WorldWideScience

Sample records for scale collective transportation

  1. Highly Scalable Trip Grouping for Large Scale Collective Transportation Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach; Risch, Tore

    2008-01-01

    Transportation-related problems, like road congestion, parking, and pollution, are increasing in most cities. In order to reduce traffic, recent work has proposed methods for vehicle sharing, for example for sharing cabs by grouping "closeby" cab requests and thus minimizing transportation cost...... and utilizing cab space. However, the methods published so far do not scale to large data volumes, which is necessary to facilitate large-scale collective transportation systems, e.g., ride-sharing systems for large cities. This paper presents highly scalable trip grouping algorithms, which generalize previous...

  2. Drift-Scale Radionuclide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Houseworth

    2004-09-22

    The purpose of this model report is to document the drift scale radionuclide transport model, taking into account the effects of emplacement drifts on flow and transport in the vicinity of the drift, which are not captured in the mountain-scale unsaturated zone (UZ) flow and transport models ''UZ Flow Models and Submodels'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169861]), ''Radionuclide Transport Models Under Ambient Conditions'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 164500]), and ''Particle Tracking Model and Abstraction of Transport Process'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170041]). The drift scale radionuclide transport model is intended to be used as an alternative model for comparison with the engineered barrier system (EBS) radionuclide transport model ''EBS Radionuclide Transport Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169868]). For that purpose, two alternative models have been developed for drift-scale radionuclide transport. One of the alternative models is a dual continuum flow and transport model called the drift shadow model. The effects of variations in the flow field and fracture-matrix interaction in the vicinity of a waste emplacement drift are investigated through sensitivity studies using the drift shadow model (Houseworth et al. 2003 [DIRS 164394]). In this model, the flow is significantly perturbed (reduced) beneath the waste emplacement drifts. However, comparisons of transport in this perturbed flow field with transport in an unperturbed flow field show similar results if the transport is initiated in the rock matrix. This has led to a second alternative model, called the fracture-matrix partitioning model, that focuses on the partitioning of radionuclide transport between the fractures and matrix upon exiting the waste emplacement drift. The fracture-matrix partitioning model computes the partitioning, between fractures and matrix, of diffusive radionuclide transport from the invert (for drifts without seepage) into the rock water

  3. Scaling in public transport networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. von Ferber

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the statistical properties of public transport networks. These networks are defined by a set of public transport routes (bus lines and the stations serviced by these. For larger networks these appear to possess a scale-free structure, as it is demonstrated e.g. by the Zipf law distribution of the number of routes servicing a given station or for the distribution of the number of stations which can be visited from a chosen one without changing the means of transport. Moreover, a rather particular feature of the public transport network is that many routes service common subsets of stations. We discuss the possibility of new scaling laws that govern intrinsic properties of such subsets.

  4. [Methods for collection, transport and culture media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolani, F; Morera, E; Panichi, G; Occhionero, M; Luzzi, I; Gianfrilli Mastrantonio, P

    1979-01-01

    A crucial factor affecting the ultimate success of anaerobic cultures is a proper specimen collection, with care to avoid inclusion of normal flora often present on human mucosa. In general, material for anaerobic cultures is best obtained using a needle and syringe, from which the air must be expelled. Then the specimens should be placed immediately into an anaerobic transport broth and then in suitable culture pre-reduced media.

  5. SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. KELLER

    2004-11-03

    This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical

  6. Transport at basin scales: 2. Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rinaldo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the second of a series, we apply the models discussed in Part 1 to a significant case study. The nature of the catchment under study, the transport phenomena investigated (i.e. nitrates moving as solutes within runoff waters and the scales involved in space and time, provide an elaborate test for theory and applications. Comparison of modeling predictions with field data (i.e. fluxes of carrier flow and solute nitrates suggests that the framework proposed for geomorphic transport models is capable to describe well large-scale transport phenomena driven and/or controlled by spatially distributed hydrologic fields (e.g. rainfall patterns in space and time, drainage pathways, soil coverage and type, matter stored in immobile phases. A sample MonteCarlo mode of application of the model is also discussed where hydrologic forcings and external nitrate applications (through fertilization are treated as random processes.

  7. Sustainable Transport Data Collection and Application: China Urban Transport Database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Transport policy making process of national and local governments should be supported by a comprehensive database to ensure a sustainable and healthy development of urban transport. China Urban Transport Database (CUTD has been built to play such a role. This paper is to make an introduction of CUTD framework including user management, data warehouse, and application modules. Considering the urban transport development features of Chinese cities, sustainable urban transport development indicators are proposed to evaluate the public transport service level in Chinese cities. International urban transport knowledge base is developed as well. CUTD has been applied in urban transport data processing, urban transport management, and urban transport performance evaluation in national and local transport research agencies, operators, and governments in China, and it will be applied to a broader range of fields.

  8. Optimization of municipal solid waste collection and transportation routes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Swapan, E-mail: swapan2009sajal@gmail.com; Bhattacharyya, Bidyut Kr., E-mail: bidyut53@yahoo.co.in

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Profitable integrated solid waste management system. • Optimal municipal waste collection scheme between the sources and waste collection centres. • Optimal path calculation between waste collection centres and transfer stations. • Optimal waste routing between the transfer stations and processing plants. - Abstract: Optimization of municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and transportation through source separation becomes one of the major concerns in the MSW management system design, due to the fact that the existing MSW management systems suffer by the high collection and transportation cost. Generally, in a city different waste sources scatter throughout the city in heterogeneous way that increase waste collection and transportation cost in the waste management system. Therefore, a shortest waste collection and transportation strategy can effectively reduce waste collection and transportation cost. In this paper, we propose an optimal MSW collection and transportation scheme that focus on the problem of minimizing the length of each waste collection and transportation route. We first formulize the MSW collection and transportation problem into a mixed integer program. Moreover, we propose a heuristic solution for the waste collection and transportation problem that can provide an optimal way for waste collection and transportation. Extensive simulations and real testbed results show that the proposed solution can significantly improve the MSW performance. Results show that the proposed scheme is able to reduce more than 30% of the total waste collection path length.

  9. LARGE-SCALE CO2 TRANSPORTATION AND DEEP OCEAN SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid Sarv

    1999-03-01

    Technical and economical feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and ocean sequestration at depths of 3000 meters or grater was investigated. Two options were examined for transporting and disposing the captured CO{sub 2}. In one case, CO{sub 2} was pumped from a land-based collection center through long pipelines laid on the ocean floor. Another case considered oceanic tanker transport of liquid carbon dioxide to an offshore floating structure for vertical injection to the ocean floor. In the latter case, a novel concept based on subsurface towing of a 3000-meter pipe, and attaching it to the offshore structure was considered. Budgetary cost estimates indicate that for distances greater than 400 km, tanker transportation and offshore injection through a 3000-meter vertical pipe provides the best method for delivering liquid CO{sub 2} to deep ocean floor depressions. For shorter distances, CO{sub 2} delivery by parallel-laid, subsea pipelines is more cost-effective. Estimated costs for 500-km transport and storage at a depth of 3000 meters by subsea pipelines and tankers were 1.5 and 1.4 dollars per ton of stored CO{sub 2}, respectively. At these prices, economics of ocean disposal are highly favorable. Future work should focus on addressing technical issues that are critical to the deployment of a large-scale CO{sub 2} transportation and disposal system. Pipe corrosion, structural design of the transport pipe, and dispersion characteristics of sinking CO{sub 2} effluent plumes have been identified as areas that require further attention. Our planned activities in the next Phase include laboratory-scale corrosion testing, structural analysis of the pipeline, analytical and experimental simulations of CO{sub 2} discharge and dispersion, and the conceptual economic and engineering evaluation of large-scale implementation.

  10. Time Scales, Bedforms and Bedload Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhont, B.

    2015-12-01

    Bedload transport rates in mountain streams may exhibit wide fluctuations even under constant flow conditions. A better understanding of bedload pulses is key to predict natural hazards induced by torrential activity and sediment issues in mountainous areas. Several processes such as bedforms migration, grain sorting and random particles' trajectories are evoked as the driving agents of pulse formation and development. Quantifying the effects of these processes is a difficult task. This work aims to investigate the interactions between bedload transport and bedform dynamics in steep gravel-bed rivers. Experiments are carried out in a 17-m long 60-cm wide flume inclined at an angle of 2.7%. The bed is initially flat and made of homogenous natural gravel with a mean diameter of 6 mm. We imposed 200 identical hydrographs (of 1 hr duration) at the flume inlet (the bed surface was not flattened out during these cycling floods). The input hydrograph and the input sediment discharge are nearly triangular. Bed topography is measured after each flood using ultrasound sensors while the bedload transport rate is steadily monitored at the outlet using accelerometers (accelerometers fixed on metallic plates record the impacts of the grains flowing out of the flume). For the sake of comparison, a similar experiment consisting of 19 floods of 10 hours is carried out under constant supply conditions. We show that accelerometers are a cost effective technique to obtain high-frequency bedload discharge data. Spectral analysis of the bedload timeseries is used to highlight the different time scales corresponding to different bedload transport processes. We show that long timeseries are necessary to capture the different processes that drive bedload transport, including the resilience time after a perturbation of the bed. The alternate bars that develop and migrate along the flume are found to significantly influence bedload transport rate fluctuations.

  11. Collective Flow and Mach Cones with transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Z.

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Fast thermalization and a strong build up of elliptic flow of QCD matter were investigated within the pQCD based 3+1 dimensional parton transport model BAMPS including bremsstrahlung 2 ↔ 3 processes. Within the same framework quenching of gluonic jets in Au+Au collisions at RHIC can be understood. The development of conical structure by gluonic jets is investigated in a static box for the regimes of small and large dissipation. Furthermore we demonstrate two different approaches to extract the shear viscosity coefficient η from a microscopical picture.

  12. Dynamic scaling regimes of collective decision making

    CERN Document Server

    Gronlund, Andreas; Minnhagen, Petter

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a social system of agents faced with a binary choice. We assume there is a correct, or beneficial, outcome of this choice. Furthermore, we assume agents are influenced by others in making their decision, and that the agents can obtain information that may guide them towards making a correct decision. The dynamic model we propose is of nonequilibrium type, converging to a final decision. We run it on random graphs and scale-free networks. On random graphs, we find two distinct regions in terms of the "finalizing time" -- the time until all agents have finalized their decisions. On scale-free networks on the other hand, there does not seem to be any such distinct scaling regions.

  13. A multimodal transportation system routing implemented in waste collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Rabbani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Waste collection is an important municipal service that charges large expenditures to waste management (WM system. In this study, a hierarchical structure is proposed in order to minimize total cost of waste collection routing problem. Moreover, in second stage destructive environmental effects of waste transportation are minimized concurrently through taking advantage of a road/rail transportation system. In the proposed multimodal transportation system, waste packs are transferred to final destination while travel time and risk of environmental threatening is minimized. The discussed problem is formulated mathematically in two stages. In the first stage, a household waste collection routing problem is formulated while, in second stage a multimodal transportation system is routed to transfer waste packs to final destination through roads and railroads. In order to solve the proposed NP hard models, an improved genetic algorithm is developed. Comparison of the obtained results with those of GAMS for small-size samples validates the proposed models.

  14. Scale-free transport in fusion plasmas: theory and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Raul [ORNL; Mier, Jose Angel [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Newman, David E [University of Alaska; Carreras, Benjamin A [BACV Solutions, Inc., Oak Ridge; Garcia, Luis [Universidad Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel [JNL Scientific, Inc., Casa Grande, AZ; Decyk, Viktor [University of California, Los Angeles

    2008-01-01

    A novel approach to detect the existence of scale-free transport in turbulent flows, based on the characterization of its Lagrangian characteristics, is presented and applied to two situations relevant for tokamak plasmas. The first one, radial transport in the presence of near-critical turbulence, has been known for quite some time to yield scale-free, superdiffusive transport. We use it to test the method and illustrate its robustness with respect to other approaches. The second situation, radial transport across radially-sheared poloidal zonal flows driven by turbulence via the Reynold stresses, is examined for the first time in this manner. The result is rather surprising and different from the traditionally assumed diffusive behavior. Instead, radial transport behaves instead in a scale-free, subdiffusive manner, which may have implications for the modeling of transport across transport barriers.

  15. Quantifying capital goods for collection and transport of waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogaard, Line K; Christensen, Thomas H

    2012-12-01

    The capital goods for collection and transport of waste were quantified for different types of containers (plastic containers, cubes and steel containers) and an 18-tonnes compacting collection truck. The data were collected from producers and vendors of the bins and the truck. The service lifetime and the capacity of the goods were also assessed. Environmental impact assessment of the production of the capital goods revealed that, per tonne of waste handled, the truck had the largest contribution followed by the steel container. Large high density polyethylene (HDPE) containers had the lowest impact per tonne of waste handled. The impact of producing the capital goods for waste collection and transport cannot be neglected as the capital goods dominate (>85%) the categories human-toxicity (non-cancer and cancer), ecotoxicity, resource depletion and aquatic eutrophication, but also play a role (>13%) within the other impact categories when compared with the impacts from combustion of fuels for the collection and transport of the waste, when a transport distance of 25 km was assumed.

  16. A Note on Scale Economies in Transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tae Hoon Oum; Yimin Zhang

    1997-01-01

    .... Using the results previously obtained by Caves et al. (1984, 1985), and incorporating the estimated link between operating characteristics and scale of outputs, mildly increasing returns for the airline sample in Caves et al. (1984...

  17. A Sparse Multi-Scale Algorithm for Dense Optimal Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitzer, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Discrete optimal transport solvers do not scale well on dense large problems since they do not explicitly exploit the geometric structure of the cost function. In analogy to continuous optimal transport, we provide a framework to verify global optimality of a discrete transport plan locally. This allows the construction of an algorithm to solve large dense problems by considering a sequence of sparse problems instead. The algorithm lends itself to being combined with a...

  18. Reactive/Adsorptive transport in (partially-) saturated porous media: from pore scale to core scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoof, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-scale modeling provides opportunities to study transport phenomena in fundamental ways because detailed information is available at the microscopic pore scale. This offers the best hope for bridging the traditional gap that exists between pore scale and macro (lab) scale description of the

  19. Visualization and modeling of smoke transport over landscape scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn P. Forney; William Mell

    2007-01-01

    Computational tools have been developed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for modeling fire spread and smoke transport. These tools have been adapted to address fire scenarios that occur in the wildland urban interface (WUI) over kilometer-scale distances. These models include the smoke plume transport model ALOFT (A Large Open Fire plume...

  20. Collective Space-Sensing Coordinates Pattern Scaling in Engineered Bacteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cao, Yangxiaolu; Ryser, Marc D; Payne, Stephen; Li, Bochong; Rao, Christopher V; You, Lingchong

    2016-01-01

    .... We found that the ring width exhibits perfect scale invariance to the colony size. Our analysis revealed a collective space-sensing mechanism, which entails sequential actions of an integral feedback loop and an incoherent feedforward loop...

  1. Thermal Transport in Supported Graphene: Substrate Effects on Collective Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    France-Lanord, Arthur; Soukiassian, Patrick; Glattli, Christian; Wimmer, Erich

    2017-03-01

    A detailed computational analysis of thermal transport in supported graphene reveals the possibility of tuning its thermal conductivity by targeted chemical modifications of the substrate's surface. Based on classical molecular dynamics with an accurate charge-optimized bond-order force field and a time-domain normal-mode analysis, our approach allows us to distinguish collective from single-phonon excitations. The computations reveal a disproportional reduction of the thermal conductivity, due to the two different excitations, when graphene interacts with a substrate. Deposition of graphene on a bare silica surface leads to a dramatic reduction of the thermal conductivity and a change in the heat transport mechanism. Remarkably, partial hydroxylation of the silica surface almost doubles the thermal conductivity of the collective excitations. Thus, specific surface terminations allow for control of the thermal conductivity of graphene.

  2. 77 FR 71430 - New Agency Information Collection Activity Under OMB Review: Public Transportation Baseline...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-30

    ...: Public Transportation Baseline Assessment for Security Enhancement (BASE) Program AGENCY: Transportation.... Information Collection Requirement Title: Public Transportation Systems Baseline Assessment for Security...): BASE electronic checklist. Affected Public: Public Transportation Agencies, including buses, rail...

  3. Leadership solves collective action problems in small-scale societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Luke; von Rueden, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Observation of leadership in small-scale societies offers unique insights into the evolution of human collective action and the origins of sociopolitical complexity. Using behavioural data from the Tsimane forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia and Nyangatom nomadic pastoralists of Ethiopia, we evaluate the traits of leaders and the contexts in which leadership becomes more institutional. We find that leaders tend to have more capital, in the form of age-related knowledge, body size or social connections. These attributes can reduce the costs leaders incur and increase the efficacy of leadership. Leadership becomes more institutional in domains of collective action, such as resolution of intragroup conflict, where collective action failure threatens group integrity. Together these data support the hypothesis that leadership is an important means by which collective action problems are overcome in small-scale societies. PMID:26503683

  4. Leadership solves collective action problems in small-scale societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Luke; von Rueden, Chris

    2015-12-05

    Observation of leadership in small-scale societies offers unique insights into the evolution of human collective action and the origins of sociopolitical complexity. Using behavioural data from the Tsimane forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia and Nyangatom nomadic pastoralists of Ethiopia, we evaluate the traits of leaders and the contexts in which leadership becomes more institutional. We find that leaders tend to have more capital, in the form of age-related knowledge, body size or social connections. These attributes can reduce the costs leaders incur and increase the efficacy of leadership. Leadership becomes more institutional in domains of collective action, such as resolution of intragroup conflict, where collective action failure threatens group integrity. Together these data support the hypothesis that leadership is an important means by which collective action problems are overcome in small-scale societies. © 2015 The Author(s).

  5. Collective strategy for obstacle navigation during cooperative transport by ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreery, Helen F; Dix, Zachary A; Breed, Michael D; Nagpal, Radhika

    2016-11-01

    Group cohesion and consensus have primarily been studied in the context of discrete decisions, but some group tasks require making serial decisions that build on one another. We examine such collective problem solving by studying obstacle navigation during cooperative transport in ants. In cooperative transport, ants work together to move a large object back to their nest. We blocked cooperative transport groups of Paratrechina longicornis with obstacles of varying complexity, analyzing groups' trajectories to infer what kind of strategy the ants employed. Simple strategies require little information, but more challenging, robust strategies succeed with a wider range of obstacles. We found that transport groups use a stochastic strategy that leads to efficient navigation around simple obstacles, and still succeeds at difficult obstacles. While groups navigating obstacles preferentially move directly toward the nest, they change their behavior over time; the longer the ants are obstructed, the more likely they are to move away from the nest. This increases the chance of finding a path around the obstacle. Groups rapidly changed directions and rarely stalled during navigation, indicating that these ants maintain consensus even when the nest direction is blocked. Although some decisions were aided by the arrival of new ants, at many key points, direction changes were initiated within the group, with no apparent external cause. This ant species is highly effective at navigating complex environments, and implements a flexible strategy that works for both simple and more complex obstacles. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Field-scale variation in colloid dispersibility and transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norgaard, Trine; Moldrup, P.; Ferre´, T. P A

    2014-01-01

    risk of colloid-facilitated transport. Subsequently, using multiple linear regression (MLR) analyses, soil dispersibility was predicted at all three sample scales from the 24 measured, geo-referenced parameters to produce sets of only a few promising indicator parameters for evaluating soil stability...... and particle mobilization on field scale. The MLR analyses at each scale were separated in predictions using all, only north, and only south locations in the field. We found that different independent variables were included in the regression models when the sample scale increased from aggregate to column...... level. Generally, the predictive power of the regression models was better on the 1-2 mm aggregate scale than on the intact 100 cm3 and 20 cm × 20 cm scales. Overall, results suggested that different drivers controlled soil dispersibility 1 at the three scales and the two sub-areas of the field...

  7. Prenatal programming of rat cortical collecting tubule sodium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chih-Jen; Lozano, German; Baum, Michel

    2012-03-15

    Prenatal insults have been shown to lead to elevated blood pressure in offspring when they are studied as adults. Prenatal administration of dexamethasone and dietary protein deprivation have demonstrated that there is an increase in transporter abundance for a number of nephron segments but not the subunits of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in the cortical collecting duct. Recent studies have shown that aldosterone is elevated in offspring of protein-deprived mothers when studied as adults, but the physiological importance of the increase in serum aldosterone is unknown. As an indirect measure of ENaC activity, we compared the natriuretic response to benzamil in offspring of mothers who ate a low-protein diet (6%) with those who ate a normal diet (20%) for the last half of pregnancy. The natriuretic response to benzamil was greater in the 6% group (821.1 ± 161.0 μmol/24 h) compared with the 20% group (279.1 ± 137.0 μmol/24 h), consistent with greater ENaC activity in vivo (P sodium transport (-1.9 ± 3.1 pmol·mm(-1)·min(-1)), the offspring of rats that ate a 6% protein diet during the last half of pregnancy had a net sodium flux of 10.7 ± 2.6 pmol·mm(-1)·min(-1) (P = 0.01) in tubules perfused in vitro. Sodium transport was measured using ion-selective electrodes, a novel technique allowing measurement of sodium in nanoliter quantities of fluid. Thus we directly demonstrate that there is prenatal programming of cortical collecting duct sodium transport.

  8. Scaling of flow and transport behavior in heterogeneous groundwater systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, Timothy; Yabusaki, Steven

    1998-11-01

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations using a detailed synthetic hydraulic conductivity field developed from geological considerations provide insight into the scaling of subsurface flow and transport processes. Flow and advective transport in the highly resolved heterogeneous field were modeled using massively parallel computers, providing a realistic baseline for evaluation of the impacts of parameter scaling. Upscaling of hydraulic conductivity was performed at a variety of scales using a flexible power law averaging technique. A series of tests were performed to determine the effects of varying the scaling exponent on a number of metrics of flow and transport behavior. Flow and transport simulation on high-performance computers and three-dimensional scientific visualization combine to form a powerful tool for gaining insight into the behavior of complex heterogeneous systems. Many quantitative groundwater models utilize upscaled hydraulic conductivity parameters, either implicitly or explicitly. These parameters are designed to reproduce the bulk flow characteristics at the grid or field scale while not requiring detailed quantification of local-scale conductivity variations. An example from applied groundwater modeling is the common practice of calibrating grid-scale model hydraulic conductivity or transmissivity parameters so as to approximate observed hydraulic head and boundary flux values. Such parameterizations, perhaps with a bulk dispersivity imposed, are then sometimes used to predict transport of reactive or non-reactive solutes. However, this work demonstrates that those parameters that lead to the best upscaling for hydraulic conductivity and head do not necessarily correspond to the best upscaling for prediction of a variety of transport behaviors. This result reflects the fact that transport is strongly impacted by the existence and connectedness of extreme-valued hydraulic conductivities, in contrast to bulk flow which depends more strongly on

  9. Continuous phosphorus measurements reveal catchment-scale transport processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velde, Y. van der; Rozemeijer, J.C.

    2012-01-01

    A small fraction of the nutrients used for agriculture is transported by rivers and artificial drainage networks to downstream waters. In lakes and coastal seas such as the Baltic Sea and the Gulf of Mexico these nutrients cause large-scale algal blooms and hypoxia and thus are a major

  10. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. González-Pinzón; R. Haggerty; M. Dentz

    2013-01-01

    We investigated scaling of conservative solute transport using temporal moment analysis of 98 tracer experiments (384 breakthrough curves) conducted in 44 streams located on five continents. The experiments span 7 orders of magnitude in discharge (10-3 to 103 m3/s), span 5 orders of magnitude in...

  11. Scaling of geochemical reaction rates via advective solute transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, A G; Ghanbarian, B; Skinner, T E; Ewing, R P

    2015-07-01

    Transport in porous media is quite complex, and still yields occasional surprises. In geological porous media, the rate at which chemical reactions (e.g., weathering and dissolution) occur is found to diminish by orders of magnitude with increasing time or distance. The temporal rates of laboratory experiments and field observations differ, and extrapolating from laboratory experiments (in months) to field rates (in millions of years) can lead to order-of-magnitude errors. The reactions are transport-limited, but characterizing them using standard solute transport expressions can yield results in agreement with experiment only if spurious assumptions and parameters are introduced. We previously developed a theory of non-reactive solute transport based on applying critical path analysis to the cluster statistics of percolation. The fractal structure of the clusters can be used to generate solute distributions in both time and space. Solute velocities calculated from the temporal evolution of that distribution have the same time dependence as reaction-rate scaling in a wide range of field studies and laboratory experiments, covering some 10 decades in time. The present theory thus both explains a wide range of experiments, and also predicts changes in the scaling behavior in individual systems with increasing time and/or length scales. No other theory captures these variations in scaling by invoking a single physical mechanism. Because the successfully predicted chemical reactions include known results for silicate weathering rates, our theory provides a framework for understanding changes in the global carbon cycle, including its effects on extinctions, climate change, soil production, and denudation rates. It further provides a basis for understanding the fundamental time scales of hydrology and shallow geochemistry, as well as the basis of industrial agriculture.

  12. Morphological response of a large-scale coastal blowout to a strong magnitude transport event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Fernandez, Irene; Jackson, Derek; Smith, Alexander; Smyth, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Large-scale blowouts are fundamental features of many coastal dune fields in temperate areas around the world. These distinctive erosional (mostly unvegetated) landform features are often characterised by a significant depression area and a connected depositional lobe at their downwind edges. These areas also provide important transport corridors to inland parts of the dune system and can provide ideal habitats for specialist flora and fauna as well as helping to enhance landscape diversity. The actual morphology and shape/size of blowouts can significantly modify the overlying atmospheric boundary layer of the wind, influencing wind flow steering and intensity within the blowout, and ultimately aeolian sediment transport. While investigations of morphological changes within blowouts have largely focused on the medium (months) to long (annual/decadal) temporal scale, studies of aeolian transport dynamics within blowouts have predominantly focused on the short-term (event) scale. Work on wind-transport processes in blowouts is still relatively rare, with ad-hoc studies providing only limited information on airflow and aeolian transport. Large-scale blowouts are characterised by elongated basins that can reach hundreds of meters, potentially resulting in airflow and transport dynamics that are very different from their smaller scale counterparts. This research focuses on a short-term, strong wind event measured at the Devil's Hole blowout (Sefton dunes, NW England), a large-scale blowout feature approximately 300 m in length and 100 m in width. In situ measurements of airflow and aeolian transport were collected during a short-term experiment on the 22nd October 2015. A total of twenty three, 3D ultrasonic anemometers, sand traps, and wenglor sensors were deployed in a spatial grid covering the distal end of the basin, walls, and depositional lobe. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) was used to quantify morphological changes within the blowout before and after the

  13. Transport Properties at Different Scales Using Digital Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richa, R.; Mukerji, T.; Mavko, G.

    2007-12-01

    In this paper we explore how rock heterogeneity translates into scale-dependent permeability and formation factor, as well as the relation between them. We used a detailed 3-D representation of pore structure of unconsolidated sand obtained from X-ray CT scan. For the samples, loose sand grains were collected from Pomponio Beach and Ano Nuevo costal dune (eolian). These loose sand grains were mixed with epoxy, packed and 3D images were digitized by High-resolution X-ray tomography (CT- scanning). Fluid flow and electrical current were computationally simulated through subsets of the microstructure at different scales. The autocorrelation lengths, a, of the entire sample were calculated in three different directions. The autocorrelation lengths show slight anisotropy in Z-direction in both samples. Since the anisotropy wasn't large so it wasn't considered further in the current analysis. Further, the anisotropy in Z-direction can be attributed to change in the resolution in Z-direction as the artifact of the 3D CT scans. The average autocorrelation, however, was used to calculate the Representative Elementary Volume (REV). Keehm (2003) suggested for single phase fluid flow the REV should be approximately ten times the autocorrelation length, a. Hence for the current analysis a REV of 200 x 200 x 200 pixels for the Pomponio Beach sands (a = 20 pixels) while a REV of 120 x 120 x 120 pixels for Año Nuevo costal dune sands (a = 12 pixels) were considered. The size of the subsets randomly selected from the microstructure varied from 200 x 200 x 200 pixels (= 10a x 10a x 10a) to 25 x 25 x 25 pixels (= 1.25a x 1.25a x 1.25a) for Pomponio Beach sands where as the size of the subsets for Año Nuevo costal dune sands altered from 175 x 175 x 175 pixels (= 14.5a x 14.5a x 14.5a) to 25 x 25 x 25 pixels (= 2.1a x 2.1a x 2.1a). The number of subsets selected for the analysis increased as the size of subset decreased in order to obtain statistically meaningful results. As can be

  14. Leadership solves collective action problems in small-scale societies

    OpenAIRE

    Glowacki, Luke; von Rueden, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Observation of leadership in small-scale societies offers unique insights into the evolution of human collective action and the origins of sociopolitical complexity. Using behavioural data from the Tsimane forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia and Nyangatom nomadic pastoralists of Ethiopia, we evaluate the traits of leaders and the contexts in which leadership becomes more institutional. We find that leaders tend to have more capital, in the form of age-related knowledge, body size or social c...

  15. Membranes for nanometer-scale mass fast transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Holt, Jason [Berkeley, CA; Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Park, Hyung Gyu [Oakland, CA

    2011-10-18

    Nanoporous membranes comprising single walled, double walled, and multiwalled carbon nanotubes embedded in a matrix material were fabricated for fluid mechanics and mass transfer studies on the nanometer scale and commercial applications. Average pore size can be 2 nm to 20 nm, or seven nm or less, or two nanometers or less. The membrane can be free of large voids spanning the membrane such that transport of material such as gas or liquid occurs exclusively through the tubes. Fast fluid, vapor, and liquid transport are observed. Versatile micromachining methods can be used for membrane fabrication. A single chip can comprise multiple membranes. These membranes are a robust platform for the study of confined molecular transport, with applications in liquid and gas separations and chemical sensing including desalination, dialysis, and fabric formation.

  16. Impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarazin, Y [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Grandgirard, V [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Dif-Pradalier, G [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Fleurence, E [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Garbet, X [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ghendrih, Ph [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC centre de Cadarache, 13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Bertrand, P [LPMIA-Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Boulevard des Aiguillettes BP239, 54506 Vandoe uvre-les-Nancy (France); Besse, N [LPMIA-Universite Henri Poincare Nancy I, Boulevard des Aiguillettes BP239, 54506 Vandoe uvre-les-Nancy (France); Crouseilles, N [IRMA, UMR 7501 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Sonnendruecker, E [IRMA, UMR 7501 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Latu, G [LSIIT, UMR 7005 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, Bd Sebastien Brant BP10413, 67412 Illkirch (France); Violard, E [LSIIT, UMR 7005 CNRS/Universite Louis Pasteur, Bd Sebastien Brant BP10413, 67412 Illkirch (France)

    2006-12-15

    The impact of large scale flows on turbulent transport in magnetized plasmas is explored by means of various kinetic models. Zonal flows are found to lead to a non-linear upshift of turbulent transport in a 3D kinetic model for interchange turbulence. Such a transition is absent from fluid simulations, performed with the same numerical tool, which also predict a much larger transport. The discrepancy cannot be explained by zonal flows only, despite they being overdamped in fluids. Indeed, some difference remains, although reduced, when they are artificially suppressed. Zonal flows are also reported to trigger transport barriers in a 4D drift-kinetic model for slab ion temperature gradient (ITG) turbulence. The density gradient acts as a source drive for zonal flows, while their curvature back stabilizes the turbulence. Finally, 5D simulations of toroidal ITG modes with the global and full-f GYSELA code require the equilibrium density function to depend on the motion invariants only. If not, the generated strong mean flows can completely quench turbulent transport.

  17. Finite-size scaling a collection of reprints

    CERN Document Server

    1988-01-01

    Over the past few years, finite-size scaling has become an increasingly important tool in studies of critical systems. This is partly due to an increased understanding of finite-size effects by analytical means, and partly due to our ability to treat larger systems with large computers. The aim of this volume was to collect those papers which have been important for this progress and which illustrate novel applications of the method. The emphasis has been placed on relatively recent developments, including the use of the &egr;-expansion and of conformal methods.

  18. Scaling and predicting solute transport processes in riverine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pinzon, R.; Haggerty, R.; Camacho Botero, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    In the last three decades, research on solute transport and nutrient processing has revealed complex interactions between landscapes and stream ecosystems, and numerous attempts to scale and predict these processes have been primarily limited by the difficulty of measuring and extrapolating hydrodynamic and geomorphic characteristics. We hypothesize that there should be predictable patterns in the way that streams interact with their landscapes, because those interactions are in the form of energy, mass and momentum, which are conservative and interrelated properties. Therefore, despite local hydrogeomorphic characteristics define the actual extent of solute transport processes in a given riverine ecosystem, the physical imprints marked-up in breakthrough curves (BTCs) should have scaling properties. To evaluate our hypothesis we created an extensive database that includes 133 BTCs from conservative tracer experiments conducted under different hydrologic conditions (1 lt/s to 1197 m3/s), different experimental conditions (10s of meters to 10s of kilometers), different geographic positions (South and North America, Europe, Australia, Antarctica), and different types of lotic environments, i.e., urban manmade channels, forested headwater streams, desert-like streams, hyporheic wells, and major rivers. We investigated the existence of patterns in conservative solute transport using a model-independent approach, i.e., temporal moments of the histories of tracer experiments. Our results show that the normalized first absolute moment is correlated with the second and third moments with R2>0.99 for all riverine ecosystems. Most importantly, the first central temporal moment of the distributions (mean travel time) is correlated with the second (variance) with an R2>0.93, and the correlation between the second central moment and the third central moment (skewness) takes the form of the coefficient of skewness (CSK) with an R2>0.98, defining a statistically averaged CSK= 1

  19. Scaling behaviour for the water transport in nanoconfined geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiavazzo, Eliodoro; Fasano, Matteo; Asinari, Pietro; Decuzzi, Paolo

    2014-04-01

    The transport of water in nanoconfined geometries is different from bulk phase and has tremendous implications in nanotechnology and biotechnology. Here molecular dynamics is used to compute the self-diffusion coefficient D of water within nanopores, around nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes and proteins. For almost 60 different cases, D is found to scale linearly with the sole parameter θ as D(θ)=DB[1+(DC/DB-1)θ], with DB and DC the bulk and totally confined diffusion of water, respectively. The parameter θ is primarily influenced by geometry and represents the ratio between the confined and total water volumes. The D(θ) relationship is interpreted within the thermodynamics of supercooled water. As an example, such relationship is shown to accurately predict the relaxometric response of contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. The D(θ) relationship can help in interpreting the transport of water molecules under nanoconfined conditions and tailoring nanostructures with precise modulation of water mobility.

  20. Cost Overruns in Large-scale Transportation Infrastructure Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cantarelli, Chantal C; Flyvbjerg, Bent; Molin, Eric J. E

    2010-01-01

    Managing large-scale transportation infrastructure projects is difficult due to frequent misinformation about the costs which results in large cost overruns that often threaten the overall project viability. This paper investigates the explanations for cost overruns that are given in the literature....... Overall, four categories of explanations can be distinguished: technical, economic, psychological, and political. Political explanations have been seen to be the most dominant explanations for cost overruns. Agency theory is considered the most interesting for political explanations and an eclectic theory...

  1. Two-scale approach to oscillatory singularly perturbed transport equations

    CERN Document Server

    Frénod, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the classical results of the two-scale convergence theory and explains – using several figures – why it works. It then shows how to use this theory to homogenize ordinary differential equations with oscillating coefficients as well as oscillatory singularly perturbed ordinary differential equations. In addition, it explores the homogenization of hyperbolic partial differential equations with oscillating coefficients and linear oscillatory singularly perturbed hyperbolic partial differential equations. Further, it introduces readers to the two-scale numerical methods that can be built from the previous approaches to solve oscillatory singularly perturbed transport equations (ODE and hyperbolic PDE) and demonstrates how they can be used efficiently. This book appeals to master’s and PhD students interested in homogenization and numerics, as well as to the Iter community.

  2. Upscaling of nanoparticle transport in porous media under unfavorable conditions: Pore scale to Darcy scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetha, N.; Raoof, Amir; Mohan Kumar, M. S.; Majid Hassanizadeh, S.

    2017-05-01

    Transport and deposition of nanoparticles in porous media is a multi-scale problem governed by several pore-scale processes, and hence, it is critical to link the processes at pore scale to the Darcy-scale behavior. In this study, using pore network modeling, we develop correlation equations for deposition rate coefficients for nanoparticle transport under unfavorable conditions at the Darcy scale based on pore-scale mechanisms. The upscaling tool is a multi-directional pore-network model consisting of an interconnected network of pores with variable connectivities. Correlation equations describing the pore-averaged deposition rate coefficients under unfavorable conditions in a cylindrical pore, developed in our earlier studies, are employed for each pore element. Pore-network simulations are performed for a wide range of parameter values to obtain the breakthrough curves of nanoparticle concentration. The latter is fitted with macroscopic 1-D advection-dispersion equation with a two-site linear reversible deposition accounting for both equilibrium and kinetic sorption. This leads to the estimation of three Darcy-scale deposition coefficients: distribution coefficient, kinetic rate constant, and the fraction of equilibrium sites. The correlation equations for the Darcy-scale deposition coefficients, under unfavorable conditions, are provided as a function of measurable Darcy-scale parameters, including: porosity, mean pore throat radius, mean pore water velocity, nanoparticle radius, ionic strength, dielectric constant, viscosity, temperature, and surface potentials of the particle and grain surfaces. The correlation equations are found to be consistent with the available experimental results, and in qualitative agreement with Colloid Filtration Theory for all parameters, except for the mean pore water velocity and nanoparticle radius.

  3. Simulation of Flow and Transport at the Micro (Pore) Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H

    2007-04-05

    An important problem in porous media involves the ability of micron and submicron-sized biological particles such as viruses or bacteria to move in groundwater systems through geologic media characterized by rock or mixed gravel, clay and sand materials. Current simulation capabilities require properly upscaled (continuum) models of colloidal filtration and adsorption to augment existing theories of fluid flow and chemical transport. Practical models typically address flow and transport behavior in aquifers over distances of 1 to 10 km where, for example, fluid momentum balance is governed by the simple Darcy's Law as a function of a pressure gradient, elevation gradient and a medium-dependent permeability parameter. In addition to fluid advection, there are multiple transport processes occurring in these systems including diffusion, dispersion and chemical interactions with solids or other aqueous chemical species. Particle transport is typically modeled in the same way as dissolved species, except that additional loss terms are incorporated to model particle filtration (physical interception), adsorption (chemical interception) and inactivation. Proper resolution of these processes at the porous medium continuum scale constitutes an important closure problem in subsurface science. We present a new simulation capability based on enabling technologies developed for microfluidics applications to model transport of colloidal-sized particles at the microscale, with relevance to the pore scale in geophysical subsurface systems. Particulate is represented by a bead-rod polymer model and is fully-coupled to a Newtonian solvent described by Navier-Stokes. Finite differences are used to discretize the interior of the domain; a Cartesian grid embedded boundary/volume-of-fluid method is used near boundaries and interfaces. This approach to complex geometry is amenable to direct simulation on grids obtained from surface extractions of tomographic image data. Short

  4. Harvesting Collective Trend Observations from Large Scale Study Trips

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Ovesen, Nis

    2014-01-01

    trips for engineering students in architecture & design and the results from crowd-collecting a large amount of trend observations as well as the derived experience from using the method on a large scale study trip. The method has been developed and formalized in relation to study trips with large......To enhance industrial design students’ decoding and understanding of the technological possibilities and the diversity of needs and preferences in different cultures it is not unusual to arrange study trips where such students acquire a broader view to strengthen their professional skills...... numbers of students to the annual Milan Design Week and the Milan fair ‘I Saloni’ in Italy. The present paper describes and evaluates the method, the theory behind it, the practical execution of the trend registration, the results from the activities and future perspectives....

  5. Collective memory in primate conflict implied by temporal scaling collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Edward D; Daniels, Bryan C; Krakauer, David C; Flack, Jessica C

    2017-09-01

    In biological systems, prolonged conflict is costly, whereas contained conflict permits strategic innovation and refinement. Causes of variation in conflict size and duration are not well understood. We use a well-studied primate society model system to study how conflicts grow. We find conflict duration is a 'first to fight' growth process that scales superlinearly, with the number of possible pairwise interactions. This is in contrast with a 'first to fail' process that characterizes peaceful durations. Rescaling conflict distributions reveals a universal curve, showing that the typical time scale of correlated interactions exceeds nearly all individual fights. This temporal correlation implies collective memory across pairwise interactions beyond those assumed in standard models of contagion growth or iterated evolutionary games. By accounting for memory, we make quantitative predictions for interventions that mitigate or enhance the spread of conflict. Managing conflict involves balancing the efficient use of limited resources with an intervention strategy that allows for conflict while keeping it contained and controlled. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. Synoptic-scale dust transport events in the southern Himalaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchi, R.; Cristofanelli, P.; Marinoni, A.; Bourcier, L.; Laj, P.; Calzolari, F.; Adhikary, B.; Verza, G. P.; Vuillermoz, E.; Bonasoni, P.

    2014-06-01

    The variability of long-range dust transport events observed in the southern Himalaya and its relation with source areas have been studied thanks to five years’ continuous measurements which were carried out at the “Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid” (NCO-P, 27°57‧N, 86°48‧E), the highest Northern Hemisphere GAW-WMO global station sited at 5079 m a.s.l. in the high Khumbu valley (Nepal) on the southern Himalaya. During the period March 2006-February 2011, the analyses of the aerosol particle concentrations and LAGRANTO three-dimensional backward trajectories indicated the occurrence of 275 days affected by synoptic-scale dust transport, which account for 22.2% of the investigated period. The frequency of dust transport days (DTDs) showed a clear seasonal cycle, with the highest seasonal value observed during pre-monsoon season (33.5% of the pre-monsoon’s days are DTDs). Large enhancements in coarse aerosol number concentration N1-10 (average: +689%) and mass PM1-10 (average: +1086%) were observed during the dust transport events as compared to the days without dust (dust-free days, DFDs). In addition, the single scattering albedo (SSA) also showed higher values, ranging from 0.87 to 0.90, during DTDs with respect to DFDs (0.80-0.87). The predominant source of mineral dust reaching the measurement site was identified in the arid regions of the north-western Indian subcontinent (Thar desert), which accounted for 41.6% of the trajectories points associated with DTDs. Seasonal analysis also indicated that the winter season was significantly influenced by far western desert regions, such as North Africa and the Arabic Peninsula.

  7. Emergence of criticality in the transportation passenger flow: scaling and renormalization in the Seoul bus system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segun Goh

    Full Text Available Social systems have recently attracted much attention, with attempts to understand social behavior with the aid of statistical mechanics applied to complex systems. Collective properties of such systems emerge from couplings between components, for example, individual persons, transportation nodes such as airports or subway stations, and administrative districts. Among various collective properties, criticality is known as a characteristic property of a complex system, which helps the systems to respond flexibly to external perturbations. This work considers the criticality of the urban transportation system entailed in the massive smart card data on the Seoul transportation network. Analyzing the passenger flow on the Seoul bus system during one week, we find explicit power-law correlations in the system, that is, power-law behavior of the strength correlation function of bus stops and verify scale invariance of the strength fluctuations. Such criticality is probed by means of the scaling and renormalization analysis of the modified gravity model applied to the system. Here a group of nearby (bare bus stops are transformed into a (renormalized "block stop" and the scaling relations of the network density turn out to be closely related to the fractal dimensions of the system, revealing the underlying structure. Specifically, the resulting renormalized values of the gravity exponent and of the Hill coefficient give a good description of the Seoul bus system: The former measures the characteristic dimensionality of the network whereas the latter reflects the coupling between distinct transportation modes. It is thus demonstrated that such ideas of physics as scaling and renormalization can be applied successfully to social phenomena exemplified by the passenger flow.

  8. Analysis on the Synergy Evolutionary Development of the Collecting, Distributing, and Transporting System of Railway Heavy Haul Transportation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenling Feng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A synergy evolutionary model of the collecting, distributing, and transporting system of railway heavy haul transportation is built by introducing synergy-related concepts and applying synergy evolutionary theory. Then spline interpolation method, numerical differential five-point formula, and method of least squares are used to solve synergistic coefficient, while fourth-order Rugge-kutta method and fourth-order Adams linear implicit formula method are used to solve coevolutionary curve of the system. Finally, the heavy load transportation of Daqin Railway is an example of the empirical analysis. The research result shows that the degree of order of the system and its three subsystems—collecting, transporting, and distributing—increases as the synergetic coefficient of the subsystems increases; otherwise, the degree of the order will decrease. It also shows that this model can better analyze the coevolutionary process of the heavy load collecting, distributing, and transporting system of Daqin Railway, with its rationality and applicability verified.

  9. Collecting duct principal cell transport processes and their regulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pearce, D; Soundararajan, R; Trimpert, C; Kashlan, O.B; Deen, P.M.T; Kohan, D.E

    2015-01-01

    .... The effects of hormonal, autocrine, and paracrine factors to regulate principal cell transport processes are central to the maintenance of fluid and electrolyte balance in the face of wide variations...

  10. Structures, profile consistency, and transport scaling in electrostatic convection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bian, N.H.; Garcia, O.E.

    2005-01-01

    that for interchange modes, profile consistency is in fact due to mixing by persistent large-scale convective cells. This mechanism is not a turbulent diffusion, cannot occur in collisionless systems, and is the analog of the well-known laminar "magnetic flux expulsion" in magneiohydrodynamics. This expulsion process...... involves a "pinch" across closed streamlines and further results in the formation of pressure fingers along the-separatrix of the convective cells. By nature, these coherent structures are dissipative because the mixing process that leads to their formation relies on a finite amount of collisional...... diffusion. Numerical simulations of two-dimensional interchange modes confirm the role of laminar expulsion by convective cells, for profile consistency and structure formation. They also show that the fingerlike pressure structures ultimately control the rate of heat transport across the plasma layer...

  11. The sediment and phosphorus transport in a large scale study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Miroslav; Krása, Josef; Dostál, Tomáš; Jáchymová, Barbora

    2017-04-01

    In the name of the Water framework directive (2000/60/ES), there exists the demand to improve quality of water bodies. Basically, pollution of the flowing or stagnant water bodies comes from point and diffuse sources. To find the balance of point (mainly urban areas) and diffuse sources (drainage - N and soil erosion and sediment transport - P) in the scale of Moldau catchment is the task of the project. The area of interest is Moldau river catchment (29.500 km2) has been modelled with fully distributed approach of the WaTEM/SEDEM model. The model estimates the soil erosion as well as sediment a phosphorus transport through the river network. The results are combined with estimation of bounded nitrogen originated from drainage systems in agricultural landscape. The modelling has been done within three levels of accuracy. The simulation scale itself is defined by 10 m elements resolution with critical points net each approximately 300m in the river net (116.000 points). Subsequently, results were aggregated for sub-catchments of 4th order (ca 5 - 15 km2 each = almost 3000 individual sub-catchments) and sub-catchments of 3rd order = ca 400 sub-catchments). Each water reservoir in the system (larger than 0.25 hectares in the area) has been included, which count more than 12.000 reservoirs. The presented approach will be further use by Moldau river catchment managers for the planning of protection and elimination of the pollution in Moldau river catchment. This will lead to localize 3000 highly endangered hot spots which threaten the water bodies significantly. In this localities a detailed modelling and designing of the protection will be done. The research activities had been supported by QJ330118, SGS14/180/OHK1/3T/11, SGS17/090/OHK1/3T/11 grants.

  12. Riverbank filtration: comparison of pilot scale transport with theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vishal; Johnson, W P; Shafieian, P; Ryu, H; Alum, A; Abbaszadegan, M; Hubbs, S A; Rauch-Williams, T

    2009-02-01

    Pilot-scale column experiments were conducted in this study using natural soil and river water from Ohio river to assess the removal of microbes of size ranging over 2 orders of magnitude, i.e., viruses (0.025-0.065 microm), bacteria (1-2 microm), and Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts (4-7 microm) under conditions representing normal operation and flood scour events. Among these different organisms, the bacterial indicators were transported over the longest distances and highest concentrations; whereas much greater retention was observed for smaller (i.e., viral indicators) and larger (i.e., Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts) microbes. These results are in qualitative agreement with colloid filtration theory (CFT) which predicts the least removal for micrometer size colloids, suggesting that the respective sizes of the organisms was a dominant control on their transport despite expected differences in their surface characteristics. Increased fluid velocity coupled with decreased ionic strength (representative of major flood events) decreased colloid retention, also in qualitative agreement with CFT. The retention of organisms occurred disproportionately near the source relative to the log-linear expectations of CFT, and this was true both in the presence and absence of a colmation zone, suggesting that microbial removal by the RBF system is not necessarily vulnerable to flood scour of the colmation zone.

  13. Collective spin and heat transport through magnetic systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flebus, B.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/372646808

    2017-01-01

    In this Thesis, the transport properties of spin superfluids, and the interplay between magnons and phonons, or electrons, play a key role. Chapter 1 is intended to give the reader an overview of the state-of-the-art, and also introduces the experimental techniques to which we refer in the following

  14. Characterization and scaling of the tokamak edge transport barrier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Philip Adrian

    2012-04-24

    scaling for {tau} {sub E,ped} are nearly identical to the IPB98 global confinement scaling. This strongly suggests a significant pedestal contribution to the global confinement. The extrapolations result in a global confinement time of 3 s for ITER which is at the lower end of the IPB98 scaling. The pedestal real space gradients show a very strong correlation with the pedestal top values. The trend is particularly pronounced for T{sub e} and shows no deviation due to other parameters. The gradients in {Psi}{sub N} coordinates shows no such correlation. The normalized pressure gradient {alpha}, which is important for the pedestal stability, has a strong correlation with the normalized pressure and with the plasma shape. The plasma shape plays an important role for the pedestal which can have significant impact on the extrapolations. The presented study confirms that the pedestal cannot be described by a unifying theory. The different observations favour various mechanisms. The pedestal top values of electron and ion temperature and density can be individually transport limited, but together they can still reach the peeling-ballooning stability limit. At the same time the pedestal widths of temperature and density scale individually.

  15. How uncertainty in socio-economic variables affects large-scale transport model forecasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manzo, Stefano; Nielsen, Otto Anker; Prato, Carlo Giacomo

    2015-01-01

    time, especially with respect to large-scale transport models. The study described in this paper contributes to fill the gap by investigating the effects of uncertainty in socio-economic variables growth rate projections on large-scale transport model forecasts, using the Danish National Transport...

  16. Large scale Wyoming transportation data: a resource planning tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.; Freeman, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Abra E.; Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center created statewide roads data for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office using 2009 aerial photography from the National Agriculture Imagery Program. The updated roads data resolves known concerns of omission, commission, and inconsistent representation of map scale, attribution, and ground reference dates which were present in the original source data. To ensure a systematic and repeatable approach of capturing roads on the landscape using on-screen digitizing from true color National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery, we developed a photogrammetry key and quality assurance/quality control protocols. Therefore, the updated statewide roads data will support the Bureau of Land Management’s resource management requirements with a standardized map product representing 2009 ground conditions. The updated Geographic Information System roads data set product, represented at 1:4,000 and +/- 10 meters spatial accuracy, contains 425,275 kilometers within eight attribute classes. The quality control of these products indicated a 97.7 percent accuracy of aspatial information and 98.0 percent accuracy of spatial locations. Approximately 48 percent of the updated roads data was corrected for spatial errors of greater than 1 meter relative to the pre-existing road data. Twenty-six percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 5 meters and 17 percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 9 meters. The Bureau of Land Management, other land managers, and researchers can use these new statewide roads data set products to support important studies and management decisions regarding land use changes, transportation and planning needs, transportation safety, wildlife applications, and other studies.

  17. Monitoring Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics with Multibeam Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D. R.; Simmons, S. M.; Best, J. L.; Keevil, G. M.; Oberg, K.; Czuba, J. A.

    2009-05-01

    Multibeam Echo-Sounder systems have developed rapidly over recent decades and are routinely deployed to provide high-resolution bathymetric information in and range of environments. Modern data handling and storage technologies now facilitate the logging of the raw acoustic back-scatter information that was previously discarded by these systems. This paper describes methodologies that exploit this logging capability to quantify both the concentration and dynamics of suspended sediment within the water column. This development provides a multi-purpose tool for the holistic surveying of sediment transport dynamics by imaging suspended sediment concentration, the associated flows and providing concurrent high-resolution bathymetry. Results obtained a RESON 7125 MBES are presented from both well constrained dock-side testing and full field deployment over dune bedforms in the Mississippi. The capacity of the system to image suspended sediment structures is demonstrated and a novel methodology for estimating 2D flow velocities, based on frame cross-correlation methods, is introduced. The results demonstrate the capability of MBES systems to successfully map spatial and temporal variations in suspended sediment concentration throughout a 2D swath and application of the velocity estimation algorithms allow real-time holistic monitoring of turbulent flow processes and suspended sediment fluxes at a scale previously unrealisable. Turbulent flow over a natural dune bedform on the Mississippi is used to highlight the process information provided and the insights that can be gleaned for this technical development.

  18. Electronic structure, transport, and collective effects in molecular layered systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hahn

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The great potential of organic heterostructures for organic device applications is exemplified by the targeted engineering of the electronic properties of phthalocyanine-based systems. The transport properties of two different phthalocyanine systems, a pure copper phthalocyanine (CoPc and a flourinated copper phthalocyanine–manganese phthalocyanine (F16CoPc/MnPc heterostructure, are investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT and the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF approach. Furthermore, a master-equation-based approach is used to include electronic correlations beyond the mean-field-type approximation of DFT. We describe the essential theoretical tools to obtain the parameters needed for the master equation from DFT results. Finally, an interacting molecular monolayer is considered within a master-equation approach.

  19. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport from Decimeter-Scale Heterogeneity to Plume-Scale Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Gary P. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kohler, Matthias [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kannappan, Ramakrishnan [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Briggs, Martin [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Day-Lewis, Fred [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-24

    Scientifically defensible predictions of field scale U(VI) transport in groundwater requires an understanding of key processes at multiple scales. These scales range from smaller than the sediment grain scale (less than 10 μm) to as large as the field scale which can extend over several kilometers. The key processes that need to be considered include both geochemical reactions in solution and at sediment surfaces as well as physical transport processes including advection, dispersion, and pore-scale diffusion. The research summarized in this report includes both experimental and modeling results in batch, column and tracer tests. The objectives of this research were to: (1) quantify the rates of U(VI) desorption from sediments acquired from a uranium contaminated aquifer in batch experiments;(2) quantify rates of U(VI) desorption in column experiments with variable chemical conditions, and(3) quantify nonreactive tracer and U(VI) transport in field tests.

  20. Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter for Transportable Collective Protection Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    who achieved a 3.5 GPA to 4.0 (4.0 max scale): Number of graduating undergraduates funded by a DoD funded Center of Excellence grant for Education ...O3 (g) k7: O3(g) + Mn → nO + O2(g) k8: O3(g) + Ag → AgO k9: O3(g) + nCH3OH → CO2(g) + n k10: nCH3OH → CH3OH (g) k11: nO + Ag → AgO k12 : 3nO

  1. Transport upscaling from pore- to Darcy-scale: Incorporating pore-scale Berea sandstone Lagrangian velocity statistics into a Darcy-scale transport CTRW model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puyguiraud, Alexandre; Dentz, Marco; Gouze, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    For the past several years a lot of attention has been given to pore-scale flow in order to understand and model transport, mixing and reaction in porous media. Nevertheless we believe that an accurate study of spatial and temporal evolution of velocities could bring important additional information for the upscaling from pore to higher scales. To gather these pieces of information, we perform Stokes flow simulations on pore-scale digitized images of a Berea sandstone core. First, micro-tomography (XRMT) imaging and segmentation processes allow us to obtain 3D black and white images of the sample [1]. Then we used an OpenFoam solver to perform the Stokes flow simulations mentioned above, which gives us the velocities at the interfaces of a cubic mesh. Subsequently, we use a particle streamline reconstruction technique which uses the Eulerian velocity field previously obtained. This technique, based on a modified Pollock algorithm [2], enables us to make particle tracking simulations on the digitized sample. In order to build a stochastic pore-scale transport model, we analyze the Lagrangian velocity series in two different ways. First we investigate the velocity evolution by sampling isochronically (t-Lagrangian), and by studying its statistical properties in terms of one- and two-points statistics. Intermittent patterns can be observed. These are due to the persistance of low velocities over a characteristic space length. Other results are investigated, such as correlation functions and velocity PDFs, which permit us to study more deeply this persistence in the velocities and to compute the correlation times. However, with the second approach, doing these same analysis in space by computing the velocities equidistantly, enables us to remove the intermittency shown in the temporal evolution and to model these velocity series as a Markov process. This renders the stochastic particle dynamics into a CTRW [3]. [1] Gjetvaj, F., A. Russian, P. Gouze, and M. Dentz (2015

  2. Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter for Transportable Collective Protection Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Frye, J. G.; Riley, Brian J.; Rappe, Kenneth G.

    2011-04-06

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has performed an assessment of a Hybrid Plasma/Filter system as an alternative to conventional methods for collective protection. The key premise of the hybrid system is to couple a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor with reactive adsorption to provide a broader envelope of protection than can be provided through a single-solution approach. The first step uses highly reactive species (e.g. oxygen radicals, hydroxyl radicals, etc.) created in a nonthermal plasma (NTP) reactor to destroy the majority (~75% - 90%) of an incoming threat. Following the NTP reactor an O3 reactor/filter uses the O3 created in the NTP reactor to further destroy the remaining organic materials. This report summarizes the laboratory development of the Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter to protect against a ‘worst-case’ simulant, methyl bromide (CH3Br), and presents a preliminary engineering assessment of the technology to Joint Expeditionary Collective Protection performance specifications for chemical vapor air purification technologies.

  3. Getting started with digital collections scaling to fit your organization

    CERN Document Server

    Monson, D

    2017-01-01

    This easy-to-follow guide to digitization fundamentals will ensure that readers gain a solid grasp of the knowledge and resources available for getting started on their own digital collection projects.

  4. PERSEUS-HUB: Interactive and Collective Exploration of Large-Scale Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Jin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Graphs emerge naturally in many domains, such as social science, neuroscience, transportation engineering, and more. In many cases, such graphs have millions or billions of nodes and edges, and their sizes increase daily at a fast pace. How can researchers from various domains explore large graphs interactively and efficiently to find out what is ‘important’? How can multiple researchers explore a new graph dataset collectively and “help” each other with their findings? In this article, we present Perseus-Hub, a large-scale graph mining tool that computes a set of graph properties in a distributed manner, performs ensemble, multi-view anomaly detection to highlight regions that are worth investigating, and provides users with uncluttered visualization and easy interaction with complex graph statistics. Perseus-Hub uses a Spark cluster to calculate various statistics of large-scale graphs efficiently, and aggregates the results in a summary on the master node to support interactive user exploration. In Perseus-Hub, the visualized distributions of graph statistics provide preliminary analysis to understand a graph. To perform a deeper analysis, users with little prior knowledge can leverage patterns (e.g., spikes in the power-law degree distribution marked by other users or experts. Moreover, Perseus-Hub guides users to regions of interest by highlighting anomalous nodes and helps users establish a more comprehensive understanding about the graph at hand. We demonstrate our system through the case study on real, large-scale networks.

  5. Scaling behavior and transport in bulk heterojunction materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Eric; Lombardo, Christopher; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2011-03-01

    A lateral device geometry has been used to study charge transport in P3HT:C71 -PCBM bulk heterojunction devices. Analysis of current-voltage curves have previously been used to study charge transport in these materials. We perform ambipolar field effect transistor measurements on these structures to extract carrier mobilities. We are also able to describe the charge transport and recombination properties of these materials. Assymetric electrodes (Al, Au) separated by 100 nm- 20 μ m enable us to gain considerable insight into transport physics. Photocurrent measruements as a function of channel length, electric field, and illumination intensity (0.1-100 suns) are used to measure the ambipolar mobility-lifetime product and study how this correlates with measured field-effect mobilities at various electric fields. Lateral structures are shown to be a powerful tool to understand transport and the role of carrier mobility on photovoltaic performance.

  6. Collection, transfer and transport of waste: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisted, Rasmus; Larsen, Anna W; Christensen, Thomas H

    2009-11-01

    The collection, transfer and transport of waste are basic activities of waste management systems all over the world. These activities all use energy and fuels, primarily of fossil origin. Electricity and fuel consumptions of the individual processes were reviewed and greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions were quantified. The emission factors were assigned a global warming potential (GWP) and aggregated into global warming factors (GWFs), which express the potential contribution to global warming from collection, transport and transfer of 1 tonne of wet waste. Six examples involving collection, transfer and transport of waste were assessed in terms of GHG emissions, including both provision and use of energy. (GHG emissions related to production, maintenance and disposal of vehicles, equipment, infrastructure and buildings were excluded.) The estimated GWFs varied from 9.4 to 368 kg CO(2)-equivalent (kg CO(2)-eq.) per tonne of waste, depending on method of collection, capacity and choice of transport equipment, and travel distances. The GHG emissions can be reduced primarily by avoiding transport of waste in private cars and by optimization of long distance transport, for example, considering transport by rail and waterways.

  7. Field collection, preservation and large scale DNA extraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some genetic studies using molecular methods such as diversity assessment or marker-assisted selection require collection of a large number of samples from fields located in the vicinity or in remote areas, followed by isolation of good quality DNA in a short time span. In the present study, different tissue preservation ...

  8. Field collection, preservation and large scale DNA extraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-08-04

    Aug 4, 2009 ... Some genetic studies using molecular methods such as diversity assessment or marker-assisted selection require collection of a large number of samples from fields located in the vicinity or in remote areas, followed by isolation of good quality DNA in a short time span. In the present study, different.

  9. Collection, transfer and transport of waste: accounting of greenhouse gases and global warming contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eisted, Rasmus; Larsen, Anna Warberg; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2009-01-01

    The collection, transfer and transport of waste are basic activities of waste management systems all over the world. These activities all use energy and fuels, primarily of fossil origin. Electricity and fuel consumptions of the individual processes were reviewed and greenhouse gases (GHG......) emissions were quantified. The emission factors were assigned a global warming potential (GWP) and aggregated into global warming factors (GWFs), which express the potential contribution to global warming from collection, transport and transfer of 1 tonne of wet waste. Six examples involving collection...

  10. Dynamics of polynucleotide transport through nanometre-scale pores

    CERN Document Server

    Meller, A

    2003-01-01

    The transport of biopolymers through large membrane channels is a ubiquitous process in biology. It is central to processes such as gene transfer by transduction and RNA transport through nuclear pore complexes. The transport of polymers through nanoscopic channels is also of interest to physicists and chemists studying the effects of steric, hydrodynamic, and electrostatic interactions between polymers and confining walls. Single-channel ion current measurements have been recently used to study the transport of biopolymers, and in particular single-stranded DNA and RNA molecules, through nanometre-size channels. Under the influence of an electric field, the negatively charged polynucleotides can be captured and drawn through the channel in a process termed 'translocation'. During translocation, the ion current flowing through the channel is mostly blocked, indicating the presence of the polymer inside the channel. The current blockades were found to be sensitive to the properties of the biopolymers such as t...

  11. Biogeochemical Signatures of Contaminant Transport at the Watershed Scale: Spectral and Wavelet Analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, K.; Harman, C. J.; Basu, N. B.; Rao, S. S.; Sivapalan, M.; Kalita, P. K.; Packman, A. I.

    2009-12-01

    Agricultural watersheds are intensely managed systems, and consist of a large number of dynamic components that interact non-linearly to create emergent patterns in space and time. These systems can be conceptualized as input signals (“drivers”) that cascade through a hierarchy of non-linear “filters” to create the modulated spatial and temporal responses (“signatures”). The coupling between flow and transport (“hydrologic filter”) and transformations (“biogeochemical filter”) control the cascading processes from precipitation through stream flow, and finally to chemical concentrations and loads, at various nested spatial and temporal scales. To detect important “signatures”, we applied spectral analysis and wavelet coherence to the 10-year dataset (at daily resolution) collected from Little Vermillion River watershed (Illinois, USA), an agricultural watershed (~400 km2), drained by an extensive network of subsurface tiles, surface ditches, and streams. Watershed monitoring data includes hydrologic measurements (flow and stage), and concentrations of chemical constituents (nitrate, phosphate, and pesticides) across different spatial scales, from tile-flow stations (drainage area ~ 0.05 km2) to river stations (drainage area ~400 km2). We find that a power-law scaling behavior exists in all the smoothed power spectra for precipitation, stream flow, nitrate concentration and load. The slopes of power spectra increase from precipitation to stream flow to nitrate concentration, demonstrating the cascading effect of the filters. The spectral analysis further shows that the filters retain the major characteristics of long-term response (annual and sub-annual cycle), but smooth (or filter) the short-term responses. Steeper slopes are observed at larger spatial scales, indicating a stronger filtering effect due to greater averaging (buffering) with increasing residence time. Further data analysis using wavelet coherence suggests that at small spatial

  12. Agri-Environmental Resource Management by Large-Scale Collective Action: Determining KEY Success Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large-scale collective action is necessary when managing agricultural natural resources such as biodiversity and water quality. This paper determines the key factors to the success of such action. Design/Methodology/Approach: This paper analyses four large-scale collective actions used to manage agri-environmental resources in Canada and…

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF A PEDESTRIAN NAVIGATION AND COMMENT COLLECTION SYSTEM AT TRANSPORTATION NODES USING RFID AND PDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuki, Nobuyoshi; Maruhashi, Atsumi; Fukuda, Tomohiro

    Promoting the utilization of public transportation is important to prevent global warming and regional activation. Since transportation nodes are increasingly larger and complicated, users tend to get lost and users' requests may not be reflected when the facilities are refurbished. Therefore, in this research, a data model which the spatial configuration and functionality of complicated railway stations can be represented were developed and a pedestrian navigation system which enables autonomous positioning and finding optimized routes was developed using RFID and PDA. Next, a system which can collect comments and requests from passengers efficiently was developed for redevelopment and rearrangement of the transportation node on the basis of the above system. The developed systems were verified at an actual transportation node. The proposed methodology will play an important role in developing an integrated navigation and comment collection system.

  14. Application of the Geophysical Scale Multi-Block Transport Modeling System to Hydrodynamic Forcing of Dredged Material Placement Sediment Transport within the James River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S. C.; Hayter, E. J.; Pruhs, R.; Luong, P.; Lackey, T. C.

    2016-12-01

    The geophysical scale circulation of the Mid Atlantic Bight and hydrologic inputs from adjacent Chesapeake Bay watersheds and tributaries influences the hydrodynamics and transport of the James River estuary. Both barotropic and baroclinic transport govern the hydrodynamics of this partially stratified estuary. Modeling the placement of dredged sediment requires accommodating this wide spectrum of atmospheric and hydrodynamic scales. The Geophysical Scale Multi-Block (GSMB) Transport Modeling System is a collection of multiple well established and USACE approved process models. Taking advantage of the parallel computing capability of multi-block modeling, we performed one year three-dimensional modeling of hydrodynamics in supporting simulation of dredged sediment placements transport and morphology changes. Model forcing includes spatially and temporally varying meteorological conditions and hydrological inputs from the watershed. Surface heat flux estimates were derived from the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB). The open water boundary condition for water level was obtained from an ADCIRC model application of the U. S. East Coast. Temperature-salinity boundary conditions were obtained from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Chesapeake Bay Program (CBP) long-term monitoring stations database. Simulated water levels were calibrated and verified by comparison with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tide gage locations. A harmonic analysis of the modeled tides was performed and compared with NOAA tide prediction data. In addition, project specific circulation was verified using US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) drogue data. Salinity and temperature transport was verified at seven CBP long term monitoring stations along the navigation channel. Simulation and analysis of model results suggest that GSMB is capable of resolving the long duration, multi-scale processes inherent to practical engineering problems such as dredged material

  15. Soil properties and preferential solute transport at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J K; Minh, Luong Nhat; Nørgaard, Trine

    An important fraction of water flow and solute transport through soil takes place through preferential flow paths. Although this had been already observed in the nineteenth century, it had been forgotten by the scientific community until it was rediscovered during the 1970s. The awareness...

  16. Regulation of transport in the connecting tubule and cortical collecting duct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staruschenko, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The central goal of this overview article is to summarize recent findings in renal epithelial transport, focusing chiefly on the connecting tubule (CNT) and the cortical collecting duct (CCD). Mammalian CCD and CNT are involved in fine tuning of electrolyte and fluid balance through reabsorption and secretion. Specific transporters and channels mediate vectorial movements of water and solutes in these segments. Although only a small percent of the glomerular filtrate reaches the CNT and CCD, these segments are critical for water and electrolyte homeostasis since several hormones, e.g. aldosterone and arginine vasopressin, exert their main effects in these nephron sites. Importantly, hormones regulate the function of the entire nephron and kidney by affecting channels and transporters in the CNT and CCD. Knowledge about the physiological and pathophysiological regulation of transport in the CNT and CCD and particular roles of specific channels/transporters has increased tremendously over the last two decades. Recent studies shed new light on several key questions concerning the regulation of renal transport. Precise distribution patterns of transport proteins in the CCD and CNT will be reviewed, and their physiological roles and mechanisms mediating ion transport in these segments will be also covered. Special emphasis will be given to pathophysiological conditions appearing as a result of abnormalities in renal transport in the CNT and CCD. PMID:23227301

  17. Super-micron-scale atomistic simulation for electronic transport with atomic vibration: Unified approach from quantum to classical transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizeki, Keisuke; Sasaoka, Kenji; Konabe, Satoru; Souma, Satofumi; Yamamoto, Takahiro

    2017-07-01

    We develop a powerful simulation method that can treat electronic transport in a super-micron-scale open system with atomic vibration at finite temperature. As an application of the developed method to realistic materials, we simulate electronic transport in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes from nanometer scale to micrometer scale at room temperature. Based on the simulation results, we successfully identify two different crossovers, namely, ballistic to diffusive crossover and coherent to incoherent crossover, simultaneously and with equal footing, from which the mean free path and the phase coherence length can be extracted clearly. Moreover, we clarify the scaling behavior of the electrical resistance and the electronic current in the crossover regime.

  18. Collection, transportation, and storage of biomass residues in the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, L.K.; Eakin, D.E.

    1981-11-01

    This study was conducted to identify potential methods for the collection, transportation and storage of agricultural and forest residues in the Pacific Northwest. Information was gathered from available literature and through contacts with researchers, equipment manufacturers, and other individuals involved in forest and agricultural activities. This information was evaluated, combined, and adapted for situations existing in the Pacific Northwest. A number of methods for collection, transportation, and storage of biomass residues using currently available technology are described. Many of these methods can be applied to residue fuel materials along with their current uses in the forest and agricultural industries.

  19. Spatially distributed lateral nitrate transport at the catchment scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesser, Fred B; Franko, Uwe; Rode, Michael

    2010-01-01

    In river catchments, N transformation and storage processes during lateral transport are important in controlling N loads of surface waters. There is a lack of approaches which capture lateral flows and associated N transformation in a spatially distributed way. The aim of this paper is to develop a new conceptual N transport and transformation model which simulates the lateral nitrate transport in subsurface flow from the source area to the receiving water body. The developed tool is based on the object modeling system (OMS) framework and consists of the analytical spatially distributed hydrological model J2000, the nitrate recharge model Meta Candy and a new groundwater N routing component. Nitrate degradation in groundwater is calculated stoichiometrically according to a predefined amount on oxidizable substrate. The new modeling approach was tested in a small agricultural lower mountain range catchment of Thuringia, Germany. The calibration of the N model using a 4-yr period showed reasonable results for nitrate load calculations with a Nash and Sutcliff coefficient of 0.78. The 3-yr validation period produced Nash-Sutcliff (NS) values of 0.75. There was a clear relationship of the goodness-of-fit between the hydrological simulations and the nitrate concentration calculations. Due to short residence times of the interflow nitrate degradation was restricted to slow base flow components. The new approach can be used to target N source areas within a catchment and assess the impact of these source areas on the N load of surface waters in a spatially distributed manner.

  20. Cost optimization of biofuel production – The impact of scale, integration, transport and supply chain configurations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, S.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/41200836X; Hoefnagels, E.T.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/313935998; Wetterlund, Elisabeth; Pettersson, Karin; Faaij, André; Junginger, H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/202130703

    2017-01-01

    This study uses a geographically-explicit cost optimization model to analyze the impact of and interrelation between four cost reduction strategies for biofuel production: economies of scale, intermodal transport, integration with existing industries, and distributed supply chain configurations

  1. Cost Overruns in Large-scale Transportation Infrastructure Projects: Explanations and Their Theoretical Embeddedness

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cantarelli, C.C; Flyvbjerg, B; Molin, E.J.E; Van Wee, B

    2010-01-01

    Managing large-scale transportation infrastructure projects is difficult due to frequent misinformation about the costs which results in large cost overruns that often threaten the overall project viability...

  2. Kansas City Transportation and Local-Scale Air Quality Study (KC-TRAQS) Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    In fall 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the Kansas City Transportation Local-Scale Air Quality Study (KC-TRAQS) to learn more about local community air quality in three neighborhoods in Kansas City, KS.

  3. 21 CFR 866.2900 - Microbiological specimen collection and transport device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological specimen collection and transport device. 866.2900 Section 866.2900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices...

  4. TransDB - GPS Data Management with Applications in Collective Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian Søndergaard; Tiesyte, Dalia

    2008-01-01

    Recent and continuing advances in geo-positioning, mobile communications, and computing electronics combine to offer opportunities for advanced and affordable collective transport services. As the roads in many parts of the world are facing increasing congestion, it becomes increasingly important...

  5. Electronic transport properties of copper and gold at atomic scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadzadeh, Saeideh

    2010-11-23

    The factors governing electronic transport properties of copper and gold atomic-size contacts are theoretically examined in the present work. A two-terminal conductor using crystalline electrodes is adopted. The non-equilibrium Green's function combined with the density functional tight-binding method is employed via gDFTB simulation tool to calculate the transport at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions. The crystalline orientation, length, and arrangement of electrodes have very weak influence on the electronic characteristics of the considered atomic wires. The wire width is found to be the most effective geometric aspect determining the number of conduction channels. The obtained conductance oscillation and linear current-voltage curves are interpreted. To analyze the conduction mechanism in detail, the transmission channels and their decomposition to the atomic orbitals are calculated in copper and gold single point contacts. The presented results offer a possible explanation for the relation between conduction and geometric structure. Furthermore, the results are in good agreement with available experimental and theoretical studies. (orig.)

  6. A remark on the vertical transport of large-scale temperature fluctuations by smaller-scale convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    A simple mixing-length discussion of vertical diffusive transport of a scalar by small-scale turbulent convection is presented, likening it to the microscopic transport in a classical gas. If the scalar is passive, the transport is governed by the well known telegraph equation. Temperature, on the other hand, influences the dynamics of the small-scale motion by modifying the buoyancy that drives the turbulent eddies; it leads to a rather more complicated equation, which, for relatively rapid variation reduces to the same wave equation as for a passive scalar, with maximal propagation speed comparable with the rms vertical eddy velocity; but in the slow diffusive limit it reduces, for good reason, to the classical diffusion equation with a diffusivity enhanced by a factor 3/2 over that pertaining to a passive scalar.

  7. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreira Paulo H. S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical non-equilibrium dual-porosity type formulation for solute transport. A Bayesian parameter estimation approach was used in which the unknown parameters were estimated with the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method through implementation of the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Sensitivity coefficients were examined in order to determine the most meaningful measurements for identifying the unknown hydraulic and transport parameters. Results obtained using the measured pressure head and solute concentration data collected during the unsaturated soil column experiment revealed the robustness of the proposed approach.

  8. Laminar flow and convective transport processes scaling principles and asymptotic analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brenner, Howard

    1992-01-01

    Laminar Flow and Convective Transport Processes: Scaling Principles and Asymptotic Analysis presents analytic methods for the solution of fluid mechanics and convective transport processes, all in the laminar flow regime. This book brings together the results of almost 30 years of research on the use of nondimensionalization, scaling principles, and asymptotic analysis into a comprehensive form suitable for presentation in a core graduate-level course on fluid mechanics and the convective transport of heat. A considerable amount of material on viscous-dominated flows is covered.A unique feat

  9. Efficient algorithms for large-scale quantum transport calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Sascha; Calderara, Mauro; Bani-Hashemian, Mohammad Hossein; VandeVondele, Joost; Luisier, Mathieu

    2017-08-01

    Massively parallel algorithms are presented in this paper to reduce the computational burden associated with quantum transport simulations from first-principles. The power of modern hybrid computer architectures is harvested in order to determine the open boundary conditions that connect the simulation domain with its environment and to solve the resulting Schrödinger equation. While the former operation takes the form of an eigenvalue problem that is solved by a contour integration technique on the available central processing units (CPUs), the latter can be cast into a linear system of equations that is simultaneously processed by SplitSolve, a two-step algorithm, on general-purpose graphics processing units (GPUs). A significant decrease of the computational time by up to two orders of magnitude is obtained as compared to standard solution methods.

  10. Pore-to-Darcy Scale Hybrid Multiscale Finite Volume Model for Reactive Flow and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the present work we develop a hybrid scheme for the coupling and temporal integration of grid-based, continuum models for pore-scale and Darcy-scale flow and reactive transport. The hybrid coupling strategy consists on applying Darcy-scale and pore-scale flow and reactive transport models over overlapping subdomains Ω C and Ω F, and enforcing continuity of state and fluxes by means of restriction and prolongation operations defined over the overlap subdomain Ω hs ≡ Ω C \\cap Ω F. For the pore-scale model, we use a Multiscale Finite Volume (MsFV) characterization of the pore-scale state in terms of Darcy-scale degrees of freedom and local functions defined as the solution of pore-scale problems. The hybrid MsFV coupling results in a local-global combination of effective mass balance relations for the Darcy-scale degrees of freedom and local problems for the pore-scale degrees of freedom that capture pore-scale behavior. Our scheme allows for the rapid coarsening of pore-scale models and the adaptive enrichment of Darcy-scale models with pore-scale information. Additionally, we propose a strategy for modeling the dynamics of the pore-scale solid-liquid boundary due to precipitation and dissolution phenomena, based on the Diffuse Domain method (DDM), which is incorporated into the MsFV approximation of pore-scale states. We apply the proposed hybrid scheme to a reactive flow and transport problem in porous media subject to heterogeneous reactions and the corresponding precipitation and dissolution phenomena.

  11. Human blood RNA stabilization in samples collected and transported for a large biobank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duale Nur

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa is a nation-wide population-based pregnancy cohort initiated in 1999, comprising more than 108.000 pregnancies recruited between 1999 and 2008. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of integrating RNA analyses into existing MoBa protocols. We compared two different blood RNA collection tube systems – the PAXgene™ Blood RNA system and the Tempus™ Blood RNA system - and assessed the effects of suboptimal blood volumes in collection tubes and of transportation of blood samples by standard mail. Endpoints to characterize the samples were RNA quality and yield, and the RNA transcript stability of selected genes. Findings High-quality RNA could be extracted from blood samples stabilized with both PAXgene and Tempus tubes. The RNA yields obtained from the blood samples collected in Tempus tubes were consistently higher than from PAXgene tubes. Higher RNA yields were obtained from cord blood (3 – 4 times compared to adult blood with both types of tubes. Transportation of samples by standard mail had moderate effects on RNA quality and RNA transcript stability; the overall RNA quality of the transported samples was high. Some unexplained changes in gene expression were noted, which seemed to correlate with suboptimal blood volumes collected in the tubes. Temperature variations during transportation may also be of some importance. Conclusions Our results strongly suggest that special collection tubes are necessary for RNA stabilization and they should be used for establishing new biobanks. We also show that the 50,000 samples collected in the MoBa biobank provide RNA of high quality and in sufficient amounts to allow gene expression analyses for studying the association of disease with altered patterns of gene expression.

  12. Seasonal associations and atmospheric transport distances of Fusarium collected with unmanned aerial vehicles and ground-based sampling devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, David; Ross, Shane; Lin, Binbin

    2014-05-01

    Spores of fungi in the genus Fusarium may be transported through the atmosphere over long distances. Members of this genus are important pathogens and mycotoxin producers. New information is needed to characterize seasonal trends in atmospheric loads of Fusarium and to pinpoint the source(s) of inoculum at both local (farm) and regional (state or country) scales. Spores of Fusarium were collected from the atmosphere in an agricultural ecosystem in Blacksburg, VA, USA using a Burkard volumetric sampler (BVS) 1 m above ground level and autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) 100 m above ground level. More than 2,200 colony forming units (CFUs) of Fusarium were collected during 104 BVS sampling periods and 180 UAV sampling periods over four calendar years (2009-2012). Spore concentrations ranged from 0 to 13 and 0 to 23 spores m-3 for the BVS and the UAVs, respectively. Spore concentrations were generally higher in the fall, spring, and summer, and lower in the winter. Spore concentrations from the BVS were generally higher than those from the UAVs for both seasonal and hourly collections. Some of the species of Fusarium identified from our collections have not been previously reported in the state of Virginia. A Gaussian plume transport model was used to estimate distances to the potential inoculum source(s) by season. This work extends previous studies showing an association between atmospheric transport barriers (Lagrangian coherent structures or LCSs) and the movement of Fusarium in the lower atmosphere. An increased understanding of the aerobiology of Fusarium may contribute to new and improved control strategies for diseases causes by fusaria in the future.

  13. Modeling Polymer Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport Experiments in Porous Media to Understand the Transport Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, P.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of groundwater contaminants can be treated with nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). However, delivery of nZVI in the subsurface to the treatment zones is challenging as the bare nZVI particles have a higher tendency to agglomerate. The subsurface mobility of nZVI can be enhanced by stabilizing nZVI with polymer, such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate CMC stabilized nZVI transport behavior in porous media. The numerical simulations were based on a set of laboratory-scale transport experiments that were conducted in a two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (length - 55 cm; height - 45 cm; width - 1.4 cm), uniformly packed with silica sand. In the transport experiments: CMC stabilized nZVI and a non-reactive dye tracer Lissamine Green B (LGB) were used; water specific discharge and CMC concentration were varied; movements of LGB, and CMC-nZVI in the sandbox were tracked using a camera, a light source and a dark box. The concentrations of LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI at the sandbox outlet were analyzed. A 2D multiphase flow and transport model was applied to simulate experimental results. The images from LGB dye transport experiments were used to determine the pore water velocities and media permeabilities in various layers in the sand box. These permeability values were used in the subsequent simulations of CMC-nZVI transport. The 2D compositional simulator, modified to include colloid filtration theory (CFT), treated CMC as a solute and nZVI as a colloid. The simulator included composition dependent viscosity to account for CMC injection and mixing, and attachment efficiency as a fitting parameter for nZVI transport modeling. In the experiments, LGB and CMC recoveries were greater than 95%; however, CMC residence time was significantly higher than the LGB residence time and the higher CMC concentration caused higher pressure drops in the sandbox. The nZVI recovery was lower than 40

  14. A Unified Gas Kinetic Scheme for Multi-scale Plasma Transport

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Chang

    2016-01-01

    A unified gas kinetic scheme (UGKS) for multi-scale and multi-component plasma transport is constructed. The current scheme is a direct modeling method, where the time evolution solutions from the Vlasov-BGK equations for both electron and ion, and the Maxwell equations are used to construct the scale-dependent plasma simulation. As a result, based on the modeling scales of mesh size and time step, the discretized governing equations for the whole plasma regimes are obtained. The UGKS takes into account the electron inertia, full electromagnetic field equations, and separate electron and ion evolution. The physics recovered in UGKS ranges from the kinetic Vlasov equation to the hydrodynamic magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations, with a unified treatment in all scales from the collisionless particle transport to the hydrodynamic wave interactions. The UGKS presents a plasma description which is more general than the Vlasov equation in the kinetic scale and all kinds of MHD equations in the hydrodynamic scale, su...

  15. 77 FR 68104 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Socio-Economic Profile of Small-Scale...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... socio-economic data about small scale fishermen and seafood dealers operating in the U.S. Caribbean. The... information sought will be collected via in- person, telephone and mail surveys. III. Data OMB Control Number... information; (c) ways to enhance the quality, utility, and clarity of the information to be collected; and (d...

  16. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Experimental work was used to validate modeling studies and develop multicontinuum models of U(VI) transport in a contaminated aquifer. At the bench scale, it has been shown that U(VI) desorption is rate-limited and that rates are dependent on the bicarbonate concentration. Two decimeter-scale experiments were conducted in order to help establish rigorous upscaling approaches that could be tested at the tracer test and plume scales.

  17. Original article Validation of the Polish version of the Collective Self-Esteem Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Róża Bazińska

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this article is to present research on the validity and reliability of the Collective Self-Esteem Scale (CSES) for the Polish population. The CSES is a measure of individual differences in collective self-esteem, understood as the global evaluation of one’s own social (collective) identity. Participants and procedure Participants from two samples (n = 466 and n = 1,009) completed a paper-pencil set of questionnaires which contained the CSES and the Ro...

  18. Study of Uranium Transport Utilizing Reactive Numerical Modeling and Experimental Data from Heterogeneous Intermediate-Scale Tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, D.; Miller, A.; Honeyman, B.

    2007-12-01

    The study of the transport of contaminants in groundwater is critical in order to mitigate risks to downstream receptors from sites where past releases of these contaminants has resulted in the degradation of the water quality of the underlying aquifer. In most cases, the fate and transport of these contaminants occurs in a chemically and physically heterogeneous environment; thereby making the prediction of the ultimate fate of these contaminants difficult. In order to better understand the fundamental processes that have the greatest effect on the transport of these contaminants, careful laboratory study must be completed in a controlled environment. Once the experimental data has been generated, the validation of numerical models may then be achieved. Questions on the management of contaminated sites may center on the long-term release (e.g., desorption, dissolution) behavior of contaminated geomedia. Data on the release of contaminants is often derived from bench-scale experiments or, in rare cases, through field-scale experiments. A central question, however, is how molecular-scale processes (e.g., bond breaking) are expressed at the macroscale. This presentation describes part of a collaborative study between the Colorado School of Mines, the USGS and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab on upscaling pore-scale processes to understanding field-scale observations. In the work described here, two experiments were conducted in two intermediate-scale tanks (2.44 m x 1.22 m x 7.6 cm and 2.44 m x 0.61 m x 7.6 cm) to generate data to quantify the processes of uranium dissolution and transport in fully saturated conditions, and to evaluate the ability of two reactive transport models to capture the relevant processes and predict U behavior at the intermediate scale. Each tank was designed so that spatial samples could be collected from the side of the tank, as well as samples from the effluent end of the tank. The larger tank was packed with a less than 2mm fraction of a

  19. How scale-free networks and large-scale collective cooperation emerge in complex homogeneous social systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Xiaoming; Hu, Gang

    2007-10-01

    We study how heterogeneous degree distributions and large-scale collective cooperation in social networks emerge in complex homogeneous systems by a simple local rule: learning from the best in both strategy selections and linking choices. The prisoner's dilemma game is used as the local dynamics. We show that the social structure may evolve into single-scale, broad-scale, and scale-free (SF) degree distributions for different control parameters. In particular, in a relatively strong-selfish parameter region the SF property can be self-organized in social networks by dynamic evolutions and these SF structures help the whole node community to reach a high level of cooperation under the poor condition of a high selfish intention of individuals.

  20. Characterization of double continuum formulations of transport through pore-scale information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, G.; Ceriotti, G.; Bijeljic, B.

    2016-12-01

    Information on pore-scale characteristics is becoming increasingly available at unprecedented levels of detail from modern visualization/data-acquisition techniques. These advancements are not completely matched by corresponding developments of operational procedures according to which we can engineer theoretical findings aiming at improving our ability to reduce the uncertainty associated with the outputs of continuum-scale models to be employed at large scales. We present here a modeling approach which rests on pore-scale information to achieve a complete characterization of a double continuum model of transport and fluid-fluid reactive processes. Our model makes full use of pore-scale velocity distributions to identify mobile and immobile regions. We do so on the basis of a pointwise (in the pore space) evaluation of the relative strength of advection and diffusion time scales, as rendered by spatially variable values of local Péclet numbers. After mobile and immobile regions are demarcated, we build a simplified unit cell which is employed as a representative proxy of the real porous domain. This model geometry is then employed to simplify the computation of the effective parameters embedded in the double continuum transport model, while retaining relevant information from the pore-scale characterization of the geometry and velocity field. We document results which illustrate the applicability of the methodology to predict transport of a passive tracer within two- and three-dimensional media upon comparison with direct pore-scale numerical simulation of transport in the same geometrical settings. We also show preliminary results about the extension of this model to fluid-fluid reactive transport processes. In this context, we focus on results obtained in two-dimensional porous systems. We discuss the impact of critical quantities required as input to our modeling approach to obtain continuum-scale outputs. We identify the key limitations of the proposed

  1. Experimental Exploration of Particle-Scale Bed Load Transport and Near-Bed Fluid Velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathel, S. L.; Furbish, D. J.; Schmeeckle, M. W.

    2016-12-01

    Bed load sediment particles move as complex motions over the surface of a stream bed, accelerating and decelerating in response to the near-bed turbulence and due to particle-bed interactions. Using high-speed imagery of coarse sand particles on a planer bed surface, we track individual particle motions from start to stop, combined with measurements of near-bed fluid velocities to better characterize the relationship between these properties. These simultaneous measurements provide an initial step towards describing the dynamic relationship between the fluid and particle entrainment on the grain-scale. We start with an Eulerian a priori method wherein we grid the analyzed area and compare the fluid velocity time series to the entrainment time series within each grid space. We progressively increase the size of the grids and monitor the correlation between the two time series. We then use an a posteriori method that focuses on the fluid velocities in the vicinity of entrained particles both at the moment of entrainment and prior to the initiation of motion. We further our analysis of the relationship between particle motions and the near-bed fluid using detailed measurements of particle motions to calibrate estimates of the sediment load using a pixel differencing method. This allows us to examine connections between the fluid and particle activity over many frames rather than over the limited, manually tracked time period. Furthermore, this allows us to empirically define a distribution of particle wait times, or the duration of time between successive entrainment events over a set area, which acts to determine the transport intensity. Preliminary results suggest that there is not a clear correlation between near-bed fluid velocities and particle entrainment. In absence of a correlation we find that (1) we must think more deeply about collective entrainment and how it 'works', and (2) we must consider how the microstructure of the particles on the bed act to set up

  2. Edible mushroom-related poisoning: A study on circumstances of mushroom collection, transport, and storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlikowski, T; Romek, M; Satora, L

    2015-07-01

    The American Association of Poison Control Center (AAPCC) shows that in 2012 there were 0.3% of human exposures involving mushrooms. Only 17% of 6600 cases were then identified by the species. The present retrospective study was designed to identify the epidemiology of mushroom poisoning in adults admitted to Krakow's Department of Clinical Toxicology (DCT) from 2002 to 2009. This study was conducted retrospectively after examining the files of 457 adult patients with wild mushroom poisoning. Mycological analysis was made and the species of the poisoning-inducing mushroom was determined. Furthermore, the circumstances related to the mushroom gathering, transport, storage, preparation, and consumption have been analyzed. The analysis revealed that in 400 (87.53%) out of 457 cases, the clinical symptoms were caused by ingestion of identified edible mushroom species. The main reason for edible mushroom poisoning is associated with their incorrect processing after harvest. The analysis of the circumstances of mushroom collection, transport, and storage shows that the largest percentage of poisoning was connected with long-term storage of mushroom dishes, collecting, and storing them in plastic bags, and long storage of mushrooms. Based on spore analysis of the gastric content, edible mushrooms were responsible for the great majority of mushroom poisoning cases admitted to the DCT. The toxicity of edible mushroom is associated with proceeding with them during collection, transport, and storage. The medical history should be supplemented by questions concerning these circumstances. The identification of the mushroom by a mycologist is highly desirable. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Unconventional Current Scaling and Edge Effects for Charge Transport through Molecular Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obersteiner, Veronika; Huhs, Georg; Papior, Nick Rübner

    2017-01-01

    -size islands. On the basis of first-principles charge-transport simulations, we explain why the scaling of the conductivity of a junction has to be highly non-linear in the number of molecules it contains. Moreover, transport through molecular clusters is found to be highly inhomogeneous with pronounced edge...... effects determined by molecules in locally different electrostatic environments. These effects are most pronounced for comparably small clusters, but electrostatic considerations show that they prevail also for more extended systems....

  4. The influence of bedrock hydrogeology on catchment-scale nitrate fate and transport in fractured aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orr, Alison [Arup, 50 Ringsend Road, Dublin 4 (Ireland); School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Nitsche, Janka [RPS, West Pier Business Campus, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin (Ireland); School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Archbold, Marie [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Environmental Protection Agency, Richview, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Deakin, Jenny [Environmental Protection Agency, Richview, Clonskeagh Road, Dublin 14 (Ireland); Department of Civil, Structural and Environmental Engineering, Trinity College Dublin (Ireland); Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Flynn, Raymond [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-01

    Characterising catchment scale biogeochemical processes controlling nitrate fate in groundwater constitutes a fundamental consideration when applying programmes of measures to reduce risks posed by diffuse agricultural pollutants to water quality. Combining hydrochemical analyses with nitrate isotopic data and physical hydrogeological measurements permitted characterisation of biogeochemical processes influencing nitrogen fate and transport in the groundwater in two fractured bedrock aquifers with contrasting hydrogeology but comparable nutrient loads. Hydrochemical and isotopic analyses of groundwater samples collected from moderately fractured, diffusely karstified limestone indicated nitrification controlled dissolved nitrogen fate and delivery to aquatic receptors. By contrast nitrate concentrations in groundwater were considerably lower in a low transmissivity highly lithified sandstone and pyrite-bearing shale unit with patchy subsoil cover. Geophysical and hydrochemical investigations showed shallower intervals contained hydraulically active fractures where denitrification was reflected through lower nitrogen levels and an isotopic enrichment ratio of 1.7 between δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 18}O. Study findings highlight the influence of bedrock hydrogeological conditions on aqueous nitrogen mobility. Investigation results demonstrate that bedrock conditions need to be considered when implementing catchment management plans to reduce the impact of agricultural practices on the quality of groundwater and baseflow in receiving rivers. Nitrate isotopic signatures in the groundwater of a freely draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly draining aquifer with a low transmissivity aquifer. - Graphical abstract: Contrasting nitrate isotope signatures of groundwater in a free draining catchment underlain by a karstified aquifer and a poorly drained catchment underlain by a low transmissivity aquifer. - Highlights: • Comparison of N fate and

  5. Bedload transport flux fluctuations over a wide range of time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Fu, X.; Ancey, C.

    2014-12-01

    Bedload transport is a highly fluctuating process. Our previous study (Ma et al., 2014) demonstrated a three-regime relation of the variance of bedload transport flux across a wide range of sampling time scales. This study further explored the fluctuation spectrum of at-a-point bedload transport flux with different sampling times. We derived out analytical solutions of the third- and fourth-order moments of bedload transport flux, based on a physically-based formulation (Ancey et al., 2008; Ma et al., 2014). A formulation of the probability density function of bedload transport flux was constructed based on the 1st through 4th order moments. Experimental data were used to test against the solutions of both the moments and PDF. Interestingly, the higher order statistical moments were found to exhibit the three-regime pattern as well. This study contributes to a comprehensive understanding of bedload transport flux fluctuation and emphasizes its timescale-dependent features resulting from the discrete nature and correlated motion of bedload material. The correlated structures of bedload transport, such as bed forms and particle clusters, deserve to be further exploration in future studies. Keywords: bedload transport; stochastic theory; high order moment; fluctuation; time scale; PDF. Ancey, C., Davison, A. C., Bohm, T., Jodeau, M., and Frey, P. Entrainment and motion of coarse particles in a shallow water stream down a steep slope, Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2008, 595, 83-114, doi: 10.1017/S0022112007008774. Ma, H. B., Heyman, J., Fu, X. D., Mettra, F., Ancey, C. and Parker, G. Bedload transport over a broad range of time scales: determination of three regimes of fluctuations. Journal of Geophysical Research-Earth Surface, 2014. (under review)

  6. Beam transport line with scaling fixed field alternating gradient type magnets

    OpenAIRE

    Shinji Machida; Richard Fenning

    2010-01-01

    A scaling fixed field alternating gradient (FFAG) accelerator provides large momentum acceptance despite the fact that magnetic guiding fields are constant in time. Optical functions are identical over the large momentum range as well. We have designed a straight beam transport line (BTL) using a scaling FFAG type magnet which has a field profile of y^{k}, where y is the horizontal coordinate and k is the magnetic field index. This FFAG-BTL has very large momentum acceptance and optical funct...

  7. Original article Validation of the Polish version of the Collective Self-Esteem Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róża Bazińska

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background The aim of this article is to present research on the validity and reliability of the Collective Self-Esteem Scale (CSES for the Polish population. The CSES is a measure of individual differences in collective self-esteem, understood as the global evaluation of one’s own social (collective identity. Participants and procedure Participants from two samples (n = 466 and n = 1,009 completed a paper-pencil set of questionnaires which contained the CSES and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale (RSES, and subsets of participants completed scales related to a sense of belonging, well-being and psychological distress (anxiety and depression. Results Like the original version, the Polish version of the CSES comprises 16 items which form the four dimensions of collective self-esteem: Public collective self-esteem, Private collective self-esteem, Membership esteem and Importance of Identity. The results confirm the four-factor structure of the Polish version of the CSES, support the whole Polish version of the CSES as well as its subscales, which represent satisfactory reliability and stability, and provide initial evidence of construct validity. Conclusions As the results of the study indicate, the Polish version of the CSES is a valid and reliable self-report measure for assessing the global self-esteem derived from membership of a group and has proved to be useful in the Polish context.

  8. Exploring with simulations the transport properties of multi-scale porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyväluoma, Jari; Mattila, Keijo; Puurtinen, Tuomas; Timonen, Jussi

    2015-04-01

    The internal structure of many natural porous materials such as soils and carbonate rocks involves multiple length scales. This severely hinders the research relating structure and transport properties: typically laboratory experiments cannot distinguish contributions from individual scales while computer simulations cannot capture multiple scales due to limited computational resources. 3D imaging and image-based fluid flow simulations are increasingly used for studying the pore-scale transport processes. Combining imaging with pore-scale flow simulation techniques, e.g. the lattice Boltzmann method, provides direct means to quantify pore-scale transport processes. However, pore-scale computer simulations have not really been able to capture multiple scales due to the limited size of the simulation system. We show here that the current computational resources and software techniques already allow transport simulations in domains beyond the realms of current imaging techniques, and, more importantly, enable numerical experiments in multi-scale porous materials. We were able to simulate single-phase fluid flow with the lattice Boltzmann method in a synthetic x-ray-tomography image taken from the set of world's largest 3D images of a porous material [1]. The used image has 163843 image voxels and porosity of 0.134 (i.e., 5.9 - 1011 pore voxels) and it represents the microstructure of Fontainebleau sandstone. While the modelled sandstone image is rather homogeneous and therefore does not really represent a multiscale porous material, from a computational point of view it serves the purpose of demonstrating the power of contemporary software and hardware techniques. The simulation was executed at the Edinburgh Parallel Computing Centre on the ARCHER supercomputer ranked number 25 among all supercomputers. ARCHER has 3008 computing nodes each of which has two 12-core Ivy Bridge 2.7 GHz CPUs and 64 GB of memory providing 1.67 Petaflops of theoretical peak performance. The

  9. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Ma

    Full Text Available Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS and Internet of Things (IoT, transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation.

  10. Large-scale transportation network congestion evolution prediction using deep learning theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Yu, Haiyang; Wang, Yunpeng; Wang, Yinhai

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how congestion at one location can cause ripples throughout large-scale transportation network is vital for transportation researchers and practitioners to pinpoint traffic bottlenecks for congestion mitigation. Traditional studies rely on either mathematical equations or simulation techniques to model traffic congestion dynamics. However, most of the approaches have limitations, largely due to unrealistic assumptions and cumbersome parameter calibration process. With the development of Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) and Internet of Things (IoT), transportation data become more and more ubiquitous. This triggers a series of data-driven research to investigate transportation phenomena. Among them, deep learning theory is considered one of the most promising techniques to tackle tremendous high-dimensional data. This study attempts to extend deep learning theory into large-scale transportation network analysis. A deep Restricted Boltzmann Machine and Recurrent Neural Network architecture is utilized to model and predict traffic congestion evolution based on Global Positioning System (GPS) data from taxi. A numerical study in Ningbo, China is conducted to validate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. Results show that the prediction accuracy can achieve as high as 88% within less than 6 minutes when the model is implemented in a Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based parallel computing environment. The predicted congestion evolution patterns can be visualized temporally and spatially through a map-based platform to identify the vulnerable links for proactive congestion mitigation.

  11. Scaling theory put into practice: First-principles modeling of transport in doped silicon nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Troels; Rurali, R.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2007-01-01

    We combine the ideas of scaling theory and universal conductance fluctuations with density-functional theory to analyze the conductance properties of doped silicon nanowires. Specifically, we study the crossover from ballistic to diffusive transport in boron or phosphorus doped Si nanowires...

  12. CFD MODELING OF FINE SCALE FLOW AND TRANSPORT IN THE HOUSTON METROPOLITAN AREA, TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fine scale modeling of flows and air quality in Houston, Texas is being performed; the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling is being applied to investigate the influence of morphologic structures on the within-grid transport and dispersion of sources in grid models ...

  13. Cost Overruns in Large-scale Transportation Infrastructure Projects : Explanations and Their Theoretical Embeddedness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cantarelli, C.C.; Flyvbjerg, B.; Molin, E.J.E.; Van Wee, B.

    2010-01-01

    Managing large-scale transportation infrastructure projects is difficult due to frequent misinformation about the costs which results in large cost overruns that often threaten the overall project viability. This paper investigates the explanations for cost overruns that are given in the literature.

  14. Theoretical and Numerical Properties of a Gyrokinetic Plasma: Issues Related to Transport Time Scale Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W.W. Lee

    2003-09-17

    Particle simulation has played an important role for the recent investigations on turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas. In this paper, theoretical and numerical properties of a gyrokinetic plasma as well as its relationship with magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) are discussed with the ultimate aim of simulating microturbulence in transport time scale using massively parallel computers.

  15. Upscaling of Long-Term U9VI) Desorption from Pore Scale Kinetics to Field-Scale Reactive Transport Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andy Miller

    2009-01-25

    Environmental systems exhibit a range of complexities which exist at a range of length and mass scales. Within the realm of radionuclide fate and transport, much work has been focused on understanding pore scale processes where complexity can be reduced to a simplified system. In describing larger scale behavior, the results from these simplified systems must be combined to create a theory of the whole. This process can be quite complex, and lead to models which lack transparency. The underlying assumption of this approach is that complex systems will exhibit complex behavior, requiring a complex system of equations to describe behavior. This assumption has never been tested. The goal of the experiments presented is to ask the question: Do increasingly complex systems show increasingly complex behavior? Three experimental tanks at the intermediate scale (Tank 1: 2.4m x 1.2m x 7.6cm, Tank 2: 2.4m x 0.61m x 7.6cm, Tank 3: 2.4m x 0.61m x 0.61m (LxHxW)) have been completed. These tanks were packed with various physical orientations of different particle sizes of a uranium contaminated sediment from a former uranium mill near Naturita, Colorado. Steady state water flow was induced across the tanks using constant head boundaries. Pore water was removed from within the flow domain through sampling ports/wells; effluent samples were also taken. Each sample was analyzed for a variety of analytes relating to the solubility and transport of uranium. Flow fields were characterized using inert tracers and direct measurements of pressure head. The results show that although there is a wide range of chemical variability within the flow domain of the tank, the effluent uranium behavior is simple enough to be described using a variety of conceptual models. Thus, although there is a wide range in variability caused by pore scale behaviors, these behaviors appear to be smoothed out as uranium is transported through the tank. This smoothing of uranium transport behavior transcends

  16. Pore-scale simulation of microbial growth using a genome-scale metabolic model: Implications for Darcy-scale reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, G. D.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Scheibe, T. D.; Fang, Y.; Mahadevan, R.; Lovley, D. R.

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in microbiology have enabled the quantitative simulation of microbial metabolism and growth based on genome-scale characterization of metabolic pathways and fluxes. We have incorporated a genome-scale metabolic model of the iron-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens into a pore-scale simulation of microbial growth based on coupling of iron reduction to oxidation of a soluble electron donor (acetate). In our model, fluid flow and solute transport is governed by a combination of the Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Microbial growth occurs only on the surface of soil grains where solid-phase mineral iron oxides are available. Mass fluxes of chemical species associated with microbial growth are described by the genome-scale microbial model, implemented using a constraint-based metabolic model, and provide the Robin-type boundary condition for the advection-diffusion equation at soil grain surfaces. Conventional models of microbially-mediated subsurface reactions use a lumped reaction model that does not consider individual microbial reaction pathways, and describe reactions rates using empirically-derived rate formulations such as the Monod-type kinetics. We have used our pore-scale model to explore the relationship between genome-scale metabolic models and Monod-type formulations, and to assess the manifestation of pore-scale variability (microenvironments) in terms of apparent Darcy-scale microbial reaction rates. The genome-scale model predicted lower biomass yield, and different stoichiometry for iron consumption, in comparison to prior Monod formulations based on energetics considerations. We were able to fit an equivalent Monod model, by modifying the reaction stoichiometry and biomass yield coefficient, that could effectively match results of the genome-scale simulation of microbial behaviors under excess nutrient conditions, but predictions of the fitted Monod model deviated from those of the genome-scale model

  17. Pore-scale simulation of microbial growth using a genome-scale metabolic model: Implications for Darcy-scale reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Fang, Yilin; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Lovley, Derek R.

    2013-09-07

    Recent advances in microbiology have enabled the quantitative simulation of microbial metabolism and growth based on genome-scale characterization of metabolic pathways and fluxes. We have incorporated a genome-scale metabolic model of the iron-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens into a pore-scale simulation of microbial growth based on coupling of iron reduction to oxidation of a soluble electron donor (acetate). In our model, fluid flow and solute transport is governed by a combination of the Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Microbial growth occurs only on the surface of soil grains where solid-phase mineral iron oxides are available. Mass fluxes of chemical species associated with microbial growth are described by the genome-scale microbial model, implemented using a constraint-based metabolic model, and provide the Robin-type boundary condition for the advection-diffusion equation at soil grain surfaces. Conventional models of microbially-mediated subsurface reactions use a lumped reaction model that does not consider individual microbial reaction pathways, and describe reactions rates using empirically-derived rate formulations such as the Monod-type kinetics. We have used our pore-scale model to explore the relationship between genome-scale metabolic models and Monod-type formulations, and to assess the manifestation of pore-scale variability (microenvironments) in terms of apparent Darcy-scale microbial reaction rates. The genome-scale model predicted lower biomass yield, and different stoichiometry for iron consumption, in comparisonto prior Monod formulations based on energetics considerations. We were able to fit an equivalent Monod model, by modifying the reaction stoichiometry and biomass yield coefficient, that could effectively match results of the genome-scale simulation of microbial behaviors under excess nutrient conditions, but predictions of the fitted Monod model deviated from those of the genome-scale model under

  18. A continuous time random walk model for Darcy-scale anomalous transport in heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comolli, Alessandro; Hakoun, Vivien; Dentz, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Achieving the understanding of the process of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media is of crucial importance for several environmental and social purposes, ranging from aquifers contamination and remediation, to risk assessment in nuclear waste repositories. The complexity of this aim is mainly ascribable to the heterogeneity of natural media, which can be observed at all the scales of interest, from pore scale to catchment scale. In fact, the intrinsic heterogeneity of porous media is responsible for the arising of the well-known non-Fickian footprints of transport, including heavy-tailed breakthrough curves, non-Gaussian spatial density profiles and the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement. Several studies investigated the processes through which heterogeneity impacts the transport properties, which include local modifications to the advective-dispersive motion of solutes, mass exchanges between some mobile and immobile phases (e.g. sorption/desorption reactions or diffusion into solid matrix) and spatial correlation of the flow field. In the last decades, the continuous time random walk (CTRW) model has often been used to describe solute transport in heterogenous conditions and to quantify the impact of point heterogeneity, spatial correlation and mass transfer on the average transport properties [1]. Open issues regarding this approach are the possibility to relate measurable properties of the medium to the parameters of the model, as well as its capability to provide predictive information. In a recent work [2] the authors have shed new light on understanding the relationship between Lagrangian and Eulerian dynamics as well as on their evolution from arbitrary initial conditions. On the basis of these results, we derive a CTRW model for the description of Darcy-scale transport in d-dimensional media characterized by spatially random permeability fields. The CTRW approach models particle velocities as a spatial Markov process, which is

  19. An innovative container for WEEE collection and transport: details and effects following the adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Rita; Gebennini, Elisa; Rimini, Bianca

    2009-11-01

    The content of hazardous components in Waste arising from Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) is a major concern that urges governments and industry to take measures to ensure proper treatment and disposal. Thus, the European Union issued directives to encourage reuse, recycling and other proper forms of recovery of such waste while companies and academics are still studying methods and technologies for optimizing recovery processes. This paper presents an analysis of the logistics process assuring the correct collection, handling, transportation and storing of WEEE. The experience comes from an Italian WEEE treatment plant (TRED Carpi S.r.l.) where a new kind of container has been introduced in order to improve the logistics system. An evaluation framework is described and used in order to compare different system configurations and assess the advantages emerging from adopting proper equipments for WEEE transport and handling.

  20. Capturing Scale-Dependent Dispersion in Saturated Soils using both Local and Nonlocal Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrard, R. M.; Zhang, Y.; Sun, H.; Xia, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Conservative tracer transport in saturated soils can exhibit scale-dependent dispersion before reaching a Gaussian asymptote. This is most likely due to increasing flow field heterogeneity or the expansion of local velocity distribution experienced by the tracer particles with travel distance. A time nonlocal transport model, previously developed to capture this non-Fickian transport has exhibited an upscaling, sometimes constant, effective dispersion coefficient D from numerical simulations. However, the efficiency of this model has not been systematically checked against real-world data. This study applies and compares both the traditional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) and the time fractional ADE models to quantify solute dynamics moving through 10-meter-long soil columns, where the spatial trend of D can shed light on the scale-dependency of pre-asymptotic dispersion.

  1. Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Wenbin [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-08-29

    This report documents the work performed by General Motors (GM) under the Cooperative agreement No. DE-EE0000470, “Investigation of Micro- and Macro-Scale Transport Processes for Improved Fuel Cell Performance,” in collaboration with the Penn State University (PSU), University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK), Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT), and University of Rochester (UR) via subcontracts. The overall objectives of the project are to investigate and synthesize fundamental understanding of transport phenomena at both the macro- and micro-scales for the development of a down-the-channel model that accounts for all transport domains in a broad operating space. GM as a prime contractor focused on cell level experiments and modeling, and the Universities as subcontractors worked toward fundamental understanding of each component and associated interface.

  2. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing a standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of the first type based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (FVM-based CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and (for capable codes) nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The intercomparison work was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence

  3. Logistical and ergonomic transportation capacity for refuse collection workers: a work physiology field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luttmann, A; Laurig, W; Jäger, M

    1992-09-01

    In a work physiology field study, the work flow and the electrocardiogram were recorded throughout whole shifts for six male refuse (garbage) collection workers who transported and emptied 1.1 m3 refuse containers. The work rate (WR), indicated by the number of 1.1 m3 containers emptied per unit of time, and the work pulse rate (WPR) were determined in the data evaluation. The work pulse rate increases with the work rate. The functional relationship can be approximated by a linear regression function (WPR = 20.9 + 35.8.WR). The work pulse rate reaches such high values that it must be assumed that the work cannot be performed continuously throughout the whole working day. Consequently, regular breaks should be provided. When determining the necessary duration of the breaks, it was assumed that an equilibrium between fatigue and recovery should be maintained during the working day. The recovery breaks should be at least long enough for the heart rate to return to the resting level. The necessary duration of the breaks was determined on the basis of the present field study and the laboratory investigations described in the literature. A minimum duration of 10 min per working hour results from the calculations. The breaks should be taken regularly at about hourly intervals. A transportation-capacity model is provided for the planning of the deployment of refuse workers. It permits calculation of the number of 1.1 m3 containers a three-man crew, comprising the refuse collection truck driver and two loaders, can empty during one shift. Both the logistical and ergonomic transportation capacities can be determined using the model. The logistical transportation capacity (TCL) indicates the number of containers which can be emptied per shift by a crew when only criteria such as the optimal utilization of the working time are considered. The ergonomic transportation capacity (TCE) is understood as the number of containers which can be emptied per shift taking into

  4. Highways in the sky: scales of atmospheric transport of plant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, David G; Ross, Shane D

    2015-01-01

    Many high-risk plant pathogens are transported over long distances (hundreds of meters to thousands of kilometers) in the atmosphere. The ability to track the movement of these pathogens in the atmosphere is essential for forecasting disease spread and establishing effective quarantine measures. Here, we discuss the scales of atmospheric dispersal of plant pathogens along a transport continuum (pathogen scale, farm scale, regional scale, and continental scale). Growers can use risk information at each of these dispersal scales to assist in making plant disease management decisions, such as the timely application of appropriate pesticides. Regional- and continental-scale atmospheric features known as Lagrangian coherent structures (LCSs) may shuffle plant pathogens along highways in the sky. A promising new method relying on overlapping turbulent back-trajectories of pathogen-laden parcels of air may assist in localizing potential inoculum sources, informing local and/or regional management efforts such as conservation tillage. The emergence of unmanned aircraft systems (UASs, or drones) to sample plant pathogens in the lower atmosphere, coupled with source localization efforts, could aid in mitigating the spread of high-risk plant pathogens.

  5. Pore-Scale Simulations Of Flow And Heat Transport In Saturated Permeable Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zegers, G. R., Sr.; Herrera, P. A.

    2015-12-01

    The study of heat transport in porous media is important for applications such as the use of temperature as environmental tracer, geothermal energy, fuel cells, etc. In recent years, there have been several advances in computational techniques that have allowed to investigate different processes in porous media at the pore-scale through detailed numerical simulations that considered synthetic porous media formed by regular grains and pore bodies arranged in different geometrical configurations. The main objective of this research is to investigate the influence of pore configurations on flow velocity and heat transport in 2D saturated porous media. We use OpenFOAM to solve flow and heat transport equations at the pore-scale. We performed detailed pore-scale numerical simulations in synthetic 2D porous media generated from regularly placed and randomly distributed circular solid grains. For each geometrical configuration we performed numerical simulations to compute the flow field in order to calculate properties such as as tortuosity, mean velocity and hydraulic conductivity, and to identify Lagrangian coherent structures to charaterize the velocity fields. We then perform heat transport simulations to relate the properties of the velocity fields and the main heat transport mechanisms. The analysis of the simulations results showed that in all the simulated configurations effective flow properties become valid at scales of 10 to 15 pore bodies. For the same porosity and boundary conditions we obtained that as expected tortuosity in the random structure is higher than in the regular configurations, while hydraulic conductivity is smaller for the random case. The results of heat transport simulations show significant differences in temperature distribution for the regular and random pore structures. For the simulated boundary and initial conditions, heat transport is more efficient in the random structure than in the regular geometry. This result indicates that the

  6. Relay transport of aerosols to Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei region by multi-scale atmospheric circulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Yucong; Guo, Jianping; Liu, Shuhua; Liu, Huan; Zhang, Gen; Yan, Yan; He, Jing

    2017-09-01

    The Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region experiences heavy aerosol pollution, which is found to have close relationships with the synoptic- and local-scale atmospheric circulations. However, how and to what extent these multi-scale circulations interplay to modulate aerosol transport have not been fully understood. To this end, this study comprehensively investigated the impacts of these circulations on aerosol transport in BTH by focusing on an episode occurred on 1 June 2013 through combining both observations and three-dimensional simulations. It was found that during this episode, the Bohai Sea acted as a transfer station, and the high-pressure system over the Yellow Sea and sea-breeze in BTH took turns to affect the transport of aerosols. In the morning, influenced by the high-pressure system, lots of aerosols emitted from Shandong and Jiangsu provinces were first transported to the Bohai Sea. After then, these aerosols were brought to the BTH region in the afternoon through the inland penetration of sea-breeze, significantly exacerbating the air quality in BTH. The inland penetration of sea-breeze could be identified by the sharp changes in ground-based observed temperature, humidity, and wind when the sea-breeze front (SBF) passed by. Combining observations with model outputs, the SBF was found to be able to advance inland more than ∼150 km till reaching Beijing. This study has important implications for better understanding the aerosol transport in BTH, and improving the forecast of such aerosol pollution.

  7. A STRATEGIC ANALYSIS OF COLLECTIVE URBAN TRANSPORT IN SPAIN USING THE FIVE FORCES MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gómez Ortega, Alba

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The transport sector in Spain is a branch of economic activity which is already of great importanceaccording to its own invoicing, value added and occupation figures, in addition to its indirect economic effects. It has an additional strategic value for economic policy, since it constitutes a fundamental part ofthe cost of placing products on increasing markets in a competitive manner. The mobility and trans-portation of passengers in cities in turn plays an essential role in the economic and social activity. All of these reasons, in addition to the recent significant problems of ustainability which this priority sector is currently confronting in all aspects, justify an interest in a study which attempts to obtaina profile of this public service by using a strategic analysis through the application of the traditional Porter Five Forces Model. The application of this model will allow us to obtain a general strategic vision which, when combined with a maturity analysis, ill provide a more in-depth knowledge of the object under study, that will serve as a basis for subsequent analyses of the collective urban public transport service.

  8. Intercomparison of 3D pore-scale flow and solute transport simulation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Mehmani, Yashar; Perkins, William A.; Pasquali, Andrea; Schönherr, Martin; Kim, Kyungjoo; Perego, Mauro; Parks, Michael L.; Trask, Nathaniel; Balhoff, Matthew T.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Geier, Martin; Krafczyk, Manfred; Luo, Li-Shi; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2016-09-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include methods that 1) explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) those that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of class 1, based on direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes, against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that validation to include additional models of class 1 based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of class 2 (a pore-network model or PNM). The PNM approach used in the current study was recently improved and demonstrated to accurately simulate solute transport in a two-dimensional experiment. While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries on solute transport in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all four approaches (CFD, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results with previously reported experimental observations. Experimental observations are limited to measured pore-scale velocities, so solute transport comparisons are made only among the various models. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations).

  9. Collection Efficiency and Ice Accretion Characteristics of Two Full Scale and One 1/4 Scale Business Jet Horizontal Tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Colin S.; Papadakis, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Collection efficiency and ice accretion calculations have been made for a series of business jet horizontal tail configurations using a three-dimensional panel code, an adaptive grid code, and the NASA Glenn LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion code. The horizontal tail models included two full scale wing tips and a 25 percent scale model. Flow solutions for the horizontal tails were generated using the PMARC panel code. Grids used in the ice accretion calculations were generated using the adaptive grid code ICEGRID. The LEWICE3D grid based ice accretion program was used to calculate impingement efficiency and ice shapes. Ice shapes typifying rime and mixed icing conditions were generated for a 30 minute hold condition. All calculations were performed on an SGI Octane computer. The results have been compared to experimental flow and impingement data. In general, the calculated flow and collection efficiencies compared well with experiment, and the ice shapes appeared representative of the rime and mixed icing conditions for which they were calculated.

  10. Translating chimpanzee personality to humans: Investigating the transportability of chimpanzee-derived personality scales to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latzman, Robert D; Sauvigné, Katheryn C; Hopkins, William D

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing interest in the study of personality in chimpanzees with repeated findings of a similar structure of personality in apes to that found in humans. To date, however, the direct translational value of instruments used to assess chimpanzee personality to humans has yet to be explicitly tested. As such, in the current study we sought to determine the transportability of factor analytically-derived chimpanzee personality scales to humans in a large human sample (N = 301). Human informants reporting on target individuals they knew well completed chimpanzee-derived and human-derived measures of personality from the two most widely studied models of human personality: Big Five and Big Three. The correspondence between informant-reported chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales was then investigated. Results indicated high convergence for corresponding scales across most chimpanzee- and human-derived personality scales. Findings from the current study provide evidence that chimpanzee-derived scales translate well to humans and operate quite similarly to the established human-derived personality scales in a human sample. This evidence of transportability lends support to the translational nature of chimpanzee personality research suggesting clear relevance of this growing literature to humans. Am. J. Primatol. 78:601-609, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A Proactive Complex Event Processing Method for Large-Scale Transportation Internet of Things

    OpenAIRE

    Yongheng Wang; Kening Cao

    2014-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) provides a new way to improve the transportation system. The key issue is how to process the numerous events generated by IoT. In this paper, a proactive complex event processing method is proposed for large-scale transportation IoT. Based on a multilayered adaptive dynamic Bayesian model, a Bayesian network structure learning algorithm using search-and-score is proposed to support accurate predictive analytics. A parallel Markov decision processes model is design...

  12. Harvard Forest regional-scale air mass composition by Patterns in Atmospheric Transport History (PATH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, J. L.; Munger, J. W.; Goldstein, A. H.; Jacob, D. J.; Wofsy, S. C.

    1998-06-01

    We calculated 4 years (1990-1993) of back trajectories arriving at Harvard Forest and used them to define patterns in atmospheric transport history. This information was used to assess the degree to which regional-scale transport modulates the chemical composition of air masses sampled at Harvard Forest. Different seasonal signals in trace-gas concentration are derived for different flow patterns. Throughout the year, high-speed transport of cool, dry, cloud-free air from the north and northwest represents background conditions for the Harvard Forest site. These synoptic conditions describe the atmosphere after passage of a cold front. The most polluted conditions in each season occurred under SW flow, with warmer temperatures, higher water vapor mixing ratios, low mixed-layer depths at the site, and a higher frequency of cloudy conditions. These regional-scale air mass characteristics describe synoptic conditions of warm sector transport. In addition to average air mass characteristics, we have analyzed the covariation of species (e.g., O3 versus NOy-NOx; O3 versus CO) to address chemical processes based on transport history. For summer daytime measurements, we show that relatively fresh pollutants arrive in SW flow while the most aged air masses with higher O3 to NOz slopes arrive with W flow, suggesting a Midwestern contribution to regional high-oxidant episodes. These observations of patterns in chemical characteristics related to patterns in transport are corroborated with probability maps indicating the likelihood of transport from upwind regions using trajectories selected for chemical distribution end-members (10th and 90th percentiles).

  13. Collection of intraoral findings in corpse with small-scale color dental scanner system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Masaki; Hanaoka, Yoichi; Tsuzuki, Tamiyuki; Ueno, Asao; Takagi, Tetsuya; Iwahara, Kaori; Yasuda, Mamoru; Sato, Yoshinobu; Minaguchi, Kiyoshi

    2009-03-10

    Together with X-ray radiography and the description in the dental chart (odontogram), the collection of intraoral images is extremely important in dental identification. Recently, thanks to advances in digital devices for taking images in the oral cavity, problems with developing images and images being lost due to scanning errors have been minimized. However, in corpses where postmortem rigidity has firmly set in and burned bodies where the jaw has to be forced open, it is difficult to open the jaw enough to allow images to be taken. In addition, collection of intraoral images requires skill. Our goal was to determine the efficacy of a newly developed, small-scale color dental scanner in collecting intraoral images. The results showed that it was comparatively easy to obtain an entire image of the oral cavity with even a minimum degree of jaw opening. This should enable even a non-expert to perform oral image collection.

  14. The Transportation Leapfrog: Using Smart Phones to Collect Driving Data and Model Fuel Economy in India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Anand [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Schewel, Laura [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Saxena, Samveg [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Phadke, Amol [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-05-01

    Car ownership in India is expected to skyrocket in the coming decades, strongly driven by rising incomes. This phenomenon provides unprecedented opportunities for automakers and equally unprecedented social and environmental challenges. Policymakers, urban planners and civil society see this car boom leading to an explosion in problems related to congestion, infrastructure, air pollution, safety, higher oil imports and climate change. For all these stakeholders to take effective action, good data on how people use their cars, their demand for mobility and their behavior in mobility is essential. Unfortunately, there is very little data on the Indian transport sector as a whole and virtually none on real-world vehicle performance and use. The rapid development of high quality mobile telecommunications infrastructure provides India with the opportunity to leapfrog the West in cheaply collecting vast amounts of useful data from transportation. In this paper, we describe a pilot project in which we use commercial smart phone apps to collect per second car driving data from the city of Pune, instantly upload it through 3G and prepare it for analysis using advanced noise filtering algorithms for less than $1 per day per car. We then use our data in an Autonomie simulation to show that India’s currently planned fuel economy test procedures will result in over-estimates of fuel economy of approximately 35% for a typical Indian car when it is operated in real world conditions. Supporting better driving cycle development is just one of many applications for smart phone derived data in Indian transportation.

  15. Full-Scale Accident Testing in Support of Used Nuclear Fuel Transportation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Samuel G.; Lindgren, Eric R.; Rechard, Rob P.; Sorenson, Ken B.

    2014-09-01

    The safe transport of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste is an important aspect of the waste management system of the United States. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) currently certifies spent nuclear fuel rail cask designs based primarily on numerical modeling of hypothetical accident conditions augmented with some small scale testing. However, NRC initiated a Package Performance Study (PPS) in 2001 to examine the response of full-scale rail casks in extreme transportation accidents. The objectives of PPS were to demonstrate the safety of transportation casks and to provide high-fidelity data for validating the modeling. Although work on the PPS eventually stopped, the Blue Ribbon Commission on America’s Nuclear Future recommended in 2012 that the test plans be re-examined. This recommendation was in recognition of substantial public feedback calling for a full-scale severe accident test of a rail cask to verify evaluations by NRC, which find that risk from the transport of spent fuel in certified casks is extremely low. This report, which serves as the re-assessment, provides a summary of the history of the PPS planning, identifies the objectives and technical issues that drove the scope of the PPS, and presents a possible path for moving forward in planning to conduct a full-scale cask test. Because full-scale testing is expensive, the value of such testing on public perceptions and public acceptance is important. Consequently, the path forward starts with a public perception component followed by two additional components: accident simulation and first responder training. The proposed path forward presents a series of study options with several points where the package performance study could be redirected if warranted.

  16. Local scale structures in Earth's thermospheric winds and their consequences for wind driven transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadly, Manbharat Singh

    In the traditional picture of Earth's upper thermosphere (~190--300 km), it is widely presumed that its convective stability and enormous kinematic viscosity attenuate wind gradients, and hence smooth out any structure present in the wind over scale size of several hundreds of kilometers. However, several independent experimental studies have shown that observed upper thermospheric wind fields at high latitudes contain stronger than expected local-scale spatial structures. The motivation of this dissertation is to investigate how the resulting local-scale gradients would distort neutral air masses and complicate thermospheric wind transport. To achieve this goal, we examined the behavior of a simple parameter that we refer to as the "distortion gradient". It incorporates all of the wind field's departures from uniformity, and is thus capable of representing all resulting contributions to the distortion or mixing of air masses. Climatological analysis of the distortion gradient using 2010, 2011, and 2012 wind data from the All-sky Scanning Doppler Imager (SDI) located at Poker Flat (65.12N, 147.47W) revealed the diurnal and seasonal trends in distortion of thermospheric masses. Distortion was observed to be dependent on geomagnetic activity and orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field. To understand the time-cumulative influence of these local-scale non-uniformities on thermospheric wind driven transport, time-resolved two-dimensional maps of the thermospheric vector wind fields were used to infer forward and backward air parcel trajectories. Tracing air parcel trajectories through a given geographic location indicates where they came from previously, and where they will go in the future. Results show that wind driven transport is very sensitive to small-scale details of the wind field. Any local-scale spatial wind gradients can significantly complicate air parcel trajectories. Transport of thermospheric neutral species in the presence of the local-scale

  17. Large-scale general collection of wild-plant DNA in Mustang, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukaya, Hirokazu; Iokawa, Yu; Kondo, Makiko; Ohba, Hideaki

    2005-02-01

    The deposit of DNA samples of wild plants that correspond to voucher specimens is highly informative and greatly enhances the value of the herbarium specimens. The Society of Himalayan Botany (SHB), Tokyo, has assembled general collections of flowering plants of the Sino-Himalayan region for more than 40 years. In a trial of the collection of these types of bioresources for use in basic research, we adopted FTA cards, which have recently been used for large-scale collection of DNA of humans, microorganisms and viruses, for the general collection of DNA samples of wild plants during a botanical expedition in Mustang, Nepal, in 2003. Three hundred and fifty-five plant specimens from Mustang, Nepal, were collected along with the corresponding DNA samples. Examination of the quality of the DNA samples by PCR demonstrated the utility of the collection system. The identification of all of the specimens collected, as well as data from the specimens, will be presented on the Flora of Nepal Database website (http://ti.um.u-tokyo.ac.jp/default.htm), which is open to the public. The DNA resources will be identified on the website and distributed openly by the SHB to researchers worldwide for basic research.

  18. Investigating the NCQ scaling of elliptic flow at LHC with a multiphase transport model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Liang [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Central China Normal University, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan (China); Li, Hui; Shou, Qi-Ye; Yin, Zhong-Bao [Central China Normal University, Key Laboratory of Quark and Lepton Physics (MOE) and Institute of Particle Physics, Wuhan (China); Qin, Hong [Central China Normal University, School of Mathematics and Statistics, Wuhan (China)

    2017-06-15

    The number of constituent quark (NCQ) scaling behavior of elliptic flow has been systematically studied at the LHC energy within the framework of a multiphase transport model (AMPT) in this work. With the variation of the fragmentation parameters, collision centrality and system energy, we find that the initial conditions of parton dynamics are more important than the final state parton cascade process for the existence of NCQ scaling when the hadronic interaction is off in Pb-Pb collisions. By turning on the hadron interaction process, the impacts of hadronic evolution are found to be responsible for a significant violation to the well established scaling structure. Our study suggests that the interpretation of NCQ scaling is not only subject to the hadronization mechanism but also to the initial conditions of parton evolution as well as the hadronic interactions especially for the LHC experiments. (orig.)

  19. Local transport measurements at mesoscopic length scales using scanning tunneling potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weigang; Munakata, Ko; Rozler, Michael; Beasley, Malcolm R

    2013-06-07

    Under mesoscopic conditions, the transport potential on a thin film carrying a current is theoretically expected to bear spatial variation due to quantum interference. Scanning tunneling potentiometry is the ideal tool to investigate such variation, by virtue of its high spatial resolution. We report in this Letter the first detailed measurement of transport potential under mesoscopic conditions. Epitaxial graphene at a temperature of 17 K was chosen as the initial system for study because the characteristic transport length scales in this material are relatively large. Tip jumping artifacts are a major possible contribution to systematic errors; and we mitigate such problems by using custom-made slender and sharp tips manufactured by focused ion beam. In our data, we observe residual resistivity dipoles associated with topographical defects, and local peaks and dips in the potential that are not associated with topographical defects.

  20. Cross-Scale Energy Transport and Kinetic Wave Properties Associated with Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Thomas W.

    In the Earth's magnetosphere, the magnetotail plasma sheet ions are much hotter than in the shocked solar wind. On the dawn-sector, the cold-component ions are more abundant and hotter by 30-40 percent when compared to the dusk sector. Recent statistical studies of the flank magnetopause and magnetosheath have shown that the level of temperature asymmetry of the magnetosheath is unable to account for this (Dimmock et al., 2015), so additional physical mechanisms must be at play, either at the magnetopause or plasma sheet, that contribute to this asymmetry. This thesis focuses on ion heating across the magnetopause boundary separating the magnetosheath and the magnetospheric plasmas, which is driven by mechanisms operating on fluid, ion and electron scales. One of the pending problems in collisionless astrophysical plasmas is to understand the plasma heating and transport across three fundamental scales: fluid, ion and electron. Presented here is evidence of the energy transport between the fluid and ion scales: energy is provided by a velocity shear at the magnetopause generating fluid-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability and their rolled-up vortices, where an ion-scale fast magnetosonic wave packet located in the center of a Kelvin-Helmholtz vortex has sufficient energy to account for observed cold-component ion heating. In addition, a statistical analysis is performed on the ion-scale wave properties in the three main plasma regimes common to flank magnetopause boundary crossings when the boundary is unstable to KHI: hot and tenuous magnetospheric, cold and dense magnetosheath and mixed (H. Hasegawa, Fujimoto, Phan, et al., 2004). The statistical analysis shows that during KH events there is enhanced non-adiabatic heating calculated during ion scale wave intervals when compared to non-KH events. This suggests that during KH events there is more free energy for ion-scale wave generation, which in turn can heat ions more effectively when compared to cases when KH

  1. An Efficient approach for selective collection made by scavengers for transportation logistics of recyclable materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adelino Carlos Maccarini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The advance of technology, associated to the increase in the production of recyclable waste due to the increase of consumption and population, has been led to a search for alternatives of management and minimization of this waste. A part of this recyclable material is collected by scavengers, who do it to guarantee their livelihood. Many of them face logistical difficulties in transportation, mainly when they have to walk long distances and the streets have high slopes. Therefore, to minimize these efforts, the purpose of this paper is to settle mobile warehouses to receive recyclable items, with trucks that receive in bulk all materials collected by the collectors, who will deliver them to someone who will be in the truck for weighing and subsequent payment to the collector. With the help of the Analysis of Variance – ANOVA, studies were made so that this receipt is a quick operation, with the historical record of each sampling in a spreadsheet and value calculations based on this description, thus minimizing errors in weighing in bulk and improving, in every collection, the system reliability.

  2. Field-scale water flow and solute transport : SWAP model concepts, parameter estimation and case studies = [Waterstroming en transport van opgeloste stoffen op veldschaal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, van J.C.

    2000-01-01

    Water flow and solute transport in top soils are important elements in many environmental studies. The agro- and ecohydrological model SWAP (Soil-Water-Plant-Atmosphere) has been developed to simulate simultaneously water flow, solute transport, heat flow and crop growth at field scale

  3. Regional-scale lateral carbon transport and CO2 evasion in temperate stream catchments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Magin

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Inland waters play an important role in regional to global-scale carbon cycling by transporting, processing and emitting substantial amounts of carbon, which originate mainly from their catchments. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between terrestrial net primary production (NPP and the rate at which carbon is exported from the catchments in a temperate stream network. The analysis included more than 200 catchment areas in southwest Germany, ranging in size from 0.8 to 889 km2 for which CO2 evasion from stream surfaces and downstream transport with stream discharge were estimated from water quality monitoring data, while NPP in the catchments was obtained from a global data set based on remote sensing. We found that on average 13.9 g C m−2 yr−1 (corresponding to 2.7 % of terrestrial NPP are exported from the catchments by streams and rivers, in which both CO2 evasion and downstream transport contributed about equally to this flux. The average carbon fluxes in the catchments of the study area resembled global and large-scale zonal mean values in many respects, including NPP, stream evasion and the carbon export per catchment area in the fluvial network. A review of existing studies on aquatic–terrestrial coupling in the carbon cycle suggests that the carbon export per catchment area varies in a relatively narrow range, despite a broad range of different spatial scales and hydrological characteristics of the study regions.

  4. Regional-scale lateral carbon transport and CO2 evasion in temperate stream catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magin, Katrin; Somlai-Haase, Celia; Schäfer, Ralf B.; Lorke, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    Inland waters play an important role in regional to global-scale carbon cycling by transporting, processing and emitting substantial amounts of carbon, which originate mainly from their catchments. In this study, we analyzed the relationship between terrestrial net primary production (NPP) and the rate at which carbon is exported from the catchments in a temperate stream network. The analysis included more than 200 catchment areas in southwest Germany, ranging in size from 0.8 to 889 km2 for which CO2 evasion from stream surfaces and downstream transport with stream discharge were estimated from water quality monitoring data, while NPP in the catchments was obtained from a global data set based on remote sensing. We found that on average 13.9 g C m-2 yr-1 (corresponding to 2.7 % of terrestrial NPP) are exported from the catchments by streams and rivers, in which both CO2 evasion and downstream transport contributed about equally to this flux. The average carbon fluxes in the catchments of the study area resembled global and large-scale zonal mean values in many respects, including NPP, stream evasion and the carbon export per catchment area in the fluvial network. A review of existing studies on aquatic-terrestrial coupling in the carbon cycle suggests that the carbon export per catchment area varies in a relatively narrow range, despite a broad range of different spatial scales and hydrological characteristics of the study regions.

  5. Weak synchronization and large-scale collective oscillation in dense bacterial suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yilin

    Collective oscillatory behavior is ubiquitous in nature and it plays a vital role in many biological processes. Collective oscillations in biological multicellular systems often arise from coupling mediated by diffusive chemicals, by electrochemical mechanisms, or by biomechanical interaction between cells and their physical environment. In these examples, the phase of some oscillatory intracellular degree of freedom is synchronized. Here, in contrast, we discovered a unique 'weak synchronization' mechanism that does not require long-range coupling, nor even inherent oscillation of individual cells: We found that millions of motile cells in dense bacterial suspensions can self-organize into highly robust collective oscillatory motion, while individuals move in an erratic manner. Over large spatial scales we found that the phase of the oscillations is in fact organized into a centimeter scale traveling wave. We present a model of noisy self-propelled particles with strictly local interactions that accounts faithfully for our observations. These findings expand our knowledge of biological self-organization and reveal a new type of long-range order in active matter systems. The mechanism of collective oscillation uncovered here may inspire new strategies to control the self-organization of active matter and swarming robots. This work is supported by funding from CUHK Direct research Grants (4053019, 4053079, 4053130), the Research Grants Council of HKSAR (RGC Ref. No. CUHK 409713), and from the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC 21473152).

  6. Simulating Multi-Scale Mercury Fate and Transport in a Coastal Plain Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knightes, C. D.; Davis, G. M.; Golden, H. E.; Conrads, P. A.; Bradley, P. M.; Journey, C. A.

    2012-12-01

    Mercury is the toxicant responsible for the largest number of fish advisories across the United States, with 1.1 million river miles under advisory. The processes governing fate, transport, and transformation of mercury in streams and rivers are not well understood, in large part, because these systems are intimately linked with their surrounding watersheds and are often highly spatially variable. In this study, we applied a linked watershed hydrology and biogeochemical cycling (N, C, and Hg) model (VELMA, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessment) to simulate daily flow, fluxes, and soil and stream concentrations of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) at multiple spatial scales in McTier Creek, a Coastal Plain watershed within the Edisto River basin of South Carolina, USA. Our goals were to (1) calibrate and simulate Hg fate and transport processes at a focused reach scale (0.1 km2) and (2) assess how representative the reach-scale parameters and processes are when multi-scale watershed information is included in Hg cycling simulations. Thus, reach-scale parameterization was applied to multi-scaled watersheds, including two headwater sub-watersheds (28 km2 and 25 km2) nested within the McTier Creek watershed (79 km2), to evaluate model performance and how well reach-scale parameterization and processes characterize nested watersheds with increasing drainage areas. The current VELMA simulations suggest that stream water column THg concentration predictions perform reasonably well at different scales based on reach-scale calibrations, but the model simulations of MeHg reach, sub-watershed, and watershed stream concentrations are out-of-phase with observed MeHg concentrations. This result suggests that processes governing MeHg loading to the main channel may be under-represented in the current model structure and underscores the complexity of simulating MeHg dynamics in watershed models. This work supports the importance of hydrology in

  7. Basin-scale wind transport during the MILAGRO field campaign and comparison to climatology using cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. de Foy

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The MILAGRO field campaign was a multi-agency international collaborative project to evaluate the regional impacts of the Mexico City air pollution plume as a means of understanding urban impacts on the global climate. Mexico City lies on an elevated plateau with mountains on three sides and has complex mountain and surface-driven wind flows. This paper asks what the wind transport was in the basin during the field campaign and how representative it was of the climatology. Surface meteorology and air quality data, radiosondes and radar wind profiler data were collected at sites in the basin and its vicinity. Cluster analysis was used to identify the dominant wind patterns both during the campaign and within the past 10 years of operational data from the warm dry season. Our analysis shows that March 2006 was representative of typical flow patterns experienced in the basin. Six episode types were identified for the basin-scale circulation providing a way of interpreting atmospheric chemistry and particulate data collected during the campaign. Decoupling between surface winds and those aloft had a strong influence in leading to convection and poor air quality episodes. Hourly characterisation of wind circulation during the MILAGRO, MCMA-2003 and IMADA field campaigns enables the comparisons of similar air pollution episodes and the evaluation of the impact of wind transport on measurements of the atmospheric chemistry taking place in the basin.

  8. Benchmark Study of 3D Pore-scale Flow and Solute Transport Simulation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibe, T. D.; Yang, X.; Mehmani, Y.; Perkins, W. A.; Pasquali, A.; Schoenherr, M.; Kim, K.; Perego, M.; Parks, M. L.; Trask, N.; Balhoff, M.; Richmond, M. C.; Geier, M.; Krafczyk, M.; Luo, L. S.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Multiple numerical approaches have been developed to simulate porous media fluid flow and solute transport at the pore scale. These include 1) methods that explicitly model the three-dimensional geometry of pore spaces and 2) methods that conceptualize the pore space as a topologically consistent set of stylized pore bodies and pore throats. In previous work we validated a model of the first type, using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes employing standard finite volume method (FVM), against magnetic resonance velocimetry (MRV) measurements of pore-scale velocities. Here we expand that benchmark study to include additional models of the first type based on the immersed-boundary method (IMB), lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), and smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), as well as a model of the second type, a pore-network model (PNM). While the PNM approach is computationally much less demanding than direct numerical simulation methods, the effect of conceptualizing complex three-dimensional pore geometries in the manner of PNMs has not been fully determined. We apply all five approaches (FVM-based CFD, IMB, LBM, SPH and PNM) to simulate pore-scale velocity distributions and nonreactive solute transport, and intercompare the model results. Comparisons are drawn both in terms of macroscopic variables (e.g., permeability, solute breakthrough curves) and microscopic variables (e.g., local velocities and concentrations). Generally good agreement was achieved among the various approaches, but some differences were observed depending on the model context. The benchmark study was challenging because of variable capabilities of the codes, and inspired some code enhancements to allow consistent comparison of flow and transport simulations across the full suite of methods. This study provides support for confidence in a variety of pore-scale modeling methods, and motivates further development and application of pore-scale simulation methods.

  9. Designing Alternative Transport Methods for the Distributed Data Collection of ATLAS EventIndex Project

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez Casani, Alvaro; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    One of the key and challenging tasks of the ATLAS EventIndex project is to index and catalog all the produced events not only at CERN but also at hundreds of worldwide grid sites, and convey the data in real time to a central Hadoop instance at CERN. While this distributed data collection is currently operating correctly in production, there are some issues that might impose performance bottlenecks in the future, with an expected rise in the event production and reprocessing rates. In this work, we first describe the current approach based on a messaging system, which conveys the data from the sources to the central catalog, and we identify some weaknesses of this system. Then, we study a promising alternative transport method based on an object store, presenting a performance comparison with the current approach, and the architectural design changes needed to adapt the system to the next run of the ATLAS experiment at CERN.

  10. Final report of the TRUE Block Scale project. 4. Synthesis of flow, transport and retention in the block scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winberg, Anders [Conterra AB (Sweden); Andersson, Peter; Byegaard, Johan [Geosigma AB (Sweden)] [and others

    2003-03-01

    The TRUE Block Scale project was performed at the Aespoe Hard Rock laboratory as an international partnership funded by ANDRA, ENRESA, JNC, Nirex, Posiva and SKB. The project, initiated mid 1996, was divided in a series of defined stages; Scoping Stage, Preliminary Characterisation Stage, Detailed Characterisation Stage, Tracer Test Stage and the Evaluation and Reporting Stage. The specific objectives were to: 1) increase understanding of tracer transport in a fracture network and improve predictive capabilities, 2) assess the importance of tracer retention mechanisms (diffusion and sorption) in a fracture network, and 3) assess the link between flow and transport data as a means for predicting transport phenomena. Characterisation in included drilling, core logging, borehole imaging, borehole radar, 3D seismic surveys, hydraulic tests (flow logging, single hole tests, cross-hole interference tests), tracer dilution tests, hydrogeochemical analyses of groundwater samples and various types of mineralogical, geochemical and petrophysical measurements on drill core samples. Drilling and characterisation of each new borehole was followed by analysis and decision with regards to need and geometry of a subsequent borehole. The main set of tools for determining the conductive geometry and the hydro-structural model was a combination of borehole television (BIPS), high resolution flow logging and pressure responses from drilling and cross-hole interference tests. The constructed hydro-structural model was made up of a set of deterministic sub-vertical structures mainly oriented northwest. Hydraulic features not part of the deterministic set were included in a stochastic background fracture population. Material properties and boundary conditions were also assigned to the developed model. Characteristics and properties measured in the laboratory were integrated in generalised microstructural models. Hypotheses formulated in relation to defined basic questions were addressed

  11. Stochastic representation of the Reynolds transport theorem: revisiting large-scale modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Harouna, S Kadri

    2016-01-01

    We explore the potential of a formulation of the Navier-Stokes equations incorporating a random description of the small-scale velocity component. This model, established from a version of the Reynolds transport theorem adapted to a stochastic representation of the flow, gives rise to a large-scale description of the flow dynamics in which emerges an anisotropic subgrid tensor, reminiscent to the Reynolds stress tensor, together with a drift correction due to an inhomogeneous turbulence. The corresponding subgrid model, which depends on the small scales velocity variance, generalizes the Boussinesq eddy viscosity assumption. However, it is not anymore obtained from an analogy with molecular dissipation but ensues rigorously from the random modeling of the flow. This principle allows us to propose several subgrid models defined directly on the resolved flow component. We assess and compare numerically those models on a standard Green-Taylor vortex flow at Reynolds 1600. The numerical simulations, carried out w...

  12. THE IMPORTANCE OF LIMIT SOLUTIONS & TEMPORAL AND SPATIAL SCALES IN THE TEACHING OF TRANSPORT PHENOMENA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SÁVIO LEANDRO BERTOLI

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In the engineering courses the field of Transport Phenomena is of significant importance and it is in several disciplines relating to Fluid Mechanics, Heat and Mass Transfer. In these disciplines, problems involving these phenomena are mathematically formulated and analytical solutions are obtained whenever possible. The aim of this paper is to emphasize the possibility of extending aspects of the teaching-learning in this area by a method based on time scales and limit solutions. Thus, aspects relative to the phenomenology naturally arise during the definition of the scales and / or by determining the limit solutions. Aspects concerning the phenomenology of the limit problems are easily incorporated into the proposed development, which contributes significantly to the understanding of physics inherent in the mathematical modeling of each limiting case studied. Finally the study aims to disseminate the use of the limit solutions and of the time scales in the general fields of engineering.

  13. Core-scale solute transport model selection using Monte Carlo analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Malama, Bwalya; James, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Model applicability to core-scale solute transport is evaluated using breakthrough data from column experiments conducted with conservative tracers tritium (H-3) and sodium-22, and the retarding solute uranium-232. The three models considered are single-porosity, double-porosity with single-rate mobile-immobile mass-exchange, and the multirate model, which is a deterministic model that admits the statistics of a random mobile-immobile mass-exchange rate coefficient. The experiments were conducted on intact Culebra Dolomite core samples. Previously, data were analyzed using single- and double-porosity models although the Culebra Dolomite is known to possess multiple types and scales of porosity, and to exhibit multirate mobile-immobile-domain mass transfer characteristics at field scale. The data are reanalyzed here and null-space Monte Carlo analysis is used to facilitate objective model selection. Prediction (or residual) bias is adopted as a measure of the model structural error. The analysis clearly shows ...

  14. Airframe noise measurements on a small-scale model of a supersonic transport concept in an anechoic flow facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preisser, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    Airframe noise has been measured on a .015 scale model of an advanced supersonic transport concept (AST-100) in an anechoic flow facility. The model was equipped with leading- and trailing-edge flaps, nose and main landing gears, and engine nacelles. Each of these components was deployed, individually and collectively, to determine their contribution to the noise field. Results are presented which show that in the clean configuration the aircraft displays a symmetric dipole directivity, whereas in the more complex landing-approach configuration the directivity peaks in the forward quadrant. It was found that the landing-approach noise was due chiefly to the landing gear, the trailing edge flaps, and the aeroacoustic interaction between the two

  15. Scaling up Ecological Measurements of Coral Reefs Using Semi-Automated Field Image Collection and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel González-Rivero

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecological measurements in marine settings are often constrained in space and time, with spatial heterogeneity obscuring broader generalisations. While advances in remote sensing, integrative modelling and meta-analysis enable generalisations from field observations, there is an underlying need for high-resolution, standardised and geo-referenced field data. Here, we evaluate a new approach aimed at optimising data collection and analysis to assess broad-scale patterns of coral reef community composition using automatically annotated underwater imagery, captured along 2 km transects. We validate this approach by investigating its ability to detect spatial (e.g., across regions and temporal (e.g., over years change, and by comparing automated annotation errors to those of multiple human annotators. Our results indicate that change of coral reef benthos can be captured at high resolution both spatially and temporally, with an average error below 5%, among key benthic groups. Cover estimation errors using automated annotation varied between 2% and 12%, slightly larger than human errors (which varied between 1% and 7%, but small enough to detect significant changes among dominant groups. Overall, this approach allows a rapid collection of in-situ observations at larger spatial scales (km than previously possible, and provides a pathway to link, calibrate, and validate broader analyses across even larger spatial scales (10–10,000 km2.

  16. Cost Factors in Scaling in SfM Collections and Processing Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    In this talk I will discuss the economics of scaling Structure from Motion (SfM)-style collections from 1 km2 and below to 100's and 1000's of square kilometers. Considerations include the costs of the technical equipment: comparisons of small, medium, and large-format camera systems, as well as various GPS-INS systems and their impact on processing accuracy for various Ground Sampling Distances. Tradeoffs between camera formats and flight time are central. Weather conditions and planning high altitude versus low altitude flights are another economic factor, particularly in areas of persistently bad weather and in areas where ground logistics (i.e. hotel rooms and pilot incidentals) are expensive. Unique costs associated with UAS collections and experimental payloads will be discussed. Finally, the costs of equipment and labor differs in SfM processing than in conventional orthomosaic and LiDAR processing. There are opportunities for 'economies of scale' in SfM collections under certain circumstances but whether the accuracy specifications are firm/fixed or 'best effort' makes a difference.

  17. Scaling and transport analysis of divertor conditions on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaBombard, B.; Goetz, J.; Kurz, C.; Jablonski, D.; Lipschultz, B.; McCracken, G.; Niemczewski, A.; Boivin, R.L.; Bombarda, F.; Christensen, C.; Fairfax, S.; Fiore, C.; Garnier, D.; Graf, M.; Golovato, S.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Horne, S.; Hubbard, A.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.; Kesner, J.; Luke, T.; Marmar, E.; May, M.; O`Shea, P.; Porkolab, M.; Reardon, J.; Rice, J.; Schachter, J.; Snipes, J.; Stek, P.; Takase, Y.; Terry, J.; Tinios, G.; Watterson, R.; Welch, B.; Wolfe, S. [Plasma Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Detailed measurements and transport analysis of divertor conditions in Alcator C-Mod [Phys. Plasmas {bold 1}, 1511 (1994)] are presented for a range of line-averaged densities, 0.7{lt}{ital {bar n}}{sub {ital e}}{lt}2.2{times}10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}. Three parallel heat transport regimes are evident in the scrape-off layer: sheath-limited conduction, high-recycling divertor, and detached divertor, which can coexist in the same discharge. {ital Local} cross-field pressure gradients are found to scale simply with a {ital local} electron temperature. This scaling is consistent with classical electron parallel conduction being balanced by anomalous cross-field transport ({chi}{sub {perpendicular}}{similar_to}0.2 m{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1}) proportional to the local pressure gradient. A 60%--80% of divertor power is radiated in attached discharges, approaching 100% in detached discharges. Detachment occurs when the heat flux to the plate is low and the plasma pressure is high ({ital T}{sub {ital e}}{similar_to}5 eV). High neutral pressures in the divertor are nearly always present (1--20 mTorr), sufficient to remove parallel momentum via ion--neutral collisions.

  18. Meso-Scale Stochastic Model for Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, A. M.; Tartakovsky, D. M.; Meakin, P.

    2008-12-01

    In a homogeneous porous medium, dispersive mixing is the result of a combination of molecular diffusion (diffusive mixing) and spreading due to variations in the fluid velocity (advective mixing). In traditional Darcy(continuum)-scale models this combination is treated as a Fickian diffusion process with a macro-scale effective diffusion coefficient (the dispersion coefficient). However, dispersive mixing is very different from purely diffusive mixing and there is ample evidence that the advection-dispersion equations significantly over-predict the extent of reactions in mixing induced chemical transformations. We have developed a new meso-scale stochastic Lagrangian particle model that treats advective mixing and diffusive mixing separately. We assume that fluid flow in homogeneous porous media is governed by a stochastic Langevin equation that is obtained by adding white noise fluctuations to the momentum conservation equation. The noise represents the random interactions between the fluid and the disordered porous medium, which forces fluid flow paths to deviate from the smooth flow paths predicted by the Darcy scale continuum flow equations. The molecular diffusion of solutes carried by the fluid is governed by the classical advection-diffusion equation, which becomes stochastic due to random advection. The stochastic meso-scale model and deterministic advection-dispersion theory were used to simulate the reactive mixing of two solutions injected in parallel into a flow domain. IN the stochastic model, the transport equations were numerically solved using smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH), a Lagrangian particle method that has been previously applied to both deterministic and stochastic transport problems. Comparison of the two solutions revealed that the Langevin model gives better estimates of concentrations than the Darcy scale advection-dispersion model, and that the Darcy scale model significantly overestimates the amount of product in mixing induced

  19. Rhythms of the collective brain: Metastable synchronization and cross-scale interactions in connected multitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilera, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Collective social events operate at many levels of organization -- from individuals to crowds -- presenting a variety of temporal and spatial scales of activity, whose causal interactions challenge our understanding of social systems. Large data sets of social media activity provide an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the processes that govern the coordination within and between those scales. Using as a case study a data set comprising 1.5 million Twitter messages of the activity around the 15M movement in Spain as an example of multitudinous self-organization, we propose a generic description of the coordination dynamics of the system based on phase-locking statistics at different frequencies using wavelet functions, identifying 8 frequency bands of entrained oscillations between 15 geographical urban nodes. We apply maximum entropy inference methods to extract Ising models capturing phase-locking activity between geographical nodes in our data at each frequency band. Inspecting the properties of the...

  20. Large-scale analysis of membrane transport in yeast using invertase reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Lauren; Davey, Michael; Conibear, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Transport of membrane proteins between cellular organelles requires the concerted action of many regulatory factors, which aid in cargo recognition and vesicle formation, targeting, and fusion. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a useful model system for studying such regulators, due to the availability of genome-wide mutant collections and reporter proteins that provide sensitive biochemical readouts of individual transport pathways. Here, we describe an enzymatic invertase assay for evaluating endocytic recycling using a chimeric GFP-Snc1-Suc2 reporter. Cell surface levels of this reporter can be measured by a colorimetric assay that monitors sucrose hydrolysis at the plasma membrane, using two different methods. The first is a semiquantitative agar overlay assay followed by image densitometry that is suitable for high-throughput screening of arrayed yeast colonies. In the second, more quantitative assay, an enzymatic solution is added to yeast cultures in a multi-well plate and the absorbance is assessed by a plate reader. Furthermore, the modular nature of the chimeric reporter allows alternate transport signals to be introduced, thereby expanding the range of transport pathways that can be evaluated by this method. Together these techniques can be used to explore the function of genes involved in a variety of cellular trafficking pathways.

  1. A Two-Stage Approach for Medical Supplies Intermodal Transportation in Large-Scale Disaster Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Junhu; Wang, Xuping; Shi, Yan

    2014-01-01

    We present a two-stage approach for the “helicopters and vehicles” intermodal transportation of medical supplies in large-scale disaster responses. In the first stage, a fuzzy-based method and its heuristic algorithm are developed to select the locations of temporary distribution centers (TDCs) and assign medial aid points (MAPs) to each TDC. In the second stage, an integer-programming model is developed to determine the delivery routes. Numerical experiments verified the effectiveness of the approach, and observed several findings: (i) More TDCs often increase the efficiency and utility of medical supplies; (ii) It is not definitely true that vehicles should load more and more medical supplies in emergency responses; (iii) The more contrasting the traveling speeds of helicopters and vehicles are, the more advantageous the intermodal transportation is. PMID:25350005

  2. A Two-Stage Approach for Medical Supplies Intermodal Transportation in Large-Scale Disaster Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhu Ruan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a two-stage approach for the “helicopters and vehicles” intermodal transportation of medical supplies in large-scale disaster responses. In the first stage, a fuzzy-based method and its heuristic algorithm are developed to select the locations of temporary distribution centers (TDCs and assign medial aid points (MAPs to each TDC. In the second stage, an integer-programming model is developed to determine the delivery routes. Numerical experiments verified the effectiveness of the approach, and observed several findings: (i More TDCs often increase the efficiency and utility of medical supplies; (ii It is not definitely true that vehicles should load more and more medical supplies in emergency responses; (iii The more contrasting the traveling speeds of helicopters and vehicles are, the more advantageous the intermodal transportation is.

  3. Pore-scale analysis on the effects of compound-specific dilution on transient transport and solute breakthrough

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo; Kitanidis, Peter

    breakthrough curves. Such dilution breakthrough curves allow capturing the compound-specific mixing of the different solutes and provide useful insights on the interplay between advective and diffusive processes, mass transfer limitations, and incomplete mixing in the heterogeneous pore-scale domains......Compound-specific diffusivities significantly impact solute transport and mixing at different scales. Although diffusive processes occur at the small pore scale, their effects propagate and remain important at larger macroscopic scales [1]. In this pore-scale modeling study in saturated porous...... media we show that compound-specific effects are important not only at steady-state and for the lateral displacement of solutes with different diffusivities but also for transient transport and solute breakthrough [2]. We performed flow and transport simulations in two-dimensional pore-scale domains...

  4. Multi-Scale Microstructural Thermoelectric Materials: Transport Behavior, Non-Equilibrium Preparation, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xianli; Wei, Ping; Li, Han; Liu, Wei; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Peng; Su, Chuqi; Xie, Changjun; Zhao, Wenyu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Tang, Xinfeng; Uher, Ctirad

    2017-05-01

    Considering only about one third of the world's energy consumption is effectively utilized for functional uses, and the remaining is dissipated as waste heat, thermoelectric (TE) materials, which offer a direct and clean thermal-to-electric conversion pathway, have generated a tremendous worldwide interest. The last two decades have witnessed a remarkable development in TE materials. This Review summarizes the efforts devoted to the study of non-equilibrium synthesis of TE materials with multi-scale structures, their transport behavior, and areas of applications. Studies that work towards the ultimate goal of developing highly efficient TE materials possessing multi-scale architectures are highlighted, encompassing the optimization of TE performance via engineering the structures with different dimensional aspects spanning from the atomic and molecular scales, to nanometer sizes, and to the mesoscale. In consideration of the practical applications of high-performance TE materials, the non-equilibrium approaches offer a fast and controllable fabrication of multi-scale microstructures, and their scale up to industrial-size manufacturing is emphasized here. Finally, the design of two integrated power generating TE systems are described-a solar thermoelectric-photovoltaic hybrid system and a vehicle waste heat harvesting system-that represent perhaps the most important applications of thermoelectricity in the energy conversion area. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Biomass Energy for Transport and Electricity: Large scale utilization under low CO2 concentration scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luckow, Patrick; Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

    2010-01-25

    This paper examines the potential role of large scale, dedicated commercial biomass energy systems under global climate policies designed to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of CO2 at 400ppm and 450ppm. We use an integrated assessment model of energy and agriculture systems to show that, given a climate policy in which terrestrial carbon is appropriately valued equally with carbon emitted from the energy system, biomass energy has the potential to be a major component of achieving these low concentration targets. The costs of processing and transporting biomass energy at much larger scales than current experience are also incorporated into the modeling. From the scenario results, 120-160 EJ/year of biomass energy is produced by midcentury and 200-250 EJ/year by the end of this century. In the first half of the century, much of this biomass is from agricultural and forest residues, but after 2050 dedicated cellulosic biomass crops become the dominant source. A key finding of this paper is the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) technologies coupled with commercial biomass energy can play in meeting stringent emissions targets. Despite the higher technology costs of CCS, the resulting negative emissions used in combination with biomass are a very important tool in controlling the cost of meeting a target, offsetting the venting of CO2 from sectors of the energy system that may be more expensive to mitigate, such as oil use in transportation. The paper also discusses the role of cellulosic ethanol and Fischer-Tropsch biomass derived transportation fuels and shows that both technologies are important contributors to liquid fuels production, with unique costs and emissions characteristics. Through application of the GCAM integrated assessment model, it becomes clear that, given CCS availability, bioenergy will be used both in electricity and transportation.

  6. Crash response data system for the controlled impact demonstration (CID) of a full scale transport aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calloway, Raymond S.; Knight, Vernie H., Jr.

    NASA Langley's Crash Response Data System (CRDS) which is designed to acquire aircraft structural and anthropomorphic dummy responses during the full-scale transport CID test is described. Included in the discussion are the system design approach, details on key instrumentation subsystems and operations, overall instrumentation crash performance, and data recovery results. Two autonomous high-environment digital flight instrumentation systems, DAS 1 and DAS 2, were employed to obtain research data from various strain gage, accelerometer, and tensiometric sensors installed in the B-720 test aircraft. The CRDS successfully acquired 343 out of 352 measurements of dynamic crash data.

  7. Stochastic Modeling Of Field-Scale Water And Solute Transport Through The Unsaturated Zone Of Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loll, Per

    were previously thought not to pose a leaching threat. Thus, a reevaluation of our understanding of the mechanisms governing chemical fate in the unsaturated zone of soils has been necessary, in order for us to make better decisions regarding widely different issues such as agricultural management...... of pesticides and nutrients, and risk identification and assessment at polluted (industrial) sites. One of the key factors requiring our attention when we are trying to predict field-scale chemical leaching is spatial variability of the soil and the influence it exerts on both water and chemical transport...

  8. Modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, B.S.

    2000-02-01

    This paper describes the modular, object-oriented redesign of a large-scale Monte Carlo neutron transport program. This effort represents a complete 'white sheet of paper' rewrite of the code. In this paper, the motivation driving this project, the design objectives for the new version of the program, and the design choices and their consequences will be discussed. The design itself will also be described, including the important subsystems as well as the key classes within those subsystems.

  9. Non-Fickian dispersive transport of strontium in laboratory-scale columns: Modelling and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongxu; Jivkov, Andrey P.; Wang, Lichun; Si, Gaohua; Yu, Jing

    2017-06-01

    In the context of environmental remediation of contaminated sites and safety assessment of nuclear waste disposal in the near-surface zone, we investigate the leaching and non-Fickian dispersive migration with sorption of strontium (mocking strontium-90) through columns packed with sand and clay. Analysis is based on breakthrough curves (BTCs) from column experiments, which simulated rainfall infiltration and source term release scenario, rather than applying constant tracer solution at the inlet as commonly used. BTCs are re-evaluated and transport parameters are estimated by inverse modelling using two approaches: (1) equilibrium advection-dispersion equation (ADE); and (2) continuous time random walk (CTRW). Firstly, based on a method for calculating leach concentration, the inlet condition with an exponential decay input is identified. Secondly, the results show that approximately 39%-58% of Br- and 16%-49% of Sr2+ are eluted from the columns at the end of the breakthrough experiments. This suggests that trapping mechanisms, including diffusion into immobile zones and attachment of tracer on mineral surfaces, are more pronounced for Sr2+ than for Br-. Thirdly, we demonstrate robustness of CTRW-based truncated power-law (TPL) model in capturing non-Fickian reactive transport with 0 2. The non-Fickian dispersion observed experimentally is explained by variations of local flow field from preferential flow paths due to physical heterogeneities. Particularly, the additional sorption process of strontium on clay minerals contributes to the delay of the peak concentration and the tailing features, which leads to an enhanced non-Fickian transport for strontium. Finally, the ADE and CTRW approaches to environmental modelling are evaluated. It is shown that CTRW with a sorption term can describe non-Fickian dispersive transport of strontium at laboratory scale by identifying appropriate parameters, while the traditional ADE with a retardation factor fails to reproduce

  10. Basin-scale transport of hydrothermal dissolved metals across the South Pacific Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resing, Joseph A; Sedwick, Peter N; German, Christopher R; Jenkins, William J; Moffett, James W; Sohst, Bettina M; Tagliabue, Alessandro

    2015-07-09

    Hydrothermal venting along mid-ocean ridges exerts an important control on the chemical composition of sea water by serving as a major source or sink for a number of trace elements in the ocean. Of these, iron has received considerable attention because of its role as an essential and often limiting nutrient for primary production in regions of the ocean that are of critical importance for the global carbon cycle. It has been thought that most of the dissolved iron discharged by hydrothermal vents is lost from solution close to ridge-axis sources and is thus of limited importance for ocean biogeochemistry. This long-standing view is challenged by recent studies which suggest that stabilization of hydrothermal dissolved iron may facilitate its long-range oceanic transport. Such transport has been subsequently inferred from spatially limited oceanographic observations. Here we report data from the US GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect (EPZT) that demonstrate lateral transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron, manganese, and aluminium from the southern East Pacific Rise (SEPR) several thousand kilometres westward across the South Pacific Ocean. Dissolved iron exhibits nearly conservative (that is, no loss from solution during transport and mixing) behaviour in this hydrothermal plume, implying a greater longevity in the deep ocean than previously assumed. Based on our observations, we estimate a global hydrothermal dissolved iron input of three to four gigamoles per year to the ocean interior, which is more than fourfold higher than previous estimates. Complementary simulations with a global-scale ocean biogeochemical model suggest that the observed transport of hydrothermal dissolved iron requires some means of physicochemical stabilization and indicate that hydrothermally derived iron sustains a large fraction of Southern Ocean export production.

  11. Development of a remote sensing network for time-sensitive detection of fine scale damage to transportation infrastructure : [final report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-23

    This research project aimed to develop a remote sensing system capable of rapidly identifying fine-scale damage to critical transportation infrastructure following hazard events. Such a system must be pre-planned for rapid deployment, automate proces...

  12. Methodologies for automating the collection and processing of GPS-GIS information for transportation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bingyan

    All transportation departments have large amounts of data and information that are needed for planning and operation of their systems. This information can be textual, graphical or spatial in nature. Spatial information is generally in the form of maps and these maps are increasingly being stored and processed as digital GIS files that can be linked to other types of information generally referred to as attribute information. In the NYSDOT database, there are many kinds of features for which information must be maintained. For example, there are about 22,500 bridges within the New York State road systems. The current spatial location for these bridges may not have the level of accuracy that would be desired by today's standards and that can be achieved with new spatial measuring techniques. Although the updating of bridge locations and the location of other features can be done using new techniques such as GPS, if this is done manually it presents a forbidding task. The main objective of this study is to find a way to automatically collect feature location data using GPS equipment and to automate the transfer of this information into archival databases. Among the objectives of this dissertation are: how to automatically download information from the DOT database; how to collect field data following a uniform procedure; how to convert the surveying results into Arc/View shape files and how to update the DOT feature location map information using field data. The end goal is to develop feasible methodologies to automate updating of mapping information using GPS by creating a systems design for the process and to create the scripts and programming needed to make this system work. This has been accomplished and is demonstrated in a sample program. Details of the Automated Acquisition System are described in this dissertation.

  13. Modeling watershed-scale solute transport using an integrated, process-based hydrologic model with applications to bacterial fate and transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Jie; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2015-10-01

    Distributed hydrologic models that simulate fate and transport processes at sub-daily timescales are useful tools for estimating pollutant loads exported from watersheds to lakes and oceans downstream. There has been considerable interest in the application of integrated process-based hydrologic models in recent years. While the models have been applied to address questions of water quantity and to better understand linkages between hydrology and land surface processes, routine applications of these models to address water quality issues are currently limited. In this paper, we first describe a general process-based watershed-scale solute transport modeling framework, based on an operator splitting strategy and a Lagrangian particle transport method combined with dispersion and reactions. The transport and the hydrologic modules are tightly coupled and the interactions among different hydrologic components are explicitly modeled. We test transport modules using data from plot-scale experiments and available analytical solutions for different hydrologic domains. The numerical solutions are also compared with an analytical solution for groundwater transit times with interactions between surface and subsurface flows. Finally, we demonstrate the application of the model to simulate bacterial fate and transport in the Red Cedar River watershed in Michigan and test hypotheses about sources and transport pathways. The watershed bacterial fate and transport model is expected to be useful for making near real-time predictions at marine and freshwater beaches.

  14. Proposal for the award of a contract for the collection and transport of waste and the treatment of standard waste

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the collection of waste from the CERN site and its transport and treatment of the standard waste. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with SAUVIN SCHMIDT (CH), the lowest bidder, for the collection and transport of waste and the treatment of standard waste for a period of three years for a maximum estimated amount of 2 220 000 Swiss francs, not subject to revision until 30 June 2009. The contract will include options for two one-year extensions beyond the initial three-year period.

  15. First-principles electron transport with phonon coupling: Large scale at low cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias L. N.; Stokbro, Kurt; Brandbyge, Mads

    2017-10-01

    Phonon-assisted tunneling plays a crucial role for electronic device performance and even more so with future size down-scaling. We show how one can include this effect in large-scale first-principles calculations using a single "special thermal displacement" (STD) of the atomic coordinates at almost the same cost as elastic transport calculations, by extending the recent method of Zacharias et al. [Phys. Rev. B 94, 075125 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.94.075125] to the important case of Landauer conductance. We apply the method to ultrascaled silicon devices and demonstrate the importance of phonon-assisted band-to-band and source-to-drain tunneling. In a diode the phonons lead to a rectification ratio suppression in good agreement with experiments, while in an ultrathin body transistor the phonons increase off currents by four orders of magnitude, and the subthreshold swing by a factor of 4, in agreement with perturbation theory.

  16. Large-scale public transcriptomic data mining reveals a tight connection between the transport of nitrogen and other transport processes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei He

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Movement of nitrogen to the plant tissues where it is needed for growth is an important contribution to nitrogen use efficiency. However, we have very limited knowledge about the mechanisms of nitrogen transport. Loading of nitrogen into the xylem and/or phloem by transporter proteins is likely important, but there are several families of genes that encode transporters of nitrogenous molecules (collectively referred to as N transporters here, each comprised of many gene members. In this study, we leveraged publicly available microarray data of Arabidopsis to investigate the gene networks of N transporters to elucidate their possible biological roles. First, we showed that tissue-specificity of nitrogen (N transporters was well reflected among the public microarray data. Then, we built coexpression networks of N transporters, which showed relationships between N transporters and particular aspects of plant metabolism, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, genes associated with several biological pathways were found to be tightly coexpressed with N transporters in different tissues. Our coexpression networks provide information at the systems-level that will serve as a resource for future investigation of nitrogen transport systems in plants, including candidate gene clusters that may work together in related biological roles.

  17. Large-Scale Public Transcriptomic Data Mining Reveals a Tight Connection between the Transport of Nitrogen and Other Transport Processes in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Karve, Abhijit A; Maslov, Sergei; Babst, Benjamin A

    2016-01-01

    Movement of nitrogen to the plant tissues where it is needed for growth is an important contribution to nitrogen use efficiency. However, we have very limited knowledge about the mechanisms of nitrogen transport. Loading of nitrogen into the xylem and/or phloem by transporter proteins is likely important, but there are several families of genes that encode transporters of nitrogenous molecules (collectively referred to as N transporters here), each comprised of many gene members. In this study, we leveraged publicly available microarray data of Arabidopsis to investigate the gene networks of N transporters to elucidate their possible biological roles. First, we showed that tissue-specificity of nitrogen (N) transporters was well reflected among the public microarray data. Then, we built coexpression networks of N transporters, which showed relationships between N transporters and particular aspects of plant metabolism, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, genes associated with several biological pathways were found to be tightly coexpressed with N transporters in different tissues. Our coexpression networks provide information at the systems-level that will serve as a resource for future investigation of nitrogen transport systems in plants, including candidate gene clusters that may work together in related biological roles.

  18. A Multiblock Approach to Pore-Scale Modeling of Reactive Transport with Applications to Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    mehmani, Y.; Sun, T.; Balhoff, M.; Bryant, S. L.; Eichhubl, P.

    2012-12-01

    In order to safely store CO2 in depleted reservoirs and deep saline aquifers, a better understanding of the storage mechanisms of CO2 is required. Reaction of CO2 with minerals to form precipitate in the subsurface helps to securely store CO2 over geologic time periods, but a concern is the formation of localized channels through which CO2 could travel at large, localized rates. Pore-scale network modeling is an attractive option for modeling and understanding this inherently pore-level process, but the relatively small domains of network models may prevent capturing of any such "emergent phenomena" and more importantly their study. Here, we develop a transient, single-phase, reactive pore-network model that includes reduction of throat conductivity as a result of precipitation. The novelty of this work is the implementation of a new Mortar/Transport method for coupling pore networks together at model interfaces that ensure continuity of pressures, species concentrations, and fluxes. Coupled sub-domains are solved separately in parallel and information is effectively communicated between them via the coupling process. The multiscale method can be further applied to modeling of multi-species/multiphase transport phenomena in highly heterogeneous media arising in various subsurface applications, and may potentially be applied to the seamless inclusion of pore-scale models in continuum simulators. The coupling allows for modeling at larger scales which may lead to more accurate upscaling approaches. Here, we couple pore-scale models with large variation in permeability and porosity which results initial preferential pathways for flow. Our simulation results suggest that the preferential pathways close in time due to precipitation, but are not redirected at late times.

  19. Multiphase Carbon-14 Transport in a Near-Field-Scale Unsaturated Column of Natural Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. T. Fox; Mitchell A. Plummer; Larry C. Hull; D. Craig Cooper

    2004-03-01

    Wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory include activated metals that release radioactive carbon-14 (14C) as they corrode. To better understand 14C phase partitioning and transport in the SDA sediments, we conducted a series of transport experiments using 14C (radio-labeled sodium carbonate) and nonreactive gas (sulfur hexafluoride) and aqueous (bromide and tritiated water) tracers in a large (2.6-m high by 0.9-m diameter) column of sediments similar to those used as cover material at the SDA. We established steady-state unsaturated flow prior to injecting tracers into the column. Tracer migration was monitored using pore-water and pore-gas samples taken from co-located suction lysimeters and gas ports inserted at ~0.3-m intervals along the column’s length. Measurements of 14C discharged from the sediment to the atmosphere (i.e., 14CO2 flux) indicate a positive correlation between CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in the column and changes in 14CO2 flux. Though 14CO2 diffusion is expected to be independent of pCO2, changes of pCO2 affect pore water chemistry sufficiently to affect aqueous/gas phase 14C partitioning and consequently 14C2 flux. Pore-water and -gas 14C activity measurements provide an average aqueous/gas partitioning ratio, Kag, of 4.5 (±0.3). This value is consistent with that calculated using standard carbonate equilibrium expressions with measured pH, suggesting the ability to estimate Kag from carbonate equilibrium. One year after the 14C injection, the column was cored and solid-phase 14C activity was measured. The average aqueous/solid partition coefficient, Kd, (1.6 L kg-1) was consistent with those derived from small-scale and short-term batch and column experiments using SDA sediments, suggesting that bench-scale measurements are a valid means of estimating aqueous/solid partitioning at the much larger spatial scale considered in these meso-scale experiments. However

  20. Nano iron particles transport in fractured rocks: laboratory and field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Meirav; Weisbrod, Noam

    2017-04-01

    Our study deals with the transport potential of nano iron particles (NIPs) in fractured media. Two different systemswere used to investigate transport on two scales: (1 )a laboratory flow system of a naturally discrete fractured chalk core, 0.43 and 0.18 m in length and diamater, respectively; and (2) a field system of hydraulically connected boreholes located 47 m apart which penetrate a fractured chalk aquifer. We started by testing the transport potential of various NIPs under different conditions. Particle stability experiments were conducted using various NIPs and different stabilizersat two ionic strengths. Overall, four different NIPs and three stabilizers were tested. Particles and solution properties (stability, aggregate/particle size, viscosity and density) were tested in batch experiments, and transport experiments (breakthrough curves (BTCs) and recovery) were conduted in the fractured chalk core. We have learned that the key parameters controlling particle transport are the particle/aggregate size and stability, which govern NIP settling rates and ultimately their migration distance. The governing mechanism controlling NIP transport was found to be sedimentation, and to a much lesser extent, processes such as diffusion, straining or interception. On the basis of these experiments, Carbo-Iron® particles ( 800 nm activated carbon particles doped with nano zero valent iron particles) and Carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) stabilizer were selected for the field test injection. In the field, Carbo-Iron particles were initially injected into the fractured aquifer using an excess of stabilizer in order to ensure maximum recovery. This resulted in high particle recovery and fast arrival time, similar to the ideal tracer (iodide). The high recovery of the stable particle solution emphasized the importance of particle stability for transport in fractures. To test mobility manipulation potential of the particles and simulate more realistic scenarios, a second field

  1. Site-to-canister scale flow and transport in Haestholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romuvaara

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, A.; Laitinen, M. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-05-01

    Radioactive waste is originating from production of electricity in nuclear power plants. Most of the waste has only low or intermediate levels of radioactivity. However, the spent nuclear fuel is highly radioactive and it has to be isolated from the biosphere. The current nuclear waste management plan in Finland is based on direct disposal of the spent nuclear fuel deep underground. The only feasible mechanism for the radionuclides to escape from an underground repository is to be carried by the groundwater flow after the failure of waste containers. The scope of this study is to examine the groundwater flow situation and transport properties in the vicinity of the disposal canister and along the potential release paths from the repository into the biosphere. The results of this study are further applied in the site specific safety analysis of a spent fuel repository. Synthesis is made of the porous medium estimates of the groundwater flow in the regional and site scales and the detailed fracture network analysis of the flow in the canister scale. This synthesis includes estimation of the transport properties from the canister into the biosphere and flow rates around the deposition holes of the waste canisters. The modelling has been carried out for four different sites: Hastholmen, Kivetty, Olkiluoto and Romavaara. According to the simulations groundwater flow rate around the deposition holes is less than about 1 litre/a for about 75 % of the deposition holes. For about 5 % of the deposition holes the flow rates are a few litres per year or higher. The highest flow rates resulted at Hastholmen, in fresh water conditions 10 000 years after present, and at Kivetty. The transport resistances were calculated for the `worst` flow paths that might have impact on the safety of the repository. The total transport resistances from the repository into the biosphere along those flow paths varied between about 40 000 a/m and 5-10{sup 6} a/m. Most of the total transport

  2. Cooperation, collective action, and the archeology of large-scale societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo, David M; Feinman, Gary M

    2016-11-01

    Archeologists investigating the emergence of large-scale societies in the past have renewed interest in examining the dynamics of cooperation as a means of understanding societal change and organizational variability within human groups over time. Unlike earlier approaches to these issues, which used models designated voluntaristic or managerial, contemporary research articulates more explicitly with frameworks for cooperation and collective action used in other fields, thereby facilitating empirical testing through better definition of the costs, benefits, and social mechanisms associated with success or failure in coordinated group action. Current scholarship is nevertheless bifurcated along lines of epistemology and scale, which is understandable but problematic for forging a broader, more transdisciplinary field of cooperation studies. Here, we point to some areas of potential overlap by reviewing archeological research that places the dynamics of social cooperation and competition in the foreground of the emergence of large-scale societies, which we define as those having larger populations, greater concentrations of political power, and higher degrees of social inequality. We focus on key issues involving the communal-resource management of subsistence and other economic goods, as well as the revenue flows that undergird political institutions. Drawing on archeological cases from across the globe, with greater detail from our area of expertise in Mesoamerica, we offer suggestions for strengthening analytical methods and generating more transdisciplinary research programs that address human societies across scalar and temporal spectra. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Improving representation of convective transport for scale-aware parameterization: 2. Analysis of cloud-resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-01

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the midlatitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of midlatitude continental convection. We show that the single-updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as three updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on the evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  4. Large-scale simulation of flow and transport in reconstructed HPLC-microchip packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khirevich, Siarhei; Höltzel, Alexandra; Ehlert, Steffen; Seidel-Morgenstern, Andreas; Tallarek, Ulrich

    2009-06-15

    Flow and transport in a particle-packed microchip separation channel were investigated with quantitative numerical analysis methods, comprising the generation of confined, polydisperse sphere packings by a modified Jodrey-Tory algorithm, 3D velocity field calculations by the lattice-Boltzmann method, and modeling of convective-diffusive mass transport with a random-walk particle-tracking approach. For the simulations, the exact conduit cross section, the particle-size distribution of the packing material, and the respective average interparticle porosity (packing density) of the HPLC-microchip packings was reconstructed. Large-scale simulation of flow and transport at Peclet numbers of up to Pe = 140 in the reconstructed microchip packings (containing more than 3 x 10(5) spheres) was facilitated by the efficient use of supercomputer power. Porosity distributions and fluid flow velocity profiles for the reconstructed microchip packings are presented and analyzed. Aberrations from regular geometrical conduit shape are shown to influence packing structure and, thus, porosity and velocity distributions. Simulated axial dispersion coefficients are discussed with respect to their dependence on flow velocity and bed porosity. It is shown by comparison to experimental separation efficiencies that the simulated data genuinely reflect the general dispersion behavior of the real-life HPLC-microchip packings. Differences between experiment and simulation are explained by differing morphologies of real and simulated packings (intraparticle porosity, packing structure in the corner regions).

  5. Multi-scale nitrate transport in a sandstone aquifer system under intensive agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Daniel; Ballard, Jean-Marc; Lefebvre, René; Savard, Martine M.

    2017-09-01

    Nitrate transport in heterogeneous bedrock aquifers is influenced by mechanisms that operate at different spatial and temporal scales. To understand these mechanisms in a fractured sandstone aquifer with high porosity, a groundwater-flow and nitrate transport model—reproducing multiple hydraulic and chemical targets—was developed to explain the actual nitrate contamination observed in groundwater and surface water in a study area on Prince Edward Island, Canada. Simulations show that nitrate is leached to the aquifer year-round, with 61% coming from untransformed and transformed organic sources originating from fertilizers and manure. This nitrate reaches the more permeable shallow aquifer through fractures in weathered sandstone that represent only 1% of the total porosity (17%). Some of the nitrate reaches the underlying aquifer, which is less active in terms of groundwater flow, but most of it is drained to the main river. The river-water quality is controlled by the nitrate input from the shallow aquifer. Groundwater in the underlying aquifer, which has long residence times, is also largely influenced by the diffusion of nitrate in the porous sandstone matrix. Consequently, following a change of fertilizer application practices, water quality in domestic wells and the river would change rapidly due to the level of nitrate found in fractures, but a lag time of up to 20 years would be necessary to reach a steady level due to diffusion. This demonstrates the importance of understanding nitrate transport mechanisms when designing effective agricultural and water management plans to improve water quality.

  6. Transport on intermediate time scales in flows with cat's eye patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöschke, Patrick; Sokolov, Igor M.; Zaks, Michael A.; Nepomnyashchy, Alexander A.

    2017-12-01

    We consider the advection-diffusion transport of tracers in a one-parameter family of plane periodic flows where the patterns of streamlines feature regions of confined circulation in the shape of "cat's eyes," separated by meandering jets with ballistic motion inside them. By varying the parameter, we proceed from the regular two-dimensional lattice of eddies without jets to the sinusoidally modulated shear flow without eddies. When a weak thermal noise is added, i.e., at large Péclet numbers, several intermediate time scales arise, with qualitatively and quantitatively different transport properties: depending on the parameter of the flow, the initial position of a tracer, and the aging time, motion of the tracers ranges from subdiffusive to superballistic. We report on results of extensive numerical simulations of the mean-squared displacement for different initial conditions in ordinary and aged situations. These results are compared with a theory based on a Lévy walk that describes the intermediate-time ballistic regime and gives a reasonable description of the behavior for a certain class of initial conditions. The interplay of the walk process with internal circulation dynamics in the trapped state results at intermediate time scales in nonmonotonic characteristics of aging not captured by the Lévy walk model.

  7. Physical scales and spatial predictability of transport processes in the environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baveye, Philippe; Boast, Charles W.

    A significant research effort has been devoted in the last four decades to the development of computer models able to describe the watershed- and regional-scale transport of water and chemicals. A vigorous and constructive debate has opposed the partisans of simple lumped models, like BIM, to the proponents of very detailed and data-intensive, distributed models like MIKE SHE. The latter models are often termed "physically-based", indicating that, because of the upscaling they perform from local to watershed scale, they are generally considered to provide a better account of the physics of transport processes in watersheds. In the present chapter, it is argued that this perception is misguided. Analysis of two historical and familiar cases of theory development suggests that there is at this stage no theoretical framework to guide upscaling efforts toward an unknown dynamical level, like the alleged "watershed level", and that direct experimentation at the higher dynamical level is required to obtain a physical representation of processes. From this perspective, "physics" no longer appears to be on the side of the "physically-based" watershed models. The consequences of this conclusion are discussed, particularly with respect to further research needs and to a number of practical aspects of watershed management.

  8. Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorover, Jon; Perdrial, Nico; Mueller, Karl; Strepka, Caleb; O’Day, Peggy; Rivera, Nelson; Um, Wooyong; Chang, Hyun-Shik; Steefel, Carl; Thompson, Aaron

    2012-11-05

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, partial pressure of carbon dioxide, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. In this final report, we provide detailed descriptions of our results from this three-year study, completed in 2012 following a one-year no cost extension.

  9. Release of Aged Contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chorover, Jon [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Perdrial, Nico [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Mueller, Karl [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Strepka, Caleb [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); O' Day, Peggy [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Rivera, Nelson [Univ. of California, Merced, CA (United States); Um, Wooyong [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Chang, Hyun-Shik [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Steefel, Carl [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Thompson, Aaron [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake (Chorover et al., 2008). In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided thorough characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions. Below, we provide some detailed descriptions of our results from this three year study, recently completed following a one-year no cost extension.

  10. Anomalous particle pinch and scaling of vin/D based on transport analysis and multiple regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G.; Kardaun, O.

    2007-01-01

    Predictions of density profiles in current tokamaks and ITER require a validated scaling relation for vin/D where vin is the anomalous inward drift velocity and D is the anomalous diffusion coefficient. Transport analysis is necessary for determining the anomalous particle pinch from measured density profiles and for separating the impact of particle sources. A set of discharges in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D, JET and ASDEX is analysed using a special version of the 1.5-D BALDUR transport code. Profiles of ρsvin/D with ρs the effective separatrix radius, five other dimensionless parameters and many further quantities in the confinement zone are compiled, resulting in the dataset VIND1.dat, which covers a wide parameter range. Weighted multiple regression is applied to the ASDEX Upgrade subset which leads to a two-term scaling \\rho _sv_in ({x'}) /D ({x'}) =0.0432 [ { ({L_{T_{\\rme}} ({ \\bar {x}'}) / \\rho _s}) ^{-2.58}+7.13 \\, U_L^{1.55} \

  11. Direct pore-scale reactive transport modelling of dynamic wettability changes induced by surface complexation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Julien; Geiger, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory experiments have shown that oil production from sandstone and carbonate reservoirs by waterflooding could be significantly increased by manipulating the composition of the injected water (e.g. by lowering the ionic strength). Recent studies suggest that a change of wettability induced by a change in surface charge is likely to be one of the driving mechanism of the so-called low-salinity effect. In this case, the potential increase of oil recovery during waterflooding at low ionic strength would be strongly impacted by the inter-relations between flow, transport and chemical reaction at the pore-scale. Hence, a new numerical model that includes two-phase flow, solute reactive transport and wettability alteration is implemented based on the Direct Numerical Simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations and surface complexation modelling. Our model is first used to match experimental results of oil droplet detachment from clay patches. We then study the effect of wettability change on the pore-scale displacement for simple 2D calcite micro-models and evaluate the impact of several parameters such as water composition and injected velocity. Finally, we repeat the simulation experiments on a larger and more complex pore geometry representing a carbonate rock. Our simulations highlight two different effects of low-salinity on oil production from carbonate rocks: a smaller number of oil clusters left in the pores after invasion, and a greater number of pores invaded.

  12. Fluid Flow and Heat Transport Computation for Power-Law Scaling Poroperm Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Leary

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In applying Darcy’s law to fluid flow in geologic formations, it is generally assumed that flow variations average to an effectively constant formation flow property. This assumption is, however, fundamentally inaccurate for the ambient crust. Well-log, well-core, and well-flow empirics show that crustal flow spatial variations are systematically correlated from mm to km. Translating crustal flow spatial correlation empirics into numerical form for fluid flow/transport simulation requires computations to be performed on a single global mesh that supports long-range spatial correlation flow structures. Global meshes populated by spatially correlated stochastic poroperm distributions can be processed by 3D finite-element solvers. We model wellbore-logged Dm-scale temperature data due to heat advective flow into a well transecting small faults in a Hm-scale sandstone volume. Wellbore-centric thermal transport is described by Peclet number Pe ≡ a0φv0/D (a0 = wellbore radius, v0 = fluid velocity at a0, φ = mean crustal porosity, and D = rock-water thermal diffusivity. The modelling schema is (i 3D global mesh for spatially correlated stochastic poropermeability; (ii ambient percolation flow calibrated by well-core porosity-controlled permeability; (iii advection via fault-like structures calibrated by well-log neutron porosity; (iv flow Pe ~ 0.5 in ambient crust and Pe ~ 5 for fault-borne advection.

  13. Multi-Component Reactive Transport Modeling of Field-Scale Bioremediation: The Schoolcraft Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanikumar, M.; Hyndman, D. W.; Dybas, M. J.

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes three-dimensional multi-component reactive transport modeling for bioremediation of a carbon tetrachloride (CT) contaminated plume at the Schoolcraft site in Western Michigan. The denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas Stutzeri Strain KC is used to mediate cometabolic reactions that degrade CT to harmless end products. CT contamination at this site occurred due its use in the past as a fumigant in grain silos. The goal of the field bioremediation design was to inoculate a transect perpendicular to the natural gradient flow of a CT plume with microbes that could effectively remediate the CT contamination through a series of pulsed nutrient injections. The final design consisted of fifteen wells spaced one meter apart in which each well can operate either as an injection or an extraction well depending on the event. This design allowed us to operate in a semi-passive mode of operation with only 6 hours of pumping per week. Our modeling approach integrates information from laboratory-scale studies aimed at understanding the relevant rates and processes under controlled conditions with plume-scale modeling in the presence of a high degree of hydraulic control and significant heterogeneity to delineate the important differences in processes/rates as we proceed from the laboratory to the field. We describe the development of a seven component reactive transport model that includes the transport of aqueous and sorbed-phase CT, mobile and immobile bacteria, acetate (electron donor), nitrate (electron acceptor) and tracer (bromide) and show detailed comparisons of observed and simulated concentrations at a number of wells and at different depths. Processes simulated in the model include advection, dispersion, degradation, two-site sorption, microbial attachment, detachment, growth and decay. We describe the influence of several modeling decisions (e.g., effects of dynamic partitioning, bioavailability and sorption) on the predictions of the model. Most

  14. Informing species conservation at multiple scales using data collected for marine mammal stock assessments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alana Grech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conservation planning and the design of marine protected areas (MPAs requires spatially explicit information on the distribution of ecological features. Most species of marine mammals range over large areas and across multiple planning regions. The spatial distributions of marine mammals are difficult to predict using habitat modelling at ecological scales because of insufficient understanding of their habitat needs, however, relevant information may be available from surveys conducted to inform mandatory stock assessments. METHODOLOGY AND RESULTS: We use a 20-year time series of systematic aerial surveys of dugong (Dugong dugong abundance to create spatially-explicit models of dugong distribution and relative density at the scale of the coastal waters of northeast Australia (∼136,000 km(2. We interpolated the corrected data at the scale of 2 km * 2 km planning units using geostatistics. Planning units were classified as low, medium, high and very high dugong density on the basis of the relative density of dugongs estimated from the models and a frequency analysis. Torres Strait was identified as the most significant dugong habitat in northeast Australia and the most globally significant habitat known for any member of the Order Sirenia. The models are used by local, State and Federal agencies to inform management decisions related to the Indigenous harvest of dugongs, gill-net fisheries and Australia's National Representative System of Marine Protected Areas. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: In this paper we demonstrate that spatially-explicit population models add value to data collected for stock assessments, provide a robust alternative to predictive habitat distribution models, and inform species conservation at multiple scales.

  15. Informing species conservation at multiple scales using data collected for marine mammal stock assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech, Alana; Sheppard, James; Marsh, Helene

    2011-03-28

    Conservation planning and the design of marine protected areas (MPAs) requires spatially explicit information on the distribution of ecological features. Most species of marine mammals range over large areas and across multiple planning regions. The spatial distributions of marine mammals are difficult to predict using habitat modelling at ecological scales because of insufficient understanding of their habitat needs, however, relevant information may be available from surveys conducted to inform mandatory stock assessments. We use a 20-year time series of systematic aerial surveys of dugong (Dugong dugong) abundance to create spatially-explicit models of dugong distribution and relative density at the scale of the coastal waters of northeast Australia (∼136,000 km(2)). We interpolated the corrected data at the scale of 2 km * 2 km planning units using geostatistics. Planning units were classified as low, medium, high and very high dugong density on the basis of the relative density of dugongs estimated from the models and a frequency analysis. Torres Strait was identified as the most significant dugong habitat in northeast Australia and the most globally significant habitat known for any member of the Order Sirenia. The models are used by local, State and Federal agencies to inform management decisions related to the Indigenous harvest of dugongs, gill-net fisheries and Australia's National Representative System of Marine Protected Areas. In this paper we demonstrate that spatially-explicit population models add value to data collected for stock assessments, provide a robust alternative to predictive habitat distribution models, and inform species conservation at multiple scales.

  16. Using molecular-scale tracers to investigate transport of agricultural pollutants in soil and water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, C.; Michaelides, K.; Chadwick, D.; Dungait, J.; Evershed, R. P.

    2012-12-01

    We explore the use of molecular-scale tracers to investigate the transport of potential pollutants due to the application of slurry to soil. The molecular-scale approach allows us to separate the pollutants which are moved to water bodies through sediment-bound and dissolved transport pathways. Slurry is applied to agricultural land to as a soil-improver across a wide-range of topographic and climatic regimes, hence a set of experiments were designed to assess the effect of changing slope gradient and rainfall intensity on the transport of pollutants. The experiments were carried out using University of Bristol's TRACE (Test Rig for Advancing Connectivity Experiments) facility. The facility includes a dual axis soil slope (6 x 2.5 x 0.3 m3) and 6-nozzle rainfall simulator, which enables the manipulation of the slope to simulate different slope gradient and rainfall scenarios. Cattle slurry was applied to the top 1 metre strip of the experimental soil slope followed by four rainfall simulations, where the gradient (5° & 10°) and the rainfall intensity (60 & 120 mm hr-1) were co-varied. Leachate was sampled from different flow pathways (surface, subsurface and percolated) via multiple outlets on the slope throughout the experiments and soil cores were taken from the slope after each experiment. Novel tracers were used to trace the pollutants in both dissolved and sediment-bound forms. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to trace dissolved slurry-derived material via water flow pathways, as the slurry was found to have a distinct signature compared with the soil. The fluorescence signatures of the leachates were compared with those of many organic compounds in order to characterise the origin of the signal. This allowed the assessment of the longevity of the signal in the environment to establish if it could be used as a robust long-term tracer of slurry material in water or if would be subject to transform processes through time. 5-βstanols, organic compounds

  17. Implementation Strategies for Large-Scale Transport Simulations Using Time Domain Particle Tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, S.; Cvetkovic, V.; Mancillas, J.; Selroos, J.

    2008-12-01

    Time domain particle tracking is an emerging alternative to the conventional random walk particle tracking algorithm. With time domain particle tracking, particles are moved from node to node on one-dimensional pathways defined by streamlines of the groundwater flow field or by discrete subsurface features. The time to complete each deterministic segment is sampled from residence time distributions that include the effects of advection, longitudinal dispersion, a variety of kinetically controlled retention (sorption) processes, linear transformation, and temporal changes in groundwater velocities and sorption parameters. The simulation results in a set of arrival times at a monitoring location that can be post-processed with a kernel method to construct mass discharge (breakthrough) versus time. Implementation strategies differ for discrete flow (fractured media) systems and continuous porous media systems. The implementation strategy also depends on the scale at which hydraulic property heterogeneity is represented in the supporting flow model. For flow models that explicitly represent discrete features (e.g., discrete fracture networks), the sampling of residence times along segments is conceptually straightforward. For continuous porous media, such sampling needs to be related to the Lagrangian velocity field. Analytical or semi-analytical methods may be used to approximate the Lagrangian segment velocity distributions in aquifers with low-to-moderate variability, thereby capturing transport effects of subgrid velocity variability. If variability in hydraulic properties is large, however, Lagrangian velocity distributions are difficult to characterize and numerical simulations are required; in particular, numerical simulations are likely to be required for estimating the velocity integral scale as a basis for advective segment distributions. Aquifers with evolving heterogeneity scales present additional challenges. Large-scale simulations of radionuclide

  18. Cloud-scale model intercomparison of chemical constituent transport in deep convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Barth

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Transport and scavenging of chemical constituents in deep convection is important to understanding the composition of the troposphere and therefore chemistry-climate and air quality issues. High resolution cloud chemistry models have been shown to represent convective processing of trace gases quite well. To improve the representation of sub-grid convective transport and wet deposition in large-scale models, general characteristics, such as species mass flux, from the high resolution cloud chemistry models can be used. However, it is important to understand how these models behave when simulating the same storm. The intercomparison described here examines transport of six species. CO and O3, which are primarily transported, show good agreement among models and compare well with observations. Models that included lightning production of NOx reasonably predict NOx mixing ratios in the anvil compared with observations, but the NOx variability is much larger than that seen for CO and O3. Predicted anvil mixing ratios of the soluble species, HNO3, H2O2, and CH2O, exhibit significant differences among models, attributed to different schemes in these models of cloud processing including the role of the ice phase, the impact of cloud-modified photolysis rates on the chemistry, and the representation of the species chemical reactivity. The lack of measurements of these species in the convective outflow region does not allow us to evaluate the model results with observations.

  19. Community structure and scale-free collections of Erdős-Rényi graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadhri, C; Kolda, Tamara G; Pinar, Ali

    2012-05-01

    Community structure plays a significant role in the analysis of social networks and similar graphs, yet this structure is little understood and not well captured by most models. We formally define a community to be a subgraph that is internally highly connected and has no deeper substructure. We use tools of combinatorics to show that any such community must contain a dense Erdős-Rényi (ER) subgraph. Based on mathematical arguments, we hypothesize that any graph with a heavy-tailed degree distribution and community structure must contain a scale-free collection of dense ER subgraphs. These theoretical observations corroborate well with empirical evidence. From this, we propose the Block Two-Level Erdős-Rényi (BTER) model, and demonstrate that it accurately captures the observable properties of many real-world social networks.

  20. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Scale Dependent Transport Phenomena and Bioactivity in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, J. D.; Codd, S. L.; Romanenko, K. V.; Hornemann, J. A.; Brosten, T. R.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides the ability to obtain data on the pore scale via imaging and the sample scale by bulk measurement, allowing for connection between microscale dynamics and macroscale transport phenomena. This has led to MRM techniques becoming a preeminent method for characterization of dynamics in porous media. A significant question in modeling transport in porous media is definition of the porous media structure as homogeneous (ordered) or heterogeneous (disordered)[1]. One means of defining the 'complexity' of a porous media is based on the dynamics of the system[2]. The ability of MRM to measure the time dependent statistics of the dynamics [3,4,5] provides quantification of the pre-asymptotic dynamics. The transition from preasymptotic to Gaussian transport consistent with models of homogeneous porous media is clearly visualized. Biological activity in porous media, such as microbial growth, typically manifests itself as biofilms or colonies of microbes that adhere to surfaces and are surrounded by a hydrogel of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The biofilm growth introduces complexity into the system structure in generation of physical pore blocking, trapping within the EPS gel, elastic interfaces due to the EPS and generation of channels in which faster flow occur. The hierarchy of length and time scales and multiple physical processes which are introduced by the biofilm growth impacts the porous media transport as reflected in the change in dynamics [6]. The transition can be modeled using statistical mechanical approaches based on continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes that generate fractional differential equations[7]. The bioactivity alters the structure of the porous media from homogeneous to heterogeneous resulting in the transition from a Gaussian to a non Gaussian subdiffusive dispersion process. References 1. M. Quintard and S. Whitaker, Transport in ordered and disordered porous media: Volume averaged

  1. Addressing the Safety of Transportation Cyber-Physical Systems: Development and Validation of a Verbal Warning Utility Scale for Intelligent Transportation Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important application of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS, advances in intelligent transportation systems (ITS improve driving safety by informing drivers of hazards with warnings in advance. The evaluation of the warning effectiveness is an important issue in facilitating communication of ITS. The goal of the present study was to develop a scale to evaluate the warning utility, namely, the effectiveness of a warning in preventing accidents in general. A driving simulator study was conducted to validate the Verbal Warning Utility Scale (VWUS in a simulated driving environment. The reliability analysis indicated a good split-half reliability for the VWUS with a Spearman-Brown Coefficient of 0.873. The predictive validity of VWUS in measuring the effectiveness of the verbal warnings was verified by the significant prediction of safety benefits indicated by variables, including reduced kinetic energy and collision rate. Compared to conducting experimental studies, this scale provides a simpler way to evaluate overall utility of verbal warnings in communicating associated hazards in intelligent transportation systems. This scale can be further applied to improve the design of warnings of ITS in order to improve transportation safety. The applications of the scale in nonverbal warning situations and limitations of the current scale are also discussed.

  2. Quantum transport and dielectric response of nanometer scale transistors using empirical pseudopotentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingtian

    As transistors, the most basic component of central processing units (CPU) in all electronic products, are scaling down to the nanometer scale, quantum mechanical effects must be studied to investigate their performance. A formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials is presented in this dissertation. We develop the transport equations and show the expressions to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (FET) with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ˜66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ~2.5 mV/V. This formalism is also applied to assess the ballistic performance of FETs with armchair-edge graphene nanoribbon (aGNRs) and silicon nanowire (SiNWs) channels and with gate lengths ranging from 5 nm to 15 nm. The device characteristics of the transistors with a 5 nm gate length are compared. Source-to-drain tunneling effects are investigated for SiNWFETs and GNRFETs by comparing the I-V characteristics of each respective transistor with different channel lengths. While a uniform dielectric constant is assumed in solving Poisson equation for the devices simulated above, the knowledge of the atomistic (i.e., local) dielectric permittivity that considers the atomistic electron distribution and quantum-confinement effect is necessary to treat the electrostatic properties accurately. The local permittivity can also provide information about the dielectric property at the interfaces. We use the random-phase approximation, first-order perturbation theory, and empirical pseudopotentials to calculate the static polarizability, susceptibility, and dielectric response function in graphene and GNRs. While the

  3. Scaling analysis in modeling transport and reaction processes a systematic approach to model building and the art of approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, William B

    2007-01-01

    This book is unique as the first effort to expound on the subject of systematic scaling analysis. Not written for a specific discipline, the book targets any reader interested in transport phenomena and reaction processes. The book is logically divided into chapters on the use of systematic scaling analysis in fluid dynamics, heat transfer, mass transfer, and reaction processes. An integrating chapter is included that considers more complex problems involving combined transport phenomena. Each chapter includes several problems that are explained in considerable detail. These are followed by several worked examples for which the general outline for the scaling is given. Each chapter also includes many practice problems. This book is based on recognizing the value of systematic scaling analysis as a pedagogical method for teaching transport and reaction processes and as a research tool for developing and solving models and in designing experiments. Thus, the book can serve as both a textbook and a reference boo...

  4. Collective action and technology development: up-scaling of innovation in rice farming communities in Northern Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limnirankul, B.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:small-scale rice farmers, collective action, community rice seed, local innovations, green manure crop, contract farming, participatory technology development, up-scaling, technological configuration, grid-group theory,

  5. The Versatility of SpAM: A Fast, Efficient, Spatial Method of Data Collection for Multidimensional Scaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hout, Michael C.; Goldinger, Stephen D.; Ferguson, Ryan W.

    2013-01-01

    Although traditional methods to collect similarity data (for multidimensional scaling [MDS]) are robust, they share a key shortcoming. Specifically, the possible pairwise comparisons in any set of objects grow rapidly as a function of set size. This leads to lengthy experimental protocols, or procedures that involve scaling stimulus subsets. We…

  6. Spatial variability of herbicide mobilisation and transport at catchment scale: insights from a field experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Doppler

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During rain events, herbicides can be transported from their point of application to surface waters, where they may harm aquatic organisms. Since the spatial pattern of mobilisation and transport is heterogeneous, the contributions of different fields to the herbicide load in the stream may vary considerably within one catchment. Therefore, the prediction of contributing areas could help to target mitigation measures efficiently to those locations where they reduce herbicide pollution the most.

    Such spatial predictions require sufficient insight into the underlying transport processes. To improve the understanding of the process chain of herbicide mobilisation on the field and the subsequent transport through the catchment to the stream, we performed a controlled herbicide application on corn fields in a small agricultural catchment (ca. 1 km2 with intensive crop production in the Swiss Plateau. Water samples were collected at different locations in the catchment (overland flow, tile drains and open channel for two months after application in 2009, with a high temporal resolution during rain events. We also analysed soil samples from the experimental fields and measured discharge, groundwater level, soil moisture and the occurrence of overland flow at several locations. Several rain events with varying intensities and magnitudes occurred during the study period. Overland flow and erosion were frequently observed in the entire catchment. Infiltration excess and saturation excess overland flow were both observed. However, the main herbicide loss event was dominated by infiltration excess.

    Despite the frequent and wide-spread occurrence of overland flow, most of this water did not reach the channel directly, but was retained in small depressions in the catchment. From there, it reached the stream via macropores and tile drains. Manholes of the drainage system and storm drains for road and farmyard runoff acted as

  7. Field scale variability of solute transport parameters and related soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lennartz

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The spatial variability of transport parameters has to be taken into account for a reliable assessment of solute behaviour in natural field soils. Two field sites were studied by collecting 24 and 36 small undisturbed soil columns at an uniform grid of 15 m spacing. Displacement experiments were conducted in these columns with bromide traced water under unsaturated steady state transport conditions. Measured breakthrough curves (BTCs were evaluated with the simple convective-dispersive equation (CDE. The solute mobility index (MI calculated as the ratio of measured to fitted pore water velocity and the dispersion coefficient (D were used to classify bromide breakthrough behaviour. Experimental BTCs were classified into two groups: type I curves expressed classical solute behaviour while type II curves were characterised by the occurrence of a bromide concentration maximum before 0.35 pore volumes of effluent (MI<0.35 resulting from preferential flow conditions. Six columns from site A and 8 from site B were identified as preferential. Frequency distributions of the transport parameters (MI and D of both sites were either extremely skewed or bimodal. Log-transformation did not lead to a normal distribution in any case. Contour maps of bromide mass flux at certain time steps indicated the clustering of preferential flow regions at both sites. Differences in the extent of preferential flow between sites seemed to be governed by soil structure. Linear cross correlations among transport parameters and independently measured soil properties revealed relations between solute mobility and volumetric soil water content at time of sampling, texture and organic carbon content. The volumetric field soil water content, a simple measure characterising the soil hydraulic behaviour at the sampling location, was found to be a highly sensitive parameter with respect to solute mobility and preferential flow situations. Almost no relation was found between solute

  8. Spatial variability of herbicide mobilisation and transport at catchment scale: insights from a field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, T.; Camenzuli, L.; Hirzel, G.; Krauss, M.; Lück, A.; Stamm, C.

    2012-07-01

    During rain events, herbicides can be transported from their point of application to surface waters, where they may harm aquatic organisms. Since the spatial pattern of mobilisation and transport is heterogeneous, the contributions of different fields to the herbicide load in the stream may vary considerably within one catchment. Therefore, the prediction of contributing areas could help to target mitigation measures efficiently to those locations where they reduce herbicide pollution the most. Such spatial predictions require sufficient insight into the underlying transport processes. To improve the understanding of the process chain of herbicide mobilisation on the field and the subsequent transport through the catchment to the stream, we performed a controlled herbicide application on corn fields in a small agricultural catchment (ca. 1 km2) with intensive crop production in the Swiss Plateau. Water samples were collected at different locations in the catchment (overland flow, tile drains and open channel) for two months after application in 2009, with a high temporal resolution during rain events. We also analysed soil samples from the experimental fields and measured discharge, groundwater level, soil moisture and the occurrence of overland flow at several locations. Several rain events with varying intensities and magnitudes occurred during the study period. Overland flow and erosion were frequently observed in the entire catchment. Infiltration excess and saturation excess overland flow were both observed. However, the main herbicide loss event was dominated by infiltration excess. Despite the frequent and wide-spread occurrence of overland flow, most of this water did not reach the channel directly, but was retained in small depressions in the catchment. From there, it reached the stream via macropores and tile drains. Manholes of the drainage system and storm drains for road and farmyard runoff acted as additional shortcuts to the stream. Although fast

  9. Solution approach for a large scale personnel transport system for a large company in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo-Arturo Garzón-Garnica

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present paper focuses on the modelling and solution of a large-scale personnel transportation system in Mexico where many routes and vehicles are currently used to service 525 points. The routing system proposed can be applied to many cities in the Latin-American region. Design/methodology/approach: This system was modelled as a VRP model considering the use of real-world transit times, and the fact that routes start at the farthest point from the destination center. Experiments were performed on different sized sets of service points. As the size of the instances was increased, the performance of the heuristic method was assessed in comparison with the results of an exact algorithm, the results remaining very close between both.  When the size of the instance was full-scale and the exact algorithm took too much time to solve the problem, then the heuristic algorithm provided a feasible solution. Supported by the validation with smaller scale instances, where the difference between both solutions was close to a 6%, the full –scale solution obtained with the heuristic algorithm was considered to be within that same range. Findings: The proposed modelling and solving method provided a solution that would produce significant savings in the daily operation of the routes. Originality/value: The urban distribution of the cities in Latin America is unique to other regions in the world. The general layout of the large cities in this region includes a small town center, usually antique, and a somewhat disordered outer region. The lack of a vehicle-centered urban planning poses distinct challenges for vehicle routing problems in the region. The use of a heuristic VRP combined with the results of an exact VRP, allowed the obtention of an improved routing plan specific to the requirements of the region.

  10. Large scale density perturbations from a uniform distribution by wave transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieu, Richard

    2017-11-01

    It has long been known that a uniform distribution of matter cannot produce a Poisson distribution of density fluctuations on very large scales 1/k > ct by the motion of discrete particles over timescale t. The constraint is part of what is sometimes referred to as the Zel'dovich bound. We investigate in this paper the transport of energy by the propagation of waves emanating incoherently from a regular and infinite lattice of oscillators, each having the same finite amount of energy reserve initially. The model we employ does not involve the expansion of the Universe; indeed there is no need to do so, because although the scales of interest are all deeply sub-horizon the size of regions over which perturbations are evaluated do far exceed ct, where t is the time elapsed since a uniform array of oscillators started to emit energy by radiation (it is assumed that t greatly exceeds the duration of emission). We find that to lowest order, when only wave fields propto 1/r are included, there is exact compensation between the energy loss of the oscillators and the energy emitted into space, which means P(0)=0 for the power spectrum of density fluctuations on the largest scales. This is consistent with the Zel'dovich bound; it proves that the model employed is causal, has finite support, and energy is strictly conserved. To the next order when near fields propto r‑2 are included, however, P(0) settles at late times to a positive value that depends only on time, as t‑2 (the same applies to an excess (non-conserving) energy term). We further observe that the behavior is peculiar to near fields. Even though this effect may give the impression of superluminal energy transport, there is no violation of causality because the two-point function vanishes completely for r>t if the emission of each oscillator is sharply truncated beyond some duration. The result calls to question any need of enlisting cosmic inflation to seed large scale density perturbations in the early

  11. Scaling Behavior for Ionic Transport and its Fluctuations in Individual Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Secchi, Eleonora; Niguès, Antoine; Jubin, Laetitia; Siria, Alessandro; Bocquet, Lydéric

    2016-04-15

    In this Letter, we perform an experimental study of ionic transport and current fluctuations inside individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The conductance exhibits a power law behavior at low salinity, with an exponent close to 1/3 versus the salt concentration in this regime. This behavior is rationalized in terms of a salinity dependent surface charge, which is accounted for on the basis of a model for hydroxide adsorption at the (hydrophobic) carbon surface. This is in contrast to boron nitride nanotubes which exhibit a constant surface conductance. Further, we measure the low frequency noise of the ionic current in CNTs and show that the amplitude of the noise scales with the surface charge, with data collapsing on a master curve for the various studied CNTs at a given pH.

  12. Cumulative Relative Reactivity: A Concept for Modeling Aquifer-Scale Reactive Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loschko, M.; Cirpka, O. A.; Wöhling, T.; Rudolph, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative understanding of pollutant fluxes from diffuse input and turnover of pollutants at catchment scale requires process-based numerical models that can explain observed time series of heads, fluxes, and concentrations. To deal with the high level of uncertainty a probabilistic framework is necessary. Due to the high computational effort, such evaluations cannot be done with a spatially explicit reactive-transport model. Conceptual simplifications are needed. The proposed approach is based on travel times and relative reactivity. The latter quantifies the intensity of the chemical reaction relative to a reference reaction rate and can be interpreted as the strength of electron-donor (or electron-acceptor) released by the matrix. In general, the relative reactivity is a spatially variable property reflecting the geology of the formation. In this approach, the paths of individual water parcels are tracked through the aquifer, the age of the water parcels is evaluated, and the relative reactivity is integrated along their trajectories. By switching from space-time discretization to cumulative relative reactivity, advective-reactive transport can be simulated by solving a single system of ordinary differential equations for each combination of concentrations in the inflow. In comparison to solving the advection-dispersion-reaction equation in a spatially explicit way, solving a limited number of ordinary differential equations is computationally significantly less costly. This permits the application of Monte-Carlo methods within a stochastic framework. The validity of the approach was tested in a two-dimensional test case, where the errors introduced by neglecting dispersive mixing were analyzed. The applicability of the approach is demonstrated in a synthetic case study of aerobic respiration and denitrification in the saturated zone using a three-dimensional steady-state groundwater flow model combined with the simplified reactive transport approach.

  13. Reactive transport in porous media: Pore-network model approach compared to pore-scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varloteaux, Clément; Vu, Minh Tan; Békri, Samir; Adler, Pierre M.

    2013-02-01

    Accurate determination of three macroscopic parameters governing reactive transport in porous media, namely, the apparent solute velocity, the dispersion, and the apparent reaction rate, is of key importance for predicting solute migration through reservoir aquifers. Two methods are proposed to calculate these parameters as functions of the Péclet and the Péclet-Dahmköhler numbers. In the first method called the pore-scale model (PSM), the porous medium is discretized by the level set method; the Stokes and convection-diffusion equations with reaction at the wall are solved by a finite-difference scheme. In the second method, called the pore-network model (PNM), the void space of the porous medium is represented by an idealized geometry of pore bodies joined by pore throats; the flow field is computed by solving Kirchhoff's laws and transport calculations are performed in the asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. Two synthetic geometries of porous media are addressed by using both numerical codes. The first geometry is constructed in order to validate the hypotheses implemented in PNM. PSM is also used for a better understanding of the various reaction patterns observed in the asymptotic regime. Despite the PNM approximations, a very good agreement between the models is obtained, which shows that PNM is an accurate description of reactive transport. PNM, which can address much larger pore volumes than PSM, is used to evaluate the influence of the concentration distribution on macroscopic properties of a large irregular network reconstructed from microtomography images. The role of the dimensionless numbers and of the location and size of the largest pore bodies is highlighted.

  14. Small scale laboratory studies of flow and transport phenonmena in pores and fractures, Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    Small scale laboratory experiments, equipped with an ability to actually observe behavior on the pore level using microscopy, provide an economical and easily understood scientific tool to help us validateconcepts and assumptions about the transport of contaminants, and offers the propensity to discover heretofore unrecognized phenomena or behavior. The main technique employs etched glass micromodels, composed of two etched glass plates, sintered together, to form a two dimensional network of three dimensional pores. Flow and transport behavior is observed on a pore or pore network level, and recorded on film and video tape. This technique is coupled with related column studies. Specifically we're examining multiphase flow behavior of relevance, for example, to liquid-liquid mass transfer (solubilization of capillary trapped organic liquids); liquid-gas mass transfer (in situ volatilization); colloid movement, attachment and detachment in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces; bacteria colonization and motility in porous systems; and heterogeneity effects on multi-phase flow, colloid movement and bacteria behavior.

  15. An investigation on platelet transport during thrombus formation at micro-scale stenosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Javier Tovar-Lopez

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an investigation of mass transport of blood cells at micro-scale stenosis where local strain-rate micro-gradients trigger platelet aggregation. Using a microfluidic flow focusing platform we investigate the blood flow streams that principally contribute to platelet aggregation under shear micro-gradient conditions. We demonstrate that relatively thin surface streams located at the channel wall are the primary contributor of platelets to the developing aggregate under shear gradient conditions. Furthermore we delineate a role for red blood cell hydrodynamic lift forces in driving enhanced advection of platelets to the stenosis wall and surface of developing aggregates. We show that this novel microfluidic platform can be effectively used to study the role of mass transport phenomena driving platelet recruitment and aggregate formation and believe that this approach will lead to a greater understanding of the mechanisms underlying shear-gradient dependent discoid platelet aggregation in the context of cardiovascular diseases such as acute coronary syndromes and ischemic stroke.

  16. Field-scale Variation in Colloid Dispersibility and Transport: Multiple Linear Regressions to Soil Physico-Chemical and Structural Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norgaard, Trine; Moldrup, P; Ferré, T P A; Katuwal, S; Olsen, P; de Jonge, L W

    2014-09-01

    Water-dispersible soil colloids (WDC) act as carriers for sorbing chemicals in macroporous soils and hence constitute a significant risk for the aquatic environment. The prediction of WDC readily available for facilitated chemical transport is an unsolved challenge. This study identifies key parameters and predictive indicators for assessing field-scale variation of WDC. Samples representing three measurement scales (1- to 2-mm aggregates, intact 100-cm rings, and intact 6283 cm columns) were retrieved from the topsoil of a 1.69-ha agricultural field in a 15-m by 15-m grid to determine colloid dispersibility, mobilization, and transport. The amount of WDC was determined using (i) a laser diffraction method on 1- to 2-mm aggregates and (ii) an end-over-end shaking method on 100-cm intact rings. The accumulated amount of colloids leached from 20-cm by 20-cm intact columns was determined as a measure of the integrated colloid mobilization and transport. The WDC and the accumulated colloid transport were higher in samples from the northern part of the field. Using multiple linear regression (MLR) analyses, WDC or amount of colloids transported were predicted at the three measurement scales from 24 measured, geo-referenced parameters to identify parameters that could serve as indicator parameters for screening for colloid dispersibility, mobilization, and transport. The MLR analyses were performed at each sample scale using all, only northern, and only southern field locations. Generally, the predictive power of the regression models was best on the smallest 1- to 2-mm aggregate scale. Overall, our results suggest that different drivers controlled colloid dispersibility and transport at the three measurement scales and in the two subareas of the field. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  17. Parameter Uniqueness And Uncertainty Associated For Multirate Transport Models Applied To Core-Scale Test Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlman, K. L.; Malama, B.; James, S. C.

    2011-12-01

    Breakthrough data collected in a set of laboratory tracer experiments are used to constrain the multirate mass transport model STAMMT-L. The uniqueness and variance of the estimated parameters are explored using both Gauss-Marquardt-Levenberg (PEST) and Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (DREAM) algorithms. The efficacy and uniqueness of different multirate distribution types (e.g., lognormal, beta, gamma) for a given dataset are compared. The information content of the different portions of the breakthrough curve (i.e., rising limb, peak, tail) is also explored with this forward model and these inverse modeling tools. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Rapid atmospheric transport and large-scale deposition of recently synthesized plant waxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel B.; Ladd, S. Nemiah; Schubert, Carsten J.; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2018-02-01

    Sedimentary plant wax 2H/1H ratios are important tools for understanding hydroclimate and environmental changes, but large spatial and temporal uncertainties exist about transport mechanisms from ecosystem to sediments. To assess atmospheric pathways, we collected aerosol samples for two years at four locations within a ∼60 km radius in northern Switzerland. We measured n-alkane distributions and 2H/1H ratios in these samples, and from local plants, leaf litter, and soil, as well as surface sediment from six nearby lakes. Increased concentrations and 2H depletion of long odd chain n-alkanes in early summer aerosols indicate that most wax aerosol production occurred shortly after leaf unfolding, when plants synthesize waxes in large quantities. During autumn and winter, aerosols were characterized by degraded n-alkanes lacking chain length preferences diagnostic of recent biosynthesis, and 2H/1H values that were in some cases more than 100‰ higher than growing season values. Despite these seasonal shifts, modeled deposition-weighted average 2H/1H values of long odd chain n-alkanes primarily reflected summer values. This was corroborated by n-alkane 2H/1H values in lake sediments, which were similar to deposition-weighted aerosol values at five of six sites. Atmospheric deposition rates for plant n-alkanes on land were ∼20% of accumulation rates in lakes, suggesting a role for direct deposition to lakes or coastal oceans near similar production sources, and likely a larger role for deposition on land and transport in river systems. This mechanism allows mobilization and transport of large quantities of recently produced waxes as fine-grained material to low energy sedimentation sites over short timescales, even in areas with limited topography. Widespread atmospheric transfer well before leaf senescence also highlights the importance of the isotopic composition of early season source water used to synthesize waxes for the geologic record.

  19. Hydrogeologic Framework Model for the Saturated Zone Site Scale flow and Transport Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. Miller

    2004-11-15

    The purpose of this report is to document the 19-unit, hydrogeologic framework model (19-layer version, output of this report) (HFM-19) with regard to input data, modeling methods, assumptions, uncertainties, limitations, and validation of the model results in accordance with AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The HFM-19 is developed as a conceptual model of the geometric extent of the hydrogeologic units at Yucca Mountain and is intended specifically for use in the development of the ''Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow Model'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]). Primary inputs to this model report include the GFM 3.1 (DTN: MO9901MWDGFM31.000 [DIRS 103769]), borehole lithologic logs, geologic maps, geologic cross sections, water level data, topographic information, and geophysical data as discussed in Section 4.1. Figure 1-1 shows the information flow among all of the saturated zone (SZ) reports and the relationship of this conceptual model in that flow. The HFM-19 is a three-dimensional (3-D) representation of the hydrogeologic units surrounding the location of the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The HFM-19 represents the hydrogeologic setting for the Yucca Mountain area that covers about 1,350 km2 and includes a saturated thickness of about 2.75 km. The boundaries of the conceptual model were primarily chosen to be coincident with grid cells in the Death Valley regional groundwater flow model (DTN: GS960808312144.003 [DIRS 105121]) such that the base of the site-scale SZ flow model is consistent with the base of the regional model (2,750 meters below a smoothed version of the potentiometric surface), encompasses the exploratory boreholes, and provides a framework over the area of interest for groundwater flow and radionuclide transport modeling. In depth, the model domain extends from land surface to the base of the regional groundwater flow model (D'Agnese et al. 1997 [DIRS 100131], p 2). For the site-scale

  20. Using GIS-Based Tools for the Optimization of Solid Waste Collection and Transport: Case Study of Sfax City, Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amjad Kallel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Expenditure for waste collection and transport in Tunisia constitutes 75–100% of the total solid waste management budget. In this study, optimized scenarios were developed using ArcGIS Network Analyst tool in order to improve the efficiency of waste collection and transportation in the district Cité El Habib of Sfax city, Tunisia. Geographic Information System (GIS was created based on data collection and GPS tracking (collection route/bins position. The actual state (Scenario S0 was evaluated, and by modifying its particular parameters, other scenarios were generated and analyzed to identify optimal routes: S1, route optimized with the same working resources (change of stops sequencing only; S2, route optimized with change of vehicles; and S3, route optimized with change of collection method (vehicles and reallocation of bins. The results showed that the three scenarios guarantee savings compared to S0 in terms of collection time (14%, 57%, and 57% for S1, S2, and S3, resp. and distance (13.5%, 13.5%, and 40.5% for S1, S2, and S3, resp.. Thus, a direct impact on fuel consumption can be expected with savings of 16%, 20%, and 48% for S1, S2, and S3, respectively, without mentioning the additional benefits related to CO2 emissions, hours of work, vehicles wear/maintenance, and so forth.

  1. The influence of decadal scale climactic events on the transport of larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, L. K.; Edwards, C. A.; Shanks, A.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding the processes that influence larval transport remains an important, yet difficult, task. This is especially true as more studies demonstrate that biological and physical oceanographic processes vary at long (e.g. decadal+) time scales. We used individual based biophysical models to study transport of Dungeness crab larvae (the most economically valuable fishery on the West Coast of the Continental United States) over a 10-year period; during both positive and negative phases of the Pacific decadal oscillation (PDO). A physical oceanographic model of the California current was developed using the Regional Ocean Modeling System with 1/30-degree resolution. Measured and modeled PDO indices were positively correlated. The biological model was implemented using the Lagrangian Transport Model, and modified to incorporate temperature dependent development and stage specific behaviors. Super individuals were used to scale production and incorporate mortality. Models were validated using time series statistics to compare measured and modeled daily recruitment. More larvae recruited, in both our measured and modeled time series, during negative PDOs. Our work suggests larvae exhibit a vertically migratory behavior too or almost too the bottom each day. During positive PDO years larvae were competent to settle earlier than negative PDO years, however, pelagic larval durations did not differ. The southern end of the population appears to be a sink population, which likely explains the decline in commercial catch. Ultimately, the population is much more demographically closed than previously thought. We hypothesize the stronger flow in the California current during negative PDO's enhances membership of larvae in the current. Further, migrating almost too the bottom causes larvae to enter the benthic boundary layer on the continental shelf and the California undercurrent on the continental slope, both, which decrease net alongshore advection. These factors result

  2. Multi-scale MHD analysis incorporating pressure transport equation for beta-increasing LHD plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiguchi, Katsuji; Carreras, Benjamin A.

    2011-05-01

    A multi-scale MHD numerical scheme is developed for analysis of nonlinear evolution of a beta-increasing plasma. The scheme is based on iterative calculations of nonlinear dynamics based on the reduced MHD (RMHD) equations and three-dimensional static equilibrium. The equation for average pressure in the RMHD equations plays the role of a transport equation that involves a heat source term and background pressure diffusion terms. The heat source term is controlled so that the beta value should be increased at a constant rate. The scheme is applied to a Large Helical Device (LHD) plasma up to average beta of 1.05%, which is unstable against linear ideal interchange modes while beta values much higher than the stability limit are obtained in the experiments. The result with the multi-scale scheme indicates that many local flat regions are generated in the background pressure profile in the nonlinear evolution of the interchange modes. This structure of the pressure profile suppresses disruptive phenomena because it reduces the driving force of the modes at higher beta value. Such self-organization in the pressure profile is considered to be the stabilizing mechanism in the plasma.

  3. Modeling Water Flow and Bromide Transport in a Two-Scale-Structured Lignitic Mine Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Vogel, T.; Maurer, T.; Buczko, U.

    2008-12-01

    Two-dimensional single- and dual-permeability simulations are used to analyze water and solute fluxes in heterogeneous lignitic mine soil at a forest-reclaimed mine spoil heap. The soil heterogeneity on this experimental site "Barenbrucker Hohe" resulted from inclined dumping structures and sediment mixtures that consist of sand with lignitic dust and embedded lignitic fragments. Observations on undisturbed field suction- cell lysimeters including tracer experiments revealed funneling-type preferential flow with lateral water and bromide movement along inclined sediment structures. The spatial distribution of soil structures and fragment distributions was acquired by a digital camera and identified by a supervised classification of the digital profile image. First, a classical single-domain modeling approach was proposed with spatially variable scaling factors inferred from image analyses. In the next step, a two-continuum scenario was constructed to examine additional effects of nonequilibrium on the flow regime. The scaling factors used for the preferential flow domain are here obtained from the gradient of the grayscale images. So far, the single domain scenarios failed to predict the bromide leaching patterns although water effluent could be described. Dual-permeability model allows the incorporation of structural effects and can be used as a tool to further testing other approaches that account for structure effects. The numerical study suggests that additional experiments are required to obtain better understanding of the highly complex transport processes on this experimental site.

  4. Groundwater quality across scales: impact on nutrient transport to large water bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Hans; Moosdorf, Nils; Mallast, Ulf

    2017-04-01

    High concentrations of dissolved nutrients such as nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in groundwater are an increasing concern in many areas of the world. Especially regions with high agriculture impact see widespread declining groundwater quality, with considerable uncertainty mainly regarding the impact of phosphorus (P). Implications reach from direct impacts on different water users to discharge of nutrient-rich groundwater to rivers, lakes and coastal areas, where it can contribute to eutrophication, hypoxia or harmful algal blooms. While local-scale studies are abundant and management options exist, quantitative approaches at regional to continental scales are scarce and frequently have to deal with data inconsistencies or are temporally sparse. Here, we present the research framework to combine large databases of local groundwater quality to data sets of climatical, hydrological, geological or landuse parameters. Pooling of such information, together with robust methods such as water balances and groundwater models, can provide constraints such as upper boundaries and likely ranges of nutrient composition in various settings, or for the nutrient transport to large water bodies. Remote Sensing can provide spatial information on the location of groundwater seepage. Results will eventually help to identify focus areas and lead to improved understanding of the role of groundwater in the context of global biogeochemical cycles.

  5. Links between soil properties and steady-state solute transport through cultivated topsoil at the field scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koestel, J. K.; Nørgaard, Trine; Loung, N. M.

    2013-01-01

    , and tracer breakthrough curves (BTCs) at the field scale for the inert solute transport under a steady-state irrigation rate which produced near-saturated conditions. Sixty-five undisturbed soil columns approximately 20 cm in height and diameter were sampled from the loamy topsoil of an agricultural field...... to larger water saturation and the activation of larger macropores. Our study provides further evidence that it should be possible to estimate solute transport properties from soil properties such as soil texture or bulk density. We also demonstrated that estimation approaches established for the column......It is known that solute transport through soil is heterogeneous at all spatial scales. However, little data are available to allow quantification of these heterogeneities at the field scale or larger. In this study, we investigated the spatial patterns of soil properties, hydrologic state variables...

  6. Experimental and Computational Studies of Temperature Gradient Driven Molecular Transport in Gas Flows through Nano/Micro-Scale Channels

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Yen-Lin; Alexeenko, Alina A; Young, Marcus; Muntz, Eric Phillip

    2007-01-01

    Studies at the University of Southern California have shown that an unconventional solid-state device, the Knudsen Compressor, can be operated as a micro-scale pump or compressor. The critical components of Knudsen Compressors are gas transport membranes, which can be formed from porous materials or densely packed parallel arrays of channels. An applied temperature gradient across a transport membrane creates a thermal creep pumping action. Experimental and computational techniques that have ...

  7. [Logistics of collection and transportation of biological samples and the organization of the central laboratory in the ELSA-Brasil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedeli, Ligia G; Vidigal, Pedro G; Leite, Claudia Mendes; Castilhos, Cristina D; Pimentel, Robércia Anjos; Maniero, Viviane C; Mill, Jose Geraldo; Lotufo, Paulo A; Pereira, Alexandre C; Bensenor, Isabela M

    2013-06-01

    The ELSA (Estudo Longitudinal de Saúde do Adulto - Brazilian Longitudinal Study for Adult Health) is a multicenter cohort study which aims at the identification of risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases in the Brazilian population. The paper describes the strategies for the collection, processing, transportation, and quality control of blood and urine tests in the ELSA. The study decided to centralize the tests at one single laboratory. The processing of the samples was performed at the local laboratories, reducing the weight of the material to be transported, and diminishing the costs of transportation to the central laboratory at the Universidade de São Paulo Hospital. The study included tests for the evaluation of diabetes, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, electrolyte abnormalities, thyroid hormones, uric acid, hepatic enzyme abnormalities, inflammation, and total blood cell count. In addition, leukocyte DNA, urine, plasma and serum samples were stored. The central laboratory performed approximately 375,000 tests.

  8. Improving Representation of Convective Transport for Scale-Aware Parameterization, Part II: Analysis of Cloud-Resolving Model Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yi-Chin; Fan, Jiwen; Zhang, Guang J.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Ghan, Steven J.

    2015-04-27

    Following Part I, in which 3-D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations of a squall line and mesoscale convective complex in the mid-latitude continental and the tropical regions are conducted and evaluated, we examine the scale-dependence of eddy transport of water vapor, evaluate different eddy transport formulations, and improve the representation of convective transport across all scales by proposing a new formulation that more accurately represents the CRM-calculated eddy flux. CRM results show that there are strong grid-spacing dependencies of updraft and downdraft fractions regardless of altitudes, cloud life stage, and geographical location. As for the eddy transport of water vapor, updraft eddy flux is a major contributor to total eddy flux in the lower and middle troposphere. However, downdraft eddy transport can be as large as updraft eddy transport in the lower atmosphere especially at the mature stage of 38 mid-latitude continental convection. We show that the single updraft approach significantly underestimates updraft eddy transport of water vapor because it fails to account for the large internal variability of updrafts, while a single downdraft represents the downdraft eddy transport of water vapor well. We find that using as few as 3 updrafts can account for the internal variability of updrafts well. Based on evaluation with the CRM simulated data, we recommend a simplified eddy transport formulation that considers three updrafts and one downdraft. Such formulation is similar to the conventional one but much more accurately represents CRM-simulated eddy flux across all grid scales.

  9. Systematic phenotyping of a large-scale Candida glabrata deletion collection reveals novel antifungal tolerance genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Schwarzmüller

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is a frequent cause of candidiasis, causing infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated disease. The inherent tolerance of C. glabrata to azole drugs makes this pathogen a serious clinical threat. To identify novel genes implicated in antifungal drug tolerance, we have constructed a large-scale C. glabrata deletion library consisting of 619 unique, individually bar-coded mutant strains, each lacking one specific gene, all together representing almost 12% of the genome. Functional analysis of this library in a series of phenotypic and fitness assays identified numerous genes required for growth of C. glabrata under normal or specific stress conditions, as well as a number of novel genes involved in tolerance to clinically important antifungal drugs such as azoles and echinocandins. We identified 38 deletion strains displaying strongly increased susceptibility to caspofungin, 28 of which encoding proteins that have not previously been linked to echinocandin tolerance. Our results demonstrate the potential of the C. glabrata mutant collection as a valuable resource in functional genomics studies of this important fungal pathogen of humans, and to facilitate the identification of putative novel antifungal drug target and virulence genes.

  10. Collective behavior of large-scale neural networks with GPU acceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jingyi; Wang, Rubin

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, the collective behaviors of a small-world neuronal network motivated by the anatomy of a mammalian cortex based on both Izhikevich model and Rulkov model are studied. The Izhikevich model can not only reproduce the rich behaviors of biological neurons but also has only two equations and one nonlinear term. Rulkov model is in the form of difference equations that generate a sequence of membrane potential samples in discrete moments of time to improve computational efficiency. These two models are suitable for the construction of large scale neural networks. By varying some key parameters, such as the connection probability and the number of nearest neighbor of each node, the coupled neurons will exhibit types of temporal and spatial characteristics. It is demonstrated that the implementation of GPU can achieve more and more acceleration than CPU with the increasing of neuron number and iterations. These two small-world network models and GPU acceleration give us a new opportunity to reproduce the real biological network containing a large number of neurons.

  11. LCA of the Collection, Transportation, Treatment and Disposal of Source Separated Municipal Waste: A Southern Italy Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni De Feo

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study performed a Life Cycle Assessment of the collection, transport, treatment and disposal of source-separated municipal waste (MW in Baronissi, a town of 17,000 inhabitants in the Campania region of Italy. Baronissi is a high-performing town in a region with scarcity of MW facilities. The environmental impacts were assessed with three different methods—IPCC 2007, Ecological Footprint and ReCiPe 2008—in order to evaluate how they influence the results as well as how the global warming affects the results, since it is one of the major environmental concerns of people. The obtained results showed how the presence of facilities in the area is fundamental. Their lack means high environmental loads due to the transportation of materials for long distances, particularly for the organic fraction. The presence of a composting plant at 10 km from the municipality would result in a decrease of 65% of the impacts due to the external transport, regardless of the evaluation method. The results obtained with ReCiPe 2008 and Ecological Footprint agreed, while those obtained with IPCC 2007 were very different since global warming is strongly affected by the transport phase. IPCC 2007 does not allow to take into account the advantages obtainable with a good level of separate collection. Considering a single impact evaluation method, there is a high risk of coming to misleading conclusions.

  12. Multi-length and time scale thermal transport using the lattice Boltzmann method with application to electronics cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Rodrigo A.; Amon, Cristina H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Ghai, Sartaj S.; Jhon, Myung S. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Institute for Complex Engineered Systems, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2006-01-15

    The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is used to investigate one-dimensional, multi-length and -time scale transient heat conduction in crystalline semiconductor solids, in which sub-continuum effects are important. The implementation of this method and its application to electronic devices are described. A silicon-on-insulator transistor subject to Joule heating conditions is used as a case study to illustrate the essence of the LBM. We compare our LBM results, for the diffusive to the ballistic transport regimes, with various hierarchical methodologies of heat transport such as the Fourier, Cattaneo, and ballistic-diffusive transport equations. (author)

  13. Reactive Transport in Porous Media: Pore-scale Mass Exchange between Aqueous Phase and Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanizadeh, S.; Qin, C.

    2013-12-01

    and biofilms is empirically introduced which lacks somewhat physical fundamentals. Therefore, to better characterize the mass exchange between aqueous phase and biofilms, in this work we start with the local descriptions of solute transport in porous media with biofilms. Then, the upscaled average equations of solute transport in both aqueous phase and biofilms are obtained by averaging the local equations over a domain of interest, like a pore throat or a typical REV of porous media. Based on some assumptions, we can reach a general form of first-order kinetic mass exchange model. As a first attempt, we limit investigates of solute mass exchange to the pore scale. The dependence of pore-scale mass exchange coefficient on a number of pore-scale parameters (such as pore structure, Damköhler number and volume fraction of biofilms) is investigated. Our studies show that this coefficient strongly depends on pore geometry, volume fraction of biofilms, Damköhler number and diffusivity ratio. Particularly, our results can be key inputs to the pore-network modeling of bioclogging.

  14. Measurement of Large-Scale Sediment Transport Dynamics Using Multibeam Sonar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, S. M.; Parsons, D. R.; Best, J. L.; Malzone, C.; Keevil, G.

    2007-12-01

    results demonstrate the ability of MBES systems to obtain large sets of data across a two-dimensional swath: this enables the real-time monitoring of suspended sediment transport and related flow processes on a scale previously unrealisable with single-beam acoustic back-scatter systems.

  15. Learning Diagnostic Diagrams in Transport-Based Data-Collection Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Vu The; Eklund, Peter; Cook, Chris

    2014-01-01

    model from Automatic Vehicle Location (AVL) and Automatic Passenger Counters (APC) data. Our purpose is to discover the variability of transit service attributes and their effects on traveller behaviour. A Tsrd diagram describes and helps to analyse factors affecting public transport by combining domain...

  16. Effect of Pore-scale Velocity on the Biodegradation of Contaminants during Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Sanchez, I.; Autenrieth, R. L.; McDonald, T. J.; Cunningham, J. A.

    2007-12-01

    Column experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of pore velocity on the extent of biodegradation of cis- dichloroethene (cis-DCE) during transport in porous media. The columns were filled with homogeneous glass beads and inoculated with the KB-1 culture (provided by SiREM, Guelph, Ontario, Canada), which is capable of complete dechlorination of perchloroethene to ethene. The columns were fed continuously with a synthetic groundwater containing a constant concentration of cis-DCE. Three different pore flow velocities (0.03, 0.08, and 0.51 m/day) were tested in duplicate, subjecting each column to a constant velocity for the entire experiment. Dechlorination of cis-DCE to vinyl chloride and ethene was monitored over time and space within the columns. Protein concentrations, also measured over time and space, were used to relate cell growth to biodegradation efficiency. At the end of the experiment, microbial DNA was harvested from the columns, and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was used to determine differences in the microbial communities that had developed in the columns subjected to different flow rates. The results show that the pore velocity has a strong influence on the microbial population and the degree of dechlorination. At high flow velocity (0.51 m/day), the degradation of cis-DCE to ethene was complete, and the organism capable of cis-DCE dechlorination ({Dehalococcoides sp.}) was present at the end of the experiment. In contrast, at medium and low flow velocities (0.08 and 0.03 m/day), incomplete dechlorination was observed with an absence or low concentration of {Dehalococcoides sp}. These results suggest that it is important for field-scale groundwater remediation to understand the interaction between physical and biological processes on the scale of single pores.

  17. Coordination between water transport capacity, biomass growth, metabolic scaling and species stature in co-occurring shrub and tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Duncan D; Sperry, John S

    2014-12-01

    The significance of xylem function and metabolic scaling theory begins from the idea that water transport is strongly coupled to growth rate. At the same time, coordination of water transport and growth seemingly should differ between plant functional types. We evaluated the relationships between water transport, growth and species stature in six species of co-occurring trees and shrubs. Within species, a strong proportionality between plant hydraulic conductance (K), sap flow (Q) and shoot biomass growth (G) was generally supported. Across species, however, trees grew more for a given K or Q than shrubs, indicating greater growth-based water-use efficiency (WUE) in trees. Trees also showed slower decline in relative growth rate (RGR) than shrubs, equivalent to a steeper G by mass (M) scaling exponent in trees (0.77-0.98). The K and Q by M scaling exponents were common across all species (0.80, 0.82), suggesting that the steeper G scaling in trees reflects a size-dependent increase in their growth-based WUE. The common K and Q by M exponents were statistically consistent with the 0.75 of ideal scaling theory. A model based upon xylem anatomy and branching architecture consistently predicted the observed K by M scaling exponents but only when deviations from ideal symmetric branching were incorporated. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Upscaling of U(VI) Desorption and Transport Using Decimeter-Scale Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, Derrick [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Two decimeter-scale 2D experiments were conducted in the proposed research. To the extent possible, the first experiment (2.44 m x 0.61 m x 10 cm) was be packed to reproduce the observed distributions of sediment size fractions in the subsurface at the tracer test site. Four size fractions of sediment (<125m, 125-250m, 250m to 2 mm, >2mm) were packed in the tank and the size fractions were placed in a sediment structure imitating pattern rather than the block pattern used in the previous experiments conducted with Naturita sediment. The second tank used the same total amount of sediment and proportions of the three size fractions used in the first experiment but was packed at larger geostatistical correlation lengths to evaluate how the scale of heterogeneity affects the upscaling results. This experiment was conducted with the goal of trying to determine how the upscaling would be affected by the diffusion path length associated with low permeability zones. The initial conditions in the tanks were based on observed field conditions. The influent was a synthetic groundwater that mimicked uncontaminated groundwater observed at the Naturita site. Samples were collected from side and end ports of the tank and were analyzed for U(VI), alkalinity, pH and major ions as was done in previous experiments. Each decimeter scale experiment was run for approximately 6 months and the experiments were run in parallel. Extensive premodeling occurred for both tanks and lasted the first year of the project.

  19. Advances in Collection, Transport and Maturation of Equine Oocytes for Assisted Reproductive Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Elaine M

    2016-12-01

    Assisted reproductive techniques that are based on oocyte manipulations have gained acceptance in the equine industry. Methods to collect and handle immature or maturing oocytes have been developed, and systems to ship oocytes now allow for collection in one location and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in another. Subsequently, ICSI-produced embryos can be transferred onsite, shipped to another location, or cryopreserved. Methods for the collection, identification, culture, maturation, and shipment of equine oocytes are reviewed, with an emphasis on procedures from laboratories providing clinical services with documented success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Evaluation of the Second Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 2) Full Scale Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Two Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the longitudinal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  1. Overview of the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) Full Scale Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 ATDs were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the horizontal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  2. Reactive Transport Modeling and Geophysical Monitoring of Bioclogging at Reservoir Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surasani, V.; Commer, M.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Li, L.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    In Microbial-Enhanced-Hydrocarbon-Recovery (MEHR), preferential bioclogging targets the growth of the biofilms (def. immobilized biopolymers with active cells embodied in it) in highly permeable thief zones to enhance sweep efficiency in oil reservoirs. During MEHR, understanding and controlling bioclogging is hindered by the lack of advanced modeling and monitoring tools; these deficiencies contribute to suboptimal performance. Our focus in this study was on developing a systematic approach to understand and monitor bioclogging at the reservoir scale using a combination of reactive transport modeling and geophysical imaging tools (EM & seismic). In this study, we created a realistic reservoir model from a heterogeneous gas reservoir in the Southern Sacramento basin, California; the model well (Citizen Green #1) was characterized using sonic, electrical, nuclear, and NMR logs for hydrologic and geophysical properties. From the simplified 2D log data model, a strip of size 150m x75m with several high permeability streaks is identified for bioclogging simulation experiments. From the NMR log data it is observed that a good linear correlation exist between logarithmic permeability (0.55- 3.34 log (mD)) versus porosity (0.041-0.28). L. mesenteroides was chosen as the model bacteria. In the presence of sucrose, it enzymatically catalyzes the production of dextran, a useful bioclogging agent. Using microbial kinetics from our laboratory experiment and reservoir heterogeneity, a reactive transport model (RTM) is established for two kinds of bioclogging treatments based on whether microbes are present in situ or are supplied externally. In both cases, sucrose media (1.5 M) is injected at the rate of 1 liter/s for 20 days into the center of high permeable strip to stimulate microbes. Simulations show that the high dextran production was deep into the formation from the injection well. This phenomenon can be explained precisely with bacterial kinetics and injection rate. In

  3. Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    container. It now permits free transit of shipping containers from their western ports, if transported by rail directly to the U.S. ( Mireles , 2005, p...Transportation Industry Study Seminar. Mireles , Richard, Castillo. (2005, January). A Cure for West Coast Congestion. Logistics Today, Vol. 46, Issue 1. 1

  4. 75 FR 60772 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Transportation Entry and Manifest of Goods Subject to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... proposed collection of information, including the validity of the methodology and assumptions used; (3....gov/xp/cgov/toolbox/forms/ . Current Actions: This submission is being made to extend the expiration...

  5. Bayesian estimation of the hydraulic and solute transport properties of a small-scale unsaturated soil column

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreira, Paulo H S; Van Genuchten, Martinus Th|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/31481518X; Orlande, Helcio R B; Cotta, Renato M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study the hydraulic and solute transport properties of an unsaturated soil were estimated simultaneously from a relatively simple small-scale laboratory column infiltration/outflow experiment. As governing equations we used the Richards equation for variably saturated flow and a physical

  6. Shear zone liquefaction in mass transport deposit emplacement : A multi-scale integration of seismic reflection and outcrop data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogata, K.; Mountjoy, J. J.; Pini, Gian Andrea; Festa, A.; Tinterri, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present the integrated outcrop-geophysical study of two mass transport complexes, the exhumed Specchio unit in the Northern Apennines of Italy and the Holocene Poverty unit in the Hikurangi margin of New Zealand. The combination of micro- to meso-scale structural, stratigraphic and sedimentologic

  7. RANS-VOF modeling of hydrodynamics and sand transport under full-scale non-breaking and breaking waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez Mora, Maria de Los Angeles; Ribberink, Jan S.; van der Zanden, Joep; van der Werf, Jebbe J.; Jacobsen, N.G.; Lynett, P.; Lynett, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    A 2D RANS-VOF model is used to simulate the flow and sand transport for two different full-scale laboratory experiments: i) non-breaking waves over a horizontal sand bed (Schretlen et al., 2011) and ii) plunging breaking waves over a barred mobile bed profile (Van der Zanden et al., 2016). For the

  8. Microbially driven fracture sealing for inhibiting contaminant transport at the field scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Lindsay; Cuthbert, Mark; Riley, Michael; Handley-Sidhu, Stephanie; Tobler, Dominique; Phoenix, Vernon

    2013-04-01

    Successful implementation of subsurface carbon storage and nuclear waste containment schemes relies on transmissivity reduction through the sealing of fractures in the surrounding rocks. Effective transmissivity reduction in fine scale features is difficult to achieve using traditional high viscosity cement grouts injected at high pressures. However, laboratory scale studies suggest microbially induced calcite precipitation (MICP) can provide a low-viscosity alternative. The first field trials of MICP in fractured hard rock were carried out in a multiple borehole array by using the ureolytic bacterium Sporosarcina pasteurii. Flow at depth at the experimental site is dominated by a single fracture. Injection of the bacteria in parallel with a 'cementing fluid' of urea and calcium chloride was used to fix the bacteria in the subsurface. Subsequent flushing with the cementing fluid alone drove further ureolysis and calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation is eventually limited by crystal growth preventing interaction of the accumulated bacteria with the cementing fluid; repeated bacteria injections are necessary. Coupled equations for bacterial and urea transport, bacterial accumulation, and calcite production were used to model the field trial numerically and gave excellent agreement with field data. While a significant reduction in the transmissivity of the fracture was achieved over several m2 the modelling results suggest challenges remain in encouraging aperture reduction at a distance from the injection borehole due primarily to cementation and clogging around the bacteria injection hole. A further borehole array at the same site provides the opportunity for additional experiments informed by the promising initial results. Models of a number of alternative bacteria and cementing fluid injection schemes have been created using the geometry of the new borehole array. These models have been parameterised using the calibrated model from the initial field trial

  9. The effect of changing micro-scale physical environmental factors on an environment's invitingness for transportation cycling in adults: an exploratory study using manipulated photographs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mertens, Lieze; Van Holle, Veerle; De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse; Deforche, Benedicte; Salmon, Jo; Nasar, Jack; Van de Weghe, Nico; Van Dyck, Delfien; Van Cauwenberg, Jelle

    2014-01-01

    .... The present mixed-methods study used manipulated photographs to determine causal relationships between micro-scale environmental factors and the environment's invitingness for transportation cycling...

  10. Test program of the drop tests with full scale and 1/2.5 scale models of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuri, S.; Matsuoka, T.; Kishimoto, J.; Ishiko, D.; Saito, Y. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD., Kobe Shipyard and Machinery Works, Hyogo (Japan); Kimura, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, LTD., Takasago Research and Dept. Center, Hyogo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    MHI have been developing 5 types of spent nuclear fuel transport and storage cask (MSF cask fleet) as a cask line-up. In order to demonstrate their safety, a representative cask model for the cask fleet have been designed for drop test regulated in IAEA TS-R-1. The drop test with a full and a 1/2.5 scale models are to be performed. It describes the test program of the drop test and manufacturing process of the scale models used for the tests.

  11. Effect of collection, transport, processing and storage of blood specimens on the activity of lysosomal enzymes in plasma and leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Burin

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to evaluate the effect of different conditions of collection, transport and storage on the quality of blood samples from normal individuals in terms of the activity of the enzymes ß-glucuronidase, total hexosaminidase, hexosaminidase A, arylsulfatase A and ß-galactosidase. The enzyme activities were not affected by the different materials used for collection (plastic syringes or vacuum glass tubes. In the evaluation of different heparin concentrations (10% heparin, 5% heparin, and heparinized syringe in the syringes, it was observed that higher doses resulted in an increase of at least 1-fold in the activities of ß-galactosidase, total hexosaminidase and hexosaminidase A in leukocytes, and ß-glucuronidase in plasma. When the effects of time and means of transportation were studied, samples that had been kept at room temperature showed higher deterioration with time (72 and 96 h before processing, and in this case it was impossible to isolate leukocytes from most samples. Comparison of heparin and acid citrate-dextrose (ACD as anticoagulants revealed that ß-glucuronidase and hexosaminidase activities in plasma reached levels near the lower normal limits when ACD was used. In conclusion, we observed that heparin should be used as the preferable anticoagulant when measuring these lysosomal enzyme activities, and we recommend that, when transport time is more than 24 h, samples should be shipped by air in a styrofoam box containing wet ice.

  12. The effect of EGF on electrolyte transport is mediated by tyrosine kinases in the rabbit cortical collecting duct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ookawara, S; Tabei, K; Furuya, H; Asano, Y

    1999-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) inhibits amiloride-sensitive Na(+) conductance in the apical membrane of the isolated rabbit cortical collecting duct. However, there is no information on the relationship between electrolyte transport and tyrosine kinase. We examined the effect of EGF on transport of potassium and chloride as well as sodium and the roles of tyrosine kinases in the rabbit cortical collecting duct using in vitro isolated tubular microperfusion. Basolateral EGF depolarized the transepithelial voltage in a dose-dependent manner within a concentration range of 10(-10) in 10(-8) M. Basolateral ouabain and luminal amiloride completely abolished EGF-induced depolarization. However, luminal BaCl(2) did not abolish its depolarization. To confirm the mechanism, sodium, potassium, and chloride fluxes were measured in the presence of 10(-10) M EGF. EGF significantly decreased the lumen-to-bath isotope flux of sodium and chloride from 93.6+/-12.5 to 61.1+/-9.6 pmol/mm/min (n = 5, ptransport primarily and potassium and chloride transport secondarily. These effects were blocked by nonspecific tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  13. Testing the {rho}* scaling of thermal transport models: predicted and measured temperatures in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor dimensionless scaling experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Scott, S.D. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Dorland, W. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical predictions of ion and electron thermal diffusivities are tested by comparing calculated and measured temperatures in low (L) mode plasmas from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor [D. J. Grove and D. M. Meade, Nucl. Fusion 25 , 1167 (1985)] nondimensional scaling experiments. The DIII-D [J. L. Luxon and L. G. Davis, Fusion Technol. 8 , 441 (1985)] L-mode {rho}* scalings, the transport models of Rebut-Lallia-Watkins (RLW), Boucher`s modification of RLW, and the Institute for Fusion Studies-Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (IFS-PPPL) model for transport due to ion temperature gradient modes are tested. The predictions use the measured densities in order to include the effects of density profile shape variations on the transport models. The uncertainties in the measured and predicted temperatures are discussed. The predictions based on the DIII- D scalings are within the measurement uncertainties. All the theoretical models predict a more favorable {rho}* dependence for the ion temperatures than is seen. Preliminary estimates indicate that sheared ow stabilization is important for some discharges, and that inclusion of its effects may bring the predictions of the IFS-PPPL model into agreement with the experiments.

  14. Evaluation of the First Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 1) Full-Scale Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Bark, Lindley W.; DeWeese, Rick L.; McEntire, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the NASA Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Program initiated the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program by obtaining two CH-46E helicopters from the Navy CH-46E Program Office (PMA-226) at the Navy Flight Readiness Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. Full-scale crash tests were planned to assess dynamic responses of transport-category rotorcraft under combined horizontal and vertical impact loading. The first crash test (TRACT 1) was performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR), which enables the study of critical interactions between the airframe, seat, and occupant during a controlled crash environment. The CH-46E fuselage is categorized as a medium-lift rotorcraft with fuselage dimensions comparable to a regional jet or business jet. The first TRACT test (TRACT 1) was conducted in August 2013. The primary objectives for TRACT 1 were to: (1) assess improvements to occupant loads and displacement with the use of crashworthy features such as pre-tensioning active restraints and energy absorbing seats, (2) develop novel techniques for photogrammetric data acquisition to measure occupant and airframe kinematics, and (3) provide baseline data for future comparison with a retrofitted airframe configuration. Crash test conditions for TRACT 1 were 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocity onto soft soil, which represent a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. The extraordinary value of the TRACT 1 test was reflected by the breadth of meaningful experiments. A total of 8 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and photogrammetric techniques. A combination of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. Loads from ATDs in energy

  15. Na+-coupled bicarbonate transporters in duodenum, collecting ducts and choroid plexus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, Jeppe

    2010-01-01

    Epithelia cover the internal and external surfaces of the organism and form barriers between the various compartments. Some of these epithelia are specialized for effective transmembrane or even transepithelial movement of acid-base equivalents. Certain epithelia with a high rate of HCO3- transport express a few potent Na+-coupled acid-base transporters to gain a net HCO3- movement across the epithelium. Examples of such epithelia are renal proximal tubules and pancreatic ducts. In contrast, multiple Na+-coupled HCO3- transporters are expressed in other HCO3- secreting epithelia, such as the duodenal mucosa or the choroid plexus, which maintain suitable intracellular pH despite a variable demand for secreting HCO3-. In the duodenum, the epithelial cells must secrete HCO3- for neutralization of the gastric acid, and at the same time prevent cellular acidification. During the neutralization, large quantities of CO2 are formed in the duodenal lumen, which enter the epithelial cells. This would tend to lower intracellular pH and require effective counteracting mechanisms to avoid cell death and to maintain HCO3- secretion. The choroid plexus secretes the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and controls the pH of the otherwise poorly buffered CSF. The pCO2 of CSF fluctuates with plasma pCO2, and the choroid plexus must regulate the HCO3- secretion to minimize the effects of these fluctuations on CSF pH. This is done while maintaining pH neutrality in the epithelial cells. Thus, the Na+-HCO3- cotransporters appear to be involved in HCO3- import in more epithelia, where Na+/H+ exchangers were until recently thought to be sufficient for maintaining intracellular pH.

  16. Collective Transport for Active Matter Run and Tumble Disk Systems on a Traveling Wave Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Sándor, Cs.; Libál, A.; Reichhardt, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2016-01-01

    We numerically examine the transport of an assembly of active run-and-tumble disks interacting with a traveling wave substrate. We show that as a function of substrate strength, wave speed, disk activity, and disk density, a variety of dynamical phases arise that are correlated with the structure and net flux of disks. We find that there is a sharp transition into a state where the disks are only partially coupled to the substrate and form a phase separated cluster state. This transition is a...

  17. No specimen left behind: industrial scale digitization of natural history collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagoderov, Vladimir; Kitching, Ian J; Livermore, Laurence; Simonsen, Thomas J; Smith, Vincent S

    2012-01-01

    Traditional approaches for digitizing natural history collections, which include both imaging and metadata capture, are both labour- and time-intensive. Mass-digitization can only be completed if the resource-intensive steps, such as specimen selection and databasing of associated information, are minimized. Digitization of larger collections should employ an "industrial" approach, using the principles of automation and crowd sourcing, with minimal initial metadata collection including a mandatory persistent identifier. A new workflow for the mass-digitization of natural history museum collections based on these principles, and using SatScan® tray scanning system, is described.

  18. 75 FR 9157 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Region Scale and Catch Weighing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... catch weight, species composition, and location data for every delivery by a catcher vessel or every pot by a catcher/processor. Second, all catch must be weighed accurately using NMFS-approved scales to... Region Scale and Catch Weighing Requirements AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

  19. Final report of the TRUE Block Scale project. 3. Modelling of flow and transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poteri, Antti [VTT Processes, Helsinki (Finland); Billaux, Daniel [Itasca Consultants SA, Ecully (France); Dershowitz, William [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA (United States); Gomez-Hernandez, J. Jaime [Univ. Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. of Hydrahulic and Environmental Engineering; Cvetkovic, Vladimir [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Water Resources Engineering; Hautojaervi, Aimo [Posiva Oy, Olkiluoto (Finland); Holton, David [Serco Assurance, Harwell (United Kingdom); Medina, Agustin [UPC, Barcelona (Spain); Winberg, Anders (ed.) [Conterra AB, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2002-12-01

    A series of tracer experiments were performed as part of the TRUE Block Scale experiment over length scales ranging from 10 to 100 m. The in situ experimentation was preceded by a comprehensive iterative characterisation campaign - the results from one borehole was used to update descriptive models and provide the basis for continued characterisation. Apart from core drilling, various types of laboratory investigations, core logging, borehole TV imaging and various types of hydraulic tests (single hole and cross-hole) were performed. Based on the characterisation data a hydro structural model of the investigated rock volume was constructed including deterministic structures and a stochastic background fracture population, and their material properties. In addition, a generic microstructure conceptual model of the investigated structures was developed. Tracer tests with radioactive sorbing tracers performed in three flow paths were preceded by various pre-tests including tracer dilution tests, which were used to select suitable configurations of tracer injection and pumping in the established borehole array. The in situ experimentation was preceded by formulation of basic questions and associated hypotheses to be addressed by the tracer tests and the subsequent evaluation. The hypotheses included address of the validity of the hydro structural model, the effects of heterogeneity and block scale retention. Model predictions and subsequent evaluation modelling was performed using a wide variety of model concepts. These included stochastic continuum, discrete feature network and channel network models formulated in 3D, which also solved the flow problem. In addition, two 'single channel' approaches (Posiva Streamtube and LaSAR extended to the block scale) were employed. A common basis for transport was formulated. The difference between the approaches was found in how heterogeneity is accounted for, both in terms of number of different types of immobile zones

  20. Collective Thomson scattering measurements of fast-ion transport due to sawtooth crashes in ASDEX Upgrade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jesper; Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Pedersen, Morten Stejner

    2016-01-01

    . Here we present the first collective Thomson scattering (CTS) measurements of sawtooth-induced redistribution of fast ions at ASDEX Upgrade. These also represent the first localized fast-ion measurements on the high-field side of this device. The results indicate fast-ion losses in the phase...

  1. Scale-up considerations for surface collecting agent assisted in-situ burn crude oil spill response experiments in the Arctic: Laboratory to field-scale investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Robin J; Aggarwal, Srijan; Perkins, Robert A; Schnabel, William

    2017-04-01

    In the event of a marine oil spill in the Arctic, government agencies, industry, and the public have a stake in the successful implementation of oil spill response. Because large spills are rare events, oil spill response techniques are often evaluated with laboratory and meso-scale experiments. The experiments must yield scalable information sufficient to understand the operability and effectiveness of a response technique under actual field conditions. Since in-situ burning augmented with surface collecting agents ("herders") is one of the few viable response options in ice infested waters, a series of oil spill response experiments were conducted in Fairbanks, Alaska, in 2014 and 2015 to evaluate the use of herders to assist in-situ burning and the role of experimental scale. This study compares burn efficiency and herder application for three experimental designs for in-situ burning of Alaska North Slope crude oil in cold, fresh waters with ∼10% ice cover. The experiments were conducted in three project-specific constructed venues with varying scales (surface areas of approximately 0.09 square meters, 9 square meters and 8100 square meters). The results from the herder assisted in-situ burn experiments performed at these three different scales showed good experimental scale correlation and no negative impact due to the presence of ice cover on burn efficiency. Experimental conclusions are predominantly associated with application of the herder material and usability for a given experiment scale to make response decisions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Structure and transport at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine: An atomic-scale perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantisi, Boris; Sator, Nicolas; Guillot, Bertrand

    2017-12-01

    Structure and transport properties at grain boundaries in polycrystalline olivine have been investigated at the atomic scale by molecular dynamics simulation (MD) using an empirical ionocovalent interaction potential. On the time scale of the simulation (a few tens of nanoseconds for a system size of ∼650,000 atoms) grain boundaries and grain interior were identified by mapping the atomic displacements along the simulation run. In the investigated temperature range (1300-1700 K) the mean thickness of the grain boundary phase is evaluated between 0.5 and 2 nm, a value which depends on temperature and grain size. The structure of the grain boundary phase is found to be disordered (amorphous-like) and is different from the one exhibited by the supercooled liquid. The self-diffusion coefficients of major elements in the intergranular region range from ∼10-13 to 10-10 m2/s between 1300 and 1700 K (with DSigb < DOgb < DFegb < DMggb) and are only one order of magnitude smaller than those evaluated in the supercooled melt. In using a newly derived expression for the bulk self-diffusion coefficient it is concluded that the latter one is driven by the grain boundary contribution as long as the grain size is smaller than a centimeter. In assuming that the electrical conduction at grain boundaries is purely ionic, the macroscopic grain boundary conductivity is found to be two orders of magnitude lower than in molten olivine, and one order of magnitude higher than the lattice conductivity. A consequence is that the conductivity of the olivine polycrystal is dominated by the grain interior contribution as soon as the grain size is larger than a micrometer or so. The grain boundary viscosity has been evaluated from the Green-Kubo relation expressing the viscosity as function of the stress tensor time correlation function. In spite of a slow convergence of the calculation by MD, the grain boundary viscosity was estimated about ∼105 Pa s at 1500 K, a value in agreement with

  3. Liquid transportation fuels via large-scale fluidised-bed gasification of lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannula, I.; Kurkela, E.

    2013-04-15

    With the objective of gaining a better understanding of the system design trade-offs and economics that pertain to biomass-to-liquids processes, 20 individual BTL plant designs were evaluated based on their technical and economic performance. The investigation was focused on gasification-based processes that enable the conversion of biomass to methanol, dimethyl ether, Fischer-Tropsch liquids or synthetic gasoline at a large (300 MWth of biomass) scale. The biomass conversion technology was based on pressurised steam/O2-blown fluidised-bed gasification, followed by hot-gas filtration and catalytic conversion of hydrocarbons and tars. This technology has seen extensive development and demonstration activities in Finland during the recent years and newly generated experimental data has also been used in our simulation models. Our study included conceptual design issues, process descriptions, mass and energy balances and production cost estimates. Several studies exist that discuss the overall efficiency and economics of biomass conversion to transportation liquids, but very few studies have presented a detailed comparison between various syntheses using consistent process designs and uniform cost database. In addition, no studies exist that examine and compare BTL plant designs using the same front-end configuration as described in this work. Our analysis shows that it is possible to produce sustainable low-carbon fuels from lignocellulosic biomass with first-law efficiency in the range of 49.6-66.7% depending on the end-product and process conditions. Production cost estimates were calculated assuming Nth plant economics and without public investment support, CO2 credits or tax assumptions. They are 58-65 euro/MWh for methanol, 58-66 euro/MWh for DME, 64-75 euro/MWh for Fischer-Tropsch liquids and 68-78 euro/MWh for synthetic gasoline. (orig.)

  4. Sediment transport at gaging stations near Mount St. Helens, Washington, 1980-90, data collection and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinehart, Randal L.

    1998-01-01

    River sedimentation caused by the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, has been monitored in a continuing program by the U.S. Geological Survey. In this report, sediment discharge and changes in sediment transport are summarized from data collected at stream-gaging stations near Mount St. Helens during the years 1980 through 1990. The objectives of the monitoring program included collection of data for calculation of total sediment discharge, computation of daily suspended-sediment discharge, and detailed observations of unique sediment-laden flows. Over the 11-year period, most sediment data were collected at gaging stations on seven eruption affected streams: the Green River, the North and South Fork Toutle Rivers, the Toutle River, the Cowlitz River, Clearwater Creek, and the Muddy River. About 170 million tons of sediment (excluding volcanic debris flows) were transported in suspension from the Toutle River basin during water years 1980–90. Another 13 million tons were transported past the gaging stations on Muddy River in the upper Lewis River basin during water years 1982–90. Long-term reductions in sediment concentration occurred within most ranges of stream discharge at streams dominated by transport from the debris-avalanche deposit and at streams in drainage basins with extensive airfall deposits. Reductions in sediment concentration were less apparent at upper ranges of discharge in two streams dominated by lahar deposits, the South Fork Toutle River and the Muddy River. Bed material, suspended sediment, and bedload were sampled periodically and analyzed for size distributions. Bed material and bedload coarsened with time at some stations. Median particle sizes of suspended sediment did not show a simple relation with time. During water years 1980–84, bed material in the lower Toutle River was medium to coarse sand. During the same period, bed material in the North Fork Toutle River was coarse sand and fine gravel. By 1990

  5. Pseudopotential-based electron quantum transport: Theoretical formulation and application to nanometer-scale silicon nanowire transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Jingtian, E-mail: jingtian.fang@utdallas.edu; Vandenberghe, William G.; Fu, Bo; Fischetti, Massimo V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2016-01-21

    We present a formalism to treat quantum electronic transport at the nanometer scale based on empirical pseudopotentials. This formalism offers explicit atomistic wavefunctions and an accurate band structure, enabling a detailed study of the characteristics of devices with a nanometer-scale channel and body. Assuming externally applied potentials that change slowly along the electron-transport direction, we invoke the envelope-wavefunction approximation to apply the open boundary conditions and to develop the transport equations. We construct the full-band open boundary conditions (self-energies of device contacts) from the complex band structure of the contacts. We solve the transport equations and present the expressions required to calculate the device characteristics, such as device current and charge density. We apply this formalism to study ballistic transport in a gate-all-around (GAA) silicon nanowire field-effect transistor with a body-size of 0.39 nm, a gate length of 6.52 nm, and an effective oxide thickness of 0.43 nm. Simulation results show that this device exhibits a subthreshold slope (SS) of ∼66 mV/decade and a drain-induced barrier-lowering of ∼2.5 mV/V. Our theoretical calculations predict that low-dimensionality channels in a 3D GAA architecture are able to meet the performance requirements of future devices in terms of SS swing and electrostatic control.

  6. Collective design in 3D printing: A large scale empirical study of designs, designers and evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan

    2017-01-01

    This paper provides an empirical study of a collective design platform (Thingiverse); with the aim of understanding the phenomenon and investigating how designs concurrently evolve through the large and complex network of designers. The case study is based on the meta-data collected from 158 489 ...

  7. An efficient strategy for small-scale screening and production of archaeal membrane transport proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Pikyee; Varela, Filipa; Magoch, Malgorzata; Silva, Ana Rita; Rosário, Ana Lúcia; Brito, José; Oliveira, Tânia Filipa; Nogly, Przemyslaw; Pessanha, Miguel; Stelter, Meike; Kletzin, Arnulf; Henderson, Peter J F; Archer, Margarida

    2013-01-01

    Membrane proteins play a key role in many fundamental cellular processes such as transport of nutrients, sensing of environmental signals and energy transduction, and account for over 50% of all known drug targets. Despite their importance, structural and functional characterisation of membrane proteins still remains a challenge, partially due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and purification. Therefore the need for development of efficient methods for heterologous production is essential. Fifteen integral membrane transport proteins from Archaea were selected as test targets, chosen to represent two superfamilies widespread in all organisms known as the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) and the 5-Helix Inverted Repeat Transporter superfamily (5HIRT). These proteins typically have eleven to twelve predicted transmembrane helices and are putative transporters for sugar, metabolite, nucleobase, vitamin or neurotransmitter. They include a wide range of examples from the following families: Metabolite-H(+)-symporter; Sugar Porter; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-1; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-2; and neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter. Overproduction of transporters was evaluated with three vectors (pTTQ18, pET52b, pWarf) and two Escherichia coli strains (BL21 Star and C43 (DE3)). Thirteen transporter genes were successfully expressed; only two did not express in any of the tested vector-strain combinations. Initial trials showed that seven transporters could be purified and six of these yielded quantities of ≥ 0.4 mg per litre suitable for functional and structural studies. Size-exclusion chromatography confirmed that two purified transporters were almost homogeneous while four others were shown to be non-aggregating, indicating that they are ready for up-scale production and crystallisation trials. Here, we describe an efficient strategy for heterologous production of membrane transport proteins in E. coli. Small-volume cultures (10 mL) produced sufficient

  8. Discrete Network Modeling for Field-Scale Flow and Transport Through Porous Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Howington, Stacy

    1997-01-01

    .... Specifically, a stochastic, high-resolution, discrete network model is developed and explored for simulating macroscopic flow and conservative transport through macroscopic porous media Networks...

  9. Assessment of Options for the Collection, Handling, and Transport of Corn Stover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlack, R.D.

    2002-11-18

    In this report, we discuss the logistics and estimate the delivered costs for collecting, handling, and hauling corn stover to an ethanol conversion facility. We compare costs for two conventional baling systems (large round bales and large rectangular bales), a silage-harvest system, and an unprocessed-pickup system. Our results generally indicate that stover can be collected, stored, and hauled for about $43.60 to $48.80/dry ton ($48.10-$53.80/dry Mg) using conventional baling equipment for conversion facilities ranging in size from 500 to 2000 dry tons/day (450-1810 dry Mg/day). These estimates are inclusive of all costs including farmer payments for the stover. Our results also suggest that costs might be significantly reduced with an unprocessed stover pickup system provided more efficient equipment is developed.

  10. Lightweight Vertical Take-Off & Landing Unmanned Aerial Systems For Local-Scale Forestry and Agriculture Remote Sensing Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, E.; Sheridan, R.; Popescu, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    The evolution of lightweight Vertical Take-Off and Landing (VTOL) rotary Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) and remote sensor technologies have provided researchers with the ability to integrate compact remote sensing systems with UAVs to create Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) capable of collecting high-resolution airborne remote sensing data. UASs offer a myriad of benefits. Some of the most notable include: (1) reduced operational cost; (2) reduced lead-time for mission planning; (3) high-resolution and high-density data collection; and (4) customization of data collection intervals to fit the needs of a specific project (i.e. acquiring data at hourly, daily, or weekly intervals). Such benefits allow researchers and natural resource managers to acquire airborne remote sensing data on local-scale phenomenon in ways that were previously cost-prohibitive. VTOL UASs also offer a stable platform capable of low speed low altitude flight over small spatial scales that do not require a dedicated runway. Such flight characteristics allow VTOL UASs to collect high-resolution data at very high densities, enabling the use of structure from motion (SFM) techniques to generate three-dimensional datasets from photographs. When combined, these characteristics make VTOL UASs ideal for collecting data over agricultural or forested research areas. The goal of this study is to provide an overview of several lightweight eight-rotor VTOL UASs designed for small-scale forest remote sensing data collection. Specific objectives include: (1) the independent integration of a lightweight multispectral camera, a lightweight scanning lidar sensor, with required components (i.e. IMU, GPS, data logger) and the UAV; (2) comparison of UAS-collected data to terrestrial lidar data and airborne multispectral and lidar data; (3) comparison of UAS SFM techniques to terrestrial lidar data; and (4) multi-temporal assessment of tree decay using terrestrial lidar and UAS SfM techniques.

  11. Evaluation of Subgrid-Scale Transport of Hydrometeors in a PDF-based Scheme using High-Resolution CRM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, M.; Ovchinnikov, M.; Wang, M.; Larson, V. E.

    2014-12-01

    In current climate models, the model resolution is too coarse to explicitly resolve deep convective systems. Parameterization schemes are therefore needed to represent the physical processes at the sub-grid scale. Recently, an approach based on assumed probability density functions (PDFs) has been developed to help unify the various parameterization schemes used in current global models. In particular, a unified parameterization scheme called the Cloud Layers Unified By Binormals (CLUBB) scheme has been developed and tested successfully for shallow boundary-layer clouds. CLUBB's implementation in the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5) is also being extended to treat deep convection cases, but parameterizing subgrid-scale vertical transport of hydrometeors remains a challenge. To investigate the roots of the problem and possible solutions, we generate a high-resolution benchmark simulation of a deep convection case using a cloud-resolving model (CRM) called System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM). We use the high-resolution 3D CRM results to assess the prognostic and diagnostic higher-order moments in CLUBB that are in relation to the subgrid-scale transport of hydrometeors. We also analyze the heat and moisture budgets in terms of CLUBB variables from the SAM benchmark simulation. The results from this study will be used to devise a better representation of vertical subgrid-scale transport of hydrometeors by utilizing the sub-grid variability information from CLUBB.

  12. Meso-scale structures and anomalous convective transport at the edge of magnetic confinement devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S.; Yu, G. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Smolyakov, A.I. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada); Soboleva, T.K. [UNAM, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2006-04-15

    We review the mechanisms of convective cross-field plasma transport in fusion related devices. We discuss the models of convective transport caused by the effective plasma gravity, as well as by the {nabla}T{sub e} and parallel shear of ExB drift instabilities.

  13. The legacy effects of keystone individuals on collective behaviour scale to how long they remain within a group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruitt, Jonathan N; Pinter-Wollman, Noa

    2015-09-07

    The collective behaviour of social groups is often strongly influenced by one or few individuals, termed here 'keystone individuals'. We examined whether the influence of keystone individuals on collective behaviour lingers after their departure and whether these lingering effects scale with their tenure in the group. In the social spider, Stegodyphus dumicola, colonies' boldest individuals wield a disproportionately large influence over colony behaviour. We experimentally manipulated keystones' tenure in laboratory-housed colonies and tracked their legacy effects on collective prey capture following their removal. We found that bolder keystones caused more aggressive collective foraging behaviour and catalysed greater inter-individual variation in boldness within their colonies. The longer keystones remained in a colony, the longer both of these effects lingered after their departure. Our data demonstrate that, long after their disappearance, keystones have large and lasting effects on social dynamics at both the individual and colony levels. © 2015 The Authors.

  14. Scale-Dependent Fracture-Matrix Interactions and Their Impact on Radionuclide Transport: Development of efficient particle-tracking methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajaram, Harihar [University of Colorado, Boulder; Brutz, Michael [University of Colorado, Boulder; Klein, Dylan R [University of Colorado, Boulder; Mallikamas, Wasin [University of Colorado, Boulder

    2014-09-18

    Matrix Diffusion and Adsorption within a rock matrix are important mechanisms for retarding transport of radionuclides in fractured rock. Due to computational limitations and difficulties in characterizing complex subsurface systems, diffusive exchange between a fracture network and surrounding rock matrix is often modeled using simplified conceptual representations. There is significant uncertainty in “effective” parameters used in these models, such as the “effective matrix diffusivity”. Often, these parameters are estimated by fitting sparse breakthrough data, and estimated values fall outside meaningful ranges, because simplified interpretive models do not consider complex three-dimensional flow. There is limited understanding of the relationship between the effective parameters and rock mass characteristics including network structure and matrix properties. There is also evidence for an apparent scale-dependence in “effective matrix diffusion” coefficients. These observations raise questions on whether fracture-matrix interaction parameters estimated from small-scale tracer tests can be used for predicting radionuclide fate and transport at the scale of DOE field sites. High-resolution three-dimensional Discrete-Fracture-Network-Matrix (DFNM) models based on well-defined local scale transport equations can help to address some of these questions. Due to tremendous advances in computational technology over the last 10 years, DFNM modeling in relatively large domains is now feasible. The overarching objective of our research is to use DFNM modeling to improve fundamental understanding of how effective parameters in conceptual models are related to fracture network structure and matrix properties. An advanced three-dimensional DFNM model is being developed, which combines upscaled particle-tracking algorithms for fracture-matrix interaction and a parallel fracture-network flow simulator. The particle-tracking algorithms allow complexity in flow fields

  15. Meteorology, physical oceanography, transport of water, biogeochemistry, and other parameters collected at fixed locations in the open ocean from the OceanSITES network

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This collection comprises data covering meteorology, physical oceanography, transport of water, biogeochemistry, and parameters relevant to the carbon cycle, ocean...

  16. Impacts of Long-Range Transport of Metals from East Asia in Bulk Aerosols Collected at the Okinawa Archipelago, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Sotaro; S, Yuka; I, Moriaki; N, Fumiya; H, Daishi; A, Takemitsu; T, Akira

    2010-05-01

    Economy of East Asia has been growing rapidly, and atmospheric aerosols discharged from this region have been transported to Japan. Okinawa island is situated approximately 1500 km south of Tokyo, Japan, 2000 km southeast of Beijing, China, and 1000 km of south Korea. Its location in Asian is well suited for studying long-range transport of air pollutants in East Asia because maritime air mass prevails during summer, while continental air mass dominates during fall, winter, and spring. The maritime air mass data can be seen as background and can be compared with continental air mass which has been affected by anthropogenic activities. Therefore, Okinawa region is suitable area for studying impacts of air pollutants from East Asia. We simultaneously collected bulk aerosol samples by using the same type of high volume air samplers at Cape Hedo Atmospheric Aerosol Monitoring Station (CHAAMS, Okinawa island), Kume island (ca. 160 km south-west of CHAAMS), and Minami-Daitou island (ca. 320 km south-east of CHAAMS). We determined the concentrations of acid-digested metals using atomic absorption spectrometer and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). We report and discuss spatial and temporal distribution of metals in the bulk atmospheric aerosols collected at CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island during June, 2008 to June 2009. We also determined 'background' concentration of metals in Okinawa archipelago. We then compare each chemical component among CHAAMS, Kume island and Minami-Daitou island to elucidate the influence of the transport processes and distances from Asian continent on metal concentrations.

  17. Catchment scale modelling of pesticide fate and transport using a simple parsimonious process-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullan, Stephanie; Whelan, Mick; Holman, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Pesticides continue to be detected in surface water resources around the world. In the UK to ensure the safety of drinking water supplies, water companies are required to create drinking water safety plans, which take a catchment risk management approach. Models can be used to predict peak pesticide concentrations in raw surface water supplies, these predictions can then be utilised in risk assessments. There is therefore a need to model pesticide fate and transport from agricultural land to surface water resources at the catchment scale. We present a simple soil water balance model linked with a pesticide fate and transport model to predict hydrological response and pesticide exposures at the catchment outlet which is intended for use in risk assessment of raw drinking water resources. The model considers two soil water stores (a topsoil store and a subsoil store) for each soil type in the catchment. It employs a daily time-step and simulates changes in soil water content, actual evapotranspiration, overland flow, drainflow, lateral throughflow and potential recharge to a groundwater store which contributes to baseflow. The model is semi-lumped (not spatially explicit). Calculations are performed for soil type and crop combinations which are weighted by their proportion within the catchment. The model utilises soil properties from the national soil database and can, therefore, be applied to any catchment in England and Wales. The pesticide fate model assumes first-order degradation kinetics, a linear sorption isotherm and leaching at the rate of the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity. Following application the pesticide is assumed to diffuse into the soil and be evenly distributed in the "non-excluded" pore water (pesticides are assumed to be unable to diffuse into the very small pores). Pesticide concentrations and loads to surface water resources are calculated for rainfall events that generate a hydrological response, assuming that a proportion of the most

  18. Prey and mound disassembly, manipulation and transport by fire ant collectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Bahnisikha; Monaenkova, Daria; Goodisman, Michael A.; Goldman, Daniel

    Fire ants inhabit subterranean nests covered by a hemispherical mound of soil permeated by narrow ( 1 body length diameter) tunnels. Fire ants can use their mound for long-term food storage [Gayahan &Tschinkel, J. Insect Sci.,2008]. Since mound tunnels are narrow, we expect that in addition to prey manipulation, mound reconfiguration could also be an important aspect of the food storage strategy. Ant colonies collected from wild were allowed to build nests in containers filled with clay soil in the laboratory. These colonies were offered diverse prey embedded with lead markers, including mealworms, crickets and shrimp. Ant-prey-soil interactions on the nest surface were recorded using overhead video and subsurface using x-ray imaging. Individual ants involved in prey storage exhibited three distinct behaviors: prey maneuvering, prey dissection and mound reconfiguration. Small prey (e.g. mealworms) were collectively carried intact into the mound through a tunnel, and then disassembled within the mound. Larger prey (e.g. shrimp) were dismantled into small pieces above the surface and carried to mound tunnels. The bodies of hard medium-sized prey (e.g. crickets) were buried after limb removal and then disassembled and moved into tunnels. Soil reconfiguration occurred in all cases.

  19. Multi-scale analysis of collective behavior in 2D self-propelled particle models of swarms: An Advection-Diffusion with Memory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghib, Michael; Levin, Simon; Kevrekidis, Ioannis

    2010-05-01

    2. The long-time behavior of the msd of the centroid walk scales linearly with time for naïve groups (diffusion), but shows a sharp transition to quadratic scaling (advection) for informed ones. These observations suggest that the mesoscopic variables of interest are the magnitude of the drift, the diffusion coefficient and the time-scales at which the anomalous and the asymptotic behavior respectively dominate transport, the latter being linked to the time scale at which the group reaches a decision. In order to estimate these summary statistics from the msd, we assumed that the configuration centroid follows an uncoupled Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) with smooth jump and waiting time pdf's. The mesoscopic transport equation for this type of random walk corresponds to an Advection-Diffusion Equation with Memory (ADEM). The introduction of the memory, and thus non-Markovian effects, is necessary in order to correctly account for the two time scales present. Although we were not able to calculate the memory directly from the individual-level rules, we show that it can estimated from a single, relatively short, simulation run using a Mittag-Leffler function as template. With this function it is possible to predict accurately the behavior of the msd, as well as the full pdf for the position of the centroid. The resulting ADEM is self-consistent in the sense that transport parameters estimated from the memory via a Kubo relationship coincide with those estimated from the moments of the jump size pdf of the associated CTRW for a large number of group sizes, proportions of informed individuals, and degrees of bias along the preferred direction. We also discuss the phase diagrams for the transport coefficients estimated from this method, where we notice velocity-precision trade-offs, where precision is a measure of the deviation of realized group orientations with respect to the informed direction. We also note that the time scale to collective decision is invariant

  20. Transportes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidalgo Fernández-Cano, Amalio

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available El movimiento de materiales dentro de la Factoría está atendido por tres principales medios de transporte, en consonancia con las características del material y de los desplazamientos. Así se han establecido: sistemas de cintas transportadoras, una red ferroviaria de ancho normal y una completa malla de caminos enlazando funcionalmente las instalaciones.

  1. Large-scale calculations of thermoelectric transport coefficients: a case study of γ-graphyne with point defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jinghua; Liu, Huijun; Fan, Dengdong; Jiang, Peiheng

    2017-11-01

    Defects such as vacancies and impurities could have profound effects on the transport properties of thermoelectric materials. However, it is usually quite difficult to directly calculate the thermoelectric properties of defect-containing systems via first-principles methods since a very large supercell is required. In this work, based on the linear response theory and the kernel polynomial method, we present an efficient approach that can help to calculate the thermoelectric transport coefficients of a large system containing millions of atoms at arbitrary chemical potential and temperature. As a prototype example, we consider dilute vacancies and hydrogen impurities in a large-scale γ-graphyne sheet and discuss their effects on the thermoelectric transport properties.

  2. Final Project Report: Release of aged contaminants from weathered sediments: Effects of sorbate speciation on scaling of reactive transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Chorover, University of Arizona; Peggy O' €™Day, University of California, Merced; Karl Mueller, Penn State University; Wooyong Um, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Carl Steefel, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    2012-10-01

    Hanford sediments impacted by hyperalkaline high level radioactive waste have undergone incongruent silicate mineral weathering concurrent with contaminant uptake. In this project, we studied the impact of background pore water (BPW) on strontium, cesium and iodine desorption and transport in Hanford sediments that were experimentally weathered by contact with simulated hyperalkaline tank waste leachate (STWL) solutions. Using those lab-weathered Hanford sediments (HS) and model precipitates formed during nucleation from homogeneous STWL solutions (HN), we (i) provided detailed characterization of reaction products over a matrix of field-relevant gradients in contaminant concentration, PCO2, and reaction time; (ii) improved molecular-scale understanding of how sorbate speciation controls contaminant desorption from weathered sediments upon removal of caustic sources; and (iii) developed a mechanistic, predictive model of meso- to field-scale contaminant reactive transport under these conditions.

  3. Regional modeling of groundwater flow and arsenic transport in the Bengal Basin: challenges of scale and complexity (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, H. A.; Voss, C. I.

    2009-12-01

    Widespread arsenic poisoning is occurring in large areas of Bangladesh and West Bengal, India due to high arsenic levels in shallow groundwater, which is the primary source of irrigation and drinking water in the region. The high-arsenic groundwater exists in aquifers of the Bengal Basin, a huge sedimentary system approximately 500km x 500km wide and greater than 15km deep in places. Deeper groundwater (>150m) is nearly universally low in arsenic and a potential source of safe drinking water, but evaluation of its sustainability requires understanding of the entire, interconnected regional aquifer system. Numerical modeling of flow and arsenic transport in the basin introduces problems of scale: challenges in representing the system in enough detail to produce meaningful simulations and answer relevant questions while maintaining enough simplicity to understand controls on processes and operating within computational constraints. A regional groundwater flow and transport model of the Bengal Basin was constructed to assess the large-scale functioning of the deep groundwater flow system, the vulnerability of deep groundwater to pumping-induced migration from above, and the effect of chemical properties of sediments (sorption) on sustainability. The primary challenges include the very large spatial scale of the system, dynamic monsoonal hydrology (small temporal scale fluctuations), complex sedimentary architecture (small spatial scale heterogeneity), and a lack of reliable hydrologic and geologic data. The approach was simple. Detailed inputs were reduced to only those that affect the functioning of the deep flow system. Available data were used to estimate upscaled parameter values. Nested small-scale simulations were performed to determine the effects of the simplifications, which include treatment of the top boundary condition and transience, effects of small-scale heterogeneity, and effects of individual pumping wells. Simulation of arsenic transport at the large

  4. Timetable-based simulation method for choice set generation in large-scale public transport networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær; Anderson, Marie Karen; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2016-01-01

    The composition and size of the choice sets are a key for the correct estimation of and prediction by route choice models. While existing literature has posed a great deal of attention towards the generation of path choice sets for private transport problems, the same does not apply to public...... transport problems. This study proposes a timetable-based simulation method for generating path choice sets in a multimodal public transport network. Moreover, this study illustrates the feasibility of its implementation by applying the method to reproduce 5131 real-life trips in the Greater Copenhagen Area...

  5. Natural spatial and temporal variations in groundwater chemistry in fractured, sedimentary rocks: scale and implications for solute transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoven, Stephen J. van der [Department of Geography-Geology, Illinois State University, Campus Box 4400, Normal, IL 61761 (United States)]. E-mail: vanderhoven@ilstu.edu; Kip Solomon, D. [Department of Geology and Geophyics, University of Utah, 135 S. 1460 E., Room 719, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Moline, Gerilynn R. [10 Victorian Heights, Thackeray Road, London SW8 3TD (United Kingdom)

    2005-05-15

    Natural tracers (major ions, {delta} {sup 18}O, and O{sub 2}) were monitored to evaluate groundwater flow and transport to a depth of 20 m below the surface in fractured sedimentary (primarily shale and limestone) rocks. Large temporal variations in these tracers were noted in the soil zone and the saprolite, and are driven primarily by individual storm events. During nonstorm periods, an upward flow brings water with high TDS, constant {delta} {sup 18}O, and low dissolved O{sub 2} to the water table. During storm events, low TDS, variable {delta} {sup 18}O, and high dissolved O{sub 2} water recharges through the unsaturated zone. These oscillating signals are rapidly transmitted along fracture pathways in the saprolite, with changes occurring on spatial scales of several meters and on a time scale of hours. The variations decreased markedly below the boundary between the saprolite and less weathered bedrock. Variations in the bedrock units occurred on time scales of days and spatial scales of at least 20 m. The oscillations of chemical conditions in the shallow groundwater are hypothesized to have significant implications for solute transport. Solutes and colloids that adsorb onto aquifer solids can be released into solution by decreases in ionic strength and pH. The decreases in ionic strength also cause thermodynamic undersaturation of the groundwater with respect to some mineral species and may result in mineral dissolution. Redox conditions are also changing and may result in mineral dissolution/precipitation. The net result of these chemical variations is episodic transport of a wide range of dissolved solutes or suspended particles, a phenomenon rarely considered in contaminant transport studies.

  6. Exploiting major trends in subject hierarchies for large-scale collection visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julien, Charles-Antoine; Tirilly, Pierre; Leide, John E.; Guastavino, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    Many large digital collections are currently organized by subject; however, these useful information organization structures are large and complex, making them difficult to browse. Current online tools and visualization prototypes show small localized subsets and do not provide the ability to explore the predominant patterns of the overall subject structure. This research addresses this issue by simplifying the subject structure using two techniques based on the highly uneven distribution of real-world collections: level compression and child pruning. The approach is demonstrated using a sample of 130K records organized by the Library of Congress Subject Headings (LCSH). Promising results show that the subject hierarchy can be reduced down to 42% of its initial size, while maintaining access to 81% of the collection. The visual impact is demonstrated using a traditional outline view allowing searchers to dynamically change the amount of complexity that they feel necessary for the tasks at hand.

  7. Link between hopping models and percolation scaling laws for charge transport in mixtures of small molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Gwang Ha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Mixed host compositions that combine charge transport materials with luminescent dyes offer superior control over exciton formation and charge transport in organic light emitting devices (OLEDs. Two approaches are typically used to optimize the fraction of charge transport materials in a mixed host composition: either an empirical percolative model, or a hopping transport model. We show that these two commonly-employed models are linked by an analytic expression which relates the localization length to the percolation threshold and critical exponent. The relation is confirmed both numerically and experimentally through measurements of the relative conductivity of Tris(4-carbazoyl-9-ylphenylamine (TCTA :1,3-bis(3,5-dipyrid-3-yl-phenylbenzene (BmPyPb mixtures with different concentrations, where the TCTA plays a role as hole conductor and the BmPyPb as hole insulator. The analytic relation may allow the rational design of mixed layers of small molecules for high-performance OLEDs.

  8. The Diversity and Scale Matter: Ubiquitous Transportation Mode Detection using Single Cell Tower Information

    OpenAIRE

    AbdelAziz, Ali Mohamed; Youssef, Moustafa

    2015-01-01

    Detecting the transportation mode of a user is important for a wide range of applications. While a number of recent systems addressed the transportation mode detection problem using the ubiquitous mobile phones, these studies either leverage GPS, the inertial sensors, and/or multiple cell towers information. However, these different phone sensors have high energy consumption, limited to a small subset of phones (e.g. high-end phones or phones that support neighbouring cell tower information),...

  9. Multi-physics and multi-scale deterioration modelling of reinforced concrete part I: Coupling transport and corrosion at the material scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michel, Alexander; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    models are sketched to describe (i) transport of heat and matter in porous media as well as phase assemblage in hardened Portland cement, (ii) corrosion of reinforcement, and (iii) material performance including corrosion-induced damages on the meso and macro scale. The presented modelling framework...... is fully coupled, i.e. information, such as temperature and moisture distribution, phase assemblage, corrosion current density, damage state of concrete cover, etc., are continuously exchanged between the models. Although not explicitly outlined in this paper, such an analysis may be further integrated...

  10. Modeling transport of a mixture of natural organic molecules: Effects of dynamic competitive sorption from particle to aquifer scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weerd, H.; van Riemsdijk, W. H.; Leijnse, A.

    2002-08-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) can act as a carrier for contaminants. Therefore it is of great importance to understand its adsorption/desorption and transport behavior. NOM is a mixture of molecules varying from simple small molecules like citric acid to complicated large molecules like humic acid. To simulate sorption and transport of NOM in aquifer material, we used a previously developed model (NOMADS) describing the dynamic competitive sorption of NOM fractions. We calibrated NOMADS using independent batch adsorption data and incorporated it in a transport code. Sorption and transport of NOM in laboratory column experiments and a field experiment were well simulated using the calibrated model, indicating that the process descriptions used are valid over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales and mass-to-volume ratios. Simulation results provided insights into the influence of pore water velocity and NOM concentration history on the shape of breakthrough curves of NOM fractions. The heterogeneity of NOM appears to be essential to understanding its adsorption and transport behavior.

  11. Resolution-dependent behavior of subgrid-scale vertical transport in the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Heng; Gustafson, William I.; Hagos, Samson M.; Wu, Chien-Ming; Wan, Hui

    2015-06-01

    To better understand the behavior of quasi-equilibrium-based convection parameterizations at higher resolution, we use a diagnostic framework to examine the resolution-dependence of subgrid-scale vertical transport of moist static energy as parameterized by the Zhang-McFarlane convection parameterization (ZM). Grid-scale input to ZM is supplied by coarsening output from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations onto subdomains ranging in size from 8 × 8 to 256 × 256 km2. Then the ZM-based parameterization of vertical transport of moist static energy for scales smaller than the subdomain size (w'h'>¯ZM) are compared to those directly calculated from the CRM simulations (w'h'>¯CRM) for different subdomain sizes. The ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases by more than half as the subdomain size decreases from 128 to 8 km across while w'h'>¯ZM decreases with subdomain size only for strong convection cases and increases for weaker cases. The resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM is determined by the positive-definite grid-scale tendency of convective available potential energy (CAPE) in the convective quasi-equilibrium (QE) closure. Further analysis shows the actual grid-scale tendency of CAPE (before taking the positive definite value) and w'h'>¯CRM behave very similarly as the subdomain size changes because they are both tied to grid-scale advective tendencies. We can improve the resolution dependence of w'h'>¯ZM significantly by averaging the grid-scale tendency of CAPE over an appropriately large area surrounding each subdomain before taking its positive definite value. Even though the ensemble mean w'h'>¯CRM decreases with increasing resolution, its variability increases dramatically. w'h'>¯ZM cannot capture such increase in the variability, suggesting the need for stochastic treatment of convection at relatively high spatial resolution (8 or 16 km).

  12. From kinetic to collective behavior in thermal transport on semiconductors and semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomas, C. de; Lopeandia, A. F.; Alvarez, F. X., E-mail: xavier.alvarez@uab.cat [Department of Physics, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Cantarero, A. [Materials Science Institute, University of Valencia, P. O. Box 22085, 46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2014-04-28

    We present a model which deepens into the role that normal scattering has on the thermal conductivity in semiconductor bulk, micro, and nanoscale samples. Thermal conductivity as a function of the temperature undergoes a smooth transition from a kinetic to a collective regime that depends on the importance of normal scattering events. We demonstrate that in this transition, the key point to fit experimental data is changing the way to perform the average on the scattering rates. We apply the model to bulk Si with different isotopic compositions obtaining an accurate fit. Then we calculate the thermal conductivity of Si thin films and nanowires by only introducing the effective size as additional parameter. The model provides a better prediction of the thermal conductivity behavior valid for all temperatures and sizes above 30 nm with a single expression. Avoiding the introduction of confinement or quantum effects, the model permits to establish the limit of classical theories in the study of the thermal conductivity in nanoscopic systems.

  13. Model Validation of an RSRM Transporter Through Full-scale Operational and Modal Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillhart, Ralph; Davis, Joshua; Allred, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) segments, which are part of the current Space Shuttle system and will provide the first stage of the Ares launch vehicle, must be transported from their manufacturing facility in Promontory, Utah, to a railhead in Corinne, Utah. This approximately 25-mile trip on secondary paved roads is accomplished using a special transporter system which lifts and conveys each individual segment. ATK Launch Systems (ATK) has recently obtained a new set of these transporters from Scheuerle, a company in Germany. The transporter is a 96-wheel, dual tractor vehicle that supports the payload via a hydraulic suspension. Since this system is a different design than was previously used, computer modeling with validation via test is required to ensure that the environment to which the segment is exposed is not too severe for this space-critical hardware. Accurate prediction of the loads imparted to the rocket motor is essential in order to prevent damage to the segment. To develop and validate a finite element model capable of such accurate predictions, ATA Engineering, Inc., teamed with ATK to perform a modal survey of the transport system, including a forward RSRM segment. A set of electrodynamic shakers was placed around the transporter at locations capable of exciting the transporter vehicle dynamics. Forces from the shakers with varying phase combinations were applied using sinusoidal sweep excitation. The relative phase of the shaker forcing functions was adjusted to match the shape characteristics of each of several target modes, thereby customizing each sweep run for exciting a particular mode. The resulting frequency response functions (FRF) from this series of sine sweeps allowed identification of all target modes and other higher-order modes, allowing good comparison to the finite element model. Furthermore, the survey-derived modal frequencies were correlated with peak frequencies observed during road-going operating tests. This

  14. Optimization-Based Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for Data Collection in Large-Scale Mobile Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinggao Yue

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Data collection is a fundamental operation in various mobile wireless sensor networks (MWSN applications. The energy of nodes around the Sink can be untimely depleted owing to the fact that sensor nodes must transmit vast amounts of data, readily forming a bottleneck in energy consumption; mobile wireless sensor networks have been designed to address this issue. In this study, we focused on a large-scale and intensive MWSN which allows a certain amount of data latency by investigating mobile Sink balance from three aspects: data collection maximization, mobile path length minimization, and network reliability optimization. We also derived a corresponding formula to represent the MWSN and proved that it represents an NP-hard problem. Traditional data collection methods only focus on increasing the amount data collection or reducing the overall network energy consumption, which is why we designed the proposed heuristic algorithm to jointly consider cluster head selection, the routing path from ordinary nodes to the cluster head node, and mobile Sink path planning optimization. The proposed data collection algorithm for mobile Sinks is, in effect, based on artificial bee colony. Simulation results show that, in comparison with other algorithms, the proposed algorithm can effectively reduce data transmission, save energy, improve network data collection efficiency and reliability, and extend the network lifetime.

  15. Informing Species Conservation at Multiple Scales Using Data Collected for Marine Mammal Stock Assessments

    OpenAIRE

    Alana Grech; James Sheppard; Helene Marsh

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Conservation planning and the design of marine protected areas (MPAs) requires spatially explicit information on the distribution of ecological features. Most species of marine mammals range over large areas and across multiple planning regions. The spatial distributions of marine mammals are difficult to predict using habitat modelling at ecological scales because of insufficient understanding of their habitat needs, however, relevant information may be available from surveys con...

  16. Large-Scale Data Collection Metadata Management at the National Computation Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Evans, B. J. K.; Bastrakova, I.; Ryder, G.; Martin, J.; Duursma, D.; Gohar, K.; Mackey, T.; Paget, M.; Siddeswara, G.

    2014-12-01

    Data Collection management has become an essential activity at the National Computation Infrastructure (NCI) in Australia. NCI's partners (CSIRO, Bureau of Meteorology, Australian National University, and Geoscience Australia), supported by the Australian Government and Research Data Storage Infrastructure (RDSI), have established a national data resource that is co-located with high-performance computing. This paper addresses the metadata management of these data assets over their lifetime. NCI manages 36 data collections (10+ PB) categorised as earth system sciences, climate and weather model data assets and products, earth and marine observations and products, geosciences, terrestrial ecosystem, water management and hydrology, astronomy, social science and biosciences. The data is largely sourced from NCI partners, the custodians of many of the national scientific records, and major research community organisations. The data is made available in a HPC and data-intensive environment - a ~56000 core supercomputer, virtual labs on a 3000 core cloud system, and data services. By assembling these large national assets, new opportunities have arisen to harmonise the data collections, making a powerful cross-disciplinary resource.To support the overall management, a Data Management Plan (DMP) has been developed to record the workflows, procedures, the key contacts and responsibilities. The DMP has fields that can be exported to the ISO19115 schema and to the collection level catalogue of GeoNetwork. The subset or file level metadata catalogues are linked with the collection level through parent-child relationship definition using UUID. A number of tools have been developed that support interactive metadata management, bulk loading of data, and support for computational workflows or data pipelines. NCI creates persistent identifiers for each of the assets. The data collection is tracked over its lifetime, and the recognition of the data providers, data owners, data

  17. Collective Influence of Multiple Spreaders Evaluated by Tracing Real Information Flow in Large-Scale Social Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Teng, Xian; Morone, Flaviano; Makse, Hernán A

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the most influential spreaders that maximize information flow is a central question in network theory. Recently, a highly scalable method called "Collective Influence (CI)" has been put forward through collective influence maximization. In contrast to previous heuristic methods evaluating nodes' significance separately, CI method inspects the collective influence of multiple spreaders. Despite that CI applies to the influence maximization problem in percolation model, it is still important to examine its efficacy in realistic information spreading. Here, we examine real-world information flow in various social platforms including American Physical Society, Facebook, Twitter and LiveJournal. Since empirical data cannot be directly mapped to ideal multi-source spreading, we leverage the behavioral patterns of users extracted from data to construct "virtual" information spreading processes. Our consistent results demonstrate that the set of spreaders selected by CI indeed can induce larger scale of i...

  18. Role of Inelastic Electron–Phonon Scattering in Electron Transport through Ultra-Scaled Amorphous Phase Change Material Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jie; Xu, Xu; Anantram, M.P.

    2014-09-01

    The electron transport through ultra-scaled amorphous phase change material (PCM) GeTe is investigated by using ab initio molecular dynamics, density functional theory, and non-equilibrium Green’s function, and the inelastic electron–phonon scattering is accounted for by using the Born approximation. It is shown that, in ultra-scaled PCM device with 6 nm channel length, < 4 % of the energy carried by the incident electrons from the source is transferred to the atomic lattice before reaching the drain, indicating that the electron transport is largely elastic. Our simulation results show that the inelastic electron–phonon scattering, which plays an important role to excite trapped electrons in bulk PCM devices, exerts very limited influence on the current density value and the shape of current–voltage curve of ultra-scaled PCM devices. The analysis reveals that the Poole–Frenkel law and the Ohm’s law, which are the governing physical mechanisms of the bulk PCM devices, cease to be valid in the ultra-scaled PCM devices.

  19. Scaling Theory for Pulsed Jet Mixed Vessels, Sparging, and Cyclic Feed Transport Systems for Slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, William L.; Rector, David R.; Rassat, Scot D.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Minette, Michael J.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Josephson, Gary B.; Wells, Beric E.; Berglin, Eric J.

    2013-09-27

    This document is a previously unpublished work based on a draft report prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) in 2012. Work on the report stopped when WTP’s approach to testing changed. PNNL is issuing a modified version of the document a year later to preserve and disseminate the valuable technical work that was completed. This document establishes technical bases for evaluating the mixing performance of Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) pretreatment process tanks based on data from less-than-full-scale testing, relative to specified mixing requirements. The technical bases include the fluid mechanics affecting mixing for specified vessel configurations, operating parameters, and simulant properties. They address scaling vessel physical performance, simulant physical performance, and “scaling down” the operating conditions at full scale to define test conditions at reduced scale and “scaling up” the test results at reduced scale to predict the performance at full scale. Essentially, this document addresses the following questions: • Why and how can the mixing behaviors in a smaller vessel represent those in a larger vessel? • What information is needed to address the first question? • How should the information be used to predict mixing performance in WTP? The design of Large Scale Integrated Testing (LSIT) is being addressed in other, complementary documents.

  20. The impact of benthic fauna on fluvial bed load transport: Challenges of upscaling laboratory experiments to river and landscape scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S. P.

    2012-04-01

    The impact on sediment transport processes and channel morphology of several relatively large, iconic animals including beaver and salmon is increasingly well understood. However, many other aquatic fauna are important zoogeomorphic agents and ecosystem engineers. These somewhat overlooked "Cinderella" species include benthic aquatic insect larvae, freshwater crustaceans and many species of fish. Despite relatively modest individual effects, the ubiquity, abundance and cumulative impact of these organisms makes them a potentially significant agency, with as yet undiscovered and unquantified impacts on channel morphology and sediment fluxes. Their actions (digging, foraging, moving, burrowing), constructions and secretions modify bed sediment characteristics (grain size distribution, interlock, imbrication, protrusion), alter bed topography (thence hydraulic roughness) and contribute to biogenic restraints on grain movement. In turn, they can affect the distribution of surface particle entrainment thresholds and bed shear stresses, with implications for bed load transport. Flume experiments have measured some of these impacts and provided direct observations of the mechanisms involved, but many of the most interesting research questions pertain to the impact of these animals at reach, catchment and even landscape scales: Not least, what is the impact of small aquatic animals on bed load flux and yield? This presentation will consider some of the challenges involved in answering this question; that is, of scaling up experimental understanding of how aquatic animals affect bed load transport processes to river scales. Pertinent themes include: (1) the potential impacts of experimental arrangements on the behaviours and activities that affect hydraulic or geomorphological processes; (2) field coincidence of the spatial and temporal distributions of (a) the animals and their behaviours with (b) the physical conditions (substrates, flows) under which those animals are

  1. Influence of long-range transboundary transport on atmospheric water vapor mercury collected at the largest city of Tibet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jie [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, Mikkeli FI 50130 (Finland); Kang, Shichang, E-mail: shichang.kang@lzb.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cryospheric Sciences, Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Tian, Lide [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Guo, Junming [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Graduate University of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Qianggong; Cong, Zhiyuan [Key Laboratory of Tibetan Environment Changes and Land Surface Processes, Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); CAS Center for Excellence in Tibetan Plateau Earth Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101 (China); Sillanpää, Mika [Laboratory of Green Chemistry, Lappeenranta University of Technology, Sammonkatu 12, Mikkeli FI 50130 (Finland); and others

    2016-10-01

    Monsoon circulation is an important process that affects long-range transboundary transport of anthropogenic contaminants such as mercury (Hg). During the Indian monsoon season of 2013, a total of 92 and 26 atmospheric water vapor samples were collected at Lhasa, the largest city of the Tibet, for Hg and major ions analysis, respectively. The relatively low pH/high electronic conductivity values, together with the fact that NH{sub 4}{sup +} in atmospheric water vapor was even higher than that determined in precipitation of Lhasa, indicated the effects of anthropogenic perturbations through long-range transboundary atmospheric transport. Concentrations of Hg in atmospheric water vapor ranged from 2.5 to 73.7 ng L{sup −1}, with an average of 12.5 ng L{sup −1}. The elevated Hg and major ions concentrations, and electronic conductivity values were generally associated with weak acidic samples, and Hg mainly loaded with anthropogenic ions such as NH{sub 4}{sup +}. The results of principal component analysis and trajectory analysis suggested that anthropogenic emissions from the Indian subcontinent may have largely contributed to the determined Hg in atmospheric water vapor. Furthermore, our study reconfirmed that below-cloud scavenging contribution was significant for precipitation Hg in Lhasa, and evaluated that on average 74.1% of the Hg in precipitation could be accounted for by below-cloud scavenging. - Highlights: • The low pH/high electronic conductivity was found in atmospheric water vapor. • Anthropogenic NH{sub 4}{sup +} was higher than that determined in precipitation of Lhasa. • Elevated Hg and major ions levels were usually associated with weak acidic samples. • Hg in atmospheric water vapor was largely influenced by transboundary transport. • Below-cloud scavenging accounted for most Hg in precipitation.

  2. Scaled-Up Production and Transport Applications of Graphitic Carbon Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviers, Kimberly R.

    Graphitic carbon nanomaterials enhance the performance of engineered systems for energy harvesting and storage. However, commercial availability remains largely cost-prohibitive due to technical barriers to mass production. This thesis examines both the scaled-up production and energy transport applications of graphitic materials. Cost driven-production of graphitic petals is developed, carbon nanotube array thermal interface materials enhance waste heat energy harvesting, and microsupercapacitors are visually examined using a new electroreflectance measurement method. Graphitic materials have previously been synthesized using batch-style processing methods with small sample sizes, limiting their commercial viability. In order to increase production throughput, a roll-to-roll radio-frequency plasma chemical vapor deposition method is employed to continuously deposit graphitic petals on carbon fiber tow. In consideration of a full production framework, efficient and informative characterization methods in the form of electrical resistance and electrochemical capacitance are highlighted. To co-optimize the functional characteristics of the material, the processing conditions are comprehensively varied using a data-driven predictive design of experiments method. Repeatable and reliable production of graphitic materials will enable a host of creative graphene-based devices to emerge into the marketplace. Two such applications are discussed in the remaining chapters. Waste heat is most efficiently harvested at high temperatures, such as vehicle exhaust systems near 600°C. However, the resistance to heat flux at the interfaces between the harvesting device and its surroundings is detrimental to the system-level performance. To study the performance of thermal interface materials up to 700°C, a reference bar measurement method was designed. Design considerations are discussed and compared to past implementations, particularly regarding radiation heat flux and thermal

  3. Linking atomic and mesoscopic scales for the modelling of the transport properties of uranium dioxide under irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertolus, Marjorie, E-mail: marjorie.bertolus@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Freyss, Michel; Dorado, Boris; Martin, Guillaume; Hoang, Kiet; Maillard, Serge; Skorek, Richard; Garcia, Philippe; Valot, Carole [CEA, DEN, DEC/SESC, Centre de Cadarache, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Chartier, Alain; Van Brutzel, Laurent; Fossati, Paul [CEA, DEN, DPC/SCCME, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Grimes, Robin W.; Parfitt, David C.; Bishop, Clare L.; Murphy, Samuel T.; Rushton, Michael J.D. [Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Staicu, Dragos; Yakub, Eugen; Nichenko, Sergii [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, 76125 Karlsruhe (Germany); and others

    2015-07-15

    This article presents a synthesis of the investigations at the atomic scale of the transport properties of defects and fission gases in uranium dioxide, as well as of the transfer of results from the atomic scale to models at the mesoscopic scale, performed during the F-BRIDGE European project (2008–2012). We first present the mesoscale models used to investigate uranium oxide fuel under irradiation, and in particular the cluster dynamics and kinetic Monte Carlo methods employed to model the behaviour of defects and fission gases in UO{sub 2}, as well as the parameters of these models. Second, we describe briefly the atomic scale methods employed, i.e. electronic structure calculations and empirical potential methods. Then, we show the results of the calculation of the data necessary for the mesoscale models using these atomic scale methods. Finally, we summarise the links built between the atomic and mesoscopic scale by listing the data calculated at the atomic scale which are to be used as input in mesoscale modelling. Despite specific difficulties in the description of fuel materials, the results obtained in F-BRIDGE show that atomic scale modelling methods are now mature enough to obtain precise data to feed higher scale models and help interpret experiments on nuclear fuels. These methods bring valuable insight, in particular the formation, binding and migration energies of point and extended defects, fission product localization, incorporation energies and migration pathways, elementary mechanisms of irradiation induced processes. These studies open the way for the investigation of other significant phenomena involved in fuel behaviour, in particular the thermochemical and thermomechanical properties and their evolution in-pile, complex microstructures, as well as of more complex fuels.

  4. Environmental Transport of Plutonium: Biogeochemical Processes at Femtomolar Concentrations and Nanometer Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kersting, Annie B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2010-10-05

    The major challenge in predicting the mobility and transport of plutonium (Pu) is determining the dominant geochemical processes that control its behavior in the subsurface. The reaction chemistry of Pu (i.e., aqueous speciation, solubility, sorptivity, redox chemistry, and affinity for colloidal particles, both abiotic and microbially mediated) is particularly complicated. It is generally thought that due to its low solubility and high sorptivity, Pu migration in the environment occurs only when facilitated by transport on particulate matter (i.e., colloidal particles). Despite the recognized importance of colloid-facilitated transport of Pu, very little is known about the geochemical and biochemical mechanisms controlling Pu-colloid formation and association, particularly at femtomolar Pu concentrations observed at DOE sites.

  5. Study of number of constituent quark scaling of elliptic flow in heavy-ion collisions using transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Singha, Subhash

    2016-01-01

    We studied the number of constituent quark scaling (NCQ) behaviour of elliptic flow ($v_{2}$) under the framework of A Multi-Phase Transport model (AMPT) at both top-RHIC and LHC energies. The NCQ-scaling in $v_{2}$ holds at top-RHIC energy with AMPT string melting version, while it breaks in Pb+Pb collisions at LHC energy using the same framework. The breaking of NCQ-scaling at LHC energy has been studied by varying the magnitude of parton-parton scattering cross-section and lifetime of hadronic cascade as implemented in AMPT. We find that the breaking of NCQ scaling in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ =2.76 TeV is independent of the magnitude of parton-parton cross-section and the later stage hadronic interactions. Further we observed that scaling holds in a small collision system like Si+Si at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV. We discussed that the breaking of NCQ scaling is possibly due to high phase-space density of constituents quarks in Pb+Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 2.76 TeV.

  6. Large-scale Flow and Transport of Magnetic Flux in the Solar ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tribpo

    Abstract. Horizontal large-scale velocity field describes horizontal displacement of the photospheric magnetic flux in zonal and meridian directions. The flow systems of solar plasma, constructed according to the velocity field, create the large-scale cellular-like patterns with up-flow in the center and the down-flow on the ...

  7. Customized Mobile Apps: Improving data collection methods in large-scale field works in Finnish Lapland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupila, Juho

    2017-04-01

    Since the 1990s, a huge amount of data related to the groundwater and soil has been collected in several regional projects in Finland. EU -funded project "The coordination of groundwater protection and aggregates industry in Finnish Lapland, phase II" started in July 2016 and it covers the last unstudied areas in these projects in Finland. Project is carried out by Geological Survey of Finland (GTK), University of Oulu and Finnish Environment Institute and the main topic is to consolidate the groundwater protection and extractable use of soil resource in Lapland area. As earlier, several kinds of studies are also carried out throughout this three-year research and development project. These include e.g. drilling with setting up of groundwater observation wells, GPR-survey and many kinds of point-type observations, like sampling and general mapping on the field. Due to size of a study area (over 80 000 km2, about one quarter of a total area of Finland), improvement of the field work methods has become essential. To the general observation on the field, GTK has developed a specific mobile applications for Android -devices. With these Apps, data can be easily collected for example from a certain groundwater area and then uploaded directly to the GTK's database. Collected information may include sampling data, photos, layer observations, groundwater data etc. and it is all linked to the current GPS-location. New data is also easily available for post-processing. In this project the benefits of these applications will be field-tested and e.g. ergonomics, economy and usability in general will be taken account and related to the other data collecting methods, like working with heavy fieldwork laptops. Although these Apps are designed for usage in GTK's projects, they are free to download from Google Play for anyone interested. Geological Survey of Finland has the main role in this project with support from national and local authorities and stakeholders. Project is funded

  8. An efficient strategy for small-scale screening and production of archaeal membrane transport proteins in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pikyee Ma

    Full Text Available Membrane proteins play a key role in many fundamental cellular processes such as transport of nutrients, sensing of environmental signals and energy transduction, and account for over 50% of all known drug targets. Despite their importance, structural and functional characterisation of membrane proteins still remains a challenge, partially due to the difficulties in recombinant expression and purification. Therefore the need for development of efficient methods for heterologous production is essential.Fifteen integral membrane transport proteins from Archaea were selected as test targets, chosen to represent two superfamilies widespread in all organisms known as the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS and the 5-Helix Inverted Repeat Transporter superfamily (5HIRT. These proteins typically have eleven to twelve predicted transmembrane helices and are putative transporters for sugar, metabolite, nucleobase, vitamin or neurotransmitter. They include a wide range of examples from the following families: Metabolite-H(+-symporter; Sugar Porter; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-1; Nucleobase-Cation-Symporter-2; and neurotransmitter-sodium-symporter. Overproduction of transporters was evaluated with three vectors (pTTQ18, pET52b, pWarf and two Escherichia coli strains (BL21 Star and C43 (DE3. Thirteen transporter genes were successfully expressed; only two did not express in any of the tested vector-strain combinations. Initial trials showed that seven transporters could be purified and six of these yielded quantities of ≥ 0.4 mg per litre suitable for functional and structural studies. Size-exclusion chromatography confirmed that two purified transporters were almost homogeneous while four others were shown to be non-aggregating, indicating that they are ready for up-scale production and crystallisation trials.Here, we describe an efficient strategy for heterologous production of membrane transport proteins in E. coli. Small-volume cultures (10 mL produced

  9. Learning Traffic as Images: A Deep Convolutional Neural Network for Large-Scale Transportation Network Speed Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Dai, Zhuang; He, Zhengbing; Ma, Jihui; Wang, Yong; Wang, Yunpeng

    2017-04-10

    This paper proposes a convolutional neural network (CNN)-based method that learns traffic as images and predicts large-scale, network-wide traffic speed with a high accuracy. Spatiotemporal traffic dynamics are converted to images describing the time and space relations of traffic flow via a two-dimensional time-space matrix. A CNN is applied to the image following two consecutive steps: abstract traffic feature extraction and network-wide traffic speed prediction. The effectiveness of the proposed method is evaluated by taking two real-world transportation networks, the second ring road and north-east transportation network in Beijing, as examples, and comparing the method with four prevailing algorithms, namely, ordinary least squares, k-nearest neighbors, artificial neural network, and random forest, and three deep learning architectures, namely, stacked autoencoder, recurrent neural network, and long-short-term memory network. The results show that the proposed method outperforms other algorithms by an average accuracy improvement of 42.91% within an acceptable execution time. The CNN can train the model in a reasonable time and, thus, is suitable for large-scale transportation networks.

  10. Relationship between application scale and maximum time latency in intelligent transport solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, V.L.; Van Lint, J.W.C.; Kester, L.; Passchier, I.; Vries, J.

    2012-01-01

    Congestion is a major problem in large urbanised areas. Intelligent Transport Solutions aim to reduce this problem. Generally, traffic is monitored using sensors, this data is processed, a traffic state is estimated and a control measure is computed and implemented. The availability and quality of

  11. Scaling up methodology for CO2 emissions in ICT applications in traffic and transport in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mans, D.; Jonkers, E.; Giannelos, I.; Palanciuc, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Amitran project aims to define a reference methodology for evaluating the effects of ICT measures in trafäc and transport on energy efficiency and consequently CO2 emissions. This methodology can be used as a reference by future projects and will address different modes for both passenger and

  12. Biogas infrastructures from farm to regional scale, prospects of biogas transport grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    prof. dr. Wim van Gemert; A.A. Broekhuis; Drs. E.J. Hengeveld; Ir. J. Bekkering

    2016-01-01

    The volume of biogas produced in agricultural areas is expected to increase in coming years. An increasing number of local and regional initiatives show a growing interest in decentralized energy production, wherein biogas can play a role. Biogas transport from production sites to user, i.e. a

  13. Biogas infrastructures from farm to regional scale, prospects of biogas transport grids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hengeveld, E. J.; Bekkering, J.; van Gemert, W. J. T.; Broekhuis, A. A.

    The volume of biogas produced in agricultural areas is expected to increase in coming years. An increasing number of local and regional initiatives show a growing interest in decentralized energy production, wherein biogas can play a role. Biogas transport from production sites to user, i.e. a CHP,

  14. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  15. Modeling methane fluxes in wetlands with gas-transporting plants. 3. Plot scale.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    A process model based on kinetic principles was developed for methane fluxes from wetlands with gas-transporting plants and a fluctuating water table. Water dynamics are modeled with the 1-D Richards equation. For temperature a standard diffusion equation is used. The depth-dependent dynamics of

  16. Relationship between application scale and maximum time latency in intelligent transport solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoop, V.; Lint, J. van; Vries, J.; Kester, L.J.H.M.; Passchier, I.

    2013-01-01

    Congestion is a major problem in large, urbanized areas. Intelligent transport solutions aim to reduce this problem. In general, traffic is monitored with the use of sensors, the resulting data are processed, a traffic state is estimated, and a control measure is computed and implemented. The

  17. Does Model Development Ahead of Data Collection Have Merit? A Case for Advancing Non-Local Fluvial Transport Theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voller, V. R.; Falcini, F.; Foufoula-Georgiou, E.; Ganti, V.; Paola, C.; Hill, K. M.; Swenson, J. B.; Longjas, A.

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to suggest how experiments might be constructed to provide data to test recently proposed phenomenological non-local model of depositional transport; formulated on the basis of morphological arguments but with limited data. A sound methodology for developing models of geological systems is to first collect significant data and then carefully identify an appropriate model form and parameters. An alternative approach is to construct what might be referred to as a phenomenological model, where limited observation of the system is used to suggest an appropriate mathematical form that matches the critical nature of the physical system behavior. By their nature, phenomenological models are often developed within a fairly narrow range of observations. In this way, interesting findings can occur when the models are modified and exercised across wider physical domains, in particular in domains where there is an absence of hard data to corroborate or invalidate the model predictions. Although this approach might be frown on my some, it is important to recognize the stellar and proven track record of phenomenological models, which despite the original scarcity of data, often pave the way to new perspectives and important findings. The poster child example is the Higgs boson. In the early 60's manipulation of the quantum field equations revealed a critical inconsistency related to the masses of fundamental particles that could only be mathematically resolved by assuming that they operated within a field that would exert drag; this conjecture took almost fifty years and the vast experimental operation of the Large Hadron Collider to physically confirm. In this work we examine a current phenomenological model used to describe non-local transport in fluvial sediment domains. This model has its genesis in attempting to describe the shapes of hill slope profiles, while acknowledging the fact that two points of the landscape with the same local slope are

  18. Geometry-coupled reactive fluid transport at the fracture scale -Application to CO 2 geologic storage

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Seunghee

    2015-08-19

    Water acidification follows CO2 injection and leads to reactive fluid transport through pores and rock fractures, with potential implications to reservoirs and wells in CO2 geologic storage and enhanced oil recovery. Kinetic rate laws for dissolution reactions in calcite and anorthite are combined with Navier-Stokes law and advection-diffusion transport to perform geometry-coupled numerical simulations in order to study the evolution of chemical reactions, species concentration and fracture morphology. Results are summarized as a function of two dimensionless parameters: the Damköhler number Da which is the ratio between advection and reaction times, and the transverse Peclet number Pe defined as the ratio between the time for diffusion across the fracture and the time for advection along the fracture. Reactant species are readily consumed near the inlet in a carbonate reservoir when the flow velocity is low (low transverse Peclet number and Da>10-1). At high flow velocities, diffusion fails to homogenize the concentration field across the fracture (high transverse Peclet number Pe>10-1). When the reaction rate is low as in anorthite reservoirs (Da<10-1) reactant species are more readily transported towards the outlet. At a given Peclet number, a lower Damköhler number causes the flow channel to experience a more uniform aperture enlargement along the length of the fracture. When the length-to-aperture ratio is sufficiently large, say l/d>30, the system response resembles the solution for 1-D reactive fluid transport. A decreased length-to-aperture ratio slows the diffusive transport of reactant species to the mineral fracture surface, and analyses of fracture networks must take into consideration both the length and slenderness of individual fractures in addition to Pe and Da numbers.

  19. The collective emission of electromagnetic waves from astrophysical jets - Luminosity gaps, BL Lacertae objects, and efficient energy transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Borovsky, Joseph E.; Benford, Gregory; Eilek, Jean A.

    1988-01-01

    A model of the inner portions of astrophysical jets is constructed in which a relativistic electron beam is injected from the central engine into the jet plasma. This beam drives electrostatic plasma wave turbulence, which leads to the collective emission of electromagnetic waves. The emitted waves are beamed in the direction of the jet axis, so that end-on viewing of the jet yields an extremely bright source (BL Lacertae object). The relativistic electron beam may also drive long-wavelength electromagnetic plasma instabilities (firehose and Kelvin-Helmholtz) that jumble the jet magnetic field lines. After a sufficient distance from the core source, these instabilities will cause the beamed emission to point in random directions and the jet emission can then be observed from any direction relative to the jet axis. This combination of effects may lead to the gap turn-on of astrophysical jets. The collective emission model leads to different estimates for energy transport and the interpretation of radio spectra than the conventional incoherent synchrotron theory.

  20. Utility of collecting metadata to manage a large scale conditions database in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Gallas, EJ; The ATLAS collaboration; Borodin, M; Formica, A

    2014-01-01

    The ATLAS Conditions Database, based on the LCG Conditions Database infrastructure, contains a wide variety of information needed in online data taking and offline analysis. The total volume of ATLAS conditions data is in the multi-Terabyte range. Internally, the active data is divided into 65 separate schemas (each with hundreds of underlying tables) according to overall data taking type, detector subsystem, and whether the data is used offline or strictly online. While each schema has a common infrastructure, each schema's data is entirely independent of other schemas, except at the highest level, where sets of conditions from each subsystem are tagged globally for ATLAS event data reconstruction and reprocessing. The partitioned nature of the conditions infrastructure works well for most purposes, but metadata about each schema is problematic to collect in global tools from such a system because it is only accessible via LCG tools schema by schema. This makes it difficult to get an overview of all schemas,...

  1. Scaling of swim speed and stroke frequency in geometrically similar penguins: they swim optimally to minimize cost of transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Katsufumi; Shiomi, Kozue; Watanabe, Yuuki; Watanuki, Yutaka; Takahashi, Akinori; Ponganis, Paul J.

    2010-01-01

    It has been predicted that geometrically similar animals would swim at the same speed with stroke frequency scaling with mass−1/3. In the present study, morphological and behavioural data obtained from free-ranging penguins (seven species) were compared. Morphological measurements support the geometrical similarity. However, cruising speeds of 1.8–2.3 m s−1 were significantly related to mass0.08 and stroke frequencies were proportional to mass−0.29. These scaling relationships do not agree with the previous predictions for geometrically similar animals. We propose a theoretical model, considering metabolic cost, work against mechanical forces (drag and buoyancy), pitch angle and dive depth. This new model predicts that: (i) the optimal swim speed, which minimizes the energy cost of transport, is proportional to (basal metabolic rate/drag)1/3 independent of buoyancy, pitch angle and dive depth; (ii) the optimal speed is related to mass0.05; and (iii) stroke frequency is proportional to mass−0.28. The observed scaling relationships of penguins support these predictions, which suggest that breath-hold divers swam optimally to minimize the cost of transport, including mechanical and metabolic energy during dive. PMID:19906666

  2. Atmospheric forcing of the upper ocean transport in the Gulf of Mexico: From seasonal to diurnal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judt, Falko; Chen, Shuyi S.; Curcic, Milan

    2016-06-01

    The 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) was an environmental disaster, which highlighted the urgent need to predict the transport and dispersion of hydrocarbon. Although the variability of the atmospheric forcing plays a major role in the upper ocean circulation and transport of the pollutants, the air-sea interaction on various time scales is not well understood. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the atmospheric forcing and upper ocean response in the GoM from seasonal to diurnal time scales, using climatologies derived from long-term observations, in situ observations from two field campaigns, and a coupled model. The atmospheric forcing in the GoM is characterized by striking seasonality. In the summer, the time-average large-scale forcing is weak, despite occasional extreme winds associated with hurricanes. In the winter, the atmospheric forcing is much stronger, and dominated by synoptic variability on time scales of 3-7 days associated with winter storms and cold air outbreaks. The diurnal cycle is more pronounced during the summer, when sea breeze circulations affect the coastal regions and nighttime wind maxima occur over the offshore waters. Realtime predictions from a high-resolution atmosphere-wave-ocean coupled model were evaluated for both summer and winter conditions during the Grand LAgrangian Deployment (GLAD) in July-August 2012 and the Surfzone Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment (SCOPE) in November-December 2013. The model generally captured the variability of atmospheric forcing on all scales, but suffered from some systematic errors.

  3. Evaluating the impact of field-scale management strategies on sediment transport to the watershed outlet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerlot, Andrew R; Pouyan Nejadhashemi, A; Woznicki, Sean A; Prohaska, Michael D

    2013-10-15

    Non-point source pollution from agricultural lands is a significant contributor of sediment pollution in United States lakes and streams. Therefore, quantifying the impact of individual field management strategies at the watershed-scale provides valuable information to watershed managers and conservation agencies to enhance decision-making. In this study, four methods employing some of the most cited models in field and watershed scale analysis were compared to find a practical yet accurate method for evaluating field management strategies at the watershed outlet. The models used in this study including field-scale model (the Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation 2 - RUSLE2), spatially explicit overland sediment delivery models (SEDMOD), and a watershed-scale model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool - SWAT). These models were used to develop four modeling strategies (methods) for the River Raisin watershed: Method 1) predefined field-scale subbasin and reach layers were used in SWAT model; Method 2) subbasin-scale sediment delivery ratio was employed; Method 3) results obtained from the field-scale RUSLE2 model were incorporated as point source inputs to the SWAT watershed model; and Method 4) a hybrid solution combining analyses from the RUSLE2, SEDMOD, and SWAT models. Method 4 was selected as the most accurate among the studied methods. In addition, the effectiveness of six best management practices (BMPs) in terms of the water quality improvement and associated cost were assessed. Economic analysis was performed using Method 4, and producer requested prices for BMPs were compared with prices defined by the Environmental Quality Incentives Program (EQIP). On a per unit area basis, producers requested higher prices than EQIP in four out of six BMP categories. Meanwhile, the true cost of sediment reduction at the field and watershed scales was greater than EQIP in five of six BMP categories according to producer requested prices. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Impacts of large-scale atmospheric circulation changes in winter on black carbon transport and deposition to the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Pozzoli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Winter warming and sea-ice retreat observed in the Arctic in the last decades may be related to changes of large-scale atmospheric circulation pattern, which may impact the transport of black carbon (BC to the Arctic and its deposition on the sea ice, with possible feedbacks on the regional and global climate forcing. In this study we developed and applied a statistical algorithm, based on the maximum likelihood estimate approach, to determine how the changes of three large-scale weather patterns associated with increasing temperatures in winter and sea-ice retreat in the Arctic impact the transport of BC to the Arctic and its deposition. We found that two atmospheric patterns together determine a decreasing winter deposition trend of BC between 1980 and 2015 in the eastern Arctic while they increase BC deposition in the western Arctic. The increasing BC trend is mainly due to a pattern characterized by a high-pressure anomaly near Scandinavia favouring the transport in the lower troposphere of BC from Europe and North Atlantic directly into to the Arctic. Another pattern with a high-pressure anomaly over the Arctic and low-pressure anomaly over the North Atlantic Ocean has a smaller impact on BC deposition but determines an increasing BC atmospheric load over the entire Arctic Ocean with increasing BC concentrations in the upper troposphere. The results show that changes in atmospheric circulation due to polar atmospheric warming and reduced winter sea ice significantly impacted BC transport and deposition. The anthropogenic emission reductions applied in the last decades were, therefore, crucial to counterbalance the most likely trend of increasing BC pollution in the Arctic.

  5. Influence of Sub-grid-Scale Isentropic Transports on McRAS Evaluations using ARM-CART SCM Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Walker, G. K.; Tao, W. K.

    2004-01-01

    In GCM-physics evaluations with the currently available ARM-CART SCM datasets, McRAS produced very similar character of near surface errors of simulated temperature and humidity containing typically warm and moist biases near the surface and cold and dry biases aloft. We argued it must have a common cause presumably rooted in the model physics. Lack of vertical adjustment of horizontal transport was thought to be a plausible source. Clearly, debarring such a freedom would force the incoming air to diffuse into the grid-cell which would naturally bias the surface air to become warm and moist while the upper air becomes cold and dry, a characteristic feature of McRAS biases. Since, the errors were significantly larger in the two winter cases that contain potentially more intense episodes of cold and warm advective transports, it further reaffirmed our argument and provided additional motivation to introduce the corrections. When the horizontal advective transports were suitably modified to allow rising and/or sinking following isentropic pathways of subgrid scale motions, the outcome was to cool and dry (or warm and moisten) the lower (or upper) levels. Ever, crude approximations invoking such a correction reduced the temperature and humidity biases considerably. The tests were performed on all the available ARM-CART SCM cases with consistent outcome. With the isentropic corrections implemented through two different numerical approximations, virtually similar benefits were derived further confirming the robustness of our inferences. These results suggest the need for insentropic advective transport adjustment in a GCM due to subgrid scale motions.

  6. Impacts of large-scale atmospheric circulation changes in winter on black carbon transport and deposition to the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzoli, Luca; Dobricic, Srdan; Russo, Simone; Vignati, Elisabetta

    2017-10-01

    Winter warming and sea-ice retreat observed in the Arctic in the last decades may be related to changes of large-scale atmospheric circulation pattern, which may impact the transport of black carbon (BC) to the Arctic and its deposition on the sea ice, with possible feedbacks on the regional and global climate forcing. In this study we developed and applied a statistical algorithm, based on the maximum likelihood estimate approach, to determine how the changes of three large-scale weather patterns associated with increasing temperatures in winter and sea-ice retreat in the Arctic impact the transport of BC to the Arctic and its deposition. We found that two atmospheric patterns together determine a decreasing winter deposition trend of BC between 1980 and 2015 in the eastern Arctic while they increase BC deposition in the western Arctic. The increasing BC trend is mainly due to a pattern characterized by a high-pressure anomaly near Scandinavia favouring the transport in the lower troposphere of BC from Europe and North Atlantic directly into to the Arctic. Another pattern with a high-pressure anomaly over the Arctic and low-pressure anomaly over the North Atlantic Ocean has a smaller impact on BC deposition but determines an increasing BC atmospheric load over the entire Arctic Ocean with increasing BC concentrations in the upper troposphere. The results show that changes in atmospheric circulation due to polar atmospheric warming and reduced winter sea ice significantly impacted BC transport and deposition. The anthropogenic emission reductions applied in the last decades were, therefore, crucial to counterbalance the most likely trend of increasing BC pollution in the Arctic.

  7. Georeferenced and secure mobile health system for large scale data collection in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Joao H G; Rebelo, Marina S; Brentani, Alexandra; Grisi, Sandra J F E; Iwaya, Leonardo H; Simplicio, Marcos A; Carvalho, Tereza C M B; Gutierrez, Marco A

    2016-10-01

    Mobile health consists in applying mobile devices and communication capabilities for expanding the coverage and improving the effectiveness of health care programs. The technology is particularly promising for developing countries, in which health authorities can take advantage of the flourishing mobile market to provide adequate health care to underprivileged communities, especially primary care. In Brazil, the Primary Care Information System (SIAB) receives primary health care data from all regions of the country, creating a rich database for health-related action planning. Family Health Teams (FHTs) collect this data in periodic visits to families enrolled in governmental programs, following an acquisition procedure that involves filling in paper forms. This procedure compromises the quality of the data provided to health care authorities and slows down the decision-making process. To develop a mobile system (GeoHealth) that should address and overcome the aforementioned problems and deploy the proposed solution in a wide underprivileged metropolitan area of a major city in Brazil. The proposed solution comprises three main components: (a) an Application Server, with a database containing family health conditions; and two clients, (b) a Web Browser running visualization tools for management tasks, and (c) a data-gathering device (smartphone) to register and to georeference the family health data. A data security framework was designed to ensure the security of data, which was stored locally and transmitted over public networks. The system was successfully deployed at six primary care units in the city of Sao Paulo, where a total of 28,324 families/96,061 inhabitants are regularly followed up by government health policies. The health conditions observed from the population covered were: diabetes in 3.40%, hypertension (age >40) in 23.87% and tuberculosis in 0.06%. This estimated prevalence has enabled FHTs to set clinical appointments proactively, with the aim of

  8. Using coarse GPS data to quantify city-scale transportation system resilience to extreme events

    CERN Document Server

    Donovan, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This article proposes a method to quantitatively measure the resilience of transportation systems using GPS data from taxis. The granularity of the GPS data necessary for this analysis is relatively coarse; it only requires coordinates for the beginning and end of trips, the metered distance, and the total travel time. The method works by computing the historical distribution of pace (normalized travel times) between various regions of a city and measuring the pace deviations during an unusual event. This method is applied to a dataset of nearly 700 million taxi trips in New York City, which is used to analyze the transportation infrastructure resilience to Hurricane Sandy. The analysis indicates that Hurricane Sandy impacted traffic conditions for more than five days, and caused a peak delay of two minutes per mile. Practically, it identifies that the evacuation caused only minor disruptions, but significant delays were encountered during the post-disaster reentry process. Since the implementation of this me...

  9. Scale Dependency of Convective Momentum Transport as Diagnosed from Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation with Spectral-bin Microphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y. C.; Fan, J.; Zhang, G. J.; Xu, K. M.; Ghan, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Convective momentum transport (CMT) has been demonstrated to have a large impact on global atmospheric circulation in both observational and numerical studies. In General Circulation Models (GCMs) CMT is often parameterized in a simple way by assuming that in-cloud horizontal momentum depends only on lateral entrainment and detrainment rates [Schneider and Lindzen, 1976]. In addition to lateral entrainment and detrainment rates the effect of perturbation pressure gradient force induced by convection (Pc) on momentum transport is significant. Because it is the most complicated term to be parameterized, a very simple form of products among a constant coefficient, mass flux, and environment vertical wind shear was employed to parameterize it [Gregory et al., 1997]. In addition, none of these CMT parameterizations deal with the scale problems. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate the past CMT parameterizations and explore the scale dependencies of Pc and CMT using Cloud Resolving Model (CRM) simulations from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) coupled with the most sophisticated spectral-bin microphysics. Our preliminary results show that the parameterized CMT from the top-hat approach is underestimated especially at the gray zone scale (~4-50 km); using the simplified 3-updraft and 1-downdraft formulation proposed in our previous study for eddy transport of moisture, the CMT can be represented well. The formulation also produced a more accurate mass flux compared to the top-hat approach, which can potentially improve the parameterization of Pc. We investigate the relative contributions from linear and nonlinear forcing to Pc at different model grid spacing (dx). Our results show that the assumption that non-linear forcing is much smaller than linear force is valid only at dx > 128 km and dx < 8 km. At the dx = 32~16 km, linear and nonlinear forcings become compatible, suggesting a more sophisticated formula for Pc might be needed.

  10. Multiscale modelling of dual-porosity porous media; a computational pore-scale study for flow and solute transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Enno T.; Raoof, Amir; van Genuchten, Martinus Th.

    2017-07-01

    Many environmental and agricultural applications involve the transport of water and dissolved constituents through aggregated soil profiles, or porous media that are structured, fractured or macroporous in other ways. During the past several decades, various process-based macroscopic models have been used to simulate contaminant transport in such media. Many of these models consider advective-dispersive transport through relatively large inter-aggregate pore domains, while exchange with the smaller intra-aggregate pores is assumed to be controlled by diffusion. Exchange of solute between the two domains is often represented using a first-order mass transfer coefficient, which is commonly obtained by fitting to observed data. This study aims to understand and quantify the solute exchange term by applying a dual-porosity pore-scale network model to relatively large domains, and analysing the pore-scale results in terms of the classical dual-porosity (mobile-immobile) transport formulation. We examined the effects of key parameters (notably aggregate porosity and aggregate permeability) on the main dual-porosity model parameters, i.e., the mobile water fraction (ϕm) and the mass transfer coefficient (α). Results were obtained for a wide range of aggregate porosities (between 0.082 and 0.700). The effect of aggregate permeability was explored by varying pore throat sizes within the aggregates. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained with the pore-scale network model at several locations along the domain were analysed using analytical solutions of the dual-porosity model to obtain estimates of ϕm and α. An increase in aggregate porosity was found to decrease ϕm and increase α, leading to considerable tailing in the BTCs. Changes in the aggregate pore throat size affected the relative flow velocity between the intra- and inter-aggregate domains. Higher flow velocities within the aggregates caused a change in the transport regime from diffusion dominated to more

  11. Reactive Chemical Transport Simulation to Study Geothermal Production with Mineral Recovery and Silica Scaling

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Pham, Minh; Klein, Christopher; Sanyal, Subir

    2001-01-01

    There are vast reserves of dissolved minerals in the hypersaline brines of geothermal fields in the Imperial Valley of California. Recovery of zinc from geothermal brines is being practiced in this area, and recovery of silica, manganese, silver, lead and lithium has been or is being considered. Therefore, the ability to model mineral recovery is very significant in terms of economic development and resource utilization. The reactive geochemical transport simulator TOUGHREACT has been used to...

  12. Collective Influence of Multiple Spreaders Evaluated by Tracing Real Information Flow in Large-Scale Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xian; Pei, Sen; Morone, Flaviano; Makse, Hernán A.

    2016-10-01

    Identifying the most influential spreaders that maximize information flow is a central question in network theory. Recently, a scalable method called “Collective Influence (CI)” has been put forward through collective influence maximization. In contrast to heuristic methods evaluating nodes’ significance separately, CI method inspects the collective influence of multiple spreaders. Despite that CI applies to the influence maximization problem in percolation model, it is still important to examine its efficacy in realistic information spreading. Here, we examine real-world information flow in various social and scientific platforms including American Physical Society, Facebook, Twitter and LiveJournal. Since empirical data cannot be directly mapped to ideal multi-source spreading, we leverage the behavioral patterns of users extracted from data to construct “virtual” information spreading processes. Our results demonstrate that the set of spreaders selected by CI can induce larger scale of information propagation. Moreover, local measures as the number of connections or citations are not necessarily the deterministic factors of nodes’ importance in realistic information spreading. This result has significance for rankings scientists in scientific networks like the APS, where the commonly used number of citations can be a poor indicator of the collective influence of authors in the community.

  13. Collective Influence of Multiple Spreaders Evaluated by Tracing Real Information Flow in Large-Scale Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Xian; Pei, Sen; Morone, Flaviano; Makse, Hernán A.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the most influential spreaders that maximize information flow is a central question in network theory. Recently, a scalable method called “Collective Influence (CI)” has been put forward through collective influence maximization. In contrast to heuristic methods evaluating nodes’ significance separately, CI method inspects the collective influence of multiple spreaders. Despite that CI applies to the influence maximization problem in percolation model, it is still important to examine its efficacy in realistic information spreading. Here, we examine real-world information flow in various social and scientific platforms including American Physical Society, Facebook, Twitter and LiveJournal. Since empirical data cannot be directly mapped to ideal multi-source spreading, we leverage the behavioral patterns of users extracted from data to construct “virtual” information spreading processes. Our results demonstrate that the set of spreaders selected by CI can induce larger scale of information propagation. Moreover, local measures as the number of connections or citations are not necessarily the deterministic factors of nodes’ importance in realistic information spreading. This result has significance for rankings scientists in scientific networks like the APS, where the commonly used number of citations can be a poor indicator of the collective influence of authors in the community. PMID:27782207

  14. Dimensionless scalings of confinement, heat transport and pedestal stability in JET-ILW and comparison with JET-C

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frassinetti, L.; Saarelma, S.; Lomas, P.; Nunes, I.; Rimini, F.; Beurskens, M.N.A.; Bílková, Petra; Boom, J.E.; De La Luna, E.; Delabie, E.; Drewelow, P.; Flanagan, J.; Garzotti, L.; Giroud, C.; Hawks, N.; Joffrin, E.; Kempenaars, M.; Kim, H.-T.; Kruezi, U.; Loarte, A.; Lomanowski, B.; Lupelli, I.; Meneses, L.; Maggi, C.F.; Menmuir, S.; Peterka, Matěj; Rachlew, E.; Romanelli, M.; Stefanikova, E.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 1 (2017), č. článku 014014. ISSN 0741-3335. [EPS 2016: Conference on Plasma Physics/43./. Leuven, 04.07.2016-08.07.2016] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : JET-ILW * dimensionless scaling * pedestal * confinement * pedestal stability * heat transport Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.392, year: 2016 http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0741-3335/59/1/014014

  15. Chaotic advection at the pore scale: Mechanisms, upscaling and implications for macroscopic transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, D. R.; Trefry, M. G.; Metcalfe, G.

    2016-11-01

    The macroscopic spreading and mixing of solute plumes in saturated porous media is ultimately controlled by processes operating at the pore scale. Whilst the conventional picture of pore-scale mechanical dispersion and molecular diffusion leading to persistent hydrodynamic dispersion is well accepted, this paradigm is inherently two-dimensional (2D) in nature and neglects important three-dimensional (3D) phenomena. We discuss how the kinematics of steady 3D flow at the pore scale generate chaotic advection-involving exponential stretching and folding of fluid elements-the mechanisms by which it arises and implications of microscopic chaos for macroscopic dispersion and mixing. Prohibited in steady 2D flow due to topological constraints, these phenomena are ubiquitous due to the topological complexity inherent to all 3D porous media. Consequently 3D porous media flows generate profoundly different fluid deformation and mixing processes to those of 2D flow. The interplay of chaotic advection and broad transit time distributions can be incorporated into a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) framework to predict macroscopic solute mixing and spreading. We show how these results may be generalised to real porous architectures via a CTRW model of fluid deformation, leading to stochastic models of macroscopic dispersion and mixing which both honour the pore-scale kinematics and are directly conditioned on the pore-scale architecture.

  16. Large-scale collection and annotation of gene models for date palm (Phoenix dactylifera, L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangyu; Pan, Linlin; Yin, Yuxin; Liu, Wanfei; Huang, Dawei; Zhang, Tongwu; Wang, Lei; Xin, Chengqi; Lin, Qiang; Sun, Gaoyuan; Ba Abdullah, Mohammed M; Zhang, Xiaowei; Hu, Songnian; Al-Mssallem, Ibrahim S; Yu, Jun

    2012-08-01

    The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.), famed for its sugar-rich fruits (dates) and cultivated by humans since 4,000 B.C., is an economically important crop in the Middle East, Northern Africa, and increasingly other places where climates are suitable. Despite a long history of human cultivation, the understanding of P. dactylifera genetics and molecular biology are rather limited, hindered by lack of basic data in high quality from genomics and transcriptomics. Here we report a large-scale effort in generating gene models (assembled expressed sequence tags or ESTs and mapped to a genome assembly) for P. dactylifera, using the long-read pyrosequencing platform (Roche/454 GS FLX Titanium) in high coverage. We built fourteen cDNA libraries from different P. dactylifera tissues (cultivar Khalas) and acquired 15,778,993 raw sequencing reads-about one million sequencing reads per library-and the pooled sequences were assembled into 67,651 non-redundant contigs and 301,978 singletons. We annotated 52,725 contigs based on the plant databases and 45 contigs based on functional domains referencing to the Pfam database. From the annotated contigs, we assigned GO (Gene Ontology) terms to 36,086 contigs and KEGG pathways to 7,032 contigs. Our comparative analysis showed that 70.6 % (47,930), 69.4 % (47,089), 68.4 % (46,441), and 69.3 % (47,048) of the P. dactylifera gene models are shared with rice, sorghum, Arabidopsis, and grapevine, respectively. We also assigned our gene models into house-keeping and tissue-specific genes based on their tissue specificity.

  17. First-principles electron transport with phonon coupling: Large scale at low cost

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunst, Tue; Markussen, Troels; Palsgaard, Mattias L. N.

    2017-01-01

    Phonon-assisted tunneling plays a crucial role for electronic device performance and even more so with future size down-scaling. We show how one can include this effect in large-scale first-principles calculations using a single "special thermal displacement" (STD) of the atomic coordinates......-to-band and source-to-drain tunneling. In a diode the phonons lead to a rectification ratio suppression in good agreement with experiments, while in an ultrathin body transistor the phonons increase off currents by four orders of magnitude, and the subthreshold swing by a factor of 4, in agreement with perturbation...

  18. Theoretical study of electromagnetic transport in Lepidoptera Danaus plexippus wing scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sackey

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the electromagnetic energies developed in the scales of the Lepidoptera Danaus plexippus. The Green tensor method was used to calculate and simulate the energies at specific wavelengths. Scattering of electromagnetic waves within the scales was simulated at different wavelengths (λ with the corresponding maximum energy occurred at λ = 0.45 μm. The study shows that the design of wing’s cross-ribs maximizes the eigenmode of electromagnetic energy. This shows promising applications in bio-sensors of Solar light and likewise in waveguide for photonic transmission.

  19. A three-scale model for ionic solute transport in swelling clays incorporating ion-ion correlation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Tien Dung; Moyne, Christian; Murad, Marcio A.

    2015-01-01

    A new three-scale model is proposed to describe the movement of ionic species of different valences in swelling clays characterized by three separate length scales (nano, micro, and macro) and two levels of porosity (nano- and micropores). At the finest (nano) scale the medium is treated as charged clay particles saturated by aqueous electrolyte solution containing monovalent and divalent ions forming the electrical double layer. A new constitutive law is constructed for the disjoining pressure based on the numerical resolution of non-local problem at the nanoscale which, in contrast to the Poisson-Boltzmann theory for point charge ions, is capable of capturing the short-range interactions between the ions due to their finite size. At the intermediate scale (microscale), the two-phase homogenized particle/electrolyte solution system is represented by swollen clay clusters (or aggregates) with the nanoscale disjoining pressure incorporated in a modified form of Terzaghi's effective principle. At the macroscale, the electro-chemical-mechanical couplings within clay clusters is homogenized with the ion transport in the bulk fluid lying in the micro pores. The resultant macroscopic picture is governed by a three-scale model wherein ion transport takes place in the bulk solution strongly coupled with the mechanics of the clay clusters which play the role of sources/sinks of mass to the bulk fluid associated with ion adsorption/desorption in the electrical double layer at the nanoscale. Within the context of the quasi-steady version of the multiscale model, wherein the electrolyte solution in the nanopores is assumed at instantaneous thermodynamic equilibrium with the bulk fluid in the micropores, we build-up numerically the ion-adsorption isotherms along with the constitutive law of the retardation coefficients of monovalent and divalent ions. In addition, the constitutive law for the macroscopic swelling pressure is reconstructed numerically showing patterns of

  20. Meso-scale kinematic indicators in exhumed mass transport deposits: Definitions and implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ogata, Kei; Pini, Gian Andrea; Festa, Andrea; Poga??nik, Z??ljko; Lucente, Claudio Corrado

    2016-01-01

    In this study we combine observations and analytical data from large-scale (10–100s of m-thick and 100 m 2 -extensive), siliciclastic and carbonate MTD/MTCs belonging to the Oligocene – Miocene foredeep and wedge-top suc-cessions of the Northern Apennines and the Paleocene – Eocene Friuli basin of

  1. Modelling of Temperature Profiles and Transport Scaling in Auxiliary Heated Tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callen, J.D.; Christiansen, J.P.; Cordey, J.G.

    1987-01-01

    -mode) scaling with input power, . The constant heat pinch or excess temperature gradient model leads to the offset linear law for the total stored energy W with Pin, W = τinc Pin + W(0), which describes JET auxiliary heating data quite well. It also provides definitions for the incremental energy confinement...

  2. Suspended sediment transport around a large-scale laboratory breaker bar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zanden, Joep; van der A, D.A.; Hurther, D.; Caceres, I.; O' Donoghue, T.; Ribberink, Jan S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents novel insights into suspended sediment concentrations and fluxes under a large-scale laboratory plunging wave. Measurements of sediment concentrations and velocities were taken at 12 locations around an evolving breaker bar, covering the complete breaking region from shoaling to

  3. Interpersonal Transport of Expiratory Aerosols among Three Manikins in a Full-Scale Test Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on occupants’ exposure of aerosols exhaled by one susceptible in a full-scale test room. Three breathing thermal manikins are standing in the middle of room and both the process in the microenvironment and in the macroenvironment are considered. A diffusive ceiling has been ins...

  4. Ultrafine particle transport and deposition in a large scale 17-generation lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad S; Saha, Suvash C; Sauret, Emilie; Gemci, Tevfik; Yang, Ian A; Gu, Y T

    2017-11-07

    To understand how to assess optimally the risks of inhaled particles on respiratory health, it is necessary to comprehend the uptake of ultrafine particulate matter by inhalation during the complex transport process through a non-dichotomously bifurcating network of conduit airways. It is evident that the highly toxic ultrafine particles damage the respiratory epithelium in the terminal bronchioles. The wide range of in silico available and the limited realistic model for the extrathoracic region of the lung have improved understanding of the ultrafine particle transport and deposition (TD) in the upper airways. However, comprehensive ultrafine particle TD data for the real and entire lung model are still unavailable in the literature. Therefore, this study is aimed to provide an understanding of the ultrafine particle TD in the terminal bronchioles for the development of future therapeutics. The Euler-Lagrange (E-L) approach and ANSYS fluent (17.2) solver were used to investigate ultrafine particle TD. The physical conditions of sleeping, resting, and light activity were considered in this modelling study. A comprehensive pressure-drop along five selected path lines in different lobes was calculated. The non-linear behaviour of pressure-drops is observed, which could aid the health risk assessment system for patients with respiratory diseases. Numerical results also showed that ultrafine particle-deposition efficiency (DE) in different lobes is different for various physical activities. Moreover, the numerical results showed hot spots in various locations among the different lobes for different flow rates, which could be helpful for targeted therapeutical aerosol transport to terminal bronchioles and the alveolar region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Scaling of phloem structure and optimality of photoassimilate transport in conifer needles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Liesche, Johannes; Jensen, Kaare Hartvig

    2015-01-01

    The phloem vascular system facilitates transport of energy-rich sugar and signalling molecules in plants, thus permitting long-range communication within the organism and growth of non-photosynthesizing organs such as roots and fruits. The flow is driven by osmotic pressure, generated...... by differences in sugar concentration between distal parts of the plant. The phloem is an intricate distribution system, and many questions about its regulation and structural diversity remain unanswered. Here, we investigate the phloem structure in the simplest possible geometry: a linear leaf, found...... are more important than translocation speed at the leaf level....

  6. The fusion code XGC: Enabling kinetic study of multi-scale edge turbulent transport in ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Azevedo, Eduardo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Abbott, Stephen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Koskela, Tuomas [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Worley, Patrick [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ku, Seung-Hoe [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ethier, Stephane [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Yoon, Eisung [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Shephard, Mark [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States); Hager, Robert [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lang, Jianying [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Intel Corporation, Santa Clara, CA (United States); Choi, Jong [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Podhorszki, Norbert [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Klasky, Scott [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Parashar, Manish [Rutgers Univ., Piscataway, NJ (United States); Chang, Choong-Seock [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The XGC fusion gyrokinetic code combines state-of-the-art, portable computational and algorithmic technologies to enable complicated multiscale simulations of turbulence and transport dynamics in ITER edge plasma on the largest US open-science computer, the CRAY XK7 Titan, at its maximal heterogeneous capability, which have not been possible before due to a factor of over 10 shortage in the time-to-solution for less than 5 days of wall-clock time for one physics case. Frontier techniques such as nested OpenMP parallelism, adaptive parallel I/O, staging I/O and data reduction using dynamic and asynchronous applications interactions, dynamic repartitioning.

  7. Solute transport in periodical heterogeneous porous media: Importance of observation scale and experimental sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majdalani, S.; Chazarin, J. P.; Delenne, C.; Guinot, V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the effects of the observation scale and sampling on the dispersion of tracers in periodical heterogeneous porous media. A Model Heterogeneous Porous Medium (MHPM) with a high degree of heterogeneity was built. It consists of a preferential flow path surrounded by glass beads. 44 tracer experiments were carried out on several series of periodic MHPM to investigate the effect of the observation scale on solute dispersion. Each series was replicated several times, allowing for a statistical description of the unit transfer function of the MHPM. No significant trend was found for the dispersion coefficient as a function of the size of the MHPM. However, given the variability of the breakthrough curves from one experiment replicate to another, under-sampling might easily lead to conclude that the dispersion coefficient is variable with distance. Depending on the samples used, it would be as easy to (wrongly) detect an increasing trend as to detect a decreasing one. A confidence interval analysis of the experimental breakthrough curves in the Laplace space shows that (i) there exists a model with scale independent parameters that can describe the experimental breakthrough curves within the limits of experimental uncertainty, (ii) this model is not the advection-dispersion (AD) model, (iii) the modelling error of the AD model decreases with the number of periods, (iv) the size of the Reference Elementary Volume for the dispersion coefficient is between 10 and 20 periods. The effects of sampling prove to override those of scaling. This, with the invalidity of the AD model, leads to question attempts to calibrate and/or identify trends in the dispersion coefficient at intermediate scales from a limited number of experiment replicates.

  8. Ion transport mechanisms in the mesonephric collecting duct system of the toad Bufo bufo: microelectrode recordings from isolated and perfused tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møbjerg, Nadja; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Novak, Ivana

    2004-01-01

    It is not clear how and whether terrestrial amphibians handle NaCl transport in the distal nephron. Therefore, we studied ion transport in isolated perfused collecting tubules and ducts from toad, Bufo bufo, by means of microelectrodes. No qualitative difference in basolateral cell membrane...... and amiloride application showed a small apical Na+ conductance. Arginine vasotocin depolarized Vbl. The small apical Na+ conductance indicates that the collecting duct system contributes little to NaCl reabsorption when compared to aquatic amphibians. In contrast, Vbl rapidly depolarized upon lowering of [Na...

  9. Direct numerical simulation of reactive flow and modeling of pore-scale transport phenomena in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomeli, Mohammad; Riaz, Amir

    2017-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of reactive flow and a long-term geochemical modeling of CO2 sequestration is carried out in a fractured media to investigate its impact on CO2 transport and storage capacity. The fracture is modeled by considering flow of CO2 between finite plates. We study the physics and the critical time of blockage for a fracture to interpret the results. To this end, we employ direct numerical simulation tools and algorithms to simulate incompressible flow along with necessary transport equations that capture the kinetics of relevant chemical reactions. The numerical model is based on a finite volume method using a sequential non-iterative approach. It is found that the reactive transport of minerals has an important effect on reservoir porosity and permeability. According to the simulations, the flow of injected CO2 in the fracture is controlled by changes in the pore-scale permeability. The fracture ceases to be a fluid channel due to geochemical reactions of minerals. In addition, using parameter analysis we also determine the effect of various reaction kinetics on permeability of porous media.

  10. Transport and Zonal Flows at Ion and Electron scales in the MST Reversed-Field Pinch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Zachary; Duff, James; Pueschel, M. J.; Terry, Paul; University of Wisconsin-Madison Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    Reversed-field pinches (RFPs) operating in an improved-confinement regime, Pulsed Poloidal Current Drive (PPCD), exhibit microturbulence that contributes to heat and particle transport. Gyrokinetic simulations are used to characterize various PPCD discharges with differing values of η ≡ dlnT / dlnn . Zonal flows play an important role in regulating ITG, TEM, and ETG transport in these discharges. Residual magnetic fluctuations from tearing modes in RFPs degrade zonal flows, setting flux levels and critical gradients. In the absence of such fluctuations, RFPs can generate very large zonal flow amplitudes, resulting in negligibly small fluxes. Potential mechanisms for this strong zonal flow generation are addressed here, including zonal flow residuals, secondary instability, and strong density gradients. Beyond fluxes, comparisons between simulation and the experiment are sought out through the study of carbon impurities. Additionally, longer-term plans for experimental comparison are introduced here through the investigation of fast ion dynamics, with a focus on particle diffusivity to assess NBI heating for RFPs.

  11. Aflatoxin levels in sunflower seeds and cakes collected from micro- and small-scale sunflower oil processors in Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmongoyo, Juma A; Wu, Felicia; Linz, John E; Nair, Muraleedharan G; Mugula, Jovin K; Tempelman, Robert J; Strasburg, Gale M

    2017-01-01

    Aflatoxin, a mycotoxin found commonly in maize and peanuts worldwide, is associated with liver cancer, acute toxicosis, and growth impairment in humans and animals. In Tanzania, sunflower seeds are a source of snacks, cooking oil, and animal feed. These seeds are a potential source of aflatoxin contamination. However, reports on aflatoxin contamination in sunflower seeds and cakes are scarce. The objective of the current study was to determine total aflatoxin concentrations in sunflower seeds and cakes from small-scale oil processors across Tanzania. Samples of sunflower seeds (n = 90) and cakes (n = 92) were collected across two years, and analyzed for total aflatoxin concentrations using a direct competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). For seed samples collected June-August 2014, the highest aflatoxin concentrations were from Dodoma (1.7-280.6 ng/g), Singida (1.4-261.8 ng/g), and Babati-Manyara (1.8-162.0 ng/g). The highest concentrations for cakes were from Mbeya (2.8-97.7 ng/g), Dodoma (1.9-88.2 ng/g), and Singida (2.0-34.3 ng/g). For seed samples collected August-October 2015, the highest concentrations were from Morogoro (2.8-662.7 ng/g), Singida (1.6-217.6 ng/g) and Mbeya (1.4-174.2 ng/g). The highest concentrations for cakes were from Morogoro (2.7-536.0 ng/g), Dodoma (1.4-598.4 ng/g) and Singida (3.2-52.8 ng/g). In summary, humans and animals are potentially at high risk of exposure to aflatoxins through sunflower seeds and cakes from micro-scale millers in Tanzania; and location influences risk.

  12. Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sándor, Cs.; Libál, A.; Reichhardt, C.; Reichhardt, C. J. Olson

    2017-01-01

    We examine numerically the transport of an assembly of active run-and-tumble disks interacting with a traveling-wave substrate. We show that as a function of substrate strength, wave speed, disk activity, and disk density, a variety of dynamical phases arise that are correlated with the structure and net flux of disks. We find that there is a sharp transition into a state in which the disks are only partially coupled to the substrate and form a phase-separated cluster state. This transition is associated with a drop in the net disk flux, and it can occur as a function of the substrate speed, maximum substrate force, disk run time, and disk density. Since variation of the disk activity parameters produces different disk drift rates for a fixed traveling-wave speed on the substrate, the system we consider could be used as an efficient method for active matter species separation. Within the cluster phase, we find that in some regimes the motion of the cluster center of mass is in the opposite direction to that of the traveling wave, while when the maximum substrate force is increased, the cluster drifts in the direction of the traveling wave. This suggests that swarming or clustering motion can serve as a method by which an active system can collectively move against an external drift.

  13. Decentralised fault diagnosis of large-scale systems: Application to water transport networks

    OpenAIRE

    Puig, Vicenç; Ocampo-Martinez, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a decentralised fault diagnosis approach for large-scale systems is proposed. This approach is based on obtaining a set of local diagnosers using the analytical redundancy relation (ARRs) approach. The proposed approach starts with obtaining the set of ARRs of the system yielding into an equivalent graph. From that graph, the graph partitioning problem is solved obtaining a set of ARRs for each local diagnoser. Finally, a decentralised fault diagnosis strategy is proposed an...

  14. RISK MANAGEMENT IN A LARGE-SCALE NEW RAILWAY TRANSPORT SYSTEM PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    SUH, Sunduck D.

    2000-01-01

    Risk management experiences of the Korean Seoul-Pusan high-speed railway (KTX) project since the planning stage are evaluated. One can clearly see the interplay of engineering and construction risks, financial risks and political risks in the development of the KTX project, which is the peculiarity of large-scale new railway system projects. A brief description on evaluation methodology and overview of the project is followed by detailed evaluations on key differences in risks between convent...

  15. Small-scale sediment transport patterns and bedform morphodynamics: New insights from high resolution multibeam bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Patrick L.; Erikson, Li H.; Rubin, David M.; Kvitek, Rikk G.

    2011-01-01

    New multibeam echosounder and processing technologies yield sub-meter-scale bathymetric resolution, revealing striking details of bedform morphology that are shaped by complex boundary-layer flow dynamics at a range of spatial and temporal scales. An inertially aided post processed kinematic (IAPPK) technique generates a smoothed best estimate trajectory (SBET) solution to tie the vessel motion-related effects of each sounding directly to the ellipsoid, significantly reducing artifacts commonly found in multibeam data, increasing point density, and sharpening seafloor features. The new technique was applied to a large bedform field in 20–30 m water depths in central San Francisco Bay, California (USA), revealing bedforms that suggest boundary-layer flow deflection by the crests where 12-m-wavelength, 0.2-m-amplitude bedforms are superimposed on 60-m-wavelength, 1-m-amplitude bedforms, with crests that often were strongly oblique (approaching 90°) to the larger features on the lee side, and near-parallel on the stoss side. During one survey in April 2008, superimposed bedform crests were continuous between the crests of the larger features, indicating that flow detachment in the lee of the larger bedforms is not always a dominant process. Assessment of bedform crest peakedness, asymmetry, and small-scale bedform evolution between surveys indicates the impact of different flow regimes on the entire bedform field. This paper presents unique fine-scale imagery of compound and superimposed bedforms, which is used to (1) assess the physical forcing and evolution of a bedform field in San Francisco Bay, and (2) in conjunction with numerical modeling, gain a better fundamental understanding of boundary-layer flow dynamics that result in the observed superimposed bedform orientation.

  16. Production of lightning NOx and its vertical distribution calculated from three-dimensional cloud-scale chemical transport model simulations

    KAUST Repository

    Ott, Lesley E.

    2010-02-18

    A three-dimensional (3-D) cloud-scale chemical transport model that includes a parameterized source of lightning NOx on the basis of observed flash rates has been used to simulate six midlatitude and subtropical thunderstorms observed during four field projects. Production per intracloud (PIC) and cloud-to-ground (PCG) flash is estimated by assuming various values of PIC and PCG for each storm and determining which production scenario yields NOx mixing ratios that compare most favorably with in-cloud aircraft observations. We obtain a mean PCG value of 500 moles NO (7 kg N) per flash. The results of this analysis also suggest that on average, PIC may be nearly equal to PCG, which is contrary to the common assumption that intracloud flashes are significantly less productive of NO than are cloud-to-ground flashes. This study also presents vertical profiles of the mass of lightning NOx after convection based on 3-D cloud-scale model simulations. The results suggest that following convection, a large percentage of lightning NOx remains in the middle and upper troposphere where it originated, while only a small percentage is found near the surface. The results of this work differ from profiles calculated from 2-D cloud-scale model simulations with a simpler lightning parameterization that were peaked near the surface and in the upper troposphere (referred to as a “C-shaped” profile). The new model results (a backward C-shaped profile) suggest that chemical transport models that assume a C-shaped vertical profile of lightning NOx mass may place too much mass near the surface and too little in the middle troposphere.

  17. In silico multi-scale model of transport and dynamic seeding in a bone tissue engineering perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, T J; Hidalgo-Bastida, L A; Cartmell, S H; Halliday, I; Care, C M

    2013-04-01

    Computer simulations can potentially be used to design, predict, and inform properties for tissue engineering perfusion bioreactors. In this work, we investigate the flow properties that result from a particular poly-L-lactide porous scaffold and a particular choice of perfusion bioreactor vessel design used in bone tissue engineering. We also propose a model to investigate the dynamic seeding properties such as the homogeneity (or lack of) of the cellular distribution within the scaffold of the perfusion bioreactor: a pre-requisite for the subsequent successful uniform growth of a viable bone tissue engineered construct. Flows inside geometrically complex scaffolds have been investigated previously and results shown at these pore scales. Here, it is our aim to show accurately that through the use of modern high performance computers that the bioreactor device scale that encloses a scaffold can affect the flows and stresses within the pores throughout the scaffold which has implications for bioreactor design, control, and use. Central to this work is that the boundary conditions are derived from micro computed tomography scans of both a device chamber and scaffold in order to avoid generalizations and uncertainties. Dynamic seeding methods have also been shown to provide certain advantages over static seeding methods. We propose here a novel coupled model for dynamic seeding accounting for flow, species mass transport and cell advection-diffusion-attachment tuned for bone tissue engineering. The model highlights the timescale differences between different species suggesting that traditional homogeneous porous flow models of transport must be applied with caution to perfusion bioreactors. Our in silico data illustrate the extent to which these experiments have the potential to contribute to future design and development of large-scale bioreactors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Screening and Scale-Up of GLUT Transporter Constructs Suitable for Biochemical and Structural Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdon, Grégory; Kang, Hae Joo; Drew, David

    2018-01-01

    Identifying membrane proteins that can be produced and isolated in homogenous form in detergent is a lengthy trial-and-error process that can be facilitated by fluorescence-based screening approaches. We describe (1) the strategy and protocol of cloning by homologous recombination, (2) whole-cell and in-gel fluorescence measurements to estimate GLUT-GFP fusion protein yields, (3) use of size-exclusion chromatography monitored by fluorescence (FSEC) for assessing the homogeneity of the GLUT-GFP fusion proteins, and (4) the protocol for large-scale production and purification of the Bos taurus GLUT5 construct that enabled its crystal structure determination.

  19. Ion-scale turbulence in MAST: anomalous transport, subcritical transitions, and comparison to BES measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wyk, F.; Highcock, E. G.; Field, A. R.; Roach, C. M.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Parra, F. I.; Dorland, W.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the effect of varying the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and toroidal equilibrium scale sheared flow on ion-scale turbulence in the outer core of MAST by means of local gyrokinetic simulations. We show that nonlinear simulations reproduce the experimental ion heat flux and that the experimentally measured values of the ITG and the flow shear lie close to the turbulence threshold. We demonstrate that the system is subcritical in the presence of flow shear, i.e., the system is formally stable to small perturbations, but transitions to a turbulent state given a large enough initial perturbation. We propose that the transition to subcritical turbulence occurs via an intermediate state dominated by low number of coherent long-lived structures, close to threshold, which increase in number as the system is taken away from the threshold into the more strongly turbulent regime, until they fill the domain and a more conventional turbulence emerges. We show that the properties of turbulence are effectively functions of the distance to threshold, as quantified by the ion heat flux. We make quantitative comparisons of correlation lengths, times, and amplitudes between our simulations and experimental measurements using the MAST BES diagnostic. We find reasonable agreement of the correlation properties, most notably of the correlation time, for which significant discrepancies were found in previous numerical studies of MAST turbulence.

  20. Spreading of the Western Mediterranean Deep Water after winter 2005: Time scales and deep cyclone transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beuvier, J.; BéRanger, K.; Lebeaupin Brossier, C.; Somot, S.; Sevault, F.; Drillet, Y.; Bourdallé-Badie, R.; Ferry, N.; Lyard, F.

    2012-07-01

    This work is dedicated to the study of the propagation of the Western Mediterranean Deep Water (WMDW) formed in the Gulf of Lions during the exceptional winter 2005. A simulation of the 1998-2008 period has been carried out with an eddy-resolving Ocean General Circulation Model of the Mediterranean Sea, driven by interannual high-resolution air-sea fluxes. This study first presents a validation of the recently improved model configuration against satellite observations. Then, we assess the ability of the model to reproduce the particularly intense deep convection event of winter 2005 in the Gulf of Lions. A huge volume of very dense water is formed in the simulation at that time (annual formation rate higher than 3 Sv). The thermohaline characteristics of the new WMDW allow a monitoring of its deep propagation. We identify several deep cyclones as mainly responsible of the fast spreading of the WMDW southwards in the Western Mediterranean. By comparing Eulerian and Lagrangian approaches, we estimate different transport times of the WMDW by these cyclonic eddies and compare them to those deduced from several observations. Finally, we argue that these cyclones favor the propagation of the WMDW thermohaline characteristics toward the Channel of Sardinia and decrease the volume of WMDW which can reach the Strait of Gibraltar.

  1. Scaling of phloem structure and optimality of photoassimilate transport in conifer needles

    CERN Document Server

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Jensen, Kaare H; Holbrook, N Michele; Schulz, Alexander; Katifori, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    The phloem vascular system facilitates transport of energy-rich sugar and signaling molecules in plants, thus permitting long range communication within the organism and growth of non-photosynthesizing organs such as roots and fruits. The flow is driven by osmotic pressure, generated by differences in sugar concentration between distal parts of the plant. The phloem is an intricate distribution system, and many questions about its regulation and structural diversity remain unanswered. Here, we investigate the phloem structure in the simplest possible geometry: a linear leaf, found, for example, in the needles of conifer trees. We measure the phloem structure in four tree species representing a diverse set of habitats and needle sizes, from 1 cm (\\textit{Picea omorika}) to 35 cm (\\textit{Pinus palustris}). We show that the phloem shares common traits across these four species and find that the size of its conductive elements obeys a power law. We present a minimal model that accounts for these common traits an...

  2. Pore-Scale Transport of Strontium During Dynamic Water Content Changes in the Unsaturated Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, W.; Kibbey, T. C. G.; Papelis, C.

    2016-12-01

    Dynamic water content changes in the unsaturated zone caused by natural and manmade processes, such as evaporation, rainfall, and irrigation, have an effect on contaminant mobility. In general, in the unsaturated zone, evaporation causes an increase in contaminant concentrations, potentially leading to sorption of contaminants on aquifer materials or precipitation of crystalline or amorphous phases. On the other hand, increase of water content may result in dissolution of precipitated phases and increased mobility of contaminants. The objective of this study was to develop a quantitative model for the transport of strontium through sand under dynamic water content conditions, as a function of strontium concentration, pH, and ionic strength. Strontium was selected as a surrogate for strontium-90, a by-product of nuclear reactions. The dynamic water content was determined using an automated device for rapidly measuring the hysteretic capillary pressure—saturation relationship, followed by ambient air evaporation, and gravimetric water content measurement. Strontium concentrations were measured using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Flow interruption experiments were conducted to determine whether equilibrium conditions existed for a given flowrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to visualize the treated quartz sand particles and the distribution of strontium on sand grains was determined using elemental maps created by energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Strontium behavior appears to be pH dependent as well as ionic strength dependent under these conditions.

  3. Watershed-scale modeling on the fate and transport of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ligaray, Mayzonee; Baek, Sang Soo [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hye-Ok [Disaster Scientific Investigation Division, National Disaster Management Research Institute, 365 Jongga-ro Jung-gu, Ulsan 44538 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sung-Deuk, E-mail: sdchoi@unist.ac.kr [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Kyung Hwa, E-mail: khcho@unist.ac.kr [School of Urban and Environmental Engineering, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, UNIST-gil 50, Ulsan 44919 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    PAHs are potentially carcinogenic substances that are persistent in the environment. Increasing concentrations of PAHs were observed due to rapid urbanization, thus; monitoring PAHs concentrations is necessary. However, it is expensive to conduct intensive monitoring activities of a large number of PAHs. This study addressed this issue by developing a multimedia model coupled with a hydrological model (i.e., Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT)) for Taehwa River (TR) watershed in Ulsan, the industrial capital of South Korea. The hydrologic module of the SWAT was calibrated, and further used to simulate the fate and transport of PAHs in soil and waterbody. The model demonstrated that the temporal or seasonal variation of PAHs in soil and waterbody can be well reproduced. Meanwhile, the spatial distribution of PAHs showed that urban areas in TR watershed have the highest PAH loadings compared to rural areas. Sensitivity analyses of the PAH soil and PAH water parameters were also able to determine the critical processes in TR watershed: degradation, deposition, volatilization, and wash off mechanism. We hope that this model will be able to aid the stakeholders in: regulating PAH concentrations emitted by various sources; and also apply the model to other Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs).

  4. RISK MANAGEMENT IN A LARGE-SCALE NEW RAILWAY TRANSPORT SYSTEM PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunduck D. SUH, Ph.D., P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Risk management experiences of the Korean Seoul-Pusan high-speed railway (KTX project since the planning stage are evaluated. One can clearly see the interplay of engineering and construction risks, financial risks and political risks in the development of the KTX project, which is the peculiarity of large-scale new railway system projects. A brief description on evaluation methodology and overview of the project is followed by detailed evaluations on key differences in risks between conventional railway system and high-speed railway system, social and political risks, engineering and construction risks, and financial risks. Risks involved in system procurement process, such as proposal solicitation, evaluation, selection, and scope of solicitation are separated out and evaluated in depth. Detailed events resulting from these issues are discussed along with their possible impact on system risk. Lessons learned and further possible refinements are also discussed.

  5. Interpersonal Transport of Droplet Nuclei among Three Manikins in a Full-Scale Test Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Li; Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm; Jensen, Rasmus Lund

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on occupants’ exposure of droplet nuclei exhaled by one susceptible in a full-scale test room. Three breathing thermal manikins are standing in the middle of room and both the process in the microenvironment and in the macroenvironment are considered. A diffusive ceiling has been...... installed to induce fresh air without generating sensible drafts in an occupied zone with fully mixing flow. The exposures of two target manikins to the droplet nuclei exhaled by one susceptible manikin were measured. Tracer gas N2O was used to simulate droplet nuclei. Comparisons on different mutual...... that instant high exposure exists even the average exposure is low. Two symmetrically located target manikins have different exposures of droplet nuclei exhaled by one susceptible manikin. The exposures of two target manikins are compared between mutual distances 0.5 m [1.6 ft.] and 0.8 m [2.6 ft...

  6. Sediment transport in steep forested catchments - An assessment of scale and disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, G. R.; Hugo, J.; Webb, A. A.; Turner, L.

    2017-04-01

    Stream sediment loads (both bedload and suspended sediment) are problematic to measure due to the time and equipment needed. There is a dearth of such data sets globally let alone for Australia. However, such data are needed to quantify sediment transport type and rates, landscape evolution, effect of human disturbance as well as patterns and temporal response. Here we present the findings from 8 steepslope forested catchments dominated by headwater streams (size range 15-100 ha) in south-eastern Australia where both bedload and suspended load have been measured over multiple years. The results demonstrate that suspended load is the dominant component and there is no consistent suspended to bedload ratio for the catchments. The suspended sediment to bedload ratio appears to be catchment specific. There was no relationship between total load (or bedload/suspended load) and average catchment slope, stream length, shape or any geomorphic descriptor. However catchment total load was found to be significantly related to catchment area. Of the 8 catchments examined here, 6 had been harvested for timber in previous decades (with large areas of forest removed) while 2 catchments had minimal disturbance (Control catchments). There was no difference in sediment loads from the harvested and Control catchments. The results demonstrate that although land disturbance had previously occurred the management practices employed in each catchment were effective in the long term. This provides confidence that the forest harvesting and subsequent management do not produce detrimental effects in the medium to long term. An assessment of erosion rates and likely soil production rates suggests that the catchments are eroding soil at the rate it is being produced.

  7. Collective synchronization of self/non-self discrimination in T cell activation, across multiple spatio-temporal scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan-Bonnet, Gregoire

    The immune system is a collection of cells whose function is to eradicate pathogenic infections and malignant tumors while protecting healthy tissues. Recent work has delineated key molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with the ability to discriminate self from non-self agents. For example, structural studies have quantified the biophysical characteristics of antigenic molecules (those prone to trigger lymphocyte activation and a subsequent immune response). However, such molecular mechanisms were found to be highly unreliable at the individual cellular level. We will present recent efforts to build experimentally validated computational models of the immune responses at the collective cell level. Such models have become critical to delineate how higher-level integration through nonlinear amplification in signal transduction, dynamic feedback in lymphocyte differentiation and cell-to-cell communication allows the immune system to enforce reliable self/non-self discrimination at the organism level. In particular, we will present recent results demonstrating how T cells tune their antigen discrimination according to cytokine cues, and how competition for cytokine within polyclonal populations of cells shape the repertoire of responding clones. Additionally, we will present recent theoretical and experimental results demonstrating how competition between diffusion and consumption of cytokines determine the range of cell-cell communications within lymphoid organs. Finally, we will discuss how biochemically explicit models, combined with quantitative experimental validation, unravel the relevance of new feedbacks for immune regulations across multiple spatial and temporal scales.

  8. Co-evolution of intelligent socio-technical systems modelling and applications in large scale emergency and transport domains

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    As the interconnectivity between humans through technical devices is becoming ubiquitous, the next step is already in the making: ambient intelligence, i.e. smart (technical) environments, which will eventually play the same active role in communication as the human players, leading to a co-evolution in all domains where real-time communication is essential. This topical volume, based on the findings of the Socionical European research project, gives equal attention to two highly relevant domains of applications: transport, specifically traffic, dynamics from the viewpoint of a socio-technical interaction and evacuation scenarios for large-scale emergency situations. Care was taken to investigate as much as possible the limits of scalability and to combine the modeling using complex systems science approaches with relevant data analysis.

  9. Full-Scale Model of Subionospheric VLF Signal Propagation Based on First-Principles Charged Particle Transport Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouznetsov, A.; Cully, C. M.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2016-12-01

    Changes in D-Region ionization caused by energetic particle precipitation are monitored by the Array for Broadband Observations of VLF/ELF Emissions (ABOVE) - a network of receivers deployed across Western Canada. The observed amplitudes and phases of subionospheric-propagating VLF signals from distant artificial transmitters depend sensitively on the free electron population created by precipitation of energetic charged particles. Those include both primary (electrons, protons and heavier ions) and secondary (cascades of ionized particles and electromagnetic radiation) components. We have designed and implemented a full-scale model to predict the received VLF signals based on first-principle charged particle transport calculations coupled to the Long Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC) software. Calculations of ionization rates and free electron densities are based on MCNP-6 (a general-purpose Monte Carlo N- Particle) software taking advantage of its capability of coupled neutron/photon/electron transport and novel library of cross-sections for low-energetic electron and photon interactions with matter. Cosmic ray calculations of background ionization are based on source spectra obtained both from PAMELA direct Cosmic Rays spectra measurements and based on the recently-implemented MCNP 6 galactic cosmic-ray source, scaled using our (Calgary) neutron monitor measurement results. Conversion from calculated fluxes (MCNP F4 tallies) to ionization rates for low-energy electrons are based on the total ionization cross-sections for oxygen and nitrogen molecules from the National Institute of Standard and Technology. We use our model to explore the complexity of the physical processes affecting VLF propagation.

  10. Small scale laboratory studies of flow and transport phenonmena in pores and fractures, Phase II. Second yearly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.L.

    1993-04-01

    Small scale laboratory experiments, equipped with an ability to actually observe behavior on the pore level using microscopy, provide an economical and easily understood scientific tool to help us validateconcepts and assumptions about the transport of contaminants, and offers the propensity to discover heretofore unrecognized phenomena or behavior. The main technique employs etched glass micromodels, composed of two etched glass plates, sintered together, to form a two dimensional network of three dimensional pores. Flow and transport behavior is observed on a pore or pore network level, and recorded on film and video tape. This technique is coupled with related column studies. Specifically we`re examining multiphase flow behavior of relevance, for example, to liquid-liquid mass transfer (solubilization of capillary trapped organic liquids); liquid-gas mass transfer (in situ volatilization); colloid movement, attachment and detachment in the presence of fluid-fluid interfaces; bacteria colonization and motility in porous systems; and heterogeneity effects on multi-phase flow, colloid movement and bacteria behavior.

  11. Pore-Scale Investigation of Micron-Size Polyacrylamide Elastic Microspheres (MPEMs) Transport and Retention in Saturated Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Chuanjin

    2014-05-06

    Knowledge of micrometer-size polyacrylamide elastic microsphere (MPEM) transport and retention mechanisms in porous media is essential for the application of MPEMs as a smart sweep improvement and profile modification agent in improving oil recovery. A transparent micromodel packed with translucent quartz sand was constructed and used to investigate the pore-scale transport, surface deposition-release, and plugging deposition-remigration mechanisms of MPEMs in porous media. The results indicate that the combination of colloidal and hydrodynamic forces controls the deposition and release of MPEMs on pore-surfaces; the reduction of fluid salinity and the increase of Darcy velocity are beneficial to the MPEM release from pore-surfaces; the hydrodynamic forces also influence the remigration of MPEMs in pore-throats. MPEMs can plug pore-throats through the mechanisms of capture-plugging, superposition-plugging, and bridge-plugging, which produces resistance to water flow; the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring in the interior of porous media can enhance the plugging effect of MPEMs; while the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring at the surface of low-permeability layer can prevent the low-permeability layer from being damaged by MPEMs. MPEMs can remigrate in pore-throats depending on their elasticity through four steps of capture-plugging, elastic deformation, steady migration, and deformation recovery. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Detecting and modelling structures on the micro and the macro scales: Assessing their effects on solute transport behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslauer, C. P.; Bárdossy, A.; Sudicky, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    This paper demonstrates quantitative reasoning to separate the dataset of spatially distributed variables into different entities and subsequently characterize their geostatistical properties, properly. The main contribution of the paper is a statistical based algorithm that matches the manual distinction results. This algorithm is based on measured data and is generally applicable. In this paper, it is successfully applied at two datasets of saturated hydraulic conductivity (K) measured at the Borden (Canada) and the Lauswiesen (Germany) aquifers. The boundary layer was successfully delineated at Borden despite its only mild heterogeneity and only small statistical differences between the divided units. The methods are verified with the more heterogeneous Lauswiesen aquifer K data-set, where a boundary layer has previously been delineated. The effects of the macro- and the microstructure on solute transport behaviour are evaluated using numerical solute tracer experiments. Within the microscale structure, both Gaussian and non-Gaussian models of spatial dependence of K are evaluated. The effects of heterogeneity both on the macro- and the microscale are analysed using numerical tracer experiments based on four scenarios: including or not including the macroscale structures and optimally fitting a Gaussian or a non-Gaussian model for the spatial dependence in the micro-structure. The paper shows that both micro- and macro-scale structures are important, as in each of the four possible geostatistical scenarios solute transport behaviour differs meaningfully.

  13. Micro-Scale Simulation of Water Transport in Porous Media Coupled with Phase Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Sahand; Behrang, Arash; Mohammadmoradi, Peyman; Hejazi, Hossein; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2015-11-01

    Sub-pore scale modeling of flow in porous media is gaining momentum. The concept of Digital Core Analysis deals with measurements of virtual core and the purpose of such modeling is to replace conventional and special core analysis when the latter are not feasible. Single phase flow phenomena are nowadays fairly easy to model given a good representation of the porous medium by its digital counterpart. Two phase flow modeling has proven more difficult to represent due to the complexities introduced by the insert of interfaces. These problems were at least partially overcome by the implementation of the ``Volume of Fluid'' method. OpenFOAM is the CFD package of choice in this work. The aforementioned approach is currently being extended in the modeling of phase change within a porous medium. Surface roughness is introduced by the incorporation of wedges of variable density and amplitude on the pore surface. A further introduced complication is that the individual grains are of different mineralogy and thus of different wettability. The problem of steam condensation in such media is addressed. It is observed that steam condenses first in the smallest of wedges, which act a nucleation sites. Water spreads on water-wet surfaces. Snap-off is observed in several cases leading to temporary trapping of vapor. Grid size effects are also addressed. The application of this modeling effort is the condensation of steam in thermal recovery methods.

  14. Time lags in watershed-scale nutrient transport: an exploration of dominant controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, K. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2017-08-01

    Unprecedented decreases in atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition together with increases in agricultural N-use efficiency have led to decreases in net anthropogenic N inputs in many eastern US and Canadian watersheds as well as in Europe. Despite such decreases, N concentrations in streams and rivers continue to increase, and problems of coastal eutrophication remain acute. Such a mismatch between N inputs and outputs can arise due to legacy N accumulation and subsequent lag times between implementation of conservation measures and improvements in water quality. In the present study, we quantified such lag times by pairing long-term N input trajectories with stream nitrate concentration data for 16 nested subwatersheds in a 6800 km2, Southern Ontario watershed. Our results show significant nonlinearity between N inputs and outputs, with a strong hysteresis effect indicative of decadal-scale lag times. The mean annual lag time was found to be 24.5 years, with lags varying seasonally, likely due to differences in N-delivery pathways. Lag times were found to be negatively correlated with both tile drainage and watershed slope, with tile drainage being a dominant control in fall and watershed slope being significant during the spring snowmelt period. Quantification of such lags will be crucial to policy-makers as they struggle to set appropriate goals for water quality improvement in human-impacted watersheds.

  15. Transport and deposition of carbon at catchment scale: stabilization mechanisms approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Mena, María; Almagro, María; Díaz-Pereira, Elvira; García-Franco, Noelia; Boix-Fayos, Carolina

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial sedimentation buries large amounts of organic carbon (OC) annually, contributing to the terrestrial carbon sink. The temporal significance of this sink will strongly depend on the attributes of the depositional environment, but also on the characteristics of the OC reaching these sites and its stability upon deposition. The fate of the redistributed OC will ultimately depend on the mechanisms of its physical and chemical protection against decomposition, its turnover rates and the conditions under which the OC is stored in sedimentary settings. This framework is more complex in Mediterranean river basins where sediments are often redistributed under a range of environmental conditions in ephemeral, intermittent and perennial fluvial courses, sometimes within the same catchment. The OC stabilization mechanisms and their relations with aggregation at different transport and sedimentary deposits is under those conditions highly uncertain. The main objective of this work was to characterize the stabilization and mineralization of OC in sediments in transit (suspended load), at a range of depositional settings (alluvial bars, reservoir sediments) and soils from the source areas in a sub-catchment (111 km2) at the headwaters of the Segura catchment in South East Spain. In order to obtain a deeper knowledge on the predominant stabilization mechanism corresponding to each erosional phase, the following organic carbon fractionation method was carried out: Four aggregate size classes were distinguished by sieving (large and small macroaggregates, free microaggregates, and free silt plus clay fraction), and the microaggregates occluded within macroaggregates (SMm) were isolated. As a further step, an oxidation of the OC occluded in silt plus clay fraction and that of the free silt plus clay fraction was performed to estimate the oxidant resistant OC pool. Measured OC in these fractions can be related to three functional pools: active (free particulate organic

  16. Numerical modeling of watershed-scale radiocesium transport coupled with biogeochemical cycling in forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, K.; Tada, K.; Tawara, Y.; Tosaka, H.; Ohno, K.; Asami, M.; Kosaka, K.

    2015-12-01

    Since the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, intensive monitoring and modeling works on radionuclide transfer in environment have been carried out. Although Cesium (Cs) concentration has been attenuating due to both physical and environmental half-life (i.e., wash-off by water and sediment), the attenuation rate depends clearly on the type of land use and land cover. In the Fukushima case, studying the migration in forest land use is important for predicting the long-term behavior of Cs because most of the contaminated region is covered by forests. Atmospheric fallout is characterized by complicated behavior in biogeochemical cycle in forests which can be described by biotic/abiotic interactions between many components. In developing conceptual and mathematical model on Cs transfer in forest ecosystem, defining the dominant components and their interactions are crucial issues (BIOMASS, 1997-2001). However, the modeling of fate and transport in geosphere after Cs exports from the forest ecosystem is often ignored. An integrated watershed modeling for simulating spatiotemporal redistribution of Cs that includes the entire region from source to mouth and surface to subsurface, has been recently developed. Since the deposited Cs can migrate due to water and sediment movement, the different species (i.e., dissolved and suspended) and their interactions are key issues in the modeling. However, the initial inventory as source-term was simplified to be homogeneous and time-independent, and biogeochemical cycle in forests was not explicitly considered. Consequently, it was difficult to evaluate the regionally-inherent characteristics which differ according to land uses, even if the model was well calibrated. In this study, we combine the different advantages in modeling of forest ecosystem and watershed. This enable to include more realistic Cs deposition and time series of inventory can be forced over the land surface. These processes are integrated

  17. Implications of heterogeneity on transport simulations at large scale: the Morroa aquifer case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anibal Jose Pérez-García

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available El acuífero Morroa, localizado en el departamento de Sucre (Colombia, representa la única fuente de suministro de agua potable de cerca de 500.000 habitantes que incluyen la totalidad de los habitantes de la capital del departamento Sincelejo. Aunque se han desarrollado muchos estudios en esta zona que incluyen la recolección de gran cantidad de información relacionada con niveles piezométricos, información estratigráfica, pruebas de bombeo, esta información es difusa, heterogénea y fraccionada. La incertidumbre asociada a esta información afecta cualquier intento de cuantificar la respuesta del acuífero, por esta razón el punto de partida de esta investigación es el desarrollo de una metodología capaz de integrar todas las variables en un modelo conceptual. Para considerar la incertidumbre se generaron múltiples realizaciones del acuífero de tal manera que todas respetan las propiedades estadísticas de la información disponible. Para generar estas realizaciones se utilizaron dos metodologías: (1 SISIM, que es un método basado en estadísticas de dos puntos (semivariograma, y (2 SNESIM, que es un algoritmo basado en el concepto de imágenes de entrenamiento (estadística de puntos múltiples. Resultados de las simulaciones muestran la gran capacidad de este último para reproducir geometrías curvilíneas complejas. En una segunda fase, se desarrollaron simulaciones de flujo y transporte de contaminantes de una manera integrada usando los dos modelos conceptuales obtenidos a través de las dos aproximaciones geoestadísticas. Condiciones de flujo estacionario y un contaminante conservativo fueron asumidos para todas las simulaciones. Los resultados obtenidos muestran una influencia notable de la heterogeneidad en general, así como una gran sensibilidad al método geoestadístico usado para generar la heterogeneidad. Las diferencias observadas tendrían un gran efecto en el diseño de políticas de manejo integral del recurso

  18. Urban Freight Management with Stochastic Time-Dependent Travel Times and Application to Large-Scale Transportation Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shichao Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addressed the vehicle routing problem (VRP in large-scale urban transportation networks with stochastic time-dependent (STD travel times. The subproblem which is how to find the optimal path connecting any pair of customer nodes in a STD network was solved through a robust approach without requiring the probability distributions of link travel times. Based on that, the proposed STD-VRP model can be converted into solving a normal time-dependent VRP (TD-VRP, and algorithms for such TD-VRPs can also be introduced to obtain the solution. Numerical experiments were conducted to address STD-VRPTW of practical sizes on a real world urban network, demonstrated here on the road network of Shenzhen, China. The stochastic time-dependent link travel times of the network were calibrated by historical floating car data. A route construction algorithm was applied to solve the STD problem in 4 delivery scenarios efficiently. The computational results showed that the proposed STD-VRPTW model can improve the level of customer service by satisfying the time-window constraint under any circumstances. The improvement can be very significant especially for large-scale network delivery tasks with no more increase in cost and environmental impacts.

  19. 2D dual permeability modeling of flow and transport in a two-scale structured lignitic mine soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, J.; Gerke, H. H.; Vogel, T.; Maurer, T.; Buczko, U.

    2009-04-01

    Two-dimensional single- and dual-permeability simulations are used to analyze water and solute fluxes in heterogeneous lignitic mine soil at a forest-reclaimed mine spoil heap. The soil heterogeneity on this experimental site "Bärenbrücker Höhe" resulted from inclined dumping structures and sediment mixtures that consist of sand with lignitic dust and embedded lignitic fragments. Observations on undisturbed field suction-cell lysimeters including tracer experiments revealed funneling-type preferential flow with lateral water and bromide movement along inclined sediment structures. The spatial distribution of soil structures and fragment distributions was acquired by a digital camera and identified by a supervised classification of the digital profile image. First, a classical single-domain modeling approach was used, with spatially variable scaling factors inferred from image analyses. In the next step, a two-continuum scenario was constructed to examine additional effects of nonequilibrium on the flow regime. The scaling factors used for the preferential flow domain are here obtained from the gradient of the grayscale images. So far, the single domain scenarios failed to predict the bromide leaching patterns although water effluent could be described. Dual-permeability model allows the incorporation of structural effects and can be used as a tool to further testing other approaches that account for structure effects. The numerical study suggests that additional experiments are required to obtain better understanding of the highly complex transport processes on this experimental site.

  20. A mechanistic modeling system for estimating large scale emissions and transport of pollen and co-allergens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Christos; Isukapalli, Sastry

    2011-01-01

    Allergic airway diseases represent a complex health problem which can be exacerbated by the synergistic action of pollen particles and air pollutants such as ozone. Understanding human exposures to aeroallergens requires accurate estimates of the spatial distribution of airborne pollen levels as well as of various air pollutants at different times. However, currently there are no established methods for estimating allergenic pollen emissions and concentrations over large geographic areas such as the United States. A mechanistic modeling system for describing pollen emissions and transport over extensive domains has been developed by adapting components of existing regional scale air quality models and vegetation databases. First, components of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS) were adapted to predict pollen emission patterns. Subsequently, the transport module of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system was modified to incorporate description of pollen transport. The combined model, CMAQ-pollen, allows for simultaneous prediction of multiple air pollutants and pollen levels in a single model simulation, and uses consistent assumptions related to the transport of multiple chemicals and pollen species. Application case studies for evaluating the combined modeling system included the simulation of birch and ragweed pollen levels for the year 2002, during their corresponding peak pollination periods (April for birch and September for ragweed). The model simulations were driven by previously evaluated meteorological model outputs and emissions inventories for the eastern United States for the simulation period. A semi-quantitative evaluation of CMAQ-pollen was performed using tree and ragweed pollen counts in Newark, NJ for the same time periods. The peak birch pollen concentrations were predicted to occur within two days of the peak measurements, while the temporal patterns closely followed the measured profiles of overall tree pollen

  1. Time Lags in Watershed-Scale Nutrient Transport: An Exploration of Dominant Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, N. B.; Van Meter, K. J.

    2016-12-01

    With agricultural intensification, rivers and streams flowing through managed catchments have become delivery channels for excess nutrients, leading to problems of eutrophication and posing risks to drinking water safety. In watersheds around the world, major policy goals have been set to improve water quality, including those in the Water Framework Directive in Europe and the Clean Water Act in the United States. Location-specific water quality goals have also been set by regional working groups, including the Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Watershed Nutrient Task Force, the Chesapeake Bay Program, and the Great Lakes Commission. In almost all cases, however, deadlines for achieving water quality goals have been missed, and insufficient improvements have been observed in receiving water bodies. Such apparent failures can be blamed on a variety of factors, including institutional inertia and a lack of funding for needed changes in management. It is our hypothesis, however, that repeated failures to meet water quality-related policy goals are in many cases due to sometimes long lag times between changes in nutrient management and improvements in water quality, and that these lag times can be attributed to the presence of biogeochemical and hydrologic nutrient legacies within the landscape. In the present work we have used the Grand River Watershed (GRW), a heavily agricultural 6800 km2 watershed in Southern Ontario, Canada, as a case study to explore long-term N dynamics and the potential impact of N legacies on water quality. In this work, we developed a 70-year dataset of nitrogen (N) inputs to the GRW and use it to quantify spatial and temporal patterns of legacy nutrient accumulation within the catchment. We then link these patterns of accumulation with 3 decades of stream nutrient concentration data at multiple scales. Results demonstrate a clear decoupling between nutrient inputs and outputs that is suggestive of watershed lag times. A statistical approach

  2. Exploring the energy landscape of the charge transport levels in organic semiconductors at the molecular scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornil, J; Verlaak, S; Martinelli, N; Mityashin, A; Olivier, Y; Van Regemorter, T; D'Avino, G; Muccioli, L; Zannoni, C; Castet, F; Beljonne, D; Heremans, P

    2013-02-19

    strongly interacting electron-hole pairs can potentially escape from their Coulomb well, a process that is at the heart of photoconversion or molecular doping. Yet they do, with near-quantitative yield in some cases. Limited screening by the low dielectric medium in organic materials leads to subtle static and dynamic electronic polarization effects that strongly impact the energy landscape for charges, which offers a rationale for this apparent inconsistency. In this Account, we use different theoretical approaches to predict the energy landscape of charge carriers at the molecular level and review a few case studies highlighting the role of electrostatic interactions in conjugated organic molecules. We describe the pros and cons of different theoretical approaches that provide access to the energy landscape defining the motion of charge carriers. We illustrate the applications of these approaches through selected examples involving OFETs, OLEDs, and solar cells. The three selected examples collectively show that energetic disorder governs device performances and highlights the relevance of theoretical tools to probe energy landscapes in molecular assemblies.

  3. Transition from non-Fickian to Fickian longitudinal transport through 3-D rough fractures: Scale-(in)sensitivity and roughness dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lichun; Bayani Cardenas, M.

    2017-03-01

    Understanding transport in rough fractures from non-Fickian to Fickian regimes and the prediction of non-Fickian transport is critical for the development of new transport theories and many practical applications. Through computational experiments that fall within the macrodispersion regime, we first simulated and analyzed solute transport through synthetic rough fractures with stationary geometrical properties (i.e., fracture roughness σb/ and correlation length λ, where b refers to aperture with its standard deviation σb and arithmetic mean ) across increasing fracture longitudinal transport domain length L, with L/λ ranging from 2.5 to 50. The results were used to determine how solute transport behavior evolves with increasing scale in the longitudinal direction. Moreover, a set of correlated fractures with aperture fields following normal and log-normal distributions was created to further identify and quantify the dependence of non-Fickian transport on roughness. We found that although persistent intermittent velocity structures were present, the breakthrough curves (BTCs) and residence time distributions showed diminishing early arrival and tailing, features of non-Fickian transport, with increasing longitudinal L/λ, ultimately converging to a Fickian transport regime given σb/ remained constant. Inverse analysis of the experimental BTCs with the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) model showed that the dispersion coefficient (D) was non-trivially scale-dependent. Simulation results for rough fractures with varying σb/ and L/λ indicated that the ratio of fluid velocity to transport velocity fitted to the ADE model depends on σb/ and L/λ. The continuous time random walk (CTRW) performed much better across all transport scales, and resulted in scale-independent fitted parameters, i.e., β in the memory function. The fitted β is proportional to σb/but is insensitive to L/λ. Therefore, bulk longitudinal solute transport across the pre-asymptotic and

  4. Inside pyroclastic density currents - uncovering the enigmatic flow structure and transport behaviour in large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breard, Eric C. P.; Lube, Gert

    2017-01-01

    Pyroclastic density currents (PDCs) are the most lethal threat from volcanoes. While there are two main types of PDCs (fully turbulent, fully dilute pyroclastic surges and more concentrated pyroclastic flows encompassing non-turbulent to turbulent transport) pyroclastic flows, which are the subject of the present study, are far more complex than dilute pyroclastic surges and remain the least understood type despite their far greater hazard, greater runout length and ability to transport vast quantities of material across the Earth's surface. Here we present large-scale experiments of natural volcanic material and gas in order to provide the missing quantitative view of the internal structure and gas-particle transport mechanisms in pyroclastic flows. We show that the outer flow structure with head, body and wake regions broadly resembles current PDC analogues of dilute gravity currents. However, the internal structure, in which lower levels consist of a concentrated granular fluid and upper levels are more dilute, contrasts significantly with the internal structure of fully dilute gravity currents. This bipartite vertical structure shows strong analogy to current conceptual models of high-density turbidity currents, which are responsible for the distribution of coarse sediment in marine basins and of great interest to the hydrocarbon industry. The lower concentrated and non-turbulent levels of the PDC (granular-fluid basal flow) act as a fast-flowing carrier for the more dilute and turbulent upper levels of the current (ash-cloud surge). Strong kinematic coupling between these flow parts reduces viscous dissipation and entrainment of ambient air into the lower part of the ash-cloud surge. This leads to a state of forced super-criticality whereby fast and destructive PDCs can endure even at large distances from volcanoes. Importantly, the basal flow/ash-cloud surge coupling yields a characteristically smooth rheological boundary across the non

  5. Reactive transport in porous media for CO2 sequestration: Pore scale modeling using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinfang; Xing, Huilin; Tian, Zhiwei; Pearce, Julie K.; Sedek, Mohamed; Golding, Suzanne D.; Rudolph, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Injection of CO2 subsurface may lead to chemical reactivity of rock where CO2 is dissolved in groundwater. This process can modify pore networks to increase or decrease porosity through mineral dissolution and precipitation. A lattice Boltzmann (LB) based computational model study on the pore scale reactive transport in three dimensional heterogeneous porous media (sandstone consisting of both reactive and non-reactive minerals) is described. This study examines how fluid transport in porous materials subject to reactive conditions is affected by unsteady state local reactions and unstable dissolution fronts. The reaction of a calcite cemented core sub-plug from the Hutton Sandstone of the Surat Basin, Australia, is used as a study case. In particular, the work studies the interaction of acidic fluid (an aqueous solution with an elevated concentration of carbonic acid) with reactive (e.g. calcite) and assumed non-reactive (e.g. quartz) mineral surfaces, mineral dissolution and mass transfer, and resultant porosity change. The proposed model is implemented in our custom LBM code and suitable for studies of multiple mineral reactions with disparate reaction rates. A model for carbonic acid reaction with calcite cemented sandstone in the CO2-water-rock system is verified through laboratory experimental data including micro-CT characterization before and after core reaction at reservoir conditions. The experimentally validated model shows: (1) the dissolution of calcite cement forms conductive channels at the pore scale, and enables the generation of pore throats and connectivity; (2) the model is able to simulate the reaction process until the reaction equilibrium status is achieved (around 1440 days); (3) calcite constituting a volume of around 9.6% of the whole core volume is dissolved and porosity is consequently increased from 1.1% to 10.7% on reaching equilibrium; (4) more than a third of the calcite (constituting 7.4% of the total core volume) is unaffected

  6. A conceptual cross-scale approach for linking empirical discharge measurements and regional groundwater models with application to legacy nitrogen transport and coastal nitrogen management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, J. R.; Helton, A. M.; Starn, J. J.; Briggs, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    Despite years of management, seasonal hypoxia from excess nitrogen (N) is a pervasive problem in many coastal waters. Current approaches to managing coastal eutrophication in the United States (USA) focus on surface runoff and river transport of nutrients, and often assume that groundwater N is at steady state. This is not necessarily the case, as terrestrial N inputs are affected by changing land use and nutrient management practices. Furthermore, approximately 70% of surface water in the USA is derived from groundwater and there is widespread N contamination in many of our nation's aquifers. Nitrogen export via groundwater discharge to streams during baseflow may be the reason many impaired coastal systems show little improvement. There is a critical need to develop approaches that consider the effects of groundwater transport on N loading to surface waters. Aquifer transport times, which can be decades or even centuries longer than surface water transport times, introduce lags between changes in terrestrial management and reductions in coastal loads. Ignoring these lags can lead to overly ambitious and unrealistic load reduction goals, or incorrect conclusions regarding the effectiveness of management strategies. Additionally, regional groundwater models typically have a coarse resolution that makes it difficult to incorporate fine-scale processes that drive N transformations, such as groundwater-surface water exchange across steep redox gradients at stream bed interfaces. Despite this challenge, representing these important fine-scale processes well is essential to modeling groundwater transport of N across regional scales and to making informed management decisions. We present 1) a conceptual approach to linking regional models and fine-scale empirical measurements, and 2) preliminary groundwater flow and transport model results for the Housatonic and Farmington Rivers in Connecticut, USA. Our cross-scale approach utilizes thermal infrared imaging and vertical

  7. Unraveling the Formation of Large Amounts of Calcite Scaling in Geothermal Wells in the Bavarian Molasse Basin: A Reactive Transport Modeling Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Wanner, Christoph; Eichinger, Florian; Jahrfeld, Thomas; Diamond, Larryn W.

    2017-01-01

    Results from reactive transport simulations performed for the geothermal plant in Kirchstockach, located in the Bavarian Molasse Basin in southern Germany, are presented to unravel the formation of calcite scaling. Simulation results successfully predict the calcite scaling profile observed along the production well if supersaturation with respect to calcite is specified for the model water leaving the pump at 800 m depth. This observation is in good agreement with a previous study suggesting...

  8. A numerical model of continental-scale topographic evolution integrating thin sheet tectonics, river transport, and orographic precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Castellanos, Daniel; Jimenez-Munt, Ivone

    2014-05-01

    How much does the erosion and sedimentation at the crust's surface influence on the patterns and distribution of tectonic deformation? This question has been mostly addressed from a numerical modelling perspective, at scales ranging from local to orogenic. Here we present a model that aims at constraining this phenomenon at the continental scale. With this purpose, we couple a thin-sheet viscous model of continental deformation with a stream-power surface transport model. The model also incorporates flexural isostatic compensation that permits the formation of large sedimentary foreland basins and a precipitation model that reproduces basic climatic effects such as continentality and orographic rainfall and rain shadow. We quantify the feedbacks between these 4 processes in a synthetic scenario inspired by the India-Asia collision. The model reproduces first-order characteristics of the growth of the Tibetan Plateau as a result of the Indian indentation. A large intramountain basin (comparable to the Tarim Basin) develops when predefining a hard inherited area in the undeformed foreland (Asia). The amount of sediment trapped in it is very sensitive to climatic parameters, particularly to evaporation, because it crucially determines its endorheic/exorheic drainage. We identify some degree of feedback between the deep and the surface processes occurs, leading locally to a <20% increase in deformation rates if orographic precipitation is account for (relative to a reference model with evenly-distributed precipitation). These enhanced thickening of the crust takes place particularly in areas of concentrated precipitation and steep slope, i.e., at the upwind flank of the growing plateau. This effect is particularly enhanced at the corners of the indenter (syntaxes). We hypothesize that this may provide clues for better understanding the mechanisms underlying the intriguing tectonic aneurisms documented in the syntaxes of the Himalayas.

  9. Modeling fate and transport of fecally-derived microorganisms at the watershed scale: State of the science and future opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Pachepsky, Yakov A; Oliver, David M; Muirhead, Richard W; Park, Yongeun; Quilliam, Richard S; Shelton, Daniel R

    2016-09-01

    Natural waters serve as habitat for a wide range of microorganisms, a proportion of which may be derived from fecal material. A number of watershed models have been developed to understand and predict the fate and transport of fecal microorganisms within complex watersheds, as well as to determine whether microbial water quality standards can be satisfied under site-specific meteorological and/or management conditions. The aim of this review is to highlight and critically evaluate developments in the modeling of microbial water quality of surface waters over the last 10 years and to discuss the future of model development and application at the watershed scale, with a particular focus on fecal indicator organisms (FIOs). In doing so, an agenda of research opportunities is identified to help deliver improvements in the modeling of microbial water quality draining through complex landscape systems. This comprehensive review therefore provides a timely steer to help strengthen future modeling capability of FIOs in surface water environments and provides a useful resource to complement the development of risk management strategies to reduce microbial impairment of freshwater sources. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. A 3D, cross-scale, baroclinic model with implicit vertical transport for the Upper Chesapeake Bay and its tributaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Yinglong J.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Wang, Harry V.; Irby, Isaac D.; Shen, Jian; Wang, Zhengui

    2016-11-01

    We develop a new vertically implicit transport solver, based on two total variation diminishing (TVD) limiters in space and time, inside a 3D unstructured-grid model (SCHISM), and apply it to the Upper Chesapeake Bay (UCB), which has complex geometry and sharp pycnocline. We show that the model is able to accurately and efficiently capture the elevation, velocity, salinity and temperature in both the deep and shallow regions of UCB. Compared with all available CTD casts, the overall model skills have the mean absolute error of 1.08 PSU and 0.85 °C, and correlation coefficient of 0.97 and 0.99 for salinity and temperature respectively. More importantly, the new implicit solver better captures the density stratification, which has great implications on biogeochemistry in this estuarine system. The cross-scale capability of the model is demonstrated by extending the high-resolution grids into a tributary (Chester River) and its sub-tributary (Corsica River), with minimal impact on the model efficiency. The model is also able to capture complex 3D structures at the transition zone between the main bay and the tributary, including the three-layered circulation in Baltimore Harbor. As more and more attention is being paid to the productive shallows in the Chesapeake Bay and other estuaries, the model can serve as a very powerful management tool to understand the impact of both local and remote forcing functions.

  11. Effect of specimen collection techniques, transport media, and incubation of cultures on the detection rate of Helicobacter pylori

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hulst, R. W.; Verheul, S. B.; Weel, J. F.; Gerrits, Y.; ten Kate, F. J.; Dankert, J.; Tytgat, G. N.

    1996-01-01

    Culture and histologic examination are considered "gold standard" methods for the detection of Helicobacter pylori, but discrepancies may occur with either method. Failure to detect Helicobacter pylori may be due to sampling error, inappropriate transport or culture media, or insufficient duration

  12. Mechanisms of along-channel sediment transport in the North Passage of the Yangtze Estuary and their response to large-scale interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jiang, C.; de Swart, H.E.; Liu, G.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of large-scale interventions in the North Passage of the Yangtze Estuary (the Deep Waterway Project, DWP) on the along-channel flow structure, suspended sediment distribution and its transport along the main channel of this passage are investigated. The focus is explaining the changes in

  13. Reactive Transport at the Pore Scale with Applications to the Dissolution of Carbonate Rocks for CO2 Sequestration Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, E.; Gray, F.; Welch, N.; Shah, S.; Crawshaw, J.

    2014-12-01

    In CO2 sequestration operations, CO2 injected into a brine aquifer dissolves in the liquid to create an acidic solution. This may result in dissolution of the mineral grains in the porous medium. Experimentally, it is hard to investigate this process at the pore scale. Therefore we develop a new hybrid particle simulation algorithm to study the dissolution of solid objects in a laminar flow field, as encountered in porous media flow situations. First, we calculate the flow field using a multi-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) algorithm implemented on GPUs, which demonstrates a very efficient use of the GPU device and a considerable performance increase over CPU calculations. Second, using a stochastic particle approach, we solve the advection-diffusion equation for a single reactive species and dissolve solid voxels according to our reaction model. To validate our simulation, we first calculate the dissolution of a solid sphere as a function of time under quiescent conditions. We compare with the analytical solution for this problem [1] and find good agreement. Then we consider the dissolution of a solid sphere in a laminar flow field and observe a significant change in the sphericity with time due to the coupled dissolution - flow process. Second, we calculate the dissolution of a cylinder in channel flow in direct comparison with corresponding dissolution experiments. We discuss the evolution of the shape and dissolution rate. Finally, we calculate the dissolution of carbonate rock samples at the pore scale in direct comparison with micro-CT experiments. This work builds on our recent research on calculation of multi-phase flow [2], [3] and hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular propagator distributions for solute transport in homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media using LB simulations [4]. It turns out that the hybrid simulation model is a suitable tool to study reactive flow processes at the pore scale. This is of great importance for CO2 storage and

  14. Modeling lightning-NOx chemistry on a sub-grid scale in a global chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gressent

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, a plume-in-grid approach is implemented in a chemical transport model (CTM to parameterize the effects of the nonlinear reactions occurring within high concentrated NOx plumes from lightning NOx emissions (LNOx in the upper troposphere. It is characterized by a set of parameters including the plume lifetime, the effective reaction rate constant related to NOx–O3 chemical interactions, and the fractions of NOx conversion into HNO3 within the plume. Parameter estimates were made using the Dynamical Simple Model of Atmospheric Chemical Complexity (DSMACC box model, simple plume dispersion simulations, and the 3-D Meso-NH (non-hydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model. In order to assess the impact of the LNOx plume approach on the NOx and O3 distributions on a large scale, simulations for the year 2006 were performed using the GEOS-Chem global model with a horizontal resolution of 2° × 2.5°. The implementation of the LNOx parameterization implies an NOx and O3 decrease on a large scale over the region characterized by a strong lightning activity (up to 25 and 8 %, respectively, over central Africa in July and a relative increase downwind of LNOx emissions (up to 18 and 2 % for NOx and O3, respectively, in July. The calculated variability in NOx and O3 mixing ratios around the mean value according to the known uncertainties in the parameter estimates is at a maximum over continental tropical regions with ΔNOx [−33.1, +29.7] ppt and ΔO3 [−1.56, +2.16] ppb, in January, and ΔNOx [−14.3, +21] ppt and ΔO3 [−1.18, +1.93] ppb, in July, mainly depending on the determination of the diffusion properties of the atmosphere and the initial NO mixing ratio injected by lightning. This approach allows us (i to reproduce a more realistic lightning NOx chemistry leading to better NOx and O3 distributions on the large scale and (ii to focus on other improvements to reduce remaining uncertainties from processes

  15. Field-scale sulfur hexafluoride tracer experiment to understand long distance gas transport in the deep unsaturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walvoord, Michelle Ann; Andraski, Brian J.; Green, Christopher T.; Stonestrom, David A.; Striegl, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    A gas-tracer test in a deep arid unsaturated zone demonstrates that standard estimates of effective diffusivity from sediment properties allow a reasonable first-cut assessment of gas contaminant transport. Apparent anomalies in historic transport behavior at this and other waste disposal sites may result from factors other than nonreactive gas transport properties.

  16. Modelling the urban air quality in Hamburg with the new city-scale chemistry transport model CityChem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, Matthias; Ramacher, Martin; Aulinger, Armin; Matthias, Volker; Quante, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Air quality modelling plays an important role by providing guidelines for efficient air pollution abatement measures. Currently, most urban dispersion models treat air pollutants as passive tracer substances or use highly simplified chemistry when simulating air pollutant concentrations on the city-scale. The newly developed urban chemistry-transport model CityChem has the capability of modelling the photochemical transformation of multiple pollutants along with atmospheric diffusion to produce pollutant concentration fields for the entire city on a horizontal resolution of 100 m or even finer and a vertical resolution of 24 layers up to 4000 m height. CityChem is based on the Eulerian urban dispersion model EPISODE of the Norwegian Institute for Air Research (NILU). CityChem treats the complex photochemistry in cities using detailed EMEP chemistry on an Eulerian 3-D grid, while using simple photo-stationary equilibrium on a much higher resolution grid (receptor grid), i.e. close to industrial point sources and traffic sources. The CityChem model takes into account that long-range transport contributes to urban pollutant concentrations. This is done by using 3-D boundary concentrations for the city domain derived from chemistry-transport simulations with the regional air quality model CMAQ. For the study of the air quality in Hamburg, CityChem was set-up with a main grid of 30×30 grid cells of 1×1 km2 each and a receptor grid of 300×300 grid cells of 100×100 m2. The CityChem model was driven with meteorological data generated by the prognostic meteorology component of the Australian chemistry-transport model TAPM. Bottom-up inventories of emissions from traffic, industry, households were based on data of the municipality of Hamburg. Shipping emissions for the port of Hamburg were taken from the Clean North Sea Shipping project. Episodes with elevated ozone (O3) were of specific interest for this study, as these are associated with exceedances of the World

  17. Effects of Spatial Variability in Flow and Sediment Transport on Benthic Invertebrates During Runoff Events: Patch and Reach-Scale Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenworthy, S.

    2005-05-01

    The short-term impact of streamflow increases on benthic populations depends on spatial patterns of organism dispersal and mortality that are difficult to observe and quantify in the field. Laboratory and field experiments suggest that the size distribution, structure, and stability of streambed sediment play critical roles in mediating the effects of flow increases on dispersal and mortality of organisms. I present the results of laboratory flume experiments in which flow and sediment transport were progressively increased and the resulting displacement of aquatic insect larvae was quantified. These and other experiments demonstrate that the displacement and mortality of benthic organisms scales with streambed entrainment and sediment transport, but that bed structure and the physical and behavioral traits of the biota can strongly influence this relationship. Application of these patch-scale experimental results to understanding the hydrogeomorphic determinants of reach-scale flood impacts involves important scientific challenges and uncertainties. Reliable estimation of the spatial variability of streambed mobilization and sediment transport as a function of channel and substrate characteristics, flow history and sediment supply is necessary to compare the effects of different events or among different stream reaches. Also needed is a better appreciation of the spatial scales of organism dispersal during flow events and the physical and biological controls on patterns of dispersal at various scales.

  18. Micron-scale mapping of megagauss magnetic fields using optical polarimetry to probe hot electron transport in petawatt-class laser-solid interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Singh, Prashant Kumar; Robinson, A P L; Blackman, D; Booth, N; Culfa, O; Dance, R J; Gizzi, L A; Gray, R J; Green, J S; Koester, P; Kumar, G Ravindra; Labate, L; Lad, Amit D; Lancaster, K L; Pasley, J; Woolsey, N C; Rajeev, P P

    2017-08-21

    The transport of hot, relativistic electrons produced by the interaction of an intense petawatt laser pulse with a solid has garnered interest due to its potential application in the development of innovative x-ray sources and ion-acceleration schemes. We report on spatially and temporally resolved measurements of megagauss magnetic fields at the rear of a 50-μm thick plastic target, irradiated by a multi-picosecond petawatt laser pulse at an incident intensity of ~1020 W/cm2. The pump-probe polarimetric measurements with micron-scale spatial resolution reveal the dynamics of the magnetic fields generated by the hot electron distribution at the target rear. An annular magnetic field profile was observed ~5 ps after the interaction, indicating a relatively smooth hot electron distribution at the rear-side of the plastic target. This is contrary to previous time-integrated measurements, which infer that such targets will produce highly structured hot electron transport. We measured large-scale filamentation of the hot electron distribution at the target rear only at later time-scales of ~10 ps, resulting in a commensurate large-scale filamentation of the magnetic field profile. Three-dimensional hybrid simulations corroborate our experimental observations and demonstrate a beam-like hot electron transport at initial time-scales that may be attributed to the local resistivity profile at the target rear.

  19. Evaluation of Surface and Transport Limitations to the Rate of Calcite Dissolution Using Pore Scale Modeling of a Capillary Tube Experiment at pCO2 4 bar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molins, S.; Trebotich, D.; Yang, L.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Ligocki, T.; Shen, C.; Steefel, C. I.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral trapping is generally considered to account for most of the long-term trapping of CO2 in the subsurface. Prediction of mineral trapping at the reservoir scale requires knowledge of continuum-scale mineral dissolution and precipitation rates. However, processes that take place at the pore scale (e.g., transport limitation to reactive surfaces) affect rates applicable at the continuum scale. To explore the pore scale processes that result in the discrepancy between rates measured in laboratory experiments and those calibrated from continuum-scale models, we have developed a high-resolution pore scale model of a capillary tube experiment. The capillary tube (L=0.7-cm, D=500-μm) is packed with crushed calcite (Iceland spar) and the resulting 3D pore structure is imaged by X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source at a 0.899-μm resolution. A solution in equilibrium with a partial pressure of CO2 of 4 bars is injected at a rate of 5 microliter/min and the effluent concentrations of calcium are measured to ensure steady state conditions are achieved. A simulation domain is constructed from the XCMT image using implicit functions to represent the mineral surface locally on a grid. The pore-scale reactive transport model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible Navier-Stokes flow, advective-diffusive transport and multicomponent geochemical reactions. Simulations are performed using 6,144 processors on NERSC's Cray XE6 Hopper to achieve a grid resolution of 2.32 μm. Equivalent continuum scale simulations are also performed to evaluate the effect of pore scale processes. Comparison of results is performed based on flux-averaged effluent calcium concentrations, which are used as indicator of effective rates in the capillary tube. Results from both pore- and continuum-scale simulations overestimate the calcium effluent concentrations, suggesting that the TST rate expression parameters

  20. Large-scale flow structures and heat transport of turbulent forced and mixed convection in a closed rectangular cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmeling, D., E-mail: Daniel.Schmeling@dlr.de [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany); Westhoff, A.; Kuehn, M.; Bosbach, J.; Wagner, C. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, Bunsenstrasse 10, D-37073 Goettingen (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > Superposition of forced and thermal convection is studied in a rectangular cavity. > For pure forced convection the mean wind exhibits a solid body rotation. > Four buoyancy induced convection rolls are formed for mixed convection at Ar {approx} 3.3. > The enthalpy flux difference between out- and inflowing air has a maximum at Ar {approx} 0.6. - Abstract: Results of an experimental study of flow structure formation and heat transport in turbulent forced and mixed convection are presented. The experiments were conducted in a rectangular cavity with a square cross section, which has an aspect ratio between length and height of {Gamma}{sub xz} = 5. Air at atmospheric pressure was used as working fluid. The air inflow was supplied through a slot below the ceiling, while exhausting was provided by another slot, which is located directly above the floor. Both vents extend over the whole length of the cell. In order to induce thermal convection the bottom of the cell is heated while the ceiling is maintained at a constant temperature. This configuration allows to generate and study mixed convection under well defined conditions. Results of forced convection at Re = 1.07 x 10{sup 4} as well as mixed convection at 1.01 x 10{sup 4} {<=} Re {<=} 3.4 x 10{sup 4} and Ra = 2.4 x 10{sup 8} (3.3 {>=} Ar {>=} 0.3), which were obtained by means of Particle Image Velocimetry and local temperature measurements, are presented. For purely forced convection a 2D mean wind, which can be approximated by a solid body rotation, is found. With increasing Archimedes number this structure becomes unstable, leading to a transition of the solid body rotation into additional smaller convection rolls. Proper orthogonal decomposition of the instantaneous velocity fields has been performed for further analysis of these coherent large-scale structures. Their fingerprint is found in the spatial temperature distribution of the out flowing air at the end of the outlet channel, which

  1. Evaluation of a Medium (STGG) for Transport and Optimal Recovery of Streptococcus pneumoniae from Nasopharyngeal Secretions Collected during Field Studies

    OpenAIRE

    O'Brien, Katherine L.; Bronsdon, Melinda A.; Dagan, Ron; Yagupsky, Pablo; Janco, Jacob; Elliott, John; Whitney, Cynthia G.; Yang, Yong-Hong; Robinson, Lisa-Gaye E.; Schwartz, Benjamin; Carlone, George M.

    2001-01-01

    Field studies of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization are hampered by the need to directly plate specimens in order to ensure isolate viability. A medium containing skim milk, tryptone, glucose, and glycerin (STGG) has been used to transport and store NP material, but its ability to preserve pneumococci has not been evaluated. Our objective was to qualitatively and semiquantitatively evaluate the ability of STGG to preserve pneumococci in NP secretions. Entw...

  2. Cationic amino acid transporters and Salmonella Typhimurium ArgT collectively regulate arginine availability towards intracellular Salmonella growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Das

    Full Text Available Cationic amino acid transporters (mCAT1 and mCAT2B regulate the arginine availability in macrophages. How in the infected cell a pathogen can alter the arginine metabolism of the host remains to be understood. We reveal here a novel mechanism by which Salmonella exploit mCAT1 and mCAT2B to acquire host arginine towards its own intracellular growth within antigen presenting cells. We demonstrate that Salmonella infected bone marrow derived macrophages and dendritic cells show enhanced arginine uptake and increased expression of mCAT1 and mCAT2B. We show that the mCAT1 transporter is in close proximity to Salmonella containing vacuole (SCV specifically by live intracellular Salmonella in order to access the macrophage cytosolic arginine pool. Further, Lysosome associated membrane protein 1, a marker of SCV, also was found to colocalize with mCAT1 in the Salmonella infected cell. The intra vacuolar Salmonella then acquire the host arginine via its own arginine transporter, ArgT for growth. The argT knockout strain was unable to acquire host arginine and was attenuated in growth in both macrophages and in mice model of infection. Together, these data reveal survival strategies by which virulent Salmonella adapt to the harsh conditions prevailing in the infected host cells.

  3. H+, Water and Urea Transport in the Inner Medullary Collecting Duct and Their Role in the Prevention and Pathogenesis of Renal Stone Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Susan M.; Klein, Janet D.

    2008-09-01

    The inner medullary collecting duct (IMCD) is the final site within the kidney for the reabsorption of urea, water and electrolytes and for the secretion of H+ before the luminal fluid becomes the final urine. Transporters expressed in the IMCD contribute to the generation of the large ion gradients that exist between the interstitium and the collecting duct lumen. Thus, the luminal fluid within the human IMCD can reach an osmolality of 1200 mOsm/kg H2O and a pH of 4. This ability of the human nephron to concentrate and acidify the urine might predispose to stone formation. However, under treatment conditions that predispose to stone formation, such as during hypercalciuria, the kidney mitigates stone formation by reducing solute concentration by reducing H2O reabsorption. Moreover, the kidney attenuates stone formation by tightly controlling acid-base balance, which prevents the bone loss, hypocitraturia and hypercalciuria observed during metabolic acidosis by augmenting net H+ excretion by tightly regulating H+ transporter function and through luminal buffering, particularly with NH3. This article will review the ion transporters present in the mammalian IMCD and their role in the prevention and in the pathogenesis of renal stone formation.

  4. Reactive transport of CO2-rich fluids in simulated wellbore interfaces: Experiments and models exploring behaviour on length scales of 1 to 6 m

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolterbeek, T. K. T.; Raoof, A.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    Defects present at casing-cement interfaces in wellbores constitute potential pathways for CO2 to migrate from geological storage systems. It is essential to understand how the transport properties of such pathways evolve when penetrated by CO2-rich fluids. While numerous studies have explored this problem at the decimetre length-scale, the 1-10-100 m scales relevant for real wellbores have received little attention. The present work addresses the effects of long-range reactive transport on a length scale of 1-6 m. This is done by means of a combined experimental and modelling study. The experimental work consisted of flow-through tests, performed on cement-filled steel tubes, 1-6 m in length, containing artificially debonded cement-interfaces. Four tests were performed, at 60-80 °C, imposing flow-through of CO2-rich fluid at mean pressures of 10-15 MPa, controlling the pressure difference at 0.12-4.8 MPa, while measuring flow-rate. In the modelling work, we developed a numerical model to explore reactive transport in CO2-exposed defects on a similar length scale. The formulation adopted incorporates fluid flow, advective and diffusive solute transport, and CO2-cement chemical reactions. Our results show that long-range reactive transport strongly affects the permeability evolution of CO2-exposed defects. In the experiments, sample permeability decreased by 2-4 orders, which microstructural observations revealed was associated with downstream precipitation of carbonates, possibly aided by migration of fines. The model simulations show precipitation in initially open defects produces a sharp decrease in flow rate, causing a transition from advection to diffusion-dominated reactive transport. While the modelling results broadly reproduce the experimental observations, it is further demonstrated that non-uniformity in initial defect aperture has a profound impact on self-sealing behaviour and system permeability evolution on the metre scale. The implication is that

  5. Wildfire particulate matter in Europe during summer 2003: meso-scale modeling of smoke emissions, transport and radiative effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hodzic

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigates effects of wildfire emissions on air quality in Europe during an intense fire season that occurred in summer 2003. A meso-scale chemistry transport model CHIMERE is used, together with ground based and satellite aerosol optical measurements, to assess the dispersion of fire emissions and to quantify the associated radiative effects. The model has been improved to take into account a MODIS-derived daily smoke emission inventory as well as the injection altitude of smoke particles. The simulated aerosol optical properties are put into a radiative transfer model to estimate (off-line the effects of smoke particles on photolysis rates and atmospheric radiative forcing. We have found that the simulated wildfires generated comparable amounts of primary aerosol pollutants (130 kTons of PM2.5, fine particles to anthropogenic sources during August 2003, and caused significant changes in aerosol optical properties not only close to the fire source regions, but also over a large part of Europe as a result of the long-range transport of the smoke. Including these emissions into the model significantly improved its performance in simulating observed aerosol concentrations and optical properties. Quantitative comparison with MODIS and POLDER data during the major fire event (3–8 August 2003 showed the ability of the model to reproduce high aerosol optical thickness (AOT over Northern Europe caused by the advection of the smoke plume from the Portugal source region. Although there was a fairly good spatial agreement with satellite data (correlation coefficients ranging from 0.4 to 0.9, the temporal variability of AOT data at specific AERONET locations was not well captured by the model. Statistical analyses of model-simulated AOT data at AERONET ground stations showed a significant decrease in the model biases suggesting that wildfire emissions are responsible for a 30% enhancement in mean AOT values during the heat

  6. Observations of mesoscale and boundary-layer scale circulations affecting dust transport and uplift over the Sahara

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Marsham

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Observations of the Saharan boundary layer, made during the GERBILS field campaign, show that mesoscale land surface temperature variations (which were related to albedo variations induced mesoscale circulations. With weak winds along the aircraft track, land surface temperature anomalies with scales of greater than 10 km are shown to significantly affect boundary-layer temperatures and winds. Such anomalies are expected to affect the vertical mixing of the dusty and weakly stratified Saharan Residual Layer (SRL. Mesoscale variations in winds are also shown to affect dust loadings in the boundary layer.

    Using the aircraft observations and data from the COSMO model, a region of local dust uplift, with strong along-track winds, was identified in one low-level flight. Large eddy model (LEM simulations based on this location showed linearly organised boundary-layer convection. Calculating dust uplift rates from the LEM wind field showed that the boundary-layer convection increased uplift by approximately 30%, compared with the uplift rate calculated neglecting the convection. The modelled effects of boundary-layer convection on uplift are shown to be larger when the boundary-layer wind is decreased, and most significant when the mean wind is below the threshold for dust uplift and the boundary-layer convection leads to uplift which would not otherwise occur.

    Both the coupling of albedo features to the atmosphere on the mesoscale, and the enhancement of dust uplift by boundary-layer convection are unrepresented in many climate models, but may have significant impacts on the vertical transport and uplift of desert dust. Mesoscale effects in particular tend to be difficult to parametrise.

  7. Modelling nanoparticle transport in porous media across the scales: from pore network models to simulation of filed injection

    OpenAIRE

    Bianco, Carlo; Sethi, Rajandrea; Tosco, Tiziana Anna Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Transport and deposition of colloidal particles in saturated porous media are of great importance in many fields of science and engineering. A thorough understanding of particle filtration processes is essential for predicting the transport and fate of colloidal particles in the subsurface environment. Particles migrating through a porous medium can remain in suspension and be transported due to advection and dispersion phenomena, or be retained due to filtration and deposition onto the porou...

  8. River transport of mercury from artisanal and small-scale gold mining and risks for dietary mercury exposure in Madre de Dios, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diringer, Sarah E; Feingold, Beth J; Ortiz, Ernesto J; Gallis, John A; Araújo-Flores, Julio M; Berky, Axel; Pan, William K Y; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2015-02-01

    Artisanal and small-scale gold mining (ASGM) is a major contributor to deforestation and the largest anthropogenic source of atmospheric mercury worldwide. Despite significant information on the direct health impacts of mercury to ASGM miners, the impact of mercury contamination on downstream communities has not been well characterized, particularly in Peru's Madre de Dios region. In this area, ASGM has increased significantly since 2000 and has led to substantial political and social controversy. This research examined the spatial distribution and transport of mercury through the Madre de Dios River with distance from ASGM activity. This study also characterized risks for dietary mercury exposure to local residents who depend on fish from the river. River sediment, suspended solids from the water column, and fish samples were collected in 2013 at 62 sites near 17 communities over a 560 km stretch of the Madre de Dios River and its major tributaries. In areas downstream of known ASGM activity, mercury concentrations in sediment, suspended solids, and fish within the Madre de Dios River were elevated relative to locations upstream of mining. Fish tissue mercury concentrations were observed at levels representing a public health threat, with greater than one-third of carnivorous fish exceeding the international health standard of 0.5 mg kg(-1). This study demonstrates that communities located hundreds of kilometers downstream of ASGM activity, including children and indigenous populations who may not be involved in mining, are at risk of dietary mercury exposure that exceed acceptable body burdens. This report represents the first systematic study of the region to aid policy decision-making related to ASGM activities in Peru.

  9. Influence of large-scale motion on turbulent transport for confined coaxial jets. Volume 2: Navier-Stokes calculations of swirling and nonswirling confined coaxial jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, B. C.; Mcdonald, H.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of large scale coherent structures in turbulent shear flows has been well documented. Discrepancies between experimental and computational data suggest a necessity to understand the roles they play in mass and momentum transport. Using conditional sampling and averaging on coincident two-component velocity and concentration velocity experimental data for swirling and nonswirling coaxial jets, triggers for identifying the structures were examined. Concentration fluctuation was found to be an adequate trigger or indicator for the concentration-velocity data, but no suitable detector was located for the two-component velocity data. The large scale structures are found in the region where the largest discrepancies exist between model and experiment. The traditional gradient transport model does not fit in this region as a result of these structures. The large scale motion was found to be responsible for a large percentage of the axial mass transport. The large scale structures were found to convect downstream at approximately the mean velocity of the overall flow in the axial direction. The radial mean velocity of the structures was found to be substantially greater than that of the overall flow.

  10. Illustration of Uncertainties in Assessments of Flow and Transport in a Block Scale Fracture Network an Example from the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poteri, A.; Cvetkovic, V.; Dershowitz, W.; Billaux, D.; Winberg, A.

    2006-12-01

    Tracer experiments have been performed since 1995 at the underground SKB Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, southeastern Sweden. Non-sorbing and sorbing radioactive tracer experiments of the TRUE Block Scale Project were conducted in single fractures and a network of fractures with support from a comprehensive program of laboratory experiments, geological, hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characterisation and associated modelling. The collected information have resulted in the definition of two generalised fracture types, one fault type with fault gouge (Type 1) and one non-fault type (Type 2) without fault gouge, the latter corresponding to background fractures. These two generic fracture types were characterized by a multiple immobile zone porosity model, referred to as the "microstructural model". Understanding gained from the TRUE Block Scale Project was used to investigate and model a previously non- tested part of the investigated rock volume. These "predictive" experiments were carried out to test and improve our conceptual understanding of solute transport in fractured rocks, and to demonstrate the current state of our predictive capabilities. The modelling included assessment of effects of geometry, macro- structure, and micro-structure, with a particular focus on the role of lower conductivity background fractures within transport pathways. Following a basic characterisation including tracer dilution and non-reactive tracer pre-tests, sorbing tracer tests were conducted in a) a single Type 1 fracture flow path and b) a flow path involving injection in a single background fracture of Type 2 connected to a major Type 1 structure. The structural model characterization of the rock indicated that the Type 1 pathway has a path length comparable to the Euclidian distance of about 20 m, but the background fracture pathways including both Type 1 and Type 2 fractures, although with an Euclidian similar to the single structure Type 1 pathway, in fact has an evaluated

  11. Nosocomial viral infections: IV. Guidelines for cohort isolation, the communicable disease survey, collection, and transport of specimens for virus isolation, and considerations for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, W M; Menegus, M A

    1981-01-01

    Virus transmission within the hospital is related to transmissibility of the virus and susceptibility of the population at risk. General guidelines for the use of cohort isolation, for the control of virus transmission in the hospital, and for the use of the communicable disease survey for pediatric patients and visitors to the hospital are out-lined. We also present a brief review of how to collect and transport specimens for virus isolation to assist the infection control practitioner and the clinician and conclude with recommendations for further investigations in the areas of virology and infection control.

  12. Gram-scale solution-phase synthesis of selective sodium bicarbonate Co-transport Inhibitor S0859

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ann Møller; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Niels; Lauritzen, Gitte

    2012-01-01

    Na+-coupled HCO3- transporters (NBCs) mediate the transport of bicarbonate ions across cell membranes and are thus ubiquitous regulators of intracellular pH. NBC dysregulation is associated with a range of diseases; for instance, NBCn1 is strongly up-regulated in a model of ErbB2-dependent breast...

  13. Weather is not significantly correlated with destination-specific transport-related physical activity among adults: A large-scale temporally matched analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Casey P; Zhang, Kai; Salvo, Deborah

    2017-08-01

    Weather is an element of the natural environment that could have a significant effect on physical activity. Existing research, however, indicates only modest correlations between measures of weather and physical activity. This prior work has been limited by a failure to use time-matched weather and physical activity data, or has not adequately examined the different domains of physical activity (transport, leisure, occupational, etc.). Our objective was to identify the correlation between weather variables and destination-specific transport-related physical activity in adults. Data were sourced from the California Household Travel Survey, collected in 2012-3. Weather variables included: relative humidity, temperature, wind speed, and precipitation. Transport-related physical activity (walking) was sourced from participant-recorded travel diaries. Three-part hurdle models were used to analyze the data. Results indicate statistically or substantively insignificant correlations between the weather variables and transport-related physical activity for all destination types. These results provide the strongest evidence to date that transport-related physical activity may occur relatively independently of weather conditions. The knowledge that weather conditions do not seem to be a significant barrier to this domain of activity may potentially expand the universe of geographic locations that are amenable to environmental and programmatic interventions to increase transport-related walking. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Leaf Collection Posting Log

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains leaf collection dates for area and subarea where leaf collection service is provided by Montgomery County Department of Transportation. Update...

  15. Micro-scale elemental composition of organo-mineral associations collected in situ from a Calcaric Gleysol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenzer, Selina; Eusterhues, Karin; Mueller, Carsten W.; Pohl, Lydia; Rennert, Thilo

    2017-04-01

    Evaluating the temporal dynamics of the chemical composition and spatial distribution of organo-mineral associations is crucial for understanding their role in cycling and stabilizing soil organic matter (SOM). Especially Fe oxides and hydroxides play an important role for the stabilization of SOM due to their high reactivity. However, it is not straight forward to study the formation of organo-mineral associations in situ at intact soil structures. In groundwater-affected redoximorphic soils, precipitation of Fe oxides occurs directly at the soil-water interface of coarse pores. Therefore, these soils are particularly suitable to observe the dynamics of Fe oxides regarding interactions with dissolved organic matter and redox-induced aging of initially short-range ordered Fe oxides. We therefore chose a dyked marshland site with a Calcaric Gleysol formed from marine sediments for collecting freshly precipitated and aged Fe oxides in situ. Sampling was carried out without physical and chemical disturbance using a special rod with attached glass slides or silicon wafers. The application of slides enabled us to use a wide range of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques to analyze the chemical and mineralogical composition of these precipitates. Three rods were inserted for half a year (R0.5), one year (R1) and two and a half years (R2.5). Wafers and glass slides within the Bg-Horizon (oxidizing conditions) were analyzed starting with field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE SEM) to select suitable spots for subsequent chemical mapping using nano-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). For R0.543 spots on two glass slides were measured, for R1 39 spots on four silicon wafers and for R2.5 34 spots on four glass slides. For the NanoSIMS measurements seven masses were chosen, mainly: 16O-, 12C-, 12C14N-, 31P-, 32S-, 27Al16O-, 56Fe16O-. One plane with 10 ms per pixel (R0.5 + 2.5) and 40 planes with 1 ms per pixel (R1) were measured. For evaluating a

  16. Influence of exogenous factors on the stress resistance of employability of collectives of railway transport of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Сергеевна Гулай

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available When conducting our investigation of the influence of exogenous and endogenous changes in the situation in the country to handle stress of railway workers, it was revealed a number of separate non-traditional forms of behavior that could be used to improve the ability to work in a collective with the help of a piece of modeling a particular stressful situation when need for increased generation or some positive results in the work of the staff

  17. Diagnosis of Clostridium difficile infection: comparison of four methods on specimens collected in Cary-Blair transport medium and tcdB PCR on fresh versus frozen samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Noah A.; LeBar, William D.; Young, Carol L.; Hankerd, Rosemary E.; Newton, Duane W.

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) caused by toxigenic strains of C. difficile is primarily a nosocomial infection with increasing prevalence. Stool specimens are typically collected in Cary-Blair transport medium to maximize culture-based detection of common stool pathogens. The goal of this study was to establish an analytically accurate and efficient algorithm for the detection of CDI in our patient population using samples collected in Cary-Blair transport medium. In addition, we wished to determine whether the sensitivity and specificity of PCR was affected by freezing samples before testing. Using 357 specimens, we compared four methods: enzyme immunoassay for the antigen glutamate dehydrogenase (Wampole™ C. DIFF CHEK-60 Assay, GDH), toxin A and B enzyme immunoassay (Remel ProSpecT™ C. difficile Toxin A/B Microplate Assay, Toxin EIA), cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (Bartels™ Cytotoxicity Assay, CT), and real-time PCR targeting the toxin B gene (BD GeneOhm™ Cdiff Assay, PCR). The analytic sensitivity and specificity of each as determined using a combined gold standard were as follows: GDH, 100% and 93.2%; Toxin EIA, 82.9% and 82.9%; CT, 100% and 100%; PCR (performed on frozen specimens) 74.3% and 96.6%; respectively. However, the sensitivity and specificity of PCR improved to 100% when performed on 50 fresh stool samples collected in Cary-Blair. While CT remains a sensitive method for the detection of CDI, GDH offers an excellent initial screening method to rule out CDI. While the performance of each assay did not appear to be affected by collection in Cary-Blair medium, PCR performed better using fresh specimens. PMID:24470904

  18. Multi scale study of carbon deposits collected in Tore-Supra and TEXTOR tokamaks; Etude multi echelle des depots carbones collectes dans les tokamaks Tore Supra et TEXTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richou, M

    2007-06-15

    Tokamaks are devices aimed at studying magnetic fusion. They operate with high temperature plasmas containing hydrogen, deuterium or tritium. One of the major issue is to control the plasma-wall interaction. The plasma facing components are most often in carbon. The major drawback of carbon is the existence of carbon deposits and dust, due to erosion. Dust is potentially reactive in case of an accidental opening of the device. These deposits also contain H, D or T and induce major safety problems when tritium is used, which will be the case in ITER. Therefore, the understanding of the deposit formation and structure has become a main issue for fusion researches. To clarify the role of the deposits in the retention phenomenon, we have done different complementary characterizations for deposits collected on similar places (neutralizers) in tokamaks Tore Supra (France) and TEXTOR (Germany). Accessible microporous volume and pore size distribution of deposits has been determined with the analysis of nitrogen and methane adsorption isotherms using the BET, Dubinin-Radushkevich and {alpha}{sub s} methods and the Density Functional Theory (DFT). To understand growth mechanisms, we have studied the deposit structure and morphology. We have shown using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Raman micro-spectrometry that these deposits are non amorphous and disordered. We have also shown the presence of nano-particles (diameter between 4 and 70 nm) which are similar to carbon blacks: nano-particle growth occurs in homogeneous phase in the edge plasma. We have emphasised a dual growth process: a homogenous and a heterogeneous one. (author)

  19. Annual Report for Hybrid Plasma Reactor/Filter for Transportable Collective Protection Systems—Phase 1B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Rappe, Kenneth G.; Frye, John G.

    2009-06-01

    Annual report covering the development of a hybrid nonthermal plasma single-pass filtration system for collective protection. This report covers NTP destruction testing on a high priority Toxic Industrial Material and an surrogate for a sulfur containing chemical agent (e.g. mustard), Effects of catalysts in the nonthermal plasma and catalyst poisoning by the sulfur are presented. Also presented are proof-of-principle data for utilizing ozone created in the NTP as a beneficial reactant to destroy adsorbed contaminants in-situ. Catalysts to decompose the ozone within the adsorbent bed are necessary to convert the adsorber into an ozone reactor.

  20. Predictions of dynamic changes in reaction rates as a consequence of incomplete mixing using pore scale reactive transport modeling on images of porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhashmi, Z; Blunt, M J; Bijeljic, B

    2015-08-01

    We present a pore scale model capable of simulating fluid/fluid reactive transport on images of porous media from first principles. We use a streamline-based particle tracking method for simulating flow and transport, while for reaction to occur, both reactants must be within a diffusive distance of each other during a time-step. We assign a probability of reaction (Pr), as a function of the reaction rate constant (kr) and the diffusion length. Firstly, we validate our model for reaction against analytical solutions for the bimolecular reaction (A+B→C) in a free fluid. Then, we simulate transport and reaction in a beadpack to validate the model through predicting the fluid/fluid reaction experimental results provided by Gramling et al. (2002). Our model accurately predicts the experimental data, as it takes into account the degree of incomplete mixing present at the sub-pore (image voxel) level, in contrast to advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) model that over-predicts pore scale mixing. Finally, we show how our model can predict dynamic changes in the reaction rate accurately accounting for the local geometry, topology and flow field at the pore scale. We demonstrate the substantial difference between the predicted early-time reaction rate in comparison to the ADRE model. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis for pesticide transport in watershed-scale water quality modeling using SWAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Yuzhou [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Zhang Minghua, E-mail: mhzhang@ucdavis.ed [University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Wenzhou Medical College, Wenzhou 325035 (China)

    2009-12-15

    The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) was calibrated for hydrology conditions in an agricultural watershed of Orestimba Creek, California, and applied to simulate fate and transport of two organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos and diazinon. The model showed capability in evaluating pesticide fate and transport processes in agricultural fields and instream network. Management-oriented sensitivity analysis was conducted by applied stochastic SWAT simulations for pesticide distribution. Results of sensitivity analysis identified the governing processes in pesticide outputs as surface runoff, soil erosion, and sedimentation in the study area. By incorporating sensitive parameters in pesticide transport simulation, effects of structural best management practices (BMPs) in improving surface water quality were demonstrated by SWAT modeling. This study also recommends conservation practices designed to reduce field yield and in-stream transport capacity of sediment, such as filter strip, grassed waterway, crop residue management, and tailwater pond to be implemented in the Orestimba Creek watershed. - Selected structural BMPs are recommended for reducing loads of OP pesticides.

  2. Pore‐scale modeling of vapor transport in partially saturated capillary tube with variable area using chemical potential

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Addassi, Mouadh; Schreyer, Lynn; Johannesson, Björn; Lin, Hai

    2016-01-01

    .... We demonstrate that isothermal vapor transport can be accurately modeled without modeling the details of the contact angle, microscale temperature fluctuations, or pressure fluctuations using a modification of the Fick‐Jacobs equation...

  3. Environmental and Social Sustainability of the Proximity Waste Collection System: A Case-Study Evaluation at an Italian Local Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Carchesio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an urban or suburban area, the sustainability of a waste management process is expected to be closely related to the territorial context and the local citizens’ behaviour. From this perspective, the implementation of the peculiar proximity waste collection system in a small town in Central Italy (San Costanzo was considered. As compared to the previous road collection system in the same municipality, its environmental performance in terms of Source Separation Level (SSL, Waste Generation or Collection Rate (WGR or WCR and Interception Rate (IR was evaluated. An original analysis of the citizens’ monthly frequency and of their participation rate both in relation to the setting out of the Unsorted Residual Waste (URW was also carried out. Following the full implementation of the new waste collection scheme, the SSL achieved almost 79%, the WCR of the URW decreased by about 82% and the most IR values resulted above 83%. From a social point of view, the study further highlighted that, with the new waste collection scheme active, more than 50% of users were accustomed to set out the URW at most 5 times per month and the corresponding participation rate to set out the URW was around 62%.

  4. Application of the INES Scale at radioactive facilities and in transport; Aplicacion de la Escala INES en instalaciones radiactivas y transporte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, M. L.; Zamora, F.

    2012-11-01

    In 2009 the CSN approved the changes introduced by the 2008 edition of the Manual of the International Nuclear and Radiological Events Scale. This is a tool that facilitates communications between the technical community, the media and the public. (Author) 2 refs.

  5. Evaluation of a medium (STGG) for transport and optimal recovery of Streptococcus pneumoniae from nasopharyngeal secretions collected during field studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, K L; Bronsdon, M A; Dagan, R; Yagupsky, P; Janco, J; Elliott, J; Whitney, C G; Yang, Y H; Robinson, L G; Schwartz, B; Carlone, G M

    2001-03-01

    Field studies of Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococci) nasopharyngeal (NP) colonization are hampered by the need to directly plate specimens in order to ensure isolate viability. A medium containing skim milk, tryptone, glucose, and glycerin (STGG) has been used to transport and store NP material, but its ability to preserve pneumococci has not been evaluated. Our objective was to qualitatively and semiquantitatively evaluate the ability of STGG to preserve pneumococci in NP secretions. Entwined duplicate calcium alginate NP swab samples were obtained from children. One swab was plated directly onto a gentamicin blood agar plate; the other was placed in STGG. Growth from the directly plated specimen was compared with growth from an STGG aliquot immediately cultured or stored at -70 degrees C for 9 weeks, -20 degrees C for 9 weeks, or 4 degrees C for 5 days. Of 186 specimens, 96 (52%) were positive for pneumococci from the direct plating; 94 (98%) of these were positive from the fresh STGG specimen. Pneumococci were recovered from all 38 positive specimens frozen at -70 degrees C, all 18 positive specimens frozen at -20 degrees C, and 18 of 20 positive specimens stored at 4 degrees C. Recovery of pneumococci after storage of NP material in STGG medium at -70 degrees C is at least as good as that from direct plating. Storage at -20 degrees C is also acceptable. Storage at 4 degrees C for 5 days is not ideal.

  6. Insights about transport mechanisms and fracture flow channeling from multi-scale observations of tracer dispersion in shallow fractured crystalline rock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N; Bour, O; Boisson, A; Le Borgne, T; Becker, M W; Nigon, B; Wajiduddin, M; Ahmed, S; Maréchal, J-C

    2017-11-01

    In fractured media, solute transport is controlled by advection in open and connected fractures and by matrix diffusion that may be enhanced by chemical weathering of the fracture walls. These phenomena may lead to non-Fickian dispersion characterized by early tracer arrival time, late-time tailing on the breakthrough curves and potential scale effect on transport processes. Here we investigate the scale dependency of these processes by analyzing a series of convergent and push-pull tracer experiments with distance of investigation ranging from 4m to 41m in shallow fractured granite. The small and intermediate distances convergent experiments display a non-Fickian tailing, characterized by a -2 power law slope. However, the largest distance experiment does not display a clear power law behavior and indicates possibly two main pathways. The push-pull experiments show breakthrough curve tailing decreases as the volume of investigation increases, with a power law slope ranging from -3 to -2.3 from the smallest to the largest volume. The multipath model developed by Becker and Shapiro (2003) is used here to evaluate the hypothesis of the independence of flow pathways. The multipath model is found to explain the convergent data, when increasing local dispersivity and reducing the number of pathways with distance which suggest a transition from non-Fickian to Fickian transport at fracture scale. However, this model predicts an increase of tailing with push-pull distance, while the experiments show the opposite trend. This inconsistency may suggest the activation of cross channel mass transfer at larger volume of investigation, which leads to non-reversible heterogeneous advection with scale. This transition from independent channels to connected channels when the volume of investigation increases suggest that both convergent and push-pull breakthrough curves can inform the existence of characteristic length scales. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Insights about transport mechanisms and fracture flow channeling from multi-scale observations of tracer dispersion in shallow fractured crystalline rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guihéneuf, N.; Bour, O.; Boisson, A.; Le Borgne, T.; Becker, M. W.; Nigon, B.; Wajiduddin, M.; Ahmed, S.; Maréchal, J.-C.

    2017-11-01

    In fractured media, solute transport is controlled by advection in open and connected fractures and by matrix diffusion that may be enhanced by chemical weathering of the fracture walls. These phenomena may lead to non-Fickian dispersion characterized by early tracer arrival time, late-time tailing on the breakthrough curves and potential scale effect on transport processes. Here we investigate the scale dependency of these processes by analyzing a series of convergent and push-pull tracer experiments with distance of investigation ranging from 4 m to 41 m in shallow fractured granite. The small and intermediate distances convergent experiments display a non-Fickian tailing, characterized by a -2 power law slope. However, the largest distance experiment does not display a clear power law behavior and indicates possibly two main pathways. The push-pull experiments show breakthrough curve tailing decreases as the volume of investigation increases, with a power law slope ranging from - 3 to - 2.3 from the smallest to the largest volume. The multipath model developed by Becker and Shapiro (2003) is used here to evaluate the hypothesis of the independence of flow pathways. The multipath model is found to explain the convergent data, when increasing local dispersivity and reducing the number of pathways with distance which suggest a transition from non-Fickian to Fickian transport at fracture scale. However, this model predicts an increase of tailing with push-pull distance, while the experiments show the opposite trend. This inconsistency may suggest the activation of cross channel mass transfer at larger volume of investigation, which leads to non-reversible heterogeneous advection with scale. This transition from independent channels to connected channels when the volume of investigation increases suggest that both convergent and push-pull breakthrough curves can inform the existence of characteristic length scales.

  8. Constraining the relative importance of raindrop- and flow-driven sediment transport mechanisms in postwildfire environments and implications for recovery time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Luke; Kean, Jason W.; Staley, Dennis M.; Rengers, Francis; Wasklewicz, Thad A.

    2016-01-01

    Mountain watersheds recently burned by wildfire often experience greater amounts of runoff and increased rates of sediment transport relative to similar unburned areas. Given the sedimentation and debris flow threats caused by increases in erosion, more work is needed to better understand the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed increase in sediment transport in burned environments and the time scale over which a heightened geomorphic response can be expected. In this study, we quantified the relative importance of different hillslope erosion mechanisms during two postwildfire rainstorms at a drainage basin in Southern California by combining terrestrial laser scanner-derived maps of topographic change, field measurements, and numerical modeling of overland flow and sediment transport. Numerous debris flows were initiated by runoff at our study area during a long-duration storm of relatively modest intensity. Despite the presence of a well-developed rill network, numerical model results suggest that the majority of eroded hillslope sediment during this long-duration rainstorm was transported by raindrop-induced sediment transport processes, highlighting the importance of raindrop-driven processes in supplying channels with potential debris flow material. We also used the numerical model to explore relationships between postwildfire storm characteristics, vegetation cover, soil infiltration capacity, and the total volume of eroded sediment from a synthetic hillslope for different end-member erosion regimes. This study adds to our understanding of sediment transport in steep, postwildfire landscapes and shows how data from field monitoring can be combined with numerical modeling of sediment transport to isolate the processes leading to increased erosion in burned areas.

  9. Statistical atmospheric inversion of local gas emissions by coupling the tracer release technique and local-scale transport modelling: a test case with controlled methane emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ars

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a new concept for estimating the pollutant emission rates of a site and its main facilities using a series of atmospheric measurements across the pollutant plumes. This concept combines the tracer release method, local-scale atmospheric transport modelling and a statistical atmospheric inversion approach. The conversion between the controlled emission and the measured atmospheric concentrations of the released tracer across the plume places valuable constraints on the atmospheric transport. This is used to optimise the configuration of the transport model parameters and the model uncertainty statistics in the inversion system. The emission rates of all sources are then inverted to optimise the match between the concentrations simulated with the transport model and the pollutants' measured atmospheric concentrations, accounting for the transport model uncertainty. In principle, by using atmospheric transport modelling, this concept does not strongly rely on the good colocation between the tracer and pollutant sources and can be used to monitor multiple sources within a single site, unlike the classical tracer release technique. The statistical inversion framework and the use of the tracer data for the configuration of the transport and inversion modelling systems should ensure that the transport modelling errors are correctly handled in the source estimation. The potential of this new concept is evaluated with a relatively simple practical implementation based on a Gaussian plume model and a series of inversions of controlled methane point sources using acetylene as a tracer gas. The experimental conditions are chosen so that they are suitable for the use of a Gaussian plume model to simulate the atmospheric transport. In these experiments, different configurations of methane and acetylene point source locations are tested to assess the efficiency of the method in comparison to the classic tracer release technique in coping

  10. Proteome scale census of major facilitator superfamily transporters in Trichoderma reesei using protein sequence and structure based classification enhanced ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitika; Kumari, Indu; Sandhu, Padmani; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2016-07-01

    Trichoderma spp. have been acknowledged as potent bio-control agents against microbial pathogens and also as plant growth promoters. Various secondary metabolites are attributed for these beneficial activities. Major facilitator superfamily (MFS) includes the large proportion of efflux-pumps which are linked with membrane transport of these secondary metabolites. We have carried out a proteome-wide identification of MFS transporters using protein sequence and structure based hierarchical method in Trichoderma reesei. 448 proteins out of 9115 were detected to carry transmembrane helices. MFS specific intragenic gene duplication and its context with transport function have been presented. Finally, using homology based techniques, domains and motifs of MFS families have been identified and utilized to classify them. From query dataset of 448 transmembrane proteins, 148 proteins are identified as potential MFS transporters. Sugar porter, drug: H(+) antiporter-1, monocarboxylate porter and anion: cation symporter emerged as major MFS families with 51, 35, 17 and 11 members respectively. Representative protein tertiary structures of these families are homology modeled for structure-function analysis. This study may help to understand the molecular basis of secretion and transport of agriculturally valuable secondary metabolites produced by these bio-control fungal agents which may be exploited in future for enhancing its biotechnological applications in eco-friendly sustainable development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Modeling watershed-scale 137Cs transport in a forested catchment affected by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lezhang; Kinouchi, Tsuyoshi; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Velleux, Mark L

    2017-05-01

    The Fukushima nuclear accident in 2011 resulted in 137Cs contamination of large areas in northeast Japan. A watershed-scale 137Cs transport model was developed and applied to a forested catchment in Fukushima area. This model considers 137Cs wash-off from vegetation, movement through soils, and transport of dissolved and particulate 137Cs adsorbed to clay, silt and sand. Comparisons between measurements and simulations demonstrated that the model well reproduced 137Cs concentrations in the stream fed from the catchment. Simulations estimated that 0.57 TBq of 137Cs was exported from the catchment between June, 2011 and December, 2014. Transport largely occurred with eroded sediment particles at a ratio of 17:70:13 of clay, silt, and sand. The overall 137Cs reduction ratio by rainfall-runoff wash-off was about 1.6%. Appreciable 137Cs remained in the catchment at the end of 2014. The largest rate of 137Cs reduction by wash-off was simulated to occur in subwatersheds of the upper catchment. However, despite relatively low initial deposition, middle portions of the watershed exported proportionately more 137Cs by rainfall-runoff processes. Simulations indicated that much of the transported 137Cs originates from erosion over hillsides and river banks. These results suggested that areas where 137Cs accumulates with redeposited sediments can be targeted for decontamination and also provided insight into 137Cs transport at the watershed scale to assess risk management and decontamination planning efforts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Simulating stream transport of nutrients in the eastern United States, 2002, using a spatially-referenced regression model and 1:100,000-scale hydrography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoos, Anne B.; Moore, Richard B.; Garcia, Ana Maria; Noe, Gregory B.; Terziotti, Silvia E.; Johnston, Craig M.; Dennis, Robin L.

    2013-01-01

    Existing Spatially Referenced Regression on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) nutrient models for the northeastern and southeastern regions of the United States were recalibrated to achieve a hydrographically consistent model with which to assess nutrient sources and stream transport and investigate specific management questions about the effects of wetlands and atmospheric deposition on nutrient transport. Recalibrated nitrogen models for the northeast and southeast were sufficiently similar to be merged into a single nitrogen model for the eastern United States. The atmospheric deposition source in the nitrogen model has been improved to account for individual components of atmospheric input, derived from emissions from agricultural manure, agricultural livestock, vehicles, power plants, other industry, and background sources. This accounting makes it possible to simulate the effects of altering an individual component of atmospheric deposition, such as nitrate emissions from vehicles or power plants. Regional differences in transport of phosphorus through wetlands and reservoirs were investigated and resulted in two distinct phosphorus models for the northeast and southeast. The recalibrated nitrogen and phosphorus models account explicitly for the influence of wetlands on regional-scale land-phase and aqueous-phase transport of nutrients and therefore allow comparison of the water-quality functions of different wetland systems over large spatial scales. Seven wetland systems were associated with enhanced transport of either nitrogen or phosphorus in streams, probably because of the export of dissolved organic nitrogen and bank erosion. Six wetland systems were associated with mitigating the delivery of either nitrogen or phosphorus to streams, probably because of sedimentation, phosphate sorption, and ground water infiltration.

  13. Multi-Scale Transport Properties of Fine-Grained Rocks: A Case Study of the Kirtland Formation, San Juan Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, J. E.; Dewers, T. A.; McPherson, B. J.; Wilson, T. H.; Flach, T.

    2009-12-01

    Understanding and characterizing transport properties of fine-grained rocks is critical in development of shale gas plays or assessing retention of CO2 at geologic storage sites. Difficulties arise in that both small scale (i.e., ~ nm) properties of the rock matrix and much larger scale fractures, faults, and sedimentological architecture govern migration of multiphase fluids. We present a multi-scale investigation of sealing and transport properties of the Kirtland Formation, which is a regional aquitard and reservoir seal in the San Juan Basin, USA. Sub-micron dual FIB/SEM imaging and reconstruction of 3D pore networks in core samples reveal a variety of pore types, including slit-shaped pores that are co-located with sedimentary structures and variations in mineralogy. Micron-scale chemical analysis and XRD reveal a mixture of mixed-layer smectite/illite, chlorite, quartz, and feldspar with little organic matter. Analysis of sub-micron digital reconstructions, mercury capillary injection pressure, and gas breakthrough measurements indicate a high quality sealing matrix. Natural full and partially mineralized fractures observed in core and in FMI logs include those formed from early soil-forming processes, differential compaction, and tectonic events. The potential impact of both fracture and matrix properties on large-scale transport is investigated through an analysis of natural helium from core samples, 3D seismic data and poro-elastic modeling. While seismic interpretations suggest considerable fracturing of the Kirtland, large continuous fracture zones and faults extending through the seal to the surface cannot be inferred from the data. Observed Kirtland Formation multi-scale transport properties are included as part of a risk assessment methodology for CO2 storage. Acknowledgements: The authors gratefully acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory for sponsoring this project. The DOE’s Basic Energy Science

  14. Scaling Behavior of Quantum Nanosystems: Emergence of Quasi-particles, Collective Modes, and Mixed Exchange Symmetry States

    OpenAIRE

    Shreif, Zeina; Ortoleva, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Quantum nanosystems such as graphene nanoribbons or superconducting nanoparticles are studied via a multiscale approach. Long space-time dynamics is derived using a perturbation expansion in the ratio of the nearest-neighbor distance to a nanometer-scale characteristic length, and a theorem on the equivalence of long-time averages and expectation values. This dynamics is shown to satisfy a coarse-grained wave equation (CGWE) which takes a Schr\\"odinger-like form with modified masses and inter...

  15. Generation, storage, collection and transportation of municipal solid waste--a case study in the city of Kathmandu, capital of Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, R; Chowdhury, M A I; Hasan, G M J; Karanjit, B; Shrestha, L R

    2008-01-01

    Solid waste management (SWM) services have consistently failed to keep up with the vast amount of solid waste produced in urban areas. There is not currently an efficient system in place for the management, storage, collection, and transportation of solid waste. Kathmandu City, an important urban center of South Asia, is no exception. In Kathmandu Metropolitan City, solid waste generation is predicted to be 1091 m(3)/d (245 tons/day) and 1155 m(3)/d (260 tons/day) for the years 2005 and 2006, respectively. The majority (89%) of households in Kathmandu Metropolitan City are willing to segregate the organic and non-organic portions of their waste. Overall collection efficiency was 94% in 2003. An increase in waste collection occurred due to private sector involvement, the shutdown of the second transfer station near the airport due to local protest, a lack of funding to maintain trucks/equipment, a huge increase in plastic waste, and the willingness of people to separate their waste into separate bins. Despite a substantial increase in total expenditure, no additional investments were made to the existing development plan to introduce a modern disposal system due to insufficient funding. Due to the lack of a proper lining, raw solid waste from the existing dumping site comes in contact with river water directly, causing severe river contamination and deteriorating the quality of the water.

  16. Pore-scale modeling of vapor transport in partially saturated capillary tube with variable area using chemical potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addassi, Mouadh; Schreyer, Lynn; Johannesson, Björn

    2016-01-01

    Here we illustrate the usefulness of using the chemical potential as the primary unknown by modeling isothermal vapor transport through a partially saturated cylindrically symmetric capillary tube of variable cross-sectional area using a single equation. There are no fitting parameters and the nu......Here we illustrate the usefulness of using the chemical potential as the primary unknown by modeling isothermal vapor transport through a partially saturated cylindrically symmetric capillary tube of variable cross-sectional area using a single equation. There are no fitting parameters...... and the numerical solutions to the equation are compared with experimental results with excellent agreement. We demonstrate that isothermal vapor transport can be accurately modeled without modeling the details of the contact angle, microscale temperature fluctuations, or pressure fluctuations using a modification...

  17. Effects of regional-scale and convective transports on tropospheric ozone chemistry revealed by aircraft observations during the wet season of the AMMA campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancellet, G.; Leclair de Bellevue, J.; Mari, C.; Nedelec, P.; Kukui, A.; Borbon, A.; Perros, P.

    2009-01-01

    The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) fourth airborne campaign was conducted in July-August 2006 to study the chemical composition of the middle and upper troposphere in West Africa with the major objective to better understand the processing of chemical emissions by the West African Monsoon (WAM) and its associated regional-scale and vertical transports. In particular, the french airborne experiment was organized around two goals. The first was to characterize the impact of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs) on the ozone budget in the upper troposphere and the evolution of the chemical composition of these convective plumes as they move westward toward the Atlantic Ocean. The second objective was to discriminate the impact of remote sources of pollution over West Africa, including transport from the middle east, Europe, Asia and from southern hemispheric fires. Observations of O3, CO, NOx, H2O and hydroperoxide above West Africa along repeated meridional transects were coupled with transport analysis based on the FLEXPART lagrangian model. The cross analysis of trace gas concentrations and transport pathways revealed 5 types of air masses: convective uplift of industrial and urban emissions, convective uplift of biogenic emissions, slow advection from Cotonou polluted plumes near the coast, meridional transport of upper tropospheric air from the subtropical barrier region, and meridional transport of Southern Hemisphere (SH) biomass burning emissions. O3/CO correlation plots and the correlation plots of H2O2 with a OH proxy revealed not only a control of the trace gas variability by transport processes but also significant photochemical reactivity in the mid- and upper troposphere. The study of four MCSs outflow showed contrasted chemical composition and air mass origins depending on the MCSs lifetime and latitudinal position. Favorables conditions for ozone production were found for MCSs with increased MCS lifetime (>1.5 days), which allowed for

  18. Effects of regional-scale and convective transports on tropospheric ozone chemistry revealed by aircraft observations during the wet season of the AMMA campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Ancellet

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA fourth airborne campaign was conducted in July–August 2006 to study the chemical composition of the middle and upper troposphere in West Africa with the major objective to better understand the processing of chemical emissions by the West African Monsoon (WAM and its associated regional-scale and vertical transports. In particular, the french airborne experiment was organized around two goals. The first was to characterize the impact of Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCSs on the ozone budget in the upper troposphere and the evolution of the chemical composition of these convective plumes as they move westward toward the Atlantic Ocean. The second objective was to discriminate the impact of remote sources of pollution over West Africa, including transport from the middle east, Europe, Asia and from southern hemispheric fires. Observations of O3, CO, NOx, H2O and hydroperoxide above West Africa along repeated meridional transects were coupled with transport analysis based on the FLEXPART lagrangian model. The cross analysis of trace gas concentrations and transport pathways revealed 5 types of air masses: convective uplift of industrial and urban emissions, convective uplift of biogenic emissions, slow advection from Cotonou polluted plumes near the coast, meridional transport of upper tropospheric air from the subtropical barrier region, and meridional transport of Southern Hemisphere (SH biomass burning emissions. O3/CO correlation plots and the correlation plots of H2O2 with a OH proxy revealed not only a control of the trace gas variability by transport processes but also significant photochemical reactivity in the mid- and upper troposphere. The study of four MCSs outflow showed contrasted chemical composition and air mass origins depending on the MCSs lifetime and latitudinal position. Favorables conditions for ozone

  19. Using pore-scale imaging and modeling to provide new insights in multi-phase flow, transport and reaction phenomena in porous media (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijeljic, B.; Andrew, M. G.; Menke, H. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    Advances in X ray imaging techniques made it possible not only to accurately describe solid and fluid(s) distributions in the pore space but also to study dynamics of multi-phase flow and reactive transport in-situ. This has opened up a range of new opportunities to better understand fundamental physics at the pore scale by experiment, and test and validate theoretical models in order to develop predictive tools at the pore scale and use it for upscaling. Firstly, we illustrate this concept by describing a new methodology for predicting non-Fickian transport in millimeter-sized three-dimensional micro-CT images of a beadpack, a sandstone, and a carbonate, representing porous media with an increasing degree of pore-scale complexity. The key strategy is to retain the full information on flow and transport signature of a porous medium by using probability distribution functions (PDFs) of voxel velocities for flow, and both PDFs of particle displacements and PDFs of particle transit times between voxels for transport. For this purpose, direct-simulation flow and transport model is used to analyse the relationship between pore structure, velocity, and the dynamics of the evolving plume. The model predictions for PDFs of particle displacements obtained by the model are in excellent agreement with those measured on similar cores in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments. A key determinant for non-Fickian transport is the spread in velocity distribution in the pore space. Further, we present micro-CT imaging of capillary trapping of scCO2 at reservoir conditions in a range of carbonates and sandstones having different pore structure and demonstrate that substantial quantities of scCO2 can be trapped in the pore space. Higher residual scCO2 saturations are found in sandstones compared to carbonates. The trapped ganglia exhibit different distribution of size, related to the inherent structure of pore space. Pore structures with large, open pores that are well connected lead

  20. COSIMA-DSS Evaluation System: A new Decision Support System for Large-Scale Transport Infrastructure Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salling, Kim Bang; Jensen, Anders Vestergaard; Leleur, Steen

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a new decision support model COSIMA-DSS that examines socio-economic feasibility risks involved in the implementation of transport infrastructure projects. The model makes use of conventionally cost-benefit analysis embedded within a wider multi-criteria analysis. The basic...

  1. Modeling of transport processes through large-scale discrete fracture networks using conforming meshes and open-source software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Tri Dat; Fourno, André; Noetinger, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    Most industrial and field studies of transport processes in Discrete Fracture Networks (DFNs) involve strong simplifying assumptions, especially at the meshing stage. High-accuracy simulations are therefore required for validating these simplified models and their domain of validity. The present paper proposes an efficient workflow based on open-source software to obtain transport simulations. High-quality computational meshes for DFNs are first generated using the conforming meshing approach FraC. Then, a tracer transport model implemented in the open-source code DuMux is used for simulating tracer transport driven by the advection-dispersion equation. We adopt the box method, a vertex-centered finite volume scheme for spatial discretization, which ensures concentration continuity and mass conservation at intersections between fractures. Numerical results on simple networks for validation purposes and on complex realistic DFNs are presented. An a-posteriori convergence study of the discretization method shows an order of convergence O(h) for tracer concentration with h the mesh size.

  2. Blood sample tube transporting system versus point of care technology in an emergency department; effect on time from collection to reporting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Mogensen, Christian Backer

    2012-01-01

    Time is a crucial factor in an emergency department and the effectiveness of diagnosing depends on, among other things, the accessibility of rapid reported laboratory test results; i.e.: a short turnaround time (TAT). Former studies have shown a reduced time to action when point of care technolog......Time is a crucial factor in an emergency department and the effectiveness of diagnosing depends on, among other things, the accessibility of rapid reported laboratory test results; i.e.: a short turnaround time (TAT). Former studies have shown a reduced time to action when point of care...... technologies (POCT) are used in emergency departments. This study assesses the hypothesis, that using Point of Care Technology in analysing blood samples versus tube transporting blood samples for laboratory analyses results in shorter time from the blood sample is collected to the result is reported...

  3. "Big data" versus "big brother": on the appropriate use of large-scale data collections in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Janet

    2013-04-01

    Discussions of "big data" in medicine often revolve around gene sequencing and biosamples. It is perhaps less recognized that administrative data in the form of vital records, hospital discharge abstracts, insurance claims, and other routinely collected data also offer the potential for using information from hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of people to answer important questions. However, the increasing ease with which such data may be used and reused has increased concerns about privacy and informed consent. Addressing these concerns without creating insurmountable barriers to the use of such data for research is essential if we are to avoid a "missed opportunity" in pediatrics research.

  4. Hydraulic and water-quality data collection for the investigation of Great Lakes tributaries for Asian carp spawning and egg-transport suitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Jackson, P. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    If the invasive Asian carps (bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis and silver carp Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) migrate to the Great Lakes, in spite of the efforts to stop their advancement, these species will require the fast-flowing water of the Great Lakes tributaries for spawning and recruitment in order to establish a growing population. Two Lake Michigan tributaries (the Milwaukee and St. Joseph Rivers) and two Lake Erie tributaries (the Maumee and Sandusky Rivers) were investigated to determine if these tributaries possess the hydraulic and water-quality characteristics to allow successful spawning of Asian carps. To examine this issue, standard U.S. Geological Survey sampling protocols and instrumentation for discharge and water-quality measurements were used, together with differential global positioning system data for georeferencing. Non-standard data-processing techniques, combined with detailed laboratory analysis of Asian carp egg characteristics, allowed an assessment of the transport capabilities of each of these four tributaries. This assessment is based solely on analysis of observed data and did not utilize the collected data for detailed transport modeling.

  5. Flow, Transport, and Reaction in Porous Media: Percolation Scaling, Critical-Path Analysis, and Effective Medium Approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Allen G.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2017-12-01

    We describe the most important developments in the application of three theoretical tools to modeling of the morphology of porous media and flow and transport processes in them. One tool is percolation theory. Although it was over 40 years ago that the possibility of using percolation theory to describe flow and transport processes in porous media was first raised, new models and concepts, as well as new variants of the original percolation model are still being developed for various applications to flow phenomena in porous media. The other two approaches, closely related to percolation theory, are the critical-path analysis, which is applicable when porous media are highly heterogeneous, and the effective medium approximation—poor man's percolation—that provide a simple and, under certain conditions, quantitatively correct description of transport in porous media in which percolation-type disorder is relevant. Applications to topics in geosciences include predictions of the hydraulic conductivity and air permeability, solute and gas diffusion that are particularly important in ecohydrological applications and land-surface interactions, and multiphase flow in porous media, as well as non-Gaussian solute transport, and flow morphologies associated with imbibition into unsaturated fractures. We describe new applications of percolation theory of solute transport to chemical weathering and soil formation, geomorphology, and elemental cycling through the terrestrial Earth surface. Wherever quantitatively accurate predictions of such quantities are relevant, so are the techniques presented here. Whenever possible, the theoretical predictions are compared with the relevant experimental data. In practically all the cases, the agreement between the theoretical predictions and the data is excellent. Also discussed are possible future directions in the application of such concepts to many other phenomena in geosciences.

  6. A Greedy Scanning Data Collection Strategy for Large-Scale Wireless Sensor Networks with a Mobile Sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chuan; Zhang, Sai; Han, Guangjie; Jiang, Jinfang; Rodrigues, Joel J P C

    2016-09-06

    Mobile sink is widely used for data collection in wireless sensor networks. It can avoid 'hot spot' problems but energy consumption caused by multihop transmission is still inefficient in real-time application scenarios. In this paper, a greedy scanning data collection strategy (GSDCS) is proposed, and we focus on how to reduce routing energy consumption by shortening total length of routing paths. We propose that the mobile sink adjusts its trajectory dynamically according to the changes of network, instead of predetermined trajectory or random walk. Next, the mobile sink determines which area has more source nodes, then it moves toward this area. The benefit of GSDCS is that most source nodes are no longer needed to upload sensory data for long distances. Especially in event-driven application scenarios, when event area changes, the mobile sink could arrive at the new event area where most source nodes are located currently. Hence energy can be saved. Analytical and simulation results show that compared with existing work, our GSDCS has a better performance in specific application scenarios.

  7. Discrete-fracture-model of multi–scale time-splitting two–phase flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2017-11-23

    In this article, we consider a two-phase immiscible incompressible flow including nanoparticles transport in fractured heterogeneous porous media. The system of the governing equations consists of water saturation, Darcy’s law, nanoparticles concentration in water, deposited nanoparticles concentration on the pore-wall, and entrapped nanoparticles concentration in the pore-throat, as well as, porosity and permeability variation due to the nanoparticles deposition/entrapment on/in the pores. The discrete-fracture model (DFM) is used to describe the flow and transport in fractured porous media. Moreover, multiscale time-splitting strategy has been employed to manage different time-step sizes for different physics, such as saturation, concentration, etc. Numerical examples are provided to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed multi-scale time splitting approach.

  8. Filtering large-scale event collections using a combination of supervised and unsupervised learning for event trigger classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehryary, Farrokh; Kaewphan, Suwisa; Hakala, Kai; Ginter, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Biomedical event extraction is one of the key tasks in biomedical text mining, supporting various applications such as database curation and hypothesis generation. Several systems, some of which have been applied at a large scale, have been introduced to solve this task. Past studies have shown that the identification of the phrases describing biological processes, also known as trigger detection, is a crucial part of event extraction, and notable overall performance gains can be obtained by solely focusing on this sub-task. In this paper we propose a novel approach for filtering falsely identified triggers from large-scale event databases, thus improving the quality of knowledge extraction. Our method relies on state-of-the-art word embeddings, event statistics gathered from the whole biomedical literature, and both supervised and unsupervised machine learning techniques. We focus on EVEX, an event database covering the whole PubMed and PubMed Central Open Access literature containing more than 40 million extracted events. The top most frequent EVEX trigger words are hierarchically clustered, and the resulting cluster tree is pruned to identify words that can never act as triggers regardless of their context. For rarely occurring trigger words we introduce a supervised approach trained on the combination of trigger word classification produced by the unsupervised clustering method and manual annotation. The method is evaluated on the official test set of BioNLP Shared Task on Event Extraction. The evaluation shows that the method can be used to improve the performance of the state-of-the-art event extraction systems. This successful effort also translates into removing 1,338,075 of potentially incorrect events from EVEX, thus greatly improving the quality of the data. The method is not solely bound to the EVEX resource and can be thus used to improve the quality of any event extraction system or database. The data and source code for this work are available at

  9. A field-scale reactive transport model for U(VI) migration influenced by coupled multirate mass transfer and surface complexation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, R.; Zheng, C.; Prommer, H.; Greskowiak, J.; Liu, C.; Zachara, J.; Rockhold, M.

    2010-05-01

    This study explores field-scale modeling of U(VI) reactive transport through incorporation of laboratory and field data. A field-scale reactive transport model was developed on the basis of laboratory-characterized U(VI) surface complexation reactions (SCRs) and multirate mass transfer processes, as well as field-measured hydrogeochemical conditions at the U.S. Department of Energy, Hanford 300 Area (300 A), Washington. The model was used to assess the importance of multirate mass transfer processes on U(VI) reactive transport and to evaluate the effect of variable geochemical conditions caused by dynamic river water-groundwater interactions on U(VI) plume migration. Model simulations revealed complex spatiotemporal relationships between groundwater composition and U(VI) speciation, adsorption, and plume migration. In general, river water intrusion enhances uranium adsorption and lowers aqueous uranium concentration because river water dilution increases pH and decreases aqueous bicarbonate concentration, leading to overall enhanced U(VI) surface complexation. Strong U(VI) retardation was computed for the field-measured hydrogeochemical conditions, suggesting a slow dissipation of the U(VI) plume, a phenomenon consistent with field observations. The simulations also showed that SCR-retarded U(VI) migration becomes more dynamic and synchronous with the groundwater flow field when multirate mass transfer processes are involved. Breakthrough curves at selected locations and the temporal changes in the calculated mass during the 20 year simulation period indicated that uranium adsorption/desorption never attained steady state because of the dynamic flow field and groundwater composition variations caused by river water intrusion. Thus, the multirate SCR model appears to be a crucial consideration for future reactive transport simulations of uranium contaminants at the Hanford 300 A site and elsewhere under similar hydrogeochemical conditions.

  10. Advanced subgrid-scale modeling for convection-dominated species transport at fluid interfaces with application to mass transfer from rising bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andre; Bothe, Dieter

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel subgrid scale (SGS) model for simulating convection-dominated species transport at deformable fluid interfaces. One possible application is the Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of mass transfer from rising bubbles. The transport of a dissolving gas along the bubble-liquid interface is determined by two transport phenomena: convection in streamwise direction and diffusion in interface normal direction. The convective transport for technical bubble sizes is several orders of magnitude higher, leading to a thin concentration boundary layer around the bubble. A true DNS, fully resolving hydrodynamic and mass transfer length scales results in infeasible computational costs. Our approach is therefore a DNS of the flow field combined with a SGS model to compute the mass transfer between bubble and liquid. An appropriate model-function is used to compute the numerical fluxes on all cell faces of an interface cell. This allows to predict the mass transfer correctly even if the concentration boundary layer is fully contained in a single cell layer around the interface. We show that the SGS-model reduces the resolution requirements at the interface by a factor of ten and more. The integral flux correction is also applicable to other thin boundary layer problems. Two flow regimes are investigated to validate the model. A semi-analytical solution for creeping flow is used to assess local and global mass transfer quantities. For higher Reynolds numbers ranging from Re = 100 to Re = 460 and Péclet numbers between Pe =104 and Pe = 4 ṡ106 we compare the global Sherwood number against correlations from literature. In terms of accuracy, the predicted mass transfer never deviates more than 4% from the reference values.

  11. Sustainable transportation stage of change, decisional balance, and self-efficacy scale development and validation in two university samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redding, Colleen A; Mundorf, Norbert; Kobayashi, Hisanori; Brick, Leslie; Horiuchi, Satoshi; Paiva, Andrea L; Prochaska, James O

    2015-01-01

    Single occupancy vehicle (SOV) transportation is a key contributor to climate change and air pollution. Sustainable transportation (ST), commuting by any means other than SOV, could both slow climate change and enhance public health. The transtheoretical model (TTM) provides a useful framework for examining how people progress towards adopting ST. Short valid and reliable measures for ST decisional balance, self-efficacy, and climate change doubt were developed and their relationship with stages of change was examined. Two large university-based volunteer samples participated in measurement studies. Using multiple procedures, three brief internally consistent measures were developed: decisional balance, self-efficacy, and climate change doubt. The stages of change correctly discriminated both decisional balance and self-efficacy, as well as replicated hypothesized relationships. Climate change doubt did not vary by stages; however, it may prove useful in future studies. Results support the validation of these measures and the application of the TTM to ST.

  12. Large-scale transport of PM2.5 in the lower troposphere during winter cold surges in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianjun; Zhang, Meigen; Bai, Xiaolin; Tan, Hongjian; Li, Sabrina; Liu, Jiping; Zhang, Rui; Wolters, Mark A; Qin, Xiuyuan; Zhang, Miming; Lin, Hongmei; Li, Yuenan; Li, Jonathan; Chen, Liqi

    2017-10-16

    A comprehensive investigation using the air quality network and meteorological data of China in 2015 showed that PM2.5 driven by cold surges from the ground level could travel up to 2000 km from northern to southern China within two days. Air pollution is more severe and prominent during the winter in north China due to seasonal variations in energy usage, trade wind movements, and industrial emissions. In February 2015, two cold surges traveling from north China caused a temporary increase in the concentration of PM2.5 in Shanghai. Subsequently, the concentration of PM2.5 in Xiamen increased to a high of 80 µg/m(3), which is double the average PM2.5 concentration in Xiamen during the winter. This finding is a new long-range transport mechanism comparing to the well-established mechanism, with long-range transport more likely to occur in the upper troposphere than at lower levels. These observations were validated by results from the back trajectory analysis and the RAMS- CMAQ model. While wind speed was found to be a major facilitator in transporting PM2.5 from Beijing to Xiamen, more investigation is required to understand the complex relationship between wind speed and PM2.5 and how it moderates air quality in Beijing, Shanghai, and Xiamen.

  13. Impacts of large-scale introduction of hydrogen in the road transport sector on urban air pollution and human exposure in Copenhagen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, S.S.; Ketzel, M.; Brandt, J.; Frohn, L.M.; Winther, M.; Nielsen, O.K. (Aarhus Univ.. National Environmental Research Institute, Roskilde (Denmark)); Joergensen, K.; Karlsson, K. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Dept. of System Analysis, Roskilde (Denmark))

    2011-07-15

    The aim of the project 'Environmental and Health Impact Assessment of Scenarios for Renewable Energy Systems with Hydrogen' (HYSCENE) is to improve modelling of the environmental impacts and related socio-cultural and welfare economic impacts of a proposed hydrogen/renewable energy system with focus on large-scale introduction of hydrogen as energy carrier in the road transport sector (http://hyscene.dmu.dk). This extended abstract will focus on the impacts on urban air pollution and human exposure. (Author)

  14. Simulating Pre-Asymptotic, Non-Fickian Transport Although Doing Simple Random Walks - Supported By Empirical Pore-Scale Velocity Distributions and Memory Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, S.; Jia, N.; Bijeljic, B.; Nowak, W.

    2016-12-01

    Pre-asymptotic characteristics are almost ubiquitous when analyzing solute transport processes in porous media. These pre-asymptotic aspects are caused by spatial coherence in the velocity field and by its heterogeneity. For the Lagrangian perspective of particle displacements, the causes of pre-asymptotic, non-Fickian transport are skewed velocity distribution, statistical dependencies between subsequent increments of particle positions (memory) and dependence between the x, y and z-components of particle increments. Valid simulation frameworks should account for these factors. We propose a particle tracking random walk (PTRW) simulation technique that can use empirical pore-space velocity distributions as input, enforces memory between subsequent random walk steps, and considers cross dependence. Thus, it is able to simulate pre-asymptotic non-Fickian transport phenomena. Our PTRW framework contains an advection/dispersion term plus a diffusion term. The advection/dispersion term produces time-series of particle increments from the velocity CDFs. These time series are equipped with memory by enforcing that the CDF values of subsequent velocities change only slightly. The latter is achieved through a random walk on the axis of CDF values between 0 and 1. The virtual diffusion coefficient for that random walk is our only fitting parameter. Cross-dependence can be enforced by constraining the random walk to certain combinations of CDF values between the three velocity components in x, y and z. We will show that this modelling framework is capable of simulating non-Fickian transport by comparison with a pore-scale transport simulation and we analyze the approach to asymptotic behavior.

  15. Transport coefficients and validity of the Stokes-Einstein relation in metallic melts: From excess entropy scaling laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Ruchi; Mishra, Raj Kumar

    2017-08-01

    Using the pair correlation function obtained via square well (SW) model [Mishra et al., 2015 Chem. Phys. 457 13], we calculate the pair excess entropy of liquid metals and determined the diffusion coefficients via Dzugutov's excess entropy-diffusivity scaling relation. Further, the applicability of the Stokes-Einstein relation for SW potential is validated by comparing the computed shear viscosity coefficients (ηV) of liquid metals with the available experimental data. Reduced ηV of considered systems has been derived and scaled with the excess entropy. We compute isothermal compressibility, surface tension and surface entropy of the investigated liquids by using diffusion coefficient data obtained from excess entropy scaling law. It is found that the computed values are in good agreement with the corresponding experimental data. Thus, we demonstrate that the Dzugutov scheme can be applied successfully to SW liquid metals to correlate their microscopic structural functions with their surface and thermodynamic properties.

  16. submitter Optimizing the data-collection time of a large-scale data-acquisition system through a simulation framework

    CERN Document Server

    Colombo, Tommaso; Garcìa, Pedro Javier; Vandelli, Wainer

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS detector at CERN records particle collision “events” delivered by the Large Hadron Collider. Its data-acquisition system identifies, selects, and stores interesting events in near real-time, with an aggregate throughput of several 10 GB/s. It is a distributed software system executed on a farm of roughly 2000 commodity worker nodes communicating via TCP/IP on an Ethernet network. Event data fragments are received from the many detector readout channels and are buffered, collected together, analyzed and either stored permanently or discarded. This system, and data-acquisition systems in general, are sensitive to the latency of the data transfer from the readout buffers to the worker nodes. Challenges affecting this transfer include the many-to-one communication pattern and the inherently bursty nature of the traffic. The main performance issues brought about by this workload are addressed in this paper, focusing in particular on the so-called TCP incast pathology. Since performing systematic stud...

  17. Risk of the residents, infrastructure and water bodies by flash floods and sediment transport - assessment for scale of the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, Tomáš; Krása, Josef; Bauer, Miroslav; Strouhal, Luděk; Jáchymová, Barbora; Devátý, Jan; David, Václav; Koudelka, Petr; Dočkal, Martin

    2015-04-01

    Pluvial and flash floods, related to massive sediment transport become phenomenon nowadays, under conditions of climate changes. Storm events, related to material damages appear at unexpected places and their effective control is only possible in form of prevention. To apply preventive measures, there have to be defined localities with reasonable reliability, which are endangered by surface runoff and sediment transport produced in the subcatchments, often at agriculturally used landscape. Classification of such localities, concerning of potential damages and magnitude of sediment transport shall be also included within the analyses, to design control measures effectively. Large scale project for whole territory of the Czech Republic (ca 80.000 km2) has therefore been granted b the Ministry of Interior of the Czech Republic, with the aim to define critical points, where interaction between surface runoff connected to massive sediment transport and infrastructure or vulnerable water bodies can occur and to classify them according to potential risk. Advanced GIS routines, based on analyses of land use, soil conditions and morphology had been used to determine the critical points - points, where significant surface runoff occurs and interacts with infrastructure and vulnerable water bodies, based exclusively on the contributing area - flow accumulation. In total, ca 150.000 critical points were determined within the Czech Republic. For each of critical points, its subcatchment had then been analyzed in detail, concerning of soil loss and sediment transport, using simulation model WATEM/SEDEM. The results were used for classification of potential risk of individual critical points, based on mean soil loss within subcatchment, total sediment transport trough the outlet point and subcatchment area. The classification has been done into 5 classes. The boundaries were determined by calibration survey and statistical analysis, performed at three experimental catchments area

  18. 78 FR 18675 - Information Collection Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Information Collection Activities AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, Transportation. ACTION: Notice and Request for Comments. SUMMARY: The Surface Transportation Board (Board or STB...

  19. From transport and storage to control of the process: the challenge of biodigestion from drawings of swine in agroindustrial scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Souza Oliveira

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze some factors that represent challenges to the application of biodigestion process for energy generation from swine waste on an agroindustrial scale, thus contributing to important reflection on the design and installation of biodigesters in agroindustrial activities.

  20. Interaction between breaking/broken waves and infragravity-scale phenomena to control sediment suspension transport in the surf zone

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Smith, GG

    2002-07-30

    Full Text Available 0025-3227 / 02 / $ ^ see front matter C223 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. PII: S0025-3227(02)00385-7 * Corresponding author. E-mail address: gsmith@csir.co.za (G.G. Smith). MARGO 3183 24-7-02 Marine Geology 187 (2002) 329^345 www....G. Smith, G.P. Mocke/ Marine Geology 187 (2002) 329^345 wave breaking processes, which interact with in- fragravity motions. Possible examples of the inter- action of wave breaking and infragravity sediment suspension and transport phenomena are (1) more...

  1. Evidence of non-Darcy flow and non-Fickian transport in fractured media at laboratory scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Cherubini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available During a risk assessment procedure as well as when dealing with cleanup and monitoring strategies, accurate predictions of solute propagation in fractured rocks are of particular importance when assessing exposure pathways through which contaminants reach receptors. Experimental data obtained under controlled conditions such as in a laboratory allow to increase the understanding of the fundamental physics of fluid flow and solute transport in fractures. In this study, laboratory hydraulic and tracer tests have been carried out on an artificially created fractured rock sample. The tests regard the analysis of the hydraulic loss and the measurement of breakthrough curves for saline tracer pulse inside a rock sample of parallelepiped shape (0.60 × 0.40 × 0.08 m. The convolution theory has been applied in order to remove the effect of the acquisition apparatus on tracer experiments. The experimental results have shown evidence of a non-Darcy relationship between flow rate and hydraulic loss that is best described by Forchheimer's law. Furthermore, in the flow experiments both inertial and viscous flow terms are not negligible. The observed experimental breakthrough curves of solute transport have been modeled by the classical one-dimensional analytical solution for the advection–dispersion equation (ADE and the single rate mobile–immobile model (MIM. The former model does not properly fit the first arrival and the tail while the latter, which recognizes the existence of mobile and immobile domains for transport, provides a very decent fit. The carried out experiments show that there exists a pronounced mobile–immobile zone interaction that cannot be neglected and that leads to a non-equilibrium behavior of solute transport. The existence of a non-Darcian flow regime has showed to influence the velocity field in that it gives rise to a delay in solute migration with respect to the predicted value assuming linear flow. Furthermore, the

  2. Collectives of diagnostic biomarkers identify high-risk subpopulations of hematuria patients: exploiting heterogeneity in large-scale biomarker data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ineffective risk stratification can delay diagnosis of serious disease in patients with hematuria. We applied a systems biology approach to analyze clinical, demographic and biomarker measurements (n = 29) collected from 157 hematuric patients: 80 urothelial cancer (UC) and 77 controls with confounding pathologies. Methods On the basis of biomarkers, we conducted agglomerative hierarchical clustering to identify patient and biomarker clusters. We then explored the relationship between the patient clusters and clinical characteristics using Chi-square analyses. We determined classification errors and areas under the receiver operating curve of Random Forest Classifiers (RFC) for patient subpopulations using the biomarker clusters to reduce the dimensionality of the data. Results Agglomerative clustering identified five patient clusters and seven biomarker clusters. Final diagnoses categories were non-randomly distributed across the five patient clusters. In addition, two of the patient clusters were enriched with patients with 'low cancer-risk' characteristics. The biomarkers which contributed to the diagnostic classifiers for these two patient clusters were similar. In contrast, three of the patient clusters were significantly enriched with patients harboring 'high cancer-risk" characteristics including proteinuria, aggressive pathological stage and grade, and malignant cytology. Patients in these three clusters included controls, that is, patients with other serious disease and patients with cancers other than UC. Biomarkers which contributed to the diagnostic classifiers for the largest 'high cancer- risk' cluster were different than those contributing to the classifiers for the 'low cancer-risk' clusters. Biomarkers which contributed to subpopulations that were split according to smoking status, gender and medication were different. Conclusions The systems biology approach applied in this study allowed the hematuric patients to cluster naturally on

  3. Mineralization associated with scale and altered rock and pipe fragments from the Berlín geothermal field, El Salvador; implications for metal transport in natural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Jasmin; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Clark, James R.

    2005-07-01

    Composite fragments sampled at solid collectors and drains of two-phase, re-injection, and vapour pipelines of the Berlín geothermal field, El Salvador, consist mainly of sulphide- and electrum-bearing aluminium-rich amorphous silica scale, sulphide- and electrum-bearing saponitic/vermiculitic clay from the reservoir, and altered metallic pipe linings containing As-S-bearing iron oxide-oxyhydroxide grains. Siliceous and clay-rich precipitates contain concentrations of gold and silver in excess of 180 and 8000 ppm, respectively, and appreciable concentrations of copper, lead, zinc, and antimony. Altered iron fragments contain substantial arsenic. Copper, lead, and zinc occur mainly as chalcopyrite, galena, and sphalerite, respectively, in amorphous silica and clay; near the surface, chalcopyrite transported from depth alters to bornite. Gold and silver occur mainly as electrum, which deposited with base metal sulphides in the clay precipitates, and amorphous silica at higher levels in the well. Electrum precipitates in the wells due to the rapid drop in temperature and loss of H 2S associated with boiling. The concentration of gold in vapour is ˜4 times greater than that in water from associated wellheads. This suggests that gold can be transported efficiently by vapour, and implies that such transport may be important in the formation of some hydrothermal ore deposits.

  4. Genesis, Pathways, and Terminations of Intense Global Water Vapor Transport in Association with Large-Scale Climate Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellars, S. L.; Kawzenuk, B.; Nguyen, P.; Ralph, F. M.; Sorooshian, S.

    2017-12-01

    The CONNected objECT (CONNECT) algorithm is applied to global Integrated Water Vapor Transport data from the NASA's Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications - Version 2 reanalysis product for the period of 1980 to 2016. The algorithm generates life-cycle records in time and space evolving strong vapor transport events. We show five regions, located in the midlatitudes, where events typically exist (off the coast of the southeast United States, eastern China, eastern South America, off the southern tip of South Africa, and in the southeastern Pacific Ocean). Global statistics show distinct genesis and termination regions and global seasonal peak frequency during Northern Hemisphere late fall/winter and Southern Hemisphere winter. In addition, the event frequency and geographical location are shown to be modulated by the Arctic Oscillation, Pacific North American Pattern, and the quasi-biennial oscillation. Moreover, a positive linear trend in the annual number of objects is reported, increasing by 3.58 objects year-over-year.

  5. Transport of selenium oxyanions through TiO2porous media: column experiments and multi-scale modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nsir, K; Svecova, L; Sardin, M; Simonnot, M O

    2014-05-01

    The present work deals with the modeling of selenium oxyanion (selenite/selenate) retention in TiO2 rutile porous media. A set of chemical interactions was elaborated from spectroscopic measurements and adsorption experiments in batch and column reactors, and a model of transient transport of the selenium species through laboratory column was developed. The adsorption model considered that both forms of selenium (Se) compete for the same sorption sites, hydroxyl groups, allowing taking into account a competitive adsorption. Stoichiometry and equilibrium constants of adsorption reactions were determined on the basis of spectrometric measurement and adsorption isotherm curve fitting. This approach led to a model of Sips type isotherm including a pH-dependence. It offers an excellent fitting compared to the classical Langmuir equation and provides a unique set of parameters for both oxyanions. IMPACT code and associated modeling method were then used to couple transport and chemical reactions. The obtained numerical results showed a reasonable prediction of the shape and the time location of selenium oxyanions and pH breakthrough curves. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Insights into the role of wettability in cathode catalyst layer of proton exchange membrane fuel cell; pore scale immiscible flow and transport processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathi, H.; Raoof, A.; Mansouri, S. H.

    2017-05-01

    The production of liquid water in cathode catalyst layer, CCL, is a significant barrier to increase the efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Here we present, for the first time, a direct three-dimensional pore-scale modelling to look at the complex immiscible two-phase flow in CCL. After production of the liquid water at the surface of CCL agglomerates due to the electrochemical reactions, water spatial distribution affects transport of oxygen through the CCL as well as the rate of reaction at the agglomerate surfaces. To explore the wettability effects, we apply hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties using different surface contact angles. Effective diffusivity is calculated under several water saturation levels. Results indicate larger diffusive transport values for hydrophilic domain compared to the hydrophobic media where the liquid water preferentially floods the larger pores. However, hydrophobic domain showed more available surface area and higher oxygen consumption rate at the reaction sites under various saturation levels, which is explained by the effect of wettability on pore-scale distribution of water. Hydrophobic domain, with a contact angle of 150, reveals efficient water removal where only 28% of the pore space stays saturated. This condition contributes to the enhanced available reaction surface area and oxygen diffusivity.

  7. Thermal-chemical-mechanical feedback during fluid-rock interactions: Implications for chemical transport and scales of equilibria in the crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutrow, Barbara

    2008-08-13

    Our research evaluates the hypothesis that feedback amongst thermal-chemical-mechanical processes operative in fluid-rock systems alters the fluid flow dynamics of the system which, in turn, affects chemical transport and temporal and spatial scales of equilibria, thus impacting the resultant mineral textural development of rocks. Our methods include computational experimentation and detailed analyses of fluid-infiltrated rocks from well-characterized terranes. This work focuses on metamorphic rocks and hydrothermal systems where minerals and their textures are utilized to evaluate pressure (P), temperature (T), and time (t) paths in the evolution of mountain belts and ore deposits, and to interpret tectonic events and the timing of these events. Our work on coupled processes also extends to other areas where subsurface flow and transport in porous media have consequences such as oil and gas movement, geothermal system development, transport of contaminants, nuclear waste disposal, and other systems rich in fluid-rock reactions. Fluid-rock systems are widespread in the geologic record. Correctly deciphering the products resulting from such systems is important to interpreting a number of geologic phenomena. These systems are characterized by complex interactions involving time-dependent, non-linear processes in heterogeneous materials. While many of these interactions have been studied in isolation, they are more appropriately analyzed in the context of a system with feedback. When one process impacts another process, time and space scales as well as the overall outcome of the interaction can be dramatically altered. Our goals to test this hypothesis are: to develop and incorporate algorithms into our 3D heat and mass transport code to allow the effects of feedback to be investigated numerically, to analyze fluid infiltrated rocks from a variety of terranes at differing P-T conditions, to identify subtle features of the infiltration of fluids and/or feedback, and

  8. Atmospheric Transport Modeling with 3D Lagrangian Dispersion Codes Compared with SF6 Tracer Experiments at Regional Scale

    OpenAIRE

    François Van Dorpe; Bertrand Iooss; Vladimir Semenov; Olga Sorokovikova; Alexey Fokin; Yves Margerit

    2007-01-01

    The results of four gas tracer experiments of atmospheric dispersion on a regional scale are used for the benchmarking of two atmospheric dispersion modeling codes, MINERVE-SPRAY (CEA), and NOSTRADAMUS (IBRAE). The main topic of this comparison is to estimate the Lagrangian code capability to predict the radionuclide atmospheric transfer on a large field, in the case of risk assessment of nuclear power plant for example. For the four experiments, the results of...

  9. Small-scale sediment transport patterns and bedform morphodynamics: New insights from high-resolution multibeam bathymetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P.L.; Erikson, L.H.; Kvitek, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    New multibeam echosounder and processing technologies yield sub-meter-scale bathymetric resolution, revealing striking details of bedform morphology that are shaped by complex boundary-layer flow dynamics at a range of spatial and temporal scales. An inertially aided post processed kinematic (IAPPK) technique generates a smoothed best estimate trajectory (SBET) solution to tie the vessel motion-related effects of each sounding directly to the ellipsoid, significantly reducing artifacts commonly found in multibeam data, increasing point density, and sharpening seafloor features. The new technique was applied to a large bedform field in 20-30 m water depths in central San Francisco Bay, California (USA), revealing bedforms that suggest boundary-layer flow deflection by the crests where 12-m-wavelength, 0.2-m-amplitude bedforms are superimposed on 60-m-wavelength, 1-m-amplitude bedforms, with crests that often were strongly oblique (approaching 90??) to the larger features on the lee side, and near-parallel on the stoss side. During one survey in April 2008, superimposed bedform crests were continuous between the crests of the larger features, indicating that flow detachment in the lee of the larger bedforms is not always a dominant process. Assessment of bedform crest peakedness, asymmetry, and small-scale bedform evolution between surveys indicates the impact of different flow regimes on the entire bedform field. This paper presents unique fine-scale imagery of compound and superimposed bedforms, which is used to (1) assess the physical forcing and evolution of a bedform field in San Francisco Bay, and (2) in conjunction with numerical modeling, gain a better fundamental understanding of boundary-layer flow dynamics that result in the observed superimposed bedform orientation. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag (outside the USA).

  10. Mechanisms of ion transport in the mesonephric collecting duct system of Bufo bufo as revealed by microelectrode recordings in isolated perfused tubules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møbjerg, Nadja; Larsen, Erik Hviid; Novak, Ivana

    2002-01-01

    amphibian, Ba2+, Bufo bufo, collecting duct, collecting tubule, K+ conductance, K+ secretion, kidney, mesonephros, ouabain, toad......amphibian, Ba2+, Bufo bufo, collecting duct, collecting tubule, K+ conductance, K+ secretion, kidney, mesonephros, ouabain, toad...

  11. Development and application of a catchment scale pesticide fate and transport model for use in drinking water risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullan, S P; Whelan, M J; Rettino, J; Filby, K; Eyre, S; Holman, I P

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the development and application of IMPT (Integrated Model for Pesticide Transport), a parameter-efficient tool for predicting diffuse-source pesticide concentrations in surface waters used for drinking water supply. The model was applied to a small UK headwater catchment with high frequency (8h) pesticide monitoring data and to five larger catchments (479-1653km(2)) with sampling approximately every 14days. Model performance was good for predictions of both flow (Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency generally >0.59 and PBIAS catchments is likely to mask the true episodic nature of exposure. The computational ef