales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Freitas Moreira

    Full Text Available Mutualistic plant-pollinator interactions play a key role in biodiversity conservation and ecosystem functioning. In a community, the combination of these interactions can generate emergent properties, e.g., robustness and resilience to disturbances such as fluctuations in populations and extinctions. Given that these systems are hierarchical and complex, environmental changes must have multiple levels of influence. In addition, changes in habitat quality and in the landscape structure are important threats to plants, pollinators and their interactions. However, despite the importance of these phenomena for the understanding of biological systems, as well as for conservation and management strategies, few studies have empirically evaluated these effects at the network level. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of local conditions and landscape structure at multiple scales on the characteristics of plant-pollinator networks. This study was conducted in agri-natural lands in Chapada Diamantina, Bahia, Brazil. Pollinators were collected in 27 sampling units distributed orthogonally along a gradient of proportion of agriculture and landscape diversity. The Akaike information criterion was used to select models that best fit the metrics for network characteristics, comparing four hypotheses represented by a set of a priori candidate models with specific combinations of the proportion of agriculture, the average shape of the landscape elements, the diversity of the landscape and the structure of local vegetation. The results indicate that a reduction of habitat quality and landscape heterogeneity can cause species loss and decrease of networks nestedness. These structural changes can reduce robustness and resilience of plant-pollinator networks what compromises the reproductive success of plants, the maintenance of biodiversity and the pollination service stability. We also discuss the possible explanations for

  6. Spatial heterogeneity regulates plant-pollinator networks across multiple landscape scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Eduardo Freitas; Boscolo, Danilo; Viana, Blandina Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Mutualistic plant-pollinator interactions play a key role in biodiversity conservation and ecosystem functioning. In a community, the combination of these interactions can generate emergent properties, e.g., robustness and resilience to disturbances such as fluctuations in populations and extinctions. Given that these systems are hierarchical and complex, environmental changes must have multiple levels of influence. In addition, changes in habitat quality and in the landscape structure are important threats to plants, pollinators and their interactions. However, despite the importance of these phenomena for the understanding of biological systems, as well as for conservation and management strategies, few studies have empirically evaluated these effects at the network level. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the influence of local conditions and landscape structure at multiple scales on the characteristics of plant-pollinator networks. This study was conducted in agri-natural lands in Chapada Diamantina, Bahia, Brazil. Pollinators were collected in 27 sampling units distributed orthogonally along a gradient of proportion of agriculture and landscape diversity. The Akaike information criterion was used to select models that best fit the metrics for network characteristics, comparing four hypotheses represented by a set of a priori candidate models with specific combinations of the proportion of agriculture, the average shape of the landscape elements, the diversity of the landscape and the structure of local vegetation. The results indicate that a reduction of habitat quality and landscape heterogeneity can cause species loss and decrease of networks nestedness. These structural changes can reduce robustness and resilience of plant-pollinator networks what compromises the reproductive success of plants, the maintenance of biodiversity and the pollination service stability. We also discuss the possible explanations for these relationships and

  7. Micro-scale displacement of NAPL by surfactant and microemulsion in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javanbakht, Gina; Arshadi, Maziar; Qin, Tianzhu; Goual, Lamia

    2017-07-01

    Industrial processes such as remediation of oil-contaminated aquifers and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) often utilize chemical additives to increase the removal of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) from subsurface formations. Although the majority of crude oils are classified as LNAPLs, they often contain heavy molecules (DNAPLs) such as asphaltenes that tend to adsorb on minerals and alter their wettability. Effective additives are therefore those that can reduce the threshold capillary pressure, thus mobilizing LNAPL inside pore spaces and solubilizing DNAPL from rock surfaces. Nonionic surfactants in brine have often been injected to oil or contaminated aquifer formations in order to enhance NAPL displacement through IFT reduction. Recent studies revealed that surfactant-based microemulsions have a higher tendency to alter the wettability of surfaces, compared to surfactants alone, leading to more effective NAPL removal. However, the impact of these additives on pore-scale displacement mechanisms and multi-phase fluid occupancy in porous media is, to date, still unclear. In this study, x-ray microtomography experiments were performed to investigate the impact of surfactants and microemulsions on the mobilization and solubilization of NAPL in heterogeneous rocks. Saturation profiles indicated that an incremental NAPL removal was attained by addition of microemulsion to brine, compared with surfactant. Residual cluster size distributions revealed that microemulsions could break up large clusters into smaller disconnected ones, improving their mobilization in the rock. In-situ contact angle measurements showed that microemulsions could reverse the wettability of rough contaminated surfaces to a higher extent than surfactants. Unlike surfactant alone, the surfactant-solvent blend in the carrier fluid of microemulsions was able to penetrate rough grain surfaces, particularly those of dolomite cement, and desorb asphaltenes in the form of small-emulsified NAPL droplets

  8. Factor structure and validity of the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 in Swedish translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsson, S; Wallin, E; Maathz, P

    2017-03-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: The Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) is a widely used measurement for psychological symptoms and distress. Some previous studies have shown that the DASS-21 can accurately measure symptoms of anxiety, depression and stress, while other studies have indicated that the DASS-21 mainly measures overall distress. The factor structure of the DASS-21 is important and debated since if affects interpretations of findings. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In this study, the DASS-21 was translated into Swedish and evaluated in three diverse samples. The DASS-21 subscales of Depression and Anxiety correlated significantly with corresponding criteria instruments. The DASS-21 Stress subscale showed more diverse associations with psychological distress. The analyses supported a bifactor model of the DASS-21 with three specific factors of depression, anxiety and stress as well as a general distress factor. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The results show that the DASS-21 may be used to measure unique symptoms of depression, anxiety and, with some caveat, stress as well as overall psychological distress. This study confirms that the DASS-21 is theoretically sound instrument that is feasible for both research and clinical practice. The DASS-21 can be an accessible tool for screening and evaluation in first-line mental health services. Introduction There is a constant need for theoretically sound and valid self-report instruments for measuring psychological distress. Previous studies have shown that the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21) is theoretically sound, but there have been some inconsistent results regarding its factor structure. Aims The aim of the present study was to investigate and elucidate the factor structure and convergent validity of the DASS-21. Methods A total of 624 participants recruited from student, primary care and psychotherapy populations. The factor structure of the DASS

  9. Genetic Heterogeneity of Breast Cancer Metastasis May Be Related to miR-21 Regulation of TIMP-3 in Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianyi Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. MicroRNAs are noncoding RNA molecules that posttranscriptionally regulated expression of target gene and implicate the progress of cancer proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The aim of this study is to determine whether microRNA-21 (miR-21, a specific microRNA implicated in multiple aspects of carcinogenesis, promoted breast cancer metastasis by regulating the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 (TIMP-3 gene. Methods. miR-21 of serum and tissue from 40 patients (30 patients with breast cancer were detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. TIMP-3 of tissue from the patient was tested by real-time RT-qPCR. Protein expression of TIMP-3 was evaluated by western blotting. Correlation analysis was performed between miR-21 and TIMP-3. Results. Of the 40 samples from tissue and serum analyzed, the miR-21 expression was significantly higher in high invasion metastasis group (HIMG that in low invasion metastasis group (LIMG; the latter was higher than that in normal group (NG. Additionally, the TIMP-3 expression was significantly lower in HIMG than in LIMG; the latter was lower than that in NG. There was significantly inverse correlation between miR-21 and TIMP-3 extracted from tissue. Conclusion. Our data suggest that miR-21 could promote metastasis in breast cancer via the regulation of TIMP3 translation, and there was consistency between miR-21 of serum and miR-21 in tissue.

  10. Personal and Social Performance (PSP scale for patients with schizophrenia: translation to Portuguese, cross-cultural adaptation and interrater reliability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anny Karinna Pires Mendes Menezes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Schizophrenia is a chronic mental disorder associated with impairment in social functioning. The most widely used scale to measure social functioning is the GAF (Global Assessment of Functioning, but it has the disadvantage of measuring at the same time symptoms and functioning, as described in its anchors. OBJECTIVES:Translation and cultural adaptation of the PSP, proposing a final version in Portuguese for use in Brazil. METHODS: We performed five steps: 1 translation; 2 back translation; 3 formal assessment of semantic equivalence; 4 debriefing; 5 analysis by experts. Interrater reliability (Intraclass correlation, ICC between two raters was also measured. RESULTS: The final version was applied by two independent investigators in 18 adults with schizophrenia (DSM-IV-TR. The interrater reliability (ICC was 0.812 (p < 0.001. CONCLUSION: The translation and adaptation of the PSP had an adequate level of semantic equivalence between the Portuguese version and the original English version. There were no difficulties related to understanding the content expressed in the translated texts and terms. Its application was easy and it showed a good interrater reliability. The PSP is a valid instrument for the measurement of personal and social functioning in schizophrenia.

  11. Stochastic multi-scale models of competition within heterogeneous cellular populations: simulation methods and mean-field analysis

    CERN Document Server

    de la Cruz, Roberto; Spill, Fabian; Alarcón, Tomás

    2016-01-01

    We propose a modelling framework to analyse the stochastic behaviour of heterogeneous, multi-scale cellular populations. We illustrate our methodology with a particular example in which we study a population with an oxygen-regulated proliferation rate. Our formulation is based on an age-dependent stochastic process. Cells within the population are characterised by their age. The age-dependent (oxygen-regulated) birth rate is given by a stochastic model of oxygen-dependent cell cycle progression. We then formulate an age-dependent birth-and-death process, which dictates the time evolution of the cell population. The population is under a feedback loop which controls its steady state size: cells consume oxygen which in turns fuels cell proliferation. We show that our stochastic model of cell cycle progression allows for heterogeneity within the cell population induced by stochastic effects. Such heterogeneous behaviour is reflected in variations in the proliferation rate. Within this set-up, we have established...

  12. Insufficient cross-cultural adaptations and psychometric properties for many translated health assessment scales: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal-Bozkir, Özgül; Parlevliet, Juliette L; de Rooij, Sophia E

    2013-06-01

    If researchers want to assess reliably different aspects of general health in the migrant populations, they need translations of internationally used health assessment scales with appropriate cross-cultural adaptations and satisfactory psychometric properties. A systematic review was performed to assess the quality of the cross-cultural adaptations and the psychometric properties of health assessment scales measuring cognition, mood, activities of daily living, health-related quality of life, and loneliness. We focused on the scales that were adapted for use with Turkish, Arab, and Surinamese (Creole and Hindi) individuals aged 65 years and older. PubMed, PsycINFO, and EMBASE databases were systematically searched, and selected articles were cross-checked for other relevant publications. In total, 68 relevant studies of the Turkish, Arab, and Surinamese populations were identified. To arrive at an appropriate cross-culturally adapted scale, five steps are required. Six studies followed this complete process. Only a few studies assessed all the psychometric properties of the cross-culturally adapted scales. The studies in which these were best assessed primarily involved cognitive and functional scales. Cross-cultural adaptations are insufficient, and psychometric properties are unknown for many translated health assessment scales. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Asynchrony, Fragmentation, and Scale Determine Benefits of Landscape Heterogeneity to Mobile Herbivores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragmentation of landscapes into spatially isolated parts is a prevailing source of environmental change worldwide. However, predicting the consequences of fragmentation for populations remains problematic, in large measure because the mechanisms translating landscape change into population performa...

  14. Multi-Reference Frame Image Registration for Rotation, Translation, and Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Translated Image . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 2.6. Radon Transform of Translated Image for Specific Angles . . . 21 2.7. Flow Chart of the FMT ...Symmteric Phase-Only Matched Filter . . . . . . . . . . . 9 FMT Fourier-Mellin Transform . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 RT Radon Transform...assuming that the technique is invariant for the spe- cific distortions of the image. One such technique is the Fourier-Mellin transform ( FMT ) [1] [7

  15. Translation, adaptation, and validation of the behavioral pain scale and the critical-care pain observational tools in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiung NH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Nai-Huan Hsiung,1 Yen Yang,1 Ming Shinn Lee,2 Koustuv Dalal,3 Graeme D Smith4 1Department of Nursing, College of Nursing, Tzu Chi University of Science and Technology, 2Department of Curriculum Design and Human Potentials Development, National Dong Hwa University, Hualien, Taiwan, Republic of China; 3Department of Public Health Science, School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden; 4School of Nursing, Midwifery & Social Care, Edinburgh Napier University, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: This study describes the cultural adaptation and testing of the behavioral pain scale (BPS and the critical-care pain observation tools (CPOT for pain assessment in Taiwan. The cross-cultural adaptation followed the steps of translation, including forward translation, back-translation, evaluation of the translations by a committee of experts, adjustments, and then piloting of the prefinal versions of the BPS and the CPOT. A content validity index was used to assess content validities of the BPS and the CPOT, with 0.80 preset as the level that would be regarded as acceptable. The principal investigator then made adjustments when the content validity index was <0.80. The pilot test was performed with a sample of ten purposively selected patients by 2 medical staff from a medical care center in Taiwan. The BPS and the CPOT are adequate instruments for the assessment of pain levels in patients who cannot communicate due to sedation and ventilation treatments. Keywords: pain, scales, BPS, CPOT, Taiwan

  16. French translation and validation of the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) in a Canadian undergraduate healthcare student context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutier, Jacinthe; Lafrance, Josée; Michallet, Bernard; Marcoux, Lyson; Cloutier, France

    2015-03-01

    The Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative recommends that future professionals be prepared for collaborative practice. To do so, it is necessary for them to learn about the principles of interprofessional collaboration. Therefore, to ascertain if students are predisposed, their attitude toward interprofessional learning must be assessed. In the French Canadian context such a measuring tool has not been published yet. The purpose of this study is to translate in French an adapted version of the RIPLS questionnaire and to validate it for use with undergraduate students from seven various health and social care programmes in a Canadian university. According to Vallerand's methodology, a method for translating measuring instruments: (i) the forward-backward translation indicated that six items of the experimental French version of the RIPLS needed to be more specific; (ii) the experimental French version of the RIPLS seemed clear according to the pre-test assessing items clarity; (iii) evaluation of the content validity indicated that the experimental French version of the RIPLS presents good content validity and (iv) a very good internal consistency was obtained (α = 0.90; n = 141). Results indicate that the psychometric properties of the RIPLS in French are comparable to the English version, although a different factorial structure was found. The relevance of three of the 19 items on the RIPLS scale is questionable, resulting in a revised 16-item scale. Future research aimed at validating the translated French version of the RIPLS could also be conducted in another francophone cultural context.

  17. Small-scale spatial heterogeneity of ecosystem properties, microbial community composition and microbial activities in a temperate mountain forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Štursová, Martina; Bárta, Jiří; Šantrůčková, Hana; Baldrian, Petr

    2016-12-01

    Forests are recognised as spatially heterogeneous ecosystems. However, knowledge of the small-scale spatial variation in microbial abundance, community composition and activity is limited. Here, we aimed to describe the heterogeneity of environmental properties, namely vegetation, soil chemical composition, fungal and bacterial abundance and community composition, and enzymatic activity, in the topsoil in a small area (36 m(2)) of a highly heterogeneous regenerating temperate natural forest, and to explore the relationships among these variables. The results demonstrated a high level of spatial heterogeneity in all properties and revealed differences between litter and soil. Fungal communities had substantially higher beta-diversity than bacterial communities, which were more uniform and less spatially autocorrelated. In litter, fungal communities were affected by vegetation and appeared to be more involved in decomposition. In the soil, chemical composition affected both microbial abundance and the rates of decomposition, whereas the effect of vegetation was small. Importantly, decomposition appeared to be concentrated in hotspots with increased activity of multiple enzymes. Overall, forest topsoil should be considered a spatially heterogeneous environment in which the mean estimates of ecosystem-level processes and microbial community composition may confound the existence of highly specific microenvironments. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The Taiwanese Derriford Appearance Scale: The translation and validation of a scale to measure individual responses to living with problems of appearance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Timothy Peter; Lawson, Victoria; Liu, Chiu Ying

    2015-09-01

    The extent of concern about physical appearance is increasingly the subject of scientific study, interventions by health professionals, and media attention. To enable carefully evaluated studies exploring the psychosocial antecedents of appearance distress, and to determine the success of interventions, the Derriford Appearance Scale 24 (DAS24) was developed. This psychometrically sound measure is well used and cited in the appearance psychology field. Outside of a Western context, the extent and impact of appearance distress is less well known. This paper describes the adaptation of the DAS24 for use in Taiwan. A formal translation protocol was followed to adapt the DAS24 into Taiwanese/Cantonese. Two hundred and eight participants from a general population and a visibly different population were recruited in Taipei, Taiwan. These participants completed a test pack administered comprising the translated DAS24, and established measures of anxiety and depression. The scale was analyzed on the basis of classical test theory. A translated DAS Scale comprising 19 items and including three clear factors was the best solution. The scale had good internal consistency, clear convergent validity, and good test-retest reliability. The three factors that emerged were appearance-related social avoidance, social distress, and negative affect. Consistent with expectations, (a) women scored higher than men (greater appearance distress), (b) the cause of appearance difference (burns, cleft lip/palate, etc.) was unrelated to appearance distress, and (c) those with visible differences were more concerned about their appearance than those without. The Taiwanese DAS19 is a user-friendly and psychometrically sound scale that fulfils an important clinical and scientific need. The items that were omitted from the translated version were considered in relation to cultural differences in the experience and expression of shame between Western countries and Taiwan/China, which demands a

  19. A Sharable and Efficient Metadata Model for Heterogeneous Earth Observation Data Retrieval in Multi-Scale Flood Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengcheng Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing plays an important role in flood mapping and is helping advance flood monitoring and management. Multi-scale flood mapping is necessary for dividing floods into several stages for comprehensive management. However, existing data systems are typically heterogeneous owing to the use of different access protocols and archiving metadata models. In this paper, we proposed a sharable and efficient metadata model (APEOPM for constructing an Earth observation (EO data system to retrieve remote sensing data for flood mapping. The proposed model contains two sub-models, an access protocol model and an enhanced encoding model. The access protocol model helps unify heterogeneous access protocols and can achieve intelligent access via a semantic enhancement method. The enhanced encoding model helps unify a heterogeneous archiving metadata model. Wuhan city, one of the most important cities in the Yangtze River Economic Belt in China, is selected as a study area for testing the retrieval of heterogeneous EO data and flood mapping. The past torrential rain period from 25 March 2015 to 10 April 2015 is chosen as the temporal range in this study. To aid in comprehensive management, mapping is conducted at different spatial and temporal scales. In addition, the efficiency of data retrieval is analyzed, and validation between the flood maps and actual precipitation was conducted. The results show that the flood map coincided with the actual precipitation.

  20. Brazilian-Portuguese translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Myasthenia Gravis Composite scale. A multicentric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Ezequiel Fernandes; Lima, Valéria Cavalcante; Perez, Eduardo Araujo; Polaro, Melissa Nunes; Valério, Berenice Cataldo Oliveira; Pereiro, João R; Nacif, Sergio Roberto; Oliveira, Claudia Santos; Oliveira, Acary Souza Bulle; Oliveira, Luis Vicente Franco

    2016-11-01

    To perform the translation, cultural adaptation and validation of the Myasthenia Gravis Composite (MGC) scale in Brazil. The study was conducted at three neuromuscular disease research centers in accordance with the international ethical standards, following a multi-modal approach and was conducted in three steps consisting of translation, cultural adaptation, and validation according to international guidelines. The final version of the MGC was applied in a sample of 27 MG patients and the total score was compared to a Portuguese version of the MG-QOL-15. The internal consistency verified by Cohen's Kappa test was excellent (0.766). The correlation between the MGC and MG-QOL-15 was strong (R = 0.777; p = 0.000). No significant differences were found between the responses of patients in the first and second applications of the MGC. The MGC scale, validated into Brazilian Portuguese, has proven to be a reliable instrument that is easy to use, and is highly reproducible.

  1. Local heterogeneity and scaled dependence of eco-hydrology in mire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, T.

    2011-12-01

    Japanese governments recently started nature conservation project to restore meandering former river channel in order to prevent invasive forest and to recover original ecosystem because various anthropogenic stressors have caused mire degradation in subarctic northern Japan such as drying and invasion of alder-dominant shrub forest. In order to predict effectiveness of this restoration, the author has so far developed the process-based National Integrated Catchment-based Eco-hydrology (NICE) model (Nakayama, 2008a, 2008b, 2010, 2011a, 2011b; Nakayama and Fujita, 2010; Nakayama and Hashimoto, 2011; Nakayama and Watanabe, 2004, 2006, 2008a, 2008b; Nakayama et al., 2006, 2007, 2010, 2011), which includes complex interactions between canopy, surface water, unsaturated water, aquifer, lake, and rivers. Because the model simulates the hydrologic cycle, elevation change, and vegetation succession processes iteratively including competition between native reed-sedge vegetation and invasive alder, it is possible to estimate nonlinear interaction between hydro-geomorphic and vegetation dynamics. In this study, the author further improved the model to evaluate positive feedback between heterogeneous drying and alder invasion in relation to stability and regime shift beyond previous researches about constant slope and its relation to regular pattern. In particular, he evaluated local heterogeneity of groundwater and surface water in both horizontal and vertical directions, and clarified relationship between microtopography about ridge-depression and hydrologic cycle about divergence-convergence in short-term period. This mechanism is also related to interaction between groundwater and inundated flow, scaled dependence of hydrologic cycle, and its effect on sediment deposition and vegetation change. These results will throw some light on two conflicting conceptualizations of peatland hydrology, so-called, shallow-flow and groundwater-flow models (Reeve et al., 2000), and bring

  2. Nano-scale interactions of particles and drops with heterogenous surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui

    Recent technological developments enable one to study the behavior and interactions of particles and drops with heterogeneous surfaces at microscopic resolution, and investigate their possible applications. In this thesis, we use the microscopic calculational technique of molecular dynamics simulation, augmented by other continuum methods as appropriate, to study some prototypical examples. For applications to particle separation, we consider on the transport of particles by flow through a narrow channel of which one side has a stripe pattern of alternating wettabilities. We first consider van der Waals forces alone. The particle-wall interaction can either trap particles on the attractive stripes or deflect the trajectories of mobile particles away from the mean flow direction. Using molecular dynamics we determine how the migration angle of finite-sized rigid particles differs from the imposed fluid flow. The effects of electrostatic interactions are considered by decorating the particles and walls with opposite charges, resulting in significantly more trapping and larger deflection angles. We then use Langevin equations to simulate larger particles in the van der Waals case, and compare the results to the MD simulations. From the analysis of the associated Fokker-Planck equation we further obtain bounds on the deflection angle. The second problem involving fluid-solid interactions is that of nano-sized drop impact on a surface, which are flat, curved or pillared, with either homogeneous interactions or cross-shaped patterns of wettability. From the simulations we observe drop bouncing, sticking, spreading or disintegrating, depending on impact velocity and surface properties. In contrast to macroscopic observation, MD shows that the presence or absence of vapor has no effect on the onset of splashing. We argue that this difference is a direct consequence of drop size. For low velocity impacts, we compare MD results with continuum lattice Boltzmann methods at the

  3. Molecular- and nm-scale Investigation of the Structure and Compositional Heterogeneity of Naturally Occurring Ferrihydrite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismasu, C.; Michel, F. M.; Stebbins, J. F.; Tcaciuc, A. P.; Brown, G. E.

    2008-12-01

    methods to study such naturally occurring nanomaterials, both at the molecular- and nm-scale. This work provides structural information at the short-, medium- and long- range, as well as evidence of compositional heterogeneity, and mineral/organic matter associations.

  4. Word Sense Disambiguation Based on Large Scale Polish CLARIN Heterogeneous Lexical Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Kędzia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Word Sense Disambiguation Based on Large Scale Polish CLARIN Heterogeneous Lexical Resources Lexical resources can be applied in many different Natural Language Engineering tasks, but the most fundamental task is the recognition of word senses used in text contexts. The problem is difficult, not yet fully solved and different lexical resources provided varied support for it. Polish CLARIN lexical semantic resources are based on the plWordNet — a very large wordnet for Polish — as a central structure which is a basis for linking together several resources of different types. In this paper, several Word Sense Disambiguation (henceforth WSD methods developed for Polish that utilise plWordNet are discussed. Textual sense descriptions in the traditional lexicon can be compared with text contexts using Lesk’s algorithm in order to find best matching senses. In the case of a wordnet, lexico-semantic relations provide the main description of word senses. Thus, first, we adapted and applied to Polish a WSD method based on the Page Rank. According to it, text words are mapped on their senses in the plWordNet graph and Page Rank algorithm is run to find senses with the highest scores. The method presents results lower but comparable to those reported for English. The error analysis showed that the main problems are: fine grained sense distinctions in plWordNet and limited number of connections between words of different parts of speech. In the second approach plWordNet expanded with the mapping onto the SUMO ontology concepts was used. Two scenarios for WSD were investigated: two step disambiguation and disambiguation based on combined networks of plWordNet and SUMO. In the former scenario, words are first assigned SUMO concepts and next plWordNet senses are disambiguated. In latter, plWordNet and SUMO are combined in one large network used next for the disambiguation of senses. The additional knowledge sources used in WSD improved the performance

  5. Geomorphic Heterogeneity at the Valley Segment Scale: Effects on Habitat Structure, Aquatic Organisms, and Stream-Riparian Food Web Linkages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, C. V.; Torgersen, C. E.

    2005-05-01

    A distinct domain of heterogeneity at the valley segment scale has long been recognized by geomorphologists, but its implications for stream ecology have received less attention. As opposed to sampling discrete points, stream ecologists' efforts to make maps have generally been applied at only at very large or small spatial scales. We have found mapping of valley segment types a powerful tool for detecting patterns at an intermediate scale, which then sets the stage for interpreting patterns observed at both smaller and larger scales. We report results from a series of studies that describe how valley segment types and their arrangements within river networks affect the expression of habitat structure, the distribution and abundance of species, the makeup of communities, and the flux of resources between aquatic and terrestrial food webs. Study tools such as valley segment mapping provide a more spatially continuous perspective on biophysical heterogeneity in riverine landscapes. In turn, increasing the spatial extent and resolution of data improves the scope of a study, which enhances power to detect patterns and investigate scaling relationships in river networks.

  6. Translation and validation of the Amsterdam preoperative anxiety and information scale (APAIS) for use in Japan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nishimori, M.; Moerman, N.; Fukuhara, S.; van Dam, F.S.A.M.; Muller, M.J.; Hanaoka, K.; Yamada, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Preoperative anxiety is a very common phenomenon that adversely affects a patient's physical and psychological outcome. To evaluate subjective complaints such as anxiety, use of a validated psychological instrument is essential. In this study, we translated, culturally adapted and validated the

  7. Scale-dependent effects of a heterogeneous landscape on genetic differentiation in the Central American squirrel monkey (Saimiri oerstedii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Blair

    Full Text Available Landscape genetic studies offer a fine-scale understanding of how habitat heterogeneity influences population genetic structure. We examined population genetic structure and conducted a landscape genetic analysis for the endangered Central American Squirrel Monkey (Saimiri oerstedii that lives in the fragmented, human-modified habitats of the Central Pacific region of Costa Rica. We analyzed non-invasively collected fecal samples from 244 individuals from 14 groups for 16 microsatellite markers. We found two geographically separate genetic clusters in the Central Pacific region with evidence of recent gene flow among them. We also found significant differentiation among groups of S. o. citrinellus using pairwise F(ST comparisons. These groups are in fragments of secondary forest separated by unsuitable "matrix" habitats such as cattle pasture, commercial African oil palm plantations, and human residential areas. We used an individual-based landscape genetic approach to measure spatial patterns of genetic variance while taking into account landscape heterogeneity. We found that large, commercial oil palm plantations represent moderate barriers to gene flow between populations, but cattle pastures, rivers, and residential areas do not. However, the influence of oil palm plantations on genetic variance was diminished when we restricted analyses to within population pairs, suggesting that their effect is scale-dependent and manifests during longer dispersal events among populations. We show that when landscape genetic methods are applied rigorously and at the right scale, they are sensitive enough to track population processes even in species with long, overlapping generations such as primates. Thus landscape genetic approaches are extremely valuable for the conservation management of a diverse array of endangered species in heterogeneous, human-modified habitats. Our results also stress the importance of explicitly considering the heterogeneity of

  8. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments--a framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian; Auken, Esben; Bamberg, Charlotte A; Christensen, Britt S B; Clausen, Thomas; Dalgaard, Esben; Effersø, Flemming; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Gertz, Flemming; Hansen, Anne Lausten; He, Xin; Jacobsen, Brian H; Jensen, Karsten Høgh; Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt; Koch, Julian; Nilsson, Bertel; Petersen, Christian; De Schepper, Guillaume; Schamper, Cyril; Sørensen, Kurt I; Therrien, Rene; Thirup, Christian; Viezzoli, Andrea

    2014-01-15

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30-50 m and 2m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  9. The Vietnamese version of the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10): Translation equivalence and psychometric properties among older women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao-Tran, Tiet-Hanh; Anderson, Debra; Seib, Charrlotte

    2017-02-06

    The Perceived Stress Scale 10 item (PSS-10) has been translated into more than 20 languages and used widely in different populations. Yet, to date, no study has tested psychometric properties of the instrument among older women and there is no Vietnamese version of the instrument. This study translated the PSS-10 into Vietnamese and assessed Vietnamese version of the Perceived Stress Scale 10 items (V-PSS-10) for translation equivalence, face validity, construct validity, correlations, internal consistency reliability, and test-retest reliability among 473 women aged 60 and over. The study found that V-PSS-10 retained the original meaning and was understood by Vietnamese older women. An exploratory factor analysis of the V-PSS-10 yielded a two-factor structure, and these two factors were significantly correlated (0.56, p perceived stress in future research and practice. However, future research would be useful to further endorse the validity and reliability of the V-PSS-10.

  10. Longitudinal thermal heterogeneity in rivers and refugia for coldwater species: Effects of scale and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullerton, A.H.; Torgersen, Christian E.; Lawer, J.J.; Steel, E. A.; Ebersole, J.L.; Lee, S.Y.

    2018-01-01

    Climate-change driven increases in water temperature pose challenges for aquatic organisms. Predictions of impacts typically do not account for fine-grained spatiotemporal thermal patterns in rivers. Patches of cooler water could serve as refuges for anadromous species like salmon that migrate during summer. We used high-resolution remotely sensed water temperature data to characterize summer thermal heterogeneity patterns for 11,308 km of second–seventh-order rivers throughout the Pacific Northwest and northern California (USA). We evaluated (1) water temperature patterns at different spatial resolutions, (2) the frequency, size, and spacing of cool thermal patches suitable for Pacific salmon (i.e., contiguous stretches ≥ 0.25 km, ≤ 15 °C and ≥ 2 °C, aooler than adjacent water), and (3) potential influences of climate change on availability of cool patches. Thermal heterogeneity was nonlinearly related to the spatial resolution of water temperature data, and heterogeneity at fine resolution (spatially continuous data. Cool patches were generally > 2.7 and  5.7 and < 49.4 km. Thermal heterogeneity varied among rivers, some of which had long uninterrupted stretches of warm water ≥ 20 °C, and others had many smaller cool patches. Our models predicted little change in future thermal heterogeneity among rivers, but within-river patterns sometimes changed markedly compared to contemporary patterns. These results can inform long-term monitoring programs as well as near-term climate-adaptation strategies.

  11. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport from Decimeter-Scale Heterogeneity to Plume-Scale Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Gary P. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kohler, Matthias [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kannappan, Ramakrishnan [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Briggs, Martin [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Day-Lewis, Fred [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Scientifically defensible predictions of field scale U(VI) transport in groundwater requires an understanding of key processes at multiple scales. These scales range from smaller than the sediment grain scale (less than 10 μm) to as large as the field scale which can extend over several kilometers. The key processes that need to be considered include both geochemical reactions in solution and at sediment surfaces as well as physical transport processes including advection, dispersion, and pore-scale diffusion. The research summarized in this report includes both experimental and modeling results in batch, column and tracer tests. The objectives of this research were to: (1) quantify the rates of U(VI) desorption from sediments acquired from a uranium contaminated aquifer in batch experiments;(2) quantify rates of U(VI) desorption in column experiments with variable chemical conditions, and(3) quantify nonreactive tracer and U(VI) transport in field tests.

  12. Does microbial centimeter-scale heterogeneity impact MCPA degradation in and leaching from a loamy agricultural soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbom, Annette E; Binning, Philip J; Aamand, Jens; Dechesne, Arnaud; Smets, Barth F; Johnsen, Anders R

    2014-02-15

    The potential for pesticide degradation varies greatly at the centimeter-scale in agricultural soil. Three dimensional numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate how such small-scale spatial heterogeneity may affect the leaching of the biodegradable pesticide 2-methyl-4-chlorophenoxyacetic acid (MCPA) in the upper meter of a variably-saturated, loamy soil profile. To incorporate realistic spatial variation in degradation potential, we used data from a site where 420 mineralization curves over 5 depths have been measured. Monod kinetics was fitted to the individual curves to derive initial degrader biomass values, which were incorporated in a reactive transport model to simulate heterogeneous biodegradation. Six scenarios were set up using COMSOL Multiphysics to evaluate the difference between models having different degrader biomass distributions (homogeneous, heterogeneous, or no biomass) and either matrix flow or preferential flow through a soil matrix with a wormhole. MCPA leached, within 250 days, below 1m only when degrader biomass was absent and preferential flow occurred. Both biodegradation in the plow layer and the microbially active lining of the wormhole contributed to reducing MCPA-leaching below 1m. The spatial distribution of initial degrader biomass within each soil matrix layer, however, had little effect on the overall MCPA-leaching. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Influence of habitat heterogeneity on the distribution of larval Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) at two spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torgersen, Christian E.; Close, David A.

    2004-01-01

    1. Spatial patterns in channel morphology and substratum composition at small (1a??10 metres) and large scales (1a??10 kilometres) were analysed to determine the influence of habitat heterogeneity on the distribution and abundance of larval lamprey. 2. We used a nested sampling design and multiple logistic regression to evaluate spatial heterogeneity in the abundance of larval Pacific lamprey, Lampetra tridentata, and habitat in 30 sites (each composed of twelve 1-m2 quadrat samples) distributed throughout a 55-km section of the Middle Fork John Day River, OR, U.SA. Statistical models predicting the relative abundance of larvae both among sites (large scale) and among samples (small scale) were ranked using Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC) to identify the 'best approximating' models from a set of a priori candidate models determined from the literature on larval lamprey habitat associations. 3. Stream habitat variables predicted patterns in larval abundance but played different roles at different spatial scales. The abundance of larvae at large scales was positively associated with water depth and open riparian canopy, whereas patchiness in larval occurrence at small scales was associated with low water velocity, channel-unit morphology (pool habitats), and the availability of habitat suitable for burrowing. 4. Habitat variables explained variation in larval abundance at large and small scales, but locational factors, such as longitudinal position (river km) and sample location within the channel unit, explained additional variation in the logistic regression model. The results emphasise the need for spatially explicit analysis, both in examining fish habitat relationships and in developing conservation plans for declining fish populations.

  14. [Translation, Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life Scale for European Portuguese].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque Dos Reis, Luis; Donato, Mariana; Sousa, Rita; Escada, Pedro

    2017-02-27

    The scale Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life uses a simple and easily administered questionnaire to evaluate the adaptation of individuals to their hearing aids. The objective of this study is to validate the scale for European Portuguese speakers, by means of translation and cultural adaptation of the questionnaire. The study includes an evaluation of reproducibility and a description of the results of the administration of the questionnaire to patients fitted with hearing aids. We invited 147 individuals fitted with hearing aids (uni- or bilateral) to participate in the study. Participants had used a hearing aid for at least six weeks and were patients of the Department of Otolaryngology at the Egas Moniz Hospital (Lisbon). The consent as well the guidelines for translation from and into the English language were obtained from the author of the scale, and the translation from and into, and cultural adaptation were carried out, along with an evaluation of reproducibility and internal consistency. The participants were 54% male and 46% female, aged between 16 and 93 (66.09 ± 17.41 years). The results of the study showed an overall level of satisfaction of 5.4 among hearing aids users. The sub-scale satisfaction levels were: positive effects 5.88, service and cost 5.25, negative effects 4.24, and self-image 5.57. The Cronbach α score was 0.75 which indicates good internal consistency. Furthermore, the questionnaire's overall and sub-scale average scores did not differ significantly from the results obtained under the American scale. The inter-examiner reproducibility was also good. This study provides reliable results of the scale for the Portuguese of Portugal and adequate internal consistency, with significant age variability in the sample. This adaptation of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire for European Portuguese speakers should be considered a good tool for evaluation of the level of satisfaction of hearing aid users

  15. A data-driven analysis of energy balance closure across FLUXNET research sites: The role of landscape scale heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoy, Paul C.; Mauder, Matthias; Foken, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    . We analyzed energy balance closure across 173 ecosystems in the FLUXNET database and explored the relationship between energy balance closure and landscape heterogeneity using MODIS products and GLOBEstat elevation data. Energy balance closure per research site (CEB,s) averaged 0.84±0.20, with best......The energy balance at most surface-atmosphere flux research sites remains unclosed. The mechanisms underlying the discrepancy between measured energy inputs and outputs across the global FLUXNET tower network are still under debate. Recent reviews have identified exchange processes and turbulent...... motions at large spatial and temporal scales in heterogeneous landscapes as the primary cause of the lack of energy balance closure at some intensively-researched sites, while unmeasured storage terms cannot be ruled out as a dominant contributor to the lack of energy balance closure at many other sites...

  16. A genome-scale integration and analysis of Lactococcus lactis translation data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Racle

    Full Text Available Protein synthesis is a template polymerization process composed by three main steps: initiation, elongation, and termination. During translation, ribosomes are engaged into polysomes whose size is used for the quantitative characterization of translatome. However, simultaneous transcription and translation in the bacterial cytosol complicates the analysis of translatome data. We established a procedure for robust estimation of the ribosomal density in hundreds of genes from Lactococcus lactis polysome size measurements. We used a mechanistic model of translation to integrate the information about the ribosomal density and for the first time we estimated the protein synthesis rate for each gene and identified the rate limiting steps. Contrary to conventional considerations, we find significant number of genes to be elongation limited. This number increases during stress conditions compared to optimal growth and proteins synthesized at maximum rate are predominantly elongation limited. Consistent with bacterial physiology, we found proteins with similar rate and control characteristics belonging to the same functional categories. Under stress conditions, we found that synthesis rate of regulatory proteins is becoming comparable to proteins favored under optimal growth. These findings suggest that the coupling of metabolic states and protein synthesis is more important than previously thought.

  17. Measuring biogeochemical heterogeneity at the micro scale in soils and sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lasse L.; Smets, Barth F.; Dechesne, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Steep physiochemical gradients and diffusive limitation associated with microscale features such as cracks and pores make soil and sediments remarkably heterogeneous environments, which is reflected on many environmentally important processes. If we are to understand and attempt to control...... the ecology of the microorganisms which inhabit these environments we must not only characterize their inhabitants, but also the complex biogeochemical landscape they live in. This includes local concentrations of electron acceptors and donors, microbial metabolites and key physical and chemical parameters.......Microscale studies have given us many insights, but we outline further progress needed to make the microscale toolkit more accessible and to extend the range of analytes that can be measured simultaneously, so that we may expand our knowledge of the complex environmental microscale heterogeneity and its impact...

  18. Note: Dynamic meso-scale full field surface deformation measurement of heterogeneous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, S.; Tessema, A.; Kidane, A.

    2016-03-01

    A dynamic experiment at mesoscale is developed to measure local deformation and strain in granular materials at high temporal and spatial resolutions. The experimental setup is comprised of a high-speed camera along with a high magnification extension tube. The method is demonstrated by measuring the full field strain across and in the boundary of the crystals at a high temporal resolution in polymer bonded sugar crystals and glass beads filled epoxy particulate composite specimens under dynamic loading. In both cases, the local strain heterogeneity is captured successfully. The measured strain and deformation field can be further used to obtain the relative motion of each crystal, crystal rotation, and the relative displacement between the polymer interface and the crystal, which are very critical to understand the local failure mechanisms in heterogeneous materials.

  19. Contrasting patterns in the small-scale heterogeneity of human helminth infections in urban and rural environments in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Simon; Alexander, Neal; Geiger, Stefan; Moyeed, Rana A; Stander, Julian; Fleming, Fiona; Hotez, Peter J; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Bethony, Jeffrey

    2006-09-01

    Marked heterogeneity exists in the patterns of parasitic infection between individuals, households and communities. Analysis of parasite distributions within populations is complicated by the fact that parasite distributions are highly aggregated and few studies have explicitly incorporated this distribution when investigating small-scale spatial heterogeneities. This study aimed to quantify the small-scale (within- and between-household) heterogeneity of helminth infection in an area of Minas Gerais State, Brazil, with rural and urban sectors. Parasitological data from a cross-sectional survey of 1,249 individuals aged 0-86 years from 242 households were analysed. Within-household clustering of infection was assessed using random effect logistic regression models and between-household spatial heterogeneity was assessed using a Bayesian negative binomial spatial model. The overall prevalence of hookworm (Necator americanus) was 66.9%, the prevalence of Schistosoma mansoni was 44.9% and the prevalence of Ascaris lumbricoides was 48.8%. Statistical analysis indicated significant (within) household and (between household) spatial clustering of hookworm in both rural and urban areas and of S. mansoni in rural areas. There was no evidence of either household or spatial clustering of S. mansoni in urban areas. The spatial correlation of S. mansoni was estimated to reduce by half over a distance of 700 m in the rural area. Rural hookworm had a much smaller half-distance (28 m) and urban hookworm showed an even smaller half-distance (12 m). We suggest that such species-specific differences in patterns of infection by environment are primarily due to variation in exposure and parasite life cycle, although host genetic factors cannot be ruled out.

  20. Two-region mass transfer to account for 2D profile scale heterogeneity in a 1D effective plot scale flow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipovic, Vilim; Coquet, Yves; Gerke, Horst H.

    2017-04-01

    In arable soil landscapes, specific spatial heterogeneities related to tillage and trafficking can influence the movement of water and chemicals. The structure in the topsoil is characterized by spatial patterns with locally compacted zones. The contrasting hydraulic properties of more-and-less compacted soil zones can result in heterogeneous flow fields and preferential flow. Two- or three-dimensional models used to account for soil spatial variability are relatively too complex when trying to include local heterogeneities in the description of field scale flow and transport problems. The idea was to reduce the model complexity linked to the explicit description of heterogeneities in 2D or 3D without deteriorating the validity of simulation results. When reducing the spatial dimensionality, the geometry in a 2D, cross-sectional explicit plot description is removed on the expense of an increased complexity of the 1D model with two flow domains and mass exchange between them. Our objective was to design a simplified 1D model approach that effectively accounts for plot-scale soil structural variability. In this simplified 1D model, effective soil hydraulic parameters can be assigned to each of the two domains separately. Different theoretical scenarios simulating different shape, size and arrangement of compacted clods in the tilled layer were set to estimate their effect on solute behaviour. The mass exchange parameters could be determined from structure quantification and by comparing simplified 1D with reference 2D results accounting for defined soil structural (i.e., here the compacted regions) geometries. The mass exchange is strongly related to the geometry of the compacted zones including their distribution and size within the non-compacted soil. Additionally, the simplified model approach was tested by comparing it with measured results from a field tracer experiment.

  1. Evaluating the assumption of power-law late time scaling of breakthrough curves in highly heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedretti, Daniele

    2017-04-01

    Power-law (PL) distributions are widely adopted to define the late-time scaling of solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) during transport experiments in highly heterogeneous media. However, from a statistical perspective, distinguishing between a PL distribution and another tailed distribution is difficult, particularly when a qualitative assessment based on visual analysis of double-logarithmic plotting is used. This presentation aims to discuss the results from a recent analysis where a suite of statistical tools was applied to evaluate rigorously the scaling of BTCs from experiments that generate tailed distributions typically described as PL at late time. To this end, a set of BTCs from numerical simulations in highly heterogeneous media were generated using a transition probability approach (T-PROGS) coupled to a finite different numerical solver of the flow equation (MODFLOW) and a random walk particle tracking approach for Lagrangian transport (RW3D). The T-PROGS fields assumed randomly distributed hydraulic heterogeneities with long correlation scales creating solute channeling and anomalous transport. For simplicity, transport was simulated as purely advective. This combination of tools generates strongly non-symmetric BTCs visually resembling PL distributions at late time when plotted in double log scales. Unlike other combination of modeling parameters and boundary conditions (e.g. matrix diffusion in fractures), at late time no direct link exists between the mathematical functions describing scaling of these curves and physical parameters controlling transport. The results suggest that the statistical tests fail to describe the majority of curves as PL distributed. Moreover, they suggest that PL or lognormal distributions have the same likelihood to represent parametrically the shape of the tails. It is noticeable that forcing a model to reproduce the tail as PL functions results in a distribution of PL slopes comprised between 1.2 and 4, which are the

  2. Translation, Cross-Cultural Adaptation, and Validation of the Activity Rating Scale for Disorders of the Knee

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flosadottir, Vala; Roos, Ewa M; Ageberg, Eva

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Activity Rating Scale (ARS) for disorders of the knee evaluates the level of activity by the frequency of participation in 4 separate activities with high demands on knee function, with a score ranging from 0 (none) to 16 (pivoting activities 4 times/wk). PURPOSE: To translate...... and cross-culturally adapt the ARS into Swedish and to assess measurement properties of the Swedish version of the ARS. STUDY DESIGN: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. METHODS: The COSMIN guidelines were followed. Participants (N = 100 [55 women]; mean age, 27 years) who were undergoing...

  3. Genetic analyses benefit from using less heterogeneous phenotypes: an illustration with the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurin, Charles A; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I; Lubke, Gitta H

    2015-05-01

    Phenotypic heterogeneity of depression has been cited as one of the causes of the limited success to detect genetic variants in genome-wide studies. The 7-item Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS-D) was developed to detect depression in individuals with physical health problems. An initial psychometric analysis showed that a short version ("HADS-4") is less heterogeneous and hence more reliable than the full scale, and correlates equally strong with a DSM-oriented depression scale. We compared the HADS-D and the HADS-4 to assess the benefits of using less heterogeneous phenotype measures in genetic analyses. We compared HADS-D and HADS-4 in three separate analyses: (1) twin- and family-based heritability estimation, (2) SNP-based heritability estimation using the software GCTA, and (3) a genome-wide association study (GWAS). The twin study resulted in heritability estimates between 18% and 25%, with additive genetic variance being the largest component. There was also evidence for assortative mating and a dominance component of genetic variance, with HADS-4 having slightly lower estimates of assortment. Importantly, when estimating heritability from SNPs, the HADS-D did not show a significant genetic variance component, while for the HADS-4, a statistically significant amount of heritability was estimated. Moreover, the HADS-4 had substantially more SNPs with small P-values in the GWAS analysis than did the HADS-D. Our results underline the benefits of using more homogeneous phenotypes in psychiatric genetic analyses. Homogeneity can be increased by focusing on core symptoms of disorders, thus reducing the noise in aggregate phenotypes caused by substantially different symptom profiles. © 2015 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  4. Translation, cultural adaptation, and psychometric testing of the environmental distress scale with Indonesian survivors of a volcanic eruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warsini, Sri; Buettner, Petra; Mills, Jane; West, Caryn; Usher, Kim

    2014-06-01

    The Mt Merapi volcanic eruption in October 2010 claimed more than 386 lives, injured thousands of survivors, and devastated the surrounding environment. No instrument was available in Indonesia to assess the psychosocial impact on survivors of environmental degradation caused by such natural disasters. We developed, translated, and tested an Indonesian version of the Environmental Distress Scale (EDS) for use as a tool to reliably measure environmental distress related to environmental damage in Indonesia. The EDS, a prospective translation and psychometric study, was modified for use in a volcano disaster setting in Indonesia; translated into Indonesian; and pilot tested to determine meaning and cultural appropriateness. A test-retest study with 80 survivors of the 2010 Mt Merapi volcanic eruption measured the reliability of the tool. The Indonesian version of the EDS (I-EDS) captured the content of the original EDS with appropriate adaptations for cultural differences of Indonesian natural disaster survivors. The I-EDS can be considered a reliable tool for assessing the psychosocial impact of environmental degradation from natural disasters such as volcanic eruptions, which might be useful for Indonesian researchers.

  5. A large-scale mutation search reveals genetic heterogeneity in 3M syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Céline; Delezoide, Anee-Lise; Guimiot, Fabien; Baumann, Clarisse; Malan, Valérie; Le Merrer, Martine; Da Silva, Daniela Bezerra; Bonneau, Dominique; Chatelain, Pierre; Chu, Carol; Clark, Robin; Cox, Helen; Edery, Patrick; Edouard, Thomas; Fano, Virginia; Gibson, Kate; Gillessen-Kaesbach, Gabriele; Giovannucci-Uzielli, Maria-Luisa; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard Margarete; van Hagen, Johana-Maria; van Hest, Liselot; Horovitz, Dafne; Melki, Judith; Partsch, Carl-Joachim; Plauchu, Henry; Rajab, Anna; Rossi, Massimiliano; Sillence, David; Steichen-Gersdorf, Elisabeth; Stewart, Helen; Unger, Sheila; Zenker, Martin; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2009-01-01

    The 3M syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder recently ascribed to mutations in the CUL7 gene and characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation. Studying a series of 33 novel cases of 3M syndrome, we have identified deleterious CUL7 mutations in 23/33 patients, including 19 novel mutations and one paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 encompassing a CUL7 mutation. Lack of mutations in 10/33 cases and exclusion of the CUL7 locus on chromosome 6p21.1 in six consanguineous families strongly support the genetic heterogeneity of the 3M syndrome. PMID:19225462

  6. Nitrate reduction in geologically heterogeneous catchments — A framework for assessing the scale of predictive capability of hydrological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Refsgaard, Jens Christian, E-mail: jcr@geus.dk [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Auken, Esben [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Bamberg, Charlotte A. [City of Aarhus (Denmark); Christensen, Britt S.B. [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Clausen, Thomas [DHI, Hørsholm (Denmark); Dalgaard, Esben [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); Effersø, Flemming [SkyTEM Aps, Beder (Denmark); Ernstsen, Vibeke [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Gertz, Flemming [Knowledge Center for Agriculture, Skejby (Denmark); Hansen, Anne Lausten [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); He, Xin [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Jacobsen, Brian H. [Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jensen, Karsten Høgh [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Jørgensen, Flemming; Jørgensen, Lisbeth Flindt [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Koch, Julian [Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Nilsson, Bertel [Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland (GEUS) (Denmark); Petersen, Christian [City of Odder (Denmark); De Schepper, Guillaume [Université Laval, Québec (Canada); Schamper, Cyril [Department of Earth Sciences, Aarhus University (Denmark); and others

    2014-01-01

    In order to fulfil the requirements of the EU Water Framework Directive nitrate load from agricultural areas to surface water in Denmark needs to be reduced by about 40%. The regulations imposed until now have been uniform, i.e. the same restrictions for all areas independent of the subsurface conditions. Studies have shown that on a national basis about 2/3 of the nitrate leaching from the root zone is reduced naturally, through denitrification, in the subsurface before reaching the streams. Therefore, it is more cost-effective to identify robust areas, where nitrate leaching through the root zone is reduced in the saturated zone before reaching the streams, and vulnerable areas, where no subsurface reduction takes place, and then only impose regulations/restrictions on the vulnerable areas. Distributed hydrological models can make predictions at grid scale, i.e. at much smaller scale than the entire catchment. However, as distributed models often do not include local scale hydrogeological heterogeneities, they are typically not able to make accurate predictions at scales smaller than they are calibrated. We present a framework for assessing nitrate reduction in the subsurface and for assessing at which spatial scales modelling tools have predictive capabilities. A new instrument has been developed for airborne geophysical measurements, Mini-SkyTEM, dedicated to identifying geological structures and heterogeneities with horizontal and lateral resolutions of 30–50 m and 2 m, respectively, in the upper 30 m. The geological heterogeneity and uncertainty are further analysed by use of the geostatistical software TProGS by generating stochastic geological realisations that are soft conditioned against the geophysical data. Finally, the flow paths within the catchment are simulated by use of the MIKE SHE hydrological modelling system for each of the geological models generated by TProGS and the prediction uncertainty is characterised by the variance between the

  7. Approaches to large scale unsaturated flow in heterogeneous, stratified, and fractured geologic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ababou, R.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops a broad review and assessment of quantitative modeling approaches and data requirements for large-scale subsurface flow in radioactive waste geologic repository. The data review includes discussions of controlled field experiments, existing contamination sites, and site-specific hydrogeologic conditions at Yucca Mountain. Local-scale constitutive models for the unsaturated hydrodynamic properties of geologic media are analyzed, with particular emphasis on the effect of structural characteristics of the medium. The report further reviews and analyzes large-scale hydrogeologic spatial variability from aquifer data, unsaturated soil data, and fracture network data gathered from the literature. Finally, various modeling strategies toward large-scale flow simulations are assessed, including direct high-resolution simulation, and coarse-scale simulation based on auxiliary hydrodynamic models such as single equivalent continuum and dual-porosity continuum. The roles of anisotropy, fracturing, and broad-band spatial variability are emphasized. 252 refs.

  8. Nanoscale modifications in the early heating stages of bone are heterogeneous at the microstructural scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourrier, Aurélien; Chadefaux, Céline; Lemaitre, Estelle; Bellot-Gurlet, Ludovic; Reynolds, Michael; Burghammer, Manfred; Plazanet, Marie; Boivin, Georges; Farlay, Delphine; Bunk, Oliver; Reiche, Ina

    2017-01-01

    Nanoscale studies of bone provide key indicators to evidence subtle structural changes that may occur in the biomedical, forensic and archaeological contexts. One specific problem encountered in all those disciplines, for which the identification of nanostructural cues could prove useful, is to properly monitor the effect of heating on bone tissue. In particular, the mechanisms at work at the onset of heating are still relatively unclear. Using a multiscale approach combining Raman microspectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), synchrotron quantitative scanning small-angle X-ray scattering imaging (qsSAXSI) and polarized light (PL) microscopy, we investigate the ultrastructure of cortical bovine bone heated at temperatures stems from the tissue histology, i.e. from the high degree of heterogeneity of the microstructure induced by the complex cellular processes involved in bone tissue formation. From this study, we conclude that the analysis of bone samples based on the structure and organization of the mineral nanocrystals requires performing measurements at the histological level, which is an advantageous feature of qsSAXSI. This is a critical aspect that extends to a much broader range of questions relating to nanoscale investigations of bone, which could also be extended to other classes of nanostructured heterogeneous materials.

  9. Translation and Initial Validation of the Japanese Version of the Self-Beliefs Related to Social Anxiety Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Shunta; Shimada, Hironori; Sato, Tomoya; Tashiro, Kyoko; Tanaka, Yuki

    2017-04-01

    Cognitive models of social anxiety posit that there are several types of maladaptive beliefs responsible for persistent social anxiety. Although these beliefs are theoretically important, currently there is no validated measure of these beliefs in Japan. In the present study, we translated into Japanese a well-validated measure of these beliefs, the Self-Beliefs Related to Social Anxiety (SBSA) Scale. The psychometric properties of the scale were also examined in two nonclinical samples ( ns = 401 and 30). Using confirmatory factor analysis, the Japanese version of the SBSA was found to have a correlated three-factor structure that consisted of "conditional beliefs," "unconditional beliefs," and "high standard beliefs." In addition, the Japanese version of the SBSA and its subscales demonstrated good internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability. The Japanese version of the SBSA also demonstrated good convergent and divergent validity. Future applications of the Japanese version of the SBSA are discussed.

  10. Translation Adaptation of the A and B activity scales of IPP-RIASEC to the university population of Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cupani, Marcos

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at: a performing a back translation of the Alternate Forms Public Domain (AFPD RIASEC markers and analyzing their psychometric properties, b verifying the internal structure of the test and examining the reliability of the scales, and c obtaining evidence of external validity (convergent validity, sex-related differences between groups and a predictive validity. The results supported that both scales A and B possess an adequate structure and that it can be used with precision to assess the six basic types of personality proposed by Holland. Additionally, we verified the same psychometric properties of the eight best markers of activities in order to develop a unified way. Overall, the results are encouraging and can be considered an acceptable option to measure professional interests.

  11. The German translation and validation of the scale for the assessment of thought, language and communication: a factor analytic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagels, Arne; Stratmann, Mirjam; Ghazi, Sayed; Schales, Christian; Frauenheim, Michael; Turner, Lena; Fährmann, Paul; Hornig, Tobias; Katzev, Michael; Müller-Isberner, Rüdiger; Krug, Axel; Kircher, Tilo

    2013-01-01

    The Scale for the Assessment of Thought, Language and Communication (TLC) represents an instrument for the assessment of formal thought disorder (FTD). The factorial dimensionality of the TLC has yielded ambiguous results for a distinction between positive (e.g. circumstantiality) and negative (e.g. poverty of speech) FTD. The purpose of the current study was to first translate and validate the TLC scale in German. Second, the internal structure was explored in order to identify different FTD dimensions. Two hundred and ten participants (146 patients with ICD-10 diagnoses: depression n = 63, schizophrenia n = 63, mania n = 20; 64 healthy subjects) were interviewed and FTD was rated with the TLC. The principal component analysis of the German TLC version revealed a 3-factor solution, reflecting a disorganized factor, an emptiness factor and a linguistic control factor. The current investigation yielded similar results to those originally reported for the TLC. Thus, a distinction between a positive disorganized, a negative and a semantic word level factor can be supported for the German translation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Translation of the humeral head scale is associated with success of rotator cuff repair for large-massive tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Noboru; D'Lima, Darryl D; Suenaga, Naoki; Ishida, Yasuyuki; Lee, Deokcheol; Goya, Isoya; Chosa, Etsuo

    2017-12-04

    Although a loss of rotator cuff integrity leads to the superior migration of the humeral head, the parameters that characterize the anterolateral migration of the humeral head have not been established. The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the translation of the humeral head scale (T-scale) and clinical outcomes of rotator cuff repair, as well as the correlation between the T-scale and radiologic parameters. One hundred thirty-five consecutive patients with full-thickness rotator cuff tears underwent primary rotator cuff repair. The T-scale, which indicates the distance from the center of the humeral head to the lateral coracoacromial arch, was measured on axial computed tomography scans, and the acromiohumeral interval (AHI) was measured radiographically. The correlation of the two parameters with the clinical scores of the Japanese Orthopaedic Association and University of California-Los Angeles scores and active forward elevation (FE) were evaluated at the preoperative and postoperative stages, respectively. The postoperative T-scale and AHI correlated well with the postoperative FE and clinical scores in the patients with large-massive tears but not in those patients with small-medium tears and preoperative large-massive tears. A significant correlation was observed between the postoperative T-scale and AHI. The T-scale was subject to cuff repair integrity. We demonstrated that the postoperative T-scale was well correlated with the clinical results and postoperative AHI after rotator cuff repair for large-massive tears, indicating that poor outcomes are associated with combined superior and anterolateral migration of the humeral head following retears.

  13. Characterization of Soil Heterogeneity Across Scales in an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Matthew; Gimenez, Daniel; Nemes, Attila; Dathe, Annette; French, Helen; Bloem, Esther; Koestel, John; Jarvis, Nick

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous water flow in undisturbed soils is a natural occurrence that is complex to model due to potential changes in hydraulic properties in soils over changes in space. The use of geophysical methods, such as Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), can provide a minimally-invasive approximation of the spatial heterogeneity of the soil. This spatial distribution can then be combined with measured hydraulic properties to inform a model. An experiment was conducted on an Intensively Investigated Soil Volume (IISV), with dimensions of 2m x 1m x 0.8m, located in an agricultural field that is part of the Gryteland catchment in Ås, Norway. The location of the IISV was determined through surface ERT runs at two sequential resolutions. The first run was used to find an area of higher apparent electrical resistivity in a 23.5 x 11.5 m area with 0.5 m spacing. The second run measured apparent electrical resistivity in a 4.7 x 1 m area with 0.1 m spacing, from which the final IISV volume was derived. Distinct features found in the higher resolution run of the IISV, including a recent tire track from a harvester, were used as a spatial reference point for the installation of 20 pairs of TDR probes and tensiometers. The instruments measured water content, temperature and pressure potential at 10 minute intervals and ran continuously for a period of two weeks. After completion of the data collection the IISV was intensively sampled, with 30 samples taken for bulk density, 62 for hydraulic property measurements, and 20 to be used for both CT scanning and hydraulic property measurements. The measurement of hydraulic properties is ongoing and retention will be measured in the 0 - 100 cm range on a sand table, and from 100 - approx. 900 cm with an automated evaporation method. The formation of spatial clusters to represent the soil heterogeneity as relatively homogeneous units based on mesoscale properties like apparent electrical resistivity, bulk density, texture, in

  14. Spatial scale-dependent habitat heterogeneity influences submarine canyon macrofaunal abundance and diversity off the Main and Northwest Hawaiian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leo, Fabio C.; Vetter, Eric W.; Smith, Craig R.; Rowden, Ashley A.; McGranaghan, Matthew

    2014-06-01

    The mapping of biodiversity on continental margins on landscape scales is highly relevant to marine spatial planning and conservation. Submarine canyons are widespread topographic features on continental and island margins that enhance benthic biomass across a range of oceanic provinces and productivity regimes. However, it remains unclear whether canyons enhance faunal biodiversity on landscape scales relevant to marine protected area (MPA) design. Furthermore, it is not known which physical attributes and heterogeneity metrics can provide good surrogates for large-scale mapping of canyon benthic biodiversity. To test mechanistic hypotheses evaluating the role of different canyon-landscape attributes in enhancing benthic biodiversity at different spatial scales we conducted 34 submersible dives in six submarine canyons and nearby slopes in the Hawaiian archipelago, sampling infaunal macrobenthos in a depth-stratified sampling design. We employed multivariate multiple regression models to evaluate sediment and topographic heterogeneity, canyon transverse profiles, and overall water mass variability as potential drivers of macrobenthic community structure and species richness. We find that variables related to habitat heterogeneity at medium (0.13 km2) and large (15-33 km2) spatial scales such as slope, backscatter reflectivity and canyon transverse profiles are often good predictors of macrobenthic biodiversity, explaining 16-30% of the variance. Particulate organic carbon (POC) flux and distance from shore are also important variables, implicating food supply as a major predictor of canyon biodiversity. Canyons off the high Main Hawaiian Islands (Oahu and Moloka'i) are significantly affected by organic enrichment, showing enhanced infaunal macrobenthos abundance, whereas this effect is imperceptible around the low Northwest Hawaiian Islands (Nihoa and Maro Reef). Variable canyon alpha-diversity and high rates of species turnover (beta-diversity), particularly for

  15. Cm-scale Heterogeneity in Degradation - Potential Impact on Leaching of MCPA through a Variably-Saturated Macroporous Clayey Till

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbom, A. E.; Johnsen, A. R.; Aamand, J.; Binning, P. J.; Dechesne, A.; Smets, B. F.; "Cream-Spatial Heterogeneity"-Team

    2011-12-01

    Recent research has revealed a large variation in pesticide mineralization potentials, but little is known about the scale at which these heterogeneities impact the spreading of contaminants. A modeling study aiming at quantifying how heterogeneous degradation potentials in agricultural soil will affect MCPA degradation and leaching was conducted. 2D-distributions (96-well micro plate mineralization assay) of the mineralization potentials of phenoxy acid herbicides (MCPA, 2,4-D) representing layers in the upper meter of variably-saturated clayey till were applied. The rapid mineralization measured was represented by Monod mineralization kinetics, whereas the rest were either represented by slow 0-order mineralization kinetics or no degradation. Five 3D-modelling scenarios were set up using the COMSOL Multiphysics 4.1 toolbox (COMSOL Inc., Burlington, MA, USA): 1) simple matrix flow of water with no biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes; 2) preferential flow (including a wormhole) of water with no biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes; 3) simple matrix flow of water with average biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes, which corresponds to results derived from a conventional homogenized soil sample; 4) simple matrix flow of water with the observed high variation in biodegradation of the MCPA corresponding to random variation in degradation; and 5) vertical structure in water flow combined with vertically structured degradation (defined hot spots and cold spots), which corresponds to a situation where both flow and degradation are associated with macropores/wormholes. Results show that cm-scale heterogeneity in degradation potential with simple matrix flow has a negligible effect on MCPA leaching at one meter below soil surface. By introducing a wormhole in the low-permeable 3D-soil modeling domain, however, the risk of MCPA-leaching below one meter depth increase drastically with low degradation potential along the wall of macropores/wormholes.

  16. Validation of Hindi Translation of SRPB Facets of WHOQOL-SRPB Scale

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grover, Sandeep; Shah, Ruchita; Kulhara, Parmanand

    2013-01-01

    ...) is a valuable instrument for assessing spirituality and religiousness. The absence of this self-administered instrument in Hindi, which is a major language in India, is an important limitation in using this scale...

  17. Water-energy dynamics, habitat heterogeneity, history, and broad-scale patterns of mammal diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Castán, Dolores; Morales-Barbero, Jennifer; Vetaas, Ole R.

    2016-11-01

    Numerous hypotheses on diversity patterns are often presented as if they were mutually exclusive. However, because of multicollinearity, correlational analyses are not able to distinguish the causal effects of different factors on these patterns. For this reason, we examine the interrelationships among current climate, habitat heterogeneity and evolutionary history by partitioning the variation in both total and non-volant mammal species richness in the Iberian Peninsula. Thus, it is possible to determine the variation accounted for by each one of these three components that is not shared by the others, and the respective overlaps. More specifically, we hypothesize that (H1) in warm temperate zones, a small increase in the available energy has strong negative effects on mammal richness if water availability is limiting; (H2) there are functional relationships between woody plant species richness (WOOD) and the richness of mammal species; (H3) there is a signal of evolutionary history in contemporary patterns of species richness, and (H4) mammal richness and the historical variable mean root distance (MRD) respond to the same driving forces. Additionally, we also test for spatial autocorrelation. We found a sharp nonlinear decrease in mammal richness with increasing energy and a monotonic increase with increasing water availability. Moreover, an interaction term between these two climate factors appeared to be statistically significant, so H1 could not be rejected. WOOD remained significant after partialling out both current climate and MRD at the family level (MRDf), supporting H2. The relationship between mammal diversity and MRD averaged by species richness was found to be spurious, but there appeared a significant historical signal using MRDf (this supports H3). The overlaps among these factors are consistent with H4 and suggest that water-energy dynamics have probably been active drivers throughout evolutionary history with habitat heterogeneity, and biotic

  18. Translator awareness Translator awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Wilss

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If we want to encompass adequately the wide-ranging field of human translation, it is necessary to include in translation studies (TS the concept of translator awareness (or translator consciousness, for that matter. However, this is more easily said than done, because this concept does not easily lend itself to definition, let alone to measurement, e. g., by investigating translator behaviour. To put it bluntly: Translator awareness is a fuzzy concept. Like many obviously difficult-to-define concepts, with which dialogue in TS is burdened, translator awareness lacks an articulated theory within which different forms of translator behaviour can be convincingly related to, or distinguished from, one another. Hence, TS has so far not tackled, at least not systematically, the issue of translator awareness. If we want to encompass adequately the wide-ranging field of human translation, it is necessary to include in translation studies (TS the concept of translator awareness (or translator consciousness, for that matter. However, this is more easily said than done, because this concept does not easily lend itself to definition, let alone to measurement, e. g., by investigating translator behaviour. To put it bluntly: Translator awareness is a fuzzy concept. Like many obviously difficult-to-define concepts, with which dialogue in TS is burdened, translator awareness lacks an articulated theory within which different forms of translator behaviour can be convincingly related to, or distinguished from, one another. Hence, TS has so far not tackled, at least not systematically, the issue of translator awareness.

  19. Locomotive syndrome in the elderly: translation, cultural adaptation, and Brazilian validation of the tool 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Regina Brandão Tavares

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The term Locomotive Syndrome refers to conditions in which the elderly are at high risk of inability to ambulate due to problems in locomotor system. For Locomotive Syndrome screening, the 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale was created. The objective here was to translate, adapt culturally to Brazil, and study the psychometric properties of 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale. Method: The translation and cultural adaptation of 25-Question Geriatric Locomotive Function Scale were carried out, thus resulting in GLFS 25-P, whose psychometric properties were analyzed in a sample of 100 elderly subjects. Sociodemographic data on pain, falls, self-perceived health and basic and instrumental functionalities were determined. GLFS 25-P was applied three times: in one same day by two interviewers, and after 15 days, again by the first interviewer. Result: GLFS 25-P showed a high internal consistency value according to Cronbach's alpha coefficient (0.942, and excellent reproducibility, according to intraclass correlation, with interobserver and intraobserver values of 97.6% and 98.4%, respectively (p < 0.01. Agreements for each item of the instrument were considerable (between 0.248 and 0.673, according to Kappa statistic. In its validation, according to the Pearson's coefficient, regular and good correlations were obtained for the basic (BADL and instrumental (IADL activities of daily living, respectively (p < 0.01. Statistically significant associations with chronic pain (p < 0.001, falls (p = 0.02 and self-perceived health (p < 0.001 were found. A multivariate analysis showed a significantly higher risk of Locomotive Syndrome in the presence of chronic pain (OR 15.92, 95% CI 3.08–82.27 and with a worse self-perceived health (OR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07–0.79. Conclusion: GLFS 25-P proved to be a reliable and valid tool in Locomotive Syndrome screening for the elderly population.

  20. The Swedish version of the Acceptance of Chronic Health Conditions Scale for people with multiple sclerosis: Translation, cultural adaptation and psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forslin, Mia; Kottorp, Anders; Kierkegaard, Marie; Johansson, Sverker

    2016-11-11

    To translate and culturally adapt the Acceptance of Chronic Health Conditions (ACHC) Scale for people with multiple sclerosis into Swedish, and to analyse the psychometric properties of the Swedish version. Ten people with multiple sclerosis participated in translation and cultural adaptation of the ACHC Scale; 148 people with multiple sclerosis were included in evaluation of the psychometric properties of the scale. Translation and cultural adaptation were carried out through translation and back-translation, by expert committee evaluation and pre-test with cognitive interviews in people with multiple sclerosis. The psychometric properties of the Swedish version were evaluated using Rasch analysis. The Swedish version of the ACHC Scale was an acceptable equivalent to the original version. Seven of the original 10 items fitted the Rasch model and demonstrated ability to separate between groups. A 5-item version, including 2 items and 3 super-items, demonstrated better psychometric properties, but lower ability to separate between groups. The Swedish version of the ACHC Scale with the original 10 items did not fit the Rasch model. Two solutions, either with 7 items (ACHC-7) or with 2 items and 3 super-items (ACHC-5), demonstrated acceptable psychometric properties. Use of the ACHC-5 Scale with super-items is recommended, since this solution adjusts for local dependency among items.

  1. Evaluating cultural competence among Japanese clinical nurses: Analyses of a translated scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noji, Ariko; Mochizuki, Yuki; Nosaki, Akiko; Glaser, Dale; Gonzales, Lucia; Mizobe, Akiko; Kanda, Katsuya

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the factor analysis testing and construct validation of the Japanese version of the Caffrey Cultural Competence Health Services (J-CCCHS). The inventory, composed of 28 items, was translated using language and subject matter experts. Psychometric testing (exploratory factor, alpha reliability, and confirmatory factor analyses) was undertaken with nurses (N = 7494, 92% female, mean age 32.6 years) from 19 hospitals across Japan. Principal components extraction with varimax rotation yielded a 5-factor solution (62.31% variance explained) that was labeled: knowledge, comfort-proximal, comfort-distal, awareness, and awareness of national policy. Cronbach α for the subscales ranged from 0.756 to 0.892. In confirmatory factor analysis using the robust maximum likelihood estimator, the chi-square test was as follows: χ(2) (340) = 14604.44, P competence, the instrument can be of value to clinicians and educators alike. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  2. Translation of the Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS) into Danish and a preliminary psychometric validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Gonge, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    A central challenge for empirical research of clinical supervision is how to measure the effectiveness of clinical supervision. The Manchester Clinical Supervision Scale (MCSS) measures supervisees' perception of the effectiveness of clinical supervision. The aims of this paper were to account fo...

  3. Use of hierarchical designs to detect scales of heterogeneity in the invasive species Sargassum muticum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Olabarria

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Invasion of alien species poses serious threats to many ecosystems. Despite the potential of Sargassum muticum to spread and invade new areas, no attention has been given to the study of variability of structural or morphological features across different spatial scales. We employed a hierarchical sampling design to examine patterns of spatial variability of fertility and morphological variables of S. muticum over different spatial scales (quadrats, sites, locations, rias ranging from metres to tens of kilometres We repeated the sampling in March, April and July to test for the consistency of patterns through time. There was no variability between rias (tens of kilometres apart, but substantial differences occurred at the other scales examined. Fertility and percent cover varied between locations (1.5-3 km apart, whereas morphological variables varied between sites (tens of metres apart and quadrats (metres apart. Furthermore, patterns of variation were not consistent over time. The study demonstrated the importance of a multi-scale sampling programme for monitoring seaweed invasion.

  4. [Examination of the psychometric properties of the French translation of the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale (MAAS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, A; Callahan, S; Bouvard, M

    2015-02-01

    Prenatal attachment (PA) is defined as the relationship that develops between a woman and her foetus. Three measurements exist for evaluating PA: the Maternal Foetal Attachment Scale (MFAS), the Maternal Antenatal Attachment Scale (MAAS) and the Prenatal Attachment Inventory (PAI). Of these three, only the PAI has been used in French. The overall objective of the current study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of this second measure of PA: the MAAS. This scale was developed in 1993 by Condon. The MAAS is a 19-item self-report questionnaire which allows for calculating a total attachment score and two subscale scores; one score estimating the quality of the affective attachment experience and the other that estimates the intensity of concern about the foetus. For each item, the future mother provided an appreciation on a 5-point Likert scale (1=absence of feelings for the foetus; 5=very strong feelings for the foetus). The sample was composed of 117 primiparous French females (27.5 ± 4.27 years) in the third trimester of pregnancy (32.84 ± 3.77 weeks of amenorrhea). The study was carried out over a period of 5 months (January-May 2012). Each woman was asked to provide demographic data, a French version of the MAAS, a validated French version of the PAI, and a scale evaluating depressive symptoms (Edinburgh PostNatal Depression Scale, EPDS). The MAAS demonstrated moderately good psychometric properties. Condon's two-factor structure of MAAS was not supported in our sample. Four factors were identified with exploratory factor analysis. Internal consistency was satisfactory for the global scale and for the factor 1 but not sufficiently adequate for the other factors. Concurrent validity was indicated by moderate correlations between the global MAAS scores with the total PAI score. A weak but significant inverse correlation was found between the MAAS and the EPDS suggesting good divergent validity. The authors suggest that additional research be conducted on

  5. On mechanics and material length scales of failure in heterogeneous interfaces using a finite strain high performance solver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Matthew; Matouš, Karel

    2015-12-01

    Three-dimensional simulations capable of resolving the large range of spatial scales, from the failure-zone thickness up to the size of the representative unit cell, in damage mechanics problems of particle reinforced adhesives are presented. We show that resolving this wide range of scales in complex three-dimensional heterogeneous morphologies is essential in order to apprehend fracture characteristics, such as strength, fracture toughness and shape of the softening profile. Moreover, we show that computations that resolve essential physical length scales capture the particle size-effect in fracture toughness, for example. In the vein of image-based computational materials science, we construct statistically optimal unit cells containing hundreds to thousands of particles. We show that these statistically representative unit cells are capable of capturing the first- and second-order probability functions of a given data-source with better accuracy than traditional inclusion packing techniques. In order to accomplish these large computations, we use a parallel multiscale cohesive formulation and extend it to finite strains including damage mechanics. The high-performance parallel computational framework is executed on up to 1024 processing cores. A mesh convergence and a representative unit cell study are performed. Quantifying the complex damage patterns in simulations consisting of tens of millions of computational cells and millions of highly nonlinear equations requires data-mining the parallel simulations, and we propose two damage metrics to quantify the damage patterns. A detailed study of volume fraction and filler size on the macroscopic traction-separation response of heterogeneous adhesives is presented.

  6. Towards Large-Scale, Heterogeneous Anomaly Detection Systems in Industrial Networks: A Survey of Current Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikel Iturbe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial Networks (INs are widespread environments where heterogeneous devices collaborate to control and monitor physical processes. Some of the controlled processes belong to Critical Infrastructures (CIs, and, as such, IN protection is an active research field. Among different types of security solutions, IN Anomaly Detection Systems (ADSs have received wide attention from the scientific community. While INs have grown in size and in complexity, requiring the development of novel, Big Data solutions for data processing, IN ADSs have not evolved at the same pace. In parallel, the development of Big Data frameworks such as Hadoop or Spark has led the way for applying Big Data Analytics to the field of cyber-security, mainly focusing on the Information Technology (IT domain. However, due to the particularities of INs, it is not feasible to directly apply IT security mechanisms in INs, as IN ADSs face unique characteristics. In this work we introduce three main contributions. First, we survey the area of Big Data ADSs that could be applicable to INs and compare the surveyed works. Second, we develop a novel taxonomy to classify existing IN-based ADSs. And, finally, we present a discussion of open problems in the field of Big Data ADSs for INs that can lead to further development.

  7. Heterogeneous Nitrification in a Full Scale Rapid Sand Filter Treating Groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopato, Laure; Röttgers, Nina; Binning, Philip John

    2013-01-01

    between 1.7 m/h and 5.1 m/h. Ammonium profiles and salt breakthrough curves were obtained in four different locations of the filter six times during two filter runs. The experiments show that the nitrification in the rapid sand filter was heterogeneous. The ammonium profiles exhibited variation in time...... and in space, vertically and laterally within the filter. The nitrification rate constants were calculated using the ammonium profiles and the local pore velocity data obtained from the breakthrough curves. The local pore velocities were estimated to vary from 0.02 to 20.5 m/h. The nitrification rate constants...... varied randomly in time and it was not possible to determine a clear order of the nitrification reaction. The average zero order nitrification rate constant was 7 mg N/l/h and the average first order nitrification rate constant was 28 h−1 with an average 1.5 g/h/m2 ammonium load. The first order...

  8. Reliability and validity of the Thai translation (Thai PPS Adult Suandok) of the Palliative Performance Scale (PPSv2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chewaskulyong, Busyamas; Sapinun, Ladarat; Downing, G Michael; Intaratat, Prapai; Lesperance, Mary; Leautrakul, Suntree; Somwangprasert, Areewan; Leerapun, Thaninit

    2012-12-01

    the Thai PPS Adult Suandok tool was translated from the Palliative Performance Scale (PPSv2) and had been used in Chiang Mai, Thailand for several years. to test the reliability and validity of the Thai translation of PPSv2. a set of 22 palliative cases were used to determine a PPS score on Time-1, and repeated two weeks later as Time-2. A survey questionnaire was also completed for qualitative analysis. a total of 70 nurses and physicians from Maharaj Nakorn Hospital in Chiang Mai participated. The Time-1 intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for absolute agreement is 0.911 (95% CI 0.86-0.96) and for consistency is 0.92 (95% CI 0.87-0.96). The Time-2 ICC for agreement is 0.905 (95% CI 0.85-0.95) and for consistency is 0.912 (95% CI 0.86-0.96). These findings indicate good agreement among participants and also were somewhat higher in the Time-2 re-test phase. Cohen's kappa score is 0.55, demonstrating a moderate agreement. Thematic analysis from the surveys showed that 91% felt PPS to be a valuable clinical tool overall, with it being 'very useful' or 'useful' in several areas, including care planning (78% and 20%), disease monitoring (69% and 27%) and prognostication (61% and 31%), respectively. Some respondents noted difficulty in determining appropriate scores in paraplegic patients or those with feeding tubes, while others found the instructions long or difficult. the Thai PPS Adult Suandok translated tool has good inter- and intra-rater reliability and can be used regularly for clinical care.

  9. Upscaling spatially heterogeneous parameterisations of soil compaction to investigate catchment scale flood risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian

    2016-04-01

    Upscaling land management signals observed at the point scale to the regional scale is challenging for three reasons. Individual catchments are unique and at the point scale land management signals are spatially and temporally variable, depending on topography, soil characteristics and on the individual characteristics of a rainfall event. However at larger scales land management effects diffuse and climatic or human induced signals have a larger impact. This does not mean that there is no influence on river flows, just that the effect is not discernible. Land management practices in different areas of the catchment vary spatially and temporally and their influence on the flood hydrograph will be different at different points within the catchment. Once the water enters the river, the land management effects are disturbed further by hydrodynamic and geomorphological dispersion. Pastoral agriculture is the dominant rural land cover in the UK (40% is classified as improved/ semi-natural grassland - Land Cover Map 2007). The intensification of agriculture has resulted in greater levels of soil compaction associated with higher stocking densities in fields. Natural flood management is the alteration, restoration or use of landscape features to reduce flood risk. Soil compaction has been shown to change the partitioning of rainfall into runoff. However the link between locally observed hydrological changes and catchment scale flood risk has not yet been proven. This paper presents the results of a hydrological modelling study on the impact of soil compaction on downstream flood risk. Field experiments have been conducted in multiple fields in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK (area of 120km2) to determine soil characteristics and compaction levels under different types of land-use. We use this data to parameterise and validate the Distributed Physically-based Connectivity of Runoff model. A number of compaction scenarios have been tested that represent

  10. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and reproducibility of the Brazilian portuguese-language version of the Wisconsin Smoking Withdrawal Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira Junior, Boanerges Lopes de; Jardim, José Roberto; Nascimento, Oliver Augusto; Souza, George Márcio da Costa e; Baker, Timothy B; Santoro, Ilka Lopes

    2012-01-01

    To cross-culturally adapt the Wisconsin Smoking Withdrawal Scale (WSWS) for use in Brazil and evaluate the reproducibility of the new (Brazilian Portuguese-language) version. The original English version of the WSWS was translated into Brazilian Portuguese. For cross-cultural adaptation, the Brazilian Portuguese-language version of the WSWS was administered to eight volunteers, all of whom were smokers. After adjustments had been made, the WSWS version was back-translated into English. The Brazilian Portuguese-language version was thereby found to be accurate. The final Brazilian Portuguese-language version of the WSWS was applied to 75 smokers at three distinct times. For the assessment of interobserver reproducibility, it was applied twice within a 30-min interval by two different interviewers. For the assessment of intraobserver reproducibility, it was applied again 15 days later by one of the interviewers. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) were used in order to test the concordance of the answers. The significance level was set at p Portuguese-language version of the WSWS is reproducible, fast, and simple. It can therefore be used as a tool for assessing the severity of the symptoms of nicotine withdrawal syndrome.

  11. Translation into Brazilian Portuguese, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Stanford presenteeism scale-6 and work instability scale for ankylosing spondylitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frauendorf, Renata; de Medeiros Pinheiro, Marcelo; Ciconelli, Rozana Mesquita

    2014-12-01

    Loss of productivity at work, as a result of health problems, is becoming an issue of interest due to the high burden it represents in society. The measurement of such phenomenon can be made using generic and specific scales for certain diseases such as the Stanford Presenteeism Scale (SPS-6) and the Work Instability Scale for Ankylosing Spondylitis (AS-WIS), specific for patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). The aim of this study was to translate and perform a cross-cultural adaptation of SPS-6 and AS-WIS into Portuguese and check their psychometric properties. The study also aimed to evaluate the relationship between the general scores of the scales and the main sociodemographic and clinical data, lifestyles, and absenteeism in patients with AS and correlate these variables with SPS-6 and AS-WIS scales. A sample of 120 patients with AS and 80 workers at a university hospital was evaluated. The processes for the translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the instruments followed preestablished steps and rules presented in the literature. For the evaluation of measurement properties and correlations between scales, intra-class correlation coefficient (reproducibility analysis), Cronbach alpha (internal consistency), and Pearson correlation coefficient (validity) were employed. The inter-observer (0.986) and intra-observer (0.992) reproducibilities of the AS-WIS were shown to be high as well as the internal consistency (0.995). Similarly, the inter-observer reliability of SPS-6 was considered good (0.890), although it showed a poorer performance when considering the same observer (Pearson correlation coefficient = 0.675 and intra-class correlation = 0.656). Internal consistency, for the total number of items, as measured by Cronbach alpha, was 0.889. The validity of the scales was evaluated thru the comparison of the achieved scores with the results of the WLQ, SF-36, ASQoL, BASFI, BASDAI, HAQ-S, and SRQ-20 instruments. Correlations between loss of

  12. Toward Multi-scale Modeling and simulation of conduction in heterogeneous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lechman, Jeremy B. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bolintineanu, Dan [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cooper, Marcia A. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Erikson, William W. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Foiles, Stephen M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kay, Jeffrey J [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Phinney, Leslie M. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Piekos, Edward S. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Specht, Paul Elliott [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wixom, Ryan R. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yarrington, Cole [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report summarizes a project in which the authors sought to develop and deploy: (i) experimental techniques to elucidate the complex, multiscale nature of thermal transport in particle-based materials; and (ii) modeling approaches to address current challenges in predicting performance variability of materials (e.g., identifying and characterizing physical- chemical processes and their couplings across multiple length and time scales, modeling information transfer between scales, and statically and dynamically resolving material structure and its evolution during manufacturing and device performance). Experimentally, several capabilities were successfully advanced. As discussed in Chapter 2 a flash diffusivity capability for measuring homogeneous thermal conductivity of pyrotechnic powders (and beyond) was advanced; leading to enhanced characterization of pyrotechnic materials and properties impacting component development. Chapter 4 describes success for the first time, although preliminary, in resolving thermal fields at speeds and spatial scales relevant to energetic components. Chapter 7 summarizes the first ever (as far as the authors know) application of TDTR to actual pyrotechnic materials. This is the first attempt to actually characterize these materials at the interfacial scale. On the modeling side, new capabilities in image processing of experimental microstructures and direct numerical simulation on complicated structures were advanced (see Chapters 3 and 5). In addition, modeling work described in Chapter 8 led to improved prediction of interface thermal conductance from first principles calculations. Toward the second point, for a model system of packed particles, significant headway was made in implementing numerical algorithms and collecting data to justify the approach in terms of highlighting the phenomena at play and pointing the way forward in developing and informing the kind of modeling approach originally envisioned (see Chapter 6). In

  13. Evaluation of Distributed Model Structures in Catchment Scale Modeling to Capture Heterogeneous Landscape Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julich, S.; Breuer, L.; Vaché, K. B.; Frede, H.

    2007-12-01

    The ability of a model to capture dominant ecological and hydrological processes is a prerequisite for the use of the model in studying impacts of landuse change on the water balance and nutrient fluxes from a watershed. However, in many cases, available model structures do not adequately represent processes of interest. In these cases, a pragmatic response is to revise the structure to better represent key processes. In this paper we outline a model application strategy designed to inject additional realism into a commonly applied model structure. Here we focus on the SWAT model in an application to the mesoscale (514 km 2) Wetter catchment, in central Germany. The catchment is characterized by a heterogeneous landscape structure and characteristics. The southwestern part is formed by a low mountain range with shallow soils over bedrock and steep slopes. Here lateral subsurface stormflow appears to be the dominant runoff generation process. The central and north- eastern regions of the basin are characterized by deep loess born soils and shallow slopes. We hypothesize that the much larger storage potential of the soils promotes vertical infiltration and storage, and that lateral runoff is much less significant. We utilize a variety of SWAT versions to evaluate the potential effects of this hypothesis on the capacity of the model to capture the measured runoff response. Our results indicate that the original SWAT- structure as well as the SWAT-G structure (which was applied to other low mountain catchments in Germany) are not able to acceptably represent the hydrograph. However, a hybrid of the two structures, specifically designed to reflect differences between the mountainous regions and the more gentle topography does result in a satisfactory representation of the hydrograph. The inclusion of elements from of both model structures (original SWAT and SWAT-G) seems to be the best way to reflect our hydrological process understanding, producing results which

  14. Translation and validation of the amyotrophic lateral sclerosis severity scale (ALSSS)

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Núbia Maria Freire Vieira; Guerra, Celise Cirelli; Teixeira, Luciane de Cássia; Silva, Luciano Bruno de Carvalho; Sordi, Marina di; Mourão, Lúcia; Nucci, Anamarli

    2009-01-01

    O objetivo do trabalho foi traduzir a Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Severity Scale para o português, como Escala de gravidade da esclerose lateral amiotrófica (Egela), além de validar e estudar sua confiabilidade. A escala foi submetida à versão e retroversão por tradutores bilíngües e três fisioterapeutas treinaram para padronizar sua aplicação. Foram avaliados 22 pacientes (5 mulheres, 17 homens, média de idade 45,9 anos) pela Egela e pela medida de independência funcional (MIF); 11 foram e...

  15. Cm-scale Heterogeneity in Degradation - Potential Impact on Leaching of MCPA through a Variably-Saturated Macroporous Clayey Till

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenbom, Annette Elisabeth; Johnsen, Anders R.; Aamand, Jens

    with no biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes; 2) preferential flow (including a wormhole) of water with no biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes; 3) simple matrix flow of water with average biodegradation of the MCPA at all nodes, which corresponds to results derived from a conventional homogenized soil sample; 4...... both flow and degradation are associated with macropores/wormholes. Results show that cm-scale heterogeneity in degradation potential with simple matrix flow has a negligible effect on MCPA leaching at one meter below soil surface. By introducing a wormhole in the low-permeable 3D-soil modeling domain......, however, the risk of MCPA-leaching below one meter depth increase drastically with low degradation potential along the wall of macropores/wormholes....

  16. Congener diversity, topographic heterogeneity and human-assisted dispersal predict spread rates of alien herpetofauna at a global scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xuan; Li, Xianping; Liu, Zetian; Tingley, Reid; Kraus, Fred; Guo, Zhongwei; Li, Yiming

    2014-07-01

    Understanding the factors that determine rates of range expansion is not only crucial for developing risk assessment schemes and management strategies for invasive species, but also provides important insight into the ability of species to disperse in response to climate change. However, there is little knowledge on why some invasions spread faster than others at large spatiotemporal scales. Here, we examine the effects of human activities, species traits and characteristics of the invaded range on spread rates using a global sample of alien reptile and amphibian introductions. We show that spread rates vary remarkably among invaded locations within a species, and differ across biogeographical realms. Spread rates are positively related to the richness of native congeneric species and human-assisted dispersal in the invaded range but are negatively correlated with topographic heterogeneity. Our findings highlight the importance of environmental characteristics and human-assisted dispersal in developing robust frameworks for predicting species' range shifts. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Application of calcined waste fish (Labeo rohita) scale as low-cost heterogeneous catalyst for biodiesel synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R; Bepari, S; Banerjee, A

    2011-02-01

    This paper explores the feasibility of converting waste Rohu fish (Labeo rohita) scale into a high-performance, reusable, low-cost heterogeneous catalyst for synthesis of biodiesel from soybean oil. The thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis revealed that a significant portion of the main component of fish scale i.e. HAP (hydroxyapatite) could be transformed into β-tri-calcium phosphate when calcined above 900°C for 2 h. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) morphology studies of the calcined scale depicted a fibrous layer of porous structure; while a BET surface area of 39 m(2)/g was measured. Response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to determine the optimal parametric conditions viz. methanol/oil molar ratio, 6.27:1, calcination temperature, 997.42°C and catalyst concentration, 1.01 wt.% of oil corresponding to a maximum FAME yield of 97.73%. Reusability results confirmed that the prepared catalyst could be reemployed up to six times, procreating a potentially applicable avenue in biodiesel synthesis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Assimilation of Heterogeneous Continuous and Episodic GNSS Observations for Board Scale Earth Science Studies. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClusky, S.; Reilinger, R. E.; Uzel, T.; Eren, K.; Dindar, A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Over the last twenty-five years an increasing number of discrete GNSS networks have been installed across the globe for a variety of purposes. These networks have been built with specific scientific or civil goals in mind such as; monitoring atmospheric or ionospheric properties, definition of terrestrial or cadastral reference frames, monitoring or tracking of infrastructure, observation tectonic processes, etc… These networks were designed with specific site spacing and topologies, monument stability requirements, instrumentation types, data sampling and telemetry requirements. Currently there are hundreds or even thousands of these networks in operation - Can the data collected by this diverse heterogeneous set of networks be assimilated into operational crustal deformation network analyses and providing new information for constraining models of Earth processes? Are there new opportunities in Earth Science research presented by these combined super networks? As case study we will compare the performance characteristics of the recently installed Turkish CORS-TR real time network with the Mediterranean Crustal Deformation Monitoring network in operated by MIT since the mid 1980’s. Additionally we will examine how the integration of data from these two networks improves our ability to constrain crustal deformation models of the region. The CORS-TR network is a continuously operating ~150 station GNSS network installed at ~80-100 km spacing across Turkey and North Cyprus. The CORS-TR network was established by Istanbul Kultur University in corporation with General Directorate of Land Registry and Cadastre (GDLRC) and General Command of Mapping (GCM) between May 2006 and May 2009 and was designed to fulfill a range of civil and scientific goals including; real time access to the Turkish cadastral reference frame for surveyors, precise RTK tracking of infrastructure, weather, atmospheric and ionospheric studies and monitoring of earthquake and crustal deformation

  19. Effective Electrostatic Interactions Between Two Overall Neutral Surfaces with Quenched Charge Heterogeneity Over Atomic Length Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S.

    2017-12-01

    Using Monte Carlo results as a reference, a classical density functional theory ( CDFT) is shown to reliably predict the forces between two heterogeneously charged surfaces immersed in an electrolyte solution, whereas the Poisson-Boltzmann ( PB) theory is demonstrated to deteriorate obviously for the same system even if the system parameters considered fall within the validity range of the PB theory in the homogeneously charged surfaces. By applying the tested CDFT, we study the effective electrostatic potential of mean force ( EPMF) between two face-face planar and hard surfaces of zero net charge on which positive and negative charges are separated and considered to present as discontinuous spots on the inside edges of the two surfaces. Main conclusions are summarized as follows: (i) strength of the EPMF in the surface charge separation case is very sensitively and positively correlated with the surface charge separation level and valency of the salt ion. Particularly, the charge separation level and the salt ion valency have a synergistic effect, which makes high limit of the EPMF strength in the surface charge separation case significantly go beyond that of the ideal homogeneously charged surface counterpart at average surface charge density similar to the average surface positive or negative charge density in the charge separation case. (ii) The surface charge distribution patterns mainly influence sign of the EPMF: symmetrical and asymmetrical patterns induce repulsive and attractive (at small distances) EPMF, respectively; but with low valency salt ions and low charge separation level the opposite may be the case. With simultaneous presence of both higher valency cation and anion, the EPMF can be repulsive at intermediate distances for asymmetrical patterns. (iii) Salt ion size has a significant impact, which makes the EPMF tend to become more and more repulsive with the ion diameter regardless of the surface charge distribution patterns and the valency of

  20. Autonomous and Decentralized Optimization of Large-Scale Heterogeneous Wireless Networks by Neural Network Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Mikio; Tran, Ha Nguyen; Miyamoto, Goh; Murata, Yoshitoshi; Harada, Hiroshi; Kato, Shuzo

    We propose a neurodynamical approach to a large-scale optimization problem in Cognitive Wireless Clouds, in which a huge number of mobile terminals with multiple different air interfaces autonomously utilize the most appropriate infrastructure wireless networks, by sensing available wireless networks, selecting the most appropriate one, and reconfiguring themselves with seamless handover to the target networks. To deal with such a cognitive radio network, game theory has been applied in order to analyze the stability of the dynamical systems consisting of the mobile terminals' distributed behaviors, but it is not a tool for globally optimizing the state of the network. As a natural optimization dynamical system model suitable for large-scale complex systems, we introduce the neural network dynamics which converges to an optimal state since its property is to continually decrease its energy function. In this paper, we apply such neurodynamics to the optimization problem of radio access technology selection. We compose a neural network that solves the problem, and we show that it is possible to improve total average throughput simply by using distributed and autonomous neuron updates on the terminal side.

  1. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale: translation and validation for a Greek sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kogevinas Manolis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS is an important screening instrument that is used routinely with mothers during the postpartum period for early identification of postnatal depression. The purpose of this study was to validate the Greek version of EPDS along with sensitivity, specificity and predictive values. Methods 120 mothers within 12 weeks postpartum were recruited from the perinatal care registers of the Maternity Departments of 4 Hospitals of Heraklion municipality, Greece. EPDS and Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II surveys were administered in random order to the mothers. Each mother was diagnosed with depression according to the validated Greek version of BDI-II. The psychometric measurements that were performed included: two independent samples t-tests, One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA, reliability coefficients, Explanatory factor analysis using a Varimax rotation and Principal Components Method. Confirmatory analysis -known as structural equation modelling- of principal components was conducted by LISREL (Linear Structural Relations. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC analysis was carried out to evaluate the global functioning of the scale. Results 8 (6.7% of the mothers were diagnosed with major postnatal depression, 14 (11.7% with moderate and 38 (31.7% with mild depression on the basis of BDI-II scores. The internal consistency of the EPDS Greek version -using Chronbach's alpha coefficient- was found 0.804 and that of Guttman split-half coefficient 0.742. Our findings confirm the multidimensionality of EPDS, demonstrating a two-factor structure which contained subscales reflecting depressive symptoms and anxiety. The Confirmatory Factor analysis demonstrated that the two factor model offered a very good fit to our data. The area under ROC curve AUC was found 0.7470 and the logistic estimate for the threshold score of 8/9 fitted the model sensitivity at 76.7% and model specificity at 68

  2. Large-scale monocular FastSLAM2.0 acceleration on an embedded heterogeneous architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouzahir, Mohamed; Elouardi, Abdelhafid; Bouaziz, Samir; Latif, Rachid; Tajer, Abdelouahed

    2016-12-01

    Simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM) is widely used in many robotic applications and autonomous navigation. This paper presents a study of FastSLAM2.0 computational complexity based on a monocular vision system. The algorithm is intended to operate with many particles in a large-scale environment. FastSLAM2.0 was partitioned into functional blocks allowing a hardware software matching on a CPU-GPGPU-based SoC architecture. Performances in terms of processing time and localization accuracy were evaluated using a real indoor dataset. Results demonstrate that an optimized and efficient CPU-GPGPU partitioning allows performing accurate localization results and high-speed execution of a monocular FastSLAM2.0-based embedded system operating under real-time constraints.

  3. Distributed constraint satisfaction for coordinating and integrating a large-scale, heterogenous enterprise

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenberg, C

    2003-01-01

    Market forces are continuously driving public and private organisations towards higher productivity, shorter process and production times, and fewer labour hours. To cope with these changes, organisations are adopting new organisational models of coordination and cooperation that increase their flexibility, consistency, efficiency, productivity and profit margins. In this thesis an organisational model of coordination and cooperation is examined using a real life example; the technical integration of a distributed large-scale project of an international physics collaboration. The distributed resource constraint project scheduling problem is modelled and solved with the methods of distributed constraint satisfaction. A distributed local search method, the distributed breakout algorithm (DisBO), is used as the basis for the coordination scheme. The efficiency of the local search method is improved by extending it with an incremental problem solving scheme with variable ordering. The scheme is implemented as cen...

  4. Study of Uranium Transport Utilizing Reactive Numerical Modeling and Experimental Data from Heterogeneous Intermediate-Scale Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D.; Miller, A.; Honeyman, B.

    2007-12-01

    The study of the transport of contaminants in groundwater is critical in order to mitigate risks to downstream receptors from sites where past releases of these contaminants has resulted in the degradation of the water quality of the underlying aquifer. In most cases, the fate and transport of these contaminants occurs in a chemically and physically heterogeneous environment; thereby making the prediction of the ultimate fate of these contaminants difficult. In order to better understand the fundamental processes that have the greatest effect on the transport of these contaminants, careful laboratory study must be completed in a controlled environment. Once the experimental data has been generated, the validation of numerical models may then be achieved. Questions on the management of contaminated sites may center on the long-term release (e.g., desorption, dissolution) behavior of contaminated geomedia. Data on the release of contaminants is often derived from bench-scale experiments or, in rare cases, through field-scale experiments. A central question, however, is how molecular-scale processes (e.g., bond breaking) are expressed at the macroscale. This presentation describes part of a collaborative study between the Colorado School of Mines, the USGS and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab on upscaling pore-scale processes to understanding field-scale observations. In the work described here, two experiments were conducted in two intermediate-scale tanks (2.44 m x 1.22 m x 7.6 cm and 2.44 m x 0.61 m x 7.6 cm) to generate data to quantify the processes of uranium dissolution and transport in fully saturated conditions, and to evaluate the ability of two reactive transport models to capture the relevant processes and predict U behavior at the intermediate scale. Each tank was designed so that spatial samples could be collected from the side of the tank, as well as samples from the effluent end of the tank. The larger tank was packed with a less than 2mm fraction of a

  5. Translation and Adaptation of the Genetic Counselling Outcome Scale (GCOS-24) for Use in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Birgitte Rode; Overbeck, Gritt; Hjortshøj, Tina Duelund

    2017-01-01

    and validated with clinical genetics patients in the British NHS. This study reports the translation and adaptation of the GCOS-24 for use in Denmark. GCOS-24 was translated and back translated, supervised by an expert committee. Feedback on the first version was collected from genetic counseling patients...

  6. Quantifying the heterogeneity of soil compaction, physical soil properties and soil moisture across multiple spatial scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Victoria; Pattison, Ian; Sander, Graham

    2016-04-01

    England's rural landscape is dominated by pastoral agriculture, with 40% of land cover classified as either improved or semi-natural grassland according to the Land Cover Map 2007. Since the Second World War the intensification of agriculture has resulted in greater levels of soil compaction, associated with higher stocking densities in fields. Locally compaction has led to loss of soil storage and an increased in levels of ponding in fields. At the catchment scale soil compaction has been hypothesised to contribute to increased flood risk. Previous research (Pattison, 2011) on a 40km2 catchment (Dacre Beck, Lake District, UK) has shown that when soil characteristics are homogeneously parameterised in a hydrological model, downstream peak discharges can be 65% higher for a heavy compacted soil than for a lightly compacted soil. However, at the catchment scale there is likely to be a significant amount of variability in compaction levels within and between fields, due to multiple controlling factors. This research focusses in on one specific type of land use (permanent pasture with cattle grazing) and areas of activity within the field (feeding area, field gate, tree shelter, open field area). The aim was to determine if the soil characteristics and soil compaction levels are homogeneous in the four areas of the field. Also, to determine if these levels stayed the same over the course of the year, or if there were differences at the end of the dry (October) and wet (April) periods. Field experiments were conducted in the River Skell catchment, in Yorkshire, UK, which has an area of 120km2. The dynamic cone penetrometer was used to determine the structural properties of the soil, soil samples were collected to assess the bulk density, organic matter content and permeability in the laboratory and the Hydrosense II was used to determine the soil moisture content in the topsoil. Penetration results show that the tree shelter is the most compacted and the open field area

  7. Spatial heterogeneity in ecologically important climate variables at coarse and fine scales in a high-snow mountain landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Kevin R; Ettinger, Ailene K; Lundquist, Jessica D; Raleigh, Mark S; Hille Ris Lambers, Janneke

    2013-01-01

    Climate plays an important role in determining the geographic ranges of species. With rapid climate change expected in the coming decades, ecologists have predicted that species ranges will shift large distances in elevation and latitude. However, most range shift assessments are based on coarse-scale climate models that ignore fine-scale heterogeneity and could fail to capture important range shift dynamics. Moreover, if climate varies dramatically over short distances, some populations of certain species may only need to migrate tens of meters between microhabitats to track their climate as opposed to hundreds of meters upward or hundreds of kilometers poleward. To address these issues, we measured climate variables that are likely important determinants of plant species distributions and abundances (snow disappearance date and soil temperature) at coarse and fine scales at Mount Rainier National Park in Washington State, USA. Coarse-scale differences across the landscape such as large changes in elevation had expected effects on climatic variables, with later snow disappearance dates and lower temperatures at higher elevations. However, locations separated by small distances (∼20 m), but differing by vegetation structure or topographic position, often experienced differences in snow disappearance date and soil temperature as great as locations separated by large distances (>1 km). Tree canopy gaps and topographic depressions experienced later snow disappearance dates than corresponding locations under intact canopy and on ridges. Additionally, locations under vegetation and on topographic ridges experienced lower maximum and higher minimum soil temperatures. The large differences in climate we observed over small distances will likely lead to complex range shift dynamics and could buffer species from the negative effects of climate change.

  8. Spatial heterogeneity in ecologically important climate variables at coarse and fine scales in a high-snow mountain landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin R Ford

    Full Text Available Climate plays an important role in determining the geographic ranges of species. With rapid climate change expected in the coming decades, ecologists have predicted that species ranges will shift large distances in elevation and latitude. However, most range shift assessments are based on coarse-scale climate models that ignore fine-scale heterogeneity and could fail to capture important range shift dynamics. Moreover, if climate varies dramatically over short distances, some populations of certain species may only need to migrate tens of meters between microhabitats to track their climate as opposed to hundreds of meters upward or hundreds of kilometers poleward. To address these issues, we measured climate variables that are likely important determinants of plant species distributions and abundances (snow disappearance date and soil temperature at coarse and fine scales at Mount Rainier National Park in Washington State, USA. Coarse-scale differences across the landscape such as large changes in elevation had expected effects on climatic variables, with later snow disappearance dates and lower temperatures at higher elevations. However, locations separated by small distances (∼20 m, but differing by vegetation structure or topographic position, often experienced differences in snow disappearance date and soil temperature as great as locations separated by large distances (>1 km. Tree canopy gaps and topographic depressions experienced later snow disappearance dates than corresponding locations under intact canopy and on ridges. Additionally, locations under vegetation and on topographic ridges experienced lower maximum and higher minimum soil temperatures. The large differences in climate we observed over small distances will likely lead to complex range shift dynamics and could buffer species from the negative effects of climate change.

  9. PedsQLTM 4.0 Generic Core Scales for adolescents in the Yoruba language: translation and general psychometric properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atilola, Olayinka; Stevanović, Dejan

    2014-04-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is a universally accepted concept for measuring the impact of different aspects of life on general well-being. Adaptation of existing QOL instruments to local cultures has been identified as a better strategy than development of new ones. To translate and adapt the Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory™ Version 4.0 Generic Core Scales (PedsQL™) to the Yoruba language and culture and to test the psychometric properties of the adapted instrument among adolescents. Psychometric properties including internal consistency reliability, construct and factorial validity of the Yoruba version of PedsQL™ were evaluated using standard procedures. The self report and proxy scales of the Yoruba PedsQL™ were developed with good cultural relevance and semantic/conceptual equivalence. Results from 527 adolescents revealed a Cronbach's coefficient which exceeded 0.7 for internal consistency reliability for all scores. The healthy subjects reported higher PedsQL™ scores than those with mental health and physical problems, which confirmed construct validity. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a good model fit for the Psychosocial Health score, but not for the other measures. The Yoruba PedsQL™ is culturally appropriate and with good internal consistency, reliability and construct validity. More work is needed regarding its factorial validity.

  10. Translating democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doerr, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    grassroots activists in social movements use translation as a novel practice to debate political alternatives in the European Union's (EU) multilingual public sphere. In recent years, new cross-European protest movements have created the multilingual discursive democracy arena known as the European Social...... Forum (ESF). I compare deliberative practices in the multilingual ESF preparatory meetings with those in monolingual national Social Forum meetings in three Western European countries. My comparison shows that multilingualism does not reduce the inclusivity of democratic deliberation as compared...... in institutionalized habits and norms of deliberation. Addressing democratic theorists, my findings suggest that translation could be a way to think about difference not as a hindrance but as a resource for democracy in linguistically heterogeneous societies and public spaces, without presupposing a shared language...

  11. Translating the Science of Measuring Ecosystems at a National Scale: NEON's Online Learning Portal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    "Big Data" are becoming increasingly common in many fields. The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) will collect data over the 30 years, using consistent, standardized methods across the United States. These freely available new data provide an opportunity for increased understanding of continental- and global scale processes such as changes in vegetation structure and condition, biodiversity and landuse. However, while "big data" are becoming more accessible and available, working with big data is challenging. New and potentially unfamiliar data types and associated processing methods, required to work with a growing diversity of available data take time and resources to learn. Analysis of these big datasets may further present a challenge given large file sizes, and uncertainty regarding best methods to properly statistically summarize and analyze results. Finally, resources that support learning these concepts and approaches, are distributed widely across multiple online spaces and may take time to find. This presentation will overview the development of NEON's collaborative University-focused online education portal. It will also cover content testing, community feedback and results from workshops using online content. Portal content is hosted in github to facilitate community input, accessibility version control. Content includes 1) videos and supporting graphics that explain key concepts related to NEON and related big spatio-temporal and 2) data tutorials that include subsets of spatio-temporal data that can be used to learn key big data skills in a self-paced approach, or that can be used as a teaching tool in the classroom or in a workshop. All resources utilize free and open data processing, visualization and analysis tools, techniques and scripts. All NEON materials are being developed in collaboration with the scientific community and are being tested via in-person workshops. Visit the portal online: www.neondataskills.org.

  12. Scales of Spatial Heterogeneity of Plastic Marine Debris in the Northeast Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Miriam C.; Titmus, Andrew J.; Ford, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Plastic debris has been documented in many marine ecosystems, including remote coastlines, the water column, the deep sea, and subtropical gyres. The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG), colloquially called the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” has been an area of particular scientific and public concern. However, quantitative assessments of the extent and variability of plastic in the NPSG have been limited. Here, we quantify the distribution, abundance, and size of plastic in a subset of the eastern Pacific (approximately 20–40°N, 120–155°W) over multiple spatial scales. Samples were collected in Summer 2009 using surface and subsurface plankton net tows and quantitative visual observations, and Fall 2010 using surface net tows only. We documented widespread, though spatially variable, plastic pollution in this portion of the NPSG and adjacent waters. The overall median microplastic numerical concentration in Summer 2009 was 0.448 particles m−2 and in Fall 2010 was 0.021 particles m−2, but plastic concentrations were highly variable over the submesoscale (10 s of km). Size-frequency spectra were skewed towards small particles, with the most abundant particles having a cross-sectional area of approximately 0.01 cm2. Most microplastic was found on the sea surface, with the highest densities detected in low-wind conditions. The numerical majority of objects were small particles collected with nets, but the majority of debris surface area was found in large objects assessed visually. Our ability to detect high-plastic areas varied with methodology, as stations with substantial microplastic did not necessarily also contain large visually observable objects. A power analysis of our data suggests that high variability of surface microplastic will make future changes in abundance difficult to detect without substantial sampling effort. Our findings suggest that assessment and monitoring of oceanic plastic debris must account for high spatial variability

  13. Scales of spatial heterogeneity of plastic marine debris in the northeast pacific ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam C Goldstein

    Full Text Available Plastic debris has been documented in many marine ecosystems, including remote coastlines, the water column, the deep sea, and subtropical gyres. The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG, colloquially called the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch," has been an area of particular scientific and public concern. However, quantitative assessments of the extent and variability of plastic in the NPSG have been limited. Here, we quantify the distribution, abundance, and size of plastic in a subset of the eastern Pacific (approximately 20-40°N, 120-155°W over multiple spatial scales. Samples were collected in Summer 2009 using surface and subsurface plankton net tows and quantitative visual observations, and Fall 2010 using surface net tows only. We documented widespread, though spatially variable, plastic pollution in this portion of the NPSG and adjacent waters. The overall median microplastic numerical concentration in Summer 2009 was 0.448 particles m(-2 and in Fall 2010 was 0.021 particles m(-2, but plastic concentrations were highly variable over the submesoscale (10 s of km. Size-frequency spectra were skewed towards small particles, with the most abundant particles having a cross-sectional area of approximately 0.01 cm(2. Most microplastic was found on the sea surface, with the highest densities detected in low-wind conditions. The numerical majority of objects were small particles collected with nets, but the majority of debris surface area was found in large objects assessed visually. Our ability to detect high-plastic areas varied with methodology, as stations with substantial microplastic did not necessarily also contain large visually observable objects. A power analysis of our data suggests that high variability of surface microplastic will make future changes in abundance difficult to detect without substantial sampling effort. Our findings suggest that assessment and monitoring of oceanic plastic debris must account for high spatial

  14. Scales of spatial heterogeneity of plastic marine debris in the northeast pacific ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Miriam C; Titmus, Andrew J; Ford, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Plastic debris has been documented in many marine ecosystems, including remote coastlines, the water column, the deep sea, and subtropical gyres. The North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG), colloquially called the "Great Pacific Garbage Patch," has been an area of particular scientific and public concern. However, quantitative assessments of the extent and variability of plastic in the NPSG have been limited. Here, we quantify the distribution, abundance, and size of plastic in a subset of the eastern Pacific (approximately 20-40°N, 120-155°W) over multiple spatial scales. Samples were collected in Summer 2009 using surface and subsurface plankton net tows and quantitative visual observations, and Fall 2010 using surface net tows only. We documented widespread, though spatially variable, plastic pollution in this portion of the NPSG and adjacent waters. The overall median microplastic numerical concentration in Summer 2009 was 0.448 particles m(-2) and in Fall 2010 was 0.021 particles m(-2), but plastic concentrations were highly variable over the submesoscale (10 s of km). Size-frequency spectra were skewed towards small particles, with the most abundant particles having a cross-sectional area of approximately 0.01 cm(2). Most microplastic was found on the sea surface, with the highest densities detected in low-wind conditions. The numerical majority of objects were small particles collected with nets, but the majority of debris surface area was found in large objects assessed visually. Our ability to detect high-plastic areas varied with methodology, as stations with substantial microplastic did not necessarily also contain large visually observable objects. A power analysis of our data suggests that high variability of surface microplastic will make future changes in abundance difficult to detect without substantial sampling effort. Our findings suggest that assessment and monitoring of oceanic plastic debris must account for high spatial variability

  15. Explaining local-scale species distributions: relative contributions of spatial autocorrelation and landscape heterogeneity for an avian assemblage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattsson, Brady J; Zipkin, Elise F; Gardner, Beth; Blank, Peter J; Sauer, John R; Royle, J Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Understanding interactions between mobile species distributions and landcover characteristics remains an outstanding challenge in ecology. Multiple factors could explain species distributions including endogenous evolutionary traits leading to conspecific clustering and endogenous habitat features that support life history requirements. Birds are a useful taxon for examining hypotheses about the relative importance of these factors among species in a community. We developed a hierarchical Bayes approach to model the relationships between bird species occupancy and local landcover variables accounting for spatial autocorrelation, species similarities, and partial observability. We fit alternative occupancy models to detections of 90 bird species observed during repeat visits to 316 point-counts forming a 400-m grid throughout the Patuxent Wildlife Research Refuge in Maryland, USA. Models with landcover variables performed significantly better than our autologistic and null models, supporting the hypothesis that local landcover heterogeneity is important as an exogenous driver for species distributions. Conspecific clustering alone was a comparatively poor descriptor of local community composition, but there was evidence for spatial autocorrelation in all species. Considerable uncertainty remains whether landcover combined with spatial autocorrelation is most parsimonious for describing bird species distributions at a local scale. Spatial structuring may be weaker at intermediate scales within which dispersal is less frequent, information flows are localized, and landcover types become spatially diversified and therefore exhibit little aggregation. Examining such hypotheses across species assemblages contributes to our understanding of community-level associations with conspecifics and landscape composition.

  16. An application of plot-scale NDVI in predicting carbon dioxide exchange and leaf area index in heterogeneous subarctic tundra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagg, J.; Lafleur, P.

    2010-07-01

    This paper reported on a study that examined the flow of carbon into and out of tundra ecosystems. It is necessary to accurately predict carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) exchange in the Tundra because of the impacts of climate change on carbon stored in permafrost. Understanding the relationships between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and vegetation and CO{sub 2} exchange may explain how small-scale variation in vegetation community extends to remotely sensed estimates of landscape characteristics. In this study, CO{sub 2} fluxes were measured with a portable chamber in a range of Tundra vegetation communities. Biomass and leaf area were measured with destructive harvest, and NDVI was obtained using a hand-held infrared camera. There was a weak correlation between NDVI and leaf area index in some vegetation communities, but a significant correlation between NDVI and biomass, including mosses. NDVI was found to be strongly related to photosynthetic activity and net CO{sub 2} uptake in all vegetation groups. However, NDVI related to ecosystem respiration only in wet sedge. It was concluded that at plot scale, the ability of NDVI to predict ecosystem properties and CO{sub 2} exchange in heterogeneous Tundra vegetation is variable.

  17. Explaining local-scale species distributions: relative contributions of spatial autocorrelation and landscape heterogeneity for an avian assemblage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brady J Mattsson

    Full Text Available Understanding interactions between mobile species distributions and landcover characteristics remains an outstanding challenge in ecology. Multiple factors could explain species distributions including endogenous evolutionary traits leading to conspecific clustering and endogenous habitat features that support life history requirements. Birds are a useful taxon for examining hypotheses about the relative importance of these factors among species in a community. We developed a hierarchical Bayes approach to model the relationships between bird species occupancy and local landcover variables accounting for spatial autocorrelation, species similarities, and partial observability. We fit alternative occupancy models to detections of 90 bird species observed during repeat visits to 316 point-counts forming a 400-m grid throughout the Patuxent Wildlife Research Refuge in Maryland, USA. Models with landcover variables performed significantly better than our autologistic and null models, supporting the hypothesis that local landcover heterogeneity is important as an exogenous driver for species distributions. Conspecific clustering alone was a comparatively poor descriptor of local community composition, but there was evidence for spatial autocorrelation in all species. Considerable uncertainty remains whether landcover combined with spatial autocorrelation is most parsimonious for describing bird species distributions at a local scale. Spatial structuring may be weaker at intermediate scales within which dispersal is less frequent, information flows are localized, and landcover types become spatially diversified and therefore exhibit little aggregation. Examining such hypotheses across species assemblages contributes to our understanding of community-level associations with conspecifics and landscape composition.

  18. Translation and validation of the vertigo symptom scale into German: A cultural adaption to a wider German-speaking population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloor-Juzi Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dizziness and comorbid anxiety may cause severe disability of patients with vestibulopathy, but can be addressed effectively with rehabilitation. For an individually adapted treatment, a structured assessment is needed. The Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS with two subscales assessing vertigo symptoms (VSS-VER and associated symptoms (VSS-AA might be used for this purpose. As there was no validated VSS available in German, the aim of the study was the translation and cross-cultural adaptation in German (VSS-G and the investigation of its reliability, internal and external validity. Methods The VSS was translated into German according to recognized guidelines. Psychometric properties were tested on 52 healthy controls and 202 participants with vestibulopathy. Internal validity and reliability were investigated with factor analysis, Cronbach’s α and ICC estimations. Discriminant validity was analysed with the Mann–Whitney-U-Test between patients and controls and the ROC-Curve. Convergent validity was estimated with the correlation with the Hospital Anxiety Subscale (HADS-A, Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI and frequency of dizziness. Results Internal validity: factor analysis confirmed the structure of two subscales. Reliability: VSS-G: α = 0.904 and ICC (CI =0.926 (0.826, 0.965. Discriminant validity: VSS-VER differentiate patients and controls ROC (CI =0.99 (0.98, 1.00. Convergent validity: VSS-G correlates with DHI (r = 0.554 and frequency (T = 0.317. HADS-A correlates with VSS-AA (r = 0.452 but not with VSS-VER (r = 0.186. Conclusions The VSS-G showed satisfactory psychometric properties to assess the severity of vertigo or vertigo-related symptoms. The VSS-VER can differentiate between healthy subjects and patients with vestibular disorders. The VSS-AA showed some screening properties with high sensitivity for patients with abnormal anxiety.

  19. The School Anxiety Scale-Teacher Report (SAS-TR): translation and psychometric properties of the Iranian version.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiamini, Zahra; Mohamadi, Ashraf; Ebadi, Abbas; Fathi- Ashtiani, Ali; Tavousi, Mahmoud; Montazeri, Ali

    2012-07-18

    The School Anxiety Scale-Teacher Report (SAS-TR) was designed to assess anxiety in children at school. The SAS-TR is a proxy rated measure and could assess social anxiety, generalized anxiety and also gives a total anxiety score. This study aimed to translate and validate the SAS-TR in Iran. The translation and cultural adaptation of the original questionnaire were carried out in accordance with the published guidelines. A sample of students participated in the study. Reliability was estimated using internal consistency and test-retest analysis. Validity was assessed using content validity. The factor structure of the questionnaire was extracted by performing both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. In all 200 elementary students aged 6 to 10 years were studied. Considering the recommended cut-off values, overall the prevalence of high anxiety condition in elementary students was found to be 21 %. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Iranian SAS-TR was 0.92 and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was found to be 0.81. The principal component analysis indicated a two-factor structure for the questionnaire (generalized and social anxiety) that jointly accounted for 55.3 % of variances observed. The confirmatory factory analysis also indicated a good fit to the data for the two-latent structure of the questionnaire. In general the findings suggest that the Iranian version of SAS-TR has satisfactory reliability, and validity for measuring anxiety in 6 to 10 years old children in Iran. It is simple and easy to use and now can be applied in future studies.

  20. The School Anxiety Scale-Teacher Report (SAS-TR: translation and psychometric properties of the Iranian version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajiamini Zahra

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The School Anxiety Scale-Teacher Report (SAS-TR was designed to assess anxiety in children at school. The SAS-TR is a proxy rated measure and could assess social anxiety, generalized anxiety and also gives a total anxiety score. This study aimed to translate and validate the SAS-TR in Iran. Methods The translation and cultural adaptation of the original questionnaire were carried out in accordance with the published guidelines. A sample of students participated in the study. Reliability was estimated using internal consistency and test-retest analysis. Validity was assessed using content validity. The factor structure of the questionnaire was extracted by performing both exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses. Results In all 200 elementary students aged 6 to 10 years were studied. Considering the recommended cut-off values, overall the prevalence of high anxiety condition in elementary students was found to be 21 %. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for the Iranian SAS-TR was 0.92 and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was found to be 0.81. The principal component analysis indicated a two-factor structure for the questionnaire (generalized and social anxiety that jointly accounted for 55.3 % of variances observed. The confirmatory factory analysis also indicated a good fit to the data for the two-latent structure of the questionnaire. Conclusion In general the findings suggest that the Iranian version of SAS-TR has satisfactory reliability, and validity for measuring anxiety in 6 to 10 years old children in Iran. It is simple and easy to use and now can be applied in future studies.

  1. The BeUpstanding ProgramTM: Scaling up the Stand Up Australia Workplace Intervention for Translation into Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genevieve N Healy

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Context and purpose: Too much sitting is now recognised as a common risk factor for several health outcomes, with the workplace identified as a key setting in which to address prolonged sitting time. The Stand Up Australia intervention was designed to reduce prolonged sitting in the workplace by addressing influences at multiple-levels, including the organisation, the environment, and the individual. Intervention success has been achieved within the context of randomised controlled trials, where research staff deliver several of the key intervention components. This study describes the initial step in the multi-phase process of scaling up the Stand Up Australia intervention for workplace translation. Methods: A research-government partnership was critical in funding and informing the prototype for the scaled up BeUpstanding programTM. Evidence, protocols and materials from Stand Up Australia were adapted in collaboration with funding partner Workplace Health and Safety Queensland to ensure consistency and compatibility with existing government frameworks and resources. In recognition of the key role of workplace champions in facilitating workplace health promotion programs, the BeUpstanding programTM is designed to be delivered through a stand-alone, free, website-based toolkit using a 'train the champion' approach. Key findings and significance: The BeUpstanding programTM was influenced by the increasing recognition of prolonged sitting as an emerging health issue as well as industry demand. The research-government partnership was critical in informing and resourcing the development of the scaled-up program.

  2. ReportSites - A Computational Method to Extract Positional and Physico- Chemical Information from Large-Scale Proteomic Post-Translational Modification Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Alistair; Edwards, Gregory; Larsen, Martin Røssel

    2012-01-01

    Background: Extracting biological meaning from proteomic datasets containing post-translational modification is a central challenge of large scale proteomics and systems biology. We report the generation of a new program (Report Sites) to precisely identify the location and local chemical...

  3. A Study of the Spanish Translation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised with Puerto Rican Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria D.; And Others

    Two studies were performed with Puerto Rican children and adolescents in Puerto Rico and Connecticut to determine the reliability and predictive validity of the Spanish translation of the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, the Escala de Inteligencia Wechsler para Ninos-Revisada (EIWN-R). Results suggest that the EIWN-R is a reliable…

  4. Experimental and in-silico investigation of population heterogeneity in continuous Sachharomyces cerevisiae scale-down fermentation in a novel two-compartment setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heins, Anna-Lena; Lencastre Fernandes, Rita; Gernaey, Krist

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In large-scale bioreactors, microbes often encounter fluctuating conditions of nutrient and oxygen supply, resulting in different microbial behavior at the different scales. The underlying reason is spatial heterogeneity, caused by limited mixing capabilities at production scale....... Consequently, scale-up of processes is challenging and there is a need for laboratory-scale reactor setups that can mimic large-scale conditions to enhance the understanding of how fluctuating environmental conditions affect microbial physiology. RESULTS: A two-compartment, scale-down setup, consisting of two...... interconnected stirred tank reactors was used in combination with mathematical modeling, to mimic large-scale continuous cultivations. One reactor represents the feeding zone with high glucose concentration and low oxygen, whereas the other one represents the remaining reactor volume. An earlier developed...

  5. Factor structure and psychometric properties of a Spanish translation of the Body Appreciation Scale-2 (BAS-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swami, Viren; García, Antonio Alías; Barron, David

    2017-09-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of a Spanish translation of the Body Appreciation Scale-2 (BAS-2) in a community sample of 411 women and 389 men in Almería, Spain. Participants completed the 10-item BAS-2 along with measures of appearance evaluation, body areas satisfaction, self-esteem, life satisfaction, and self-reported body mass index (BMI). Exploratory factor analyses with one split-half subsample revealed that BAS-2 scores had a one-dimensional factor structure in women and men. Confirmatory factor analysis with a second split-half subsample showed the one-dimensional factor structure had acceptable fit and was invariant across sex. There were no significant sex differences in BAS-2 scores. BAS-2 scores were significantly and positively correlated with appearance evaluation, body areas satisfaction, self-esteem, and life satisfaction. Body appreciation was significantly and negatively correlated with BMI in men, but associations in women were only significant in the second subsample. Results suggest that the Spanish BAS-2 has adequate psychometric properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Dutch translation and validation of the Body Appreciation Scale-2: An investigation with female university students in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleva, Jessica M; Martijn, Carolien; Veldhuis, Jolanda; Tylka, Tracy L

    2016-12-01

    This paper describes a Dutch translation and validation of the Body Appreciation Scale-2 (BAS-2; Tylka & Wood-Barcalow, 2015a), an instrument for assessing key components of positive body image. Dutch-speaking female university students (N=310, Mage=21.31, SD=3.04) completed the Dutch BAS-2. To assess its construct validity, participants also completed measures of appearance satisfaction, functionality satisfaction, self-objectification, self-esteem, and optimistic life orientation. Exploratory factor analysis revealed a one-dimensional factor structure of the Dutch BAS-2, substantiating the BAS-2 factor structure found in samples of U.S., Chinese, and Iranian university students and community adults. Dutch BAS-2 scores also demonstrated good internal consistency (α=.90), convergent validity, and incremental validity. In addition, lower body mass indices were associated with higher Dutch BAS-2 scores. The present findings support the cross-cultural equivalence of the BAS-2 and thus its promise in enabling research on positive body image in diverse cultural contexts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the Turkish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale on patients with knee injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citaker, Seyit; Kafa, Nihan; Hazar Kanik, Zeynep; Ugurlu, Mustafa; Kafa, Baris; Tuna, Zeynep

    2016-03-01

    The Lower Extremity Functional Scale is a widely used questionnaire to evaluate the functional impairment in lower extremities. To date, the Lower Extremity Functional Scale has not been translated into Turkish. The aim of this study is to translate and culturally adapt the Lower Extremity Functional Scale into a Turkish version, and evaluate the psychometric properties of this version in patients with knee injuries. The translation of the English version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale into a Turkish version was performed using standard guidelines. Validity and reliability of Turkish version were tested in 134 patients with knee injuries. Association level between other outcomes measures (Kujala Patellofemoral Score, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale and a Visual Analog Scale) and Turkish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale was analyzed to assess validation. Participants completed the questionnaire at baseline and after 2 days to test reliability. The Turkish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale was showed a high degree of internal consistency (Cronbach α = 0.93). ICCs were 0.96 and no floor or ceiling effects. The Lower Extremity Functional Scale had a high level of association with the Kujala Patellofemoral Score (r = 0.82), Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale (r = 0.80) and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index scores (r = 0.69) (all, p < 0.05). The Turkish version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale is a valid and reliable questionnaire that can be used to evaluate functional status in Turkish speaking patients with different knee disorders. III.

  8. Validation of a Yoruba translation of the World Health Organization's quality of life scale--short form among stroke survivors in Southwest Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinpelu, A O; Maruf, F A; Adegoke, B O A

    2006-12-01

    The World Health Organization's quality of life scale - short form (WHOQOL-BREF) is a well-validated, cross-cultural tool for measuring quality of life (QOL) of patients with chronic diseases. It has been translated into over 20 languages, none of which is an indigenous Nigerianlanguage. The aim of this study was to investigate the validity of a Yoruba translated version of the WHOQOL-BREF Yoruba is the indigenous language of southwestern Nigeria. The English version of the WHOQOL-BREF was translated into Yoruba and it went through two rounds of back-translation. The English and Yoruba versions of WHOQOL-BREF were completed by 41 stroke survivors, literate in both languages. Participants were recruited through purposive sampling method from physiotherapy clinics of all tertiary health institutions in southwestern Nigeria between April and August, 2004. Data was analyzed using Spearman rank order correlation and paired t- test with the alpha level set at 0.05. Participants (24 males, 14 females) were aged 55 +/- 10.7 years and have had stroke for 28.4 +/- 6.7 months. Participants' domain scores on the Yoruba translated version of WHOQOL-BREF correlated significantly with those on its English version (r = 0.695-0.859; p = 0.000). This Yoruba version is a valid translation of the English WHOQOL-BREF and may be used for assessing QOL of stroke survivors in southwestern Nigeria.

  9. Increasing the spatial scale of process-based agricultural systems models by representing heterogeneity: The case of urine patches in grazed pastures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snow, Val O.; Cichota, R; McAuliffe, John

    2017-01-01

    We sought to extend the spatial scale of soil-plant models by including, rather than ignoring, heterogeneity using the deposition of urine patches as an example. Our “pseudo-patches” approach preserves the most important biophysical effects but is computationally-tractable within a multi-paddock ...

  10. Effect of spatial heterogeneity of runoff generation mechanisms on the scaling behavior of event runoff responses in a natural river basin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, H.; Sivapalan, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the effects of spatial heterogeneity of runoff generation on the scaling behavior of runoff timing responses. A previous modeling study on the Illinois River Basin in Oklahoma had revealed a systematic spatial trend in the relative dominance of

  11. Fe-based heterogeneous catalysts for the Fischer-Tropsch reaction: Sonochemical synthesis and bench-scale experimental tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comazzi, Alberto; Pirola, Carlo; Longhi, Mariangela; Bianchi, Claudia L M; Suslick, Kenneth S

    2017-01-01

    The sonochemical synthesis of nanostructured materials owes its origins to the extreme conditions created during acoustic cavitation, i.e., the formation of localized hot spots in the core of collapsing bubbles in a liquid irradiated with high intensity ultrasound (US). In particular, in the present work a sonochemical synthesis has been investigated for the production of three different iron-based samples supported on SiO2 and loaded with different metals and promoters (10 %wt of Fe; 30 %wt of Fe; 30 %wt of Fe, 2 %wt of K and 3.75 %wt of Cu) active in the Fischer-Tropsch (FT) process. Sonochemically synthesized heterogeneous catalysts were characterized by BET, XRPD, TPR, ICP, CHN, TEM, SEM and then tested in a fixed bed FT-bench-scale rig fed with a mixture of H2 and CO at a H2/CO molar ratio equal to 2, at activation temperatures of 350-400°C and reaction temperatures of 250-260°C. The experimental results showed that the ultrasonic samples are effective catalysts for the FT process. Notably, increasing the activation temperature increased CO conversion, while product selectivity did not diminish. All the sonochemically prepared samples presented in this work provided better catalytic results compared to the corresponding traditional FT impregnated catalysts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Very large scale heterogeneous integration (VLSHI) and wafer-level vacuum packaging for infrared bolometer focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsberg, Fredrik; Roxhed, Niclas; Fischer, Andreas C.; Samel, Björn; Ericsson, Per; Hoivik, Nils; Lapadatu, Adriana; Bring, Martin; Kittilsland, Gjermund; Stemme, Göran; Niklaus, Frank

    2013-09-01

    Imaging in the long wavelength infrared (LWIR) range from 8 to 14 μm is an extremely useful tool for non-contact measurement and imaging of temperature in many industrial, automotive and security applications. However, the cost of the infrared (IR) imaging components has to be significantly reduced to make IR imaging a viable technology for many cost-sensitive applications. This paper demonstrates new and improved fabrication and packaging technologies for next-generation IR imaging detectors based on uncooled IR bolometer focal plane arrays. The proposed technologies include very large scale heterogeneous integration for combining high-performance, SiGe quantum-well bolometers with electronic integrated read-out circuits and CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packing. The fabrication and characterization of bolometers with a pitch of 25 μm × 25 μm that are arranged on read-out-wafers in arrays with 320 × 240 pixels are presented. The bolometers contain a multi-layer quantum well SiGe thermistor with a temperature coefficient of resistance of -3.0%/K. The proposed CMOS compatible wafer-level vacuum packaging technology uses Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding. The presented technologies are suitable for implementation in cost-efficient fabless business models with the potential to bring about the cost reduction needed to enable low-cost IR imaging products for industrial, security and automotive applications.

  13. Translation Theory 'Translated'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wæraas, Arild; Nielsen, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    common theoretical approaches to translation within the organization and management discipline: actor-network theory, knowledge-based theory, and Scandinavian institutionalism. Although each of these approaches already has borne much fruit in research, the literature is diverse and somewhat fragmented......, but also overlapping. We discuss the ways in which the three versions of translation theory may be combined and enrich each other so as to inform future research, thereby offering a more complete understanding of translation in and across organizational settings....

  14. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the driving anger scale (DAS): long form and short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantini, Jessye Almeida; Santos, George Oliveira; Machado, Eduardo de Carvalho; Nardi, Antonio Egídio; Silva, Adriana Cardoso

    2015-01-01

    Driving anger has attracted the attention of researchers in recent years because it may induce individuals to drive aggressively or adopt risk behaviors. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS) was designed to evaluate the propensity of drivers to become angry or aggressive while driving. This study describes the cross-cultural adaptation of a Brazilian version of the short form and the long form of the DAS. Translation and adaptation were made in four steps: two translations and two back-translations carried out by independent evaluators; the development of a brief version by four bilingual experts in mental health and driving behaviors; a subsequent experimental application; and, finally, an investigation of operational equivalence. Final Brazilian versions of the short form and of the long form of the DAS were made and are presented. This important instrument, which assesses driving anger and aggressive behaviors, is now available to evaluate the driving behaviors of the Brazilian population, which facilitates research in this field.

  15. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Shame and Stigma Scale (SSS) into Portuguese (Brazil) to evaluate patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirola, William Eduardo; Paiva, Bianca Sakamoto Ribeiro; Barroso, Eliane Marçon; Kissane, David W; Serrano, Claudia Valéria Maseti Pimenta; Paiva, Carlos Eduardo

    Head and neck cancer is the sixth leading cause of death from cancer worldwide and its treatment may involve surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The surgical procedure may cause mutilating sequelae, that can alter patient self-image. Thus, head and neck cancer is often connected to the negative stigma with decreased quality of life. Few studies assess the social stigma and shame perceived by patients with head and neck cancer. To perform the translation and cultural adaptation of the Shame and Stigma Scale (SSS) into Portuguese (Brazil). Two independent translations (English into Portuguese) were carried out by two professionals fluent in the English language. After the synthesis of the translations, two independent back-translations (from Portuguese into English) were performed by two translators whose native language is English. All translations were critically assessed by a committee of experts consisting of five members. A sample of 15 patients answered the Brazilian Portuguese version of the SSS to carry out the pretest. At this step, the patients were able to suggest modifications and evaluate the understanding of the items. There was no need to change the scale after this step. Based on the previous steps, we obtained the Portuguese (Brazil) version of the SSS, which was called "Escala de Vergonha e Estigma". The Portuguese (Brazil) version of the SSP was shown to be adequate to be applied to the population with HNC and, therefore, the psychometric properties of the tool will be evaluated during following steps. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  16. Landscape scale heterogeneity in the East Turkana ecosystem during the Okote Member (1.56-1.38 Ma).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, D B; Braun, D R; Behrensmeyer, A K; Lehmann, S B; Merritt, S R; Reeves, J S; Wood, B A; Bobe, R

    2017-11-01

    Placing the biological adaptations of Pleistocene hominins within a well-resolved ecological framework has been a longstanding goal of paleoanthropology. This effort, however, has been challenging due to the discontinuous nature of paleoecological data spanning many important periods in hominin evolution. Sediments from the Upper Burgi (1.98-1.87 Ma), KBS (1.87-1.56 Ma) and Okote (1.56-1.38 Ma) members of the Koobi Fora Formation at East Turkana in northern Kenya document an important time interval in the evolutionary history of the hominin genera Homo and Paranthropus. Although much attention has been paid to Upper Burgi and KBS member deposits, far less is known regarding the East Turkana paleoecosystem during Okote Member times. This study pairs spatially-resolved faunal abundance data with stable isotope geochemistry from mammalian enamel to investigate landscape-scale ecosystem variability during Okote Member times. We find that during this period 1) taxa within the East Turkana large mammal community were distributed heterogeneously across space, 2) the abundance of C 3 and C 4 vegetation varied between East Turkana subregions, and 3) the Karari subregion, an area with abundant evidence of hominin stone tool manufacture, had significantly more C 3 vegetation than regions closer to the central axis of the Turkana Basin (i.e., Ileret and Koobi Fora). These findings indicate that the East Turkana paleoecosystem during the Okote Member was highly variable across space and provided a complex adaptive landscape for Pleistocene hominins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Thermoregulation and microhabitat use in mountain butterflies of the genus Erebia: importance of fine-scale habitat heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleckova, Irena; Konvicka, Martin; Klecka, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Mountain butterflies have evolved efficient thermoregulation strategies enabling their survival in marginal conditions with short flight season and unstable weather. Understanding the importance of their behavioural thermoregulation by habitat use can provide novel information for predicting the fate of alpine Lepidoptera and other insects under ongoing climate change. We studied the link between microhabitat use and thermoregulation in adults of seven species of a butterfly genus Erebia co-occurring in the Austrian Alps. We captured individuals in the field and measured their body temperature in relation to microhabitat and air temperature. We asked whether closely related species regulate their body temperature differently, and if so, what is the effect of behaviour, species traits and individual traits on body to air and body to microhabitat temperature differences. Co-occurring species differed in mean body temperature. These differences were driven by active microhabitat selection by individuals and also by species-specific habitat preferences. Species inhabiting grasslands and rocks utilised warmer microclimates to maintain higher body temperature than woodland species. Under low air temperatures, species of rocky habitats heated up more effectively than species of grasslands and woodlands which allowed them to stay active in colder weather. Species morphology and individual traits play rather minor roles in the thermoregulatory differences; although large species and young individuals maintained higher body temperature. We conclude that diverse microhabitat conditions at small spatial scales probably contribute to sympatric occurrence of closely related species with different thermal demands and that preserving heterogeneous conditions in alpine landscapes might mitigate detrimental consequences of predicted climate change. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Heterogeneous Gossip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Davide; Guerraoui, Rachid; Kermarrec, Anne-Marie; Koldehofe, Boris; Mogensen, Martin; Monod, Maxime; Quéma, Vivien

    Gossip-based information dissemination protocols are considered easy to deploy, scalable and resilient to network dynamics. Load-balancing is inherent in these protocols as the dissemination work is evenly spread among all nodes. Yet, large-scale distributed systems are usually heterogeneous with respect to network capabilities such as bandwidth. In practice, a blind load-balancing strategy might significantly hamper the performance of the gossip dissemination.

  19. Preliminary data concerning the reliability and psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the 20-item Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptic Treatment Scale (SWN-20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arapidis Konstantinos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 20-item Subjective Well-Being Under Neuroleptic Treatment Scale (SWN-20 is a self-report scale developed in order to assess the well-being of patients receiving antipsychotic medication independent of the improvement in their psychotic symptoms. The current study reports on the reliability and the psychometric properties of the Greek translation of the SWN-20. Methods A total of 100 inpatients or outpatients with schizophrenia (79 males and 21 females, aged 42.6 ± 11.35 years old from 3 different facilities were assessed with the Positive and Negative Symptoms Scale (PANSS, the Calgary Depression Scale and the Simpson-Angus Scale, and completed the SWN-20. The statistical analysis included the calculation of Pearson product moment correlation coefficient, the Cronbach α and factor analysis with Varimax normalised rotation. Results The SWN-20 had an α value equal to 0.79 and all the items were equal. The factor analysis revealed the presence of seven factors explaining 66% of total variance. The correlation matrix revealed a moderate relationship of the SWN-20 and its factors with the PANSS-Negative (PANSS-N, PANSS-General Psychopathology (PANSS-G, the Simpson-Angus and the Calgary scales, and no relationship to age, education and income class. Discussion The Greek translation of the SWN-20 is reliable, with psychometric properties close to the original scale.

  20. Reliability and validity of Arabic translation of Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS and Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire (BMQ-specific for use in children and their parents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mervat Alsous

    Full Text Available to evaluate the reliability and discriminant validity of Arabic translation of the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS and the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire-specific (BMQ-specific.Having developed Arabic translations of the study instruments, a cross-sectional study was carried out between March and October 2015 in two multidisciplinary governmental hospitals in Jordan. An expert panel monitored the forward and backward translation of the MARS and BMQ. Standard Arabic was used (with no specific dialect inclusion to allow greater generalisability across Arabic speaking countries. Once the Arabic translations of the questionnaires were developed they were tested for consistency, validity and reliability on a group of children with chronic diseases and their parents.A total of 258 parents and 208 children were included in the study. The median age of participated children and parents was 15 years and 42 years respectively. Principle component analysis of all questionnaires indicated that all had good construct validity as they clearly measured one construct. The questionnaires were deemed reliable based on the results of Cronbach alpha coefficient. Furthermore, reliability of the questionnaires was demonstrated by test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC which ranged from good to excellent for all scales (ICC>0.706. The Pearson correlation coefficient ranged from 0.546-0.805 for the entire sample which indicated a significant moderate to strong positive correlation between MARS and BMQ items at time 1 and 2. Reported adherence was greater than 59% using MARS-children and MARS-parents scales, and was correlated with beliefs in necessity and independent of the concerns regarding medications.The Arabic translations of both BMQ and MARS for use in children and their parents have good internal consistency and proved to be valid and reliable tools that can be used by researchers in clinical practice to measure adherence and

  1. Reliability and validity of Arabic translation of Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire (BMQ)–specific for use in children and their parents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsous, Mervat; Alhalaiqa, Fadwa; Abu Farha, Rana; Abdel Jalil, Mariam; McElnay, James; Horne, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Objectives to evaluate the reliability and discriminant validity of Arabic translation of the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire-specific (BMQ-specific). Methods Having developed Arabic translations of the study instruments, a cross-sectional study was carried out between March and October 2015 in two multidisciplinary governmental hospitals in Jordan. An expert panel monitored the forward and backward translation of the MARS and BMQ. Standard Arabic was used (with no specific dialect inclusion) to allow greater generalisability across Arabic speaking countries. Once the Arabic translations of the questionnaires were developed they were tested for consistency, validity and reliability on a group of children with chronic diseases and their parents. Results A total of 258 parents and 208 children were included in the study. The median age of participated children and parents was 15 years and 42 years respectively. Principle component analysis of all questionnaires indicated that all had good construct validity as they clearly measured one construct. The questionnaires were deemed reliable based on the results of Cronbach alpha coefficient. Furthermore, reliability of the questionnaires was demonstrated by test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) which ranged from good to excellent for all scales (ICC>0.706). The Pearson correlation coefficient ranged from 0.546–0.805 for the entire sample which indicated a significant moderate to strong positive correlation between MARS and BMQ items at time 1 and 2. Reported adherence was greater than 59% using MARS-children and MARS-parents scales, and was correlated with beliefs in necessity and independent of the concerns regarding medications. Conclusion The Arabic translations of both BMQ and MARS for use in children and their parents have good internal consistency and proved to be valid and reliable tools that can be used by researchers in clinical practice to

  2. Reliability and validity of Arabic translation of Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire (BMQ)-specific for use in children and their parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsous, Mervat; Alhalaiqa, Fadwa; Abu Farha, Rana; Abdel Jalil, Mariam; McElnay, James; Horne, Robert

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the reliability and discriminant validity of Arabic translation of the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS) and the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire-specific (BMQ-specific). Having developed Arabic translations of the study instruments, a cross-sectional study was carried out between March and October 2015 in two multidisciplinary governmental hospitals in Jordan. An expert panel monitored the forward and backward translation of the MARS and BMQ. Standard Arabic was used (with no specific dialect inclusion) to allow greater generalisability across Arabic speaking countries. Once the Arabic translations of the questionnaires were developed they were tested for consistency, validity and reliability on a group of children with chronic diseases and their parents. A total of 258 parents and 208 children were included in the study. The median age of participated children and parents was 15 years and 42 years respectively. Principle component analysis of all questionnaires indicated that all had good construct validity as they clearly measured one construct. The questionnaires were deemed reliable based on the results of Cronbach alpha coefficient. Furthermore, reliability of the questionnaires was demonstrated by test-retest intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) which ranged from good to excellent for all scales (ICC>0.706). The Pearson correlation coefficient ranged from 0.546-0.805 for the entire sample which indicated a significant moderate to strong positive correlation between MARS and BMQ items at time 1 and 2. Reported adherence was greater than 59% using MARS-children and MARS-parents scales, and was correlated with beliefs in necessity and independent of the concerns regarding medications. The Arabic translations of both BMQ and MARS for use in children and their parents have good internal consistency and proved to be valid and reliable tools that can be used by researchers in clinical practice to measure adherence and beliefs about

  3. [Review on landscape heterogeneity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yutao; Yu, Xinxiao; Guang, Wenbin

    2002-04-01

    On the base of precedent studies, the occurring mechanism, classification, measurement methods, and the important role of landscape heterogeneity in landscape ecology were reviewed. The inner and outer uncertain factors result in landscape heterogeneity. Landscape heterogeneity has close relations with landscape stability, landscape design, architecture, management and disturbance, scale and ecological diversity in ecology. Complexity of landscape heterogeneity research, non-system of measurement indices and methods, difficulties and limitations of landscape heterogeneity modelling were all discussed respectively. In addition, it is suggested that the theory and methods of ecological complexity should be used to improve landscape heterogeneity research.

  4. Subsurface high resolution definition of subsurface heterogeneity for understanding the biodynamics of natural field systems: Advancing the ability for scaling to field conditions. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, E.L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (US); Brockman, F.J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (US)

    1998-06-01

    'This research is an integrated physical (geophysical and hydrologic) and microbial study using innovative geophysical imaging and microbial characterization methods to identify key scales of physical heterogeneities that affect the biodynamics of natural subsurface environments. Data from controlled laboratory and in-situ experiments at the INEEL Test Area North (TAN) site are being used to determine the dominant physical characteristics (lithologic, structural, and hydrologic) that can be imaged in-situ and correlated with microbial properties. The overall goal of this research is to contribute to the understanding of the interrelationships between transport properties and spatially varying physical, chemical, and microbiological heterogeneity. The outcome will be an improved understanding of the relationship between physical and microbial heterogeneity, thus facilitating the design of bioremediation strategies in similar environments. This report summarizes work as of May 1998, the second year of the project. This work is an extension of basic research on natural heterogeneity first initiated within the DOE/OHER Subsurface Science Program (SSP) and is intended to be one of the building blocks of an integrated and collaborative approach with an INEEL/PNNL effort aimed at understanding the effect of physical heterogeneity on transport properties and biodynamics in natural systems. The work is closely integrated with other EMSP projects at INEEL (Rick Colwell et al.) and PNNL (Fred Brockman and Jim Fredrickson).'

  5. Subsurface high-resolution definition of subsurface heterogeneity for understanding the biodynamics of natural field systems: Advancing the ability for scaling to field conditions. 1997 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, E.L.

    1997-01-01

    'This research is an integrated physical (geophysical and hydrologic) and microbial study using innovative geophysical imaging and microbial characterization methods to identify key scales of physical heterogeneities that affect the biodynamics of natural subsurface environments. Data from controlled laboratory and in situ experiments at the INEEL Test Area North (TAN) site are being used to determine the dominant physical characteristics (lithologic, structural, and hydrologic) that can be imaged in situ and correlated with microbial properties. Emphasis is being placed on identifying fundamental scales of variation of physical parameters that control transport behavior relative to predicting subsurface microbial dynamics. The outcome will be an improved understanding of the relationship between physical and microbial heterogeneity, thus facilitating the design of bioremediation strategies in similar environments. This work is an extension of basic research on natural heterogeneity first initiated within the DOE/OHER Subsurface Science Program (SSP) and is intended to be one of the building blocks of an integrated and collaborative approach with an INEEL/PNNL effort aimed at understanding the effect of physical heterogeneity on transport properties and biodynamics in natural systems. The work is closely integrated with other EMSP projects at INEEL (Rick Colwell et al.) and PNNL (Fred Brockman and Jim Fredrickson).'

  6. Understanding Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding of the...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  7. Psychometric properties of the newly translated creole multidimensional scale of perceived social support (MSPSS) and perceived adequacy of resource scale (PARS) and the relationship between perceived social support and resources in Haitian mothers in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Jean; Alce, Marise; Astros, Adrian

    2016-02-09

    Low income postpartum mothers with little to no social support have increased maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, especially those with limited English proficiency and limited accesses to resources. Haitians, a growing minority in the US are an understudied population excluded from most studies due to the lack of instruments in Creole. The most widely used instruments for measuring social support, the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS) and Perceived Adequacy of Resource Scale (PARS), are not available in Creole. Currently, there are no published studies on the psychometric properties of the MSPSS or the PARS in Creole. Data from Haitian mothers are needed to identify potential postpartum mothers and infants most at risk of developing adverse maternal and infant outcomes from a lack of social support and perceived resources. The purpose of this study is to test the psychometrics of the newly-translated Creole instruments of the MSPSS and PARS with a sample of bilingual (Creole/English) mothers. The MSPSS and PARS were translated and back translated from English to Creole. The adapted Creole versions of the instruments were tested using a convenience sample. A total of 85 Haitian mothers' completed both instruments in Creole and English 2 weeks apart. Internal consistency reliability and stability were strong for both the MSPSS and PARS (.91-.99). The two instruments had strong reliability and validity for the translated Creole versions and similar to the English versions. The MSPSS and PARS are a valid measure of perceived social support and resources. Psychometric findings suggest that the newly translated Creole versions are good representations of the English versions indicating the translation process was successful. The newly translated instruments available in Creole provide non-English speaking Haitian mothers the opportunity to participate in studies.

  8. The impact of the sensory experience on scale and preference heterogeneity: The GMNL model approach applied to pig castration and meat quality

    OpenAIRE

    Kallas, Zein; Borrisser-Pairó,, Francesc; Martínez, Beatriz; Vieira, Ceferina; Rubio, Begonia; Panella, Nuria; Gil, Marta; Linares, Belén; Garrido, María Dolores; Olivares, Álvaro; Ibañez, Miguel; Oliver, M. Angels; Gil Roig, José María

    2015-01-01

    The EU is considering a future ban on surgical pig castration by 2018 which may affect markets and consumers preferences. This study analysed consumers’ expected preference toward a masking strategy obtained from a mixture of spices and smoking of high level boar taint frankfurter sausages. In addition, we analysed the impact of the sensory experience on the nonobserved heterogeneity both at the scale and mean preferences. We carried out two Non-Hypothetical Discrete Choice Experiments ...

  9. Scaling net ecosystem production and net biome production over a heterogeneous region in the western United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Turner

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Bottom-up scaling of net ecosystem production (NEP and net biome production (NBP was used to generate a carbon budget for a large heterogeneous region (the state of Oregon, 2.5×105 km2 in the western United States. Landsat resolution (30 m remote sensing provided the basis for mapping land cover and disturbance history, thus allowing us to account for all major fire and logging events over the last 30 years. For NEP, a 23-year record (1980–2002 of distributed meteorology (1 km resolution at the daily time step was used to drive a process-based carbon cycle model (Biome-BGC. For NBP, fire emissions were computed from remote sensing based estimates of area burned and our mapped biomass estimates. Our estimates for the contribution of logging and crop harvest removals to NBP were from the model simulations and were checked against public records of forest and crop harvesting. The predominately forested ecoregions within our study region had the highest NEP sinks, with ecoregion averages up to 197 gC m−2 yr−1. Agricultural ecoregions were also NEP sinks, reflecting the imbalance of NPP and decomposition of crop residues. For the period 1996–2000, mean NEP for the study area was 17.0 TgC yr−1, with strong interannual variation (SD of 10.6. The sum of forest harvest removals, crop removals, and direct fire emissions amounted to 63% of NEP, leaving a mean NBP of 6.1 TgC yr−1. Carbon sequestration was predominantly on public forestland, where the harvest rate has fallen dramatically in the recent years. Comparison of simulation results with estimates of carbon stocks, and changes in carbon stocks, based on forest inventory data showed generally good agreement. The carbon sequestered as NBP, plus accumulation of forest products in slow turnover pools, offset 51% of the annual emissions of fossil fuel CO2 for the state. State-level NBP dropped below zero in 2002

  10. Aggregate-scale spatial heterogeneity in reductive transformation of ferrihydrite resulting from coupled biogeochemical and physical processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallud, C.; Masue-Slowey, Y.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-05-01

    -section and interior at low lactate concentration (0.3 mM) after 30 d of reaction. Under high lactate (3 mM) concentration, magnetite was observed only as a transitory phase, and rather goethite/lepidocrocite and siderite were the dominant secondary mineralization products. Our results illustrate the importance of slow diffusive transport of both electron donor and metabolites concentrations and concomitant biogeochemical reactions within soils and sediments, giving rise to heterogeneous products over small spatial (μm) scale.

  11. Scaling net ecosystem production and net biome production over a heterogeneous region in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, D. P.; Ritts, W. D.; Law, B. E.; Cohen, W. B.; Yang, Z.; Hudiburg, T.; Campbell, J. L.; Duane, M.

    2007-08-01

    Bottom-up scaling of net ecosystem production (NEP) and net biome production (NBP) was used to generate a carbon budget for a large heterogeneous region (the state of Oregon, 2.5×105 km2) in the western United States. Landsat resolution (30 m) remote sensing provided the basis for mapping land cover and disturbance history, thus allowing us to account for all major fire and logging events over the last 30 years. For NEP, a 23-year record (1980-2002) of distributed meteorology (1 km resolution) at the daily time step was used to drive a process-based carbon cycle model (Biome-BGC). For NBP, fire emissions were computed from remote sensing based estimates of area burned and our mapped biomass estimates. Our estimates for the contribution of logging and crop harvest removals to NBP were from the model simulations and were checked against public records of forest and crop harvesting. The predominately forested ecoregions within our study region had the highest NEP sinks, with ecoregion averages up to 197 gC m-2 yr-1. Agricultural ecoregions were also NEP sinks, reflecting the imbalance of NPP and decomposition of crop residues. For the period 1996-2000, mean NEP for the study area was 17.0 TgC yr-1, with strong interannual variation (SD of 10.6). The sum of forest harvest removals, crop removals, and direct fire emissions amounted to 63% of NEP, leaving a mean NBP of 6.1 TgC yr-1. Carbon sequestration was predominantly on public forestland, where the harvest rate has fallen dramatically in the recent years. Comparison of simulation results with estimates of carbon stocks, and changes in carbon stocks, based on forest inventory data showed generally good agreement. The carbon sequestered as NBP, plus accumulation of forest products in slow turnover pools, offset 51% of the annual emissions of fossil fuel CO2 for the state. State-level NBP dropped below zero in 2002 because of the combination of a dry climate year and a large (200 000 ha) fire. These results highlight

  12. Translational genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Kussmann

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The term “Translational Genomics” reflects both title and mission of this new journal. “Translational” has traditionally been understood as “applied research” or “development”, different from or even opposed to “basic research”. Recent scientific and societal developments have triggered a re-assessment of the connotation that “translational” and “basic” are either/or activities: translational research nowadays aims at feeding the best science into applications and solutions for human society. We therefore argue here basic science to be challenged and leveraged for its relevance to human health and societal benefits. This more recent approach and attitude are catalyzed by four trends or developments: evidence-based solutions; large-scale, high dimensional data; consumer/patient empowerment; and systems-level understanding.

  13. Towards Liquid Chromatography Time-Scale Peptide Sequencing and Characterization of Post-Translational Modifications in the Negative-Ion Mode Using Electron Detachment Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Frank; Hørning, Ole B; Jensen, Søren S

    2008-01-01

    Electron detachment dissociation (EDD) of peptide poly-anions is gentle towards post-translational modifications (PTMs) and produces predictable and interpretable fragment ion types (a., x ions). However, EDD is considered an inefficient fragmentation technique and has not yet been implemented...... in large-scale peptide characterization strategies. We successfully increased the EDD fragmentation efficiency (up to 9%), and demonstrate for the first time the utility of EDD-MS/MS in liquid chromatography time-scale experiments. Peptides and phosphopeptides were analyzed in both positive- and negative...

  14. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illangasekare, Tissa [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Trevisan, Luca [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Agartan, Elif [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Mori, Hiroko [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Vargas-Johnson, Javier [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Cihan, Abdullah [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Zhou, Quanlin [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  15. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1994-07-01

    The current project is a systematic research effort to quantify relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: (a) Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems, (b) Design estimates for nearly miscible displacements, (c) Design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs (d), Compositional flow visualization experiments, and (e) Simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems. The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section.

  16. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1995-06-01

    The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems; Design estimates for nearly miscible displacements; Design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs; Compositional flow visualization experiments; Simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section.

  17. Scale dependence of cirrus horizontal heterogeneity effects on TOA measurements - Part I: MODIS brightness temperatures in the thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry; Cornet, Céline; Szczap, Frédéric; Várnai, Tamás

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a study on the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on MODIS simulated thermal infrared (TIR) brightness temperatures (BTs) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) as a function of spatial resolution from 50 m to 10 km. A realistic 3-D cirrus field is generated by the 3DCLOUD model (average optical thickness of 1.4, cloud-top and base altitudes at 10 and 12 km, respectively, consisting of aggregate column crystals of Deff = 20 µm), and 3-D thermal infrared radiative transfer (RT) is simulated with the 3DMCPOL code. According to previous studies, differences between 3-D BT computed from a heterogenous pixel and 1-D RT computed from a homogeneous pixel are considered dependent at nadir on two effects: (i) the optical thickness horizontal heterogeneity leading to the plane-parallel homogeneous bias (PPHB) and the (ii) horizontal radiative transport (HRT) leading to the independent pixel approximation error (IPAE). A single but realistic cirrus case is simulated and, as expected, the PPHB mainly impacts the low-spatial-resolution results (above ˜ 250 m) with averaged values of up to 5-7 K, while the IPAE mainly impacts the high-spatial-resolution results (below ˜ 250 m) with average values of up to 1-2 K. A sensitivity study has been performed in order to extend these results to various cirrus optical thicknesses and heterogeneities by sampling the cirrus in several ranges of parameters. For four optical thickness classes and four optical heterogeneity classes, we have found that, for nadir observations, the spatial resolution at which the combination of PPHB and HRT effects is the smallest, falls between 100 and 250 m. These spatial resolutions thus appear to be the best choice to retrieve cirrus optical properties with the smallest cloud heterogeneity-related total bias in the thermal infrared. For off-nadir observations, the average total effect is increased and the minimum is shifted to coarser spatial resolutions.

  18. Health related quality of life in patients with diabetic foot ulceration - translation and Polish adaptation of Diabetic Foot Ulcer Scale short form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macioch, Tomasz; Sobol, Elżbieta; Krakowiecki, Arkadiusz; Mrozikiewicz-Rakowska, Beata; Kasprowicz, Monika; Hermanowski, Tomasz

    2017-01-21

    Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a common complication of diabetes and not only an important factor of mortality among patients with diabetes but also decreases the quality of life. The short form of Diabetic Foot Ulcer Scale (DFS-SF) provides comprehensive measurement of the impact of diabetic foot ulcers on patients' health related quality of life (HRQoL). The purpose of this study was to translate DFS-SF into Polish and evaluate its psychometric performance in patients with diabetic foot ulcers. The DFS-SF translation process was performed in line with Principles of Good Practice for the Translation and Cultural Adaptation Process for patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) developed by ISPOR TCA group. Assessment of the reliability and validity of Polish DFS-SF was performed in native Polish patients with current DFU. The DFS-SF validation study involved 212 patients diagnosed with DFU, with 4.4 years of DFU duration on average. The average ulcer size was 5.5 sq. cm, and generally only one limb was affected. Men (72%) and type 2 diabetes patients (86%) prevailed, with 17.8 years representing the mean time since diagnosis. The mean population age was 62.5 years. The internal consistency of all scales of the Polish DFS-SF was high (Cronbach's alpha ranged from 0.82 to 0.93). Item convergent and discriminant validity was satisfactory (median corrected item-scale correlation ranged from 0.61 to 0.81). The Polish DFS-SF demonstrated good construct validity when correlated with the SF-36v2 and showed better psychometric performance than SF-36v2. The newly translated Polish DFS-SF may be used to assess the impact of DFU on HRQoL in Polish patients.

  19. Dry coniferous forest restoration and understory plant diversity: The importance of community heterogeneity and the scale of observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erich Kyle Dodson; David W. Peterson

    2010-01-01

    Maintaining understory plant species diversity is an important management goal as forest restoration and fuel reduction treatments are applied extensively to dry coniferous forests of western North America. However, understory diversity is a function of both local species richness (number of species in a sample unit) and community heterogeneity (beta diversity) at...

  20. Multi-Regional Reactive Transport Due to Strong Anisotropy in Unsaturated Soils with Evolving Scales of Heterogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xinghua Mo

    2006-10-13

    Anisotropic and heterogeneous flow in unsaturated porous media is dependent on saturation conditions, and currently there exist limited options that adequately model this phenomenon. The phenomenon of lateral spreading commonly attributed to anisotropy can move contaminants beyond compliance boundaries at unexpected velocitites essentially bypassing large regions of the subsurface.

  1. Tracer test modeling for characterizing heterogeneity and local scale residence time distribution in an artificial recharge site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, Cristina; Martinez-Landa, Lurdes; Carrera, Jesús; Hidalgo, Juan J.; Ayora, Carlos

    2017-04-01

    Artificial recharge of aquifers (AR) is a standard technique to replenish and enhance groundwater resources, that have widely been used due to the increasing demand of quality water. AR through infiltration basins consists on infiltrate surface water, that might be affected in more or less degree by treatment plant effluents, runoff and others undesirables water sources, into an aquifer. The water quality enhances during the passage through the soil and organic matter, nutrients, organic contaminants, and bacteria are reduced mainly due to biodegradation and adsorption. Therefore, one of the goals of AR is to ensure a good quality status of the aquifer even if lesser quality water is used for recharge. Understand the behavior and transport of the potential contaminants is essential for an appropriate management of the artificial recharge system. The knowledge of the flux distribution around the recharge system and the relationship between the recharge system and the aquifer (area affected by the recharge, mixing ratios of recharged and native groundwater, travel times) is essential to achieve this goal. Evaluate the flux distribution is not always simple because the complexity and heterogeneity of natural systems. Indeed, it is not so much regulate by hydraulic conductivity of the different geological units as by their continuity and inter-connectivity particularly in the vertical direction. In summary for an appropriate management of an artificial recharge system it is needed to acknowledge the heterogeneity of the media. Aiming at characterizing the residence time distribution (RTDs) of a pilot artificial recharge system and the extent to which heterogeneity affects RTDs, we performed and evaluated a pulse injection tracer test. The artificial recharge system was simulated as a multilayer model which was used to evaluate the measured breakthrough curves at six monitoring points. Flow and transport parameters were calibrated under two hypotheses. The first

  2. Psychometric Properties of Persian Translated Version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC in Arak Community-dwelling Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryoush Khajavi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Balance deficiency, falls and fear of fall are important problems that can resulted in reversed health outcomes including decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was surveying factor structure, validation, and reliability determination of Persian translated version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale in community-dwelling older adults of Arak city. Materials and Methods: Research method was descriptive in form of psychometry. The statistic population was older adults of Arak in year 2012 and 308 subjects with mean age 69.38 years were selected availably. Data were collected by Persian translated version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence that is a 16-item scale and evaluates balance confidence in activities of daily living. Data were analyzed by Exploratory Factor Analysis. Test-retest and internal reliability were calculated by Pearson correlation coefficient and Chronbach’s Alpha. Data were analyzed with SPSS-16. Results: The findings resulted in extraction of one factor with eigenvalue over one that explained 82.89% of total variance. Test-retest reliability between 1 to 4 weeks and internal reliability (Chronbach’s alpha were 0.82 and 0.98, respectively. Gutmann split-half correlation coefficient and intra-class correlation coefficient were calculated 95% and 85%, respectively. Conclusion: Persian translated version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC-F is a valid and reliable tool for Iranian community-dwelling older adults that can be used in clinical and research purpose.

  3. Understanding Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...

  4. THE TRANSLATION, VALIDATION AND CULTURAL ADAPTATION OF FUNCTIONAL ASSESSMENT OF CHRONIC ILLNESS THERAPY - SPIRITUAL WELL-BEING 12 (FACIT-SP12) SCALE IN GREEK LANGUAGE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradelos, Evangelos C; Tzavella, Foteini; Koukia, Evmorfia; Tsaras, Konstantinos; Papathanasiou, Ioanna V; Aroni, Adamantia; Alikari, Victoria; Ralli, Maria; Bredle, Jason; Zyga, Sofia

    2016-06-01

    According to World Health Organization (WHO), spirituality is an important domain of quality of life especially in terminal, life threatens chronic diseases. For many people spirituality and religion are not just very important dimensions of their existence, but also a source of support that contributes to wellbeing and coping with everyday difficulties of life. Aim of the study was the translation of the Facit Spiritual Well Being Scale (Facit-Sp12) in Greek language and the validation of the scale for the Greek population. The Facit-Sp12 questionnaire is an anonymous self-administered questionnaire that contains twelve, four point Likert scale, closed questions (0=Not at all, 1=A little bit, 2=Some-what, 3=Quite a bit, 4=Very Much). The questionnaire was translated into Greek language and then back translated in the English in order to be checked for any inconsistencies. The sample of the study was 183 chronic kidney disease patients, undergoing hemodialysis. Exploratory factor analysis, with principal components analysis with Varimax rotation was performed for checking the construct validity of the questionnaire. The test-retest reliability and the internal consistency were also examined. Statistical analysis performed by the use of SPSS 21.0. Statistical significance level was set at p=0.05. The final Greek version of the questionnaire includes all of the twelve questions. The mean age of the participants was 61.81±13.9. Three factors were exported from the statistical analysis. The Cronbach-α coefficient was 0.77 for the total questionnaire and for each subscale was 0.70 for "meaning", 0.73 for "peace" and 0.87 for "faith". Between the three subscales "meaning" had the highest score (mean 12.49, SD=2.865). The Facit Spiritual Wellbeing Scale-Facit-Sp12, is a valuable and reliable questionnaire of three dimensions that can be used for assessing spirituality and spiritual wellbeing in Greek population.

  5. Impacts of physical and chemical aquifer heterogeneity on basin-scale solute transport: Vulnerability of deep groundwater to arsenic contamination in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Holly A.; Khan, Mahfuzur R.

    2016-12-01

    Aquifer heterogeneity presents a primary challenge in predicting the movement of solutes in groundwater systems. The problem is particularly difficult on very large scales, across which permeability, chemical properties, and pumping rates may vary by many orders of magnitude and data are often sparse. An example is the fluvio-deltaic aquifer system of Bangladesh, where naturally-occurring arsenic (As) exists over tens of thousands of square kilometers in shallow groundwater. Millions of people in As-affected regions rely on deep (≥150 m) groundwater as a safe source of drinking water. The sustainability of this resource has been evaluated with models using effective properties appropriate for a basin-scale contamination problem, but the extent to which preferential flow affects the timescale of downward migration of As-contaminated shallow groundwater is unknown. Here we embed detailed, heterogeneous representations of hydraulic conductivity (K), pumping rates, and sorptive properties (Kd) within a basin-scale numerical groundwater flow and solute transport model to evaluate their effects on vulnerability and deviations from simulations with homogeneous representations in two areas with different flow systems. Advective particle tracking shows that heterogeneity in K does not affect average travel times from shallow zones to 150 m depth, but the travel times of the fastest 10% of particles decreases by a factor of ∼2. Pumping distributions do not strongly affect travel times if irrigation remains shallow, but increases in the deep pumping rate substantially reduce travel times. Simulation of advective-dispersive transport with sorption shows that deep groundwater is protected from contamination over a sustainable timeframe (>1000 y) if the spatial distribution of Kd is uniform. However, if only low-K sediments sorb As, 30% of the aquifer is not protected. Results indicate that sustainable management strategies in the Bengal Basin should consider impacts of both

  6. Scale dependence of cirrus horizontal heterogeneity effects on TOA measurements – Part I: MODIS brightness temperatures in the thermal infrared

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Fauchez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study on the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on MODIS simulated thermal infrared (TIR brightness temperatures (BTs at the top of the atmosphere (TOA as a function of spatial resolution from 50 m to 10 km. A realistic 3-D cirrus field is generated by the 3DCLOUD model (average optical thickness of 1.4, cloud-top and base altitudes at 10 and 12 km, respectively, consisting of aggregate column crystals of Deff = 20 µm, and 3-D thermal infrared radiative transfer (RT is simulated with the 3DMCPOL code. According to previous studies, differences between 3-D BT computed from a heterogenous pixel and 1-D RT computed from a homogeneous pixel are considered dependent at nadir on two effects: (i the optical thickness horizontal heterogeneity leading to the plane-parallel homogeneous bias (PPHB and the (ii horizontal radiative transport (HRT leading to the independent pixel approximation error (IPAE. A single but realistic cirrus case is simulated and, as expected, the PPHB mainly impacts the low-spatial-resolution results (above ∼ 250 m with averaged values of up to 5–7 K, while the IPAE mainly impacts the high-spatial-resolution results (below ∼ 250 m with average values of up to 1–2 K. A sensitivity study has been performed in order to extend these results to various cirrus optical thicknesses and heterogeneities by sampling the cirrus in several ranges of parameters. For four optical thickness classes and four optical heterogeneity classes, we have found that, for nadir observations, the spatial resolution at which the combination of PPHB and HRT effects is the smallest, falls between 100 and 250 m. These spatial resolutions thus appear to be the best choice to retrieve cirrus optical properties with the smallest cloud heterogeneity-related total bias in the thermal infrared. For off-nadir observations, the average total effect is increased and the minimum is shifted to coarser spatial

  7. Scale Dependence of Cirrus Horizontal Heterogeneity Effects on TOA Measurements. Part I; MODIS Brightness Temperatures in the Thermal Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchez, Thomas; Platnick, Steven; Meyer, Kerry; Cornet, Celine; Szczap, Frederic; Varnai, Tamas

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a study on the impact of cirrus cloud heterogeneities on MODIS simulated thermal infrared (TIR) brightness temperatures (BTs) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) as a function of spatial resolution from 50 meters to 10 kilometers. A realistic 3-D (three-dimensional) cirrus field is generated by the 3DCLOUD model (average optical thickness of 1.4, cloudtop and base altitudes at 10 and 12 kilometers, respectively, consisting of aggregate column crystals of D (sub eff) equals 20 microns), and 3-D thermal infrared radiative transfer (RT) is simulated with the 3DMCPOL (3-D Monte Carlo Polarized) code. According to previous studies, differences between 3-D BT computed from a heterogenous pixel and 1-D (one-dimensional) RT computed from a homogeneous pixel are considered dependent at nadir on two effects: (i) the optical thickness horizontal heterogeneity leading to the plane-parallel homogeneous bias (PPHB); and the (ii) horizontal radiative transport (HRT) leading to the independent pixel approximation error (IPAE). A single but realistic cirrus case is simulated and, as expected, the PPHB mainly impacts the low-spatial resolution results (above approximately 250 meters), with averaged values of up to 5-7 K (thousand), while the IPAE mainly impacts the high-spatial resolution results (below approximately 250 meters) with average values of up to 1-2 K (thousand). A sensitivity study has been performed in order to extend these results to various cirrus optical thicknesses and heterogeneities by sampling the cirrus in several ranges of parameters. For four optical thickness classes and four optical heterogeneity classes, we have found that, for nadir observations, the spatial resolution at which the combination of PPHB and HRT effects is the smallest, falls between 100 and 250 meters. These spatial resolutions thus appear to be the best choice to retrieve cirrus optical properties with the smallest cloud heterogeneity-related total bias in the thermal

  8. Characterisation of the large-scale production process of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) with the analysis of succession and spatial heterogeneity of lignocellulolytic enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánfi, Renáta; Pohner, Zsuzsanna; Kovács, József; Luzics, Szabina; Nagy, Adrienn; Dudás, Melinda; Tanos, Péter; Márialigeti, Károly; Vajna, Balázs

    2015-12-01

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) lignocellulolytic enzyme activity pattern and variation was investigated in a large-scale facility from spawning until the end of the second flush. In the first cultivation cycle laccase production reached its peak during vegetative growth stage, while manganese-peroxidase showed the highest activity during fruiting body induction. Cellulose and hemicellulose degrading enzymes had maximal activity at the beginning of flush and harvest stage. The enzyme activities showed similar tendencies among five different mushroom substrate blocks representing a production house. The spatial variability analysis of enzyme activities pointed out the within substrate block heterogeneity as the main source if variation. This result was confirmed by Combined Cluster and Discriminant Analysis (CCDA) method showing minimal among block heterogeneity considering the whole investigation period; furthermore in the first cultivation cycle all blocks were grouped into one cluster. Copyright © 2015 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Understanding Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne Gram; Gottlieb, Henrik; Klitgård, Ida

    Understanding Translation is designed as a textbook for courses on the theory and practice of translation in general and of particular types of translation - such as interpreting, screen translation and literary translation. The aim of the book is to help you gain an in-depth understanding...... of the phenomenon of translation and to provide you with a conceptual framework for the analysis of various aspects of professional translation. Intended readers are students of translation and languages, but the book will also be relevant for others who are interested in the theory and practice of translation...... - translators, language teachers, translation users and literary, TV and film critics, for instance. Discussions focus on translation between Danish and English....

  10. Machine Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张严心

    2015-01-01

    As a kind of ancillary translation tool, Machine Translation has been paid increasing attention to and received different kinds of study by a great deal of researchers and scholars for a long time. To know the definition of Machine Translation and to analyse its benefits and problems are significant for translators in order to make good use of Machine Translation, and helpful to develop and consummate Machine Translation Systems in the future.

  11. Modeling the large-scale effects of surface moisture heterogeneity on wetland carbon fluxes in the West Siberian Lowland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Bohn

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We used a process-based model to examine the role of spatial heterogeneity of surface and sub-surface water on the carbon budget of the wetlands of the West Siberian Lowland over the period 1948–2010. We found that, while surface heterogeneity (fractional saturated area had little overall effect on estimates of the region's carbon fluxes, sub-surface heterogeneity (spatial variations in water table depth played an important role in both the overall magnitude and spatial distribution of estimates of the region's carbon fluxes. In particular, to reproduce the spatial pattern of CH4 emissions recorded by intensive in situ observations across the domain, in which very little CH4 is emitted north of 60° N, it was necessary to (a account for CH4 emissions from unsaturated wetlands and (b use spatially varying methane model parameters that reduced estimated CH4 emissions in the northern (permafrost half of the domain (and/or account for lower CH4 emissions under inundated conditions. Our results suggest that previous estimates of the response of these wetlands to thawing permafrost may have overestimated future increases in methane emissions in the permafrost zone.

  12. Dutch Translation and Cross-cultural Adaptation of the Lysholm Score and Tegner Activity Scale for Patients With Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshuis, Rienk; Lentjes, Gijsbertus Wilhelmus; Tegner, Yelverton; Wolterbeek, Nienke; Veen, Maurits Remmelt

    2016-11-01

    Study Design Clinical measurement. Background The Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale are frequently used patient-reported instruments to determine the functional status and activity level after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Objectives To translate and cross-culturally adapt the Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale for use in the Dutch population and to evaluate the reliability and validity of these questionnaires in individuals after ACL reconstruction. Methods The translation and adaptation were conducted in several steps according to the guidelines in the literature. The measurement properties of the Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale (internal consistency, construct validity, and floor and ceiling effects) were tested in 96 patients. Reproducibility was tested in 69 patients with ACL injuries. On the first occasion, the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (IKDC) and RAND 36-Item Health Survey (RAND-36) were also administered. Results The Lysholm score and Tegner activity scale showed good test-retest reliability between repeated measures (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.93 and 0.97, respectively) and reasonable to good internal consistency (Cronbach α = .70-.83). The Lysholm score had a very strong correlation with the IKDC (r = 0.83, P<.01) and moderate correlation with the RAND-36 (r = 0.55, P<.01). The Tegner activity scale had moderate correlations with both the IKDC (r = 0.42, P<.01) and RAND-36 (r = 0.48, P<.01). Conclusion The psychometric performance of the Lysholm score and the Tegner activity scale as outcome measures for Dutch patients after ACL reconstruction is acceptable. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(11):976-983. Epub 28 Sep 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6566.

  13. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation, and validation of the french version of the 15-item Myasthenia Gravis Quality Of life scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Simone; Ghout, Idir; Demeret, Sophie; Bolgert, Francis; Eymard, Bruno; Sharshar, Tarek; Portero, Pierre; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2017-05-01

    Evaluation of quality of life (QOL) has become essential in healthcare. Currently no MG-specific QOL measure exists in French. The aim of this study was to translate, culturally adapt, and evaluate the psychometric properties of the French version of the 15-Item Myasthenia Gravis Quality of Life Scale (MG-QOL15) scale for French myasthenia patients. Translation and cross-cultural adaption of the MG-QOL15 was performed, followed by reliability and validity evaluations. One hundred and twenty-five patients were included. Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach α = 0.92) as was test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.92, 95% CI 0.86-0.96). Concurrent validity was good for both clinical scores (myasthenic muscle score: ρ = -0.52, P < 0.001; Myasthenia Gravis-Activities of Daily Living scale score: ρ = 0.62, P < 0.001). Correlations were strongest for overall QOL (ρ = 0.62, P < 0.001) and physical health (ρ = 0.67, P < 0.001) on the World Health Organization Quality of Life short score (WHO-QOL BREF). The French version of the MG-QOL15 is valid and reliable and is now available for use with French-speaking patients. Muscle Nerve, 2016 Muscle Nerve 55: 639-645, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Understory Plant Community Composition Is Associated with Fine-Scale Above- and Below-Ground Resource Heterogeneity in Mature Lodgepole Pine (Pinus contorta Forests.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne C S McIntosh

    Full Text Available Understory plant communities play critical ecological roles in forest ecosystems. Both above- and below-ground ecosystem properties and processes influence these communities but relatively little is known about such effects at fine (i.e., one to several meters within-stand scales, particularly for forests in which the canopy is dominated by a single species. An improved understanding of these effects is critical for understanding how understory biodiversity is regulated in such forests and for anticipating impacts of changing disturbance regimes. Our primary objective was to examine the patterns of fine-scale variation in understory plant communities and their relationships to above- and below-ground resource and environmental heterogeneity within mature lodgepole pine forests. We assessed composition and diversity of understory vegetation in relation to heterogeneity of both the above-ground (canopy tree density, canopy and tall shrub basal area and cover, downed wood biomass, litter cover and below-ground (soil nutrient availability, decomposition, forest floor thickness, pH, and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs and multiple carbon-source substrate-induced respiration (MSIR of the forest floor microbial community environment. There was notable variation in fine-scale plant community composition; cluster and indicator species analyses of the 24 most commonly occurring understory species distinguished four assemblages, one for which a pioneer forb species had the highest cover levels, and three others that were characterized by different bryophyte species having the highest cover. Constrained ordination (distance-based redundancy analysis showed that two above-ground (mean tree diameter, litter cover and eight below-ground (forest floor pH, plant available boron, microbial community composition and function as indicated by MSIR and PLFAs properties were associated with variation in understory plant community composition. These results provide

  15. Translatress, Translator, Translation

    OpenAIRE

    Margala, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    I still manage to surprise a few scholars from other fields when they hear that there is such a thing as research of gender issues within the field of translation studies. It may seem as such a narrow niche – but only deceivingly so. It is language, linguistics, pragmatics, culture, history, literature, anthropology, gender metaphorics, communication, interpreting, cultural politics, social studies and politics, psychology and I can go on and on. History seems to be a very appropriate startin...

  16. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the Brazilian Portuguese version of the Driving Anger Scale (DAS: long form and short form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessye Almeida Cantini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Driving anger has attracted the attention of researchers in recent years because it may induce individuals to drive aggressively or adopt risk behaviors. The Driving Anger Scale (DAS was designed to evaluate the propensity of drivers to become angry or aggressive while driving. This study describes the cross-cultural adaptation of a Brazilian version of the short form and the long form of the DAS.Methods: Translation and adaptation were made in four steps: two translations and two back-translations carried out by independent evaluators; the development of a brief version by four bilingual experts in mental health and driving behaviors; a subsequent experimental application; and, finally, an investigation of operational equivalence.Results: Final Brazilian versions of the short form and of the long form of the DAS were made and are presented. Conclusions: This important instrument, which assesses driving anger and aggressive behaviors, is now available to evaluate the driving behaviors of the Brazilian population, which facilitates research in this field.

  17. Linguistic and clinical validation of the Arabic-translated Aberdeen Menorrhagia Severity Scale as an indicator of quality of life for women with abnormal uterine bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Rafea, Basim F; Vilos, George A; Al Jasser, Rakia S; Al Anazy, Reem M; Javaid, Khalida; Al-Mandeel, Hazem M

    2012-08-01

    To develop a conceptually and semantically valid Arabic version of a validated disease-specific instrument of quality of life (QoL) for women with abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB). This is a prospective cohort study conducted at the Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between December 2010 and December 2011 following ethics approval. Forward translation of the Aberdeen Menorrhagia Severity Scale (AMSS) from English into Arabic was followed by backward translation of the consensus target (Arabic) version into the source (English) language. Subsequently, a final target (Arabic) language version was created. Sixty-one Arabic-speaking women of reproductive age participated in the study. The final Arabic questionnaire was administered to 41 women with self-perceived normal menses (Group 1) on 2 occasions 2 weeks apart. Agreement in the answers deems the questionnaire reliable. The final Arabic version was administered to 20 women with self-perceived AUB (Group 2), and their scores were compared with the first response of Group 1. A significant difference between the groups deems the questionnaire valid. For linguistic validation; intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) of 0.87 and Kappa statistics of 0.56 to 0.87 indicated good to excellent agreement. For clinical validation, there was a significant difference between Group 1 and 2 (p=0.001). The translated Arabic AMSS is a reliable and valid indicator of QoL in Saudi women with AUB.

  18. Psychometric Examination, Adaptation, and Evaluation of the Hebrew Translation of the MMPI-2-RF VRIN-r and TRIN-r Validity Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shkalim, Eleanor; Ben-Porath, Yossef S; Handel, Richard W; Almagor, Moshe; Tellegen, Auke

    2016-01-01

    In this study we examined the utility of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF; Ben-Porath & Tellegen, 2008/2011; Tellegen & Ben-Porath, 2008/2011) Variable Response Inconsistency-Revised (VRIN-r) and True Response Inconsistency-Revised (TRIN-r) scales, including alternative versions of the scales, in the Hebrew translation of the test. First, we examined the applicability of the U.S. VRIN-r and TRIN-r scales in an Israeli Hebrew-speaking mixed clinical sample, and replaced original item pairs that did not meet the development criteria with substitution item pairs that did. Then, using the Israeli normative sample and a pure clinical sample, we compared the psychometric functioning of the adapted Hebrew-language VRIN-r and TRIN-r scales with that of the original versions of these scales under various conditions of simulated non-content-based (random and fixed) responding. Overall, results showed that the adapted versions of the scales did not improve on the original ones. We therefore recommend using the U.S. VRIN-r and TRIN-r versions, which could also facilitate cross-cultural comparisons.

  19. Heterogeneous integration of lithium niobate and silicon nitride waveguides for wafer-scale photonic integrated circuits on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Lin; Pfeiffer, Martin H P; Volet, Nicolas; Zervas, Michael; Peters, Jon D; Manganelli, Costanza L; Stanton, Eric J; Li, Yifei; Kippenberg, Tobias J; Bowers, John E

    2017-02-15

    An ideal photonic integrated circuit for nonlinear photonic applications requires high optical nonlinearities and low loss. This work demonstrates a heterogeneous platform by bonding lithium niobate (LN) thin films onto a silicon nitride (Si3N4) waveguide layer on silicon. It not only provides large second- and third-order nonlinear coefficients, but also shows low propagation loss in both the Si3N4 and the LN-Si3N4 waveguides. The tapers enable low-loss-mode transitions between these two waveguides. This platform is essential for various on-chip applications, e.g., modulators, frequency conversions, and quantum communications.

  20. Translation, Adaptation, and Validation of Hindi Version of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale in Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain for Use in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Dipika; Gudala, Kapil; Lavudiya, Sreenu; Ghai, Babita; Arora, Pooja

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVES : This study translates the Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) into Hindi and examines the psychometric properties of the translated version (Hindi PCS [Hi-PCS]) in patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP). METHODS : Forward and backward translations were performed from English to Hindi according to standard methodology. A final version was evaluated by a committee of clinical experts and Hi-PCS was then pilot-tested in 10 patients with CLBP. Cross-cultural validation of the resulting adapted Hi-PCS was done by administering Hi-PCS at baseline to 100 patients with CLBP (≥ 12 weeks pain) who were able to read and write in Hindi, and re-administering Hi-PCS after 3 days. Construct validity was assessed using factor analysis. Psychometric properties including internal consistency; test-retest reliability; and convergent validity with pain severity, functional disability, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were also assessed. RESULTS : Principal component analysis observed a three-factor structure, which explained 58% of the variance. Confirmatory factor analysis elicited the best fit as judged by the model fit indices. Hi-PCS as a whole was deemed to be internally consistent (Cronbach's α = 0.76). Intraclass correlation coefficient for the Hi-PCS is 0.923 (95% CI: 0.875-0.953). Hi-PCS was moderately correlated with pain intensity (r = 0.651) and functional disability (r = 0.352), and negatively correlated with QoL (r = -0.380). CONCLUSIONS : PCS translation and cross-cultural adaptation to Hindi demonstrated good factor structure along adequate psychometric properties and could be recommended for use in CLBP research in India. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and ICU Mobility Scale: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurika Maria Fogaça Kawaguchi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To translate the Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and the ICU Mobility Scale (IMS into Portuguese, creating versions that are cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil, and to determine the interobserver agreement and reliability for both versions. Methods: The processes of translation and cross-cultural validation consisted in the following: preparation, translation, reconciliation, synthesis, back-translation, review, approval, and pre-test. The Portuguese-language versions of both instruments were then used by two researchers to evaluate critically ill ICU patients. Weighted kappa statistics and Bland-Altman plots were used in order to verify interobserver agreement for the two instruments. In each of the domains of the instruments, interobserver reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The correlation between the instruments was assessed by Spearman's correlation test. Results: The study sample comprised 103 patients-56 (54% of whom were male-with a mean age of 52 ± 18 years. The main reason for ICU admission (in 44% was respiratory failure. Both instruments showed excellent interobserver agreement ( > 0.90 and reliability ( > 0.90 in all domains. Interobserver bias was low for the IMS and the Perme Score (−0.048 ± 0.350 and −0.06 ± 0.73, respectively. The 95% CIs for the same instruments ranged from −0.73 to 0.64 and −1.50 to 1.36, respectively. There was also a strong positive correlation between the two instruments (r = 0.941; p < 0.001. Conclusions: In their versions adapted for use in Brazil, both instruments showed high interobserver agreement and reliability.

  2. Scaling-up impact in perinatology through systems science: Bridging the collaboration and translational divides in cross-disciplinary research and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munar, Wolfgang; Hovmand, Peter S; Fleming, Carrie; Darmstadt, Gary L

    2015-08-01

    Despite progress over the past decade in reducing the global burden of newborn deaths, gaps in the knowledge base persist, and means of translating empirical findings into effective policies and programs that deliver life-saving interventions remain poorly understood. Articles in this issue highlight the relevance of transdisciplinary research in perinatology and calls for increased efforts to translate research into public policy and to integrate interventions into existing primary care delivery systems. Given the complexity and multi-causality of many of the remaining challenges in newborn health, and the effects that social and economic factors have over many newborn conditions, it has further been proposed that integrated, multi-sector public policies are also required. In this article, we discuss the application of systems science methods to advance transdisciplinary research and public policy-making in perinatology. Such approaches to research and public policy have been used to address various global challenges but have rarely been implemented in developing country settings. We propose that they hold great promise to improve not only our understanding of complex perinatology problems but can also help translate research-based insights into effective, multi-pronged solutions that deliver positive, intended effects. Examples of successful transdisciplinary science exist, but successes and failures are context specific, and there are no universal blueprints or formulae to reproduce what works in a specific context into different social system settings. Group model building is a tool, based in the field of System Dynamics, that we have used to facilitate transdisciplinary research and, to a lesser extent, policy formulation in a systematic and replicable way. In this article, we describe how group model building can be used and argue for scaling its use to further the translation of empirical evidence and insights into policy and action that increase maternal

  3. Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and ICU Mobility Scale: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yurika Maria Fogaça; Nawa, Ricardo Kenji; Figueiredo, Thais Borgheti; Martins, Lourdes; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To translate the Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and the ICU Mobility Scale (IMS) into Portuguese, creating versions that are cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil, and to determine the interobserver agreement and reliability for both versions. Methods: The processes of translation and cross-cultural validation consisted in the following: preparation, translation, reconciliation, synthesis, back-translation, review, approval, and pre-test. The Portuguese-language versions of both instruments were then used by two researchers to evaluate critically ill ICU patients. Weighted kappa statistics and Bland-Altman plots were used in order to verify interobserver agreement for the two instruments. In each of the domains of the instruments, interobserver reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The correlation between the instruments was assessed by Spearman's correlation test. Results: The study sample comprised 103 patients-56 (54%) of whom were male-with a mean age of 52 ± 18 years. The main reason for ICU admission (in 44%) was respiratory failure. Both instruments showed excellent interobserver agreement (κ > 0.90) and reliability (α > 0.90) in all domains. Interobserver bias was low for the IMS and the Perme Score (−0.048 ± 0.350 and −0.06 ± 0.73, respectively). The 95% CIs for the same instruments ranged from −0.73 to 0.64 and −1.50 to 1.36, respectively. There was also a strong positive correlation between the two instruments (r = 0.941; p < 0.001). Conclusions: In their versions adapted for use in Brazil, both instruments showed high interobserver agreement and reliability. PMID:28117473

  4. Influence of Fault Surface Heterogeneity on Apparent Frictional Strength, Slip Mode and Rupture Mode: Insights from Meter-Scale Rock Friction Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takizawa, S.; Kawakata, H.

    2016-12-01

    Influence of fault zone heterogeneity on the behavior of fault motion has been studied in many aspects, such as strain partitioning, heat generation, slip mode, rupture mode, and effective friction law. However, a multi-scale investigation of fault behavior due to heterogeneity was difficult in nature, because of the limited access to natural fault zones at the seismogenic depth and the lack of in situ high-resolution observations. To overcome these difficulties, we study the behavior of a meter-scale synthetic fault made of Indian metagabbro during laboratory direct shear experiments, utilizing high-density arrays of strain gauges mounted close to the fault. We focus on two target experiments that are loaded under the same normal stress of 6.7 MPa and loading rate of 0.01 mm/s, but with different initial surface conditions. To change the surface condition, we applied a fast loading experiment under a rate of 1 mm/s between the two target experiments. It turned out the fast loading activated many foreshocks before the mainshock and caused a roaming of the mainshock nucleation site. These features were closely related to the re-distribution of the real contact area and surface wear, which together reflected a more heterogeneous state of the surface condition. During the first target experiment before the fast loading, the synthetic fault moved in a classic stick-slip fashion and the typical rupture mode was subshear within the range of the fault length. However, during the second target experiment, the synthetic fault inherited the heterogeneous features generated from the previous fast loading, showing a macroscopic creep-like behavior that actually consisted of many small stick-slip events. The apparent frictional strength increased while the recurrence interval and the stress drop decreased, compared to the levels seen in the first target experiment. The rupture mode became more complicated; supershear phases sometimes emerged but may only exist transiently

  5. Temperature Dependence in Heterogeneous Nucleation with Application to the Direct Determination of Cluster Energy on Nearly Molecular Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Robert L; Winkler, Paul M; Wagner, Paul E

    2017-12-04

    A re-examination of measurements of heterogeneous nucleation of water vapor on silver nanoparticles is presented here using a model-free framework that derives the energy of critical cluster formation directly from measurements of nucleation probability. Temperature dependence is correlated with cluster stabilization by the nanoparticle seed and previously found cases of unusual increasing nucleation onset saturation ratio with increasing temperature are explained. A necessary condition for the unusual positive temperature dependence is identified, namely that the critical cluster be more stable, on a per molecule basis, than the bulk liquid to exhibit the effect. Temperature dependence is next examined in the classical Fletcher model, modified here to make the energy of cluster formation explicit in the model.  The contact angle used in the Fletcher model is identified as the microscopic contact angle, which can be directly obtained from heterogeneous nucleation experimental data by a recently developed analysis method. Here an equivalent condition, increasing contact angle with temperature, is found necessary for occurrence of unusual temperature dependence. Our findings have immediate applications to atmospheric particle formation and nanoparticle detection in condensation particle counters (CPCs).

  6. Translation and cultural adaptation of the Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) pain scale into Arabic for use with patients with diabetes in Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoushi, Sabri; Johnson, Mark I; Tashani, Osama A

    2017-12-01

    In Libya neuropathic pain is rarely assessed in patients with diabetes. The Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (LANSS) pain scale is used worldwide to screen for neuropathic pain. There is no Arabic version of LANSS for use in Libya. The aim of this study was to develop an Arabic version of LANSS and to assess its validity and reliability in diabetic patients in Benghazi, Libya. LANSS was translated into Arabic by four bilingual translators and back translated to English by a university academic. Validity and reliability of the Arabic LANSS was assessed on 110 patients attending a Diabetes Centre in Benghazi. Concurrent validity was tested and compared with the Self-completed Leeds Assessment of Neuropathic Symptoms and Signs (S-LANSS). Test-retest reliability was conducted 1-2 weeks later. Internal consistency and inter-class correlation (ICC) between LANSS and S-LANSS was also tested. Internal consistency within first completion of the Arabic LANSS was acceptable (Cronbach's alpha = 0.793) and similar to the Arabic S-LANSS (0.796) and the second completion of the Arabic LANSS (0.795). ICC between the Arabic LANSS and the Arabic S-LANSS was 0.999 (p 0.95, p < 0.0001). We concluded that the Arabic version of LANSS pain scale was valid and reliable for use on Libyan diabetic patients. This study provided results suggesting that the S-LANSS could also be used on diabetic patients.

  7. Translation for language purposes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjoldager, Anne

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes the background, subjects, assumptions, procedure, and preliminary results of a small-scale experimental study of L2 translation (Danish into English) and picture verbalization in L2 (English)....

  8. Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD-YBOCS): Brazilian Portuguese translation, cultural adaptation and validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Brito, Maria J; Sabino Neto, Miguel; de Oliveira, Mário F; Cordás, Táki A; Duarte, Leandro S; Rosella, Maria F; Felix, Gabriel A; Ferreira, Lydia M

    2015-01-01

    To translate, culturally adapt, and validate a Brazilian Portuguese version of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD-YBOCS). Ninety-three patients of both sexes seeking rhinoplasty were consecutively selected at the Plastic Surgery Outpatient Clinic of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil, between May 2012 and March 2013. The BDD-YBOCS was translated into Brazilian Portuguese. Thirty patients participated in the cultural adaptation of the scale. The final version was tested for reliability in 20 patients, and for construct validity in 43 patients (correlation of the BDD-YBOCS with the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination [BDDE]). Total Cronbach's alpha was 0.918. The BDD-YBOCS had excellent inter-rater (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.934; p < 0.001) and intra-rater reliability (ICC = 0.999; p < 0.001). Significant differences in BDD-YBOCS scores were found between patients with and without BDD symptoms (p < 0.001), and among patients with different levels of BDD severity (p < 0.001). A strong correlation (r = 0.781; p < 0.001) was observed between the BDDE and the BDD-YBOCS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.851, suggesting a very good accuracy for discriminating between presence and absence of BDD symptoms. The Brazilian Portuguese version of the BDD-YBOCS is a reliable instrument, showing face, content and construct validity.

  9. Equity-oriented toolkit for health technology assessment and knowledge translation: application to scaling up of training and education for health workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walker Peter

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human resources for health are in crisis worldwide, especially in economically disadvantaged areas and areas with high rates of HIV/AIDS in both health workers and patients. International organizations such as the Global Health Workforce Alliance have been established to address this crisis. A technical working group within the Global Health Workforce Alliance developed recommendations for scaling up education and training of health workers. The paper will illustrate how decision-makers can use evidence and tools from an equity-oriented toolkit to scale up training and education of health workers, following five recommendations of the technical working group. The Equity-Oriented Toolkit, developed by the World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Knowledge Translation and Health Technology Assessment in Health Equity, has four major steps: (1 burden of illness; (2 community effectiveness; (3 economic evaluation; and (4 knowledge translation/implementation. Relevant tools from each of these steps will be matched with the appropriate recommendation from the technical working group.

  10. Cross-cultural alexithymia: development and validation of a Hindi translation of the 20-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, R; Mandal, M K; Taylor, G J; Parker, J D

    1996-03-01

    The possibility that alexithymia may be a culture-bound construct was evaluated by developing a Hindi version of the Twenty-Item Toronto Alexithymia Scale and assessing its psychometric properties in a sample of 285 normal young adults in India. The Hindi version of the scale (TAS-20-H) showed excellent cross-language equivalence with the English version. In addition, the TAS-20-H demonstrated adequate internal consistency, good test-retest reliability, and a three-factor structure consistent with the three-factor model of the original scale.

  11. Gravity destabilized non-wetting phase invasion in macro-heterogeneous porous media: Near pore scale macro modified invasion percolation simulation of experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GLASS JR.,ROBERT J.; CONRAD,STEPHEN H.; YARRINGTON,LANE

    2000-03-08

    The authors reconceptualize macro modified invasion percolation (MMIP) at the near pore (NP) scale and apply it to simulate the non-wetting phase invasion experiments of Glass et al [in review] conducted in macro-heterogeneous porous media. For experiments where viscous forces were non-negligible, they redefine the total pore filling pressure to include viscous losses within the invading phase as well as the viscous influence to decrease randomness imposed by capillary forces at the front. NP-MMIP exhibits the complex invasion order seen experimentally with characteristic alternations between periods of gravity stabilized and destabilized invasion growth controlled by capillary barriers. The breaching of these barriers and subsequent pore scale fingering of the non-wetting phase is represented extremely well as is the saturation field evolution, and total volume invaded.

  12. Facilitating the use of large-scale biological data and tools in the era of translational bioinformatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kouskoumvekaki, Irene; Shublaq, Nour; Brunak, Søren

    2014-01-01

    As both the amount of generated biological data and the processing compute power increase, computational experimentation is no longer the exclusivity of bioinformaticians, but it is moving across all biomedical domains. For bioinformatics to realize its translational potential, domain experts need...... access to user-friendly solutions to navigate, integrate and extract information out of biological databases, as well as to combine tools and data resources in bioinformatics workflows. In this review, we present services that assist biomedical scientists in incorporating bioinformatics tools...... into their research.We review recent applications of Cytoscape, BioGPS and DAVID for data visualization, integration and functional enrichment. Moreover, we illustrate the use of Taverna, Kepler, GenePattern, and Galaxy as open-access workbenches for bioinformatics workflows. Finally, we mention services...

  13. Multiphase flow towards coupled solid-liquid interactions in 2D heterogeneous porous micromodels: a fluorescent microscopy and micro-PIV measurement at pore scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaofa; Kazemifar, Farzan; Blois, Gianluca; Christensen, Kenneth; Kenneth Christensen, Notre Dame Team

    2017-11-01

    Multiphase flow in porous media is relevant to a range of applications in the energy and environmental sectors. Recently, the interest has been renewed by geological storage of CO2 within saline aquifers. Central to this goal is predicting the fidelity of candidate sites pre-injection of CO2 and its post-injection migration. Moreover, local pressure buildup may cause micro-seismic events, which could prove disastrous, and possibly compromise seal integrity. Evidence shows that the large-scale events are coupled with pore-scale phenomena, necessitating the understanding of pore-scale stress, strain, and flow processes and their representation in large-scale modeling. To this end, the pore-scale flow of water and supercritical CO2 is investigated under reservoir-relevant conditions over a range of wettability conditions in 2D heterogeneous micromodels that reflect the complexity of real sandstone. High-speed fluorescent microscopy, complemented by a fast differential pressure transmitter, allows for simultaneous measurement of the flow field within and the instantaneous pressure drop across the micromodels. A flexible micromodel is also designed, to be used in conjunction with the micro-PIV technique, enabling the quantification of coupled solid-liquid interactions. This work was supported as part of the GSCO2, an EFRC funded by the US DOE, Office of Science, and partially supported by WPI-I2CNER.

  14. Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief in Pregnant Burned Women: Translation and Psychometric Evaluation of the Persian Version

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Hossein Goudarzian; Mozhgan Taebei; Aria Soleimani; Mohammad Tahmasbi; Mahshid Ahmadi; Mohammad Hamid Madani

    2017-01-01

    Background   The aim of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of the Persian version of Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B) in pregnant women suffering from burns.   Materials and Methods   This cross-cultural psychometrics study was done in 2015 to 2016 and included 410 pregnant burned patients. Participants completed BSHS-B. The face, content and construct validity of the scale were ascertained. Reliability was also assessed using internal consistency, construct r...

  15. Evidence of wave front folding of sonic booms by a laboratory-scale deterministic experiment of shock waves in a heterogeneous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganjehi, Lili; Marchiano, Régis; Coulouvrat, François; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2008-07-01

    The influence of the planetary boundary layer on the sonic boom received at the ground level is known since the 1960s to be of major importance. Sonic boom propagation in a turbulent medium is characterized by an increase of the mean rise time and a huge variability. An experiment is conducted at a 1:100,000 scale in water to investigate ultrasonic shock wave interaction with a single heterogeneity. The experiment shows a very good scaling with sonic boom, concerning the size of the heterogeneities, the wave amplitude, and the rise time of the incident wave. The wave front folding associated with local focusing, and its link to the increase of the rise time, are evidenced by the experiment. The observed amplification of the peak pressure (by a factor up to 2), and increase of the rise time (by up to about one magnitude order), are in qualitative agreement with sonic boom observations. A nonlinear parabolic model is compared favorably to the experiment on axis, though the paraxial approximation turns out less precise off axis. Simulations are finally used to discriminate between nonlinear and linear propagations, showing nonlinearities affect mostly the higher harmonics that are in the audible range for sonic booms.

  16. To change or not to change - translating and culturally adapting the paediatric version of the Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Af Sandeberg, Margareta; Wenemark, Marika; Bartholdson, Cecilia; Lützén, Kim; Pergert, Pernilla

    2017-02-20

    Paediatric cancer care poses ethically difficult situations that can lead to value conflicts about what is best for the child, possibly resulting in moral distress. Research on moral distress is lacking in paediatric cancer care in Sweden and most questionnaires are developed in English. The Moral Distress Scale-Revised (MDS-R) is a questionnaire that measures moral distress in specific situations; respondents are asked to indicate both the frequency and the level of disturbance when the situation arises. The aims of this study were to translate and culturally adapt the questionnaire to the context of Swedish paediatric cancer care. In doing so we endeavoured to keep the content in the Swedish version as equivalent to the original as possible but to introduce modifications that improve the functional level and increase respondent satisfaction. The procedure included linguistic translation and cultural adaptation of MDS-R's paediatric versions for Physicians, Nurses and Other Healthcare Providers to the context of Swedish paediatric cancer care. The process of adjustment included: preparation, translation procedure and respondent validation. The latter included focus group and cognitive interviews with healthcare professionals in paediatric cancer care. To achieve a Swedish version with a good functional level and high trustworthiness, some adjustments were made concerning design, language, cultural matters and content. Cognitive interviews revealed problems with stating the level of disturbance hypothetically and items with negations caused even more problems, after having stated that the situation never happens. Translation and cultural adaptation require the involvement of various types of specialist. It is difficult to combine the intention to keep the content as equivalent to the original as possible with the need for modifications that improve the functional level and increase respondent satisfaction. The translated and culturally adapted Swedish MDS-R seems

  17. Translational Creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandro

    2010-01-01

    A long-established approach to legal translation focuses on terminological equivalence making translators strictly follow the words of source texts. Recent research suggests that there is room for some creativity allowing translators to deviate from the source texts. However, little attention...... is given to genre conventions in source texts and the ways in which they can best be translated. I propose that translators of statutes with an informative function in expert-to-expert communication may be allowed limited translational creativity when translating specific types of genre convention....... This creativity is a result of translators adopting either a source-language or a target-language oriented strategy and is limited by the pragmatic principle of co-operation. Examples of translation options are provided illustrating the different results in target texts. The use of a target-language oriented...

  18. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the anterior cruciate ligament-return to sport after injury (ACL-RSI) scale into Turkish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harput, Gulcan; Tok, Damla; Ulusoy, Burak; Eraslan, Leyla; Yildiz, Taha Ibrahim; Turgut, Elif; Demirci, Serdar; Duzgun, Irem; Tunay, Volga Bayrakci; Baltaci, Gul; Ergun, Nevin

    2017-01-01

    To translate and culturally adapt the anterior cruciate ligament-return to sport after injury (ACL-RSI) scale into Turkish (ACL-RSI-Tr) and examine and evaluate the psychometric properties of the Turkish version in individuals who have undergone anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The ACL-RSI was forward- and back-translated, culturally adapted and validated on ninety-three Turkish individuals who had undergone ACL reconstruction (5 females, 88 males; age 28.7 ± 8.6 years; body mass 80.1 ± 13.9 kg; height 178.8 ± 6.9 cm; body mass index 25.0 ± 3.7 kg/m2). All patients completed the translated ACL-RSI, Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and International Knee Documentary Committee (IKDC) and Lysholm questionnaires. We then analysed the internal consistency, reliability and validity of the newly formed ACL-RSI-Tr scale. The ACL-RSI-Tr showed good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha 0.86) and test-retest reliability (ICC 0.92) and was significantly correlated with the KOOS 'quality of life' (r = 0.58, p < 0.002), 'symptoms and stiffness' (r = 0.35, p = 0.001), 'pain' (r = 0.49, p < 0.001), 'sports' (r = 0.44, p < 0.001) and 'daily life' (r = 0.42, p < 0.001) subscales. The ACL-RSI-Tr also correlated significantly with the TSK (r = - 0.45, p < 0.001), Lysholm (r = 0.45, p < 0.001) and IKDC (r = 0.44, p < 0.001) scores. The Turkish version of the ACL-RSI scale was valid, discriminant, consistent and reliable in patients who had undergone ACL reconstruction. This score could be useful to evaluate the effect of psychological factors on return to sport following ACL surgery. Diagnostic study, Level I.

  19. Quality of mixing in a stired bioreactor used for animal cells culture: heterogeneities in a lab scale bioreactor and evolution of mixing time with scale up

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Collignon, ML; Dossin, D; Delafosse, A; Crine, M; Toye, D

    2010-01-01

    .... The mixing time is measured by conductimetry inside 20 l, 80 l, 600 l tanks. The Grenville correlation is adjusted on these experimental measurements to improve the prediction of the mixing time during the scale-up of the...

  20. Optimizing Electric Vehicle Coordination Over a Heterogeneous Mesh Network in a Scaled-Down Smart Grid Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Lévesque, Martin; Maier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    , smart grid (SG) is still at the developmental stage to address those issues. In this regard, a smart grid testbed (SGT) is desirable to develop, analyze, and demonstrate various novel SG solutions, namely demand response, real-time pricing, and congestion management. In this paper, a novel SGT...... is developed in a laboratory by scaling a 250 kVA, 0.4 kV real low-voltage distribution feeder down to 1 kVA, 0.22 kV. Information and communication technology is integrated in the scaled-down network to establish real-time monitoring and control. The novelty of the developed testbed is demonstrated...

  1. Defining biotypes for depression and anxiety based on large-scale circuit dysfunction: a theoretical review of the evidence and future directions for clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Leanne M

    2017-01-01

    Complex emotional, cognitive and self-reflective functions rely on the activation and connectivity of large-scale neural circuits. These circuits offer a relevant scale of focus for conceptualizing a taxonomy for depression and anxiety based on specific profiles (or biotypes) of neural circuit dysfunction. Here, the theoretical review first outlines the current consensus as to what constitutes the organization of large-scale circuits in the human brain identified using parcellation and meta-analysis. The focus is on neural circuits implicated in resting reflection (default mode), detection of "salience," affective processing ("threat" and "reward"), "attention," and "cognitive control." Next, the current evidence regarding which type of dysfunctions in these circuits characterize depression and anxiety disorders is reviewed, with an emphasis on published meta-analyses and reviews of circuit dysfunctions that have been identified in at least two well-powered case:control studies. Grounded in the review of these topics, a conceptual framework is proposed for considering neural circuit-defined "biotypes." In this framework, biotypes are defined by profiles of extent of dysfunction on each large-scale circuit. The clinical implications of a biotype approach for guiding classification and treatment of depression and anxiety is considered. Future research directions will develop the validity and clinical utility of a neural circuit biotype model that spans diagnostic categories and helps to translate neuroscience into clinical practice in the real world. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Large-scale analysis of post-translational modifications in E. coli under glucose-limiting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Colin W; Sridhara, Viswanadham; Boutz, Daniel R; Person, Maria D; Marcotte, Edward M; Barrick, Jeffrey E; Wilke, Claus O

    2017-04-17

    Post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins is central to many cellular processes across all domains of life, but despite decades of study and a wealth of genomic and proteomic data the biological function of many PTMs remains unknown. This is especially true for prokaryotic PTM systems, many of which have only recently been recognized and studied in depth. It is increasingly apparent that a deep sampling of abundance across a wide range of environmental stresses, growth conditions, and PTM types, rather than simply cataloging targets for a handful of modifications, is critical to understanding the complex pathways that govern PTM deposition and downstream effects. We utilized a deeply-sampled dataset of MS/MS proteomic analysis covering 9 timepoints spanning the Escherichia coli growth cycle and an unbiased PTM search strategy to construct a temporal map of abundance for all PTMs within a 400 Da window of mass shifts. Using this map, we are able to identify novel targets and temporal patterns for N-terminal N α acetylation, C-terminal glutamylation, and asparagine deamidation. Furthermore, we identify a possible relationship between N-terminal N α acetylation and regulation of protein degradation in stationary phase, pointing to a previously unrecognized biological function for this poorly-understood PTM. Unbiased detection of PTM in MS/MS proteomics data facilitates the discovery of novel modification types and previously unobserved dynamic changes in modification across growth timepoints.

  3. A Danish version of the Friendship Scale - Translation and validation of a brief measure of social isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kent, Peter; Hawthorne, Graeme; Kjær, Per

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is common and social isolation is both a risk factor for poor recovery from LBP and a consequence of LBP. The Friendship Scale is a brief measure of social isolation that has been validated for use in the general population and in people with LBP. The aim of this study was to ...

  4. Translation, Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life Scale for European Portuguese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Roque dos Reis

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: This adaptation of the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life questionnaire for European Portuguese speakers should be considered a good tool for evaluation of the level of satisfaction of hearing aid users, and until now, is the only available scale for speakers of European Portuguese.

  5. Retrospective Assessment of ADHD Symptoms in Childhood: Discriminatory Validity of Finnish Translation of the Wender Utah Rating Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisaari, Sasa; Laasonen, Marja; Leppamaki, Sami; Tani, Pekka; Hokkanen, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine the discriminatory validity of the Wender Utah Rating Scale (WURS) and its five suggested subscales (Conduct Problems, Impulsivity Problems, Mood Difficulties, Inattention/Anxiety, Academic Concerns) in a Finnish sample. Method: WURS was administered to 114 adults, aged 18 to 55 years. Participants with ADHD (n = 37) and…

  6. High Resolution Definition of Subsurface Heterogeneity for Understanding the Biodynamics of Natural Field Systems: Advancing the Ability for Scaling to Field Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majer, Ernest L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    1999-12-31

    This research is an integrated project which uses physical (geophysical and hydrologic) and innovative geophysical imaging and microbial characterization methods to identify key scales of physical heterogeneities that affect bioremediation. In the this effort data from controlled laboratory and in situ experiments at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental (INEEL) Test Area North (TAN) site were used to determine the dominant physical characteristics (lithologic, structural, and hydrologic) that can be imaged in situ and correlated with flow and transport properties. Emphasis was placed on identifying fundamental scales of variation of physical parameters that control transport behavior relative to subsurface microbial dynamics that could be used to develop a predictive model. A key hypothesis of the work was that nutrient flux and transport properties are key factors in controlling microbial dynamics, and that geophysical techniques could be used to identify the critical physical properties and scales controlling transport. This hypothesis was essentially validated. The goal was not only to develop and apply methods to monitor the spatial and temporal distribution of the bioremediation in fractured sites such as TAN, but also to develop methods applicable to a wider range of DOE sites. The outcome has been an improved understanding of the relationship between physical, chemical and microbial processes in heterogeneous environments, thus applicable to the design and monitoring of bioremediation strategies for a variety of environments. In this EMSP work we demonstrated that high resolution geophysical methods have considerable resolving power, especially when linked with modern advanced processing and interpretation. In terms of basic science, in addition to providing innovative methods for monitoring bioremediation, the work also provided a strong motivation for developing and extending high resolution geophysical methods.

  7. Effect of Pore-Scale Heterogeneity and Capillary-Viscous Fingering on Commingled Waterflood Oil Recovery in Stratified Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad W. Al-Shalabi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oil recovery prediction and field pilot implements require basic understanding and estimation of displacement efficiency. Corefloods and glass micromodels are two of the commonly used experimental methods to achieve this. In this paper, waterflood recovery is investigated using layered etched glass micromodel and Berea sandstone core plugs with large permeability contrasts. This study focuses mainly on the effect of permeability (heterogeneity in stratified porous media with no cross-flow. Three experimental setups were designed to represent uniformly stratified oil reservoir with vertical discontinuity in permeability. Waterflood recovery to residual oil saturation (Sor is measured through glass micromodel (to aid visual observation, linear coreflood, and forced drainage-imbibition processes by ultracentrifuge. Six oil samples of low-to-medium viscosity and porous media of widely different permeability (darcy and millidarcy ranges were chosen for the study. The results showed that waterflood displacement efficiencies are consistent in both permeability ranges, namely, glass micromodel and Berea sandstone core plugs. Interestingly, the experimental results show that the low permeability zones resulted in higher ultimate oil recovery compared to high permeability zones. At Sor microheterogeneity and fingering are attributed for this phenomenon. In light of the findings, conformance control is discussed for better sweep efficiency. This paper may be of help to field operators to gain more insight into microheterogeneity and fingering phenomena and their impact on waterflood recovery estimation.

  8. Large-scale association analysis identifies new lung cancer susceptibility loci and heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across histological subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, James D; Hung, Rayjean J; Han, Younghun; Zong, Xuchen; Carreras-Torres, Robert; Christiani, David C; Caporaso, Neil E; Johansson, Mattias; Xiao, Xiangjun; Li, Yafang; Byun, Jinyoung; Dunning, Alison; Pooley, Karen A; Qian, David C; Ji, Xuemei; Liu, Geoffrey; Timofeeva, Maria N; Bojesen, Stig E; Wu, Xifeng; Le Marchand, Loic; Albanes, Demetrios; Bickeböller, Heike; Aldrich, Melinda C; Bush, William S; Tardon, Adonina; Rennert, Gad; Teare, M Dawn; Field, John K; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Lazarus, Philip; Haugen, Aage; Lam, Stephen; Schabath, Matthew B; Andrew, Angeline S; Shen, Hongbing; Hong, Yun-Chul; Yuan, Jian-Min; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Pesatori, Angela C; Ye, Yuanqing; Diao, Nancy; Su, Li; Zhang, Ruyang; Brhane, Yonathan; Leighl, Natasha; Johansen, Jakob S; Mellemgaard, Anders; Saliba, Walid; Haiman, Christopher A; Wilkens, Lynne R; Fernandez-Somoano, Ana; Fernandez-Tardon, Guillermo; van der Heijden, Henricus F M; Kim, Jin Hee; Dai, Juncheng; Hu, Zhibin; Davies, Michael P A; Marcus, Michael W; Brunnström, Hans; Manjer, Jonas; Melander, Olle; Muller, David C; Overvad, Kim; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Tumino, Rosario; Doherty, Jennifer A; Barnett, Matt P; Chen, Chu; Goodman, Gary E; Cox, Angela; Taylor, Fiona; Woll, Penella; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Manz, Judith; Muley, Thomas R; Risch, Angela; Rosenberger, Albert; Grankvist, Kjell; Johansson, Mikael; Shepherd, Frances A; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Arnold, Susanne M; Haura, Eric B; Bolca, Ciprian; Holcatova, Ivana; Janout, Vladimir; Kontic, Milica; Lissowska, Jolanta; Mukeria, Anush; Ognjanovic, Simona; Orlowski, Tadeusz M; Scelo, Ghislaine; Swiatkowska, Beata; Zaridze, David; Bakke, Per; Skaug, Vidar; Zienolddiny, Shanbeh; Duell, Eric J; Butler, Lesley M; Koh, Woon-Puay; Gao, Yu-Tang; Houlston, Richard S; McLaughlin, John; Stevens, Victoria L; Joubert, Philippe; Lamontagne, Maxime; Nickle, David C; Obeidat, Ma'en; Timens, Wim; Zhu, Bin; Song, Lei; Kachuri, Linda; Artigas, María Soler; Tobin, Martin D; Wain, Louise V; Rafnar, Thorunn; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E; Reginsson, Gunnar W; Stefansson, Kari; Hancock, Dana B; Bierut, Laura J; Spitz, Margaret R; Gaddis, Nathan C; Lutz, Sharon M; Gu, Fangyi; Johnson, Eric O; Kamal, Ahsan; Pikielny, Claudio; Zhu, Dakai; Lindströem, Sara; Jiang, Xia; Tyndale, Rachel F; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Bossé, Yohan; Chanock, Stephen; Brennan, Paul; Landi, Maria Teresa; Amos, Christopher I

    2017-07-01

    Although several lung cancer susceptibility loci have been identified, much of the heritability for lung cancer remains unexplained. Here 14,803 cases and 12,262 controls of European descent were genotyped on the OncoArray and combined with existing data for an aggregated genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis of lung cancer in 29,266 cases and 56,450 controls. We identified 18 susceptibility loci achieving genome-wide significance, including 10 new loci. The new loci highlight the striking heterogeneity in genetic susceptibility across the histological subtypes of lung cancer, with four loci associated with lung cancer overall and six loci associated with lung adenocarcinoma. Gene expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) analysis in 1,425 normal lung tissue samples highlights RNASET2, SECISBP2L and NRG1 as candidate genes. Other loci include genes such as a cholinergic nicotinic receptor, CHRNA2, and the telomere-related genes OFBC1 and RTEL1. Further exploration of the target genes will continue to provide new insights into the etiology of lung cancer.

  9. Translation and cross-cultural adaptation of the lower extremity functional scale into a Brazilian Portuguese version and validation on patients with knee injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metsavaht, Leonardo; Leporace, Gustavo; Riberto, Marcelo; Sposito, Maria Matilde M; Del Castillo, Letícia N C; Oliveira, Liszt P; Batista, Luiz Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Clinical measurement. To translate and culturally adapt the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) into a Brazilian Portuguese version, and to test the construct and content validity and reliability of this version in patients with knee injuries. There is no Brazilian Portuguese version of an instrument to assess the function of the lower extremity after orthopaedic injury. The translation of the original English version of the LEFS into a Brazilian Portuguese version was accomplished using standard guidelines and tested in 31 patients with knee injuries. Subsequently, 87 patients with a variety of knee disorders completed the Brazilian Portuguese LEFS, the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index, and the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form and a visual analog scale for pain. All patients were retested within 2 days to determine reliability of these measures. Validation was assessed by determining the level of association between the Brazilian Portuguese LEFS and the other outcome measures. Reliability was documented by calculating internal consistency, test-retest reliability, and standard error of measurement. The Brazilian Portuguese LEFS had a high level of association with the physical component of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (r = 0.82), the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (r = 0.87), the International Knee Documentation Committee Subjective Knee Evaluation Form (r = 0.82), and the pain visual analog scale (r = -0.60) (all, PPortuguese LEFS had a low level of association with the mental component of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (r = 0.38, PPortuguese version of the LEFS were high. The standard error of measurement was low (3.6) and the agreement was considered high, demonstrated by the small differences between test and retest and the narrow

  10. Translation and validation of the Chinese version of the short Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale for patients with mental illness in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S S W; Lo, A W Y; Leung, T K S; Chan, F S M; Wong, A T Y; Lam, R W T; Tsang, D K Y

    2014-03-01

    Quality of life outcomes are useful in the assessment of mental and social wellbeing and for informed health care decision-making, especially in the choice of interventions in psychiatric rehabilitation. In its original form, the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale (WEMWBS) is a proven reliable and valid tool for assessing quality of life in normal adults, but not in adults from Asian countries. A shortened 7-item version of WEMWBS (SWEMWBS) with good internal construct validity was used for this study. The present study describes the translation of WEMWBS from English to Chinese and its validation in a sample of Chinese-speaking patient population. Participants included patients admitted to the inpatient units, and those attending the day hospital and outpatient units of the Kowloon Hospital (n = 126). Translation was performed using the multiple forward and backward translation protocol. Patients also completed the 5-item World Health Organization Well-being Index (WHO5) questionnaire. A case therapist completed the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale within 2 days. A total of 20 patients were selected for test-retest measurements performed after 2 weeks. The sample displayed a normal distribution of the Chinese version of SWEMWBS (C-SWEMWBS) scores (mean ± standard deviation, 23.16 ± 5.39; skewness, -0.068; kurtosis, -0.355). Internal reliability coefficient (Cronbach's alpha) for C-SWEMWBS was 0.89 which was consistent with that of English version. The corrected item-total correlation was high with Spearman's rank correlation coefficients ranging from 0.57 (item 6) to 0.75 (item 5). Good test-retest reliability was observed (r = 0.677; p = 0.001). Principal components factor analysis identified a single component (eigenvalues, 4.28; 61.1% variance), similar to the English version. Scores of C-SWEMWBS were positively correlated with the scores of WHO5 (r = 0.49; p gender. The C-SWEMWBS showed high levels of internal consistency and reliability against

  11. Translating Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves Chevrel

    2007-07-01

    Europe thinks in many languages and Europe is a land of translation. Translation is a means of transmitting culture, a means of making it available to others and an invitation to share. It is a cement which binds Europe together.

  12. TRANSLATING FEMINISM

    OpenAIRE

    Gajewska, Agnieszka

    2012-01-01

    Translating feminism Pointing to manifold and long-lasting connections between feminism and translation, the article first presents a selection of multilingual writers (Narcyza Żmichowska and Deborah Vogel), translators (Zofia Żeleńska and Kazimiera Iłłakowiczówna) and translation commentators (Joanna Lisek and Karolina Szymaniak) to ponder why the work of early Polish feminists is neglected. It seems that one of the reasons might be the current colonization of Polish femini...

  13. Satellite-based remote sensing of running water habitats at large riverscape scales: Tools to analyze habitat heterogeneity for river ecosystem management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugue, F.; Lapointe, M.; Eaton, B. C.; Lepoutre, A.

    2016-01-01

    We illustrate an approach to quantify patterns in hydraulic habitat composition and local heterogeneity applicable at low cost over very large river extents, with selectable reach window scales. Ongoing developments in remote sensing and geographical information science massively improve efficiencies in analyzing earth surface features. With the development of new satellite sensors and drone platforms and with the lowered cost of high resolution multispectral imagery, fluvial geomorphology is experiencing a revolution in mapping streams at high resolution. Exploiting the power of aerial or satellite imagery is particularly useful in a riverscape research framework (Fausch et al., 2002), where high resolution sampling of fluvial features and very large coverage extents are needed. This study presents a satellite remote sensing method that requires very limited field calibration data to estimate over various scales ranging from 1 m to many tens or river kilometers (i) spatial composition metrics for key hydraulic mesohabitat types and (ii) reach-scale wetted habitat heterogeneity indices such as the hydromorphological index of diversity (HMID). When the purpose is hydraulic habitat characterization applied over long river networks, the proposed method (although less accurate) is much less computationally expensive and less data demanding than two dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Here, we illustrate the tools based on a Worldview 2 satellite image of the Kiamika River, near Mont Laurier, Quebec, Canada, specifically over a 17-km river reach below the Kiamika dam. In the first step, a high resolution water depth (D) map is produced from a spectral band ratio (calculated from the multispectral image), calibrated with limited field measurements. Next, based only on known river discharge and estimated cross section depths at time of image capture, empirical-based pseudo-2D hydraulic rules are used to rapidly generate a two-dimensional map of flow velocity

  14. Hydrological heterogeneity in Mediterranean reclaimed slopes: runoff and sediment yield at the patch and slope scales along a gradient of overland flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino-Martín, L.; Moreno-de las Heras, M.; Pérez-Domingo, S.; Espigares, T.; Nicolau, J. M.

    2012-05-01

    Hydrological heterogeneity is recognized as a fundamental ecosystem attribute in drylands controlling the flux of water and energy through landscapes. Therefore, mosaics of runoff and sediment source patches and sinks are frequently identified in these dry environments. There is a remarkable scarcity of studies about hydrological spatial heterogeneity in restored slopes, where ecological succession and overland flow are interacting. We conducted field research to study the hydrological role of patches and slopes along an "overland flow gradient" (gradient of overland flow routing through the slopes caused by different amounts of run-on coming from upslope) in three reclaimed mining slopes of Mediterranean-continental climate. We found that runoff generation and routing in non-rilled slopes showed a pattern of source and sink areas of runoff. Such hydrological microenvironments were associated with seven vegetation patches (characterized by plant community types and cover). Two types of sink patches were identified: shrub Genista scorpius patches could be considered as "deep sinks", while patches where the graminoids Brachypodium retusum and Lolium perenne dominate were classified as "surface sinks" or "runoff splays". A variety of source patches were also identified spanning from "extreme sources" (Medicago sativa patches; equivalent to bare soil) to "poor sources" (areas scattered by dwarf-shrubs of Thymus vulgaris or herbaceous tussocks of Dactylis glomerata). Finally, we identified the volume of overland flow routing along the slope as a major controlling factor of "hydrological diversity" (heterogeneity of hydrological behaviours quantified as Shannon diversity index): when overland flow increases at the slope scale hydrological diversity diminishes.

  15. Hydrological heterogeneity in Mediterranean reclaimed slopes: runoff and sediment yield at the patch and slope scales along a gradient of overland flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Merino-Martín

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological heterogeneity is recognized as a fundamental ecosystem attribute in drylands controlling the flux of water and energy through landscapes. Therefore, mosaics of runoff and sediment source patches and sinks are frequently identified in these dry environments. There is a remarkable scarcity of studies about hydrological spatial heterogeneity in restored slopes, where ecological succession and overland flow are interacting. We conducted field research to study the hydrological role of patches and slopes along an "overland flow gradient" (gradient of overland flow routing through the slopes caused by different amounts of run-on coming from upslope in three reclaimed mining slopes of Mediterranean-continental climate. We found that runoff generation and routing in non-rilled slopes showed a pattern of source and sink areas of runoff. Such hydrological microenvironments were associated with seven vegetation patches (characterized by plant community types and cover. Two types of sink patches were identified: shrub Genista scorpius patches could be considered as "deep sinks", while patches where the graminoids Brachypodium retusum and Lolium perenne dominate were classified as "surface sinks" or "runoff splays". A variety of source patches were also identified spanning from "extreme sources" (Medicago sativa patches; equivalent to bare soil to "poor sources" (areas scattered by dwarf-shrubs of Thymus vulgaris or herbaceous tussocks of Dactylis glomerata. Finally, we identified the volume of overland flow routing along the slope as a major controlling factor of "hydrological diversity" (heterogeneity of hydrological behaviours quantified as Shannon diversity index: when overland flow increases at the slope scale hydrological diversity diminishes.

  16. A review on the use of entropy in landscape ecology: heterogeneity, unpredictability, scale dependence and their links with thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Vranken, Isabelle; Baudry, Jacques; Aubinet, Marc; Visser, Marjolein; Bogaert, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a universal law that can predict the spatiotemporal structure of any entity at any scale has long been pursued. Thermodynamics have targeted this goal, and the concept of entropy has been widely applied for various disciplines and purposes, including landscape ecology. Within this discipline, however, the uses of the entropy concept and its underlying assumptions are various and are seldom described explicitly. In addition, the link between this concept and thermodynamic...

  17. Different Scales of os Isotopic Heterogeneity in Ophiolite Chromitites from Sagua de TÁNAMO and MAYARÍ Mining Districts (eastern Cuba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervilla, F.; Marchesi, C.; González-Jiménez, J. M.; Proenza, J. A.; Garrido, C. J.; Griffin, W. L.; O'Really, S.; Pearson, N. J.

    2009-04-01

    We performed in situ laser ablation MC-ICP-MS measurements of Os isotopes in platinum-group minerals (PGM) included in unaltered chromite from ophiolite chromitites of the Sagua de Tánamo mining district (eastern Cuba). The results reveal important heterogeneities at the km, hand sample and thin section scales. Initial 187Os/188Os (calculated at 90Ma, the estimated age of ophiolite formation) spans from 0.1185 to 0.1295 in the whole district. These values correspond to γOs = -8.1-0.4, calculated by comparison with the Os isotopic evolution of the primitive upper mantle (PUM; Meisel et al., 2001, GCA 65), and all but one PGMs have γOs lower than PUM. PGMs in a single hand sample from the Caridad Mine exhibit 187Os/188Os ratios from 0.1185 to 0.1274, which overlap almost the entire range of values measured in the Sagua de Tánamo district. In one thin section from the same mine 187Os/188Os varies between 0.1200 and 0.1263 in two PGMs that are only few millimetres from each other. The few analyzed PGM grains from the Mayarí district have 187Os/188Os = 0.1271-0.1272 (γOs = -1.4) that are generally higher than in Sagua de Tánamo and much more homogeneous. The sub-PUM (i.e. negative) initial γOs values can be explained by Re depletion during a long history of partial melting starting at 1.61 Ga, as indicated by calculated Os model ages. However, the heterogeneous isotopic signature of PGMs in a single hand sample and thin section suggests a more complex magmatic scenario for the formation of PGMs and the host chromite. At such small scales, the formation of PGMs with variable Os isotopic signatures requires a heterogeneous genetic environment where melts with different Os isotopic compositions coexist in space and/or time. This scenario can be achieved during chromite crystallization by mixing in mantle conduits of primitive and differentiated melts. Each new batch of primitive melt (with its own Os isotopic signature inherited from a highly heterogeneous

  18. Translation, cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the French version of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Return to Sport after Injury (ACL-RSI) scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohu, Y; Klouche, S; Lefevre, N; Webster, K; Herman, S

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to translate, adapt and validate in French the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Return to Sport after Injury (ACL-RSI), a 12-item English language scale assessing the psychological impact of returning to sports after ACL reconstruction. The ACL-RSI scale was forward and back translated, cross-culturally adapted and validated using international guidelines. The study population included all patients who were active in sports and underwent primary arthroscopic ACL reconstruction. The control group included subjects with no history of knee trauma. At the 6-month follow-up, the study population completed the ACL-RSI scale twice within 3-4 days, Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and subjective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) scores. Statistical tests assessed the construct validity, discriminant validity, internal consistency, reliability and feasibility of the ACL-RSI scale. Ninety-one patients with ACL tears and 98 control subjects were included: mean age 31.7 ± 8.1 and 21.8 ± 2, respectively. The ACL-RSI scores were correlated with all KOOS sub-categories (r = 0.22-0.64, p sport (72.1 ± 21.4 vs. 60.3 ± 18.1, p = 0.008). Internal consistency was high (α = 0.96). Test-retest reproducibility was excellent: ρ = 0.90 (0.86-0.94), p < 0.00001. Administration time was 1.32 ± 0.7 mn, and all items were answered. This study showed that the cross-cultural adaptation of the English version of the ACL-RSI was successful and validated in a French-speaking population. The discriminant capacity of the scale between patients who underwent reconstruction and healthy subjects was confirmed. II.

  19. Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and ICU Mobility Scale: translation into Portuguese and cross-cultural adaptation for use in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Yurika Maria Fogaça; Nawa, Ricardo Kenji; Figueiredo, Thais Borgheti; Martins, Lourdes; Pires-Neto, Ruy Camargo

    2016-01-01

    To translate the Perme Intensive Care Unit Mobility Score and the ICU Mobility Scale (IMS) into Portuguese, creating versions that are cross-culturally adapted for use in Brazil, and to determine the interobserver agreement and reliability for both versions. The processes of translation and cross-cultural validation consisted in the following: preparation, translation, reconciliation, synthesis, back-translation, review, approval, and pre-test. The Portuguese-language versions of both instruments were then used by two researchers to evaluate critically ill ICU patients. Weighted kappa statistics and Bland-Altman plots were used in order to verify interobserver agreement for the two instruments. In each of the domains of the instruments, interobserver reliability was evaluated with Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The correlation between the instruments was assessed by Spearman's correlation test. The study sample comprised 103 patients-56 (54%) of whom were male-with a mean age of 52 ± 18 years. The main reason for ICU admission (in 44%) was respiratory failure. Both instruments showed excellent interobserver agreement ( > 0.90) and reliability ( > 0.90) in all domains. Interobserver bias was low for the IMS and the Perme Score (-0.048 ± 0.350 and -0.06 ± 0.73, respectively). The 95% CIs for the same instruments ranged from -0.73 to 0.64 and -1.50 to 1.36, respectively. There was also a strong positive correlation between the two instruments (r = 0.941; p composta por 103 pacientes, sendo a maioria homens (n = 56; 54%), com média de idade = 52 ± 18 anos. O principal motivo de internação nas UTIs foi insuficiência respiratória (em 44%). Os dois instrumentos apresentaram excelente concordância interobservador (> 0,90) e confiabilidade ( > 0,90) em todos os domínios. Constatou-se um baixo viés interobservador na EMU e no Perme Escore (-0,048 ± 0,350 e -0,06 ± 0,73, respectivamente). Os IC95% para os mesmos instrumentos variaram

  20. Translation and psychometric analysis of the Malaysian version of medication understanding and use self-efficacy scale (m-muse for diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safaa A Al Abboud

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Enhancing diabetes self-efficacy (SE level can improve the self-management behaviour in patients living with diabetes mellitus (DM. This study aimed to translate and assess the psychometric properties of Malaysian version of diabetes Medication Understanding and Use Self-Efficacy Scale (M-MUSE. Methods: Following the translation of English version of MUSE to Malay language using established international standard translation guidelines, 252 adult diabetics (≥ 18 years old; DM type 1 or 2 attending the Endocrine Clinic at Hospital Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, were recruited in this cross-sectional study. After testing the face and content validity, the psychometric properties of the final M-MUSE were evaluated using the Classical Test Theory (CTT for reliability (Cronbach’s alpha (α and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and construct validity (factor analysis (FA. Results: The semantic and conceptual problems in M-MUSE were identified and modified by a qualified professional translation committee. The final version showed good reliability values for internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = 0.89 and one month test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.72. The Bartlett’s test of sphericity and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin tests proved the suitability of M-MUSE for factor analysis. The extracted single component M-MUSE (eigenvalue > 1 explained a total variance of 57.58% with an eigenvalue of 4.60. The two factor structures; namely taking medication (item # 1, 6, 7 and 8 and learning about medication (item # 2, 3, 4 and 5 explained a total variance of 59.25% with good factor loading values (ranged from 0.63 to 0.89 for taking medication, and 0.66 to 0.83 for learning about medication. Conclusion: The M-MUSE appears to be a linguistically reliable and valid measure that is conceptually equivalent to the original version. The M-MUSE can be used in Malaysian healthcare settings to evaluate the SE in understanding and using prescribed

  1. Satellite Albedo products Validation by Upscaling Multi-nodes in situ Data into a Satellite Pixel Scale over Heterogeneous Land Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, D.; Wen, J.; Wu, X.; Liu, Q.; Peng, J.; Xiao, Q.; Qinhuo, L.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface albedo is a key parameter for energy budgets. There are many available products from remote sensing sensors, such as Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and so on. Their accuracy should be carefully quantified before being used. Most validations directly use a single-point in situ measurement in the relatively homogeneous land surface. However, it is not valid over heterogeneous cases. A multi-scale validation strategy using a high-resolution albedo imagery as a bridge is alternative, with several uncertainties from high-spatial-resolution albedo imagery, geometric registration, and the upscaling process. It results a relative precision. Hence, for more effective validation, the albedo absolute value based on ground measurements is still required, which can be conceptualized as the "truth" value of pixel scale albedo. In this study, a sampling strategy based on using wireless sensor network (WSN) technology to measure albedo at multiple nodes is proposed to capture the land surface heterogeneity in Huailai remote sensing test station, Hebei province, China, which is one station of a Chinese validation network (fig. 1). The nodes are distributed in an optimal layout determined by a sequential selection method using theirs representativeness. The first six nodes with the highest degree of representativeness are finally selected (fig. 2). Upscaling functions with different weights for each node, calculated by the ordinary least squares (OLS) linear regression, are used to upscale them to a coarse pixel scale. Application is exemplified by the validation of the MODIS albedo product (fig. 3), and VIIRS albedo product (fig.4), from Jul. 18, 2013 to Jul. 31, 2014. The RMSEs are 0.025 and 0.020 for MCD43B3 full inversion and magnitude inversion, respectively. The overall accuracy of VIIRS albedo is 0.021 and 0.014 under clear sky and

  2. Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD-YBOCS: Brazilian Portuguese translation, cultural adaptation and validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria J. de Brito

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To translate, culturally adapt, and validate a Brazilian Portuguese version of the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale modified for Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD-YBOCS. Methods: Ninety-three patients of both sexes seeking rhinoplasty were consecutively selected at the Plastic Surgery Outpatient Clinic of the Universidade Federal de São Paulo, Brazil, between May 2012 and March 2013. The BDD-YBOCS was translated into Brazilian Portuguese. Thirty patients participated in the cultural adaptation of the scale. The final version was tested for reliability in 20 patients, and for construct validity in 43 patients (correlation of the BDD-YBOCS with the Body Dysmorphic Disorder Examination [BDDE]. Results: Total Cronbach’s alpha was 0.918. The BDD-YBOCS had excellent inter-rater (intra-class correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.934; p < 0.001 and intra-rater reliability (ICC = 0.999; p < 0.001. Significant differences in BDD-YBOCS scores were found between patients with and without BDD symptoms (p < 0.001, and among patients with different levels of BDD severity (p < 0.001. A strong correlation (r = 0.781; p < 0.001 was observed between the BDDE and the BDD-YBOCS. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.851, suggesting a very good accuracy for discriminating between presence and absence of BDD symptoms. Conclusion: The Brazilian Portuguese version of the BDD-YBOCS is a reliable instrument, showing face, content and construct validity.

  3. Genome-scale reconstruction of Escherichia coli's transcriptional and translational machinery: a knowledge base, its mathematical formulation, and its functional characterization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Thiele

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic network reconstructions represent valuable scaffolds for '-omics' data integration and are used to computationally interrogate network properties. However, they do not explicitly account for the synthesis of macromolecules (i.e., proteins and RNA. Here, we present the first genome-scale, fine-grained reconstruction of Escherichia coli's transcriptional and translational machinery, which produces 423 functional gene products in a sequence-specific manner and accounts for all necessary chemical transformations. Legacy data from over 500 publications and three databases were reviewed, and many pathways were considered, including stable RNA maturation and modification, protein complex formation, and iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis. This reconstruction represents the most comprehensive knowledge base for these important cellular functions in E. coli and is unique in its scope. Furthermore, it was converted into a mathematical model and used to: (1 quantitatively integrate gene expression data as reaction constraints and (2 compute functional network states, which were compared to reported experimental data. For example, the model predicted accurately the ribosome production, without any parameterization. Also, in silico rRNA operon deletion suggested that a high RNA polymerase density on the remaining rRNA operons is needed to reproduce the reported experimental ribosome numbers. Moreover, functional protein modules were determined, and many were found to contain gene products from multiple subsystems, highlighting the functional interaction of these proteins. This genome-scale reconstruction of E. coli's transcriptional and translational machinery presents a milestone in systems biology because it will enable quantitative integration of '-omics' datasets and thus the study of the mechanistic principles underlying the genotype-phenotype relationship.

  4. Machine translation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, M.

    1982-04-01

    Each language has its own structure. In translating one language into another one, language attributes and grammatical interpretation must be defined in an unambiguous form. In order to parse a sentence, it is necessary to recognize its structure. A so-called context-free grammar can help in this respect for machine translation and machine-aided translation. Problems to be solved in studying machine translation are taken up in the paper, which discusses subjects for semantics and for syntactic analysis and translation software. 14 references.

  5. The scale-of-choice effect and how estimates of assortative mating in the wild can be biased due to heterogeneous samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolán-Alvarez, Emilio; Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio; de Coo, Alicia; Cortés, Beatriz; Estévez, Daniel; Ferreira, Mar; González, Rubén; Briscoe, Adriana D

    2015-07-01

    The mode in which sexual organisms choose mates is a key evolutionary process, as it can have a profound impact on fitness and speciation. One way to study mate choice in the wild is by measuring trait correlation between mates. Positive assortative mating is inferred when individuals of a mating pair display traits that are more similar than those expected under random mating while negative assortative mating is the opposite. A recent review of 1134 trait correlations found that positive estimates of assortative mating were more frequent and larger in magnitude than negative estimates. Here, we describe the scale-of-choice effect (SCE), which occurs when mate choice exists at a smaller scale than that of the investigator's sampling, while simultaneously the trait is heterogeneously distributed at the true scale-of-choice. We demonstrate the SCE by Monte Carlo simulations and estimate it in two organisms showing positive (Littorina saxatilis) and negative (L. fabalis) assortative mating. Our results show that both positive and negative estimates are biased by the SCE by different magnitudes, typically toward positive values. Therefore, the low frequency of negative assortative mating observed in the literature may be due to the SCE's impact on correlation estimates, which demands new experimental evaluation. © 2015 The Author(s). Evolution © 2015 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  6. Collectives of diagnostic biomarkers identify high-risk subpopulations of hematuria patients: exploiting heterogeneity in large-scale biomarker data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    the basis of the heterogeneity within their biomarker data, into five distinct risk subpopulations. Our findings highlight an approach with the promise to unlock the potential of biomarkers. This will be especially valuable in the field of diagnostic bladder cancer where biomarkers are urgently required. Clinicians could interpret risk classification scores in the context of clinical parameters at the time of triage. This could reduce cystoscopies and enable priority diagnosis of aggressive diseases, leading to improved patient outcomes at reduced costs. PMID:23327460

  7. The 2014-15 eruption and the short-term geochemical evolution of the Fogo volcano (Cape Verde): Evidence for small-scale mantle heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, J.; Martins, S.; Mattielli, N.; Madeira, J.; Faria, B.; Ramalho, R. S.; Silva, P.; Moreira, M.; Caldeira, R.; Moreira, M.; Rodrigues, J.; Martins, L.

    2017-09-01

    Recurrent eruptions at very active ocean island volcanoes provide the ideal means to gain insight on the scale of spatial variations at the mantle source and on temporal changes of magma genesis and evolution processes. In 2014, after 19 years of quiescence, Fogo volcano (Cape Verde Archipelago) experienced a new eruption, with the vents located 200 m from those of the 1995 eruption, and less than 2000 m from those of the 1951 event. This offered a unique opportunity to investigate the existence of small-scale mantle heterogeneities and the short-term compositional evolution of magmas erupted by a very active oceanic volcano like Fogo. Here we present petrological and geochemical data from the early stages of the Fogo's most recent eruption - started on November 23, 2014 - and compare them with the signature of previous eruptions (particularly those of 1995 and 1951). The magmas erupted in 2014 are alkaline (up to 23.4% and 0.94% of normative ne and lc, respectively) with somewhat evolved compositions (Mg # events as well as the inefficient homogenization within the plumbing system when on route to the surface. The lid effect of an old and thick lithosphere is considered of utmost importance to the preservation of a significant part of source heterogeneity by erupted magmas. The decrease in the contribution of an enriched component to the Fogo magmas in the 2014 eruption marks a change on the volcano short-term evolution that was characterized by a progressive increase of the importance of such a component. Nb/U ratios of the 2014 lavas are similar, within 2σ, to the mean value of OIB, but significantly lower than those reported for the 1995 and 1951 eruptions. This is considered to reflect the lack of significant mixing of the 2014 magmas with lithospheric melts, as opposed to what is here hypothesised for the two previous eruptions.

  8. Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief in Pregnant Burned Women: Translation and Psychometric Evaluation of the Persian Version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Hossein Goudarzian

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background   The aim of this study was to investigate the validity and reliability of the Persian version of Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B in pregnant women suffering from burns.   Materials and Methods   This cross-cultural psychometrics study was done in 2015 to 2016 and included 410 pregnant burned patients. Participants completed BSHS-B. The face, content and construct validity of the scale were ascertained. Reliability was also assessed using internal consistency, construct reliability and intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC.   Results   Construct validity determined nine factors with an eigenvalue greater than 1. The model had a good fit [(c2(68 = 412.038, p < .05, c2/df= 4.612, GFI = .893, CFI = .912, NFI = .902, IFI = .931, RMSEA (90% C.I. = .091 (.088 - .112] with all factors loadings greater than 0.5 and statistically significant. The internal consistency, construct reliability and ICC were greater than 0.70.   Conclusion   Findings revealed that the Persian version of the BSHS-B is valid and reliable, and may be used to assess and evaluate quality of life in Iranian pregnant burned patients.

  9. Quality of mixing in a stired bioreactor used for animal cells culture: heterogeneities in a lab scale bioreactor and evolution of mixing time with scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collignon, ML.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal cells are industrially cultivated inside stirred bioreactors to produce proteinic compounds. Due to the use of mild agitation conditions in order to limit mechanical constraints, the homogeneity of the culture medium can be far from perfect. This study has therefore two objectives: the global characterization of the mixing via the mixing time and the local description of concentration fields. The mixing time is measured by conductimetry inside 20 l, 80 l, 600 l tanks. The Grenville correlation is adjusted on these experimental measurements to improve the prediction of the mixing time during the scale-up of the process. The concentration fields are visualized by the Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (P.L.I.F. technique in the 20 l tank. This part of the study is focused on the time evolution of the maximum value of the tracer concentration inside measurement planes and of the numerical distribution of theses concentration fields.

  10. An efficient implementation of 3D high-resolution imaging for large-scale seismic data with GPU/CPU heterogeneous parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jincheng; Liu, Wei; Wang, Jin; Liu, Linong; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2018-02-01

    De-absorption pre-stack time migration (QPSTM) compensates for the absorption and dispersion of seismic waves by introducing an effective Q parameter, thereby making it an effective tool for 3D, high-resolution imaging of seismic data. Although the optimal aperture obtained via stationary-phase migration reduces the computational cost of 3D QPSTM and yields 3D stationary-phase QPSTM, the associated computational efficiency is still the main problem in the processing of 3D, high-resolution images for real large-scale seismic data. In the current paper, we proposed a division method for large-scale, 3D seismic data to optimize the performance of stationary-phase QPSTM on clusters of graphics processing units (GPU). Then, we designed an imaging point parallel strategy to achieve an optimal parallel computing performance. Afterward, we adopted an asynchronous double buffering scheme for multi-stream to perform the GPU/CPU parallel computing. Moreover, several key optimization strategies of computation and storage based on the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) were adopted to accelerate the 3D stationary-phase QPSTM algorithm. Compared with the initial GPU code, the implementation of the key optimization steps, including thread optimization, shared memory optimization, register optimization and special function units (SFU), greatly improved the efficiency. A numerical example employing real large-scale, 3D seismic data showed that our scheme is nearly 80 times faster than the CPU-QPSTM algorithm. Our GPU/CPU heterogeneous parallel computing framework significant reduces the computational cost and facilitates 3D high-resolution imaging for large-scale seismic data.

  11. Scale translation from shaken to diffused bubble aerated systems for lycopene production by Blakeslea trispora under stimulated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantzouridou, Fani Th; Naziri, Eleni

    2017-03-01

    This study deals with the scale up of Blakeslea trispora culture from the successful surface-aerated shake flasks to dispersed-bubble aerated column reactor for lycopene production in the presence of lycopene cyclase inhibitor 2-methyl imidazole. Controlling the initial volumetric oxygen mass transfer coefficient (kLa) via airflow rate contributes to increasing cell mass and lycopene accumulation. Inhibitor effectiveness seems to decrease in conditions of high cell mass. Optimization of crude soybean oil (CSO), airflow rate, and 2-methyl imidazole was arranged according to central composite statistical design. The optimized levels of factors were 110.5 g/L, 2.3 vvm, and 29.5 mg/L, respectively. At this optimum setting, maximum lycopene yield (256 mg/L) was comparable or even higher to those reported in shake flasks and stirred tank reactor. 2-Methyl imidazole use at levels significantly lower than those reported for other inhibitors in the literature was successful in terms of process selectivity. CSO provides economic benefits to the process through its ability to stimulate lycopene synthesis, as an inexpensive carbon source and oxygen vector at the same time.

  12. Translation and validation of the Life Satisfaction Index for Adolescents scale with neuromuscular disorders: LSI-A Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valdecir Antonio Simon

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To validate the Life Satisfaction Index for Adolescents (LSI-A scale, parent version and patient version, for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, spinal muscular atrophy (SMA and limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD. Methods The parent version of the instrument was divided into Groups A, B, C and D; and the patient version, divided into B, C and D. For the statistical calculation, the following tests were used: Cronbach’s α, ICC, Pearson and the ROC Curve. Results The parent and patient versions of the instrument are presented, with the following results in the overall score, respectively: Cronbach’s α, 0.87 and 0.89; reliability, r 0.98 and 0.97; reproducibility, ICC 0.69 and 0.80; sensitivity, 0.78 and 0.72; specificity, 0.5 and 0.69; and accuracy, 64% and 70