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Sample records for savannah pressurized subcritical experiment

  1. MCNP multiplication analysis of subcritical HEU experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, G.P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Brockhoff, R.C. [Kansas State Univ., Manhattan, KS (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A series of measurements and improvements to computational techniques was described in Ref. 1 that were aimed at better understanding the determination of the reactivity of subcritical systems from measurements of the multiplying characteristics of the system. This methodology has been applied to a number of the bare highly enriched uranium (HEU) measurements (simulating 0.5- to 21.5-kg balls with nesting shells) of Ref. 2, demonstrating that the experimental multiplication results can be reproduced computationally with good accuracy. This capability promises to improve special nuclear material (SNM) assays of unknown systems such as those encountered in SNM safeguards, arms-control verification, imports of foreign-generated SNM, smuggling of SNM, etc. Improved techniques and understanding are needed since traditionally measured or calculated multiplications are not always an invariant characteristic of a subcritical system, especially if one has an SNM system with no significant intrinsic internal neutron source that is illuminated nonuniformly with an external source (i.e., a nonnormal mode system). The measurement techniques used in Refs. 1 and 2 to determine multiplication are based on the Feynman variance-to-mean method, which has been previously documented in Refs. 3 and 4 and applied successfully to normal mode systems such as plutonium and uranium spheres. These techniques have been applied to nonnormal mode problems with less success, and both Refs. 1 and 2 as well as the current paper are attempts to better understand the subcritical multiplication of such systems.

  2. Pore pressure migration during hydraulic stimulation due to permeability enhancement by low-pressure subcritical fracture slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukuhira, Yusuke; Moriya, Hirokazu; Ito, Takatoshi; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Häring, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Understanding the details of pressure migration during hydraulic stimulation is important for the design of an energy extraction system and reservoir management, as well as for the mitigation of hazardous-induced seismicity. Based on microseismic and regional stress information, we estimated the pore pressure increase required to generate shear slip on an existing fracture during stimulation. Spatiotemporal analysis of pore pressure migration revealed that lower pore pressure migrates farther and faster and that higher pore pressure migrates more slowly. These phenomena can be explained by the relationship between fracture permeability and stress state criticality. Subcritical fractures experience shear slip following smaller increases of pore pressure and promote migration of pore pressure because of their enhanced permeability. The difference in migration rates between lower and higher pore pressures suggests that the optimum wellhead pressure is the one that can stimulate relatively permeable fractures, selectively. Its selection optimizes economic benefits and minimizes seismic risk.

  3. Analysis of reactivity determination methods in the subcritical experiment Yalina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Carl-Magnus; Seltborg, Per; Åhlander, Alexandra; Gudowski, Waclaw; Stummer, Thomas; Kiyavitskaya, Hanna; Bournos, Victor; Fokov, Yurij; Serafimovich, Ivan; Chigrinov, Sergey

    2005-12-01

    Different reactivity determination methods have been investigated, based on experiments performed at the subcritical assembly Yalina in Minsk, Belarus. The development of techniques for on-line monitoring of the reactivity level in a future accelerator-driven system (ADS) is of major importance for safe operation. Since an ADS is operating in a subcritical mode, the safety margin to criticality must be sufficiently large. The investigated methods are the Slope Fit Method, the Sjöstrand Method and the Source Jerk Method. The results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed with different nuclear data libraries. The results of the Slope Fit Method are in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulation results, whereas the Sjöstrand Method appears to underestimate the criticality somewhat. The Source Jerk Method is subject to inadequate statistical accuracy.

  4. Enhanced Capabilities for Subcritical Experiments (ECSE) Risk Management Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Mary Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Process Modeling and Analysis Group

    2016-05-02

    Risk is a factor, element, constraint, or course of action that introduces an uncertainty of outcome that could impact project objectives. Risk is an inherent part of all activities, whether the activity is simple and small, or large and complex. Risk management is a process that identifies, evaluates, handles, and monitors risks that have the potential to affect project success. The risk management process spans the entire project, from its initiation to its successful completion and closeout, including both technical and programmatic (non-technical) risks. This Risk Management Plan (RMP) defines the process to be used for identifying, evaluating, handling, and monitoring risks as part of the overall management of the Enhanced Capabilities for Subcritical Experiments (ECSE) ‘Project’. Given the changing nature of the project environment, risk management is essentially an ongoing and iterative process, which applies the best efforts of a knowledgeable project staff to a suite of focused and prioritized concerns. The risk management process itself must be continually applied throughout the project life cycle. This document was prepared in accordance with DOE O 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, its associated guide for risk management DOE G 413.3-7, Risk Management Guide, and LANL ADPM AP-350-204, Risk and Opportunity Management.

  5. Simulation of primary fuel atomization processes at subcritical pressures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arienti, Marco

    2013-06-01

    This report documents results from an LDRD project for the first-principles simulation of the early stages of spray formation (primary atomization). The first part describes a Cartesian embedded-wall method for the calculation of flow internal to a real injector in a fully coupled primary calculation. The second part describes the extension to an all-velocity formulation by introducing a momentum-conservative semi-Lagrangian advection and by adding a compressible term in the Poissons equation. Accompanying the description of the new algorithms are verification tests for simple two-phase problems in the presence of a solid interface; a validation study for a scaled-up multi-hole Diesel injector; and demonstration calculations for the closing and opening transients of a single-hole injector and for the high-pressure injection of liquid fuel at supersonic velocity.

  6. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Justin R; Rother, Gernot; Browning, James F; Ankner, John F; Banuelos, Jose L; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R

    2012-04-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300-473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO(2) in contact with quartz and Si/SiO(2) wafers are also shown. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  7. High-pressure cell for neutron reflectometry of supercritical and subcritical fluids at solid interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Justin R.; Rother, Gernot; Browning, James F.; Ankner, John F.; Banuelos, Jose L.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Wesolowski, David J.; Cole, David R.

    2012-04-01

    A new high-pressure cell design for use in neutron reflectometry (NR) for pressures up to 50 MPa and a temperature range of 300-473 K is described. The cell design guides the neutron beam through the working crystal without passing through additional windows or the bulk fluid, which provides for a high neutron transmission, low scattering background, and low beam distortion. The o-ring seal is suitable for a wide range of subcritical and supercritical fluids and ensures high chemical and pressure stability. Wafers with a diameter of 5.08 cm (2 in.) and 5 mm or 10 mm thickness can be used with the cells, depending on the required pressure and momentum transfer range. The fluid volume in the sample cell is very small at about 0.1 ml, which minimizes scattering background and stored energy. The cell design and pressure setup for measurements with supercritical fluids are described. NR data are shown for silicon/silicon oxide and quartz wafers measured against air and subsequently within the high-pressure cell to demonstrate the neutron characteristics of the high-pressure cell. Neutron reflectivity data for supercritical CO2 in contact with quartz and Si/SiO2 wafers are also shown.

  8. Adverse experiences with nitric acid at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, W.S.; Craig, D.K.; Vitacco, M.J.; McCormick, J.A.

    1991-06-01

    Nitric acid is used routinely at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in many processes. However, the site has experienced a number of adverse situations in handling nitric acid. These have ranged from minor injuries to personnel to significant explosions. This document compiles many of these events and includes discussions of process upsets, fires, injuries, and toxic effects of nitric acid and its decomposition products. The purpose of the publication is to apprise those using the acid that it is a potentially dangerous material and can react in many ways as demonstrated by SRS experience. 10 refs.

  9. Determination of subcriticality and effective source strength by source drop and jerk experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taninaka, Hiroshi [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kengo [Atomic Energy Research Institute, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka, 577-8502 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents applicability of least squares inverse kinetics method (LSIKM) to source drop and source jerk experiments. The LSIKM can estimate both reactivity and source strength by applying least square approximation to a correlation between time-sequence count data and inverse kinetics analysis data. The experiments were performed in the UTR-KINKI reactor to demonstrate the applicability of the LSIKM. To source jerk data, for comparison, conventional integral method is also applied. In the subcriticality and source strength obtained by the LSIKM, spatial dependence is slightly observed. However, the integral method leads to significant spatial dependence. The sub-criticalities inferred from source drop data are consistent with the results from source jerk data. (authors)

  10. FINAL DESIGN REVIEW REPORT Subcritical Experiments Gen 2, 3-ft Confinement Vessel Weldment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-09-28

    A Final Design Review (FDR) of the Subcritical Experiments (SCE) Gen 2, 3-ft. Confinement Vessel Weldment was held at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) on September 14, 2017. The review was a focused review on changes only to the confinement vessel weldment (versus a system design review). The changes resulted from lessons-learned in fabricating and inspecting the current set of confinement vessels used for the SCE Program. The baseline 3-ft. confinement vessel weldment design has successfully been used (to date) for three (3) high explosive (HE) over-tests, two (2) fragment tests, and five (5) integral HE experiments. The design team applied lessons learned from fabrication and inspection of these vessel weldments to enhance fit-up, weldability, inspection, and fitness for service evaluations. The review team consisted of five (5) independent subject matter experts with engineering design, analysis, testing, fabrication, and inspection experience. The

  11. Savannah River Laboratory's operating experience with glass melters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, F H; Randall, C T; Cosper, M B; Moseley, J P

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy, with recommendations from the Du Pont Company, is proposing that a Defense Waste Processing Facility be constructed at the Savannah River Plant to immobilize radioactive The immobilization process is designed around the solidification of waste sludge in borosilicate glass. The Savannah River Laboratory, who is responsible for the solidification process development program, has completed an experimental program with one large-scale glass melter and just started up another melter. Experimental data indicate that process requirements can easily be met with the current design. 7 figures.

  12. Subcritical experiments at the FREYA experiment; Experimentos subcriticos en el proyecto FREYA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becares Palacios, V.; Villamarin fernandez, D.

    2013-07-01

    The FREYA Project of the 7th Framework Program is aimed to the study of the kinetics of subcritical reactors coupled to an external neutron source, and, more specifically, to the validation of reactivity monitoring techniques. CIEMAT activities within the frame of this project have consisted in analyzing the possible ways of correcting the spatial and energy effects on these reactivity monitoring techniques, as well as analyzing the effects that may have on them the presence of different materials in the reflector and the position of the neutron source.

  13. The TRADE experiment: shielding calculations for the building hosting the subcritical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burn, K W; Carta, M; Casalini, L; Kadi, Y; Monti, S; Nava, E; Palomba, M; Petrovich, C; Picardi, L; Rubbia, C; Troiani, F

    2005-01-01

    The TRADE project (TRiga Accelerator Driven Experiment), to be performed at the existing TRIGA reactor at ENEA Casaccia, has been proposed as a validation of the accelerator-driven system (ADS) concept. TRADE will be the first experiment in which the three main components of an ADS--the accelerator, spallation target and sub-critical blanket--are coupled at a power level sufficient to encounter reactivity feedback effects. As such, TRADE represents the necessary intermediate step in the development of hybrid transmutation systems, its expected outcomes being considered crucial--in terms of proof of stability of operation, dynamic behaviour and licensing issues--for the subsequent realisation of an ADS Transmutation Demonstrator. An essential role in the feasibility study of the experiment is played by radioprotection calculations. Such a system exhibits new characteristics with respect to a traditional reactor, owing to the presence of the proton accelerator. As beam losses always occur under normal operating conditions of an accelerator, shielding studies need to be performed not only around the reactor but also along the beam line from the accelerator to the spallation target. This paper illustrates a preliminary evaluation, using Monte Carlo methods, of the additional shielding to be located around the reactor structures, the beam transport line and the existing reactor building to allow access into the reactor hall and to restrict the doses outside to their legal limits.

  14. Subcritical measurements of the WINCO slab tank experiment using the source-jerk technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spriggs, G.D.; Hansen, G.E.; Martin, E.R.; Plassmann, E.A.; Pederson, R.A.; Schlesser, J.A.; Krawczyk, T.L.; Tanner, J.E.; Smolen, G.R. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA); Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Co., Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Subcritical measurements of the WINCO slab tank using the source-jerk technique are presented. This technique determines subcriticality by analyzing the transient response produced by the sudden removal of an extraneous neutron source (i.e., a source jerk). We have found that the technique can provide an accurate means of measuring k in configurations that are close to critical (i.e., 0.90 < k < 1.0). As the system becomes more subcritical (i.e., k < 0.90), spatial effects introduce significant biases depending on the source and detector positions. A comparison between the measurements and Monte Carlo code calculations is also presented. 15 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. PILOT-SCALE SUBCRITICAL WATER REMEDIATION OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON- AND PESTICIDE-CONTAMINATED SOIL. (R825394)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subcritical water (hot water under enough pressure to maintain the liquid state) was used to remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pesticides from highly contaminated soils. Laboratory-scale (8 g of soil) experiments were used to determine conditions f...

  16. Final Progress Report: FRACTURE AND SUBCRITICAL DEBONDING IN THIN LAYERED STRUCTURES: EXPERIMENTS AND MULTI-SCALE MODELING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold H. Dauskardt

    2005-08-30

    Final technical report detailing unique experimental and multi-scale computational modeling capabilities developed to study fracture and subcritical cracking in thin-film structures. Our program to date at Stanford has studied the mechanisms of fracture and fatigue crack-growth in structural ceramics at high temperature, bulk and thin-film glasses in selected moist environments where we demonstrated the presence of a true mechanical fatigue effect in some glass compositions. We also reported on the effects of complex environments and fatigue loading on subcritical cracking that effects the reliability of MEMS and other micro-devices using novel micro-machined silicon specimens and nanomaterial layers.

  17. Gas Pressure-Drop Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luyben, William L.; Tuzla, Kemal

    2010-01-01

    Most chemical engineering undergraduate laboratories have fluid mechanics experiments in which pressure drops through pipes are measured over a range of Reynolds numbers. The standard fluid is liquid water, which is essentially incompressible. Since density is constant, pressure drop does not depend on the pressure in the pipe. In addition, flow…

  18. The importance of vegetation density for tourists' wildlife viewing experience and satisfaction in African savannah ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbieu, Ugo; Grünewald, Claudia; Schleuning, Matthias; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Southern African protected areas (PAs) harbour a great diversity of animals, which represent a large potential for wildlife tourism. In this region, global change is expected to result in vegetation changes, such as bush encroachment and increases in vegetation density. However, little is known on the influence of vegetation structure on wildlife tourists' wildlife viewing experience and satisfaction. In this study, we collected data on vegetation structure and perceived mammal densities along 196 road transects (each 5 km long) and conducted a social survey with 651 questionnaires across four PAs in three Southern African countries. Our objectives were 1) to assess visitors' attitude towards vegetation, 2) to test the influence of perceived mammal density and vegetation structure on the easiness to spot animals, and 3) on visitors' satisfaction during their visit to PAs. Using a Boosted Regression Tree procedure, we found mostly negative non-linear relationships between vegetation density and wildlife tourists' experience, and positive relationships between perceived mammal densities and wildlife tourists' experience. In particular, wildlife tourists disliked road transects with high estimates of vegetation density. Similarly, the easiness to spot animals dropped at thresholds of high vegetation density and at perceived mammal densities lower than 46 individuals per road transect. Finally, tourists' satisfaction declined linearly with vegetation density and dropped at mammal densities smaller than 26 individuals per transect. Our results suggest that vegetation density has important impacts on tourists' wildlife viewing experience and satisfaction. Hence, the management of PAs in savannah landscapes should consider how tourists perceive these landscapes and their mammal diversity in order to maintain and develop a sustainable wildlife tourism.

  19. The importance of vegetation density for tourists’ wildlife viewing experience and satisfaction in African savannah ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grünewald, Claudia; Schleuning, Matthias; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2017-01-01

    Southern African protected areas (PAs) harbour a great diversity of animals, which represent a large potential for wildlife tourism. In this region, global change is expected to result in vegetation changes, such as bush encroachment and increases in vegetation density. However, little is known on the influence of vegetation structure on wildlife tourists’ wildlife viewing experience and satisfaction. In this study, we collected data on vegetation structure and perceived mammal densities along 196 road transects (each 5 km long) and conducted a social survey with 651 questionnaires across four PAs in three Southern African countries. Our objectives were 1) to assess visitors’ attitude towards vegetation, 2) to test the influence of perceived mammal density and vegetation structure on the easiness to spot animals, and 3) on visitors’ satisfaction during their visit to PAs. Using a Boosted Regression Tree procedure, we found mostly negative non-linear relationships between vegetation density and wildlife tourists’ experience, and positive relationships between perceived mammal densities and wildlife tourists’ experience. In particular, wildlife tourists disliked road transects with high estimates of vegetation density. Similarly, the easiness to spot animals dropped at thresholds of high vegetation density and at perceived mammal densities lower than 46 individuals per road transect. Finally, tourists’ satisfaction declined linearly with vegetation density and dropped at mammal densities smaller than 26 individuals per transect. Our results suggest that vegetation density has important impacts on tourists’ wildlife viewing experience and satisfaction. Hence, the management of PAs in savannah landscapes should consider how tourists perceive these landscapes and their mammal diversity in order to maintain and develop a sustainable wildlife tourism. PMID:28957420

  20. Solubility of Benzo[a]pyrene and Organic Matter of Soil in Subcritical Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Sushkova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic subcritical water extraction method of benzo[a]pyrene from soils is under consideration. The optimum conditions for benzo[a]pyrene extraction from soil are described including the soil treatment by subcritical water at 250 °C and 100 atm for 30 min. The effectiveness of developed method was determined using the matrix spiking recovery technique. A comparative analysis was made to evaluate the results of benzo[a]pyrene extraction from soils using the subcritical water and organic solvents. The advantages of the subcritical water extraction involve the use of ecologically friendly solvent, a shorter time for the analysis and a higher amount of benzo[a]pyrene extracted from soil (96 %. The influence of subcritical water extraction on soil properties was measured the investigation of the processes occurring within soil under the influence the high temperature and pressure. Under appropriate conditions of the experiment there is the destruction of the soil organic matter while the composition of the soil mineral fraction remains practically unchanged.

  1. Monte Carlo simulation of a perturbed subcritical core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaradat, Mustafa K.; Park, Chang Je [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    Jordan Subcritical Assembly (JSA) is designed for the purpose of education, training, and experiment research. Jordan subcritical assembly is considered Jordan's First Nuclear Facility Moving Jordan into the nuclear age. It is a teaching and training experimental facility that is designed to stay in a subcriticality A subcritical assembly is a multiplying system of nuclear fuel and moderator whose effective multiplication factor is less than unity. An extraneous source of neutron is required for the operation in order to compensate for the difference between the production rate of fission neutrons in the fuel and the rate of loss caused by absorption and leakage.

  2. Virtual Savannah

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskildsen, Søren; Rodil, Kasper; Rehm, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    It is a daunting task to visualize square kilometers of African savannah and currently in zoos it is impossible to present true African ecology to visitors. Virtual Savannah is a dynamic virtual world that introduces school children to a 3D representation of the wildlife sanctuaries Serengeti...... and Masai Mara. The objective is to substitute supplementary textual information currently used in schools and provide the teacher with information about each pupil. The Virtual Savannah was tested in situ on 19 pupils age 10-11 with the purpose of logging all interaction with animals, GUI...... and the navigation. The test depicted how they managed to search the virtual world for answers in patterns related to restrictions in the system and using graphical points of interest as reference points. Collecting information about the complete interaction provides teachers with a tool to assess the individual...

  3. Virtual Savannah

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodil, Kasper; Eskildsen, Søren; Rehm, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Virtual Savannah is constructed to visualize parts of a curriculum, which the educational service at Aalborg Zoo has difficulties in teaching children visiting the zoo. It contains rich media like audio, text, video and picture galleries about African ecology, but some of this episodic information...

  4. Modeling of Parameters of Subcritical Assembly SAD

    CERN Document Server

    Petrochenkov, S; Puzynin, I

    2005-01-01

    The accepted conceptual design of the experimental Subcritical Assembly in Dubna (SAD) is based on the MOX core with a nominal unit capacity of 25 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient $k_{\\rm eff} =0.95$ and accelerator beam power 1 kW. A subcritical assembly driven with the existing 660 MeV proton accelerator at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research has been modelled in order to make choice of the optimal parameters for the future experiments. The Monte Carlo method was used to simulate neutron spectra, energy deposition and doses calculations. Some of the calculation results are presented in the paper.

  5. Subcritical multiplication determination studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, G.P.; Goulding, C.A.

    1995-07-01

    A series of measurements and improvements to computational techniques are in progress at Los Alamos National Laboratory that are aimed at better understanding the determination of the reactivity of subcritical systems from measurements of the apparent multiplication of the system. Such studies are being performed in order to improve the special nuclear material (SNM) assays of unknown systems such as those encountered in SNM safeguards, arms-control verification, imports of foreign-generated SNM, etc. Improved techniques and understanding are needed since measured multiplication is not always an invariant characteristic of a subcritical system, especially if one has a system with no significant intrinsic internal neutron source that is illuminated nonuniformly with an external source (i.e., a non-normal mode system).

  6. Mechanisms of Subcritical Cracking in Calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royne, A.; Dysthe, D. K.; Bisschop, J.

    2008-12-01

    microplasticity (pile-up of dislocations in the process zone around the crack tip). In our experiment, we study the subcritical growth of a cleavage crack through a single calcite crystal. We use the well documented Double Torsion method which allows for easy study of a tensile crack growing in the specimen. We find that the environmental conditions, and in particular the availability of water, has a significant influence on both the crack tip velocity at a given load, but also the behaviour of the crack movement. Based on our experimental data, we propose what mechanisms are dominant for subcritical crack growth in calcite at various load levels.

  7. Quantum Subcritical Bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesugi, T.; Morikawa, M.; Shiromizu, T.

    1996-08-01

    We quantize subcritical bubbles which are formed in the weakly first order phase transition. We find that the typical size of the thermal fluctuation reduces in quantum-statistical physics. We estimate the typical size and the amplitude of thermal fluctuations near the critical temperature in the electroweak phase transition using a quantum statistical average. Furthermore, based on our study, we discuss implications for the dynamics of phase transitions.

  8. Subcritical nuclear assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    A Subcritical Nuclear Assembly is a device where the nuclear-fission chain reaction is initiated and maintained using an external neutron source. It is a valuable educational and research tool where in a safe way many reactor parameters can be measured. Here, we have used the Wigner-Seitz method in the six-factor formula to calculate the effective multiplication factor of a subcritical nuclear reactor Nuclear Chicago model 9000. This reactor has approximately 2500 kg of natural uranium heterogeneously distributed in slugs. The reactor uses a {sup 239}PuBe neutron source that is located in the center of an hexagonal array. Using Monte Carlo methods, with the MCNP5 code, a three-dimensional model of the subcritical reactor was designed to estimate the effective multiplication factor, the neutron spectra, the total and thermal neutron fluences along the radial and axial axis. With the neutron spectra in two locations outside the reactor the ambient dose equivalent were estimated. (Author)

  9. Pressure gauge experiments in India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, A.; Desa, E.; VijayKumar, K.; Desa, E.S.; Desai, R.G.P.; Prabhudesai, S.

    attached to a vertical post driven into the riverbed. The transducer’s positive port was exposed to water via an oil-filled capillary tube. A flow retarding perforated cap over the positive port minimised the Bernoulli effect. This ability of a... transducer whose precision is ±0.1%. The pressure inlet remained at the center of and flush with a flat surface, thereby minimizing the undesired Bernoulli dynamic pressure effects arising from flows, waves and a combination of flows and waves (Joseph et al...

  10. Subcritical-Water Extraction of Organics from Solid Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank; Patrick, Steven; Kirby, James; Bickler, Donald; Willis, Peter; Pelletier, Christine; Bryson, Charles

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus for extracting organic compounds from soils, sands, and other solid matrix materials utilizes water at subcritical temperature and pressure as a solvent. The apparatus, called subcritical water extractor (SCWE), is a prototype of subsystems of future instrumentation systems to be used in searching for organic compounds as signs of past or present life on Mars. An aqueous solution generated by an apparatus like this one can be analyzed by any of a variety of established chromatographic or spectroscopic means to detect the dissolved organic compound( s). The apparatus can be used on Earth: indeed, in proof-of-concept experiments, SCWE was used to extract amino acids from soils of the Atacama Desert (Chile), which was chosen because the dryness and other relevant soil conditions there approximate those on Mars. The design of the apparatus is based partly on the fact that the relative permittivity (also known as the dielectric constant) of liquid water varies with temperature and pressure. At a temperature of 30 C and a pressure of 0.1 MPa, the relative permittivity of water is 79.6, due to the strong dipole-dipole electrostatic interactions between individual molecular dipoles. As the temperature increases, increasing thermal energy causes increasing disorientation of molecular dipoles, with a consequent decrease in relative permittivity. For example, water at a temperature of 325 C and pressure of 20 MPa has a relative permittivity of 17.5, which is similar to the relative permittivities of such nonpolar organic solvents as 1-butanol (17.8). In the operation of this apparatus, the temperature and pressure of water are adjusted so that the water can be used in place of commonly used organic solvents to extract compounds that have dissimilar physical and chemical properties.

  11. The Muse-4 experiment: measurement of the kinetic parameters of a subcritical system; L'experience MUSE-4: mesure des parametres cinetiques d'un systeme sous-critique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vollaire, J

    2004-10-01

    Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS) which are based on an external neutron source coupled to a subcritical core, offer advantages for the incineration of radioactive waste. In order to understand the neutronic specificity of such a system, during the MUSE IV experimental program, the experimental reactor MASURCA (CEA Cadarache) has been coupled to the neutrons source GENEPI. This setup has enabled the development of an on-line measurement technique of the effective multiplication factor. This measurement benefits from the characteristics of the reactor response depending on the multiplication factor at the prompt fission and delayed fission time scales. The analysis of those experiments shows that the proposed method give results in agreement with the one deduced using classical reactivity measurement techniques which can not however be used in a power ADS. (author)

  12. Crystallization In High Level Waste (HLW) Glass Melters: Operational Experience From The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2014-02-27

    Include noble metals in glass melt experiments because of their potential to act as nucleation sites for spinel crystallization.

  13. Cement-based radioactive waste hosts formed under elevated temperatures and pressures (FUETAP concretes) for Savannah River Plant high-level defense waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dole, L.R.; Rogers, G.C.; Morgan, M.T.; Stinton, D.P.; Kessler, J.H.; Robinson, S.M.; Moore, J.G.

    1983-03-01

    Concretes that are formed under elevated temperatures and pressures (called FUETAP) are effective hosts for high-level radioactive defense wastes. Tailored concretes developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been prepared from common Portland cements, fly ash, sand, clays, and waste products. These concretes are produced by accelerated curing under mild autoclave conditions (85 to 200/sup 0/C, 0.1 to 1.5 MPa) for 24 h. The solids are subsequently dewatered (to remove unbound water) at 250/sup 0/C for 24 h. The resulting products are strong (compressive strength, 40 to 100 MPa), leach resistant (plutonium leaches at the rate of 10 pg/(cm/sup 2/.d)), and radiolytically stable, monolithic waste forms (total gas value = 0.005 molecule/100 eV). This report summarizes the results of a 4-year FUETAP development program for Savannah River Plant (SRP) high-level defense wastes. It addresses the major questions concerning the performance of concretes as radioactive waste forms. These include leachability, radiation stability, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, impact strength, permeability, phase complexity, and effect of waste composition.

  14. Accelerator driven sub-critical core

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Peter M; Sattarov, Akhdiyor

    2015-03-17

    Systems and methods for operating an accelerator driven sub-critical core. In one embodiment, a fission power generator includes a sub-critical core and a plurality of proton beam generators. Each of the proton beam generators is configured to concurrently provide a proton beam into a different area of the sub-critical core. Each proton beam scatters neutrons within the sub-critical core. The plurality of proton beam generators provides aggregate power to the sub-critical core, via the proton beams, to scatter neutrons sufficient to initiate fission in the sub-critical core.

  15. Subcritical water as reaction environment: fundamentals of hydrothermal biomass transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Maria; Nilges, Peter; Harnisch, Falk; Schröder, Uwe

    2011-05-23

    Subcritical water, that is, water above the boiling and below critical point, is a unique and sustainable reaction medium. Based on its solvent properties, in combination with the often considerable intrinsic water content of natural biomass, it is often considered as a potential solvent for biomass processing. Current knowledge on biomass transformation in subcritical water is, however, still rather scattered without providing a consistent picture. Concentrating on fundamental physical and chemical aspects, this review summarizes the current state of knowledge of hydrothermal biomass conversion in subcritical water. After briefly introducing subcritical water as a reaction medium, its advantages for biomass processing compared to other thermal processes are highlighted. Subsequently, the physical-chemical properties of subcritical water are discussed in the light of their impact on the occurring chemical reactions. The influence of major operational parameters, including temperature, pressure, and reactant concentration on hydrothermal biomass transformation processes are illustrated for selected carbohydrates. Major emphasis is put on the nature of the carbohydrate monomers, since the conversion of the respective polymers is analogous with the additional prior step of hydrolytic depolymerization. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Pressure-shear experiments on granular materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhart, William Dodd (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Thornhill, Tom Finley, III (, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Vogler, Tracy John; Alexander, C. Scott (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-10-01

    Pressure-shear experiments were performed on granular tungsten carbide and sand using a newly-refurbished slotted barrel gun. The sample is a thin layer of the granular material sandwiched between driver and anvil plates that remain elastic. Because of the obliquity, impact generates both a longitudinal wave, which compresses the sample, and a shear wave that probes the strength of the sample. Laser velocity interferometry is employed to measure the velocity history of the free surface of the anvil. Since the driver and anvil remain elastic, analysis of the results is, in principal, straightforward. Experiments were performed at pressures up to nearly 2 GPa using titanium plates and at higher pressure using zirconium plates. Those done with the titanium plates produced values of shear stress of 0.1-0.2 GPa, with the value increasing with pressure. On the other hand, those experiments conducted with zirconia anvils display results that may be related to slipping at an interface and shear stresses mostly at 0.1 GPa or less. Recovered samples display much greater particle fracture than is observed in planar loading, suggesting that shearing is a very effective mechanism for comminution of the grains.

  17. Ultrasound-Enhanced Subcritical CO2 Extraction of Lutein from Chlorella pyrenoidosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xiao-Dan; Hou, Yan; Huang, Xing-Xin; Qiu, Tai-Qiu; Jiang, Jian-Guo

    2015-05-13

    Lutein is an important pigment of Chlorella pyrenoidosa with many beneficial functions in human health. The main purpose of this study was to extract lutein from C. pyrenoidosa using ultrasound-enhanced subcritical CO2 extraction (USCCE). Effects of operating conditions on the extraction, including extraction pretreatment, temperature, pressure, time, CO2 flow rate, and ultrasonic power, were investigated, and an orthogonal experiment was designed to study the effects of extraction pressure, temperature, cosolvent amount, and time on the extraction yields. The USCCE method was compared with other extraction methods in terms of the yields of lutein and the microstructure of C. pyrenoidosa powder by scanning electron microscopy. A maximal extraction yield of 124.01 mg lutein/100 g crude material was achieved under optimal conditions of extraction temperature at 27 °C, extraction pressure at 21 MPa, cosolvent amount at 1.5 mL/g ethanol, and ultrasound power at 1000 W. Compared to other methods, USCCE could significantly increase the lutein extraction yield at lower extraction temperature and pressure. Furthermore, the kinetic models of USCCE and subcritical CO2 extraction (SCCE) of lutein from C. pyrenoidosa were set as E = 130.64 × (1 - e(-0.6599t)) and E = 101.82 × (1 - e(-0.5683t)), respectively. The differences of parameters in the kinetic models indicate that ultrasound was able to enhance the extraction process of SCCE.

  18. COMPARISONS OF SOXHLET EXTRACTION, PRESSURIZED LIQUID EXTRACTION, SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTION, AND SUBCRITICAL WATER EXTRACTION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL SOLIDS: RECOVERY, SELECTIVITY, AND EFFECTS ON SAMPLE MATRIX. (R825394)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extractions of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated soil from a former manufactured gas plant site were performed with a Soxhlet apparatus (18 h), by pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) (50 min at 100°C), supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) (1 h at 150°...

  19. A microfluidic sub-critical water extraction instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrit, Stewart; Noell, Aaron C.; Fisher, Anita; Lee, Mike C.; Takano, Nobuyuki; Bao, Xiaoqi; Kutzer, Thomas C.; Grunthaner, Frank

    2017-11-01

    This article discusses a microfluidic subcritical water extraction (SCWE) chip for autonomous extraction of amino acids from astrobiologically interesting samples. The microfluidic instrument is composed of three major components. These include a mixing chamber where the soil sample is mixed and agitated with the solvent (water), a subcritical water extraction chamber where the sample is sealed with a freeze valve at the chip inlet after a vapor bubble is injected into the inlet channels to ensure the pressure in the chip is in equilibrium with the vapor pressure and the slurry is then heated to ≤200 °C in the SCWE chamber, and a filter or settling chamber where the slurry is pumped to after extraction. The extraction yield of the microfluidic SCWE chip process ranged from 50% compared to acid hydrolysis and 80%-100% compared to a benchtop microwave SCWE for low biomass samples.

  20. Total acid number reduction kinetics of naphthenic acids using non-catalytic subcritical methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Faisal; Mandal, Pradip Chandra; Shaari, Ku Zilati bt Ku; Nadeem, Saad

    2017-10-01

    Naphthenic acids (NAs) are weak organic acids present in the heavy crude oil and Oil Sand Bitumens. Whereas, the NAs are the major cause of corrosion in different processing, handling and storage equipment's of the refinery. Esterification of these acids can be an interesting method to reduce the NAs content in the crude oil besides its esters are valuable commodity and can be used as added lubricant in the oils. In this study, NAs reduction kinetics were investigated in a batch type reactor with subcritical methanol, the experiments were performed at temperatures of 150-210°C and fixed methanol partial pressure of 2 MPa. Findings of this study demonstrate that the 59% of total acid number (TAN) reduction was achieved at the temperature of 210°C, methanol partial pressure of 2 MPa and reaction time of 150 min. The TAN reduction followed second order kinetics with activation energy and frequency factor of 54.15 KJ/mol and 7.6×103, respectively. These results suggest that subcritical methanol can be an effective to reduce the TAN non-catalytically.

  1. Contribution to the experimental validation of the coupling between a particle accelerator and a subcritical core: Muse-3 and Muse-7 experiments; Contribution a la validation experimentale du couplage entre un accelerateur et un massif sous-critique: experience muse 3. et muse 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bompas, C.A

    2000-12-01

    As part of the research on the Hybrid Systems and more specially on the physical phenomena involved in a sub-critical core coupled with an external source, it is necessary to qualify several neutronic parameters. These parameters characterize, on the one hand, the external source supplying the core with neutrons (importance, amplification) and, on the other hand, the sub-critical core (spatial distribution of flux, power emitted from the core, reactivity, influence of a spectrum degraded by the presence of buffers like lead). The MUSE Program consists of parametric studies of configuration with different compositions at different sub-critical levels supplied by different types of external source. The first part of this work concerns the first analyses of the static results obtained during the third phase of this experimental program (MUSE-III experiment) and also the preparation of the fourth phase (MUSE-IV experiment). This study has notably concluded on the superiority of a transition zone in lead compared to a sodium zone in terms of neutronic potential (because of the (n, 2n) reaction) and of the source importance. The second part of this work concerns the interpretation of the dynamic results obtained during the MUSE-III experiment and the realization of calculations on the MUSE-IV configurations. This study has shown the important impact of the hydrogenous materials on the external source for the MUSE-III dynamic results. It has also determined the applicability of the pulsed neutron source reactivity measurement technique and optimized the position of monitors for the future MUSE-IV experiment. (authors)

  2. Sediment toxicity in Savannah Harbor

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Savannah Harbor, located near the mouth of the Savannah River, Georgia and South Carolina, is impacted by industrial and municipal effluents. Contaminants released...

  3. Kinetics and reaction pathways of total acid number reduction of cyclopentane carboxylic acid using subcritical methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandal Pradip C.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclopentane carboxylic acid (CPCA is a model compound of Naphthenic acids (NAs. This objective of this paper is to discover total acid number (TAN reduction kinetics and pathways of the reaction between CAPA and subcritical methanol (SubC-MeOH. The experiments were carried out in an autoclave reactor at temperatures of 180-220°C, a methanol partial pressure (MPP of 3 MPa, reaction times of 0-30 min and CPCA initial gas phase concentrations of 0.016-0.04 g/mL. TAN content of the samples were analyzed using ASTM D 974 techniques. The reaction products were identified and quantified with the help of GC/MS and GC-FID respectively. Experimental results reveal that TAN removal kinetics followed first order kinetics with an activation energy of 13.97 kcal/mol and a pre-exponential factor of 174.21 s-1. Subcritical methanol is able to reduce TAN of CPCA decomposing CPCA into new compounds such as cyclopentane, formaldehyde, methyl acetate and 3-pentanol.

  4. Pilot-scale subcritical solvent extraction of curcuminoids from Curcuma long L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hye-Lim; Chung, Myong-Soo

    2015-10-15

    Curcuminoids consisted curcumin, demethoxycurcumin and bisdemethoxycurcumin, were extracted from turmeric using subcritical solvent by varying conditions of temperature (110-150 °C), time (1-10 min), pressure (5-100 atm), solid-to-solvent ratio, and mixing ratio of solvent. Preliminary lab-scale experiments were conducted to determine the optimum extraction temperature and mixing ratio of water and ethanol for the pilot-scale extraction. The maximum yield of curcuminoids in the pilot-scale system was 13.58% (curcumin 4.94%, demethoxycurcumin 4.73%, and bisdemethoxycurcumin 3.91% in dried extracts) at 135 °C/5 min with water/ethanol mixture (50:50, v/v) as a solvent. On the other hand, the extraction yields of curcuminoids were obtained as 10.49%, 13.71% and 13.96% using the 50%, 95% and 100% ethanol, respectively, at the atmospheric condition (60 °C/120 min). Overall results showed that the subcritical solvent extraction is much faster and efficient extraction method considering extracted curcuminoids contents and has a potential to develop a commercial process for the extraction of curcuminoids. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental subcritical facility driven by D-D/D-T neutron generator at BARC, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Amar; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Bajpai, Shefali; Sarkar, P. S.; Bishnoi, Saroj

    2015-05-01

    The paper presents design of an experimental subcritical assembly driven by D-D/D-T neutron and preliminary experimental measurements. The system has been developed for investigating the static and dynamic neutronic properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems. This system is modular in design and it is first in the series of subcritical assemblies being designed. The subcritical core consists of natural uranium fuel with high density polyethylene as moderator and beryllium oxide as reflector. The fuel is embedded in high density polyethylene moderator matrix. Estimated keff of the system is ∼0.89. One of the unique features of subcritical core is the use of Beryllium oxide (BeO) as reflector and HDPE as moderator making the assembly a compact modular system. The subcritical core is coupled to Purnima Neutron Generator which works in D-D and D-T mode with both DC and pulsed operation. It has facility for online source strength monitoring using neutron tagging and programmable source modulation. Preliminary experiments have been carried out for spatial flux measurement and reactivity estimation using pulsed neutron source (PNS) techniques with D-D neutrons. Further experiments are being planned to measure the reactivity and other kinetic parameters using noise methods. This facility would also be used for carrying out studies on effect of source importance and measurement of source multiplication factor ks and external neutron source efficiency φ∗ in great details. Experiments with D-T neutrons are also underway.

  6. Subcritical tests - nuclear weapon testing under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty; Subkritiske tester - kjernevaapentesting under avtalen om fullstendig proevestans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoeibraaten, S

    1998-10-01

    The report discusses possible nuclear weapons related experiments and whether these are permitted under the 1996 Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). The term ''subcritical experiments'' as used in the United States includes experiments in which one studies fissile materials (so far only plutonium) under extreme conditions generated by conventional high explosives, and in which a self-sustained chain reaction never develops in the fissile material. The known facts about the American subcritical experiments are presented. There is very little reason to doubt that these experiments were indeed subcritical and therefore permitted under the CTBT. Little is known about the Russian efforts that are being made on subcritical experiments.

  7. Subcritical flutter in the acoustics of friction

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O.N Kirillov

    2008-01-01

    ...-simple eigenfrequencies at the nodes. At contact with friction pads, the rotating continua, such as the singing wine glass or the squealing disc brake, start to vibrate owing to the subcritical flutter instability...

  8. Subcritical Noise Analysis Measurements with Fresh and Spent Research Reactor Fuels Elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, T.E.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Kryter, R.C.; Miller, V.C.

    1999-02-01

    The verification of the subcriticality is of utmost importance for the safe transportation and storage of nuclear reactor fuels. Transportation containers and storage facilities are designed such that nuclear fuels remain in a subcritical state. Such designs often involve excess conservatism because of the lack of relevant experimental data to verify the accuracy of Monte Carlo codes used in nuclear criticality safety analyses. A joint experimental research program between Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions, Inc., and the University of Missouri was initiated to obtain measured quantities that could be directly related to the subcriticality of simple arrays of Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) fuel elements. A series of measurement were performed to assess the reactivity of materials such as BORAL, stainless steel, aluminum, and lead that are typically used in the construction of shipping casks. These materials were positioned between the fuel elements. In addition, a limited number of measurements were performed with configurations of fresh and spent (irradiated) fuel elements to ascertain the reactivity of the spent fuel elements. In these experiments, fresh fuel elements were replaced by spent fuel elements such that the subcritical reactivity change could be measured. The results of these measurements were used by Westinghouse Safety Management Solutions to determine the subcriticality of MURR fuel elements isolated by absorbing materials. The measurements were interpreted using the MCNP-DSP Monte Carlo code to obtain the subcritical neutron multiplication factor k(sub eff), and the bias in K(sub eff) that are used in criticality safety analyses.

  9. Experimental subcritical facility driven by D-D/D-T neutron generator at BARC, India

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Amar, E-mail: image@barc.gov.in; Roy, Tushar; Kashyap, Yogesh; Ray, Nirmal; Shukla, Mayank; Patel, Tarun; Bajpai, Shefali; Sarkar, P.S.; Bishnoi, Saroj

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: •Experimental subcritical facility BRAHMMA coupled to D-D/D-T neutron generator. •Preliminary results of PNS experiments reported. •Feynman-alpha noise measurements explored with continuous source. -- Abstract: The paper presents design of an experimental subcritical assembly driven by D-D/D-T neutron and preliminary experimental measurements. The system has been developed for investigating the static and dynamic neutronic properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems. This system is modular in design and it is first in the series of subcritical assemblies being designed. The subcritical core consists of natural uranium fuel with high density polyethylene as moderator and beryllium oxide as reflector. The fuel is embedded in high density polyethylene moderator matrix. Estimated k{sub eff} of the system is ∼0.89. One of the unique features of subcritical core is the use of Beryllium oxide (BeO) as reflector and HDPE as moderator making the assembly a compact modular system. The subcritical core is coupled to Purnima Neutron Generator which works in D-D and D-T mode with both DC and pulsed operation. It has facility for online source strength monitoring using neutron tagging and programmable source modulation. Preliminary experiments have been carried out for spatial flux measurement and reactivity estimation using pulsed neutron source (PNS) techniques with D-D neutrons. Further experiments are being planned to measure the reactivity and other kinetic parameters using noise methods. This facility would also be used for carrying out studies on effect of source importance and measurement of source multiplication factor k{sub s} and external neutron source efficiency φ{sup ∗} in great details. Experiments with D-T neutrons are also underway.

  10. Design, Development and Installation of Jordan Subcritical Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ned Xoubi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Following its announcement in 2007 to pursue a nuclear power program and in the absence of any nuclear facility essential for the education, training, and research, Jordan decided to build a subcritical reactor as its first nuclear facility. Jordan Subcritical Assembly (JSA is uranium fueled light water moderated and reflected subcritical reactor driven by a plutonium-beryllium source, and the core consists of 313 LEU fuel rods, loaded into a water-filled vessel in a square lattice of 19.11 mm pitch. The fuel rods are based on PWR fuel structural pattern type, made of uranium oxide (UO2 with 3.4 wt% 235U enrichment in zirconium alloy (Zr-4 cladding. Design, optimization, and verification were performed using MCNP5 nuclear code; the computed effective multiplication factor is 0.95923. The JSA is designed to fulfill the training needs of students and is equipped to perform all of the fundamental experiments required for a typical nuclear engineering university program. This paper presents the design, development, modeling, core analysis, and utilization of Jordan’s first nuclear facility and why this simplified low cost reactor presents an attractive choice to fulfill the preliminary experimental needs of nuclear engineering education in developing countries.

  11. Subcritical water extraction of flavoring and phenolic compounds from cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuwijitjaru, Pramote; Sayputikasikorn, Nucha; Samuhasaneetoo, Suched; Penroj, Parinda; Siriwongwilaichat, Prasong; Adachi, Shuji

    2012-01-01

    Cinnamon bark (Cinnamomum zeylanicum) powder was treated with subcritical water at 150 and 200°C in a semi-continuous system at a constant flow rate (3 mL/min) and pressure (6 MPa). Major flavoring compounds, i.e., cinnamaldehyde, cinnamic acid, cinnamyl alcohol and coumarin, were extracted at lower recoveries than the extraction using methanol, suggesting that degradation of these components might occur during the subcritical water treatment. Caffeic, ferulic, p-coumaric, protocatechuic and vanillic acids were identified from the subcritical water treatment. Extraction using subcritical water was more effective to obtain these acids than methanol (50% v/v) in both number of components and recovery, especially at 200°C. Subcritical water treatment at 200°C also resulted in a higher total phenolic content and DPPH radical scavenging activity than the methanol extraction. The DPPH radical scavenging activity and total phenolic content linearly correlated but the results suggested that the extraction at 200°C might result in other products that possessed a free radical scavenging activity other than the phenolic compounds.

  12. A vibrating membrane bioreactor operated at supra- and sub-critical flux: Influence of extracellular polymeric substances from yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren Prip; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2007-01-01

    A vibrating membrane bioreactor, in which the fouling problems are reduced by vibrating a hollow fiber membrane module, has been tested in constant flux microfiltration above (supra-critical) and below (sub-critical) an experimentally determined critical flux. Suspensions of bakers yeast cells were....... Filtration just below the critical flux (sub-critical) seems to be a good compromise between acceptable flux level and acceptable increase of fouling resistance and trans-membrane pressure (TMP) in a given time period. EPS from the yeast cells causes the membrane module to foul and part of the fouling...... is continually washed out during supra-critical flux operation whereas the washing out at sub-critical flux operation is not observed. This might be due to locally different hydrodynamic conditions at the membrane surface and pore entrances at supra- and sub-critical flux respectively....

  13. Research experiments on pressure-difference sensors with ferrofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruican, Hao, E-mail: haoruican@163.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Polytechnic, Beijing 100176 (China); Huagang, Liu; Wen, Gong; Na, Zhang [School of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing Polytechnic, Beijing 100176 (China); Ruixiao, Hao [Civil and Architectural Engineering Institute of CCCC-FHEB Co., Ltd., Beijing 101102 (China)

    2016-10-15

    Ferrofluid has distinctive properties and can be applied in many industrial uses, especially in sensors. The principles of pressure-difference sensors with ferrofluid were illustrated and experiments were demonstrated. Four types of ferrofluids with different concentrations were selected for the experiments performed. Then, the parameters of ferrofluid, such as density and magnetization, were measured. The magnetization curves of the ferrofluid were sketched. Four U tubes with different diameters were designed and built. Experiments were conducted to analyze the impacts of tube diameter and ferrofluid concentration on the output voltage/pressure difference performance. According to the experiment results, the tube diameter has little effect on the sensor output voltage. With the concentration of ferrofluid increasing, the output voltage and sensitivity of the pressure-difference sensor increases. The measurable range of the sensor also increases with the increasing concentration of ferrofluid. The workable range and the sensitivity of the designed sensor were (−2000~+2000)Pa and 1.26 mV/Pa, respectively. - Highlights: • The principle of pressure difference sensor with ferrofluid was illustrated. • The parameters of ferrofluid, such as density and magnetization, were measured. The magnetization curves of the ferrofluid were sketched. • Four series of U tubes with different diameter were designed and manufactured. • The experiments were made to analyze the factors of the tube diameter and the concentration of ferrofluid on the output-input pressure difference. • The sensitivity of the pressure difference sensor with ferrofluid was studied and the corresponding conclusions were obtained.

  14. The physics of accelerator driven sub-critical reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Accelerator driven systems; nuclear waste transmutation; computer codes; reactor physics; reactor noise; kinetics; burnup; transport theory; Monte Carlo; thorium utilization; neutron multiplication; sub-criticality; sub-critical facilities.

  15. Hydrolysis of sweet blue lupin hull using subcritical water technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftci, Deniz; Saldaña, Marleny D A

    2015-10-01

    Hydrolysis of sweet blue lupin hulls was conducted in this study using subcritical water technology. Effects of process parameters, such as pressure (50-200 bar), temperature (160-220°C), flow rate (2-10 mL/min), and pH (2-12), were studied to optimize maximum hemicellulose sugars recovery in the extracts. Extracts were analyzed for total hemicellulose sugars, phenolics and organic carbon contents and solid residues left after treatments were also characterized. Temperature, flow rate, and pH had a significant effect on hemicellulose sugar removal; however, the effect of pressure was not significant. The highest yield of hemicellulose sugars in the extracts (85.5%) was found at 180°C, 50 bar, 5 mL/min and pH 6.2. The thermal stability of the solid residue obtained at optimum conditions improved after treatment and the crystallinity index increased from 11.5% to 58.6%. The results suggest that subcritical water treatment is a promising technology for hemicellulose sugars removal from biomass. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Subcritical water extractor for Mars analog soil analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amashukeli, Xenia; Grunthaner, Frank J; Patrick, Steven B; Yung, Pun To

    2008-06-01

    Abstract Technologies that enable rapid and efficient extraction of biomarker compounds from various solid matrices are a critical requirement for the successful implementation of in situ chemical analysis of the martian regolith. Here, we describe a portable subcritical water extractor that mimics multiple organic solvent polarities by tuning the dielectric constant of liquid water through adjustment of temperature and pressure. Soil samples, collected from the Yungay region of the Atacama Desert (martian regolith analogue) in the summer of 2005, were used to test the instrument's performance. The total organic carbon was extracted from the samples at concentrations of 0.2-55.4 parts per million. The extraction data were compared to the total organic carbon content in the bulk soil, which was determined via a standard analytical procedure. The instrument's performance was examined over the temperature range of 25-250 degrees C at a fixed pressure of 20.7 MPa. Under these conditions, water remains in a subcritical fluid state with a dielectric constant varying between approximately 80 (at 25 degrees C) and approximately 30 (at 250 degrees C).

  17. Non-Catalytic and MgSO4 - Catalyst based Degradation of Glycerol in Subcritical and Supercritical Water Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfud Mahfud

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the glycerol degradation reaction in subcritical and supercritical water media. The degradation of glycerol into other products was performed both with sulphate salt catalysts and without catalyst. The reactant was made from glycerol and water with the mass ratio of 1:10. The experiments were carried out using a batch reactor at a constant pressure of 250 kgf/cm2, with the temperature range of 200-400oC, reaction time of 30 minutes, and catalyst mol ratio in glycerol of 1:10 and 1:8. The products of the non-catalytic glycerol degradation were acetaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. The use of sulphate salt as catalyst has high selectivity to acetaldehyde and still allows the formation alcohol product in small quantities. The mechanism of ionic reaction and free radical reaction can occur at lower temperature in hydrothermal area or subcritical water. Conversion of glycerol on catalytic reaction showed a higher yield when compared with the reaction performed without catalyst

  18. Experiences of pressure to conform in postgraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grendar, Jan; Beran, Tanya; Oddone-Paolucci, Elizabeth

    2018-01-03

    Perception of pressure to conform prevents learners from actively participating in educational encounters. We expected that residents would report experiencing different amounts of pressure to conform in a variety of educational settings. A total of 166 residents completed questionnaires about the frequency of conformity pressure they experience across 14 teaching and clinical settings. We examined many individual characteristics such as their age, sex, international student status, level of education, and tolerance of ambiguity; and situational characteristics such as residency program, type of learning session, status of group members, and type of rotation to determine when conformity pressure is most likely to occur. The majority of participants (89.8%) reported pressure to conform at least sometimes in at least one educational or clinical setting. Residents reported higher rates of conformity during informal, rather than formal, teaching sessions, p < .001. Also, pressure was greater when residents interacted with higher status group members, but not with the same or lower level status members, p < .001. Effect sizes were in the moderate range. The findings suggest that most residents do report feeling pressure to conform in their residency settings. This result is consistent with observations of medical students, nursing students, and clerks conforming in response to inaccurate information within experimental studies. Perception of pressure is associated with the setting rather than the trainee personal characteristics.

  19. PPOOLEX experiments on dynamic loading with pressure feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puustinen, M.; Laine, J.; Raesaenen, A. (Lappeenranta Univ. of Technology, Nuclear Safety Research Unit (Finland))

    2011-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of the dynamic loading experiments (DYN series) carried out with the scaled down, two compartment PPOOLEX test facility designed and constructed at LUT. Steam was blown into the dry well compartment and from there through the DN200 vertical blowdown pipe to the condensation pool filled with sub-cooled water. The main purpose of the experiments was to study dynamic loads caused by different condensation modes. Particularly, the effect of counterpressure on loads due to pressure oscillations induced by chugging was of interest. Before the experiments the condensation pool was filled with isothermal water so that the blowdown pipe outlet was submerged by 1.03-1.11 m. The initial temperature of the pool water varied from 11 deg. C to 63 deg. C, the steam flow rate from 290 g/s to 1220 g/s and the temperature of incoming steam from 132 deg. C to 182 deg. C. Non-condensables were pushed from the dry well into the gas space of the wet well with a short discharge of steam before the recorded period of the experiments. As a result of this procedure, the system pressure was at an elevated level in the beginning of the actual experiments. An increased counterpressure was used in the last experiment of the series. The diminishing effect of increased system pressure on chugging intensity and on measured loads is evident from the results of the last experiment. The highest pressure pulses both inside the blowdown pipe and in the condensation pool were about half of those measured with a lower system pressure but otherwise with similar test parameters. The experiments on dynamic loading gave expected results. The loads experienced by pool structures depended strongly on the steam mass flow rate, pool water temperature and system pressure. The DYN experiments indicated that chugging and condensation within the blowdown pipe cause significant dynamic loads in case of strongly sub-cooled pool water. The level of pool water temperature is decisive

  20. Theoretical Analysis for Heat Transfer Optimization in Subcritical Electrothermal Energy Storage Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Hu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Electrothermal energy storage (ETES provides bulk electricity storage based on heat pump and heat engine technologies. A subcritical ETES is described in this paper. Based on the extremum principle of entransy dissipation, a geometry model is developed for heat transfer optimization for subcritical ETES. The exergy during the heat transfer process is deduced in terms of entropy production. The geometry model is validated by the extremum principle of entropy production. The theoretical analysis results show that the extremum principle of entransy dissipation is an effective criterion for the optimization, and the optimum heat transfer for different cases with the same mass flux or pressure has been discussed. The optimum heat transfer can be achieved by adjusting the mass flux and pressure of the working fluid. It also reveals that with the increase of mass flux, there is a minimum exergy in the range under consideration, and the exergy decreases with the increase of the pressure.

  1. Angelo Mosso's experiments at very low barometric pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Camillo; West, John B

    2013-03-01

    In 1898, Angelo Mosso (1846-1910) used his low-pressure chambers to carry out some remarkable experiments that are not well known. Paul Bert (1833-1886) had previously demonstrated that the deleterious effects of high altitude were due to low PO2, but this conclusion was disputed by many of the eminent scientists of the day. Mosso believed that the physiological effects of high altitude were caused by a low PCO2 (acapnia) and he made a series of low-pressure chamber experiments to test this. In some studies he added oxygen to the air in the chambers so that he could study the effects of extreme hypobaria; in one experiment he survived a barometric pressure of only 192 mm Hg equivalent to an altitude of about 10,800 m. Some of his experiments were observed by his daughter Mimí who wrote a colorful account in her book dedicated to her father "Un cercatore d'ignoto" (A seeker of the unknown).

  2. Subcritical neutron production using multiple accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, W.Y.; Jones, J.L. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Harmon, J.F. [Idaho State Univ., Pocatello, ID (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A subcritical neutron production technique using multiple accelerators is being developed to provide a selective alternative (for small volumes) to nuclear reactor neutron production. The concept combines the capabilities of multiple commercially-available linear accelerators and a compact subcritical assembly design to generate reactor-like thermal neutron fluxes (i.e., 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}/s) in small irradiation volumes of up to 500 cm{sup 3}. In addition, fast and epithermal neutron fluxes will also be available. The neutron source utilizes radially-oriented, pulsed, electron accelerators. The subcritical neutron production assembly is in the form of a compact right-cylinder (approximately 20-cm dia.). This assembly uses an outer ring of graphite (i.e., reflector) with re-entrant holes to enable penetration of the electron beam to the internal structure which comprises of uranium as an electron convertor/neutron multiplier followed by H{sub 2}O beryllium, H{sub 2}O aluminum, and D{sub 2}O in succession toward the center. The inner-most region filled with D{sub 2}O is the central irradiation volume. The material configuration and overall design is to maximize thermal neutron fluxes in the central irradiation volume based on photoneutron/photofission and neutron multiplication processes as well as neutron transport. This assembly will be designed not to reach a nuclear critical state under any normal and/or accidental condition.

  3. Hydrolysis of polycarbonate in sub-critical water in fused silica capillary reactor with in situ Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Z.; Chou, I.-Ming; Burruss, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages of using fused silica capillary reactor (FSCR) instead of conventional autoclave for studying chemical reactions at elevated pressure and temperature conditions were demonstrated in this study, including the allowance for visual observation under a microscope and in situ Raman spectroscopic characterization of polycarbonate and coexisting phases during hydrolysis in subcritical water. ?? 2009 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  4. Source-jerk method for application on ADS neutronics study The ADS is stated for Accelerator Driven sub-critical System

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu Qing Fu; Li Yi; Xia Pu; Zheng Wu Qing; Zhu Guo Sheng

    2003-01-01

    The paper is concerned in the source-jerk method used to measure the sub-criticality, and the sub-critical experiment facility, which is used for the study on the neutronics of ADS, driven by external neutron source sup 2 sup 5 sup 2 Cf. The effects of the location of neutron source and material buffer where is at the location of the pipe of proton beam and target of fission-product dispersion on the sub-criticality of reactor are studied by source-jerk method

  5. NEXT: Neutrino Experiment with high pressure Xenon gas TPC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yahlali, Nadia, E-mail: Nadia.Yahlali@ific.uv.e [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (Centro mixto UV-CSIC), Apdo. de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain); Ball, M.; Carcel, S.; Diaz, J.; Gil, A.; Gomez Cadenas, J.J.; Martin-Albo, J.; Monrabal, F.; Serra, L.; Sorel, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular (Centro mixto UV-CSIC), Apdo. de Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-05-21

    The search of the neutrinoless double-{beta} decay address the major Physics goals of revealing the nature of the neutrino and setting an absolute scale for its mass. The observation of a positive {beta}{beta}{sup 0{nu}}signal, the unique signature of Majorana neutrinos, would have deep consequences in particle physics and cosmology. Therefore, any claim of observing a positive signal shall require extremely robust evidences. NEXT is a new double-{beta} experiment which aims at building a 100 kg high pressure {sup 136}Xe gas TPC, to be hosted in the Canfranc Underground Laboratory (LSC), in Spain. This paper address the novel design concept of NEXT TPC believed to provide a pathway for an optimized and robust double-{beta} experiment.

  6. Subcritical water extraction of lipids from wet algal biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shuguang; Reddy, Harvind K.; Schaub, Tanner; Holguin, Francisco Omar

    2016-05-03

    Methods of lipid extraction from biomass, in particular wet algae, through conventionally heated subcritical water, and microwave-assisted subcritical water. In one embodiment, fatty acid methyl esters from solids in a polar phase are further extracted to increase biofuel production.

  7. Production of value added materials by subcritical water hydrolysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was the determination of the best experimental conditions for the production of useful materials such as amino acids by subcritical water hydrolysis from supercritical carbon dioxide extracted krill residues and to compare the results with raw krill. Subcritical water hydrolysis efficiency from raw and ...

  8. The physics of accelerator driven sub-critical reactors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    utilization; neutron multiplication; sub-criticality; sub-critical facilities. PACS Nos 89.30.Gg; 28.41.-I; 28.50.-k. 1. Introduction. Accelerator driven systems (ADS) are attracting worldwide attention increasingly due to their superior safety characteristics and their potential for burning actinide and fission product-waste and energy ...

  9. Subcritical water extraction of bioactive compounds from dry loquat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ERASTO

    concentrated in a rotary evaporator at 60°C until dry. The total extraction yield was obtained by the mean value of the total extracts divided by the mass of dry loquat leaves used. Subcritical water extraction. Subcritical water extraction was carried using an extractor. (Hangzhou Huali Co. Ltd, Hangzhou, China). The extractor ...

  10. Subcritical carbon dioxide-water hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse pith for reducing sugars production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiezhen; Chen, Xiaopeng; Wang, Linlin; Wei, Xiaojie; Wang, Huasheng; Lu, Songzhou; Li, Yunhua

    2017-03-01

    The aim of present study was to obtain total reducing sugars (TRS) by hydrolysis in subcritical CO2-water from sugarcane bagasse pith (SCBP), the fibrous residue remaining after papermaking from sugarcane bagasse. The optimum hydrolysis conditions were evaluated by L16(4(5)) orthogonal experiments. The TRS yield achieved 45.8% at the optimal conditions: 200°C, 40min, 500rmin(-1), CO2 initial pressure of 1MPa and liquid-to-solid ratio of 50:1. Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance were used to characterize hydrolysis liquor, treated and untreated SCBP, resulting in the removal of hemicelluloses to mainly produce xylose, glucose and arabinose during hydrolysis. The severity factors had no correlation to TRS yield, indicating that the simple kinetic processes of biomass solubilisation cannot perfectly describe the SCBP hydrolysis. The first-order kinetic model based on consecutive reaction was used to obtain rate constants, activation energies and pre-exponential factors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Equilibria of ternary system acetic acid-water-CO2 under subcritical conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutierrez, Jose M. Jimenez; Mussatto, Solange I.; Tsou, Joana

    in a very wide range of applications. However, those conditions, especially the levels of high pressure required at larger scale, involve certain equipment limitations. An alternative to overcome those restrictions is to use subcritical carbon dioxide. In order to understand the different systems......) of the ternary system HAc—H2O—CO2 at different subcritical conditions. A proposed computer model could be validated with experimental data, leading to a certain degree of adjustment due to specific factors, such as the binary interaction parameter kij, used in the model based on the Peng-Robinson EoS coupled...... it will be returned to the atmosphere (as part of the carbon cycle), CO2 is an inexpensive and clean source with numerous industrial applications in diverse fields: from chemical processes to biotechnological purposes [1]. Many of these studies have been focused on supercritical CO2, due to its broad potential uses...

  12. Demonstration of Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation Process Using Savannah River Site High Level Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, T.B.

    2001-09-10

    This report details the experimental effort to demonstrate the continuous precipitation of cesium from Savannah River Site High Level Waste using sodium tetraphenylborate. In addition, the experiments examined the removal of strontium and various actinides through addition of monosodium titanate.

  13. Carbonate mineral dissolution kinetics in high pressure experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethlefsen, F.; Dörr, C.; Schäfer, D.; Ebert, M.

    2012-04-01

    The potential CO2 reservoirs in the North German Basin are overlain by a series of Mesozoic barrier rocks and aquifers and finally mostly by Tertiary and Quaternary close-to-surface aquifers. The unexpected rise of stored CO2 from its reservoir into close-to-surface aquifer systems, perhaps through a broken well casing, may pose a threat to groundwater quality because of the acidifying effect of CO2 dissolution in water. The consequences may be further worsening of the groundwater quality due to the mobilization of heavy metals. Buffer mechanisms counteracting the acidification are for instance the dissolution of carbonates. Carbonate dissolution kinetics is comparably fast and carbonates can be abundant in close-to-surface aquifers. The disadvantages of batch experiments compared to column experiments in order to determine rate constants are well known and have for instance been described by v. GRINSVEN and RIEMSDIJK (1992). Therefore, we have designed, developed, tested, and used a high-pressure laboratory column system to simulate aquifer conditions in a flow through setup within the CO2-MoPa project. The calcite dissolution kinetics was determined for CO2-pressures of 6, 10, and 50 bars. The results were evaluated by using the PHREEQC code with a 1-D reactive transport model, applying a LASAGA (1984) -type kinetic dissolution equation (PALANDRI and KHARAKA, 2004; eq. 7). While PALANDRI and KHARAKA (2004) gave calcite dissolution rate constants originating from batch experiments of log kacid = -0.3 and log kneutral = -5.81, the data of the column experiment were best fitted using log kacid = -2.3 and log kneutral = -7.81, so that the rate constants fitted using the lab experiment applying 50 bars pCO2 were approximately 100 times lower than according to the literature data. Rate constants of experiments performed at less CO2 pressure (pCO2 = 6 bars: log kacid = -1.78; log kneutral = -7.29) were only 30 times lower than literature data. These discrepancies in the

  14. Hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and subcritical-crack growth in high strength steels and nickel base alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, R. P.; Klier, K.; Simmons, G. W.; Chornet, E.

    1973-01-01

    Embrittlement, or the enhancement of crack growth by gaseous hydrogen in high strength alloys, is of primary interest in selecting alloys for various components in the space shuttle. Embrittlement is known to occur at hydrogen gas pressures ranging from fractions to several hundred atmospheres, and is most severe in the case of martensitic high strength steels. Kinetic information on subcritical crack growth in gaseous hydrogen is sparse at this time. Corroborative information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion is inadequate to permit a clear determination of the rate controlling process and possible mechanism in hydrogen enhanced crack growth, and for estimating behavior over a range of temperatures and pressures. Therefore, coordinated studies of the kinetics of crack growth, and adsorption and diffusion of hydrogen, using identical materials, have been initiated. Comparable conditions of temperature and pressure will be used in the chemical and mechanical experiments. Inconel 718 alloy and 18Ni(200) maraging steel have been selected for these studies. Results from these studies are expected to provide not only a better understanding of the gaseous hydrogen embrittlement phenomenon itself, but also fundamental information on hydrogen adsorption and diffusion, and crack growth information that can be used directly for design.

  15. Plastic deformation of silicate garnets. I. High-pressure experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voegelé, V.; Ando, J. I.; Cordier, P.; Liebermann, R. C.

    Deformation experiments have been carried out on garnet single crystals (Py20 Al73 Sp2 Gr5) under high confining pressure (6.5 GPa) and temperatures in the range 700-1440°C. The high-pressure sample assembly was designed to generate high differential stress. Below 1000°C, the specimens show only evidence of microplasticity associated with microcracking. Above 1000°C, garnet become ductile and the microstructure is characteristic of dislocation creep with significant recovery. The observed glide systems are 1/2{11¯0}, 1/2{112¯}, 1/2{123¯}, {010} and {011} in the whole temperature range. The most stable (and hence less mobile) dislocation lines appear to be the 70° 1/2 (i.e., with a large edge component) and edge . Except for some rare dislocations generated at low temperature, most of the dislocations exhibit no visible dissociation. The detailed characterization of the dislocations suggests that they have an extended, non-planar core. This core structure induces a high Peierls friction and is responsible for the brittle behavior of garnets at low temperature. The Peierls regime extends up to high temperature until diffusion takes place and enhances dislocation climb superimposed to glide.

  16. Concept of turbines for ultrasupercritical, supercritical, and subcritical steam conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, V. E.; Khomenok, L. A.; Pichugin, I. I.; Kovalev, I. A.; Bozhko, V. V.; Vladimirskii, O. A.; Zaitsev, I. V.; Kachuriner, Yu. Ya.; Nosovitskii, I. A.; Orlik, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    The article describes the design features of condensing turbines for ultrasupercritical initial steam conditions (USSC) and large-capacity cogeneration turbines for super- and subcritical steam conditions having increased steam extractions for district heating purposes. For improving the efficiency and reliability indicators of USSC turbines, it is proposed to use forced cooling of the head high-temperature thermally stressed parts of the high- and intermediate-pressure rotors, reaction-type blades of the high-pressure cylinder (HPC) and at least the first stages of the intermediate-pressure cylinder (IPC), the double-wall HPC casing with narrow flanges of its horizontal joints, a rigid HPC rotor, an extended system of regenerative steam extractions without using extractions from the HPC flow path, and the low-pressure cylinder's inner casing moving in accordance with the IPC thermal expansions. For cogeneration turbines, it is proposed to shift the upper district heating extraction (or its significant part) to the feedwater pump turbine, which will make it possible to improve the turbine plant efficiency and arrange both district heating extractions in the IPC. In addition, in the case of using a disengaging coupling or precision conical bolts in the coupling, this solution will make it possible to disconnect the LPC in shifting the turbine to operate in the cogeneration mode. The article points out the need to intensify turbine development efforts with the use of modern methods for improving their efficiency and reliability involving, in particular, the use of relatively short 3D blades, last stages fitted with longer rotor blades, evaporation techniques for removing moisture in the last-stage diaphragm, and LPC rotor blades with radial grooves on their leading edges.

  17. FLUOLE-2: An Experiment for PWR Pressure Vessel Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiollay Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available FLUOLE-2 is a benchmark-type experiment dedicated to 900 and 1450 MWe PWR vessels surveillance dosimetry. This two-year program started in 2014 and will end in 2015. It will provide precise experimental data for the validation of the neutron spectrum propagation calculation from core to vessel. It is composed of a square core surrounded by a stainless steel baffe and internals: PWR barrel is simulated by steel structures leading to different steel-water slides; two steel components stand for a surveillance capsule holder and for a part of the pressure vessel. Measurement locations are available on the whole experimental structure. The experimental knowledge of core sources will be obtained by integral gamma scanning measurements directly on fuel pins. Reaction rates measured by calibrated fission chambers and a large set of dosimeters will give information on the neutron energy and spatial distributions. Due to the low level neutron flux of EOLE ZPR a special, high efficiency, calibrated gamma spectrometry device will be used for some dosimeters, allowing to measure an activity as low as 7. 10−2 Bq per sample. 103mRh activities will be measured on an absolute calibrated X spectrometry device. FLUOLE-2 experiment goal is to usefully complete the current experimental benchmarks database used for the validation of neutron calculation codes. This two-year program completes the initial FLUOLE program held in 2006–2007 in a geometry representative of 1300 MWe PWR.

  18. Dynamics of Subcritical Bubbles in First Order Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiromizu, T.; Morikawa, M.; Yokoyama, J.

    1995-11-01

    We derivate the Langevin and the Fokker-Planck equations for the radius of O(3)-symmetric subcritical bubbles as a phenomenological model to treat thermal fluctuation. The effect of thermal noise on subcritical bubbles is examined. We find that the fluctuation-dissipation relation holds and that in the high temperature phase the system settles down rapidly to the thermal equilibrium state even if it was in a nonequilibrium state initially. We then estimate the typical size of subcritical bubbles as well as the amplitude of fluctuations on that scale. We also discuss their implication to the electroweak phase transition.

  19. Design, Development and Installation of Jordan Subcritical Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ned Xoubi

    2013-01-01

    Following its announcement in 2007 to pursue a nuclear power program and in the absence of any nuclear facility essential for the education, training, and research, Jordan decided to build a subcritical reactor as its first nuclear facility. Jordan Subcritical Assembly (JSA) is uranium fueled light water moderated and reflected subcritical reactor driven by a plutonium-beryllium source, and the core consists of 313 LEU fuel rods, loaded into a water-filled vessel in a square lattice of 19.11 ...

  20. Westinghouse independent safety review of Savannah River production reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leggett, W.D.; McShane, W.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Liparulo, N.J.; McAdoo, J.D.; Strawbridge, L.E. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Nuclear and Advanced Technology Div.); Toto, G. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Nuclear Services Div.); Fauske, H.K. (Fauske and Associates, Inc., Burr Ridge, IL (USA)); Call, D.W. (Westinghouse Savannah R

    1989-04-01

    Westinghouse Electric Corporation has performed a safety assessment of the Savannah River production reactors (K,L, and P) as requested by the US Department of Energy. This assessment was performed between November 1, 1988, and April 1, 1989, under the transition contract for the Westinghouse Savannah River Company's preparations to succeed E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company as the US Department of Energy contractor for the Savannah River Project. The reviewers were drawn from several Westinghouse nuclear energy organizations, embody a combination of commercial and government reactor experience, and have backgrounds covering the range of technologies relevant to assessing nuclear safety. The report presents the rationale from which the overall judgment was drawn and the basis for the committee's opinion on the phased restart strategy proposed by E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company, Westinghouse, and the US Department of Energy-Savannah River. The committee concluded that it could recommend restart of one reactor at partial power upon completion of a list of recommended upgrades both to systems and their supporting analyses and after demonstration that the organization had assimilated the massive changes it will have undergone.

  1. Coupling of subcritical methanol with acidic ionic liquids for the acidity reduction of naphthenic acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zafar Faisal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of naphthenic acids (NAs in crude oil is the major cause of corrosion in the refineries and its processing equipment. The goal of this study is to reduce the total acid number (TAN of NAs by treating them with subcritical methanol in the presence of acidic ionic liquid (AIL catalysts. Experiments were carried out in an autoclave batch reactor and the effect of different reaction parameters was investigated. It was observed that TAN reduction was positively dependent on the temperature and concentration of the AIL whereas excess of methanol has a negative effect. Approximately 90% TAN reduction was achieved under the optimized reaction conditions using [BMIM]HSO4 as catalyst. It was also perceived from the experimental results that the AILs with longer alkyl chain exhibited higher catalytic activity. The activity and stability of AIL showed that they can be promising catalyst to esterify NAs under subcritical methanol.

  2. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  3. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separations operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  4. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  5. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  6. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. (comp.)

    1991-01-01

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  7. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, July 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  8. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, August 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation, tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  9. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, November 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1991-12-31

    This document details monthly activities at the Savannah River Laboratory. Topics addressed are reactor operation; tritium facilities and production; separation operations; environmental concerns; and waste management. (FI)

  10. High pressure studies on uranium and thorium silicide compounds: Experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yagoubi, S.; Heathman, S.; Svane, A.

    2013-01-01

    The actinide silicides ThSi, USi and USi2 have been studied under high pressure using both theory and experiment. High pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments were performed on polycrystalline samples in diamond anvil cells at room temperature and for pressures up to 54, 52 and 26 GPa,...

  11. Astrobionibbler: In Situ Microfluidic Subcritical Water Extraction of Amino Acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, A. C.; Fisher, A. M.; Takano, N.; Fors-Francis, K.; Sherrit, S.; Grunthaner, F.

    2016-10-01

    A fluidic-chip based instrument for subcritical water extraction (SCWE) of amino acids and other organics from powder samples has been developed. A variety of soil analog extractions have been performed to better understand SCWE capabilities.

  12. Negative Pressure Wound Therapy: Experience in 45 Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Kathryn A.; Stanley, Bryden J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To report experience with negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) in 45 consecutive dogs admitted with extensive cutaneous wounds and to determine if NPWT is feasible in veterinary hospital practice. Study Design Prospective descriptive study Animals Dogs (n = 45) Methods Collected data were organized into 6 categories: patient data, wound data, NPWT data, adjunctive treatments, complications, and final outcome Results Wounds (53 in 45 dogs) were largely traumatic in origin, and distributed fairly evenly to the trunk, proximal and distal aspects of the limbs. Most wounds (34 dogs, 76%) had no granulation tissue and were treated a mean of 4.2 days after wounding, whereas 11 dogs had granulating wounds that were initially treated a mean of 87 days after wounding. Median NPWT use was 3 days with a mean hospitalization of 7.8 days. Most wounds (33; 62%) were closed surgically after NPWT and were healed by 14 days. The other 18 wounds healed (mean, 21 days) by second intention after hospital discharge. Overall, 96% of the wounds healed; 2 dogs died before definitive closure could be attempted. Conclusion NPWT is applicable to a wide variety of canine wounds is well tolerated, allows for several days between dressing changes, and can used to optimize the wound bed for surgical closure or second intention healing. PMID:24512302

  13. Pulsed neutron source based on accelerator-subcritical-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Makoto; Noda, Akira; Iwashita, Yoshihisa; Okamoto, Hiromi; Shirai, Toshiyuki [Kyoto Univ., Uji (Japan). Inst. for Chemical Research

    1997-03-01

    A new pulsed neutron source which consists of a 300MeV proton linac and a nuclear fuel subcritical assembly is proposed. The proton linac produces pulsed spallation neutrons, which are multipied by the subcritical assembly. A prototype proton linac that accelerates protons up to 7MeV has been developed and a high energy section of a DAW structure is studied with a power model. Halo formations in high intensity beam are also being studied. (author)

  14. On Respiratory Rate of Cherry Tomatoes under Subcritical Heights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Duan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of subcritical drop heights on respiratory rate was studied for cherry tomatoes. The cherry tomatoes were dropped, and the mean value of O2 concentration was measured, and then the respiration rate was calculated. The results showed that the respiration rate of the cherry tomatoes increases remarkably with the dropping height. Finally, the relationship between the subcritical dropping heights and respiration rate was modeled and validated, showing good agreement.

  15. On Respiratory Rate of Cherry Tomatoes under Subcritical Heights

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Duan; Yu-fen Chen; Zhong-zheng Sun; Ming-qing Chen; Hui Zhang; Jing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    The influence of subcritical drop heights on respiratory rate was studied for cherry tomatoes. The cherry tomatoes were dropped, and the mean value of O2 concentration was measured, and then the respiration rate was calculated. The results showed that the respiration rate of the cherry tomatoes increases remarkably with the dropping height. Finally, the relationship between the subcritical dropping heights and respiration rate was modeled and validated, showing good agreement.

  16. Supercritical CO(2) and subcritical propane extraction of pungent paprika and quantification of carotenoids, tocopherols, and capsaicinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnayfeed, M H; Daood, H G; Illés, V; Biacs, P A

    2001-06-01

    Ground paprika (Capsicum annuum L.) was extracted with supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO(2)) and subcritical propane at different conditions of pressure and temperature to estimate the yield and variation in carotenoid, tocopherol, and capsaicinoid contents and composition. The yield of paprika extract was found to be affected by the extraction conditions with SC-CO(2) but fairly constant at different conditions with subcritical propane. The maximum yields of oleoresin were 7.9 and 8.1% of ground paprika by SC-CO(2) and subcritical propane, respectively. The quantitative distribution of carotenoids, tocopherols, and capsaicinoids between paprika extract and powder was influenced by extraction conditions. SC-CO(2) was inefficient in the extraction of diesters of xanthophylls even at 400 bar and 55 degrees C, whereas tocopherols and capsaicinoids were easy to extract at these conditions. Under mild conditions subcritical propane was superior to SC-CO(2) in the extraction of carotenoids and tocopherols but less efficient in the extraction of capsaicinoids.

  17. Polymorphism of a polymer precursor: metastable glycolide polymorph recovered via large scale high-pressure experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchison, Ian B.; Delori, Amit; Wang, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    Using a large volume high-pressure press a new polymorph of an important precursor for biomedical polymers was isolated in gram quantities and used to seed crystallisation experiments at ambient pressure.......Using a large volume high-pressure press a new polymorph of an important precursor for biomedical polymers was isolated in gram quantities and used to seed crystallisation experiments at ambient pressure....

  18. High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

    2012-09-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this

  19. Fractional Scaling Analysis for IRIS pressurizer reduced scale experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezerra da Silva, Mario Augusto, E-mail: mabs500@gmail.co [Departamento de Energia Nuclear - Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, 50740-540 Recife, PE (Brazil); Brayner de Oliveira Lira, Carlos Alberto, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.b [Departamento de Energia Nuclear - Centro de Tecnologia e Geociencias, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire, 1000, 50740-540 Recife, PE (Brazil); Oliveira Barroso, Antonio Carlos de, E-mail: barroso@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares - Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-900 Cidade Universitaria, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2010-10-15

    About twenty organizations joined in a consortium led by Westinghouse to develop an integral, modular and medium size pressurized water reactor (PWR), known as international reactor innovative and secure (IRIS), which is characterized by having most of its components inside the pressure vessel, eliminating or minimizing the probability of severe accidents. The pressurizer is responsible for pressure control in PWRs. A small continuous flow is maintained by the spray system in conventional pressurizers. This mini-flow allows a mixing between the reactor coolant and the pressurizer water, warranting acceptable limits for occasional differences in boron concentrations. There are neither surge lines nor spray in IRIS pressurizer, but surge and recirculation orifices that promote a circulation flow between primary system and pressurizer, avoiding power transients whether outsurges occur. The construction of models is a routine practice in engineering, being supported by similarity rules. A new method of scaling systems, Fractional Scaling Analysis, has been successfully used to analyze pressure variations, considering the most relevant agents of change. The aim of this analysis is to obtain the initial boron concentration ratio and the volumetric flows that ensure similar behavior for boron dispersion in a prototype and its model.

  20. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M

    1999-06-09

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

  1. Reptiles and amphibians of the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibbons, J.W.; Patterson, K.K.

    1978-11-01

    Taxonomic, distributional, and ecological information on the reptiles and amphibians of the Savannah River Plant (SRP) is provided. The purpose of such a presentation is to give a professional biologist an initial familiarity with herpetology on the SRP, and to provide sufficient comprehensive information to an ecologist, regardless of his experience in herpetology, to permit him to undertake studies that in some manner incorporate the herpetofauna of the SRP. (ERB)

  2. Neutrino Physics with Accelerator Driven Subcritical Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffoli, Emilio

    2017-09-01

    Accelerator Driven Subcritical System (ADS) reactors are being developed around the world, to produce energy and, at the same time, to provide an efficient way to dispose of and to recycle nuclear waste. Used nuclear fuel, by itself, cannot sustain a chain reaction; however in ADS reactors the additional neutrons which are required will be supplied by a high-intensity accelerator. This accelerator will produce, as a by-product, a large quantity of {\\bar{ν }}μ via muon Decay At Rest (µDAR). Using liquid scintillators, it will be possible to to measure the CP-violating phase δCP and to look for experimental signs of the presence of sterile neutrinos in the appearance channel, testing the LSND and MiniBooNE anomalies. Even in the first stage of the project, when the beam energy will be lower, it will be possible to produce {\\bar{ν }}e via Isotope Decay At Rest (IsoDAR), which can be used to provide competitive bounds on sterile neutrinos in the disappearance channel. I will consider several experimental setups in which the antineutrinos are created using accelerators that will be constructed as part of the China-ADS program.

  3. Experiment on wear behavior of high pressure gas seal faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Peng, Xudong; Bai, Shaoxian; Meng, Xiangkai; Li, Jiyun

    2014-11-01

    Current researches show that mechanical deformation of seal ring face makes fluid film clearance decrease at high pressure side, thus a divergent clearance is formed and face wear occurs more seriously at the high pressure side than that on the low pressure side. However, there is still lack of published experimental works enough to prove the theoretical results. In this paper, a spiral groove dry gas seal at high pressures is experimentally investigated so as to prove the face wear happened at the high pressure side of seal faces due to the face mechanical deformation, and the wear behavior affected by seal ring structure is also studied. The experimental results show that face wear would occur at the high pressure side of seal faces due to the deformation, thus the leakage and face temperature increase, which all satisfies the theoretical predictions. When sealed pressure is not less than 5 MPa, the pressure can provide enough opening force to separate the seal faces. The seal ring sizes have obvious influence on face wear. Face wear, leakage and face temperature of a dry gas seal with the smaller cross sectional area of seal ring are less than that of a dry gas seal with bigger one, and the difference of leakage rate between these two sizes of seal face width is in the range of 24%-25%. Compared with the effect of seal ring sizes, the effect of secondary O-ring seal position on face deformation and face wear is less. The differences between these two types of dry gas seals with different secondary O-ring seal positions are less than 5.9% when the rotational speed varies from 0 to 600 r/min. By linking face wear and sealing performance changes to the shift in mechanical deformation of seal ring, this research presents an important experimental method to study face deformation of a dry gas seal at high pressures.

  4. Experiments on aerosol removal by high-pressure water spray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corno, Ada del, E-mail: delcorno@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Morandi, Sonia, E-mail: morandi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Parozzi, Flavio, E-mail: parozzi@rse-web.it [RSE, Power Generation Technologies and Materials Dept, via Rubattino 54, I-20134 Milano (Italy); Araneo, Lucio, E-mail: lucio.araneo@polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, via Lambruschini 4A, I-20156 Milano (Italy); CNR-IENI, via Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Casella, Francesco, E-mail: francesco2.casella@mail.polimi.it [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, via Lambruschini 4A, I-20156 Milano (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Experimental research to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols if applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. • Cloud of monodispersed SiO{sub 2} particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration in the range 2–90 mg/m{sup 3}. • Carried out in a chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls equipped with a high pressure water spray with single nozzle. • Respect to low-pressure sprays, removal efficiency turned out significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure sprays system. - Abstract: An experimental research was managed in the framework of the PASSAM European Project to measure the efficiency of high-pressure sprays in capturing aerosols when applied to a filtered containment venting system in case of severe accident. The campaign was carried out in a purposely built facility composed by a scrubbing chamber 0.5 × 1.0 m and 1.5 m high, with transparent walls to permit the complete view of the aerosol removal process, where the aerosol was injected to form a cloud of specific particle concentration. The chamber was equipped with a high pressure water spray system with a single nozzle placed on its top. The test matrix consisted in the combination of water pressure injections, in the range 50–130 bar, on a cloud of monodispersed SiO{sub 2} particles with sizes 0.5 or 1.0 μm and initial concentration ranging between 2 and 99 mg/m{sup 3}. The spray was kept running for 2 min and the efficiency of the removal was evaluated, along the test time, using an optical particle sizer. With respect to low-pressure sprays, the removal efficiency turned out much more significant: the half-life for 1 μm particles with a removal high-pressure spray system is orders of magnitude shorter than that with a low-pressure spray system. The highest removal rate was

  5. Reynolds number effect on VIV: from subcritical to supercritical flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triantafyllou, M.S.; Hover, F.S.; Techet, A.H. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Dept. of Ocean Engineering, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Vortex Induced Vibrations in flexibly supported rigid cylinders and long, flexible slender structures, such as cables and risers, are caused by the formation of large-scale vortices, whose dynamics are controlled to a large extend by inviscid mechanisms. Reynolds number remains a very important parameter, however, because it influences the formation and shedding mechanisms of the vortical patterns. For low Reynolds numbers, below a few thousand, a nearly complete understanding has been obtained in recent years, at least for flexibly mounted rigid cylinders. This is not the case, though, for VIV above Re=10,000 and - especially - above the critical Reynolds number of about Re=250,000 for smooth cylinders. The talk provides observed WV trends of flexibly mounted cylinders, obtained in recent experiments as function of the Reynolds number, from Re about 1,000 up to 1,000,000. In particular, similarities and differences between subcritical and supercritical force and motion data will be discussed, and conclusions on the governing principal mechanisms will be drawn, including transitions in the arrangement of vortical patterns and effects of correlation length. (authors)

  6. Evaluation of reactivity monitoring techniques at the Yalina - Booster sub-critical facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becares Palacios, V.

    2014-07-01

    The management of long-lived radioactive wastes produced by nuclear reactors constitutes one of the main challenges of nuclear technology nowadays. A possible option for its management consists in the transmutation of long lived nuclides into shorter lived ones. Accelerator Driven Subcritical Systems (ADS) are one of the technologies in development to achieve this goal. An ADS consists in a subcritical nuclear reactor maintained in a steady state by an external neutron source driven by a particle accelerator. The interest of these systems lays on its capacity to be loaded with fuels having larger contents of minor actinides than conventional critical reactors, and in this way, increasing the transmutation rates of these elements, that are the main responsible of the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear waste. One of the key points that have been identified for the operation of an industrial-scale ADS is the need of continuously monitoring the reactivity of the subcritical system during operation. For this reason, since the 1990s a number of experiments have been conducted in zero-power subcritical assemblies (MUSE, RACE, KUCA, Yalina, GUINEVERE/FREYA) in order to experimentally validate these techniques. In this context, the present thesis is concerned with the validation of reactivity monitoring techniques at the Yalina-Booster subcritical assembly. This assembly belongs to the Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research (JIPNR-Sosny) of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus. Experiments concerning reactivity monitoring have been performed in this facility under the EUROTRANS project of the 6th EU Framework Program in year 2008 under the direction of CIEMAT. Two types of experiments have been carried out: experiments with a pulsed neutron source (PNS) and experiments with a continuous source with short interruptions (beam trips). For the case of the first ones, PNS experiments, two fundamental techniques exist to measure the reactivity, known as the prompt

  7. Building America Case Study: Savannah Gardens, Savannah, Georgia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-03-01

    Southface Energy Institute (Southface) partnered with owners and/or builders with various market constraints and ultimate goals for three projects in different climate zones: Savannah, GA (CZ 2), Clemson, SC (CZ 3), and LaFayette, GA (CZ 4). This report documents the design process, computational energy modeling, construction, envelope performance metrics, long-term monitoring results, and successes and failures of the design and execution of these high performance homes. The three bedroom/two bathroom test home in Savannah Gardens on an elevated slab foundation has a semi-conditioned, encapsulated attic. A neighboring home built to EarthCraft specifications was also monitored as a control for exterior foam insulation and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). For the JMC Patrick Square, a single-story project in Clemson, the small-scale production builder wanted to increase their level of energy efficiency beyond their current green building practices, including bringing ducts into conditioned space. Through a combination of upgrade measures the team met this goal and achieved many Zero Energy Ready Home requirements. LaFayette Housing Authority undertook a development of 30 affordable rental housing units in 15 duplexes in LaFayette, GA. Because they would be long-term owners, their priorities were low utility bills for the residents and durable, maintainable buildings. The team employed BEopt to optimize building envelope and systems choices, including 2x6 advanced framed walls, insulated slab, and heat pump water heater in a utility closet which was ducted to/from an encapsulated attic.

  8. Lower Savannah aging, disability & transportation resource center : regional travel management and coordination center (TMCC) model and demonstration project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    This report details the deployed technology and implementation experiences of the Lower Savannah Aging, Disability & Transportation : Resource Center in Aiken, South Carolina, which served as the regional Travel Management and Coordination Center (TM...

  9. Experience with the use of negative pressure bolster dressing for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methodology: This was a prospective study of consecutive patients from January 2009 to December 2010, with wounds over uneven and highly mobile anatomic regions that had their skin grafts stabilized using negative pressure wound dressing. Data on patients' age, sex, region of the body that was skin grafted, size of ...

  10. Modeling of the CTEx subcritical unit using MCNPX code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Avelino [Divisao de Defesa Quimica, Biologica e Nuclear. Centro Tecnologico do Exercito - CTEx, Guaratiba, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. da, E-mail: ademir@con.ufrj.br [Programa de Engenharia Nuclear. Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ Centro de Tecnologia, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rebello, Wilson F. [Secao de Engenharia Nuclear - SE/7 Instituto Militar de Engenharia - IME Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Cunha, Victor L. Lassance [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The present work aims at simulating the subcritical unit of Army Technology Center (CTEx) namely ARGUS pile (subcritical uranium-graphite arrangement) by using the computational code MCNPX. Once such modeling is finished, it could be used in k-effective calculations for systems using natural uranium as fuel, for instance. ARGUS is a subcritical assembly which uses reactor-grade graphite as moderator of fission neutrons and metallic uranium fuel rods with aluminum cladding. The pile is driven by an Am-Be spontaneous neutron source. In order to achieve a higher value for k{sub eff}, a higher concentration of U235 can be proposed, provided it safely remains below one. (author)

  11. Advanced separations at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M.; McCabe, D.

    1996-10-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has many waste streams that are contaminated with radionuclides and/or hazardous materials that must be treated to remove the radioactivity (cesium, strontium, tritium, actinides) and hazardous components (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), cyanide, metal ions).

  12. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

    1998-08-01

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of waste, restoration of the environment, and the development of industry in and around the site.

  13. Savannah River Site environmental data for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W. [ed.

    1995-12-31

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. An attempt also has been made to include all available data from environmental research programs.

  14. Savannah River Technology Center, monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This is the monthly report to detail the research currently being conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center. The areas of research are in Tritium, Seperation processes, Environmental Engineering, and Waste Management.

  15. Comparative phylogeography of African savannah ungulates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenzen, Eline; Heller, Rasmus; Siegismund, Hans Redlef

    2012-01-01

    and South-West Africa. Furthermore, differing Pleistocene evolutionary biogeographic scenarios are proposed for East and Southern Africa, supported by palaeoclimatic data and the fossil record. Environmental instability in East Africa facilitated several spatial and temporal refugia and is reflected......The savannah biome of sub-Saharan Africa harbours the highest diversity of ungulates (hoofed mammals) on Earth. In this review, we compile population genetic data from 19 codistributed ungulate taxa of the savannah biome and find striking concordance in the phylogeographic structuring of species....... Data from across taxa reveal distinct regional lineages, which reflect the survival and divergence of populations in isolated savannah refugia during the climatic oscillations of the Pleistocene. Data from taxa across trophic levels suggest distinct savannah refugia were present in West, East, Southern...

  16. Gypsum scaling in pressure retarded osmosis: experiments, mechanisms and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minmin; Hou, Dianxun; She, Qianhong; Tang, Chuyang Y

    2014-01-01

    Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is an osmotically-driven membrane process that can be used to harvest salinity-gradient power. The PRO performance (both water flux and power density) can be severely limited by membrane fouling. The current study, for the first time, investigates PRO scaling in a bench-scale pressurized system using calcium sulfate dihydrate (gypsum) as a model scalant. In addition to the bulk feed solution (FS) saturation index (SI bulk), gypsum scaling was found to be strongly affected by the draw solution (DS) type and concentration, the applied hydraulic pressure, and the membrane orientation. The commonly recommended active layer facing draw solution (AL-DS) orientation was highly prone to internal scaling. In this orientation, severe internal concentration polarization (ICP) of scaling precursors induced gypsum clogging in membrane support layer even when the FS was undersaturated (e.g., SI bulk = 0.8). At higher SI bulk values, external gypsum crystal deposition occurred in addition to internal scaling. More severe scaling was observed when the DS contained scaling precursors such as Ca(2+) or SO4(2-), suggesting that the reverse diffusion of these precursors into the FS can significantly enhanced gypsum scaling. Increasing applied hydraulic pressure could enhance reverse solute diffusion and thus result in more severe gypsum scaling when the DS contained scaling precursors. A conceptual model, capturing the two important PRO scaling mechanisms (ICP of scaling precursors from FS and reverse diffusion of scaling precursors from the DS), is presented to rationalize the experimental results. Our results provide significant implications for PRO scaling control. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Ion acoustic wave generation by a standing electromagnetic field in a subcritical plasma

    OpenAIRE

    P. Fischer; Gauthereau, C.; Godiot, J.; G. Matthieussent

    1987-01-01

    An electromagnetic wave ( f = 9 GHz, Pi = 150 kW, τ = 1.5 μs) is launched into a subcritical argon plasma (n e ≃1011 cm-3, P0 ≃ 5 × 10-4 Torr), resulting in a standing wave. The associated ponderomotive force generates an ion acoustic wave with a wave vector equal to twice the electromagnetic one and with a frequency satisfying the usual dispersion relation (fA ≃ 150 kHz). The main features of the ion acoustic wave, as measured in this 3D experiment, agree with a simple theory. However, varyi...

  18. Hydrothermal liquefaction of Spirulina and Nannochloropsis Salina under subcritical and supercritical water conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Reddy, H.; Deng, S.

    2013-01-01

    Six hydrothermal liquefaction experiments on Nannochloropsis salina and Spirulina platensis at subcritical and supercritical water conditions (220-375 °C, 20-255 bar) were carried out to explore the feasibility of extracting lipids from wet algae, preserving nutrients in lipid-extracted algae solid...... on Nannochloropsis salina at 350 °C and 175 bar. For Spirulina platensis algae sample, the optimal hydrothermal liquefaction condition appears to be at 310 °C and 115 bar, while the optimal condition for Nannochloropsis salina is at 350 °C and 175 bar. Preliminary data also indicate that a lipid-extracted algae...

  19. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SCHWINKENDORF, K.N.

    2006-05-12

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements. The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprising two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with ''green'' (fresh) fuel and one with spent fuel. Both the green and spent fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, 3 green fuel and 4 spent fuel loading configurations were considered to serve as benchmark models. However, shortcomings in experimental data failed to meet the high standards for a benchmark problem. Nevertheless, the data provided by these subcritical measurements can

  20. 78 FR 36431 - Safety Zone; Inbound Transit of M/V TEAL, Savannah River; Savannah, GA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Inbound Transit of M/V TEAL, Savannah River... establishing a temporary moving safety zone around the M/V TEAL during its inbound transit on the Savannah... will transition to a temporary fixed safety zone when the M/V TEAL moors to CB8. This regulation is...

  1. The Free Overfall in Circular Sections with Different Flat Base in Supercritical and Subcritical Flow Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Vatankhah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A free overfall offers a simple device for flow discharge measuring by a single measurement of depth at the end of the channel yb which is known as the end depth or brink depth. When the bottom of a channel drops suddenly, the flow separates from sharp edge of the brink and the pressure distribution is not hydrostatic because of the curvature of the flow. In channels with subcritical flow regime, control section occurs at the upstream with a critical depth (yc. Although pressure distribution at the critical depth is hydrostatic, the location of the critical depth can vary with respect to the discharge value. So, the end depth at brink is offered to estimate the discharge. A unique relationship between the brink depth (yb and critical depth (yc, known as end-depth ratio (EDR = yb/yc, exist. Since a relationship between the discharge and critical depth exists, the discharge can ultimately be related to yb. However, when the approaching flow is supercritical, critical section does not exist. Therefore, the discharge will be a function of end depth and channel longitudinal slope. In current study, an analytical model is presented for a circular free overfall with different flat base height in subcritical and supercritical flow regimes. The flow over a drop in a free overfall is simulated by applying the energy to calculate the EDR and end depth-discharge (EDD relationship. End-depth-discharge relationship: The flow of a free overfall in a channel can be assumed that is similar to the flow over a sharp-crested weir by taking weir height equal to zero. It is assumed that pressure at the end section is atmospheric, and also streamlines at the end section are parallel. To account for the curvature of streamlines, the deflection of jet due to gravity, the coefficient of contraction, Cc, is considered. At a short distance upstream the end section, the pressure is hydrostatic. By applying the energy equation between end section and control

  2. Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-05-01

    Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found.

  3. Microwave ion source for accelerator driven sub-critical system

    CERN Document Server

    Cui Bao Qun; Jiang Wei; LiLiQiang; WangRongWen

    2002-01-01

    A microwave ion source is under developing for a demonstration prototype of a accelerator driven sub-critical system at CIAE (China Institute of Atomic Energy), 100 mA hydrogen beam has been extracted from the source through a 7.3 mm aperture in diameter, proton ratio is more than 85%, reliability has been tested for 100 h without any failures

  4. Experimental Study of Subcritical Water Liquefaction of Biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhe; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    In this work, hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of wood industry residues (wood, bark, sawdust) and macroalgae for producing biofuels has been investigated under subcritical water conditions (at temperature of 300 C), with and without the presence of catalyst. The effects of catalyst and biomass type...

  5. Local energy losses at positive and negative steps in subcritical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Local energy losses occur when there is a transition in open channel flow. Even though local losses in subcritical open channel flow due to changes in channel width have been studied, to date no studies have been reported for losses due to changes in bed elevations. Steps are commonly used in engineering applications ...

  6. Monte Carlo Alpha Iteration Algorithm for a Subcritical System Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Jin Shim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The α-k iteration method which searches the fundamental mode alpha-eigenvalue via iterative updates of the fission source distribution has been successfully used for the Monte Carlo (MC alpha-static calculations of supercritical systems. However, the α-k iteration method for the deep subcritical system analysis suffers from a gigantic number of neutron generations or a huge neutron weight, which leads to an abnormal termination of the MC calculations. In order to stably estimate the prompt neutron decay constant (α of prompt subcritical systems regardless of subcriticality, we propose a new MC alpha-static calculation method named as the α iteration algorithm. The new method is derived by directly applying the power method for the α-mode eigenvalue equation and its calculation stability is achieved by controlling the number of time source neutrons which are generated in proportion to α divided by neutron speed in MC neutron transport simulations. The effectiveness of the α iteration algorithm is demonstrated for two-group homogeneous problems with varying the subcriticality by comparisons with analytic solutions. The applicability of the proposed method is evaluated for an experimental benchmark of the thorium-loaded accelerator-driven system.

  7. Local energy losses at positive and negative steps in subcritical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-04-22

    7) 554-568. MORRIS HM and WIGGERT JM (1972) Applied Hydraulics in. Engineering. John Wiley & Sons, New York. ÖRSEL SI (2002) Local Losses at a Step in a Sub-critical Open. Channel Flow. M.Sc. Thesis, Department ...

  8. Extraction of antioxidants from Chlorella sp. using subcritical water treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, S. M.; Mustapa Kamal, S. M.; Harun, M. R.; Omar, R.; Siajam, S. I.

    2017-06-01

    Chlorella sp. microalgae is one of the main source of natural bioactive compounds used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Subcritical water extraction is the technique that offers an efficient, non-toxic, and environmental-friendly method to obtain natural ingredients. In this work, the extracts of Chlorella sp. microalgae was evaluated in terms of: chemical composition, extraction (polysaccharides) yield and antioxidant activity, using subcritical water extraction. Extractions were performed at temperatures ranging from 100°C to 300°C. The results show that by using subcritical water, the highest yield of polysaccharides is 23.6 that obtained at 150°C. Analysis on the polysaccharides yield show that the contents were highly influenced by the extraction temperature. The individual antioxidant activity were evaluated by in vitro assay using a free radical method. In general, the antioxidant activity of the extracts obtained at different water temperatures was high, with values of 31.08-54.29 . The results indicated that extraction by subcritical water was effective and Chlorella sp. can be a useful source of natural antioxidants.

  9. High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction experiments on Zn at low temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Takemura, K; Fujihisa, H; Kikegawa, T

    2002-01-01

    High-pressure powder x-ray diffraction experiments have been performed on Zn with a He-pressure medium at low temperature. When the sample was compressed in the He medium at low temperature, large nonhydrostaticity developed, yielding erroneous lattice parameters. On the other hand, when the pressure was changed at high temperatures, good hydrostaticity was maintained. No anomaly in the volume dependence of the c/a axial ratio has been found.

  10. The impact of personality traits and professional experience on police officers' shooting performance under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landman, Annemarie; Nieuwenhuys, Arne; Oudejans, Raôul R D

    2016-07-01

    We explored the impact of professional experience and personality on police officers' shooting performance under pressure. We recruited: (1) regular officers, (2) officers wanting to join a specialised arrest unit (AU) (expected to possess more stress-resistant traits; pre-AU) and (3) officers from this unit (expected to also possess more professional experience; AU) (all male). In Phase 1, we determined personality traits and experience. In Phase 2, state anxiety, shot accuracy, decision-making (shoot/don't shoot), movement speed and gaze behaviour were measured while officers performed a shooting test under low and high pressure. Results indicate minimal differences in personality among groups and superior performance of AU officers. Regression analyses showed that state anxiety and shooting performance under high pressure were first predicted by AU experience and second by certain personality traits. Results suggest that although personality traits attenuate the impact of high pressure, it is relevant experience that secures effective performance under pressure. Practitioner Summary: To obtain information for police selection and training purposes, we let officers who differed in personality and experience execute a shooting test under low and high pressure. Outcomes indicate that experience affected anxiety and performance most strongly, while personality traits of thrill- and adventure-seeking and self-control also had an effect.

  11. Hydrogen oxidation at high pressure and intermediate temperatures: experiments and kinetic modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Gersen, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation at 50 bar and temperatures of 700–900 K was investigated in a high pressure laminar flow reactor under highly diluted conditions. The experiments provided information about H 2 oxidation at pressures above the third explosion limit. The fuel–air equivalence ratio of the reactants...

  12. Benzo(a)pyrene accumulation in soils of technogenic emission zone by subcritical water extraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sushkova, Svetlana; Minkina, Tatiana; Kizilkaya, Ridvan; Mandzhieva, Saglara; Batukaev, Abdulmalik; Bauer, Tatiana; Gulser, Coskun

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of research is the assessment of main marker of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contamination, benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) content in soils of emission zone of the power complex plant in soils with use of ecologically clean and effective subcritical water extraction method. Studies were conducted on the soils of monitoring plots subjected to Novocherkassk Power Plant emissions from burning coal. In 2000, monitoring plots were established at different distances from the NPS (1.0-20.0 km). Soil samples for the determination of soil properties and the contents of BaP were taken from a depth of 0-20 cm. The soil cover in the region under study consisted of ordinary chernozems, meadow-chernozemic soils, and alluvial meadow soils. This soil revealed the following physical and chemical properties: Corg-3.1-5.0%, pH-7.3-7.6, ECE-31.2-47.6 mmol(+)/100g; CaCO3-0.2-1.0%, the content of physical clay - 51-67% and clay - 3-37%. BaP extraction from soils was carried out by a subcritical water extraction method. Subcritical water extraction of BaP from soil samples was conducted in a specially developed extraction cartridge made of stainless steel and equipped with screw-on caps at both ends. It was also equipped with a manometer that included a valve for pressure release to maintain an internal pressure of 100 atm. The extraction cartridge containing a sample and water was placed into an oven connected to a temperature regulator under temperature 250oC and pressure 60 atm. The BaP concentration in the acetonitrile extract was determined by HPLC. The efficiency of BaP extraction from soil was determined using a matrix spike. The main accumulation of pollutant in 20 cm layer of soils is noted directly in affected zone on the plots situated at 1.2, 1.6, 5.0, 8.0 km from emission source in the direction of prevailing winds. The maximum quantity of a pollutant was founded in the soil of the plot located mostly close to a source of pollution in the direction of prevailing winds

  13. First reactivity determination of a subcritical reactor using a single beam-trip and fission chambers operating in current mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Ordonez, M.; Villamarin, D.; Becares, V.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.M. [Nuclear Innovation Group, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, Madrid (Spain); Bergloef, C. [Reactor Physics Department, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Kiyavitskaya, H. [Joint Institute for Power and Nuclear Research, National Academy of Sciences, Minsk (Belarus)

    2009-06-15

    Transmutation of spent nuclear fuel in Accelerator-Driven Systems (ADS) is considered as a key technology for achieving sustainable nuclear energy. In the design of future ADS facilities, the reactivity monitoring system is of highest importance. An extensive experimental program devoted to reactivity monitoring of ADS has been carried out at the subcritical facility YALINA-Booster in the framework of IP-EUROTRANS. The main objective, besides the qualification of the reactivity monitoring techniques, has been to develop electronic chains that can be used in a full power ADS. For this purpose, YALINA-Booster couples a D-T neutron generator to a flexible zero-power subcritical assembly with a coupled fast-thermal neutron spectrum. The high intensity of the accelerator and the possibility to work in continuous or pulsed mode allowed the study of the current-to-flux relationship and beam-trip experiments. In addition, the experimental facility provided the opportunity to test electronic chains in current mode, which correspond to the most probable condition in a full power ADS. There exists a relationship between the reactivity of a subcritical core, the intensity of the accelerator and the neutron source intensity. Hence, by monitoring these three quantities it should be possible to determine the origin of any reactivity or power change within the subcritical assembly. We have developed the necessary acquisition system to monitor the conditions of these three variables in the millisecond scale. The current-to-flux technique provides relative changes in the behavior of the core, however, in order to determine absolute values of the reactivity, we have taken profit of short imposed beam interruptions in the millisecond scale, thus providing the possibility for applying the Source-Jerk method within few milliseconds. It is the first time that the reactivity of an ADS is determined in a single beam-trip using fission chambers operating in current mode. The experiments

  14. Optimization of Subcritical Water Extraction of Resveratrol from Grape Seeds by Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajie Tian

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The subcritical water extraction (SWE is a high-efficiency and environment-friendly extraction method. The extraction of resveratrol (RES of grape seeds obtained from the wine production process was proposed using subcritical water extraction (SWE. The effects of different extraction process parameters on RES yield were investigated by single factors. Extraction optimization was conducted using response surface methodology (RSM. Extraction temperature was proven to be the most significant factor influencing RES yield. The optimal conditions was as follows: extraction pressure of 1.02 MPa, temperature of 152.32 °C, time of 24.89 min, and a solid/solvent ratio of 1:15 g/mL. Under these optimal conditions, the predicted extraction RES yield was 6.90 μg/g and the recoveries was up to 91.98%. Compared to other previous studies, this method required less pollution and less treatment time to extract RES from grape seeds. From these results, added economic value to this agroindustrial residue is proposed using environmentally friendly extraction techniques.

  15. Archives: Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 10 of 10 ... Archives: Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice. Journal Home > Archives: Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Consequence Analyses Following Potential Savannah River Site Hydrological Releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, A.

    1999-07-28

    Postulated accidental release of radiological material to surface water bodies on the Savannah River Site and the resulting downstream contamination of the Savannah River pose a potential threat to downstream river users.

  17. Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice: About this ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice: About this journal. Journal Home > Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Savannahs of Asia: antiquity, biogeography, and an uncertain future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnam, Jayashree; Tomlinson, Kyle W; Rasquinha, Dina N; Sankaran, Mahesh

    2016-09-19

    The savannahs of Asia remain locally unrecognized as distinctive ecosystems, and continue to be viewed as degraded forests or seasonally dry tropical forests. These colonial-era legacies are problematic, because they fail to recognize the unique diversity of Asian savannahs and the critical roles of fire and herbivory in maintaining ecosystem health and diversity. In this review, we show that: the palaeo-historical evidence suggests that the savannahs of Asia have existed for at least 1 million years, long before widespread landscape modification by humans; savannah regions across Asia have levels of C4 grass endemism and diversity that are consistent with area-based expectations for non-Asian savannahs; there are at least three distinct Asian savannah communities, namely deciduous broadleaf savannahs, deciduous fine-leafed and spiny savannahs and evergreen pine savannahs, with distinct functional ecologies consistent with fire- and herbivory-driven community assembly. Via an analysis of savannah climate domains on other continents, we map the potential extent of savannahs across Asia. We find that the climates of African savannahs provide the closest analogues for those of Asian deciduous savannahs, but that Asian pine savannahs occur in climates different to any of the savannahs in the southern continents. Finally, we review major threats to the persistence of savannahs in Asia, including the mismanagement of fire and herbivory, alien woody encroachment, afforestation policies and future climate uncertainty associated with the changing Asian monsoon. Research agendas that target these issues are urgently needed to manage and conserve these ecosystems.This article is part of the themed issue 'Tropical grassy biomes: linking ecology, human use and conservation'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  19. Mechanical Interaction in Pressurized Pipe Systems: Experiments and Numerical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Simão

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic interaction between the unsteady flow occurrence and the resulting vibration of the pipe are analyzed based on experiments and numerical models. Waterhammer, structural dynamic and fluid–structure interaction (FSI are the main subjects dealt with in this study. Firstly, a 1D model is developed based on the method of characteristics (MOC using specific damping coefficients for initial components associated with rheological pipe material behavior, structural and fluid deformation, and type of anchored structural supports. Secondly a 3D coupled complex model based on Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD, using a Finite Element Method (FEM, is also applied to predict and distinguish the FSI events. Herein, a specific hydrodynamic model of viscosity to replicate the operation of a valve was also developed to minimize the number of mesh elements and the complexity of the system. The importance of integrated analysis of fluid–structure interaction, especially in non-rigidity anchored pipe systems, is equally emphasized. The developed models are validated through experimental tests.

  20. The Disappearance of Independence in Textbook Coverage of Asch's Social Pressure Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Asch's classic social pressure experiments are discussed in almost all introductory and social psychology textbooks. However, the results of these experiments have been shown to be misrepresented in textbooks. An analysis of textbooks from 1953 to 1984 revealed that although most of the responses on critical trials were independent correct ones,…

  1. Historical Background of Ultrahigh Pressure Shock Compression Experiments at LLNL: 1973 to 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nellis, W.J.

    2000-10-09

    My purpose is to recount the historical development of ultrahigh pressure shock compression experiments at LLNL, which I experienced in the period 1973 to 2000. I used several experimental techniques: shock-impedance-match experiments using planar shock waves driven by nuclear explosives (NIMs), the Janus Laser, a railgun, and a two-stage light-gas gun.

  2. Radioiodine in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kantelo, M.V.; Bauer, L.R.; Marter, W.L.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Zeigler, C.C.

    1993-01-15

    Radioiodine, which is the collective term for all radioactive isotopes of the element iodine, is formed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) principally as a by-product of nuclear reactor operations. Part of the radioiodine is released to the environment during reactor and reprocessing operations at the site. The purpose of this report is to provide an introduction to radioiodine production and disposition, its status in the environment, and the radiation dose and health risks as a consequence of its release to the environment around the Savannah River Plant. A rigorous dose reconstruction study is to be completed by thee Center for Disease Control during the 1990s.

  3. Hydrostatic pressure cells development for X-ray and neutrons experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Passamai Junior, Jose Luis; Pinheiro, Christiano J.G.; Orlando, Marcos Tadeu D.; Passos, Carlos A.C. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (UFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Correa, Hamilton P.S. [Universidade Federal do Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Rossi, Jesualdo L.; Mazzocchi, Vera L.; Parente, Carlos B.R.; Mestnik Filho, Jose; Martinez, Luis G., E-mail: jelrossi@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Melo, Francisco C.L. de, E-mail: frapi@iae.cta.br [Centro Tecnologico da Aeronautica (CTA), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial

    2011-07-01

    A set of hydrostatic pressure cells was specially developed in order to be applied in X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption and neutron diffraction experiments. For the experiments where X-rays are used, the pressure cells are built in a CuBe alloy body with two B{sub 4}C anvils in order to allow the low absorption of the radiation. The B{sub 4}C anvils were specially prepared in CTA - Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial - Sao Jose dos Campos - Brazil, in order to present enhanced X-ray transparency and high hardness. One of the advantage of the CuBe-body cell with B{sub 4}C anvil is that it can be also used under magnetic fields, for instance for measurements of AC magnetic susceptibility under high hydrostatic pressures. The X-ray cells work in transmission mode and present a 2 mm diameter hole for the beam path. The X-ray beam pass through the hole and outgoing to the detector positioned in front of the pressure cell. A second type of pressure cell was developed in order to be used in neutron elastic scattering experiments, especially in neutron diffraction experiments. The neutron cell pressure cell was constructed in Zirconium alloy reinforced with carbon fibers composite in order to improve the mechanical resistance of his cylindrical geometry. The B{sub 4}C pressure cells are available to users of the techniques of X-ray diffraction and absorption in the Brazilian National Synchrotron Laboratory - LNLS, at Campinas City. The neutron pressure cell is available to users at the neutron powder diffraction facility installed at the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute - IPEN, Sao Paulo. In this work will be shown details and drawings of the two types of hydrostatic pressure cells. (author)

  4. Simulation and experiment research on the proportional pressure control of water-assisted injection molding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hua; Chen, Yinglong; Zhang, Zengmeng; Yang, Huayong

    2012-05-01

    Water-assisted injection molding (WAIM), a newly developed fluid-assisted injection molding technology has drawn more and more attentions for the energy saving, short cooling circle time and high quality of products. Existing research for the process of WAIM has shown that the pressure control of the injecting water is mostly important for the WAIM. However, the proportional pressure control for the WAIM system is quite complex due to the existence of nonlinearities in the water hydraulic system. In order to achieve better pressure control performance of the injecting water to meet the requirements of the WAIM, the proportional pressure control of the WAIM system is investigated both numerically and experimentally. A newly designed water hydraulic system for WAIM is first modeled in AMEsim environment, the load characteristics and the nonlinearities of water hydraulic system are both considered, then the main factors affecting the injecting pressure and load flow rate are extensively studied. Meanwhile, an open-loop model-based compensation control strategy is employed to regulate the water injection pressure and a feedback proportional integrator controller is further adopted to achieve better control performance. In order to verify the AMEsim simulation results WAIM experiment for particular Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) parts is implemented and the measured experimental data including injecting pressure and flow rate results are compared with the simulation. The good coincidence between experiment and simulation shows that the AMEsim model is accurate, and the tracking performance of the load pressure indicates that the proposed control strategy is effective for the proportional pressure control of the nonlinear WAIM system. The proposed proportional pressure control strategy and the conclusions drawn from simulation and experiment contribute to the application of water hydraulic proportional control and WAIM technology.

  5. Comparing Fast Pressure Jump and Temperature Jump Protein Folding Experiments and Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Anna Jean; Liu, Yanxin; Prigozhin, Maxim B; Schulten, Klaus; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-06-10

    The unimolecular folding reaction of small proteins is now amenable to a very direct mechanistic comparison between experiment and simulation. We present such a comparison of microsecond pressure and temperature jump refolding kinetics of the engineered WW domain FiP35, a model system for β-sheet folding. Both perturbations produce experimentally a faster and a slower kinetic phase, and the "slow" microsecond phase is activated. The fast phase shows differences between perturbation methods and is closer to the downhill limit by temperature jump, but closer to the transiently populated intermediate limit by pressure jump. These observations make more demands on simulations of the folding process than just a rough comparison of time scales. To complement experiments, we carried out several pressure jump and temperature jump all-atom molecular dynamics trajectories in explicit solvent, where FiP35 folded in five of the six simulations. We analyzed our pressure jump simulations by kinetic modeling and found that the pressure jump experiments and MD simulations are most consistent with a 4-state kinetic mechanism. Together, our experimental and computational data highlight FiP35's position at the boundary where activated intermediates and downhill folding meet, and we show that this model protein is an excellent candidate for further pressure jump molecular dynamics studies to compare experiment and modeling at the folding mechanism level.

  6. The imprint of the Hawking effect in subcritical flows

    CERN Document Server

    Coutant, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    We study the propagation of low frequency shallow water waves on a one dimensional flow of varying depth. When taking into account dispersive effects, the linear propagation of long wavelength modes on uneven bottoms excites new solutions of the dispersion relation which possess a much shorter wavelength. The peculiarity is that one of these new solutions has a negative energy. When the flow becomes supercritical, this mode has been shown to be responsible for the (classical) analog of the Hawking effect. For subcritical flows, the production of this mode has been observed numerically and experimentally, but the precise physics governing the scattering remained unclear. In this work, we provide an analytic treatment of this effect in subcritical flows. We analyze the scattering of low frequency waves using a new perturbative series, derived from a generalization of the Bremmer series. We show that the production of short wavelength modes is governed by a complex value of the position: a complex turning point....

  7. Evaluation of sub-critical water as an extraction fluid for model contaminants from recycled PET for reuse as food packaging material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Amélia S F; Agnelli, José A M; Manrich, Sati

    2010-04-01

    Recycling of plastics for food-contact packaging is an important issue and research into meaningful and cost-effective solutions is in progress. In this paper, the use of sub-critical water was evaluated as an alternative way of purifying poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) flakes for direct food contact applications. The effects of temperature, pressure and flow rate were assessed on the extraction efficiency of two of the most challenging classes of contaminants (toluene and benzophenone) from PET by sub-critical water using a first-order fractional experimental design. Extraction yield was quantified using GC/FID. The most important parameter was flow rate, indicating that the decrease in sub-critical water polarity with temperature was insufficient to eliminate partition effects. Temperature was also important, but only for the optimization of toluene extraction. These results may be explained by the poor solubility of higher molar mass compounds in sub-critical water compared to lower molar mass compounds under the same conditions, and the small decrease in dielectric constant with temperature under the experimental conditions evaluated. As cleaning efficiency is low and PET is very susceptible to hydrolysis, which limits the use of higher temperatures vis-à-vis physical recycling, the proposed extraction is unsuitable for a standalone super-clean process but may be a step in the process.

  8. Cardiovascular model for the simulation of exercise, lower body negative pressure, and tilt experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croston, R. C.; Fitzjerrell, D. G.

    1974-01-01

    A mathematical model and digital computer simulation of the human cardiovascular system and its controls have been developed to simulate pulsatile dynamic responses to the cardiovascular experiments of the Skylab missions and to selected physiological stresses of manned space flight. Specific model simulations of the bicycle ergometry, lower body negative pressure, and tilt experiments have been developed and verified for 1-g response by comparison with available experimental data. The zero-g simulations of two Skylab experiments are discussed.

  9. Pressure and temperature dependence of growth and morphology of Escherichia coli: Experiments and Stochastic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Pradeep

    2012-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of Escherichia coli E.coli, a mesophilic bacterium, as a function of pressure $P$ and temperature $T$. E.coli can grow and divide in a wide range of pressure (1-400atm) and temperature ($23-40^{\\circ}$C). For $T>30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time of E.coli increases exponentially with pressure and exhibit a departure from exponential behavior at pressures between 250-400 atm for all the temperatures studied in our experiments. For $T<30^{\\circ}$ C, the division time shows an anomalous dependence on pressure -- first decreases with increasing pressure and then increases upon further increase of pressure. The sharp change in division time is followed by a sharp change in phenotypic transition of E. Coli at high pressures where bacterial cells switch to an elongating cell type. We propose a model that this phenotypic changes in bacteria at high pressures is an irreversible stochastic process whereas the switching probability to elongating cell type increases with increasing press...

  10. A simple proof of exponential decay of subcritical contact processes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Swart, Jan M.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 170, 1-2 (2018), s. 1-9 ISSN 0178-8051 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-15238S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : subcritical contact process * sharpness of the phase transition * eigenmeasure Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.895, year: 2016 http:// library .utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/SI/swart-0462694.pdf

  11. Development and Investigation of Reactivity Measurement Methods in Subcritical Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Johanna

    2005-05-01

    Subcriticality measurements during core loading and in future accelerator driven systems have a clear safety relevance. In this thesis two subcriticality methods are treated: the Feynman-alpha and the source modulation method. The Feynman-alpha method is a technique to determine the reactivity from the relative variance of the detector counts during a measurement period. The period length is varied to get the full time dependence of the variance-to-mean. The corresponding theoretical formula was known only with stationary sources. In this thesis, due to its relevance for novel reactivity measurement methods, the Feynman-alpha formulae for pulsed sources for both the stochastic and the deterministic cases are treated. Formulae neglecting as well as including the delayed neutrons are derived. The formulae neglecting delayed neutrons are experimentally verified with quite good agreement. The second reactivity measurement technique investigated in this thesis is the so-called source modulation technique. The theory of the method was elaborated on the assumption of point kinetics, but in practice the method will be applied by using the signal from a single local neutron detector. Applicability of the method therefore assumes point kinetic behaviour of the core. Hence, first the conditions of the point kinetic behaviour of subcritical cores was investigated. After that the performance of the source modulation technique in the general case as well as and in the limit of exact point kinetic behaviour was examined. We obtained the unexpected result that the method has a finite, non-negligible error even in the limit of point kinetic behaviour, and a substantial error in the operation range of future accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADS). In practice therefore the method needs to be calibrated by some other method for on-line applications.

  12. Kinetic model for the esterification of oleic acid catalyzed by zinc acetate in subcritical methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chengcai; Deng, Tiansheng [State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 165, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Qi, Yongqin; Hou, Xianglin; Qin, Zhangfeng [State Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion, Institute of Coal Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 165, Taiyuan, Shanxi 030001 (China)

    2010-03-15

    The esterification of oleic acid in subcritical methanol catalyzed by zinc acetate was investigated in a batch-type autoclave. The effect of reaction conditions such as temperature, pressure, reaction time and molar ratio of oleic acid to methanol on the esterification was examined. The oleic acid conversion reached 95.0% under 220 C and 6.0 MPa with the molar ratio of methanol to oleic acid being 4 and 1.0 wt% zinc acetate as catalyst. A kinetic model for the esterification was established. By fitting the kinetic model with the experimental results, the reaction order n = 2.2 and activation energy E{sub a} = 32.62 KJ/mol were obtained. (author)

  13. An integrated green process: Subcritical water, enzymatic hydrolysis, and fermentation, for biohydrogen production from coconut husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharja, Maktum; Junianti, Fitri; Ranggina, Dian; Nurtono, Tantular; Widjaja, Arief

    2017-10-09

    The objective of this work is to develop an integrated green process of subcritical water (SCW), enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation of coconut husk (CCH) to biohydrogen. The maximum sugar yield was obtained at mild severity factor. This was confirmed by the degradation of hemicellulose, cellulose and lignin. The tendency of the changing of sugar yield as a result of increasing severity factor was opposite to the tendency of pH change. It was found that CO2 gave a different tendency of severity factor compared to N2 as the pressurizing gas. The result of SEM analysis confirmed the structural changes during SCW pretreatment. This study integrated three steps all of which are green processes which ensured an environmentally friendly process to produce a clean biohydrogen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nonlinear elastic behavior of sub-critically damaged body armor panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jason T.; Chimenti, D. E.

    2012-05-01

    A simple go/no-go test for body armor panels using pressure-sensitive, dye-indicator film (PSF) has been shown to be statistically effective in revealing subcritical damage to body armor panels. Previous measurements have shown that static indicator levels are accurately reproduced in dynamic loading events. Further impact tests on armor worn by a human resuscitation dummy using instrumented masses with an attached accelerometer and embedded force transducer have been performed and analyzed. New impact tests have shown a reliable correlation between PSF indication (as digitized images) and impact force for a wide range of impactor energies and masses. Numerical evaluation of digital PSF images is presented and correlated with impact parameters. Relationships between impactor mass and energy, and corresponding measured force are shown. We will also report on comparisons between ballistic testing performed on panels damaged under various impact conditions and tests performed on undamaged panels.

  15. Application of supercritical and subcritical fluids for the extraction of hazardous materials from soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skorupan Dara

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcritical and supercritical extractions are novel, non destructive techniques which can be applied for the removal of hazardous compounds from contaminated soil without any changes of the soil composition and structure. The aim of the presented review paper is to give information on up-to day results of this method commonly applied by several institutions worldwide. Interest in the application of SC CO2 has been more expressed in the last two decades, which may be related to its favorable characteristics (non-toxic, non-flammable, increase diffusion into small pores, low viscosity under SC conditions, low price and others. However, interest in wet oxidation (WO and especially in SCWO (the application of water under supercritical conditions with air has also increased in the last few years. Interest in H2O as a SC fluid, as well as in extraction with water under subcritical conditions may also be related to specific characteristics and the enhanced rate of extraction. Moreover, the solubility of some specific compounds present in soil can be easily changed by adjusting the pressure and temperature of extraction. The high price of the units designed to operate safely at a pressure and temperature much higher than the a critical one of the applied fluids is the main reason why, at present, there is no more broader application of such techniques for the removal hazardous materials from contaminated soil. In the present paper, among many literature citations and their overall review, some specific details related to the development of specific analytical methods under SC conditions are also considered.

  16. Carolina bays of the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalles, J.F. (Creighton Univ., Omaha, NE (USA)); Sharitz, R.R.; Gibbons, J.W.; Leversee, G.J.; Knox, J.N. (Savannah River Ecology Lab., Aiken, SC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Much of the research to date on the Carolina bays of the Savannah River Plant and elsewhere has focused on certain species or on environmental features. Different levels of detail exist for different groups of organisms and reflect the diverse interests of previous investigators. This report summarizes aspects of research to date and presents data from numerous studies. 70 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice aims to promote and advance the practice and study of all fields of medicine in Nigeria in general as well ... case reports, letters, preliminary communications etc. it aims to serve medical doctors, medical consultants, allied health professionals and medical scientists ...

  18. Savannah River Technology Center. Monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    This document contains information about the research programs being conducted at the Savannah River Plant. Topics of discussion include: thermal cycling absorption process, development of new alloys, ion exchange, oxalate precipitation, calcination, environmental research, remedial action, ecological risk assessments, chemical analysis of salt cakes, natural phenomena hazards assessment, and sampling of soils and groundwater.

  19. Savannah River Laboratory monthly report, February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.; Ice, L.W. [ed.

    1992-02-01

    This report is a progress report for the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of February 1992. The progress and activities in six categories were described in the report. The categories are reactor, tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general. Each category described numerous and varied activities. Some examples of these activities described are such things as radiation monitoring, maintenance, modifications, and remedial action.

  20. Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States))

    1992-03-26

    Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor's heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70[degrees]C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

  1. Role of interfacial bonding in the design and realization of Magnetically Applied Pressure Shear (MAPS) experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jow; Alexander, C. Scott

    2017-06-01

    MAPS (Magnetically Applied Pressure Shear) is a new technique that can be used to explore the material behavior under dynamic compression-shear loadings at strain rates and pressures that are much higher than those that can be achieved by gas-gun driven pressure shear experiments. A significant challenge for MAPS is the transmission of large shear stress through material interfaces. In this study, numerical simulations were used to gain insights on the behavior of the interface between molybdenum, which is the driver, and zirconia, the anvil, in MAPS experiments. Molybdenum was stressed into the plastic regime and zirconia stayed elastic but appeared to have incurred some spall damage at the later stage of the experiments. By including damage for the anvil and interfacial sliding in the simulations, both the longitudinal and transverse velocity data were able to be reasonably simulated. The results indicate that the interfacial slip appears to usually occur at the beginning stage of the shear loading when the pressure is relatively low. After the pressure reaches a certain level, the shear stress could be fully transmitted. Some other possible experiment designs to minimize the role of interface in MAPS are discussed. Sandia National Labs is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corp., for the U.S. Dept. of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Experimental study of subcritical laboratory magnetized collisionless shocks using a laser-driven magnetic piston

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaeffer, D. B., E-mail: dschaeffer@physics.ucla.edu; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California—Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Winske, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Recent experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles have successfully generated subcritical magnetized collisionless shocks, allowing new laboratory studies of shock formation relevant to space shocks. The characteristics of these shocks are compared with new data in which no shock or a pre-shock formed. The results are consistent with theory and 2D hybrid simulations and indicate that the observed shock or shock-like structures can be organized into distinct regimes by coupling strength. With additional experiments on the early time parameters of the laser plasma utilizing Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, and fast-gate filtered imaging, these regimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical shock formation criteria.

  3. Experimental study of subcritical laboratory magnetized collisionless shocks using a laser-driven magnetic piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, D. B.; Everson, E. T.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Clark, S. E.; Constantin, C. G.; Winske, D.; Gekelman, W.; Niemann, C.

    2015-11-01

    Recent experiments at the University of California, Los Angeles have successfully generated subcritical magnetized collisionless shocks, allowing new laboratory studies of shock formation relevant to space shocks. The characteristics of these shocks are compared with new data in which no shock or a pre-shock formed. The results are consistent with theory and 2D hybrid simulations and indicate that the observed shock or shock-like structures can be organized into distinct regimes by coupling strength. With additional experiments on the early time parameters of the laser plasma utilizing Thomson scattering, spectroscopy, and fast-gate filtered imaging, these regimes are found to be in good agreement with theoretical shock formation criteria.

  4. Design of a laboratory platform for atmospheric pressure biomedical plasma experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah; Rutz, Sara; Hicks, Nathaniel; Briggs, Brandon

    2017-10-01

    The design of a laboratory set up for atmospheric pressure plasma (APP) experiments with biomedical applications is described. A comparison between various types of cold APP discharges (DC, RF, microwave) is presented, as well as various configurations of electrodes, dielectric materials, and gas feed conditions. Particular attention is paid to designs comprising floating electrode dielectric barrier discharges (FE-DBD) (for example as described in), but atmospheric pressure plasma jets are considered as well. A plan is discussed for initial experiments on the response of bacterial populations of E. coli and Deinococcus radiodurans to APP treatment as well as to media activated by APP. Supported by 2017 University of Alaska Anchorage Innovate Award.

  5. Experiments on Corium Dispersion after Lower Head Failure at Moderate Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BLANCHAT,THOMAS K.; GARGALLO,M.; JACOBS,G.; MEYER,L.; WILHELM,D.

    1999-09-21

    Concerning the mitigation of high pressure core melt scenarios, the design objective for future PWRS is to transfer high pressure core melt to low pressure core melt sequences, by means of pressure relief valves at the primary circuit, with such a discharge capacity to limit the pressure in the reactor coolant system to less than 20 bar. Studies have shown that in late in-vessel reflooding scenarios there may be a time window where the pressure is indeed in this range, at the moment of the reactor vessel rupture. It has to be verified that large quantities of corium released from the vessel after failure at pressures <20 bar cannot be carried out of the reactor pit, because the melt collecting and cooling concept of future PWRs would be rendered useless. Existing experiments investigated the melt dispersal phenomena in the context of the DCH resolution for existing power plants in the USA, most of them having cavities with large instrument tunnels leading into subcompartments. For such designs, breaches with small cross sections at high vessel failure pressures had been studied. However, some present and future European PWRs have an annular cavity design without a large pathway out of the cavity other than through the narrow annular gap between the RPV and the cavity wall. Therefore, an experimental program was launched, focusing on the annular cavity design and low pressure vessel failure. The first part of the program comprises two experiments which were performed with thermite melt steam and a prototypic atmosphere in the containment in a scale 1:10. The initial pressure in the RPV-model was 11 and 15 bars, and the breach was a hole at the center of the lower head with a scaled diameter of 100 cm and 40 cm, respectively. The main results were: 78% of melt mass were ejected out of the cavity with the large hole and 21% with the small hole; the maximum pressures in the model containment were 6 bar and 4 bar, respectively. In the second part of the experimental

  6. Countermeasure for reducing post-flight orthostatic intolerance: Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) experiment E140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, John B.

    1993-01-01

    Investigators have shown that after 1-2 weeks of bed rest ingestion of 1000 ml of a salt water solution during 4 hours of continuous exposure to 30 mm Hg of lower body negative pressure will protect plasma volume and orthostatic function for up to 24 hours. We hypothesize that a similar countermeasure will reduce the effects of fluid loss induced by headward fluid shift during space flight. The objective of this flight experiment is to evaluate the efficacy of the proposed countermeasure in reversing these effects on the cardiovascular system. Lower Body Negative Pressure (LBNP) involves exposing the legs and lower abdomen to reduced air pressure. The LBNP device is an air-tight chamber that seals the subject's waist to enclose the lower body. As used in this experiment, LBNP provides both the candidate treatment as well as the means of assessing the effectiveness of the treatment.

  7. Commercial integration and partnering at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steele, J.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Babione, R.A.; Shikashio, L.A.; Wacaster, A.J.; Paterson, A.D. [SCIENTECH, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS), particularly the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) with the experience from the first successful Integrated Technology Demonstration, can provide an excellent foundation for meeting DOE-EM`s objectives with the new DOE-EM five focus area approach. With this in mind, SRTC established an activity to pursue full commercialization of environmental technologies. This report is an assessment of the status of commercialization at SRS and provides recommendations for enhancement as well as some tools critical to implementation. A review was made of the current situation at SRS with regards to taking technology development to commercial fruition. This was done from the perspective of comparing it to known commercialization models and processes. It was found that SRTC already works through many of the steps in these processes. With integration and action-oriented efforts of the inclusion of business and market factors, SRTC could become an aggressive, successful developer of commercialized technologies. Commercial success criteria tools were developed with regards to integrating them with SRTC selection criteria to ensure that all critical factors are covered in technology commercialization project evaluations. Private investors are very clear that their interest lies in funding commercial enterprises, not merely technologies. Mobilizing private capital is critical to real job growth and long-term economic development. Also, potential industry partners were identified that are willing to be involved with SRS` technology applications and regional development efforts. As another important component to success, regional support organizations were reviewed and evaluated.

  8. The impact of personality traits and professional experience on police officers' shooting performance under pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landman, A.; Nieuwenhuys, A.; Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2016-01-01

    We explored the impact of professional experience and personality on police officers' shooting performance under pressure. We recruited: (1) regular officers, (2) officers wanting to join a specialised arrest unit (AU) (expected to possess more stress-resistant traits; pre-AU) and (3) officers from

  9. Design of Plant Gas Exchange Experiments in a Variable Pressure Growth Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corey, Kenneth A.

    1996-01-01

    Sustainable human presence in extreme environments such as lunar and martian bases will require bioregenerative components to human life support systems where plants are used for generation of oxygen, food, and water. Reduced atmospheric pressures will be used to minimize mass and engineering requirements. Few studies have assessed the metabolic and developmental responses of plants to reduced pressure and varied oxygen atmospheres. The first tests of hypobaric pressures on plant gas exchange and biomass production at the Johnson Space Center will be initiated in January 1996 in the Variable Pressure Growth Chamber (VPGC), a large, closed plant growth chamber rated for 10.2 psi. Experiments were designed and protocols detailed for two complete growouts each of lettuce and wheat to generate a general database for human life support requirements and to answer questions about plant growth processes in reduced pressure and varied oxygen environments. The central objective of crop growth studies in the VPGC is to determine the influence of reduced pressure and reduced oxygen on the rates of photosynthesis, dark respiration, evapotranspiration and biomass production of lettuce and wheat. Due to the constraint of one experimental unit, internal controls, called pressure transients, will be used to evaluate rates of CO2 uptake, O2 evolution, and H2O generation. Pressure transients will give interpretive power to the results of repeated growouts at both reduced and ambient pressures. Other experiments involve the generation of response functions to partial pressures of O2 and CO2 and to light intensity. Protocol for determining and calculating rates of gas exchange have been detailed. In order to build these databases and implement the necessary treatment combinations in short time periods, specific requirements for gas injections and removals have been defined. A set of system capability checks will include determination of leakage rates conducted prior to the actual crop

  10. Operation and reactivity measurements of an accelerator driven subcritical TRIGA reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, David Sean

    Experiments were performed at the Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory (NETL) in 2005 and 2006 in which a 20 MeV linear electron accelerator operating as a photoneutron source was coupled to the TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General Atomics) Mark II research reactor at the University of Texas at Austin (UT) to simulate the operation and characteristics of a full-scale accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS). The experimental program provided a relatively low-cost substitute for the higher power and complexity of internationally proposed systems utilizing proton accelerators and spallation neutron sources for an advanced ADSS that may be used for the burning of high-level radioactive waste. Various instrumentation methods that permitted ADSS neutron flux monitoring in high gamma radiation fields were successfully explored and the data was used to evaluate the Stochastic Pulsed Feynman method for reactivity monitoring.

  11. Extraction of bioactive compounds from sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) defatted seeds using water and ethanol under sub-critical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoira, Romina; Velez, Alexis; Andreatta, Alfonsina E; Martínez, Marcela; Maestri, Damián

    2017-12-15

    Sesame seeds contain a vast array of lignans and phenolic compounds having important biological properties. An optimized method to obtain these seed components was designed by using water and ethanol at high pressure and temperature conditions. The maximum concentrations of lignans, total phenolics, flavonoids and flavonols compounds were achieved at 220°C extraction temperature and 8MPa pressure, using 63.5% ethanol as co-solvent. Under these conditions, the obtained sesame extracts gave the best radical scavenging capacity. Kinetic studies showed a high extraction rate of phenolic compounds until the first 50min of extraction, and it was in parallel with the highest scavenging capacity. The comparison of our results with those obtained under conventional extraction conditions (normal pressure, ambient temperature) suggests that recovery of sesame bioactive compounds may be markedly enhanced using water/ethanol mixtures at sub-critical conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fracture propagation during fluid injection experiments in shale at elevated confining pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mike; Mecklenburgh, Julian; Rutter, Ernest; Fauchille, Anne-Laure; Taylor, Rochelle; Lee, Peter

    2017-04-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing to recover shale-gas has focused attention upon the fundamental fracture properties of gas-bearing shales. Fracture propagation trajectories in these materials depend on the interaction between the anisotropic mechanical properties of the shale and the anisotropic in-situ stress field. However, there is a general paucity of available experimental data on their anisotropic mechanical, physical and fluid-flow properties, especially at elevated confining pressures. Here we report the results of laboratory-scale fluid injection experiments, for Whitby mudstone and Mancos shale (an interbedded silt and mudstone), as well as Pennant sandstone (a tight sandstone with permeability similar to shales), which is used an isotropic baseline and tight-gas sandstone analogue. Our injection experiments involved the pressurisation of a blind-ending central hole in an initially dry cylindrical sample. Pressurisation was conducted under constant volume-rate control, using silicone oils of various viscosities. The dependence of breakdown pressure on confining pressure was seen to be dependent on the rock strength, with the significantly stronger Pennant sandstone exhibiting much lower confining-pressure dependence of breakdown pressure than the weaker shales. In most experiments, a small drop in the injection pressure record was observed at what is taken to be fracture initiation, and in the Pennant sandstone this was accompanied by a small burst of acoustic energy. Breakdown was found to be rapid and uncontrollable after initiation if injection is continued, but can be limited to a slower (but still uncontrolled) rate by ceasing the injection of fluid after the breakdown initiation in experiments where it could be identified. A simplified 2-dimensional model for explaining these observations is presented in terms of the stress intensities at the tip of a pressurised crack. Additionally, we present a suite of supporting mechanical, flow and elastic

  13. Inelastic X-ray scattering experiments at extreme conditions: high temperatures and high pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Hosokawa

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we review the present status of experimental techniques under extreme conditions of high temperature and high pressure used for inelastic X-ray scattering (IXS experiments of liquid metals, semiconductors, molten salts, molecular liquids, and supercritical water and methanol. For high temperature experiments, some types of single-crystal sapphire cells were designed depending on the temperature of interest and the sample thickness for the X-ray transmission. Single-crystal diamond X-ray windows attached to the externally heated high-pressure vessel were used for the IXS experiment of supercritical water and methanol. Some typical experimental results are also given, and the perspective of IXS technique under extreme conditions is discussed.

  14. Shock pressure induced by glass-confined laser shock peening: Experiments, modeling and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Xianqian; Song Hongwei; Wei Yanpeng; Wang Xi; Huang Chenguang [Key Laboratory for Hydrodynamics and Ocean Engineering, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Duan Zhuping [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-09-01

    The shock pressure generated by the glass confined regime in laser shock peening and its attenuation in the target material are investigated. First, the particle velocity of the target back free surface induced by laser generated shock pressure of this regime is measured using a photonic Doppler velocimetry system. The temporal profile of the particle velocity at the back free surface, where the elastic precursor is captured, manifests a powerful diagnostic capability of this newly developed photonic Doppler velocimetry system for tracking the velocity on short time scales in shock-wave experiments. Second, a coupling pressure analytical model, in which the material constitutive models of confined layers and target material are considered, is proposed to predict the plasma pressure profile at the surface of target. Furthermore, using the predicted shock pressure profile as the input condition, the dynamic response of the target under the shock pressure is simulated by LS-DYNA. The simulated back free surface velocity profile agrees well with that measured by the photonic Doppler velocimetry system. Finally, the attenuation behavior of stress waves and particle velocities in the depth of the target is analyzed, and it indicates an exponential decay. The corresponding empirical formulas for the attenuation behavior are given based on the numerical results.

  15. Intracochlear Pressure Changes due to 2 Electrode Types: An Artificial Model Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittmann, Philipp; Mittmann, Marlene; Ernst, Arneborg; Todt, Ingo

    2017-04-01

    Objective To preserve residual hearing in cochlear implant surgery, the electrode design has been refined, and an atraumatic insertion has become one aspect of cochlear implant research. Previous studies have described the effect of insertion speed and opening of the round window membrane on intracochlear pressure changes. The aim of our current study was to observe intracochlear pressure changes due to different cochlear implant electrodes in an artificial cochlear model with stable surrounding factors. Study Design Prospective controlled study. Setting Tertiary referral center. Subjects and Methods The experiments were performed in an artificial cochlear model with a pressure sensor in the apical area. With straight and perimodiolar electrode arrays, 5 insertions with the same insertion speed and 5 insertions over the same time were performed. Results With the perimodiolar high-volume electrode, significantly greater intracochlear fluid pressure changes were observed than with the straight electrode. Compared with the straight electrode, the perimodiolar electrode induces significantly higher pressure peaks (1.12 ± 0.15 vs 0.86 ± 0.05 mm Hg, P = .006) and significantly higher amplitudes (0.38 ± 0.07 vs 0.09 ± 0.07 mm Hg, P pressure changes during cochlear implantation.

  16. Energy conversion of biomass with supercritical and subcritical water using large-scale plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okajima, Idzumi; Sako, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Exploiting unused or waste biomass as an alternative fuel is currently receiving much attention because of the potential reductions in CO2 emissions and the lower cost in comparison to expensive fossil fuels. If we are to use biomass domestically or industrially, we must be able to convert biomass to high-quality and easy-to-use liquid, gas, or solid fuels that have high-calorific values, low moisture and ash contents, uniform composition, and suitable for stored over long periods. In biomass treatment, hot and high-pressure water including supercritical and subcritical water is an excellent solvent, as it is clean and safe and its action on biomass can be optimized by varying the temperature and pressure. In this article, the conversion of waste biomass to fuel using hot and high-pressure water is reviewed, and the following examples are presented: the production of large amounts of hydrogen from waste biomass, the production of cheap bioethanol from non-food raw materials, and the production of composite powder fuel from refractory waste biomass in the rubble from the Great East Japan Earthquake. Several promising techniques for the conversion of biomass have been demonstrated in large-scale plants and commercial deployment is expected in the near future. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. in northern Guinea Savannah of Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In field trials conducted at Samaru (11 11 07 36'E) in 2003 and 2004 wet seasons in Northern Guinea Savannah of Nigeria, Variety B301 and derivatives of its crosses with IT84S 2246-4 (IT90K-59 and IT90K-76 did not support Alectra emergence. Varieties IT89KD-245-1 and IT89KD 245, both of which are derivatives of ...

  18. Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

    1992-03-01

    Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of {sup 137}Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of {sup 137}Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope {sup 137}Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

  19. Cesium in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Bauer, L.R.; Evans, A.G.; Geary, L.A.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Pinder, J.E.; Strom, R.N.

    1992-03-01

    Cesium in the Savannah River Site Environment is published as a part of the Radiological Assessment Program (RAP). It is the fourth in a series of eight documents on individual radioisotopes released to the environment as a result of Savannah River Site (SRS) operations. The earlier documents describe the environmental consequences of tritium, iodine, and uranium. Documents on plutonium, strontium, carbon, and technetium will be published in the future. These are dynamic documents and current plans call for revising and updating each one on a two-year schedule.Radiocesium exists in the environment as a result of above-ground nuclear weapons tests, the Chernobyl accident, the destruction of satellite Cosmos 954, small releases from reactors and reprocessing plants, and the operation of industrial, medical, and educational facilities. Radiocesium has been produced at SRS during the operation of five production reactors. Several hundred curies of [sup 137]Cs was released into streams in the late 50s and 60s from leaking fuel elements. Smaller quantities were released from the fuel reprocessing operations. About 1400 Ci of [sup 137]Cs was released to seepage basins where it was tightly bound by clay in the soil. A much smaller quantity, about four Ci. was released to the atmosphere. Radiocesium concentration and mechanisms for atmospheric, surface water, and groundwater have been extensively studied by Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) and ecological mechanisms have been studied by Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL). The overall radiological impact of SRS releases on the offsite maximum individual can be characterized by total doses of 033 mrem (atmospheric) and 60 mrem (liquid), compared with a dose of 12,960 mrem from non-SRS sources during the same period of time. Isotope [sup 137]Cs releases have resulted in a negligible risk to the environment and the population it supports.

  20. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    This is a monthly report published by Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Topics discussed in this progress report are: Terrazzo reservoir, Replacement Tritium Facility Final Safety Analysis Report, tritium processing and disposal, separation processes, environmental effects and future impacts, laboratory performance evaluation, groundwater characterization, mixed waste management facility, Raman Spectroscopy, waste processing, Defense Waste Processing Facility, mercury recycling, off-gas components testing, incineration facility blowdown solidification, and weld residual stress minimization study.

  1. Waste management units - Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-10-01

    This report is a compilation of worksheets from the waste management units of Savannah River Plant. Information is presented on the following: Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with a known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received hazardous waste or hazardous constituents with no known release to the environment; Solid Waste Management Units having received no hazardous waste or hazardous constituents; Waste Management Units having received source; and special nuclear, or byproduct material only.

  2. Tritium protection at the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinig, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant produces tritium for the nation's defense. In addition to the planned production, unwanted tritium results from neutron irradiation of the heavy water moderator in the plant's reactors. During the past 30 years, continual improvements have been made in methods to protect the large workforce at the reactors and at the tritium facility from the potential hazards of tritium. This paper describes the current protection program.

  3. Watershed modeling at the Savannah River Site.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vache, Kellie [Oregon State University

    2015-04-29

    The overall goal of the work was the development of a watershed scale model of hydrological function for application to the US Department of Energy’s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). The primary outcomes is a grid based hydrological modeling system that captures near surface runoff as well as groundwater recharge and contributions of groundwater to streams. The model includes a physically-based algorithm to capture both evaporation and transpiration from forestland.

  4. Radioactive isotope production for medical applications using Kharkov electron driven subcritical assembly facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-05-15

    Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine has a plan to construct an accelerator driven subcritical assembly. The main functions of the subcritical assembly are the medical isotope production, neutron thereby, and the support of the Ukraine nuclear industry. Reactor physics experiments and material research will be carried out using the capabilities of this facility. The United States of America and Ukraine have started collaboration activity for developing a conceptual design for this facility with low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. Different conceptual designs are being developed based on the facility mission and the engineering requirements including nuclear physics, neutronics, heat transfer, thermal hydraulics, structure, and material issues. Different fuel designs with LEU and reflector materials are considered in the design process. Safety, reliability, and environmental considerations are included in the facility conceptual design. The facility is configured to accommodate future design improvements and upgrades. This report is a part of the Argonne National Laboratory Activity within this collaboration for developing and characterizing the subcritical assembly conceptual design. In this study, the medical isotope production function of the Kharkov facility is defined. First, a review was carried out to identify the medical isotopes and its medical use. Then a preliminary assessment was performed without including the self-shielding effect of the irradiated samples. Finally, more detailed investigation was carried out including the self-shielding effect, which defined the sample size and irradiation location for producing each medical isotope. In the first part, the reaction rates were calculated as the multiplication of the cross section with the unperturbed neutron flux of the facility. Over fifty isotopes were considered and all transmutation channels are used including (n,{gamma}), (n,2n), (n,p), and ({gamma},n). In the second part

  5. The safe, economical operation of a slightly subcritical reactor and transmutor with a small proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi

    1994-04-01

    This report describes methods in which an accelerator can be used to increase the safety and neutron economy of a power reactor and transmutor of long-lived radioactive wastes, such as minor actinides and fission products, by providing neutrons for its subcritical operation. Instead of the rather large subcriticality of k=0.9--0.95 which we originally proposed for such a transmutor, we propose to use a slightly subcritical reactor, such as k=0.99, which will avoid many of the technical difficulties that are associated with large subcriticality, such as localized power peaking, radiation damage due to the injection of medium-energy protons, the high current accelerator, and the requirement for a long beam-expansion section. We analyzed the power drop that occurred in Phoenix reactor, and show that the operating this reactor in subcritical condition improves its safety.

  6. Saltstone Osmotic Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, Ralph L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, Kenneth L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRN

    2013-09-23

    Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004.

  7. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of CELSS model wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Wydeven, T.; Koo, C.

    1989-01-01

    A mixture of ammonium hydroxide with acetic acid and a slurry of human feces, urine, and wipes were used as CELSS model wastes to be wet-oxidized at temperatures from 250 to 500 C, i.e. below and above the critical point of water (374 C and 218 kg/sq cm or 21.4 MPa). The effects of oxidation temperature ( 250-500 C) and residence time (0-120 mn) on carbon and nitrogen and on metal corrosion from the reactor material were studied. Almost all of the organic matter in the model wastes was oxidized in the temperature range from 400 to 500 C, above the critical conditions for water. In contrast, only a small portion of the organic matter was oxidized at subcritical conditions. A substantial amount of nitrogen remained in solution in the form of ammonia at temperatures ranging from 350 to 450 C suggesting that, around 400 C, organic carbon is completely oxidized and most of the nitrogen is retained in solution. The Hastelloy C-276 alloy reactor corroded during subcritical and supercritical water oxidation.

  8. Electron kinetics dependence on gas pressure in laser-induced oxygen plasma experiment: Theoretical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamal, Yosr E. E.-D.; Abdellatif, Galila

    2017-08-01

    A study is performed to investigate the dependency of threshold intensity on gas pressure observed in the measurements of the breakdown of molecular oxygen that carried out by Phuoc (2000) [1]. In this experiment, the breakdown was induced by 532 nm laser radiation of pulse width 5.5 ns and spot size of 8.5 μm, in oxygen over a wide pressure range (190-3000 Torr). The analysis aimed to explore the electron kinetic reliance on gas pressure for the separate contribution of each of the gain and loss processes encountered in this study. The investigation is based on an electron cascade model applied previously in Gamal and Omar (2001) [2] and Gaabour et al. (2013) [3]. This model solves numerically a differential equation designates the time evolution of the electron energy distribution, and a set of rate equations that describe the change of excited states population. The numerical examination of the electron energy distribution function and its parameters revealed that photo-ionization of the excited molecules plays a significant role in enhancing the electron density growth rate over the whole tested gas pressure range. This process is off set by diffusion of electrons out of the focal volume in the low-pressure regime. At atmospheric pressure electron, collisional processes dominate and act mainly to populate the excited states. Hence photo-ionization becomes efficient and compete with the encountered loss processes (electron diffusion, vibrational excitation of the ground state molecules as well as two body attachments). At high pressures ( 3000 Torr) three body attachments are found to be the primary cause of losses which deplete the electron density and hence results in the slow decrease of the threshold intensity.

  9. Preliminary experience with airway pressure release ventilation in a trauma/surgical intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, Benjamin W; Maxwell, Robert A; Richart, Charles M; Brooks, Donald K; Ciraulo, David L; Barker, Donald E; Burns, R Phillip

    2005-07-01

    Airway pressure-release ventilation (APRV) is a pressure-limited, time-cycled mode of mechanical ventilation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our initial experience with the use of APRV in acutely injured, ventilated patients. Since March 2003, APRV has been used selectively in adult trauma patients with or at risk for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. Data were obtained before and during the 72 hours after switching to APRV. A retrospective analysis of these data was then performed. Complete data were available on 46 of 60 patients (77%) for the first 72 hours of APRV. Before APRV, the average Pao2/Fio2 ratio was 243 and the average peak airway pressure was 28 cm H2O. Peak airway pressure decreased 19% (p = 0.001), Pao2/Fio2 improved by 23% (p = 0.017) and release tidal volumes improved by 13% (p = 0.020) over the course of the analysis. APRV significantly improved oxygenation by alveolar recruitment and allowed for a reduction in peak airway pressures. This relatively new modality had favorable results and appears to be an effective alternative for lung recruitment in traumatically injured patients at risk for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome.

  10. Global bifurcations to subcritical magnetorotational dynamo action in Keplerian shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riols, A.; Rincon, F.; Cossu, C.; Lesur, G.; Longaretti, P.-Y.; Ogilvie, G. I.; Herault, J.

    2013-09-01

    Magnetorotational dynamo action in Keplerian shear flow is a three-dimensional, nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic process whose study is relevant to the understanding of accretion and magnetic field generation in astrophysics. Transition to this form of dynamo is subcritical and shares many characteristics of transition to turbulence in non-rotating hydrodynamic shear flows. This suggests that these different fluid systems become active through similar generic bifurcation mechanisms, which in both cases have eluded detailed understanding so far. In this paper, we investigate numerically the bifurcation mechanisms at work in the incompressible Keplerian magnetorotational dynamo problem in the shearing box framework. Using numerical techniques imported from dynamical systems research, we show that the onset of chaotic dynamo action at magnetic Prandtl numbers larger than unity is primarily associated with global homoclinic and heteroclinic bifurcations of nonlinear magnetorotational dynamo cycles. These global bifurcations are supplemented by local bifurcations of cycles marking the beginning of period-doubling cascades. This suggests that nonlinear magnetorotational dynamo cycles provide the pathway to turbulent injection of both kinetic and magnetic energy in incompressible magnetohydrodynamic Keplerian shear flow in the absence of an externally imposed magnetic field. Studying the nonlinear physics and bifurcations of these cycles in different regimes and configurations may subsequently help to better understand the conditions of excitation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and instability-driven dynamos in various astrophysical systems and laboratory experiments. The detailed characterization of global bifurcations provided for this three-dimensional subcritical fluid dynamics problem may also prove useful for the problem of transition to turbulence in hydrodynamic shear flows.

  11. Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-10-22

    One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

  12. TNT and RDX degradation and extraction from contaminated soil using subcritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Shin, Moon-Su; Jo, Young-Tae; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2015-01-01

    The use of explosives either for industrial or military operations have resulted in the environmental pollution, poses ecological and health hazard. In this work, a subcritical water extraction (SCWE) process at laboratory scale was used at varying water temperature (100-175 °C) and flow rate (0.5-1.5 mL min(-1)), to treat 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) contaminated soil, to reveal information with respect to the explosives removal (based on the analyses of soil residue after extraction), and degradation performance (based on the analyses of water extracts) of this process. Continuous flow subcritical water has been considered on removal of explosives to avoid the repartitioning of non-degraded compounds to the soil upon cooling which usually occurs in the batch system. In the SCWE experiments, near complete degradation of both TNT and RDX was observed at 175 °C based on analysis of water extracts and soil. Test results also indicated that TNT removal of >99% and a complete RDX removal were achieved by this process, when the operating conditions were 1 mL min(-1), and treatment time of 20 min, after the temperature reached 175 °C. HPLC-UV and ion chromatography analysis confirmed that the explosives underwent for degradation. The low concentration of explosives found in the process wastewater indicates that water recycling may be viable, to treat additional soil. Our results have shown in the remediation of explosives contaminated soil, the effectiveness of the continuous flow SCWE process. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Highly Selective and Considerable Subcritical Butane Extraction to Separate Abamectin in Green Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yating; Gu, Lingbiao; Wang, Fei; Kong, Lingjun; Pang, Huili; Qin, Guangyong

    2017-06-01

    We specially carried out the subcritical butane extraction to separate abamectin from tea leaves. Four parameters, such as extraction temperature, extraction time, number of extraction cycles, and solid-liquid ratio were studied and optimized through the response surface methodology with design matrix developed by Box-Behnken. Seventeen experiments with three various factors and three variable levels were employed to investigate the effect of these parameters on the extraction of abamectin. Besides, catechins, theanine, caffeine, and aroma components were determined by both high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to evaluate the tea quality before and after the extraction. The results showed that the extraction temperature was the uppermost parameter compared with others. The optimal extraction conditions selected as follows: extraction temperature, 42°C; number of extraction cycles and extraction time, 1 and 30 min, respectively; and solid-liquid ratio, 1:10. Based on the above study, the separation efficiency of abamectin was up to 93.95%. It is notable that there has a quite low loss rate, including the negligible damage of aroma components, the bits reduce of catechins within the range of 0.7%-13.1%, and a handful lessen of caffeine and theanine of 1.81% and 2.6%, respectively. The proposed method suggested subcritical butane possesses solubility for lipid-soluble pesticides, and since most of the pesticides are attached to the surfaces of tea, thus the as-applied method was successfully effective to separate abamectin because of the so practical and promising method.

  14. Laboratory experiments on rainfall-induced flowslide from pore pressure and moisture content measurements

    OpenAIRE

    M. R. Hakro; I. S. H. Harahap

    2015-01-01

    During or immediately after rainfall many slope failures have been observed. The slope failure occurred due to rainfall infiltration that rapidly increase the pore pressure and trigger the slope failure. Numerous studies have been conducted to investigate the rainfall-induced slope failure, but the mechanism of slope failure is still not well clarified. To investigate mechanism of rainfall-induced slope failure laboratory experiments have been conducted in f...

  15. Laser driven shock wave experiments for equation of state studies at megabar pressures

    CERN Document Server

    Pant, H C; Senecha, V K; Bandyopadhyay, S; Rai, V N; Khare, P; Bhat, R K; Gupta, N K; Godwal, B K

    2002-01-01

    We present the results from laser driven shock wave experiments for equation of state (EOS) studies of gold metal. An Nd:YAG laser chain (2 J, 1.06 mu m wavelength, 200 ps pulse FWHM) is used to generate shocks in planar Al foils and Al + Au layered targets. The EOS of gold in the pressure range of 9-13 Mbar is obtained using the impedance matching technique. The numerical simulations performed using the one-dimensional radiation hydrodynamic code support the experimental results. The present experimental data show remarkable agreement with the existing standard EOS models and with other experimental data obtained independently using laser driven shock wave experiments.

  16. Biological surveys on the Savannah River in the vicinity of the Savannah River Plant (1951-1976)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, R. A.

    1982-04-01

    In 1951, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was contracted by the Savannah River Plant to initiate a long-term monitoring program in the Savannah River. The purpose of this program was to determine the effect of the Savannah River Plant on the Savannah River aquatic ecosystem. The data from this monitoring program have been computerized by the Savannah River Laboratory, and are summarized in this report. During the period from 1951-1976, 16 major surveys were conducted by the Academy in the Savannah River. Water chemistry analyses were made, and all major biological communities were sampled qualitatively during the spring and fall of each survey year. In addition, quantitative diatom data have been collected quarterly since 1953. Major changes in the Savannah River basin, in the Savannah River Plant's activities, and in the Academy sampling patterns are discussed to provide a historical overview of the biomonitoring program. Appendices include a complete taxonomic listing of species collected from the Savannah River, and summaries of the entire biological and physicochemical data base.

  17. The Effect of Pressure and Acoustic Excitation on Coaxial LN2/GN2 Jets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, D

    2003-01-01

    ... conventionally associated with subcritical spray combustion no longer necessarily apply. Until recently, relatively little has been understood about the injection and combustion behavior of propellants at supercritical chamber pressures...

  18. Destructive Testing of an ES-3100 Shipping Container at the Savannah River National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loftin, B. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Abramczyk, G. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-06-09

    Destructive testing of an ES-3100 Shipping Container was completed by the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems organization within the Savannah River National Laboratory in order to qualify the ES-3100 as a candidate storage and transport package for applications at various facilities at the Savannah River Site. The testing consisted of the detonation of three explosive charges at separate locations on a single ES-3100. The locations for the placement were chosen based the design of the ES-3100 as well as the most likely places for the package to incur damage as a result of the detonation. The testing was completed at an offsite location, which raised challenges as well as allowed for development of new partnerships for this testing and for potential future testing. The results of the testing, the methods used to complete the testing, and similar, potential future work will be discussed.

  19. Geospatial Information Systems Analysis of Regional Environmental Change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmund C. Merem

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper uses remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS; and descriptive statistics in the assessment of environmental change along the Savannah River Basin of Georgia. Results of the study show that Savannah River basin side of Georgia has been experiencing environmental change due to several decades of relentless pressure induced by anthropocentric activities and host of other socio-economic factors. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI analysis of the area also shows a decline in vegetation cover. The pace of ecological change showed some variations across time and space. Generally, the results point to a decline in water bodies, vegetation, and increase in population, loss of harvested cropland, farms and increasing threats to the environmental systems of the region.

  20. SUB-LEU-METAL-THERM-001 SUBCRITICAL MEASUREMENTS OF LOW ENRICHED TUBULAR URANIUM METAL FUEL ELEMENTS BEFORE & AFTER IRRADIATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TOFFER, H.

    2006-07-18

    With the shutdown of the Hanford PUREX (Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant) reprocessing plant in the 1970s, adequate storage capacity for spent Hanford N Reactor fuel elements in the K and N Reactor pools became a concern. To maximize space utilization in the pools, accounting for fuel burnup was considered. Fuel that had experienced a neutron environment in a reactor is known as spent, exposed, or irradiated fuel. In contrast fuel that has not yet been placed in a reactor is known as green, unexposed, or unirradiated fuel. Calculations indicated that at typical fuel exposures for N Reactor, the spent-fuel critical mass would be twice the critical mass for green fuel. A decision was reached to test the calculational result with a definitive experiment. If the results proved positive, storage capacity could be increased and N Reactor operation could be prolonged. An experiment to be conducted in the N Reactor spent-fuel storage pool was designed and assembled (References 1 and 2) and the services of the Battelle Northwest Laboratories (BNWL) (now Pacific Northwest National Laboratory [PNNL]) critical mass laboratory were procured for the measurements (Reference 3). The experiments were performed in April 1975 in the Hanford N Reactor fuel storage pool. The fuel elements were MKIA fuel assemblies, comprised of two concentric tubes of low-enriched metallic uranium. Two separate sets of measurements were performed: one with unirradiated fuel and one with irradiated fuel. Both the unirradiated and irradiated fuel, were measured in the same geometry. The spent-fuel MKIA assemblies had an average burnup of 2865 MWd (megawatt days)/t. A constraint was imposed restricting the measurements to a subcritical limit of k{sub eff} = 0.97. Subcritical count rate data was obtained with pulsed-neutron and approach-to-critical measurements. Ten (10) configurations with green fuel and nine (9) configurations with spent fuel are described and evaluated. Of these, three (3) green fuel

  1. High performance curcumin subcritical water extraction from turmeric (Curcuma longa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh Kiamahalleh, Mohammad; Najafpour-Darzi, Ghasem; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Valizadeh Kiamahalleh, Meisam

    2016-06-01

    Curcumin is a hydrophobic polyphenolic compound derived from turmeric rhizome, which consists about 2-5% of the total rhizome content and is a more valuable component of turmeric. For reducing the drawbacks of conventional extraction (using organic solvents) of curcumin, the water as a clean solvent was used for extracting curcumin. Subcritical water extraction (SWE) experimental setup was fabricated in a laboratory scale and the influences of some parameters (e.g. extraction temperature, particle size, retention time and pressure) on the yield of extraction were investigated. Optimum extraction conditions such as SWE pressure of 10bar, extractive temperature of 140°C, particle size of 0.71mm and retention time of 14min were defined. The maximum amount of curcumin extracted at the optimum condition was 3.8wt%. The yield of curcumin extraction was more than 76wt% with regards to the maximum possible curcumin content of turmeric, as known to be 5%. The scanning electron microscope (SEM) images from the outer surface of turmeric, before and after extraction, clearly demonstrated the effect of each parameter; changes in porosity and hardness of turmeric that is directly related to the amount of extracted curcumin in process optimization of the extraction parameters. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. (n,xn) cross section measurements for Y-89 foils used as detectors for high energy neutron measurements in the deeply subcritical assembly “QUINTA”

    OpenAIRE

    Bielewicz Marcin; Kilim Stanisław; Strugalska-Gola Elżbieta; Szuta Marcin; Wojciechowski Andrzej; Tyutyunnikov Sergey; Prokofiev Alexander; Passoth Elke

    2017-01-01

    Study of the deep subcritical systems (QUINTA) using relativistic beams is performed within the project “Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes” (E&T – RAW). The experiment assembly was irradiated by deuteron/proton beam (Dubna NUCLOTRON). We calculated the neutron energy spectrum inside the whole assembly by using threshold energy (n,xn) reactions in yttrium (Y-89) foils. There are almost no experimental cross section data for those reactions. New Y-89(n,xn) cross section measurement...

  3. Subcritical Multiplication Parameters of the Accelerator-Driven System with 100 MeV Protons at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Jae-Yong Lim; Cheol Ho Pyeon; Takahiro Yagi; Tsuyoshi Misawa

    2012-01-01

    Basic experiments on the accelerator-driven system (ADS) at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are carried out by combining a solid-moderated and -reflected core with the fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator. The reaction rates are measured by the foil activation method to obtain the subcritical multiplication parameters. The numerical calculations are conducted with the use of MCNPX and JENDL/HE-2007 to evaluate the reaction rates of activation foils set in the core region and at...

  4. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  5. Guide to Savannah River Laboratory Analytical Services Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-04-01

    The mission of the Analytical Services Group (ASG) is to provide analytical support for Savannah River Laboratory Research and Development Programs using onsite and offsite analytical labs as resources. A second mission is to provide Savannah River Site (SRS) operations with analytical support for nonroutine material characterization or special chemical analyses. The ASG provides backup support for the SRS process control labs as necessary.

  6. Estimating runoff and soil moisture deficit in guinea savannah region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimating runoff and soil moisture deficit in guinea savannah region of Nigeria using water balance method. ... The estimation ofrunoff and soil moisture deficit in Guinea Savannah region using semi arid model based on soil water balance technique (SAMBA) was carried out. The input to the SAMBA model are daily rainfall ...

  7. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A. [eds.

    1995-12-31

    The 1990s have brought dramatic change to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in its role as a key part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) weapons complex. Shrinking federal budgets, sharp workforce reductions, the end of the Cold War, and a major shift in mission objectives have combined to severely test the mettle of SRS-South Carolina`s largest employer. But the sprawling 310-square-mile site`s employees have responded to the test in admirable fashion, effectively shifting their emphasis from weapons production to environmental restoration. This report describes the environmental report for the SRS for 1995.

  8. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, C.L.; Hetrick, C.S.; Stevenson, D.A. (eds.); Davis, H.A.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    This volume of Savannah River Site Environmental report for 1988 (WSRC-RP-89-59-1) contains the figures and tables referenced in Volume 1. The figures contain graphic illustrations of sample locations and/or data. The tables contain summaries of the following types of data: Federal and State standards and guides applicable to SRS operations; concentrations of radioactivity in environmental media; the quantity of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS operations; offsite radiation dose commitments from SRS operations; measurements of physical properties, chemicals, and metals concentrations in environmental media; and interlaboratory comparison of analytical results.

  9. Savannah River Site Environmental Data for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W.

    1994-12-16

    Tables in this document present data from routine environmental monitoring and surveillance programs at the Savannah River Site. An attempt has been made to include all available data from environmental research programs. The first section of the book is a collection of maps of radiological and non radiological sampling locations. Also included are a list of the media sampled, along with sample sizes and representative aliquots; the minimum detectable concentrations for gamma analysis of soil, food, fish and wildlife, and vegetation samples; and a list of the minimum detectable concentrations for Environmental Monitoring Section radiological analyses.

  10. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, A

    2008-08-27

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2007 (WSRC-STI-2008-00057) prepared for the US Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting', and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; (3) highlight significant programs and efforts; (4) assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

  11. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, Albert R.

    2005-06-07

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2004 (WSRC-TR-2005-00005) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,'' and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts; and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

  12. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R.; Todd, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes environmental activities conducted on and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, S.C., from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1991, with an update on compliance activities through April 1, 1992. The report is a single volume with a separate summary pamphlet highlighting the major findings for 1991. The report is divided into an executive summary and 14 chapters containing information on environmental compliance issues, environmental monitoring methods and programs, and environmental research activities for 1991, as well as historical data from previous years. Analytical results, figures, charts, and data tables relevant to the environmental monitoring program for 1991 at SRS are included.

  13. Scaling of viscosity with rate, pressure, and temperature: Linking simulations to experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhao, Vikram; Robbins, Mark

    Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) is important in many practical devices and produces extreme pressures (> 1 GPa) and shear rates (105 -107 s-1). This makes EHL fluids ideal candidates for bridging the gap between experimental and simulation studies of viscosity. There is an ongoing debate about whether the high-rate response of simple molecules like squalane follows a power-law Carreau model or a thermal activation based Eyring model. We use molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the rheological response of squalane for a wide range of rates (105 -1010 s-1), pressures (0.1 MPa to 3 GPa), and temperatures (100 - 313 K). We find that experimental and theoretical results can be collapsed onto a master curve consistent with Eyring theory over more than 20 orders of magnitude in rate. Extrapolating Eyring fits to simulations at 107 s-1 and above yields Newtonian viscosities η0 that are consistent with available low-rate experiments, and allows predictions to much higher pressures and lower temperatures. There is no indication of a diverging viscosity at finite stress, since log η0 rises sublinearly with pressure up to 6 GPa and η0 >1012 Pa-s. Correlations between chain conformations and Eyring parameters are also presented. This research was performed within the Center for Materials in Extreme Dynamic Environments (CMEDE) under the Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute at Johns Hopkins University. Financial support was provided by Grant W911NF-12-2-0022.

  14. Pressure Contact Sounding Data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Hill, C. K.; Turner, R. E.; Long, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 41 stations participating in the AVE III measurement program that began at 0000 GMT on February 6 and ended at 1200 GMT on February 7, 1975. Soundings were taken at 3-hour intervals during a large period of the experiment from most stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data processing, change in reduction scheme since the AVE II pilot experiment, and data accuracy are briefly discussed. An example of contact data is presented, and microfiche cards of all the contact data are included in the appendix. The AVE III project was conducted to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales of-motion interrelationships.

  15. Pressure contact sounding data for NASA's Atmospheric Variability Experiment (AVE 2). [rawinsondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuelberg, H. E.; Turner, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    The basic rawinsonde data are described at each pressure contact from the surface to sounding termination for the 54 stations participating in the AVE 2 pilot experiment. Soundings were taken at three-hour intervals from stations within the United States east of about 105 degrees west longitude. Methods of data reduction and estimates of data accuracy are discussed. Examples of the data records produced are shown. The AVE 2 pilot experiment was conducted as part of NASA's program to better understand and establish the extent of applications for meteorological satellite sensor data through correlative ground truth experiments and to provide basic experimental data for use in studies of atmospheric scales-of-motion interrelationships.

  16. Thorium as a Fuel for Accelerator Driven Subcritical Electronuclear Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barashenkov, V S; Singh, V

    2000-01-01

    Neutron yield and energy production in a very large, practically infinite, uranium and thorium target-blocks irradiated by protons with energies in the range 0.1-2 GeV are studied by Monte Carlo method. Though the comparison of uranium and thorium targets shows that the neutron yield in the latter is 30-40 % less and the energy gain is approximatelly two times smaller, accelerator Driven subcritical Systems (ADS) with thorium fuel are very perspective at the bombarding energies higher than several hundreds MeV. An admixture of fissile elements U^{233}, U^{235}, Pu^{239} in the set-up gives larger neutron multiplication which in turn shows better energy amplification. It is argued that due to the practically complete burning of the fuel in such set-up there is no need of technology of conversion of the exhaust fuel.

  17. Gravity-driven soap film dynamics in subcritical regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auliel, M. I.; Castro, F.; Sosa, R.; Artana, G.

    2015-10-01

    We undertake the analysis of soap-film dynamics with the classical approach of asymptotic expansions. We focus our analysis in vertical soap film tunnels operating in subcritical regimes with elastic Mach numbers Me=O(10-1) . Considering the associated set of nondimensional numbers that characterize this flow, we show that the flow behaves as a two-dimensional (2D) divergence free flow with variable mass density. When the soap film dynamics agrees with that of a 2D and almost constant mass density flow, the regions where the second invariant of the velocity gradient is non-null correspond to regions where the rate of change of film thickness is non-negligible.

  18. Efficient, high-speed methane fermentation for sewage sludge using subcritical water hydrolysis as pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Tokumoto, Hayato; Ishii, Kyoko; Ishii, Ryo

    2009-06-01

    A novel biomass-energy process for the production of methane from sewage sludge using a subcritical water (sub-CW) hydrolysis reaction as pretreatment is proposed. The main substances of sewage sludge hydrolyzed by sub-CW at 513 K for 10 min were acetic acid, formic acid, pyroglutamic acid, alanine, and glycine. Fermentation experiments were conducted in an anaerobic-sludge reactor for two different samples: real sewage sludge and a model solution containing components typically produced by the sub-CW pretreatment of sewage sludge. In the experiment for the sub-CW pretreatment of sewage sludge, methane generation was twice that for non-pretreatment after 3 days of incubation. In the model experiment, the methane conversion was about 40% with the application of mixture of organic acids and amino acids after 5 days of incubation. Furthermore, the methane conversion was about 60% for 2 days when only organic acids, such as acetic acid and formic acid, were applied. Because acetic acid is the key intermediate and main precursor of the methanogenesis step, fermentation experiments were conducted in an anaerobic-sludge reactor with high concentrations of acetic acid (0.01-0.1M). Nearly 100% of acetic acid was converted to methane and carbon dioxide in 1-3 days.

  19. Refractive X-ray lens for high pressure experiments at SPring-8

    CERN Document Server

    Ohishi, Y; Ishii, M; Ishikawa, T; Shimomura, O

    2001-01-01

    A stacked compound refractive X-ray lens was designed to produce an efficiently focused (phi (cursive,open) Greek<0.1 mm) beam for high-pressure experiments at SPring-8. High-pressure X-ray diffraction requires an intense, high-energy and monochromatic X-ray beam in order to penetrate the absorptive window of a diamond anvil cell (DAC). Our lens, producing a focal spot of 120x275 mu m sup 2 and a peak gain of 12, is well matched to these requirements. It is composed of many plastic chips made by molding, which allows many identical chips to be made precisely. Other advantages of this lens include high throughput, simple energy tunability and easy installation.

  20. Pressure Drop Experiments on a Flow Channel Filled with Catalysts for Nuclear Hydrogen Production System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Sungdeok; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M. H.; Kim, Y. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seo, D. U.; Park, G. C. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed a hybrid-design decomposer to withstand severe operating conditions. Hong and Seo have been studying a two-dimensional numerical analysis for a catalyst channel line-up with a 3mm ball shaped catalyst. They compared their CFD results to many widespread correlations developed for porous media such as those by Carman, Ergun, and Zhavoronkov as well as Susskind and Becker and Reichelt including a pebble-bed nuclear reactor design correlation. They concluded that the validation should be accomplished by the experiments for a catalyst channel simulating the channel of the PHE. In this paper, we discuss the pressure drop experiments on a flow channel filled with ball shaped catalysts. The test section simulates a single channel of the PHE secondary side plate-fin channel. The experimental results compared well with the known pressure drop correlations and a numerical analysis, respectively. We discussed an experimental validation of a pressure drop correlations and 2D CFD analysis on a flow channel filled with catalysts in the channel. The results of the pressure drop measurements are compared with the results obtained using well-known empirical correlations and 2D CFD analysis. From the comparison results, the validity of all the correlations and 2D numerical analysis is not satisfactory. There are two kind of reasons are presumed. While the general packed channel has radially infinite and complete circular cross section, the catalyst channel has radially finite with a very narrow width and irregular wavy cross section. Another reason is presumed to be because the inordinate large void fraction in the catalyst channel which is beyond the application range on void fraction in the empirical correlations.

  1. Savannah River site environmental report for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.; Mamatey, A. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of site-generated waste, restoration of the surrounding environment, and the development of industry in and around the site. However, SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC)-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program. In 1996, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 31,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Though the environmental monitoring program was streamlined in 1996-to improve its cost-effectiveness without compromising data quality or reducing its overall ability to produce critical information-thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, food products, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

  2. Mammals of the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cothran, E.G.; Smith, M.H.; Wolff, J.O.; Gentry, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    This book is designed to be used as a field guide, reference book, bibliography, and introduction to the basic biology and ecology of the 54 mammal species that currently or potentially exist on or near the Savannah River Site (SRS). For 50 of these species, we present basic descriptions, distinguishing morphological features, distribution and habitat preferences, food habits, reproductive biology, social behavior, ecological relationships with other species, and economic importance to man. For those species that have been studied on the SRS, we summarize the results of these studies. Keys and illustrations are provided for whole body and skull identification. A selected glossary defines technical terminology. Illustrations of tracks of the more common larger mammals will assist in field identifications. We also summarize the results of two major long-term SRS studies, The Forbearer Census'' and White-tailed Deer Studies''. A cross-indexed list of over 300 SRS publications on mammals classifies each publication by 23 categories such as habitat, reproduction, genetics, etc., and also for each mammal species. The 149 Master's theses and Ph.D. dissertations that have been conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory are provided as additional references.

  3. Mammals of the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cothran, E.G.; Smith, M.H.; Wolff, J.O.; Gentry, J.B.

    1991-12-31

    This book is designed to be used as a field guide, reference book, bibliography, and introduction to the basic biology and ecology of the 54 mammal species that currently or potentially exist on or near the Savannah River Site (SRS). For 50 of these species, we present basic descriptions, distinguishing morphological features, distribution and habitat preferences, food habits, reproductive biology, social behavior, ecological relationships with other species, and economic importance to man. For those species that have been studied on the SRS, we summarize the results of these studies. Keys and illustrations are provided for whole body and skull identification. A selected glossary defines technical terminology. Illustrations of tracks of the more common larger mammals will assist in field identifications. We also summarize the results of two major long-term SRS studies, ``The Forbearer Census`` and ``White-tailed Deer Studies``. A cross-indexed list of over 300 SRS publications on mammals classifies each publication by 23 categories such as habitat, reproduction, genetics, etc., and also for each mammal species. The 149 Master`s theses and Ph.D. dissertations that have been conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory are provided as additional references.

  4. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

    1994-08-01

    Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance to ensure the safety of the public and the well-being of the environment. DOE Order 5400,1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` requires the submission of an environmental report that documents the impact of facility operations on the environment and on public health. SRS has had an extensive environmental surveillance program in place since 1951 (before site startup). At that time, data generated by the on-site surveillance program were reported in site documents. Beginning in 1959, data from off-site environmental monitoring activities were presented in reports issued for public dissemination. Separate reporting of SRS`s on- and off-site environmental monitoring activities continued until 1985, when data from both surveillance programs were merged into a single public document. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 1993. For complete program descriptions, consult the ``SRS Environmental Monitoring Plan`` (WSRC-3Ql-2-1000). It documents the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, the frequency of monitoring and analysis, the specific analytical and sampling procedures, and the quality assurance requirements.

  5. Testing the potential of multi-spectral remote sensing for retrospectively estimating fire severity in African savannahs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alistair M.S. Smith; Martin J. Wooster; Nick A. Drake; Frederick M. Dipotso; Michael J. Falkowski; Andrew T. Hudak

    2005-01-01

    The remote sensing of fire severity is a noted goal in studies of forest and grassland wildfires. Experiments were conducted to discover and evaluate potential relationships between the characteristics of African savannah fires and post-fire surface spectral reflectance in the visible to shortwave infrared spectral region. Nine instrumented experimental fires were...

  6. Subcritical Multiplication Parameters of the Accelerator-Driven System with 100 MeV Protons at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yong Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Basic experiments on the accelerator-driven system (ADS at the Kyoto University Critical Assembly are carried out by combining a solid-moderated and -reflected core with the fixed-field alternating gradient accelerator. The reaction rates are measured by the foil activation method to obtain the subcritical multiplication parameters. The numerical calculations are conducted with the use of MCNPX and JENDL/HE-2007 to evaluate the reaction rates of activation foils set in the core region and at the location of the target. Here, a comparison between the measured and calculated eigenvalues reveals a relative difference of around 10% in C/E values. A special mention is made of the fact that the reaction rate analyses in the subcritical systems demonstrate apparently the actual effect of moving the tungsten target into the core on neutron multiplication. A series of further ADS experiments with 100 MeV protons needs to be carried out to evaluate the accuracy of subcritical multiplication parameters.

  7. Polyethylene-reflected plutonium metal sphere : subcritical neutron and gamma measurements.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattingly, John K.

    2009-11-01

    Numerous benchmark measurements have been performed to enable developers of neutron transport models and codes to evaluate the accuracy of their calculations. In particular, for criticality safety applications, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Program (ICSBEP) annually publishes a handbook of critical and subcritical benchmarks. Relatively fewer benchmark measurements have been performed to validate photon transport models and codes, and unlike the ICSBEP, there is no program dedicated to the evaluation and publication of photon benchmarks. Even fewer coupled neutron-photon benchmarks have been performed. This report documents a coupled neutron-photon benchmark for plutonium metal reflected by polyethylene. A 4.5-kg sphere of ?-phase, weapons-grade plutonium metal was measured in six reflected configurations: (1) Bare; (2) Reflected by 0.5 inch of high density polyethylene (HDPE); (3) Reflected by 1.0 inch of HDPE; (4) Reflected by 1.5 inches of HDPE; (5) Reflected by 3.0 inches of HDPE; and (6) Reflected by 6.0 inches of HDPE. Neutron and photon emissions from the plutonium sphere were measured using three instruments: (1) A gross neutron counter; (2) A neutron multiplicity counter; and (3) A high-resolution gamma spectrometer. This report documents the experimental conditions and results in detail sufficient to permit developers of radiation transport models and codes to construct models of the experiments and to compare their calculations to the measurements. All of the data acquired during this series of experiments are available upon request.

  8. Cryogenic fluid management experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, R. N.; Bailey, W. J.; Fester, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The cryogenic fluid management experiment (CFME), designed to characterize subcritical liquid hydrogen storage and expulsion in the low-q space environment, is discussed. The experiment utilizes a fine mesh screen fluid management device to accomplish gas-free liquid expulsion and a thermodynamic vent system to intercept heat leak and control tank pressure. The experiment design evolved from a single flight prototype to provision for a multimission (up to 7) capability. A detailed design of the CFME, a dynamic test article, and dedicated ground support equipment were generated. All materials and parts were identified, and components were selected and specifications prepared. Long lead titanium pressurant spheres and the flight tape recorder and ground reproduce unit were procured. Experiment integration with the shuttle orbiter, Spacelab, and KSC ground operations was coordinated with the appropriate NASA centers, and experiment interfaces were defined. Phase 1 ground and flight safety reviews were conducted. Costs were estimated for fabrication and assembly of the CFME, which will become the storage and supply tank for a cryogenic fluid management facility to investigate fluid management in space.

  9. Coupled Subcritical Water and Solid Phase Extraction for In-Situ Chemical Analysis Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Leiden Measurement Technology (LMT) will design and develop a low volume analyte separation, concentration, and transfer system (ConTech), that couples a Subcritical...

  10. 77 FR 30518 - Support of Deployment of Prototype Small Modular Reactors at the Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... of Deployment of Prototype Small Modular Reactors at the Savannah River Site AGENCY: Savannah River... availability of support for deployment of Small Modular Reactors (SMR) on the Savannah River Site (SRS). DATES... Services Available to Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Vendors at the Savannah River Site (SRS).'' Copies of...

  11. Variations in atmospheric pressure as a source of errors in polychromatic X-ray experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Matjushin, A M

    2000-01-01

    The influence of the atmospheric pressure on the accuracy of energy diffractometry (ED), X-ray fluorescence analysis (XRF) using a semiconductor Si(Li) detector, polychromatic diffractometry without the energy dispersion (PDWED) using a coordinate detector has been considered. It is shown that in the interval of pressures 710-810 mm Hg, errors in the determination of interplanar spaces can reach 2% for PDWED, which is caused by the displacement of the maximum of spectral distribution due to changes in absorption by air gaps of the device, and by changes in the quantum efficiency of the coordinate detector. In the ED and XRF methods, changes in the spectrum lead to errors in the determination of relative intensities of diffraction and fluorescence peaks, respectively. The changes in integral intensity are about 1% and can be neglected in the majority of experiments. The curves of the displacement of the spectral distribution maximum and spectral changes were calculated as a function of the atmospheric pressure...

  12. Elastic Properties of Tricalcium Aluminate from High-Pressure Experiments and First-Principles Calculations

    KAUST Repository

    Moon, Juhyuk

    2012-06-04

    The structure and elasticity of tricalcium aluminate (C 3A) have been experimentally and theoretically studied. From high-pressure X-ray diffraction experiments, the bulk modulus of 102(6) and 110(3) GPa were obtained by fitting second- and third-order finite strain equation of state, respectively. First-principles calculations with a generalized gradient approximation gave an isotropic bulk modulus of 102.1 GPa and an isothermal bulk modulus of 106.0 GPa. The static calculations using the exchange-correlation functional show an excellent agreement with the experimental measurements. Based on the agreement, accurate elastic constants and other elastic moduli were computed. The slight difference of behavior at high pressure can be explained by the infiltration of pressure-transmitting silicone oil into structural holes in C 3A. The computed elastic and mechanical properties will be useful in understanding structural and mechanical properties of cementitious materials, particularly with the increasing interest in the advanced applications at the nanoscale. © 2012 The American Ceramic Society.

  13. Concept of a self-pressurized feed system for liquid rocket engines and its fundamental experiment results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Jun; Okaya, Shunichi; Igoh, Hiroshi; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2017-04-01

    A new propellant feed system referred to as a self-pressurized feed system is proposed for liquid rocket engines. The self-pressurized feed system is a type of gas-pressure feed system; however, the pressurization source is retained in the liquid state to reduce tank volume. The liquid pressurization source is heated and gasified using heat exchange from the hot propellant using a regenerative cooling strategy. The liquid pressurization source is raised to critical pressure by a pressure booster referred to as a charger in order to avoid boiling and improve the heat exchange efficiency. The charger is driven by a part of the generated pressurization gas using a closed-loop self-pressurized feed system. The purpose of this study is to propose a propellant feed system that is lighter and simpler than traditional gas pressure feed systems. The proposed system can be applied to all liquid rocket engines that use the regenerative cooling strategy. The concept and mathematical models of the self-pressurized feed system are presented first. Experiment results for verification are then shown and compared with the mathematical models.

  14. Subcritical CO2 sintering of microspheres of different polymeric materials to fabricate scaffolds for tissue engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhamidipati, Manjari; Sridharan, BanuPriya; Scurto, Aaron M; Detamore, Michael S

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use CO2 at sub-critical pressures as a tool to sinter 3D, macroporous, microsphere-based scaffolds for bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Porous scaffolds composed of ~200 μm microspheres of either poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or polycaprolactone (PCL) were prepared using dense phase CO2 sintering, which were seeded with rat bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (rBMSCs), and exposed to either osteogenic (PLGA, PCL) or chondrogenic (PLGA) conditions for 6 weeks. Under osteogenic conditions, the PLGA constructs produced over an order of magnitude more calcium than the PCL constructs, whereas the PCL constructs had far superior mechanical and structural integrity (125 times stiffer than PLGA constructs) at week 6, along with twice the cell content of the PLGA constructs. Chondrogenic cell performance was limited in PLGA constructs, perhaps as a result of the polymer degradation rate being too high. The current study represents the first long-term culture of CO2-sintered microsphere-based scaffolds, and has established important thermodynamic differences in sintering between the selected formulations of PLGA and PCL, with the former requiring adjustment of pressure only, and the latter requiring the adjustment of both pressure and temperature. Based on more straightforward sintering conditions and more favorable cell performance, PLGA may be the material of choice for microspheres in a CO2 sintering application, although a different PLGA formulation with the encapsulation of growth factors, extracellular matrix-derived nanoparticles, and/or buffers in the microspheres may be advantageous for achieving a more superior cell performance than observed here. © 2013.

  15. CFD Analysis and Design of Detailed Target Configurations for an Accelerator-Driven Subcritical System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, Adam; Merzari, Elia; Sofu, Tanju; Zhong, Zhaopeng; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-08-01

    High-fidelity analysis has been utilized in the design of beam target options for an accelerator driven subcritical system. Designs featuring stacks of plates with square cross section have been investigated for both tungsten and uranium target materials. The presented work includes the first thermal-hydraulic simulations of the full, detailed target geometry. The innovative target cooling manifold design features many regions with complex flow features, including 90 bends and merging jets, which necessitate three-dimensional fluid simulations. These were performed using the commercial computational fluid dynamics code STAR-CCM+. Conjugate heat transfer was modeled between the plates, cladding, manifold structure, and fluid. Steady-state simulations were performed but lacked good residual convergence. Unsteady simulations were then performed, which converged well and demonstrated that flow instability existed in the lower portion of the manifold. It was established that the flow instability had little effect on the peak plate temperatures, which were well below the melting point. The estimated plate surface temperatures and target region pressure were shown to provide sufficient margin to subcooled boiling for standard operating conditions. This demonstrated the safety of both potential target configurations during normal operation.

  16. Complete degradation of Orange G by electrolysis in sub-critical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuksel, Asli; Sasaki, Mitsuru; Goto, Motonobu

    2011-06-15

    Complete degradation of azo dye Orange G was studied using a 500 mL continuous flow reactor made of SUS 316 stainless steel. In this system, a titanium reactor wall acted as a cathode and a titanium plate-type electrode was used as an anode in a subcritical reaction medium. This hydrothermal electrolysis process provides an environmentally friendly route that does not use any organic solvents or catalysts to remove organic pollutants from wastewater. Reactions were carried out from 30 to 90 min residence times at a pressure of 7 MPa, and at different temperatures of 180-250°C by applying various direct currents ranging from 0.5 to 1A. Removal of dye from the product solution and conversion of TOC increased with increasing current value. Moreover, the effect of salt addition on degradation of Orange G and TOC conversion was investigated, because in real textile wastewater, many salts are also included together with dye. Addition of Na(2)CO(3) resulted in a massive degradation of the dye itself and complete mineralization of TOC, while NaCl and Na(2)SO(4) obstructed the removal of Orange G. Greater than 99% of Orange G was successfully removed from the product solution with a 98% TOC conversion. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Particle formation of budesonide from alcohol-modified subcritical water solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Adam G; Mammucari, Raffaella; Foster, Neil R

    2011-02-28

    Recently, subcritical water (SBCW: water that has been heated to a temperature between 100°C and 200°C at pressures of up to 70bar) has been used to dissolve several hydrophobic pharmaceutical compounds (Carr et al., 2010a). Furthermore, a number of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) have been rapidly precipitated from SBCW solutions (Carr et al., 2010b,c). It is possible to alter the precipitate morphology by altering the processing variables; including the SBCW-API solution injection temperature and adding impurities (such as pharmaceutical excipients, e.g. lactose) to the precipitation chamber. The work presented in this article demonstrates that the morphology of pharmaceutical particles can be tuned by adding organic solvents (ethanol and methanol) to the SBCW-API solutions. Particle morphology has also been tuned by adding different pharmaceutical excipients (polyethylene glycol 400 and lactose) to the precipitation chamber. Different morphologies of pharmaceutical particles were produced, ranging from nanospheres of 60nm diameter to 5μm plate particles. Budesonide was used as the model API in this study. Two experimental products were spray dried to form dry powder products. The aerodynamic particle size of the powder was established by running the powder through an Andersen Cascade Impactor. It has been shown that the drug particles produced from the SBCW micronization process, when coupled with a spray drying process, are suitable for delivery to the lungs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Sugars and char formation on subcritical water hydrolysis of sugarcane straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lachos-Perez, D; Tompsett, G A; Guerra, P; Timko, M T; Rostagno, M A; Martínez, Julian; Forster-Carneiro, T

    2017-11-01

    Subcritical water has potential as an environmentally friendly solvent for applications including hydrolysis, liquefaction, extraction, and carbonization. Here, we report hydrolysis of sugarcane straw, an abundant byproduct of sugar production, in a semi-continuous reactor at reaction temperatures ranging from 190 to 260°C and at operating pressures of 9 and 16MPa. The target hydrolysis products were total reducing sugars. The main products of sugarcane straw hydrolysis were glucose, xylose, arabinose, and galactose in addition to 5- hydroxymethylfurfural and furfural as minor byproducts. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis provided additional information on the surface and bulk composition of the residual biomass. Char was present on samples treated at temperatures equal to and greater than 190°C. Samples treated at 260°C contained approximately 20wt% char, yet retained substantial hemicellulose and cellulose content. Hydrolysis temperature of 200°C provided the greatest TRS yield while minimizing char formation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Subcritical co-solvents extraction of lipid from wet microalgae pastes of Nannochloropsis sp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min; Liu, Tianzhong; Chen, Xiaolin; Chen, Lin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Junfeng; Gao, Lili; Chen, Yu; Peng, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    In this paper subcritical co-solvents extraction (SCE) of algal lipid from wet pastes of Nannochloropsis sp. is examined. The influences of five operating parameters including the ratio between ethanol to hexane, the ratio of mixed solvents to algal biomass (dry weight), extraction temperature, pressure, and time were investigated. The determined optimum extraction conditions were 3:1 (hexane to ethanol ratio), 10:1 ratio (co-solvents to microalgae (dry weight) ratio), 90°C, 1.4 MPa, and 50 min, which could produce 88% recovery rate of the total lipids. In addition, electron micrographs of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were conducted to show that the algal cell presented shrunken, collapsed with some wrinkles and microholes after SCE extraction. The main composition of total lipids extracted under the optimum conditions was TAG which represented more than 80%. And the fatty acid profile of triglycerides revealed that C16:0 (35.67 ± 0.2%), C18:1 (26.84 ± 0.044%) and C16:1 (25.96 ± 0.011%) were dominant. Practical applications: The reported method could save energy consumption significantly through avoiding deep dewatering (for example drying). The composition of the extracted lipid is suitable for the production of high quality biodiesel. PMID:22745570

  20. Life experiences among obstructive sleep apnoea patients receiving continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shui-Tao; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Lee, Pei-Shan; Tsao, Lee-Ing

    2014-01-01

    To generate a descriptive theoretical framework for experiences among obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients undergoing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. Insufficient information is available about subjective experiences among OSA patients undergoing CPAP therapy. This study aims to address that lack of insight into patients' feelings. A qualitative study using the grounded theory method to establish a descriptive theory. Twenty-two Taiwanese OSA patients undergoing CPAP therapy participated in comprehensive interviews. The patients, aged 37-68 years, participated in wide-ranging interviews. 'Living with CPAP' was the core theme describing the life experiences of OSA patients undergoing CPAP. Health warnings were identified as the antecedent condition, with subcategories including the following: severe snoring, choking and feelings of a terrible death during sleep, day and night sleepiness, easy tiredness, decreased memory, poor sleep, dry mouth, dry throat, headache, high blood pressure, poor blood sugar level control and falling asleep while driving. Analyses indicated seven subcategories of OSA patients with CPAP: (1) seeking medical information, (2) difficulties with CPAP, (3) trial and error for the 'right' CPAP, (4) long scheduled waiting times, (5) wondering, (6) high expectations, and (7) getting back good health. The results will assist healthcare providers with references for OSA health care based on patients' subjective perspectives. After interpreting and analysing results, suggestions include the following: (1) provide medical resource education for outpatients and inpatients to access self-care knowledge regarding OSA; (2) institute professional personnel for providing OSA health education in sleep clinics or sleep centres; (3) develop hospital standards for sleep examination processes to shorten waiting times; (4) establish case management for pursuing OSA patients receiving CPAP; (5) arrange regular forums for patients to share

  1. Theoretical Analysis for Heat Transfer Optimization in Subcritical Electrothermal Energy Storage Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Peng Hu; Gao-Wei Zhang; Long-Xiang Chen; Ming-Hou Liu

    2017-01-01

    Electrothermal energy storage (ETES) provides bulk electricity storage based on heat pump and heat engine technologies. A subcritical ETES is described in this paper. Based on the extremum principle of entransy dissipation, a geometry model is developed for heat transfer optimization for subcritical ETES. The exergy during the heat transfer process is deduced in terms of entropy production. The geometry model is validated by the extremum principle of entropy production. The theoretical analys...

  2. High pressure and temperature deformation experiments on San Carlos olivine and implications for upper mantle anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Sushant; Frost, Daniel J.; Walte, Nicolas; Miyajima, Nobuyoshi; Heidelbach, Florian

    2010-05-01

    Crystallographic preferred orientation developed in olivine due to shearing in the mantle is thought to be the prominent reason behind seismic anisotropy in the upper mantle. Seismic anisotropy in upper mantle can be observed up to a depth of 350 km with a marked drop in the strength of anisotropy seen around 250 km. Studies on natural rock samples from the mantle and deformation experiments performed on olivine have revealed that olivine deforms mainly through dislocation creep with Burgers vectors parallel to the [100] crystallographic axis under low pressure conditions (up to 3 GPa). Under similar pressures, evidence of [001] slip has been reported due to the presence of water. In order to understand the deformation mechanism in olivine at pressures greater than 3 GPa, we have performed experiments using the deformation DIA multi-anvil apparatus. The DIA consist of 6 square faceted anvils that compress a cubic high-pressure assembly. The deformation DIA possesses two vertically acting opposing inner rams, which can be operated independently of the main compressive force to deform the sample assembly. The experimental setup consists of a hot-pressed sample of polycrystalline dry San Carlos olivine 0.2 mm cut from a 1.2 mm diameter core at 45° . This slice is sandwiched between alumina pistons also cut at 45° in simple shear geometry. Experiments have been performed at 3, 5 and 8 GPa at a deformation anvil strain rate of 1.0x10-4 s-1and temperatures between 1200-1400° C. Deformed samples were cut normal to the shear plane and parallel to the shear direction. Then the sample was polished and analyzed using electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD) to identify the crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). The fabric that developed in olivine deformed at 3 GPa mainly resulted from the [100] slip on the (010) plane. Samples deformed at 5 GPa showed both [100] and [001] slip. On the other hand, samples deformed at 8 GPa and 1200° C, show deformation mainly

  3. Results from the DCH-1 (Direct Containment Heating) experiment. [Pressurized melt ejection and direct containment heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Brockmann, J.E.; Pilch, M.; Ross, J.E.; Oliver, M.S.; Lucero, D.A.; Kerley, T.E.; Arellano, F.E.; Gomez, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    The DCH-1 (Direct Containment Heating) test was the first experiment performed in the Surtsey Direct Heating Test Facility. The test involved 20 kg of molten core debris simulant ejected into a 1:10 scale model of the Zion reactor cavity. The melt was produced by a metallothermic reaction of iron oxide and aluminum powders to yield molten iron and alumina. The cavity model was placed so that the emerging debris propagated directly upwards along the vertical centerline of the chamber. Results from the experiment showed that the molten material was ejected from the caviity as a cloud of particles and aerosol. The dispersed debris caused a rapid pressurization of the 103-m/sup 3/ chamber atmosphere. Peak pressure from the six transducers ranged from 0.09 to 0.13 MPa (13.4 to 19.4 psig) above the initial value in the chamber. Posttest debris collection yielded 11.6 kg of material outside the cavity, of which approximately 1.6 kg was attributed to the uptake of oxygen by the iron particles. Mechanical sieving of the recovered debris showed a lognormal size distribution with a mass mean size of 0.55 mm. Aerosol measurements indicated a subsantial portion (2 to 16%) of the ejected mass was in the size range less than 10 m aerodynamic equivalent diameter.

  4. Pressurizing new reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neill, J.S.

    1956-01-30

    The Technical Division was asked recently to consider designs for new reactors that would add 8000 MW capacity to the Savannah River Plant. One modification of the existing SRP design that would enable a higher power rating, and therefore require fewer new reactors, is an increase in the maximum pressure in the D{sub 2}O system. The existing reactors at SRP are designed for a maximum pressure in the gas plenum of only 5 psig. Higher pressures enable higher D{sub 2} temperatures and higher sheath temperatures without local boiling or burnout. The requirements in reactor cooling facilities at any given power level would therefore be reduced by pressurizing.

  5. Numerical simulations of subcritical reactor kinetics in thermal hydraulic transient phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, J.; Park, W. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-12-31

    A subcritical reactor driven by a linear proton accelerator has been considered as a nuclear waste incinerator at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Since the multiplication factor of a subcritical reactor is less than unity, to compensate exponentially decreasing fission neutrons, external neutrons form spallation reactions are essentially required for operating the reactor in its steady state. Furthermore, the profile of accelerator beam currents is very important in controlling a subcritical reactor, because the reactor power varies in accordance to the profile of external neutrons. We have developed a code system to find numerical solutions of reactor kinetics equations, which are the simplest dynamic model for controlling reactors. In a due course of our previous numerical study of point kinetics equations for critical reactors, however, we learned that the same code system can be used in studying dynamic behavior of the subcritical reactor. Our major motivation of this paper is to investigate responses of subcritical reactors for small changes in thermal hydraulic parameters. Building a thermal hydraulic model for the subcritical reactor dynamics, we performed numerical simulations for dynamic responses of the reactor based on point kinetics equations with a source term. Linearizing a set of coupled differential equations for reactor responses, we focus our research interest on dynamic responses of the reactor to variations of the thermal hydraulic parameters in transient phases. 5 refs., 8 figs. (Author)

  6. Subcritical Water Hydrolysis of Peptides: Amino Acid Side-Chain Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas; Bowra, Steve; Cooper, Helen J.

    2017-09-01

    Previously we have shown that subcritical water may be used as an alternative to enzymatic digestion in the proteolysis of proteins for bottom-up proteomics. Subcritical water hydrolysis of proteins was shown to result in protein sequence coverages greater than or equal to that obtained following digestion with trypsin; however, the percentage of peptide spectral matches for the samples treated with trypsin were consistently greater than for those treated with subcritical water. This observation suggests that in addition to cleavage of the peptide bond, subcritical water treatment results in other hydrolysis products, possibly due to modifications of amino acid side chains. Here, a model peptide comprising all common amino acid residues (VQSIKCADFLHYMENPTWGR) and two further model peptides (VCFQYMDRGDR and VQSIKADFLHYENPTWGR) were treated with subcritical water with the aim of probing any induced amino acid side-chain modifications. The hydrolysis products were analyzed by direct infusion electrospray tandem mass spectrometry, either collision-induced dissociation or electron transfer dissociation, and liquid chromatography collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The results show preferential oxidation of cysteine to sulfinic and sulfonic acid, and oxidation of methionine. In the absence of cysteine and methionine, oxidation of tryptophan was observed. In addition, water loss from aspartic acid and C-terminal amidation were observed in harsher subcritical water conditions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  7. Uranium waste disposal at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.R.; McDonell, W.R.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Savannah River Site generates waste containing depleted, natural, and enriched uranium residue. The past and current practice for disposal of this waste at the Savannah River Site have been assessed using radionuclide pathway analysis to estimate environmental impact of closure alternatives for existing disposal sites, and to assist in the development of improved disposal facilities in the near future. This paper outlines the status of uranium waste management technology as currently practiced to maintain the environmental impact within an acceptable limit at the Savannah River Site, and indicates those steps being taken to improve future operations.

  8. Uranium waste disposal at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.R.; McDonell, W.R.; Wilhite, E.L.

    1990-12-31

    The Savannah River Site generates waste containing depleted, natural, and enriched uranium residue. The past and current practice for disposal of this waste at the Savannah River Site have been assessed using radionuclide pathway analysis to estimate environmental impact of closure alternatives for existing disposal sites, and to assist in the development of improved disposal facilities in the near future. This paper outlines the status of uranium waste management technology as currently practiced to maintain the environmental impact within an acceptable limit at the Savannah River Site, and indicates those steps being taken to improve future operations.

  9. Efficient Solutions for New Homes Case Study: Savannah Gardens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-03-15

    The Savannah Housing Department is leading sustainable and affordable housing development in Georgia. It partnered with Southface Energy Institute, a member of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Partnership for Home Innovation Building America research team, to seek cost-effective solutions for increasing the energy efficiency of the Savannah Housing Department’s standard single-family home plans in the Savannah Gardens Community. Based on engineering, cost, and constructability analyses, the combined research team chose to pilot two technologies to evaluate efficiency and comfort impacts for homeowners: a heat-pump water heater in an encapsulated attic and an insulated exterior wall sheathing.

  10. Wildflowers of the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seger, Tona [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). USDA Forest Service

    2015-08-01

    This guidebook is a resource to help field personnel (nonbotanists) identify plants on the Savannah River Site (SRS) premises. Although not a complete flora guide, this publication contains information about 123 plant species found on the SRS. Plants are listed by their common names and arranged by the color of the flower. The SRS supports a diverse array of plant communities. Land use history, the establishment of the SRS, and current land management practices have shaped the flora presently found on the SRS. Located south of Aiken, SC, SRS spans 198,344 acres with land covering Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties. Situated on the Upper Coastal Plain and Sandhills physiographic provinces, the SRS has more than 50 distinct soil types. The topography is rolling to flat with elevation ranges from 50 to 400 feet above sea level.

  11. Thermodynamic Modeling of Savannah River Evaporators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, C.F.

    2001-08-02

    A thermodynamic model based on the code SOLGASMIX is developed to calculate phase equilibrium in evaporators and related tank wastes at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This model uses the Pitzer method to calculate activity coefficients, and many of the required Pitzer parameters have been determined in the course of this work. Principal chemical species in standard SRS simulant solutions are included, and the temperature range for most parameters has been extended above 100 C. The SOLGASMIX model and calculations using the code Geochemists Workbench are compared to actual solubility data including silicate, aluminate, and aluminosilicate solutions. In addition, SOLGASMIX model calculations are also compared to transient solubility data involving SRS simulant solutions. These comparisons indicate that the SOLGASMIX predictions closely match reliable data over the range of temperature and solution composition expected in the SRS evaporator and related tanks. Predictions using the Geochemists Workbench may be unreliable, due primarily to the use of an inaccurate activity coefficient model.

  12. Savannah River Site environmental data for 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W. [ed.

    1994-05-01

    The figures and tables in this report represent a capsule view of the routine environmental monitoring and surveillance programs at the Savannah River Site. An attempt has been made to include all available data from environmental research programs. The first section of the book is a collection of maps of radiological and nonradiological sampling locations. Also included are general radiological and nonradiological sampling and analysis schedules; a list of the media sampled, along with sample sizes and representative aliquots; a list of the lower limits of detection for radiological detection instruments; the minimum detectable concentrations for gamma analysis of water and air samples; and the minimum detectable concentrations for gamma analysis of soil, food, fish and wildlife, and vegetation samples. Following the first section are data tables containing radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring results, radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance results, dose estimates, quality assurance activities, and results of nonroutine occurrences and special surveys.

  13. Savannah River Site environmental data for 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W. [ed.

    1993-09-01

    The figures and tables in this report represent a capsule view of the routine environmental monitoring and surveillance programs at the Savannah River Site. An attempt has been made to include all available data from environmental research programs. The first section of the book is a collection of maps of radiological and nonradiological sampling locations. Also included are general radiological and nonradiological sampling and analysis schedules; a list of the media sampled, along with sample sizes and representative aliquots; a list of the lower limits of detection for radiological detection instruments; the minimum detectable concentrations for gamma analysis of water and air samples; and the minimum detectable concentrations for gamma analysis of soil, food, fish and wildlife, and vegetation samples. Following the first section are data tables containing radiological and nonradiological effluent monitoring results, radiological and nonradiological environmental surveillance results, dose estimates, quality assurance activities, and results of nonroutine occurrences and special surveys.

  14. SAVANNAH RIVER ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, A

    2007-08-22

    The ''Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2006'' (WSRC-TR-2007-00008) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts; and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

  15. Advanced separations at Savannah River site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, M.C. [Savannah River Technology Center, Aiken, SC (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has many waste streams that are contaminated with radionuclides and/or hazardous materials that must be treated to remove the radioactivity (Cs, Sr, tritium, actinides) and hazardous components (poly-chlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], cyanide, metal ions). This task provides testbeds for ESP-developed materials and technology using actual SRS waste streams. The work includes different SRS waste streams: high-level waste (HLW) solutions currently stored in underground tanks onsite, water recycled from the waste vitrification plant, groundwater and other aqueous streams contaminated with metal ions and radionuclides, and reactor basin water in excess facilities. Another part of this task is to provide a report on materials for Cs removal from aqueous solutions for use as a reference.

  16. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, A

    2006-07-18

    The ''Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2005'' (WSRC-TR-2006-00007) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to: present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; highlight significant programs and efforts; and assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment.

  17. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, C.L.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to meet three of the primary objectives of the Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental monitoring program. These objectives are to assess actual or potential exposures to populations form the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from normal operations or nonroutine occurrences; to demonstrate compliance with applicable authorized limits and legal requirements; and to communicate results of the monitoring program to the public. This 1989 report contains descriptions of radiological and nonradiological monitoring programs, it provides data obtained from these programs, and it describes various environmental research activities ongoing at the site. Also included are summaries of environmental management and compliance activities, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act activities, and a listing of environmental permits issued by regulatory agencies.

  18. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, A.

    2009-09-15

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2008 (SRNS-STI-2009-00190) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.' The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are distributed each year to government officials, universities, public libraries, environmental and civic groups, news media, and interested individuals. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (3) highlight significant programs and efforts.

  19. Savannah River Site Environmental Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-01

    Formal sitewide environmental planning at the . Savannah River Site (SRS) began in 1986 with the development and adoption of the Strategic Environmental Plan. The Strategic Environmental Plan describes the philosophy, policy, and overall program direction of environmental programs for the operation of the SRS. The Strategic Environmental Plan (Volume 2) provided the basis for development of the Environmental Implementation Plan (EIP). The EIP is the detailed, comprehensive environmental master plan for operating contractor organizations at the SRS. The EIP provides a process to ensure that all environmental requirements and obligations are being met by setting specific measurable goals and objectives and strategies for implementation. The plan is the basis for justification of site manpower and funding requests for environmental projects and programs over a five-year planning period.

  20. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.; Spitzer, D.

    1994-12-16

    The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from producing nuclear weapons materials for national defense to managing the waste it has generated, restoring the environment, and enhancing industrial development in and around the site. But no matter what the site`s mission is, it will continue to maintain its comprehensive environmental monitoring and surveillance program. In 1994, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 30,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, foodstuffs, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

  1. Meteorological annual report for 1995 at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, C.H.; Tatum, C.P.

    1996-12-01

    The Environmental Technology Section (ETS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) collects, archives, and analyzes basic meteorological data supporting a variety of activities at SRS. These activities include the design, construction, and operation of nuclear and non-nuclear facilities, emergency response, environmental compliance, resource management, and environmental research. This report contains tabular and graphical summaries of data collected during 1995 for temperature, precipitation, relative humidity, wind, barometric pressure, and solar radiation. Most of these data were collected at the central Climatology Facility. Summaries of temperature and relative humidity were generated with data from the lowest level of measurement at the Central Climatology Site tower (13 feet above ground). (Relative humidity is calculated from measurements of dew-point temperature.) Wind speed summaries were generated with data from the second measurement level (58 feet above ground). Wind speed measurements from this level are believed to best represent open, well-exposed areas of the Site. Precipitation summaries were based on data from the Building 773-A site since quality control algorithms for the central Climatology Facility rain gauge data were not finalized at the time this report was prepared. This report also contains seasonal and annual summaries of joint occurrence frequencies for selected wind speed categories by 22.5 degree wind direction sector (i.e., wind roses). Wind rose summaries are provided for the 200-foot level of the Central Climatology tower and for each of the eight 200-foot area towers.

  2. Savannah River Site generic data base development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard , A.

    2000-01-04

    This report describes the results of a project to improve the generic component failure database for the Savannah River Site (SRS). Additionally, guidelines were developed further for more advanced applications of database values. A representative list of components and failure modes for SRS risk models was generated by reviewing existing safety analyses and component failure data bases and from suggestions from SRS safety analysts. Then sources of data or failure rate estimates were identified and reviewed for applicability. A major source of information was the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability, or NUCLARR. This source includes an extensive collection of failure data and failure rate estimates for commercial nuclear power plants. A recent Idaho National Engineering Laboratory report on failure data from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant was also reviewed. From these and other recent sources, failure data and failure rate estimates were collected for the components and failure modes of interest. For each component failure mode, this information was aggregated to obtain a recommended generic failure rate distribution (mean and error factor based on a lognormal distribution). Results are presented in a table in this report. A major difference between generic database and previous efforts is that this effort estimates failure rates based on actual data (failure events) rather than on existing failure rate estimates. This effort was successful in that over 75% of the results are now based on actual data. Also included is a section on guidelines for more advanced applications of failure rate data. This report describes the results of a project to improve the generic component failure database for the Savannah River site (SRS). Additionally, guidelines were developed further for more advanced applications of database values.

  3. Reactor safety determination Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menegus, R.I.; Ring, H.F.

    1956-02-01

    Large quantities of radioactive material are present in the Reactor and Separations Areas of the Savannah River Plant. This report deals with the precautions that were taken in the design of the plant to guard against the escape of radioactive material, and with the various devices and procedures that have been provided to assure safe operation under foreseeable operating conditions. Because no amount of care and foresight can guarantee against the risk of accident, one must assume that there is a remote possibility that a serious release of radioactive material can occur even in a very carefully designed plant. Once liberated to the surroundings, radioactive material may be spread by wind and water. No effective control of these agents is possible. The obvious preventive measure is isolation of the plant site from centers of population. So far as is practicable, this has been done at Savannah River, but the need for communications, power and a work force makes it impossible to secure the full benefits that might be derived from complete isolation of the plant. In order to calculate the magnitude of the hazard to people outside the plant site, it is necessary to assume the occurrence of highly improbable events - the very events that this design seeks to prevent by careful design and operation. Nevertheless, if one assumes a release of radioactivity, one must estimate the airborne and waterborne radioactive burdens carried off the plant site, if one wishes to evaluate the hazard to which the off-site populace is exposed. The climate and the geology of the plant site determine the direction of transport and the dilution of the radioactive material. This information, together with data on the distribution of the population around the site, may be used to estimate the damage to be anticipated in the improbable event of the release of large quantities of radioactive material.

  4. Relationships of contact pressure with subjective experiences of comfort and discomfort in using hand saws

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuijt-Evers, L.

    2005-01-01

    The relationships of objective measurements (contact pressure and productivity) with subjective experienced comfort and discomfort in using hand saws was examined. Professional carpenters evaluated five different hand saws. The pressure-time integral during the static pressure measurement (beta =

  5. Development study on subcriticality monitor. 1. Report under business contract with Japan Nuclear Fuel Cycle Development Institute

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, S

    2002-01-01

    In this trust fund, we reviewed subcriticality measuring methods and neutron or gamma ray measuring and date transmission systems appropriate for realizing inexpensive on-line criticality surveillance systems, which is required for ensuring the safety of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Since the neutron flux level in subcritical systems is fairly low without external neutron sources, it is desirable to use pulse type neutron detectors for subcritical measurement systems. This logically implies that subcriticality measurement methods based on the temporal domain should be used for developing an on-line criticality surveillance system. In the deep subcriticality conditions, a strong external neutron source is needed for eactivity measurement and a D-T tube can be used in order to improve the accuracy of the measurement. A D-T tube is convenient since it is free from Tritium problem since Tritium is sealed in an airtight container and also can be controlled by power supply. Hence, under deep subcritical condit...

  6. Review of Savannah River Site K Reactor inservice inspection and testing restart program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.T.; Hartley, R.S.; Kido, C.

    1992-09-01

    Inservice inspection (ISI) and inservice testing (IST) programs are used at commercial nuclear power plants to monitor the pressure boundary integrity and operability of components in important safety-related systems. The Department of Energy (DOE) - Office of Defense Programs (DP) operates a Category A (> 20 MW thermal) production reactor at the Savannah River Site (SRS). This report represents an evaluation of the ISI and IST practices proposed for restart of SRS K Reactor as compared, where applicable, to current ISI/IST activities of commercial nuclear power facilities.

  7. Analysis of a thermite experiment to study low pressure corium dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelm, D.

    2001-08-01

    The report describes the recalculation of a thermite experiment in a reduced scale which simulates the discharge of molten core materials out of the pressure vessel of a light water reactor into the open compartments and the dome of the containment. The experiment was performed in the framework of a multinational effort at the Sandia National Laboratory, U.S.A. It is being followed by the DISCO program at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. A computational fluid dynamics code was supplemented with specific models to recalculate the Sandia experiment in order to identify problem areas which need to be addressed in the future. Therefore, a first attempt was undertaken to extrapolate to reactor conditions. This was done in two steps to separate geometric from material scaling relationships. The study shows that important experimental results can be extrapolated according to general scaling laws but that there are sensitivities, especially when replacing thermite by corium. The results show a considerable scatter and a dependence on geometric resolution and dynamics of energy transfer between participating components. (orig.) [German] Der Bericht beschreibt die Berechnung eines in reduziertem Massstab durchgefuehrten Thermitexperimentes, das den Auswurf von geschmolzenem Kernmaterial aus dem Druckbehaelter eines Leichtwasserreaktors in die angrenzenden Raeume und den Dom des Sicherheitsbehaelters beschreibt. Das Experiment wurde im Rahmen einer internationalen Uebereinkunft im Sandia National Laboratory, U.S.A., durchgefuehrt. Die Thematik wird zur Zeit im DISCO Programm im Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe weiter verfolgt. Ein Fluiddynamikcode wurde mit speziellen Modellen ergaenzt, um das Sandia Experiment nachzurechnen. Dabei wurden Problembereiche identifiziert, die zukuenftig bearbeitet werden muessen. Ein erster Versuch der Extrapolation auf den Reaktorfall wurde unternommen. Die Extrapolation wurde in zwei Schritten durchgefuehrt, um die geometrische von der

  8. Subcritical hydrothermal conversion of organic wastes and biomass. Reaction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Amadeus Castro Vega

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal conversion is a procedure which emulates organic matter’s natural conversion into bio-crude having physical and chemical properties analogous to petroleum. The artificial transformation of biomass requi- res previous knowledge of the main reaction routes and product availability. The main component of biomass (depolymerisation by hydrolysis is presented in hydrothermal cellulose conversion, producing oligosaccharides which exhibit dehydration and retro-aldol condensation reactions for transforming into furfurals and carboxylic acids. Other biomass components (such as lignin, proteins, and fat esters present both hydrolysis and pyrolysis reaction routes. As long as biomass mainly contains carbohydrates, subcritical hydrothermal conversion products and their wastes will be fundamentally analogous to those displaying cellulose. These substances have added- value by far surpassing raw material’s acquisition cost. When the main hydrothermal conversion products’ O/C, H/C molar ratios as reported in literature are plotted, an evolutionary tralectory for conversion products appears to be closely or even overlapped with fossil fuels’ geological evolution.

  9. Effect of fluid salinity on subcritical crack propagation in calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostom, Fatma; Røyne, Anja; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Renard, François

    2013-01-01

    The slow propagation of cracks, also called subcritical crack growth, is a mechanism of fracturing responsible for a ductile deformation of rocks under crustal conditions. In the present study, the double-torsion technique was used to measure the effect of fluid chemistry on the slow propagation of cracks in calcite single crystals at room temperature. Time-lapse images and measurements of force and load-point displacement allowed accurate characterization of crack velocities in a range of 10- 8 to 10- 4 m/s. Velocity curves as a function of energy-release rates were obtained for different fluid compositions, varying NH4Cl and NaCl concentrations. Our results show the presence of a threshold in fluid composition, separating two regimes: weakening conditions where the crack propagation is favored, and strengthening conditions where crack propagation slows down. We suggest that electrostatic surface forces that modify the repulsion forces between the two surfaces of the crack may be responsible for this behavior.

  10. Effective Subcritical Butane Extraction of Bifenthrin Residue in Black Tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yating; Gu, Lingbiao; Wang, Fei; Kong, Lingjun; Qin, Guangyong

    2017-03-30

    As a natural and healthy beverage, tea is widely enjoyed; however, the pesticide residues in tea leaves affect the quality and food safety. To develop a highly selective and efficient method for the facile removal of pesticide residues, the subcritical butane extraction (SBE) technique was employed, and three variables involving temperature, time and extraction cycles were studied. The optimum SBE conditions were found to be as follows: extraction temperature 45 °C, extraction time 30 min, number of extraction cycles 1, and in such a condition that the extraction efficiency reached as high as 92%. Further, the catechins, theanine, caffeine and aroma components, which determine the quality of the tea, fluctuated after SBE treatment. Compared with the uncrushed leaves, pesticide residues can more easily be removed from crushed leaves, and the practical extraction efficiency was 97%. These results indicate that SBE is a useful method to efficiently remove the bifenthrin, and as appearance is not relevant in the production process, tea leaves should first be crushed and then extracted in order that residual pesticides are thoroughly removed.

  11. The Chain-Length Distribution in Subcritical Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolen, Steven Douglas [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2000-06-01

    The individual fission chains that appear in any neutron multiplying system provide a means, via neutron noise analysis, to unlock a wealth of information regarding the nature of the system. This work begins by determining the probability density distributions for fission chain lengths in zero-dimensional systems over a range of prompt neutron multiplication constant (K) values. This section is followed by showing how the integral representation of the chain-length distribution can be used to obtain an estimate of the system's subcritical prompt multiplication (MP). The lifetime of the chains is then used to provide a basis for determining whether a neutron noise analysis will be successful in assessing the neutron multiplication constant, k, of the system in the presence of a strong intrinsic source. A Monte Carlo transport code, MC++, is used to model the evolution of the individual fission chains and to determine how they are influenced by spatial effects. The dissertation concludes by demonstrating how experimental validation of certain global system parameters by neutron noise analysis may be precluded in situations in which the system K is relatively low and in which realistic detector efficiencies are simulated.

  12. Catalytic upgrading of duckweed biocrude in subcritical water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caicai; Duan, Peigao; Xu, Yuping; Wang, Bing; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Lei

    2014-08-01

    Herein, a duckweed biocrude produced from the hydrothermal liquefaction of Lemna minor was treated in subcritical water with added H₂. Effects of several different commercially available materials such as Ru/C, Pd/C, Pt/C, Pt/γ-Al₂O₃, Pt/C-sulfide, Rh/γ-Al₂O₃, activated carbon, MoS₂, Mo₂C, Co-Mo/γ-Al₂O₃, and zeolite on the yields of product fractions and the deoxygenation, denitrogenation, and desulfurization of biocrude at 350°C were examined, respectively. All the materials showed catalytic activity for deoxygenation and desulfurization of the biocrude and only Ru/C showed activity for denitrogenation. Of those catalysts examined, Pt/C showed the best performance for deoxygenation. Among all the upgraded oils, the oil produced with Ru/C shows the lowest sulfur, the highest hydrocarbon content (25.6%), the highest energy recovery (85.5%), and the highest higher heating value (42.6 MJ/kg). The gaseous products were mainly unreacted H₂, CH₄, CO₂, and C₂H6. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Effective Subcritical Butane Extraction of Bifenthrin Residue in Black Tea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yating Zhang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available As a natural and healthy beverage, tea is widely enjoyed; however, the pesticide residues in tea leaves affect the quality and food safety. To develop a highly selective and efficient method for the facile removal of pesticide residues, the subcritical butane extraction (SBE technique was employed, and three variables involving temperature, time and extraction cycles were studied. The optimum SBE conditions were found to be as follows: extraction temperature 45 °C, extraction time 30 min, number of extraction cycles 1, and in such a condition that the extraction efficiency reached as high as 92%. Further, the catechins, theanine, caffeine and aroma components, which determine the quality of the tea, fluctuated after SBE treatment. Compared with the uncrushed leaves, pesticide residues can more easily be removed from crushed leaves, and the practical extraction efficiency was 97%. These results indicate that SBE is a useful method to efficiently remove the bifenthrin, and as appearance is not relevant in the production process, tea leaves should first be crushed and then extracted in order that residual pesticides are thoroughly removed.

  14. Catalyst-free ethyl biodiesel production from rice bran under subcritical condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullaikah, Siti; Afifudin, Riza; Amalia, Rizky

    2015-12-01

    In-situ ethyl biodiesel production from rice bran under subcritical water and ethanol with no catalyst was employed. This process is environmentally friendly and is very flexible in term of feedstock utilization since it can handle relatively high moisture and free fatty acids (FFAs) contents. In addition, the alcohol, i.e. bioethanol, is a non-toxic, biodegradable, and green raw material when produced from non-edible biomass residues, leading to a 100% renewable biodiesel. The fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs, ethyl biodiesel) are better than fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs, methyl biodiesel) in terms of fuel properties, including cetane number, oxidation stability and cold flow properties. The influences of the operating variables such as reaction time (1 - 10 h), ethanol concentration (12.5 - 87.5%), and pressurizing gas (N2 and CO2) on the ethyl biodiesel yield and purity have been investigated systematically while the temperature and pressure were kept constant at 200 °C and 40 bar. The optimum results were obtained at 5 h reaction time and 75% ethanol concentration using CO2 as compressing gas. Ethyl biodiesel yield and purity of 58.78% and 61.35%, respectively, were obtained using rice bran with initial FFAs content of 37.64%. FFAs level was reduced to 14.22% with crude ethyl biodiesel recovery of 95.98%. Increasing the reaction time up to 10 h only increased the yield and purity by only about 3%. Under N2 atmosphere and at the same operating conditions (5h and 75% ethanol), ethyl biodiesel yield and purity decreased to 54.63% and 58.07%, respectively, while FFAs level was increased to 17.93% and crude ethyl biodiesel recovery decreased to 87.32%.

  15. Editorial | Adedoyin | Savannah Journal of Medical Research and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. Savannah NWR - Annual Narrative Report Calendar Year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Savannah NWR summarizes Refuge activities during the 1997 calendar year. The report contains information on land acquisition,...

  17. Data banks for risk assessment at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durant, W.S.; Lux, C.R.; Baughman, D.F.

    1990-01-01

    The Savannah River Site maintains a compilation of operating problems and equipment failures that have occurred in the fuel reprocessing and other areas in the form of computerized data banks. 14 refs., 25 figs.

  18. Savannah, Georgia Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Savannah, Georgia Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model. MOST...

  19. Assessment of Radionuclides in the Savannah River Site Environment Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1999-01-26

    This document summarizes the impact of radionuclide releases from Savannah River Site (SRS) facilities from 1954 through 1996. The radionuclides reported here are those whose release resulted in the highest dose to people living near SRS.

  20. Pine Savannah restoration monitoring –Tammany Holding Tract

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Monitor the response of pine flatwood/savannah to restoration and management actions including brush removal, prescribed burning and planting longleaf pine...

  1. Savannah Coastal National Wildlife Refuges Complex: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Savannah Coastal NWR Complex for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge...

  2. Analysis of the Temporal Response of Coupled Asymmetrical Zero-Power Subcritical Bare Metal Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klain, Kimberly L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-06-21

    The behavior of symmetrical coupled-core systems has been extensively studied, yet there is a dearth of research on asymmetrical systems due to the increased complexity of the analysis of such systems. In this research, the multipoint kinetics method is applied to asymmetrical zeropower, subcritical, bare metal reactor systems. Existing research on asymmetrical reactor systems assumes symmetry in the neutronic coupling; however, it will be shown that this cannot always be assumed. Deep subcriticality adds another layer of complexity and requires modification of the multipoint kinetics equations to account for the effect of the external neutron source. A modified set of multipoint kinetics equations is derived with this in mind. Subsequently, the Rossi-alpha equations are derived for a two-region asymmetrical reactor system. The predictive capabilities of the radiation transport code MCNP6 for neutron noise experiments are shown in a comparison to the results of a series of Rossi-alpha measurements performed by J. Mihalczo utilizing a coupled set of symmetrical bare highly-enriched uranium (HEU) cylinders. The ptrac option within MCNP6 can generate time-tagged counts in a cell (list-mode data). The list-mode data can then be processed similarly to measured data to obtain values for system parameters such as the dual prompt neutron decay constants observable in a coupled system. The results from the ptrac simulations agree well with the historical measured values. A series of case studies are conducted to study the effects of geometrical asymmetry in the coupling between two bare metal HEU cylinders. While the coupling behavior of symmetrical systems has been reported on extensively, that of asymmetrical systems remains sparse. In particular, it appears that there has been no previous research in obtaining the coupling time constants for asymmetrically-coupled systems. The difficulty in observing such systems is due in part to the inability to determine the

  3. CFD Analyses and Experiments in a PAT Modeling: Pressure Variation and System Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modesto Pérez-Sánchez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of a PAT modeling is presented for application in water pipe systems as an interesting and promising energy converter to improve the system energy efficiency. The study is focused on the use of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD model in conjunction with laboratory data for representing PAT performance. The first stage of the procedure concerns a systematic analysis of the role played by the characteristic PAT parameters in the computational mesh definitions of the CFD model, with the aim of defining the most efficient set of capturing the main features of the PAT behaviour under different operating conditions. In the second stage, comparisons of CFD results and experiments were carried out to examine some system components for better understanding the PAT response. Specifically, the behavior of the pressure distribution along the PAT installation when implemented in a water pipe system are analyzed, and the links between pressure variation and the head drop in different system components responsible for the head losses and net head definition are also examined.

  4. Two-wave photon Doppler velocimetry measurements in direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lea Lewis J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct impact Hopkinson pressure bar systems offer many potential advantages over split Hopkinson pressure bars, including access to higher strain rates, higher strains for equivalent striker velocity and system length, lower dispersion and faster achievement of force equilibrium. Currently advantages are gained at a significant cost: the fact that input bar data is unavailable removes all information about the striker impacted specimen face, preventing the determination of force equilibrium, and requiring approximations to be made on the sample deformation history. Recently photon Doppler velocimetry methods have been developed, which can replace strain gauges on Hopkinson bars. In this paper we discuss an experimental method and complementary data analysis for using Doppler velocimetry to measure surface velocities of the striker and output bars in a direct impact bar experiment, allowing similar data to be recorded as in a split bar system, with the same level of convenience. We discuss extracting velocity and force measurements, and improving the accuracy and convenience of Doppler velocimetry on Hopkinson bars. Results obtained using the technique are compared to equivalent split bar tests, showing improved stress measurements for the lowest and highest strains.

  5. Savannah River Site peer evaluator standards: Operator assessment for restart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    Savannah River Site has implemented a Peer Evaluator program for the assessment of certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors and Shift Technical Engineers prior to restart. This program is modeled after the nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Examiner Standard, ES-601, for the requalification of licensed operators in the commercial utility industry. It has been tailored to reflect the unique differences between Savannah River production reactors and commercial power reactors.

  6. Savannah River Site peer evaluator standards: Operator assessment for restart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    Savannah River Site has implemented a Peer Evaluator program for the assessment of certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors and Shift Technical Engineers prior to restart. This program is modeled after the nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) Examiner Standard, ES-601, for the requalification of licensed operators in the commercial utility industry. It has been tailored to reflect the unique differences between Savannah River production reactors and commercial power reactors.

  7. Research on simulation and experiment of noninvasive intracranial pressure monitoring based on acoustoelasticity effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu J

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Jun Wu1, Wei He2, Wei-min Chen1, Lian Zhu21Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Technology and Systems, 2State Key Laboratory of Power Transmission Equipment and System Security and New Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing, People’s Republic of ChinaAbstract: The real-time monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP is very important for craniocerebrally critically ill patients, but it is very difficult to realize long-time monitoring for the traditional invasive method, which very easily infects patients. Many noninvasive methods have emerged, but these have not been able to monitor ICP for long periods in real time, and they are not ready for clinical application. In order to realize long-time, online, real-time, noninvasive monitoring for ICP, a new method based on acoustoelasticity of ultrasound is herein proposed. Experimental models were devised to research the new method for experiment and simulation. Polymethyl methacrylate and hydrogel were adopted for the experiment, and their mechanical properties were very close to the real brain. A numerical solution for acoustoelasticity theory was acquired by simulating calculation based on a finite-element method. This was compared to the experimental value. The results showed a consistent match between theoretical solution and experimental value, with maximum error at most 5%. Thus, the effectiveness of the new method was verified. Theoretical and practical foundation is provided for this new method, and it could be used for animal experimentation or clinical testing in further research.Keywords: medical instruments, noninvasive, intracranial pressure, ultrasonic, acoustoelasticity, biomechanics

  8. High-pressure phases of CaCO 3: Crystal structure prediction and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oganov, Artem R.; Glass, Colin W.; Ono, Shigeaki

    2006-01-01

    Post-aragonite phase of CaCO3, experimentally known to be stable above 40 GPa [S. Ono, T. Kikegawa, Y. Ohishi, J. Tsuchiya, Post-aragonite phase transformation in CaCO3 at 40 GPa, Am. Mineral. 90 (2005) 667-671], is believed to be a major carbon-containing mineral in the Earth's mantle. Crystal structure of this mineral phase could not be solved using experimental data or traditional theoretical simulation methods and remained a controversial issue. Using a combination of advanced ab initio simulation techniques and high-pressure experiment, we have been able to determine the crystal structure of CaCO3 post-aragonite. Here, we performed simulations with the USPEX code [C.W. Glass, A.R. Oganov, and N. Hansen, (in preparation). USPEX: a universal structure prediction program], which is based on an evolutionary algorithm using ab initio free energy as the fitness function. This novel methodology for crystal structure prediction, which uses only the chemical composition as input, is described in detail. For CaCO3, we identify a number of energetically competitive structures, the most stable of which closely matches the experimental powder diffraction pattern and, in agreement with experiment, becomes more stable than aragonite above 42 GPa. This structure belongs to a new structure type, which is also adopted by the high-pressure post-aragonite phases of SrCO3 and BaCO3. It has 2 formula units in the orthorhombic unit cell (space group Pmmn) and contains triangular CO32- ions and Ca2+ ions in the 12-fold coordination. Above 137 GPa, a pyroxene-type structure (space group C2221) with chains of CO44- tetrahedra becomes more stable than post-aragonite. For MgCO3, this structure becomes more stable than magnesite above 106 GPa and is a good candidate structure for MgCO3 post-magnesite.

  9. Experimental Assessment of a Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Operating at Subcritical and Supercritical Conditions in a Small-Scale Solar Organic Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Lazova

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the performance of a helical coil heat exchanger operating at subcritical and supercritical conditions is analysed. The counter-current heat exchanger was specially designed to operate at a maximal pressure and temperature of 42 bar and 200 °C, respectively. The small-scale solar organic Rankine cycle (ORC installation has a net power output of 3 kWe. The first tests were done in a laboratory where an electrical heater was used instead of the concentrated photovoltaic/thermal (CPV/T collectors. The inlet heating fluid temperature of the water was 95 °C. The effects of different parameters on the heat transfer rate in the heat exchanger were investigated. Particularly, the performance analysis was elaborated considering the changes of the mass flow rate of the working fluid (R-404A in the range of 0.20–0.33 kg/s and the inlet pressure varying from 18 bar up to 41 bar. Hence, the variation of the heat flux was in the range of 5–9 kW/m2. The results show that the working fluid’s mass flow rate has significant influence on the heat transfer rate rather than the operational pressure. Furthermore, from the comparison between the experimental results with the heat transfer correlations from the literature, the experimental results fall within the uncertainty range for the supercritical analysis but there is a deviation of the investigated subcritical correlations.

  10. Experiment plan for characterization of the properties of molten rock at atmospheric and elevated pressures: Magma Energy Research Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modreski, P.J.

    1979-02-01

    Knowledge of the properties of molten rock (magma) is of importance to the Magma Energy Research Project of Sandia Laboratories. Facilities have been set up at Sandia to study the physical properties, chemistry, and corrosive nature of magma to 1600/sup 0/C and from atmospheric pressure to 4 kbar (400 MPa). Experiments at atmospheric pressure are being done in the presence of multicomponent gas mixtures to control the chemical activities of oxygen and sulfur. The high-pressure apparatus includes cold-seal small-volume pressure vessels (to 1100/sup 0/C and 1 kbar) and a large (750 cm/sup 3/ sample volume), internally heated pressure vessel (to 1600/sup 0/C and 4 kbar). The large vessel contains a number of penetrations for electrical leads and pressure lines, and is linked to a computer for data acquisition and control of experiments. Water and other dissolved volatiles (CO/sub 2/, CO, SO/sub 2/, S/sub 2/, H/sub 2/S, HCl, HF) have significant effects on all the properties of magma, and these effects will be studied in the high-pressure apparatus. Phase equilibria, viscosity, electrical conductivity, and materials compatibility will be the first properties to be examined under pressure. This report includes a review of the nature and chemical basis for the effects of dissolved volatiles on these properties of magma. 70 references, 10 figures.

  11. The role of high-pressure experiments on determining super-Earth properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Diana; O'Connell, Richard J.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2009-08-01

    Super-Earths are the newest class of extra-solar planets with a mass range between about 1-10 M ⊕ . With their large masses, they experience very large internal pressures. The central pressure scales proportionately with mass, reaching values that require us to extend our understanding of rock and H2O behavior to such extreme conditions. Pressure also constrains the power law relationship between mass and radius of solid planets R˜ M β . The value for the exponent is 0.262≤ β≤0.274 as constrained by the different internal structure models for super-Earths, while it is 0.3 for planets between 5-50% the mass of Earth. Despite uncertainties in planetary composition, temperature structure and equation of state, the mass-radius relationship is robust, and thus, useful for inferring the expected signal in transit searches. In the next few years many super-Earths will be discovered and their masses and radii will be known with some uncertainty. Even without errors in both the data and structure models, a large number of compositions can fit the same average density. However, the follow-up observations with space telescopes will yield very precise radius measurements and even probe the atmospheres of super-Earths. This radius uncertainty will then be comparable to the current error derived from the equation of state used by the structure models. Thus, there is a need for accurate equations of state of solid planetary materials. Furthermore, information on the structure, such as the size and state of the core, crucially depends on the exact behavior of super-Earth materials (i.e. silicates, iron, iron alloy and ices) at high pressures and temperatures. In addition, information about the atmospheric composition of these planets may prove useful in constraining their interiors. Ultimately any inference on the structure of super-Earths, including information from atmospheres, depends on the precision of interior models, which in turn require accurate equations of

  12. Hydrothermal liquefaction of Spirulina and Nannochloropsis salina under subcritical and supercritical water conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toor, Saqib S; Reddy, Harvind; Deng, Shuguang; Hoffmann, Jessica; Spangsmark, Dorte; Madsen, Linda B; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo; Rosendahl, Lasse A

    2013-03-01

    Six hydrothermal liquefaction experiments on Nannochloropsis salina and Spirulina platensis at subcritical and supercritical water conditions (220–375 °C, 20–255 bar) were carried out to explore the feasibility of extracting lipids from wet algae, preserving nutrients in lipid-extracted algae solid residue, and recycling process water for algae cultivation. GC–MS, elemental analyzer, FT-IR, calorimeter and nutrient analysis were used to analyze bio-crude, lipid-extracted algae and water samples produced in the hydrothermal liquefaction process. The highest bio-crude yield of 46% was obtained on N. salina at 350 °C and 175 bar. For S. platensis algae sample, the optimal hydrothermal liquefaction condition appears to be at 310 °C and 115 bar, while the optimal condition for N. salina is at 350 °C and 175 bar. Preliminary data also indicate that a lipid-extracted algae solid residue sample obtained in the hydrothermal liquefaction process contains a high level of proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Subcritical Butane Extraction of Wheat Germ Oil and Its Deacidification by Molecular Distillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwei Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Extraction and deacidification are important stages for wheat germ oil (WGO production. Crude WGO was extracted using subcritical butane extraction (SBE and compared with traditional solvent extraction (SE and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SCE based on the yield, chemical index and fatty acid profile. Furthermore, the effects of the molecular distillation temperature on the quality of WGO were also investigated in this study. Results indicated that WGO extracted by SBE has a higher yield of 9.10% and better quality; at the same time, its fatty acid composition has no significant difference compared with that of SE and SCE. The molecular distillation experiment showed that the acid value, peroxide value and p-anisidine value of WGO were reduced with the increase of the evaporation temperatures, and the contents of the active constituents of tocopherol, polyphenols and phytosterols are simultaneously decreased. Generally, the distillation temperature of 150 °C is an appropriate condition for WGO deacidification with the higher deacidification efficiency of 77.78% and the higher retention rate of active constituents.

  14. Sub-critical crack growth in silicate glasses: Role of network topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedskjaer, Morten M.; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    The presence of water in the surrounding atmosphere can cause sub-critical crack growth (SCCG) in glasses, a phenomenon known as fatigue or stress corrosion. Here, to facilitate the compositional design of more fatigue-resistant glasses, we investigate the composition dependence of SCCG by studying fourteen silicate glasses. The fatigue curves (V-KI) have been obtained by indentation experiments through measurements of the crack length as a function of post-indentation fatigue duration. Interestingly, we find that the fatigue resistance parameter N is generally improved by increasing the alumina content and is thereby found to exhibit a fairly linear dependence on the measured Vickers hardness HV for a wide range of N and HV values. This finding highlights the important role of network topology in governing the SCCG in silicate glasses, since hardness has been shown to scale linearly with the number of atomic constraints. Our results therefore suggest that glasses showing under-constrained flexible networks, which feature floppy internal modes of deformation, are more readily attacked by water molecules, thus promoting stress corrosion and reducing the fatigue resistance.

  15. Subcritical Butane Extraction of Wheat Germ Oil and Its Deacidification by Molecular Distillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinwei; Sun, Dewei; Qian, Lige; Liu, Yuanfa

    2016-12-07

    Extraction and deacidification are important stages for wheat germ oil (WGO) production. Crude WGO was extracted using subcritical butane extraction (SBE) and compared with traditional solvent extraction (SE) and supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SCE) based on the yield, chemical index and fatty acid profile. Furthermore, the effects of the molecular distillation temperature on the quality of WGO were also investigated in this study. Results indicated that WGO extracted by SBE has a higher yield of 9.10% and better quality; at the same time, its fatty acid composition has no significant difference compared with that of SE and SCE. The molecular distillation experiment showed that the acid value, peroxide value and p-anisidine value of WGO were reduced with the increase of the evaporation temperatures, and the contents of the active constituents of tocopherol, polyphenols and phytosterols are simultaneously decreased. Generally, the distillation temperature of 150 °C is an appropriate condition for WGO deacidification with the higher deacidification efficiency of 77.78% and the higher retention rate of active constituents.

  16. (n,xn) cross section measurements for Y-89 foils used as detectors for high energy neutron measurements in the deeply subcritical assembly "QUINTA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielewicz, Marcin; Kilim, Stanisław; Strugalska-Gola, Elżbieta; Szuta, Marcin; Wojciechowski, Andrzej; Tyutyunnikov, Sergey; Prokofiev, Alexander; Passoth, Elke

    2017-09-01

    Study of the deep subcritical systems (QUINTA) using relativistic beams is performed within the project "Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes" (E&T - RAW). The experiment assembly was irradiated by deuteron/proton beam (Dubna NUCLOTRON). We calculated the neutron energy spectrum inside the whole assembly by using threshold energy (n,xn) reactions in yttrium (Y-89) foils. There are almost no experimental cross section data for those reactions. New Y-89(n,xn) cross section measurements were carried out at The Svedberg laboratory (TSL) in Uppsala, Sweden in 2015. In this paper we present preliminary results of those experiments.

  17. (n,xn cross section measurements for Y-89 foils used as detectors for high energy neutron measurements in the deeply subcritical assembly “QUINTA”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bielewicz Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Study of the deep subcritical systems (QUINTA using relativistic beams is performed within the project “Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Wastes” (E&T – RAW. The experiment assembly was irradiated by deuteron/proton beam (Dubna NUCLOTRON. We calculated the neutron energy spectrum inside the whole assembly by using threshold energy (n,xn reactions in yttrium (Y-89 foils. There are almost no experimental cross section data for those reactions. New Y-89(n,xn cross section measurements were carried out at The Svedberg laboratory (TSL in Uppsala, Sweden in 2015. In this paper we present preliminary results of those experiments.

  18. Effects of user experience and method in the inflation of endotracheal tube pilot balloon on cuff pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, A B; Demirel, I; Gunduz, G; Erhan, O L

    2013-01-01

    Endotracheal tube cuff pressure (ETCP) is recommended to be maintained between 20-30 cm H2O limits. While insufficient inflation of ETC may cause aspirations, over-inflation of it may lead to damage in tracheal epithelium. We planned to investigate the effects of user experience and cuff pressure inflation method differences following endotracheal tube cuff pressure and complaints about it. Two hundred and fifty patients planned for general anaesthesia were included in this study. ETC was inflated by users with different experience according to leakage or pilot balloon palpation techniques. ETCPs were measured by manometer at three periods (5 and 60 minutes after endotracheal intubation, and before extubation). Complaints about it were recorded in post anaesthetic care unit and 24 hours postoperatively. Though we found experience of user had significant effect on the ETCP regulations, we observed inflation methods did not have any effect. However we found ETCP was higher than normal range with experienced users. A correlation was observed between cuff pressure and anaesthesia duration with postoperative complaints. Our study concluded that the methods used do not have any significant advantage over one another. While ETC inflated at normal pressure increases as user's experience increases, experience alone is not enough in adjusting ETCP. A manometer should be used in routine inflation of ETC instead of conventional methods. CP and anaesthesia duration have correlations with some postoperative complaints.

  19. Gram-Positive Nickel Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Riparian Sediments Contaminated with Ni and U on the Savannah River Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sowder, A. G.; Khijniak, T. V.; van Nostrand, J.; Bertsch, P. M.; Morris, P. J.

    2002-12-01

    The natural attenuation of pollutants in riparian and wetland systems is driven in large part by the services provided by the diverse microbial communities that thrive in these nutritionally and chemically complex environments. For co-contaminated systems, the presence of heavy metals at excessive levels may alter the structure and function of microbial communities that are essential for the immobilization of inorganics and degradation of organic contaminants. We examined riparian sediments heavily contaminated with U and Ni (1000's of mg/kg) from a small stream on the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site that received metallurgical process effluents wastewater over a thirty-year period associated with the production of nuclear materials. Four gram positive bacteria were isolated that displayed marked resistance (5000 mg/kg) to Ni relative to organisms from uncontaminated control locations: Arthrobacter oxydans, Streptomyces galbus, Streptomyces aureofaciens, and Kitasatospora cystarginea. The metal resistance of S. aureofaciens and K. cystarginea was further characterized in growth experiments for resistance to other metals. Ongoing geochemical characterization of U and Ni in terms of solid phase partitioning and aqueous phase speciation and solubility indicate that Ni is more chemically labile and, by extension, bioavailable than U in these aged-contaminated sediments. Accordingly, the isolation of Ni resistant organisms is consistent with greater selective pressure from Ni as a result of its greater bioavailability. These results are placed in context of environmental management and remediation of co-contaminated, biogeochemically complex environments.

  20. Novel, high-pressure instability experiments using imploding cylindrical liners with liquid deuterium fill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Patrick; Martin, Matthew; McBride, Ryan; Sinars, Daniel; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    We present preliminary results from experiments where a liquid deuterium filled cylindrical liner is imploded onto a perturbed beryllium rod. The liner implosion creates a shock in the deuterium that strikes the interface twice: once as it implodes, and once again after the shock reflects off of the axis. This causes the perturbation to grow due to the Richtmeyer-Meshkov instability and the Rayleigh-Taylor instability while also generating significant vorticity as the shocks cross the interface. In the initial experiments growth of the perturbation is observed after 1st shock, however, after reshock significant three-dimensional structure is observed at scale lengths much smaller than the initial perturbation. At this time, very little evidence of the seeded mode remains. Pressures exceeding 100 Mbar are predicted at stagnation with an Atwood number at the unstable interface of about 1/3. Analysis of the images will be presented. Additionally, future plans will be discussed. Emphasis in the near future will be on improving image contrast and data collection. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract D.

  1. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea: Maori, Pacific and New Zealand European experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Jessie P; O'Keeffe, Karyn M; Neill, Alister M; Campbell, Angela J

    2014-09-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), but can be limited by poor adherence. In New Zealand (NZ), ethnicity has been shown to be a predictor of CPAP adherence. This study aimed to explore Maori , Pacific and NZ European patients' experience of CPAP treatment. Patients identifying as Maori , Pacific, or NZ European ethnicity referred for CPAP treatment for OSA attended separate, 1.5-hour group discussions facilitated by a health care worker of the same ethnic group, using an interview template. Thematic analysis was applied to the discussion transcripts independently by two investigators, following published guidelines. Five Maori , five Pacific, and eight NZ Europeans participated (mean age 47, range 30-71 years, mean ± standard deviation CPAP adherence 6.32 ± 1.25 hours/night). Patients in all three groups reported that they had little knowledge of OSA or CPAP prior to treatment initiation. All groups identified barriers to treatment (both at the CPAP initiation phase and long term), reported feelings of being 'overwhelmed' with information during the initial CPAP education session, and discussed the importance of successful role models. Family and friends were generally reported as being supportive of CPAP therapy. The three groups all reported similar initial CPAP experiences, highlighting access barriers to publicly funded assessment and treatment pathways, and sleep health knowledge as key issues. Educational resources to improve access, enable self-management, and increase community awareness of OSA would help overcome some of the issues identified in this study.

  2. Integrated Pressure-Fed Liquid Oxygen / Methane Propulsion Systems - Morpheus Experience, MARE, and Future Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Eric; Morehead, Robert; Melcher, John C.; Atwell, Matt

    2016-01-01

    An integrated liquid oxygen (LOx) and methane propulsion system where common propellants are fed to the reaction control system and main engines offers advantages in performance, simplicity, reliability, and reusability. LOx/Methane provides new capabilities to use propellants that are manufactured on the Mars surface for ascent return and to integrate with power and life support systems. The clean burning, non-toxic, high vapor pressure propellants provide significant advantages for reliable ignition in a space vacuum, and for reliable safing or purging of a space-based vehicle. The NASA Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Morpheus lander demonstrated many of these key attributes as it completed over 65 tests including 15 flights through 2014. Morpheus is a prototype of LOx/Methane propellant lander vehicle with a fully integrated propulsion system. The Morpheus lander flight demonstrations led to the proposal to use LOx/Methane for a Discovery class mission, named Moon Aging Regolith Experiment (MARE) to land an in-situ science payload for Southwest Research Institute on the Lunar surface. Lox/Methane is extensible to human spacecraft for many transportation elements of a Mars architecture. This paper discusses LOx/Methane propulsion systems in regards to trade studies, the Morpheus project experience, the MARE NAVIS (NASA Autonomous Vehicle for In-situ Science) lander, and future possible applications. The paper also discusses technology research and development needs for Lox/Methane propulsion systems.

  3. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, A.; Dunaway-Ackerman, J.

    2011-08-16

    This report was prepared in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1A, 'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' to present summary environmental data for the purpose of: (a) characterizing site's environmental management performance; (b) summarizing environmental occurrences and responses reported during the calendar year; (c) describing compliance status with respect to environmental standards and requirements; and (d) highlighting significant site programs and efforts. This report is the principal document that demonstrates compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment,' and is a key component of DOE's effort to keep the public informed of environmental conditions at Savannah River Site (SRS). SRS has four primary missions: (1) Environmental Management - Cleaning up the legacy of the Cold War efforts and preparing decommissioned facilities and areas for long-term stewardship; (2) Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Support - Meeting the needs of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile through the tritium programs of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); (3) Nuclear Nonproliferation Support - Meeting the needs of the NNSA's nuclear nonproliferation programs by safely storing and dispositioning excess special nuclear materials; and (4) Research and Development - Supporting the application of science by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to meet the needs of SRS, the DOE complex, and other federal agencies During 2010, SRS worked to fulfill these missions and position the site for future operations. SRS continued to work with the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to find and implement solutions and schedules for waste management and disposition. As part of its mission to clean up the Cold War legacy, SRS will continue

  4. ROUGHNESS LENGTHS FOR THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunter, C.

    2012-03-28

    Surface roughness values for the areas surrounding the H, D and N-Area meteorological towers were computed from archived 2010 meteorological data. These 15-minute-averaged data were measured with cup anemometers and bidirectional wind vanes (bivanes) 61 m above the surface. The results of the roughness calculation using the standard deviation of elevation angle {sigma}{sub E}, and applying the simple formula based on tree canopy height, gave consistent estimates for roughness around the H-Area tower in the range of 1.76 to 1.86 m (95% confidence interval) with a mean value of 1.81 m. Application of the {sigma}{sub E} method for the 61-m level at D and N-Areas gave mean values of 1.71 and 1.81 with confidence ranges of 1.62-1.81 and 1.73-1.88 meters, respectively. Roughness results are azimuth dependent, and thus are presented as averages over compass sectors spanning 22.5 degrees. Calculated values were compared to other methods of determining roughness, including the standard deviation of the azimuth direction, {sigma}{sub A}, and standard deviation of the wind speed, {sigma}{sub U}. Additional data was obtained from a sonic anemometer at 61-m on the H-Area tower during a period of a few weeks in 2010. Results from the sonic anemometer support our use of {sigma}{sub E} to calculate roughness. Based on the H-Area tower results, a surface roughness of 1.8 m using is recommended for use in dispersion modeling applications that consider the impacts of a contaminant release to individuals along the Site boundary. The canopy surrounding the H-Area tower is relatively uniform (i.e., little variance in roughness by upwind direction), and data supplied by the U.S. Forest Service at Savannah River show that the canopy height and composition surrounding the H-Area tower is reasonably representative of forested areas throughout the SRS reservation. For dispersion modeling analyses requiring assessments of a co-located worker within the respective operations area, recommended

  5. Ichthyoplankton entrainment study at the SRS Savannah River water intakes for Westinghouse Savannah River Company. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paller, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1992-03-26

    Cooling water for L and K Reactors and makeup water for Par Pond is pumped from the Savannah River at the 1G, 3G, and 5G pump houses. Ichthyoplankton (drifting fish larvae and eggs) from the river are entrained into the reactor cooling systems with the river water and passed through the reactor`s heat exchangers where temperatures may reach 70{degrees}C during full power operation. Ichthyoplankton mortality under such conditions is assumed to be 100 percent. The number of ichthyoplankton entrained into the cooling system depends on a variety of variables, including time of year, density and distribution of ichthyoplankton in the river, discharge levels in the river, and the volume of water withdrawn by the pumps. Entrainment at the 1 G pump house, which is immediately downstream from the confluence of Upper Three Runs Creek and the Savannah River, is also influenced by discharge rates and ichthyoplankton densities in Upper Three Runs Creek. Because of the anticipated restart of several SRS reactors and the growing concern surrounding striped bass and American shad stocks in the Savannah River, the Department of Energy requested that the Environmental Sciences Section (ESS) of the Savannah River Laboratory sample ichthyoplankton at the SRS Savannah River intakes. Dams & Moore, Inc., under a contract with Westinghouse Savannah River Company performed the sampling and data analysis for the ESS.

  6. High power ring methods and accelerator driven subcritical reactor application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tahar, Malek Haj [Univ. of Grenoble (France)

    2016-08-07

    High power proton accelerators allow providing, by spallation reaction, the neutron fluxes necessary in the synthesis of fissile material, starting from Uranium 238 or Thorium 232. This is the basis of the concept of sub-critical operation of a reactor, for energy production or nuclear waste transmutation, with the objective of achieving cleaner, safer and more efficient process than today’s technologies allow. Designing, building and operating a proton accelerator in the 500-1000 MeV energy range, CW regime, MW power class still remains a challenge nowadays. There is a limited number of installations at present achieving beam characteristics in that class, e.g., PSI in Villigen, 590 MeV CW beam from a cyclotron, SNS in Oakland, 1 GeV pulsed beam from a linear accelerator, in addition to projects as the ESS in Europe, a 5 MW beam from a linear accelerator. Furthermore, coupling an accelerator to a sub-critical nuclear reactor is a challenging proposition: some of the key issues/requirements are the design of a spallation target to withstand high power densities as well as ensure the safety of the installation. These two domains are the grounds of the PhD work: the focus is on the high power ring methods in the frame of the KURRI FFAG collaboration in Japan: upgrade of the installation towards high intensity is crucial to demonstrate the high beam power capability of FFAG. Thus, modeling of the beam dynamics and benchmarking of different codes was undertaken to validate the simulation results. Experimental results revealed some major losses that need to be understood and eventually overcome. By developing analytical models that account for the field defects, one identified major sources of imperfection in the design of scaling FFAG that explain the important tune variations resulting in the crossing of several betatron resonances. A new formula is derived to compute the tunes and properties established that characterize the effect of the field imperfections on the

  7. Recycling high-performance carbon fiber reinforced polymer composites using sub-critical and supercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Chase C.

    complete recycling loop. After showing the feasibility and power of this technology, the third phase of the study was focused on the fundamentals on the degradation of highly cross-linked polymer network by sub- and near-critical water. A methodology framework was established to study the apparent kinetics of the degradation of epoxy in sub-critical water. The reaction rate was modeled by a phenomenological rate model of nth order, and the rate constant was modeled by taking into account of the contributions of important physical parameters, e.g., pressure, temperature and dielectric constants. The applicability of the established model to describe the degradation kinetics was confirmed by the validation runs. This model is a suitable starting point to gain the knowledge required for eventual industrial process design. The final phase of this research consisted of a preliminary foray into investigating the economic feasibility of this technology. A process model was designed around a reactor which was sized according to considerations of industrial relevancy. The simulation of the process was done using Aspen Plus, powerful and comprehensive process simulation software. Economic analysis of this pseudo-realistic process suggested that such technology was economically viable and competitive comparing to other recycling technologies. In summary, this dissertation work represents the first comprehensive investigation on recycling aerospace-grade, multilayer woven fabric composites using supercritical and sub-critical water. The fundamental knowledge gained and process technology developed during this research is anticipated to play an important role in advancing this recycling technology toward potential adoption and implementation by the recycling and composite industry.

  8. Topical negative pressure therapy Recent experience of the department of plastic surgery at Ibn Sina University Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Abdelmoughit Echchaoui; Malika Benyachou; Jawad Hafidi; Imane Elaissaoui; Hasna Zaouri; Samir Elmazouz; Noureddine Gharib; Abdellah Abbassi

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionThe topical negative pressure therapy (TNP) is a non-invasive method to treat chronic and acute wounds locally, using a continuous or intermittent negative pressure.The objective of this study is to present the first experience of this type of treatment used in clinical cases in our department. By presenting these cases, we highlight indication and efficiency of this new technique applied in relatively complicated situations, at the same time it also allows a significant improveme...

  9. Effect of water on critical and subcritical fracture properties of Woodford shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaofeng; Eichhubl, Peter; Olson, Jon E.

    2017-04-01

    Subcritical fracture behavior of shales under aqueous conditions is poorly characterized despite increased relevance to oil and gas resource development and seal integrity in waste disposal and subsurface carbon sequestration. We measured subcritical fracture properties of Woodford shale in ambient air, dry CO2 gas, and deionized water by using the double-torsion method. Compared to tests in ambient air, the presence of water reduces fracture toughness by 50%, subcritical index by 77%, and shear modulus by 27% and increases inelastic deformation. Comparison between test specimens coated with a hydrophobic agent and uncoated specimens demonstrates that the interaction of water with the bulk rock results in the reduction of fracture toughness and enhanced plastic effects, while water-rock interaction limited to the vicinity of the propagating fracture tip by a hydrophobic specimen coating lowers subcritical index and increases fracture velocity. The observed deviation of a rate-dependent subcritical index from the power law K-V relations for coated specimens tested in water is attributed to a time-dependent weakening process resulting from the interaction between water and clays in the vicinity of the fracture tip.

  10. Characterization of the Subcritical Water Extraction of Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Jillian N; Thurbide, Kevin B; Lambertus, Gordon; Jensen, Eric

    2012-08-10

    The characteristics of using Subcritical Water Extraction (SWE) to recover Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride from both standard solutions and the contents of commercial capsule formulations were investigated. Analysis of solutions and extracts was done by HPLC with UV detection at 254 nm. Standard solutions of Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride were exposed to a variety of SWE operating conditions, including temperatures from 125 to 275°C and periods ranging from 5 to 30 min. Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride could be quantitatively recovered from standard solutions (1.0mg/mL) that were heated up to 175°C for 30 min, up to 200°C for 15 min, or up to 225°C for 10 min. At higher temperatures and/or times, Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride recoveries were generally incomplete and often produced decomposition by-products during the process. By comparison, the concentration of Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride in the standard solution had relatively little effect on recovery. Considering these parameters, an SWE method was developed to extract Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride from the contents of Prozac(®) capsules. It was found that Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride could be quantitatively extracted from the capsule contents in 8 min at a temperature of 200°C using 3.5 mL of water as the extraction solvent. Gelatinization of the starch excipient in the capsule contents was also observed to occur temporarily during the capsule extractions, before ultimately disappearing again. The period of this phenomenon was dependent on both temperature and sample size. The results indicate that SWE can be a very useful method for Fluoxetine-Hydrochloride extraction and suggest that it may be interesting to explore other pharmaceuticals using this method as well. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Tritium in the Savannah River Site environment. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.; Bauer, L.R.; Hayes, D.W.; Marter, W.L.; Zeigler, C.C.; Stephenson, D.E.; Hoel, D.D.; Hamby, D.M.

    1991-05-01

    Tritium is released to the environment from many of the operations at the Savannah River Site. The releases from each facility to the atmosphere and to the soil and streams, both from normal operations and inadvertent releases, over the period of operation from the early 1950s through 1988 are presented. The fate of the tritium released is evaluated through environmental monitoring, special studies, and modeling. It is concluded that approximately 91% of the tritium remaining after decay is now in the oceans. A dose and risk assessment to the population around the site is presented. It is concluded that about 0.6 fatal cancers may be associated with the tritium released during all the years of operation to the population of about 625,000. This same population (based on the overall US cancer statistics) is expected to experience about 105,000 cancer fatalities from all types of cancer. Therefore, it is considered unlikely that a relationship between any of the cancer deaths occurring in this population and releases of tritium from the SRS will be found.

  12. Operational Readiness Review: Savannah River Replacement Tritium Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-02-01

    The Operational Readiness Review (ORR) is one of several activities to be completed prior to introducing tritium into the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Secretary of Energy will rely in part on the results of this ORR in deciding whether the startup criteria for RTF have been met. The RTF is a new underground facility built to safely service the remaining nuclear weapons stockpile. At RTF, tritium will be unloaded from old components, purified and enriched, and loaded into new or reclaimed reservoirs. The RTF will replace an aging facility at SRS that has processed tritium for more than 35 years. RTF has completed construction and is undergoing facility startup testing. The final stages of this testing will require the introduction of limited amounts of tritium. The US Department of Energy (DOE) ORR was conducted January 19 to February 4, 1993, in accordance with an ORR review plan which was developed considering previous readiness reviews. The plan also considered the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendations 90-4 and 92-6, and the judgements of experienced senior experts. The review covered three major areas: (1) Plant and Equipment Readiness, (2) Personnel Readiness, and (3) Management Systems. The ORR Team was comprised of approximately 30 members consisting of a Team Leader, Senior Safety Experts, and Technical Experts. The ORR objectives and criteria were based on DOE Orders, industry standards, Institute of Nuclear Power Operations guidelines, recommendations of external oversight groups, and experience of the team members.

  13. Law enforcement tools available at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, K.J.

    2000-03-29

    A number of nuclear technologies developed and applied at the Savannah River Site in support of nuclear weapons material production and environmental remediation can be applied to problems in law enforcement. Techniques and equipment for high-sensitivity analyses of samples are available to identify and quantify trace elements and establish origins and histories of forensic evidence removed from crime scenes. While some of theses capabilities are available at local crime laboratories, state-of-the-art equipment and breakthroughs in analytical techniques are continually being developed at DOE laboratories. Extensive experience with the handling of radioactive samples at the DOE labs minimizes the chances of cross-contamination of evidence received from law enforcement. In addition to high-sensitivity analyses, many of the field techniques developed for use in a nuclear facility can assist law enforcement personnel in detecting illicit materials and operations, in retrieving of pertinent evidence and in surveying crime scenes. Some of these tools include chemical sniffers, hand-held detectors, thermal imaging, etc. In addition, mobile laboratories can be deployed to a crime scene to provide field screening of potential evidence. A variety of portable sensors can be deployed on vehicle, aerial, surface or submersible platforms to assist in the location of pertinent evidence or illicit operations. Several specific nuclear technologies available to law enforcement and their potential uses are discussed.

  14. Development and application of an analysis methodology for interpreting ambiguous historical pressure data in the WIPP gas-generation experiments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felicione, F. S.

    2006-01-23

    The potential for generation of gases in transuranic (TRU) waste by microbial activity, chemical interactions, corrosion, and radiolysis was addressed in the Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-West) Gas-Generation Experiments (GGE). Data was collected over several years by simulating the conditions in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) after the eventual intrusion of brine into the repository. Fourteen test containers with various actual TRU waste immersed in representative brine were inoculated with WIPP-relevant microbes, pressurized with inert gases, and kept in an inert-atmosphere environment for several years to provide estimates of the gas-generation rates that will be used in computer models for future WIPP Performance Assessments. Modest temperature variations occurred during the long-term ANL-West experiments. Although the experiment temperatures always remained well within the experiment specifications, the small temperature variation was observed to affect the test container pressure far more than had been anticipated. In fact, the pressure variations were so large, and seemingly erratic, that it was impossible to discern whether the data was even valid and whether the long-term pressure trend was increasing, decreasing, or constant. The result was that no useful estimates of gas-generation rates could be deduced from the pressure data. Several initial attempts were made to quantify the pressure fluctuations by relating these to the measured temperature variation, but none was successful. The work reported here carefully analyzed the pressure measurements to determine if these were valid or erroneous data. It was found that a thorough consideration of the physical phenomena that were occurring can, in conjunction with suitable gas laws, account quite accurately for the pressure changes that were observed. Failure of the earlier attempts to validate the data was traced to the omission of several phenomena, the most important being the variation in

  15. Pressure and energy balance of stagnating plasmas in z-pinch experiments: implications to current flow at stagnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Y; Starobinets, A; Fisher, V I; Kroupp, E; Osin, D; Fisher, A; Deeney, C; Coverdale, C A; Lepell, P D; Yu, E P; Jennings, C; Cuneo, M E; Herrmann, M C; Porter, J L; Mehlhorn, T A; Apruzese, J P

    2013-07-19

    Detailed spectroscopic diagnostics of the stagnating plasma in two disparate z pinches allow, for the first time, the examination of the plasma properties within a 1D shock wave picture, demonstrating a good agreement with this picture. The conclusion is that for a wide range of imploding-plasma masses and current amplitudes, in experiments optimizing non-Planckian hard radiation yields, contrary to previous descriptions the stagnating plasma pressure is balanced by the implosion pressure, and the radiation energy is provided by the imploding-plasma kinetic energy, rather than by the magnetic-field pressure and magnetic-field-energy dissipation, respectively.

  16. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, C.L.; Hetrick, C.S.; Stevenson, D.A. (eds.); Davis, H.A.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    During 1988, as in previous years, Savannah River Site operations had no adverse impact on the general public or the environment. Based on the SRS site-specific code, the maximum radiation dose commitment to a hypothetical individual at the SRS boundary from 1988 SRS atmospheric releases of radioactive materials was 0.46 millirem (mrem) (0.0046 millisievert (mSv)). To obtain the maximum dose, an individual would have had to reside on the SRS boundary at the location of highest dose for 24 hours per day, 365 days per year, consume a maximum amount of foliage and meat which originated from the general vicinity of the plant boundary, and drink a maximum amount of milk from cows grazing at the plant boundary. The average radiation dose commitment from atmospheric releases to the hypothetical individual on the SRS boundary in 1988 was 0.18 mrem (0. 0018 mSv). This person, unlike the maximumly exposed individual, consumes an average amount of foliage, meat, and milk which originated from the foliage and animals living at the plant boundary.

  17. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummins, C.L.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    this volume of Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1989 (WSRC-IM-90-60) contains the figures and tables referenced in Volume I. The figures contain graphic illustrations of sample locations and/or data. The tables present summaries of the following types of data federal and state standards and guides applicable to SRS operations; concentrations of radioactivity in environmental media; the quantity of radioactivity released to the environment from SRS operations; offsite radiation committed dose from SRS operations; measurements of physical properties, chemicals, and metals concentrations in environmental media; and interlaboratory comparison of analytical results. The figures and tables in this report contain information about the routine environmental monitoring program at SRS unless otherwise indicated. No attempt has been made to include all data from environmental research programs. Variations in the report's content from year to year reflect changes in the routine environmental monitoring program or the inability to obtain certain samples from a specific location. 42 figs., 188 tabs.

  18. Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. MAMATEY

    2003-01-01

    The ''Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2003'' (WSRC-TR-2004-00015) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and DOE Order 5400.5, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment''. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; (3) highlight significant programs and efforts; and (4) assess the impact of SRS operations on the public and the environment. This year's report reflects a continuing effort (begun in 2001) to streamline the document and thereby increase its cost effectiveness--without omitting valuable technical data. To that end each author will continue to work toward presenting results in summary fashion, focusing on historical trends. Complete data tables again are included on the CD inside the back cover of the report. The CD also features an electronic version of the report; an appendix of site, environmental sampling location, dose, and groundwater maps; and complete 2003 reports from a number of other SRS organizations.

  19. Savannah River Site. Environmental report for 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, Margaret W. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site. ed; Mamatey, Albert R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Site. ed

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the Savannah River Site (SRS)—and that of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)—is positive environmental stewardship and full regulatory compliance, with zero violations. The site’s employees maintained progress toward achievement of this goal in 2001, as demonstrated by examples in this chapter. The site’s compliance efforts were near-perfect again in 2001. No notices of violation (NOVs) were issued in 2001 under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA), or the Clean Water Act (CWA). Two NOVs were issued to SRS during 2001—one, associated with permit requirement compliance, was issued under the Clean Air Act (CAA); the other, related to an oil release, was issued under the South Carolina Pollution Control Act. Under the CWA, the site’s National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) compliance rate was 99.6 percent. Also, 274 National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) reviews of newly proposed actions were conducted and formally documented in 2001, and only one of the year’s 799 Site Item Reportability and Issues Management (SIRIM) program-reportable events was categorized as environmental; it was classified as an off-normal event.

  20. In-situ biodiesel and sugar production from rice bran under subcritical condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zullaikah, Siti; Rahkadima, Yulia Tri

    2015-12-01

    An integrated method of producing biodiesel and sugar using subcritical water and methanol has been employed as a potential way to reduce the high cost of single biofuel production from rice bran. The effects of temperature, methanol to water ratio and reaction time on the biodiesel yield and purity, and the concentration of sugar in hydrolysate were investigated systematically. Biodiesel with yield and purity of 65.21%and 73.53%, respectively, was obtained from rice bran with initial free fatty acid (FFA) content of 37.64% under the following conditions: T= 200 oC, P= 4.0 MPa (using CO2 as pressurizing gas), ratio of rice bran/water/methanol of 1/2/6 (g/mL/mL), and 3 h of reaction time. FFAs level was reduced to 10.00% with crude biodiesel recovery of 88.69%. However, the highest biodiesel yield (67.39%) and crude biodiesel recovery (100.00%) were obtained by decreasing the amount of methanol so that the ratio of rice bran/water/methanol became 1/4/4, g/mL/mL. In addition, the highest sugar concentration of 0.98 g/L was obtained at 180 oC and 4.0 MPa with ratio of rice bran/water/methanol of 1/4/4 (g/mL/mL) and reaction time of 3 h. Since no catalyst was employed and the biodiesel and reducing sugar were produced directly from rice bran with high water and FFA contents, the process was simple and environmentally friendly, which would make the production of biofuel more economical and sustainable.

  1. Kinetic and Thermodynamics studies for Castor Oil Extraction Using Subcritical Water Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoez, Wael; Ashour, Eman; Naguib, Shahenaz M; Hilal, Amr; Al Mahdy, Dalia A; Mahrous, Engy A; Abdel-Sattar, Essam

    2016-06-01

    In this work both kinetic and thermodynamics of castor oil extraction from its seeds using subcritical water technique were studied. It was found that the extraction process followed two consecutive steps. In these steps, the oil was firstly extracted from inside the powder by diffusion mechanism. Then the extracted oil, due to extending the extraction time under high temperature and pressure, was subjected to a decomposition reaction following first order mechanism. The experimental data correlated well with the irreversible consecutive unimolecular-type first order mechanism. The values of both oil extraction rate constants and decomposition rate constants were calculated through non-linear fitting using DataFit software. The extraction rate constants were found to be 0.0019, 0.024, 0.098, 0.1 and 0.117 min(-1), while the decomposition rate constants were 0.057, 0.059, 0.014, 0.019 and 0.17 min(-1) at extraction temperatures of 240, 250, 260, 270 and 280°C, respectively. The thermodynamic properties of the oil extraction process were investigated using Arrhenius equation. The values of the activation energy, Ea, and the frequency factor, A, were 73 kJ mol(-1) and 946, 002 min(-1), respectively. The physicochemical properties of the extracted castor oil including the specific gravity, viscosity, acid value, pH value and calorific value were found to be 0.947, 7.487, 1.094 mg KOH/g, 6.1, and 41.5 MJ/Kg, respectively. Gas chromatography analysis showed that ricinoleic acid (83.6%) appears as the predominant fatty acid in the extracted oil followed by oleic acid (5.5%) and linoleic acid (2.3%).

  2. Transient analysis of subcritical/supercritical carbon dioxide based natural circulation loop with end heat exchangers: experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ajay Kumar; Ramgopal, Maddali; Bhattacharyya, Souvik

    2017-09-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) based natural circulation loops (NCLs) has gained attention due to its compactness with higher heat transfer rate. In the present study, experimental investigations have been carried out to capture the transient behaviour of a CO2 based NCL operating under subcritical as well as supercritical conditions. Water is used as the external fluid in cold and hot heat exchangers. Results are obtained for various inlet temperatures (323-353 K) of water in the hot heat exchanger and a fixed inlet temperature (305 K) of cooling water in the cold heat exchanger. Effect of loop operating pressure (50-90 bar) on system performance is also investigated. Effect of loop tilt in two different planes (XY and YZ) is also studied in terms of transient as well as steady state behaviour of the loop. Results show that the time required to attain steady state decreases as operating pressure of the loop increases. It is also observed that the change in temperature of loop fluid (CO2) across hot or cold heat exchanger decreases as operating pressure increases.

  3. Design and construction of an automatic measurement electronic system and graphical neutron flux for the subcritical reactor; Diseno y construccion de un sistema electronico automatico de medicion y graficado del flujo neutronico para el reactor subcritico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, J.L.; Balderas, E.G.; Rivero G, T. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1997-07-01

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) has in its installations with a nuclear subcritical reactor which was designed and constructed with the main purpose to be used in the nuclear sciences education in the Physics areas and Reactors engineering. Within the nuclear experiments that can be realized in this reactor are very interesting those about determinations of neutron and gamma fluxes spectra, since starting from these some interesting nuclear parameters can be obtained. In order to carry out this type of experiments different radioactive sources are used which exceed the permissible doses by far to human beings. Therefore it is necessary the remote handling as of the source as of detectors used in different experiments. In this work it is presented the design of an electronic system which allows the different positions inside of the tank of subcritical reactor at ININ over the radial and axial axes in manual or automatic ways. (Author)

  4. Couples' experiences with continuous positive airway pressure treatment: a dyadic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lichuan; Antonelli, Mary T; Willis, Danny G; Kayser, Karen; Malhotra, Atul; Patel, Sanjay R

    2017-10-01

    The majority of adults sleep with a partner, making sleep a dyadic experience. However, interventions to improve sleep have primarily focused on individuals. This qualitative analysis used a dyadic approach to identify facilitators and barriers to successful treatment of one of the most common sleep disorders, obstructive sleep apnea, with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Twenty joint qualitative interviews were conducted with couples, one couple at a time, with a sample of 20 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and their partners to develop an understanding of couples' experiences with CPAP use. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed. Conventional qualitative content analysis was used to analyze the interview data. Facilitators of CPAP use were the following: the partner aiding diagnosis and treatment, couples working together using CPAP, the perceived benefits of CPAP for both partners, the patient being motivated to use CPAP for the benefit of the partner, and various types of support provided by the partner to encourage CPAP use. Major barriers to CPAP use were the following: anxiety related to CPAP use particularly in the beginning of therapy, bothersome equipment causing disruptions in sleep and bedtime routine, interruptions to intimacy, and concern about image change while wearing CPAP. Findings from this study suggest that couple-directed interventions that advocate for a mutually engaging perspective and promote supportive relationships and positive dyadic coping may be targets for improving CPAP adherence. Further research evaluating the potential of couple-focused interventions to improve sleep health is warranted. Copyright © 2017 National Sleep Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Getting to Normal: Women's Experiences Self-Managing Their Perceived Blood Pressure Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Mary M; Harden, Janet K; Peters, Rosalind M

    2016-01-01

    In the United States, nearly 25% of all women older than 20 years have hypertension (HTN). Nearly 30% to 50% of persons with HTN experience symptoms attributed to high blood pressure (BP). Women with hypertensive symptoms may connect their symptoms to perceived BP changes and may be using their perceptions about BP changes to guide their HTN self-management. There is limited research about perceived BP changes or their use in self-management. The purpose of this qualitative study is to describe the experiences of women with HTN self-managing their perceived BP changes. van Manen's phenomenology methodology and method guided the inquiry. Women with HTN who believed they could tell when their BP changed based on their symptoms were recruited from community settings and were interviewed once with a semistructured guide. Interviews were digitally recorded and professionally transcribed. Textual data were analyzed using thematic analysis to identify major themes. Seven black and 6 white women comprised the study sample. Participants were middle aged (mean [SD], 50.5 [9.62] years), were experienced in living with HTN (mean [SD],10.76 [9.50] years), had at least a high school education, and had a limited annual income (93% <$24 000). One central theme ("getting to normal") and 4 subthemes (i.e., "I can tell," "tending to it," "the wake-up call," and "doing it right") were discovered in the data. The themes depict a process of episodic symptom-driven and day-to-day actions that the participants used to get their BP to normal. The study is significant as new knowledge was discovered about how women perceive their BP changes and use them to guide self-management. This study contributes to clinical practice through suggestions for improving patient assessments. Results serve as a foundation for further research of the self-management of BP changes and developing belief-based interventions with the potential to improve BP control.

  6. Electron beam injection experiments - The beam-plasma discharge at low pressures and magnetic field strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, W.; Leinbach, H.; Kellogg, P.; Monson, S.; Hallinan, T.; Garriott, O. K.; Konradi, A.; Mccoy, J.; Daly, P.; Baker, B.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes electron beam injection experiments which clarify observational results obtained in rocket flights. A column of enhanced density plasma, exceeding the density expected from ionization by primary beam electrons, was observed in a large vacuum system at low magnetic fields (1 to 1.5 G) and low ambient pressures (10 to the minus 6 to 10 to the minus 5 torr). The peak luminosity of the discharge was about 10 times that of the beam alone, and the radius increased by a factor of three. In the absence of the discharge, RF emission is observed at 1.1 to 1.2 times the cyclotron frequency, and a strong band of RF noise with upper frequency cutoff at about the cyclotron frequency is observed in the discharge mode, along with higher frequency noise at or near the plasma frequency. The onset of the plasma discharge is critically dependent on beam current. The described results agree with observations obtained at much higher densities and magnetic fields in fusion research studies.

  7. Filter-based Aerosol Measurement Experiments using Spherical Aerosol Particles under High Temperature and High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Chan; Jung, Woo Young; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Doo Young [FNC TECH., Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Optical Particle Counter (OPC) is used to provide real-time measurement of aerosol concentration and size distribution. Glass fiber membrane filter also be used to measure average mass concentration. Three tests (MTA-1, 2 and 3) have been conducted to study thermal-hydraulic effect, a filtering tendency at given SiO{sub 2} particles. Based on the experimental results, the experiment will be carried out further with a main carrier gas of steam and different aerosol size. The test results will provide representative behavior of the aerosols under various conditions. The aim of the tests, MTA 1, 2 and 3, are to be able to 1) establish the test manuals for aerosol generation, mixing, sampling and measurement system, which defines aerosol preparation, calibration, operating and evaluation method under high pressure and high temperature 2) develop commercial aerosol test modules applicable to the thermal power plant, environmental industry, automobile exhaust gas, chemical plant, HVAC system including nuclear power plant. Based on the test results, sampled aerosol particles in the filter indicate that important parameters affecting aerosol behavior aerosols are 1) system temperature to keep above a evaporation temperature of ethanol and 2) aerosol losses due to the settling by ethanol liquid droplet.

  8. Simulation of distortion and residual stress in high pressure die casting - modelling and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, P.; Kaschnitz, E.; Schumacher, P.

    2012-07-01

    Two individual high-pressure die-casting geometries were developed in order to study the influence of process parameters and different alloys on the distortion behaviour of castings. These geometries were a stress lattice and a V-shaped sample tending to form residual stress due to different wall thickness respectively by a deliberate massive gating system. In the experimental castings the influence of the most important process parameters such as die temperature and die opening time and the cooling regime was examined. The time evolution of process temperatures was measured using thermal imaging. The heat transfer coefficients were adapted to the observed temperature distributions. Castings were produced from the two alloys AlSi12 and AlSi10MnMg. The distortion of the castings was measured by means of a tactile measuring device. For the alloy AlSi10MnMg thermo-physical and thermo-mechanical data were obtained using differential scanning calorimetry, laser flash technique, dilatometry and tensile testing at elevated temperatures. These data were used for modelling the material behaviour of the AlSi10MnMg alloy in the numerical model while for the alloy AlSi12(Fe) literature data were used. Process and stress simulation were conducted using the commercial FEM software ANSYS Workbench. A survey on the results of the comparison between simulation and experiment is given for both alloys.

  9. A modified Hopkinson pressure bar experiment to evaluate a damped piezoresistive MEMS accelerometer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frew, Danny Joe; Duong, Henry

    2009-03-01

    We conducted a series of modified Hopkinson pressure bar (HPB) experiments to evaluate a new, damped, high-shock accelerometer that has recently been developed by PCB Piezotronics Inc. Pulse shapers were used to create a long duration, non-dispersive stress pulse in an aluminum bar that interacted with a tungsten disk at the end of the incident bar. We measured stress at the aluminum bar-disk interface with a quartz gage and measured acceleration at the free-end of the disk with an Endevco brand 7270A and the new PCB 3991 accelerometers. The rise-time of the incident stress pulse in the aluminum bar was long enough and the disk length short enough so that the response of the disk can be approximated closely as rigid-body motion; an experimentally verified analytical model has been shown previously to support this assumption. Since the cross-sectional area and mass of the disk were known, we calculated acceleration of the rigid-disk from the quartz-gage force measurement and Newton's Second Law of Motion. Comparisons of accelerations calculated from the quartz-gage data and measured acceleration data show excellent agreement for acceleration pulses with the PCB accelerometer for peak amplitudes between 4,000 and 40,000 Gs , rise times as short as 40 microsec, and pulse durations between 150 and 320 microsec.

  10. Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed Discharges in Air at Atmospheric Pressure -- Experiment and Theory of Regime Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, David; Lacoste, Deanna; Laux, Christophe

    2009-10-01

    In atmospheric pressure air preheated from 300 to 1000 K, the Nanosecond Repetitively Pulsed (NRP) method has been used to generate corona, glow, and spark discharges. Experiments have been performed to determine the parameter space (applied voltage, pulse repetition frequency, ambient gas temperature, and inter-electrode gap distance) of each discharge regime. Notably, there is a minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime that increases with decreasing gas temperature. A theory is developed to describe the Corona-to-Glow (C-G) and Glow-to-Spark (G-S) transitions for NRP discharges. The C-G transition is shown to depend on the Avalanche-to-Streamer Transition (AST) as well as the electric field strength in the positive column. The G-S transition is due to the thermal ionization instability. The minimum gap distance for the existence of the glow regime can be understood by considering that the applied voltage of the AST must be lower than that of the thermal ionization instability. This is a previously unknown criterion for generating glow discharges, as it does not correspond to the Paschen minimum or to the Meek-Raether criterion.

  11. THE COLD AND DARK PROCESS AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, J; William Austin, W; Cathy Sizemore, C

    2007-01-31

    The deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of a facility exposes D&D workers to numerous hazards. One of the more serious hazards is coming into contact to hazardous energy sources (e.g. electrical, pressurized steam). At the Savannah River Site (SRS) a formal process for identifying and eliminating sources of hazardous energy was developed and is called ''Cold & Dark''. Several ''near miss'' events involving cutting of energized conductors during D&D work in buildings thought to be isolated identified the need to have a formal process to identify and isolate these potentially hazardous systems. This process was developed using lessons learned from D&D activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Rocky Flats) in Colorado. The Cold & Dark process defines an isolation boundary (usually a building perimeter) and then systematically identifies all of the penetrations through this boundary. All penetrations that involve hazardous energy sources are then physically air-gapped. The final product is a documented declaration of isolation performed by a team involving operations, engineering, and project management. Once the Cold & Dark declaration is made for a building work can proceed without the usual controls used in an operational facility (e.g. lockout/tagout, arc flash PPE). It is important to note that the Cold & Dark process does not remove all hazards from a facility. Work planning and controls still need to address hazards that can be present from such things as chemicals, radiological contamination, residual liquids, etc., as well as standard industrial hazards.

  12. Subcritical calculation of the nuclear material warehouse;Calculo de subcriticidad del almacen del material nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia M, T.; Mazon R, R., E-mail: teodoro.garcia@inin.gob.m [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2009-07-01

    In this work the subcritical calculation of the nuclear material warehouse of the Reactor TRIGA Mark III labyrinth in the Mexico Nuclear Center is presented. During the adaptation of the nuclear warehouse (vault I), the fuel was temporarily changed to the warehouse (vault II) and it was also carried out the subcritical calculation for this temporary arrangement. The code used for the calculation of the effective multiplication factor, it was the Monte Carlo N-Particle Extended code known as MCNPX, developed by the National Laboratory of Los Alamos, for the particles transport. (Author)

  13. Subcritical water extraction of amino acids from Mars analog soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noell, Aaron C; Fisher, Anita M; Fors-Francis, Kisa; Sherrit, Stewart

    2018-01-18

    For decades, the Martian regolith has stymied robotic mission efforts to catalog the organic molecules present. Perchlorate salts, found widely throughout Mars, are the main culprit as they breakdown and react with organics liberated from the regolith during pyrolysis, the primary extraction technique attempted to date on Mars. This work further develops subcritical water extraction (SCWE) as a technique for extraction of amino acids on future missions. The effect of SCWE temperature (185, 200, and 215°C) and duration of extraction (10-120 min) on the total amount and distribution of amino acids recovered was explored for three Mars analog soils (JSC Mars-1A simulant, an Atacama desert soil, and an Antarctic Dry Valleys soil) and bovine serum albumin (as a control solution of known amino acid content). Total amounts of amino acids extracted increased with both time and temperature; however, the distribution shifted notably due to the destruction of the amino acids with charged or polar side chains at the higher temperatures. The pure bovine serum albumin solution and JSC Mars 1A also showed lower yields than the Atacama and Antarctic extractions suggesting that SCWE may be less effective at hydrolyzing large or aggregated proteins. Changing solvent from water to a dilute (10 mM) HCl solution allowed total extraction efficiencies comparable to the higher temperature/time combinations while using the lowest temperature/time (185°C/20 min). The dilute HCl extractions also did not lead to the shift in amino acid distribution observed at the higher temperatures. Additionally, adding sodium perchlorate salt to the extraction did not interfere with recoveries. Native magnetite in the JSC Mars-1A may have been responsible for destruction of glycine, as evidenced by its uncharacteristic decrease as the temperature/time of extraction increased. This work shows that SCWE can extract high yields of native amino acids out of Mars analog soils with minimal disruption of the

  14. Corrosion Control Measures For Liquid Radioactive Waste Storage Tanks At The Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiersma, B. J.; Subramanian, K. H.

    2012-11-27

    The Savannah River Site has stored radioactive wastes in large, underground, carbon steel tanks for approximately 60 years. An assessment of potential degradation mechanisms determined that the tanks may be vulnerable to nitrate- induced pitting corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Controls on the solution chemistry and temperature of the wastes are in place to mitigate these mechanisms. These controls are based upon a series of experiments performed using simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks. The technical bases and evolution of these controls is presented in this paper.

  15. Estimating salinity intrusion effects due to climate change on the Lower Savannah River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrads, Paul; Roehl, Edwin A.; Daamen, Ruby C.; Cook, John B.; Sexton, Charles T.; Tufford, Daniel L.; Carbone, Gregory J.; Dow, Kristin

    2010-01-01

    The ability of water-resource managers to adapt to future climatic change is especially challenging in coastal regions of the world. The East Coast of the United States falls into this category given the high number of people living along the Atlantic seaboard and the added strain on resources as populations continue to increase, particularly in the Southeast. Increased temperatures, changes in regional precipitation regimes, and potential increased sea level may have a great impact on existing hydrological systems in the region. The Savannah River originates at the confluence of the Seneca and Tugaloo Rivers, near Hartwell, Ga., and forms the state boundary between South Carolina and Georgia. The J. Strom Thurmond Dam and Lake, located 238 miles upstream from the Atlantic Ocean, is responsible for most of the flow regulation that affects the Savannah River from Augusta, Ga., to the coast. The Savannah Harbor experiences semi-diurnal tides of two low and two high tides in a 24.8-hour period with pronounced differences in tidal range between neap and spring tides occurring on a 14-day and 28-day lunar cycle. Salinity intrusion results from the interaction of three principal forces - streamflow, mean tidal water levels, and tidal range. To analyze, model, and simulate hydrodynamic behaviors at critical coastal streamgages in the Lower Savannah River Estuary, data-mining techniques were applied to over 15 years of hourly streamflow, coastal water-quality, and water-level data. Artificial neural network (ANN) models were trained to learn the variable interactions that cause salinity intrusions. Streamflow data from the 9,850 square-mile Savannah River Basin were input into the model as time-delayed variables. Tidal inputs to the models were obtained by decomposing tidal water-level data into a “periodic” signal of tidal range and a “chaotic” signal of mean water levels. The ANN models were able to convincingly reproduce historical behaviors and generate

  16. Summary of a high subsonic force/pressure experiment for 58 deg cambered/twisted thick delta wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.; Lamar, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of a force, moment, and pressure experiment involving six thick, cambered and twisted, delta wings with 58 deg leading-edge sweep. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 7- by 10-foot High-Speed Tunnel at Mach numbers of 0.75, 0.80, and 0.83. The design goal was a configuration which was self-trimming at a lift coefficient of 0.25 and Mach number of 0.80. Although the design goal was not met, the configuration which came closest and which had the best overall performance was selected for further study. Wing surface pressure data and limited surface oil flow data for this configuration are presented to show the extent of attached flow at the design point. For selected cases, inviscid solutions from vortex lattice method/suction analogy, PAN AIR, FLO-28, and FLO-57 are compared with the experimental force, moment, and pressure data.

  17. A high-pressure vessel for X-ray diffraction experiments for liquids in a wide temperature range

    CERN Document Server

    Hosokawa, S

    2001-01-01

    An internally heated high-pressure vessel was developed for angle-dispersive X-ray scattering experiments on liquids at high-temperatures and high-pressures. It consists of a closed-end Al cylinder and a steel flange. Continuous windows made of Be cover a scattering angle range up to 55 deg. In combination with a single-crystal sapphire cell and a small heating system inside the vessel, we were able to carry out diffraction measurements for liquids in a wide temperature range up to 2000 K at high pressures up to 150 bars. Some of our recent X-ray scattering experiments using synchrotron radiation, such as inelastic scattering, high-energy elastic scattering, and anomalous scattering, are also reported.

  18. Adverse Childhood Experiences and Blood Pressure Trajectories From Childhood to Young Adulthood The Georgia Stress and Heart Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Su, Shaoyong; Wang, Xiaoling; Pollock, Jennifer S.; Treiber, Frank A.; Xu, Xiaojing; Snieder, Harold; McCall, W. Vaughn; Stefanek, Michael; Harshfield, Gregory A.

    2015-01-01

    Background-The purposes of this study were to assess the long-term effect of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on blood pressure (BP) trajectories from childhood to young adulthood and to examine whether this relation is explained by childhood socioeconomic status (SES) or risk behaviors that are

  19. A History of the Savannah District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    River from the City of Savannah, Mar. 1968. (Savannah District, Corps of Engineers) Col. Peter A. Feringa , Savannah District Engineer, 1941 - 1943...Corps to build a small airfield with runway and apron in as little as two weeks .6 Major Peter A. Feringa , who became District Engineer in Savannah...ary 1942 Lieutenant Colonel Peter A. Feringa , Acting District Engineer, 275 remarked, "A vastly increased burden of work has been thrown on the

  20. Nuclear engineering R&D at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strosnider, D.R.; Ferrara, W.R.

    1991-12-31

    The Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) is the prime operating contractor for the US Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site (SRS), located near Aiken, South Carolina. One division of WSRC, the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), has the primary responsibility for research and development, which includes supporting the safe and efficient operation of the SRS production reactors. Several Sections of SRL, as well as other organization in WSRC, pursue R&D and oversight activities related to nuclear engineering. The Sections listed below are described in more detail in this document: (SRL) nuclear reactor technology and scientific computations department; (SRL) safety analysis and risk management department; (WSRC) new production reactor program; and (WSRC) environment, safety, health, and quality assurance division.

  1. Bio-oil production via subcritical hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durak, Halil

    2017-04-01

    Biomass based raw materials can be converted into the more valued energy forms using biochemical methods such as ethanol fermentation, methane fermentation and the thermochemical methods such as direct combustion, pyrolysis, gasification, liquefaction. The bio-oil obtained from the biomass has many advantages than traditional use. Firstly, it has features such as high energy density, easy storage and easy transportation. Bio-oil can be used as a fuel in engines, turbines and burning units directly. Besides, it can be converted into products in higher quality and volume via catalytic cracking, hydrodexygenation, emulsification, and steam reforming [1,2]. Many organic solvents such as acetone, ethanol, methanol, isopropanol are used in the supercritical liquefaction processes. When we think about the cost and effects of the organic solvent on nature, it will be understood better that it is necessary to find solvent that are more sensitive against nature. Here, water must have an important place because of its features. Most important solvent of the world water is named as "universal solvent" because none of the liquids can dissolve the materials as much as done by water. Water is found much at the nature and cost of it is very few when compared with the other solvent. Hydrothermal liquefaction, a thermochemical conversion process is an effective method used for converting biomass into the liquid products. General reaction conditions for hydrothermal liquefaction process are the 250-374 °C temperature range and 4 - 22 Mpa pressure values range, besides, the temperature values can be higher according to the product that is expected to be obtained [3,4]. In this study, xanthium strumarium plant stems have been used as biomass source. The experiments have been carried out using a cylindrical reactor (75 mL) at the temperatures of 300 °C. The produced liquids at characterized by elemental analysis, GC-MS and FT-IR. According to the analysis, different types of compounds

  2. Deformation Experiment on Quartz Aggregates with High Porosity and High Water Contents at High Pressure and Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, K.; Hirth, G.

    2016-12-01

    Large earthquakes typically nucleate near the depth limit of seismogenic zones. In these areas, high Vp/Vs ratios are commonly observed, indicating the presence of high pore fluid pressures. Thus, it is important to understand how the water content (both water in the crystal and in the pores) and the pore structure affect the rheology of polycrystalline materials. We conducted deformation experiments on quartz aggregates using a Griggs-type deformation apparatus. Samples were hot-pressed from silica gels, which contain 9 wt% water within the amorphous structure and absorbed on the surface. Hydrostatic experiments within the α-quartz stability field at a pressure of 1.5 GPa and 900°C indicate that hot-pressed samples are composed of quartz and no relict of amorphous material is present. The average grain size and porosity of the hot-pressed aggregates is about 4 μm and 23%, respectively. The grain shape is equigranular and no crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) is observed. Initial results from general shear experiments on the hot-pressed quartz aggregates at the equivalent strain rate of 1.5 x 10-4 1/s, a pressure of 1.5 GPa and 900°C show very low strength (equivalent stress of 140 MPa) and nominally steady state flow at shear strains up to 3.5. The samples show no CPO and evidence for strain localization along R1 riedel shears. In contrast, deformation experiments on cores of quartzite show dislocation creep at this pressure/temperature condition. The measured stress from the new experiments is significantly lower than predicted by the wet quartz flow law (e.g., Hirth et al., 2001). The low flow stress and absence of CPO suggest the operation of grain-size sensitive flow, or perhaps that the effective pressure law is still applicable and the sample deforms by a distributed semi-brittle flow process

  3. Population Dynamics of Banteng, Buffalo and Deer in Bekol Savannah, Baluran National Park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SUHADI

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Baluran National Park give contribution at regional development to draw tourist and fascination provided is savannah in area. Savannah circumstance, forest, landscape, climate, vegetation and wild animal is represent experienced attraction. Research method use population dynamics perception of banteng, buffalo and deer in savannah of Bekol year 2004 and year 2005 as primary data, while secondary data year population dynamics 2003, 2004, and year 2005 outside savannah of Bekol, year population dynamics 2003 in savannah of Bekol. Secondary data obtained from daily report of Controller ecosystem Forest Worker animal discovery Baluran National Park from Section Bekol. Research location of outside savannah Bekol were Balanan, Perengan, Bitakol, Karangtekok, Pandean, Pondok jaran, Bama, Curah uling, Gunung Montor, Lempuyang, Bilik, Batangan, Labuhan Merak, Kramat, Semiang, Sirokoh, Lemah bang, Gunung Krasak, and Glengseran. The populations of banteng and buffalo in the savannah is unstable compared to the populations of them outside Bekol savannah. The populations of banteng and buffalo in Bekol savannah decrease, whereas the populations of them outside the Bekol savannah increase. The population of deer in Bekol savannah in 2004 is better than population of 2003, 2005, and 2006, whereas the population of deer outside Bekol savannah in 2006 increase significantly. The populations of banteng, buffalo, and deer decrease from year to year, in which the reductions of banteng and buffalo populations are obviously significant.

  4. A Simple Membrane Osmometer System & Experiments that Quantitatively Measure Osmotic Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marvel, Stephen C.; Kepler, Megan V.

    2009-01-01

    It is important for students to be exposed to the concept of osmotic pressure. Understanding this concept lays the foundation for deeper discussions that lead to more theoretical aspects of water movement associated with the concepts of free energy, water potential, osmotic potential, pressure potential, and osmotic adjustment. The concept of…

  5. Savannah River Restart Peer Evaluation Program final examination report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M.P.; Draper, D.G.

    1991-12-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 6, 1991 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered during three distinct phases to 73 certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors, and Shift Technical Engineers assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This program was conceived and developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and it's implementation satisfies recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The review identified both strengths and weaknesses of the procedures and personnel.

  6. Savannah River Restart Peer Evaluation Program final examination report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, M.P.; Draper, D.G.

    1991-12-01

    During the period of August 13, 1990 through September 6, 1991 the Savannah River Peer Evaluation Program was administered during three distinct phases to 73 certified Central Control Room Operators, Central Control Room Supervisors, and Shift Technical Engineers assigned to the K Reactor, on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This program was conceived and developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) and it`s implementation satisfies recommendations made by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. The review identified both strengths and weaknesses of the procedures and personnel.

  7. Self-Pressurization and Spray Cooling Simulations of the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) Ground-Based Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartuzova, O.; Kassemi, M.; Agui, J.; Moder, J.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a CFD (computational fluid dynamics) model for simulating the self-pressurization of a large scale liquid hydrogen storage tank. In this model, the kinetics-based Schrage equation is used to account for the evaporative and condensing interfacial mass flows. Laminar and turbulent approaches to modeling natural convection in the tank and heat and mass transfer at the interface are compared. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass fluxes predicted by these two approaches during tank self-pressurization are compared against each other. The ullage pressure and vapor temperature evolutions are also compared against experimental data obtained from the MHTB (Multipuprpose Hydrogen Test Bed) self-pressurization experiment. A CFD model for cooling cryogenic storage tanks by spraying cold liquid in the ullage is also presented. The Euler- Lagrange approach is utilized for tracking the spray droplets and for modeling interaction between the droplets and the continuous phase (ullage). The spray model is coupled with the VOF (volume of fluid) model by performing particle tracking in the ullage, removing particles from the ullage when they reach the interface, and then adding their contributions to the liquid. Droplet ullage heat and mass transfer are modeled. The flow, temperature, and interfacial mass flux predicted by the model are presented. The ullage pressure is compared with experimental data obtained from the MHTB spray bar mixing experiment. The results of the models with only droplet/ullage heat transfer and with heat and mass transfer between the droplets and ullage are compared.

  8. Subcritical water extraction of antioxidant phenolic compounds from XiLan olive fruit dreg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xue-Mei; Zhu, Ping; Zhong, Qiu-Ping; Li, Meng-Ying; Ma, Han-Ruo

    2015-08-01

    Olive fruit dreg (OFD), waste from olive softdrink processing, has caused disposal problems. Nevertheless, OFD is a good source of functional ingredients, such as phenolic compounds. This study investigated the extraction conditions of phenolic compounds from OFD by using subcritical water (SCW) extraction method, antioxidant activity of SCW extracts, and components of phenolic compounds by LC-MS. SCW extraction experiments were performed in a batch stainless steel reactor at temperatures ranging from 100 to 180 °C at residence time of 5 to 60 min, and at solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:20 to 1:60. Higher recoveries of phenolic compounds [37.52 ± 0.87 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g, dry weight (DW)] were obtained at 160 °C, solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:50, and extract time of 30 min than at 2 h extraction with methanol (1.21 ± 0.16 mg GAE/g DW), ethanol (0.24 ± 0.07 mg GAE/g DW), and acetone (0.34 ± 0.01 mg GAE/g DW). The antioxidant activities of the SCW extracts were significantly stronger than those in methanol extracts at the same concentration of total phenolic contents. LC-MS analysis results indicated that SCW extracts contained higher amounts of phenolic compounds, such as chlorogenic acid, homovanillic acid, gallic acid, hydroxytyrosol, quercetin, and syringic acid. SCW at 160 °C, 30 min, and solid-to-liquid ratio of 1:50 may be a good substitute of organic solvents, such as methanol, ethanol, and acetone to recover phenolic compounds from OFD.

  9. Nonlinear dynamics aspects of subcritical transitions and singular flows in viscoelastic fluids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becherer, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in theoretical aspects of flows of viscoelastic fluids (such as dilute polymer solutions). This thesis addresses two distinct issues related to such flows. Motivated by the possible occurrence of subcritical (finite-amplitude) instabilities in parallel

  10. Subcritical water - a perspective reaction media for biomass processing to chemicals

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlovič, Irena; Škerget, Mojca; Knez, Željko

    2015-01-01

    Biomass and water are recognized as a key renewable feedstock in sustainable production of chemicals, fuels and energy. Subcritical water (SubCW), or commonly referred as hot compressed water (HCW), is the water above boiling and below critical point (CP

  11. LAVENDER: A steady-state core analysis code for design studies of accelerator driven subcritical reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shengcheng; Wu, Hongchun; Cao, Liangzhi; Zheng, Youqi, E-mail: yqzheng@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Huang, Kai; He, Mingtao; Li, Xunzhao

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • A new code system for design studies of accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADSRs) is developed. • S{sub N} transport solver in triangular-z meshes, fine deletion analysis and multi-channel thermal-hydraulics analysis are coupled in the code. • Numerical results indicate that the code is reliable and efficient for design studies of ADSRs. - Abstract: Accelerator driven subcritical reactors (ADSRs) have been proposed and widely investigated for the transmutation of transuranics (TRUs). ADSRs have several special characteristics, such as the subcritical core driven by spallation neutrons, anisotropic neutron flux distribution and complex geometry etc. These bring up requirements for development or extension of analysis codes to perform design studies. A code system named LAVENDER has been developed in this paper. It couples the modules for spallation target simulation and subcritical core analysis. The neutron transport-depletion calculation scheme is used based on the homogenized cross section from assembly calculations. A three-dimensional S{sub N} nodal transport code based on triangular-z meshes is employed and a multi-channel thermal-hydraulics analysis model is integrated. In the depletion calculation, the evolution of isotopic composition in the core is evaluated using the transmutation trajectory analysis algorithm (TTA) and fine depletion chains. The new code is verified by several benchmarks and code-to-code comparisons. Numerical results indicate that LAVENDER is reliable and efficient to be applied for the steady-state analysis and reactor core design of ADSRs.

  12. Promotion or suppression of glucose isomerization in subcritical aqueous straight- and branched-chain alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Da-Ming; Kobayashi, Takashi; Adachi, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    The influence of water-miscible alcohols (methanol, 1-propanol, 2-propanol, and t-butyl alcohol) on the isomerization of glucose to fructose and mannose was investigated under subcritical aqueous conditions (180-200 °C). Primary and secondary alcohols promoted the conversion and isomerization of glucose to afford fructose and mannose with high and low selectivity, respectively. On the other hand, the decomposition (side-reaction) of glucose was suppressed in the presence of the primary and secondary alcohols compared with that in subcritical water. The yield of fructose increased with increasing concentration of the primary and secondary alcohols, and the species of the primary and secondary alcohols tested had little effect on the isomerization behavior of glucose. In contrast, the isomerization of glucose was suppressed in subcritical aqueous t-butyl alcohol. Both the conversion of glucose and the yield of fructose decreased with increasing concentration of t-butyl alcohol. In addition, mannose was not detected in reactions using subcritical aqueous t-butyl alcohol.

  13. Subcritical localization in the discrete nonlinear Schrödinger equation with arbitrary power nonlinearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, O.; Juul Rasmussen, J.; Christiansen, P.L.

    1994-01-01

    Discretizing the continuous nonlinear Schrodinger equation with arbitrary power nonlinearity influences the time evolution of its ground state solitary solution. In the subcritical case, for grid resolutions above a certain transition value, depending on the degree of nonlinearity, the solution w...

  14. Subcritical crack growth behavior of AI2O3-Glass dental composites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Q.; With, G. de; Dortmans, L.J.M.G.; Feenstra, F.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the subcritical crack growth (SCG) behavior of alumina-glass dental composites. Alumina-glass composites were fabricated by infiltrating molten glass to porous alumina preforms. Rectangular bars of the composite were subject to dynamic loading in air, with

  15. PLUTONIUM SOLUBILITY IN SIMULATED SAVANNAH RIVER SITE WASTE SOLUTIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudisill, T.; Hobbs, D.; Edwards, T.

    2010-09-27

    To address the accelerated disposition of the supernate and salt portions of Savannah River Site (SRS) high level waste (HLW), solubility experiments were performed to develop a predictive capability for plutonium (Pu) solubility. A statistically designed experiment was used to measure the solubility of Pu in simulated solutions with salt concentrations and temperatures which bounded those observed in SRS HLW solutions. Constituents of the simulated waste solutions included: hydroxide (OH{sup -}), aluminate (Al(OH){sub 4}{sup -}), sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}), carbonate (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}{sup -}), and nitrite (NO{sub 2}{sup -}) anions. Each anion was added to the waste solution in the sodium form. The solubilities were measured at 25 and 80 C. Five sets of samples were analyzed over a six month period and a partial sample set was analyzed after nominally fifteen months of equilibration. No discernable time dependence of the measured Pu concentrations was observed except for two salt solutions equilibrated at 80 C which contained OH{sup -} concentrations >5 mol/L. In these solutions, the Pu solubility increased with time. This observation was attributed to the air oxidation of a portion of the Pu from Pu(IV) to the more soluble Pu(V) or Pu(VI) valence states. A data driven approach was subsequently used to develop a modified response surface model for Pu solubility. Solubility data from this study and historical data from the literature were used to fit the model. The model predicted the Pu solubility of the solutions from this study within the 95% confidence interval for individual predictions and the analysis of variance indicated no statistically significant lack of fit. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) model was compared with predicted values from the Aqueous Electrolyte (AQ) model developed by OLI Systems, Inc. and a solubility prediction equation developed by Delegard and Gallagher for Hanford tank waste. The agreement between

  16. Use of Electronic Hand-held Devices for Collection of Savannah River Site Environmental Data - 13329

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marberry, Hugh [SRNS Savannah River Site 730-4B Room 3043 Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Moore, Winston [SRNS Savannah River Site 735B Room 116 Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Savannah River Nuclear Solutions has begun using Xplore Tablet PC's to collect data in the field for soil samples, groundwater samples, air samples and round sheets at the Savannah River Site (SRS). EPA guidelines for groundwater sampling are incorporated into the application to ensure the sample technician follows the proper protocol. The sample technician is guided through the process for sampling and round sheet data collection by a series of menus and input boxes. Field measurements and well stabilization information are entered into the tablet for uploading into Environmental Restoration Data Management System (ERDMS). The process helps to eliminate input errors and provides data integrity. A soil sample technician has the ability to collect information about location of sample, field parameter, describe the soil sample, print bottle labels, and print chain of custody for the sample that they have collected. An air sample technician has the ability to provide flow, pressure, hours of operation, print bottle labels and chain of custody for samples they collect. Round sheets are collected using the information provided in the various procedures. The data are collected and uploaded into ERDMS. The equipment used is weather proof and hardened for the field use. Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities are integrated into the applications to provide the location where samples were collected and to help sample technicians locate wells that are not visited often. (authors)

  17. Nutrition label experience, obesity, high blood pressure, and high blood lipids in a cohort of 42,750 Thai adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wimalin Rimpeekool

    Full Text Available Nutrition labels have been promoted for nearly two decades in Thailand to educate people about healthy eating and to combat nutrient-related non-communicable diseases (NCDs. But little is known about how nutrition labels are experienced and whether they are linked with better health. Our objective was to investigate the associations between nutrition label experience, obesity and nutrient-related NCDs in Thai consumers.A cross-sectional study was undertaken with a nationwide cohort of 42,750 distance learning Thai adult students enrolled in an Open University in 2013. We measured exposure as nutrition label experience (read, understand, use. Health outcomes were high blood pressure, high blood lipids, and high Body Mass Index (overweight at risk and obesity. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the association between nutrition label experience and health outcome adjusting for sociodemographic attributes, physical activity, smoking, and alcohol intake.Frequent nutrition label use varied by cohort attributes and health outcomes and was least for those with low physical activity and high blood pressure. Being male, older, an urban resident or with low physical activity was associated with increasing high blood pressure and high blood lipids. Compared to those who read, understand and use nutrition labels, participants who did not (read, understand, and use, were more likely to report high blood pressure (Adjusted Odds Ratio 1.33; 1.17-1.51, high blood lipids (AOR 1.26; 1.14-1.39, and obesity (AOR 1.23; 1.13-1.33, but were not more likely to be overweight at risk (AOR 1.06; 0.97-1.16.We found cross-sectional associations between low nutrition label experience and increased likelihood of high blood pressure, high blood lipids, and obesity among Thai adults. Nutrition label education should be promoted as part of a public health approach to appropriate food choices and better lifestyles to reduce obesity and nutrient-related NCDs.

  18. Savannah River Site Waste Removal Program - Past, Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saldivar, E.

    2002-02-25

    The Savannah River Site has fifty-one high level waste tanks in various phases of operation and closure. These tanks were originally constructed to receive, store, and treat the high level waste (HLW) created in support of the missions assigned by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Federal Facilities Agreement (FFA) requires the high level waste to be removed from the tanks and stabilized into a final waste form. Additionally, closure of the tanks following waste removal must be completed. The SRS HLW System Plan identifies the interfaces of safe storage, waste removal, and stabilization of the high level waste and the schedule for the closure of each tank. HLW results from the dissolution of irradiated fuel components. Desired nuclear materials are recovered and the byproducts are neutralized with NaOH and sent to the High Level Waste Tank Farms at the SRS. The HLW process waste clarifies in the tanks as the sludge settles, resulting in a layer of dense sludge with salt supernate settling above the sludge. Salt supernate is concentrated via evaporation into saltcake and NaOH liquor. This paper discusses the history of SRS waste removal systems, recent waste removal experiences, and the challenges facing future removal operations to enhance efficiency and cost effectiveness. Specifically, topics will include the evolution and efficiency of systems used in the 1960's which required large volumes of water to current systems of large centrifugal slurry pumps, with significant supporting infrastructure and safety measures. Interactions of this equipment with the waste tank farm operations requirements will also be discussed. The cost and time improvements associated with these present-day systems is a primary focus for the HLW Program.

  19. Analysis of Cavity Pressure and Warpage of Polyoxymethylene Thin Walled Injection Molded Parts: Experiments and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrier, Patrick; Tosello, Guido; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    was characterized by measuring distances using a tactile coordinate measuring machine (CMM). Molding simulations have been executed taking into account actual processing conditions. Various aspects have been considered in the simulation: machine barrel geometry, injection speed profiles, cavity injection pressure......, melt and mold temperatures, material rheological and pvT characterization. Factors investigated for comparisons were: injection pressure profile, short shots length, flow pattern, and warpage. A reliable molding experimental database was obtained, accurate simulations were conducted and a number...... of conclusions concerning improvements to simulation accuracy are presented regarding: pvT data, mesh, short shots, cavity pressure for process control validation as well as molding machine geometry modelling. Eventually, a methodology for improved molding simulations of cavity injection pressure, filling...

  20. The effect of the inflation pressure of tyres on motorcycle weave stability: experiments and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossalter, V.; Favaron, V.; Giolo, E.; Jomaa, T.

    2016-10-01

    Increasing the stability of a motorcycle requires an understanding of the optimal conditions of the tyre. The inflation pressure is one of the main parameters that directly affects the tyre properties, which in turn influences motorcycle stability and safety. This paper focuses on the effect of the inflation pressure of the tested tyres on motorcycle weave stability. Experimental data are collected from tests carried out in straight running at constant speed. The data analysis is based on stochastic subspace identification methods. Simulations are performed using an advanced motorcycle multi-body code with parameters measured from the tested vehicle. Finally, the comparison between simulations and experimental tests is discussed. The research results show an agreement between experimental tests and simulations where weave stability increases with inflation pressure for the specified range of tyre pressure.

  1. Plutonium Critical Mass Curve Comparison to Mass at Upper Subcritical Limit (USL) Using Whisper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Monte Carlo Codes; Zhang, Ning [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Nuclear Criticality Safety Division

    2016-09-27

    Whisper is computational software designed to assist the nuclear criticality safety analyst with validation studies with the MCNP® Monte Carlo radiation transport package. Standard approaches to validation rely on the selection of benchmarks based upon expert judgment. Whisper uses sensitivity/uncertainty (S/U) methods to select relevant benchmarks to a particular application or set of applications being analyzed. Using these benchmarks, Whisper computes a calculational margin. Whisper attempts to quantify the margin of subcriticality (MOS) from errors in software and uncertainties in nuclear data. The combination of the Whisper-derived calculational margin and MOS comprise the baseline upper subcritical limit (USL), to which an additional margin may be applied by the nuclear criticality safety analyst as appropriate to ensure subcriticality. A series of critical mass curves for plutonium, similar to those found in Figure 31 of LA-10860-MS, have been generated using MCNP6.1.1 and the iterative parameter study software, WORM_Solver. The baseline USL for each of the data points of the curves was then computed using Whisper 1.1. The USL was then used to determine the equivalent mass for plutonium metal-water system. ANSI/ANS-8.1 states that it is acceptable to use handbook data, such as the data directly from the LA-10860-MS, as it is already considered validated (Section 4.3 4) “Use of subcritical limit data provided in ANSI/ANS standards or accepted reference publications does not require further validation.”). This paper attempts to take a novel approach to visualize traditional critical mass curves and allows comparison with the amount of mass for which the keff is equal to the USL (calculational margin + margin of subcriticality). However, the intent is to plot the critical mass data along with USL, not to suggest that already accepted handbook data should have new and more rigorous requirements for validation.

  2. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain: new powerful tool for closed wound management: clinical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seung Jun; Han, DaeHee; Song, Hyunsuk; Jang, Yu Jin; Park, Dong Ha; Park, Myong Chul

    2014-07-01

    Although various reconstructive flap surgeries have been successfully performed, there still are difficult wound complications, such as seroma formation, wound margin necrosis, delayed wound healing, and even flap failures. The negative-pressure wound therapy has been described in detail in the literature to assist open chronic/complex wound closure in reconstructive surgery. However, the negative-pressure wound therapy was difficult to be applied under the incisional closed wounds. A total of 23 patients underwent the various reconstructive flap surgeries with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain. Instead of using regular suction units, Barovac (50-90 mm Hg, Sewoon Medical, Seoul, Republic of Korea) drainage tubes were connected to the wall suction unit, providing continuous high-powered negative pressure. In addition, continuous subatmospheric suction pressure (100-300 mm Hg) was applied. Outcome of the measures was obtained from the incidence of seroma, volume of postoperative drainage, hospitalization period, and incidence of other typical wound complications. Dead space was evaluated postoperatively with ultrasonography. Using continuous high-pressure negative suction drain, successful management of seroma was obtained without any major complication such as wound infection, flap loss, and wound margin necrosis, except for only 1 case of seroma after discharge from the hospital. The indwelling time of the drain in the latissimus dorsi donor site was significantly reduced in comparison with the authors' previous data (P = 0.047). The volume of drainage and hospitalization period were also reduced; however, these were not statistically significant. The dead space with continuous high-pressure negative suction drain was more reduced than in the control group in the immediate postoperative period and confirmed with ultrasonography. Continuous high-pressure negative suction drain might be the simple and powerful solution in the management of challenging

  3. Impact of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation curves: Experiments and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, M.; Fiorentino, E.-A.; Mâløy, K. J.; Schäfer, G.; Toussaint, R.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we study the influence of sample geometry on the measurement of pressure-saturation relationships, by analyzing the drainage of a two-phase flow from a quasi-2-D random porous medium. The medium is transparent, which allows for the direct visualization of the invasion pattern during flow, and is initially saturated with a viscous liquid (a dyed glycerol-water mix). As the pressure in the liquid is gradually reduced, air penetrates from an open inlet, displacing the liquid which leaves the system from an outlet on the opposite side. Pressure measurements and images of the flow are recorded and the pressure-saturation relationship is computed. We show that this relationship depends on the system size and aspect ratio. The effects of the system's boundaries on this relationship are measured experimentally and compared with simulations produced using an invasion percolation algorithm. The pressure build up at the beginning and end of the invasion process are particularly affected by the boundaries of the system whereas at the central part of the model (when the air front progresses far from these boundaries), the invasion happens at a statistically constant capillary pressure. These observations have led us to propose a much simplified pressure-saturation relationship, valid for systems that are large enough such that the invasion is not influenced by boundary effects. The properties of this relationship depend on the capillary pressure thresholds distribution, sample dimensions, and average pore connectivity and its applications may be of particular interest for simulations of two-phase flow in large porous media.

  4. Subcritical and supercritical water oxidation of organic, wet wastes for carbon cycling in regenerative life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronsse, Frederik; Lasseur, Christophe; Rebeyre, Pierre; Clauwaert, Peter; Luther, Amanda; Rabaey, Korneel; Zhang, Dong Dong; López Barreiro, Diego; Prins, Wolter; Brilman, Wim

    2016-07-01

    For long-term human spaceflight missions, one of the major requirements is the regenerative life support system which has to be capable of recycling carbon, nutrients and water from both solid and liquid wastes generated by the crew and by the local production of food through living organisms (higher plants, fungi, algae, bacteria, …). The European Space Agency's Life Support System, envisioned by the MELiSSA project, consists of a 5 compartment artificial ecosystem, in which the waste receiving compartment (so-called compartment I or briefly 'CI') is based on thermophilic fermentation. However, as the waste generated by the crew compartment and food production compartment contain typical plant fibres (lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose), these recalcitrant fibres end up largely unaffected in the digestate (sludge) generated in the C-I compartment. Therefore, the C-I compartment has to be supplemented with a so-called fibre degradation unit (in short, FDU) for further oxidation or degradation of said plant fibres. A potential solution to degrading these plant fibres and other recalcitrant organics is their oxidation, by means of subcritical or supercritical water, into reusable CO2 while retaining the nutrients in an organic-free liquid effluent. By taking advantage of the altered physicochemical properties of water above or near its critical point (647 K, 22.1 MPa) - including increased solubility of non-polar compounds and oxygen, ion product and diffusivity - process conditions can be created for rapid oxidation of C into CO2. In this research, the oxidizer is provided as a hydrogen peroxide solution which, at elevated temperature, will dissociated into O2. The purpose of this study is to identify ideal process conditions which (a) ensure complete oxidation of carbon, (b) retaining the nutrients other than C in the liquid effluent and (c) require as little oxidizer as possible. Experiments were conducted on a continuous, tubular heated reactor and on batch

  5. Using Design of Experiments Methods for Assessing Peak Contact Pressure to Material Properties of Soft Tissue in Human Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjan Bahraminasab

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contact pressure in the knee joint is a key element in the mechanisms of knee pain and osteoarthritis. Assessing the contact pressure in tibiofemoral joint is a challenging mechanical problem due to uncertainty in material properties. In this study, a sensitivity analysis of tibiofemoral peak contact pressure to the material properties of the soft tissue was carried out through fractional factorial and Box-Behnken designs. The cartilage was modeled as linear elastic material, and in addition to its elastic modulus, interaction effects of soft tissue material properties were added compared to previous research. The results indicated that elastic modulus of the cartilage is the most effective factor. Interaction effects of axial/radial modulus with elastic modulus of cartilage, circumferential and axial/radial moduli of meniscus were other influential factors. Furthermore this study showed how design of experiment methods can help designers to reduce the number of finite element analyses and to better interpret the results.

  6. Enhancing yield and profitability of cassava in the savannah and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was conducted to simulate intercropping of cassava and groundnut as practiced by farmers in the savannah and forest zones of Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). It aims to (i) evaluate the intercropping of two most cultivated food crops (Cassava and Groundnut) under conditions of marginal soils of ...

  7. Operation Savannah: A Measure of SADF Decline, Resourcefulness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SADF conventional warfare capacity exhibited a decline during the 1950s, followed by belated efforts at rearmament and consolidation during the 1960s. However, Operation Savannah, the SADF's intervention in the Angolan civil war during 1975–1976, as the force's first involvement in a conventional-type war since 1945, ...

  8. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-03

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  9. Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal Home · Journals · Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice · About · Log In · Register · Advanced Search · By Author · By Title. Issues. Current Issue · Archives · Open Journal Systems · Help. ISSN: 2276-6839. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  10. Radiological impact of 2016 operations at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minter, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Jannik, G. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-06-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2016 Savannah River Site (SRS) air and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios, such as the consumption of wildlife or goat milk.

  11. The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-10-18

    This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

  12. Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Savannah Journal of Medical Research and Practice aims to promote and advance the practice and study of all fields of medicine in Nigeria in general as well as in other African countries and the rest of the world. We therefore welcome contributions relating to all aspects of medicine from workers ...

  13. Anthrax in Togo: Spatial Risk in the Savannah Region | Kulo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During the dry season in northern Togo, herds are led in search of water sources and natural pasture. These areas are often unfamiliar to the herdsmen and can also pose health risks to the herd. Additionally, migrating animals can spread diseases to other herds. The Savannah Region, in northern of Togo, has ...

  14. Onsite transportation of radioactive materials at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, R.

    2015-03-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Transportation Safety Document (TSD) defines the onsite packaging and transportation safety program at SRS and demonstrates its compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) transportation safety requirements, to include DOE Order 460.1C, DOE Order 461.2, Onsite Packaging and Transfer of Materials of National Security Interest, and 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management (Subpart B).

  15. Estimation of Potential Evapotranspiration for a Coastal Savannah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samani , Priestley-Taylor, IRMAK1, IRMAK2 and TURC, were used to estimate daily PET values at Atomic-Kwabenya in the coastal savannah environment of Ghana for the year 2005. The study compared PET values generated by six models ...

  16. Probabilities of Natural Events Occurring at Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, J.C.

    2001-07-17

    This report documents the comprehensive evaluation of probability models of natural events which are applicable to Savannah River Plant. The probability curves selected for these natural events are recommended to be used by all SRP/SRL safety analysts. This will ensure a consistency in analysis methodology for postulated SAR incidents involving natural phenomena.

  17. Numerical Weather Forecasting at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R.L.

    1999-01-26

    Facilities such as the Savannah River Site (SRS), which contain the potential for hazardous atmospheric releases, rely on the predictive capabilities of dispersion models to assess possible emergency response actions. The operational design in relation to domain size and forecast time is presented, along with verification of model results over extended time periods with archived surface observations.

  18. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report, September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrell, J.M. [comp.

    1992-09-01

    This is a monthly progress report from the Savannah River Laboratory for the month of September, 1992. It has sections dealing with work in the broad areas of reactor safety, tritium processes and absorption, separations programs and wastes, environmental concerns and responses, waste management practices, and general concerns.

  19. Pressurized laboratory experiments show no stable carbon isotope fractionation of methane during gas hydrate dissolution and dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapham, Laura L; Wilson, Rachel M; Chanton, Jeffrey P

    2012-01-15

    The stable carbon isotopic ratio of methane (δ(13)C-CH(4)) recovered from marine sediments containing gas hydrate is often used to infer the gas source and associated microbial processes. This is a powerful approach because of distinct isotopic fractionation patterns associated with methane production by biogenic and thermogenic pathways and microbial oxidation. However, isotope fractionations due to physical processes, such as hydrate dissolution, have not been fully evaluated. We have conducted experiments to determine if hydrate dissolution or dissociation (two distinct physical processes) results in isotopic fractionation. In a pressure chamber, hydrate was formed from a methane gas source at 2.5 MPa and 4 °C, well within the hydrate stability field. Following formation, the methane source was removed while maintaining the hydrate at the same pressure and temperature which stimulated hydrate dissolution. Over the duration of two dissolution experiments (each ~20-30 days), water and headspace samples were periodically collected and measured for methane concentrations and δ(13)C-CH(4) while the hydrate dissolved. For both experiments, the methane concentrations in the pressure chamber water and headspace increased over time, indicating that the hydrate was dissolving, but the δ(13)C-CH(4) values showed no significant trend and remained constant, within 0.5‰. This lack of isotope change over time indicates that there is no fractionation during hydrate dissolution. We also investigated previous findings that little isotopic fractionation occurs when the gas hydrate dissociates into gas bubbles and water due to the release of pressure. Over a 2.5 MPa pressure drop, the difference in the δ(13)C-CH(4) was hydrate dissociates and demonstrated that there is no fractionation when the hydrate dissolves. Therefore, measured δ(13)C-CH(4) values near gas hydrates are not affected by physical processes, and can thus be interpreted to result from either the gas source

  20. Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE)-Parametric Pressure Distribution Boundary Layer Stability Study and Wing Glove Design Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozendaal, Rodger A.

    1986-01-01

    The Variable Sweep Transition Flight Experiment (VSTFE) was initiated to establish a boundary-layer transition data base for laminar flow wing design. For this experiment, full-span upper-surface gloves will be fitted to a variable sweep F-14 aircraft. The results of two initial tasks are documented: a parametric pressure distribution/boundary-layer stability study and the design of an upper-surface glove for Mach 0.8. The first task was conducted to provide a data base from which wing-glove pressure distributions could be selected for glove designs. Boundary-layer stability analyses were conducted on a set of pressure distributions for various wing sweep angles, Mach numbers, and Reynolds number in the range of those anticipated for the flight-test program. The design procedure for the Mach 0.8 glove is described, and boundary-layer stability calculations and pressure distributions are presented both at design and off-design conditions. Also included is the analysis of the clean-up glove (smoothed basic wing) that will be flight-tested initially and the analysis of a Mach 0.7 glove designed at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  1. Fully Hydro-Mechanically Coupled Experiments and Simulations on Rough Fractures Subjected to High-Pressure Fluid Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, D.; Settgast, R.; Annavarapu, C.; Madonna, C.; Bayer, P.; Amann, F.

    2016-12-01

    This work presents fully hydro-mechanically coupled experiments and simulations in heterogeneous fractures. Cylindrical specimens with an artificial fracture normal to the cylinder axis were axially loaded to evaluate: (i) fracture normal closure; (ii) fracture contact stress evolution; and (iii) fracture normal closure and fluid injection pressure response. The laboratory experiments were simulated with the GEOS framework, which captures the non-linear behavior of fracture normal closure and fluid pressure response. To apply the developed model on the field scale, a heterogeneous fracture aperture field is created from aperture data recorded under zero-stress on natural tensile fractures from the Grimsel Test Site (GTS), Switzerland. The field stresses measured in the GTS are applied on the model domain, yielding the unique aperture distribution and stress perturbations in the rock mass associated with the applied stress state. Next, fluid is injected into the fracture center and tortuous flow channeling is observed. Increasing fluid injection pressures result in localized fracture opening, which leads to an increasingly non-linear relationship between fluid injection flow rate and pressure.

  2. Fast Fourier transform to measure pressure coefficient of muons in the GRAPES-3 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, P. K.; Ahmad, S.; Antia, H. M.; Arunbabu, K. P.; Chandra, A.; Dugad, S. R.; Gupta, S. K.; Hariharan, B.; Hayashi, Y.; Jagadeesan, P.; Jain, A.; Kawakami, S.; Kojima, H.; Morris, S. D.; Nayak, P. K.; Oshima, A.; Rao, B. S.; Reddy, L. V.; Shibata, S.

    2016-06-01

    The GRAPES-3 large area (560 m2) tracking muon telescope is operating at Ooty in India since 2001. It records 4 × 109 muons of energy ≥ 1 GeV every day. These high statistics data have enabled extremely sensitive measurements of solar phenomena, including the solar anisotropies, Forbush decreases, coronal mass ejections etc. to be made. However, prior to such studies, the variation in observed muon rate caused by changes in atmospheric pressure needs to be corrected. Traditionally, the pressure coefficient (β) for the muon rate was derived from the observed data. But the influence of various solar effects makes the measurement of β somewhat difficult. In the present work, a different approach to circumvent this difficulty was used to measure β, almost independent of the solar activity. This approach exploits a small amplitude (∼1 hPa) periodic (12 h) variation of atmospheric pressure at Ooty that introduces a synchronous variation in the muon rate. By using the fast Fourier transform technique the spectral power distributions at 12 h from the atmospheric pressure, and muon rate were used to measure β. The value of pressure coefficient was found to be β =(- 0.128 ± 0.005) % hPa-1.

  3. Tire–rim interface pressure of a commercial vehicle wheel under radial loads: theory and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiaofei; Shan, Yingchun; Liu, Xiandong; He, Tian; Wang, Jiegong

    2017-11-01

    The simulation of the radial fatigue test of a wheel has been a necessary tool to improve the design of the wheel and calculate its fatigue life. The simulation model, including the strong nonlinearity of the tire structure and material, may produce accurate results, but often leads to a divergence in calculation. Thus, a simplified simulation model in which the complicated tire model is replaced with a tire-wheel contact pressure model is used extensively in the industry. In this paper, a simplified tire–rim interface pressure model of a wheel under a radial load is established, and the pressure of the wheel under different radial loads is tested. The tire–rim contact behavior affected by the radial load is studied and analyzed according to the test result, and the tire–rim interface pressure extracted from the test result is used to evaluate the simplified pressure model and the traditional cosine function model. The results show that the proposed model may provide a more accurate prediction of the wheel radial fatigue life than the traditional cosine function model.

  4. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamatey, A.; Fanning, R.

    2010-08-19

    The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 2009 (SRNS-STI-2010-00175) is prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) according to requirements of DOE Order 231.1A,'Environment, Safety and Health Reporting,' and DOE Order 5400.5, 'Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment.' The annual SRS Environmental Report has been produced for more than 50 years. Several hundred copies are distributed each year to government officials, universities, public libraries, environmental and civic groups, news media, and interested individuals. The report's purpose is to: (1) present summary environmental data that characterize site environmental management performance; (2) confirm compliance with environmental standards and requirements; and (3) highlight significant programs and efforts. SRS maintained its record of environmental excellence in 2009, as its operations continued to result in minimal impact to the offsite public and the surrounding environment. The site's radioactive and chemical discharges to air and water were well below regulatory standards for environmental and public health protection; its air and water quality met applicable requirements; and the potential radiation dose from its discharges was less than the national dose standards. The largest radiation dose that an offsite, hypothetical, maximally exposed individual could have received from SRS operations during 2009 was estimated to be 0.12 millirem (mrem). (An mrem is a standard unit of measure for radiation exposure.) The 2009 SRS dose is just 0.12 percent of the DOE all-pathway dose standard of 100 mrem per year, and far less than the natural average dose of about 300 mrem per year (according to Report No. 160 of the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements) to people in the United States. This 2009 all-pathway dose of 0.12 mrem was the same as the 2008 dose. Environmental monitoring is conducted extensively within a 2,000-square-mile network

  5. Pressure relief protection in cryostats: CERN’s experience on LHC and HIE Isolde

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    Cryostats contain large cold surfaces, cryogenic fluids, and sometimes large stored energy (e.g. energized magnets), with the potential risk of sudden liberation of energy through thermodynamic transformations of the fluids, which can be uncontrolled and lead to a dangerous increase of pressure inside the cryostat envelopes. The consequence, in the case of a rupture of the envelopes, may be serious for personnel (injuries from deflagration, burns, and oxygen deficiency hazard) as well as for the equipment. Performing a thorough risk analysis is an essential step to identify and understand risk hazards that may cause a pressure increase and in order to assess consequences, define mitigation actions, and design adequate safety relief devices to limit pressure accordingly. Lessons learnt from real cases are essential for improving safety awareness for future projects: LHC and HIE Isolde are amongst these examples.

  6. Clinical experience with telemetric intracranial pressure monitoring in a Danish neurosurgical center

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lilja, Alexander; Andresen, Morten; Hadi, Amer

    2014-01-01

    for late wound infection at the surgical site in two patients. CONCLUSION: Telemetric ICP monitoring is useful in patients with complicated CSF dynamic disturbances who would otherwise require repeated invasive pressure monitoring. It seems to be a feasible method to guide adjustment of programmable valve......BACKGROUND: Monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP) is important in the optimal treatment of various neurological and neurosurgical diseases. Telemetric ICP monitoring allows long-term measurements in the patient's everyday life and the possibility to perform additional measurements without...... kinds of hydrocephalus, seven patients had idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and three patients had normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH). Fifteen patients had a shunt prior to implantation. Median duration of implantation was 248 (49-666) days and median duration from implantation to last...

  7. Preliminary Simulations of the Ullage Dynamics in Microgravity During the Jet Mixing Portion of Tank Pressure Control Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breisacher, Kevin; Moder, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The results of CFD simulations of microgravity tank pressure control experiments performed on the Space Shuttle are presented. A 13.7 liter acrylic model tank was used in these experiments. The tank was filled to an 83 percent fill fraction with Freon refrigerant to simulate cryogenic propellants stored in space. In the experiments, a single liquid jet near the bottom of the tank was used for mixing the tank. Simulations at a range of jet Weber numbers were performed. Qualitative comparisons of the liquid and gas interface dynamics observed and recorded in the experiments and those computed are shown and discussed. The simulations were able to correctly capture jet penetration of the ullage, qualitatively reproduce ullage shapes and dynamics, as well as the final equilibrium position of the ullage.

  8. Integrated modeling of CO2 storage and leakage scenarios including transitions between super- and sub-critical conditions, and phase change between liquid and gaseous CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruess, K.

    2011-05-15

    Storage of CO{sub 2} in saline aquifers is intended to be at supercritical pressure and temperature conditions, but CO{sub 2} leaking from a geologic storage reservoir and migrating toward the land surface (through faults, fractures, or improperly abandoned wells) would reach subcritical conditions at depths shallower than 500-750 m. At these and shallower depths, subcritical CO{sub 2} can form two-phase mixtures of liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}, with significant latent heat effects during boiling and condensation. Additional strongly non-isothermal effects can arise from decompression of gas-like subcritical CO{sub 2}, the so-called Joule-Thomson effect. Integrated modeling of CO{sub 2} storage and leakage requires the ability to model non-isothermal flows of brine and CO{sub 2} at conditions that range from supercritical to subcritical, including three-phase flow of aqueous phase, and both liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}. In this paper, we describe and demonstrate comprehensive simulation capabilities that can cope with all possible phase conditions in brine-CO{sub 2} systems. Our model formulation includes: (1) an accurate description of thermophysical properties of aqueous and CO{sub 2}-rich phases as functions of temperature, pressure, salinity and CO{sub 2} content, including the mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O; (2) transitions between super- and subcritical conditions, including phase change between liquid and gaseous CO{sub 2}; (3) one-, two-, and three-phase flow of brine-CO{sub 2} mixtures, including heat flow; (4) non-isothermal effects associated with phase change, mutual dissolution of CO{sub 2} and water, and (de-) compression effects; and (5) the effects of dissolved NaCl, and the possibility of precipitating solid halite, with associated porosity and permeability change. Applications to specific leakage scenarios demonstrate that the peculiar thermophysical properties of CO{sub 2} provide a potential for positive as well as negative

  9. High-pressure study of binary thorium compounds from first principles theory and comparisons with experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanchana, V.; Vaitheeswaran, G.; Svane, A.

    2014-01-01

    transitions from NaCl to CsCl are found in ThP, ThAs, ThSb and ThSe at pressures of 26.1, 22.1, 8.1 and 23.2 GPa, respectively, in excellent agreement with experimental results. ThC, ThN and ThS are found to be stable in the NaCl structure, and ThBi and ThTe in the CsCl structure, for pressures below 50 GPa...

  10. Numerical simulation and experiment on split tungsten carbide cylinder of high pressure apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfei; Li, Mingzhe; Liu, Zhiwei; Wang, Bolong

    2015-12-01

    A new high pressure device with a split cylinder was investigated on the basis of the belt-type apparatus. The belt-type die is subjected to excessive tangential tensile stress and the tungsten carbide cylinder is easily damaged in the running process. Taking into account the operating conditions and material properties of the tungsten carbide cylinder, it is divided into 6 blocks to eliminate the tangential tensile stress. We studied two forms of the split type: radial split and tangential split. Simulation results indicate that the split cylinder has more uniform stress distribution and smaller equivalent stress compared with the belt-type cylinder. The inner wall of the tangential split cylinder is in the situation that compressive stress is distributed in the axial, radial, and tangential directions. It is similar to the condition of hydrostatic pressure, and it is the best condition for tungsten carbide materials. The experimental results also verify that the tangential split die can bear the highest chamber pressure. Therefore, the tangential split structure can increase the pressure bearing capacity significantly.

  11. Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO): Past experiences, current developments, and future prospects

    KAUST Repository

    Sarp, S.

    2016-01-16

    Pressure Retarded Osmosis (PRO) has attracted worldwide attention with respect to its salinity gradient energy production potential, and low energy desalination applications. PRO processes, which use Seawater Reverse Osmosis (SWRO) brine as draw solutions, have a higher potential of being applied to any new, and existing membrane based seawater desalination systems, as an energy production and/or conservation process. Hydraulic pressure is applied on a high salinity draw solution, and the hydraulic pressure of the high salinity draw solution can be kept relatively constant during operation, even though the volumetric flow rate is to be increased. Therefore, the draw side of the PRO process can be considered near-isobaric, in most cases. The harvested Gibbs free energy of mixing, and the volumetric expansion can explain this near-isobaric behavior of the draw side in the PRO process. Thus, PRO can be used to multiply the internal energy of the draw solution with respect to the ratio of the permeated water flux. Even though PRO has very high theoretical potential for energy production and/or recovery, there are several shortcomings, which should be answered before the realization of the scale up applications, such as; thermodynamic process optimization, high power density membranes, and high efficiency hydraulic pressure conversion and recovery systems. This review gives detailed information about the PRO process including; (1) theoretical background, (2) membranes for PRO, (3) experimental and large scale applications, and (4) economic feasibility of PRO applications.

  12. High-pressure structural study of yttrium monochalcogenides from experiment and theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaitheeswaran, G.; Kanchana, V.; Svane, A.

    2011-01-01

    , and 67 GPa for YS, YSe, and YTe, respectively. First-principles total energy calculations are carried out using the full-potential linear muffin-tin orbital method. The calculated and measured lattice constants and bulk moduli are in good agrement. Under applied pressure, the yttrium monochalcogenides...

  13. Use of high noninvasive respiratory support pressures in preterm neonates: a single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binmanee, Abdulaziz; El Helou, Salhab; Shivananda, Sandesh; Fusch, Christoph; Mukerji, Amit

    2017-12-01

    To describe the incidence, indications and clinical outcomes following high pressures on noninvasive respiratory support (NRS) in preterm neonates. Retrospective cohort study of all neonates with BW high noninvasive respiratory support (NRS), defined as mean airway pressure ≥10 cm H2O for at least 12 continuous hours using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) and/or nasal high-frequency ventilation (NIHFV). Clinical and physiological outcomes following high NRS were ascertained. Median (IQR) and percentages were used to describe continuous and categorical data, respectively. There were 131 instances of high NRS use in 70 of 315 eligible infants. Most common indication was post-extubation, observed in 37% (49/131) of high NRS instances. Intubation was avoided in 71% (93/131) of instances in the first 7 days following high NRS initiation. There were no physiological perturbations in heart rate, blood pressure or oxygen requirement. Furthermore, there were no instances of lung hyperinflation, pneumothoraces or spontaneous intestinal perforation following high NRS. The use of high NRS pressure was followed by avoidance of intubation in the majority of cases without adverse effects. Further research on high NRS use including its indications, clinical outcomes and safety profile is warranted.

  14. Numerical simulation and experiment on split tungsten carbide cylinder of high pressure apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfei; Li, Mingzhe, E-mail: limz@jlu.edu.cn; Wang, Bolong [Dieless Forming Technology Center, Jilin University, Changchun 130025 (China); Liu, Zhiwei [School of Mechanical Engineering, Anhui University of Science and Technology, Huainan, Anhui 232001 (China)

    2015-12-15

    A new high pressure device with a split cylinder was investigated on the basis of the belt-type apparatus. The belt-type die is subjected to excessive tangential tensile stress and the tungsten carbide cylinder is easily damaged in the running process. Taking into account the operating conditions and material properties of the tungsten carbide cylinder, it is divided into 6 blocks to eliminate the tangential tensile stress. We studied two forms of the split type: radial split and tangential split. Simulation results indicate that the split cylinder has more uniform stress distribution and smaller equivalent stress compared with the belt-type cylinder. The inner wall of the tangential split cylinder is in the situation that compressive stress is distributed in the axial, radial, and tangential directions. It is similar to the condition of hydrostatic pressure, and it is the best condition for tungsten carbide materials. The experimental results also verify that the tangential split die can bear the highest chamber pressure. Therefore, the tangential split structure can increase the pressure bearing capacity significantly.

  15. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of ZnO: Process modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Illiberi, A.; Kniknie, B.; Beckers, E.H.A.; Simons, P.J.P.M.; Lankhorst, A.

    2014-01-01

    The deposition of zinc oxide has been performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and trends in growth rates are compared with the literature. Diethylzinc and tertiary butanol were used as the primary reactants and deposition rates above 800 nm/min were obtained. The reaction

  16. Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition of ZnO: Process modeling and experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deelen, J. van; Illiberi, A.; Kniknie, B.; Beckers, E.H.A.; Simons, P.J.P.M.; Lankhorst, A.

    2013-01-01

    The deposition of zinc oxide has been performed by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition and trends in growth rates are compared with the literature. Diethylzinc and tertiary butanol were used as the primary reactants and deposition rates above 800 nm/minwere obtained. The reaction

  17. Patients experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home for the treatment of deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, Christina; Acosta, Stefan; Kumlien, Christine

    2017-05-01

    To explore experiences of negative pressure wound therapy at home, in patients with deep perivascular groin infection after vascular surgery and management in daily life. Deep surgical site infection after vascular surgery with exposed vessels often requires long-term treatment with negative pressure wound therapy, and continued therapy at home has become routine. An explorative qualitative study. Nine men and six women with a deep surgical site infection in the groin after vascular surgery, treated in their home with negative pressure wound therapy, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent content analysis. Undergoing negative pressure wound therapy at home meant a transition from being a dependent patient to a person who must have self-care competence and be involved in their own care. A need to feel prepared for this before discharge from hospital was expressed. Lack of information and feelings of uncertainty prolonged the time before feeling confident in managing the treatment. The informants gradually accepted the need to be tied up to a machine, became competent in its management and found solutions to perform everyday tasks. Overall, it was a relief to be treated at home. Several benefits of negative pressure wound therapy at home were expressed. However, unnecessary stress and anxiety were experienced due to a lack of information on the treatment and instruction concerning the equipment. Adequate information and education must therefore be provided to facilitate the transition from a patient to a person with self-care competence and ability to manage this treatment at home. The findings revealed a need for more support and knowledge in their transition from hospital care to home care with negative pressure wound therapy. Routines must be established that ensure patient safety and security in treatment at home. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Experiment data report for Semiscale Mod-1 Test S-29-3; integral test from reduced initial pressure. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crapo, H.S.; Collins, B.L.; Sackett, K.E.

    1976-09-01

    Recorded test data are presented for Test S-29-3 of the Semiscale Mod-1 special heat transfer test series. This test is among several Semiscale Mod-1 experiments conducted to investigate the thermal and hydraulic phenomena accompanying a hypothesized loss-of-coolant accident in a pressurized water reactor system. Test S-29-3 was conducted from an initial cold leg fluid temperature of 544/sup 0/F and an initial pressure of 1,760 psia. A simulated double-ended offset shear cold leg break was used to investigate the system response to a depressurization transient starting from a lower initial pressure than that usually associated with pressurized water reactor operation. System flow was set to achieve a full core fluid temperature differential of 66/sup 0/F at full core power of 1.6 MW. The flow resistance of the intact loop was based on core area scaling. An electrically heated core with a peaked radial power profile was used in the pressure vessel to simulate the effects of a nuclear core. During system depressurization, core power was reduced from the initial level of 1.6 MW to simulate the surface heat flux response of nuclear fuel rods until such time that departure from nucleate boiling might occur. Blowdown to the pressure suppression system was accompanied by simulated emergency core cooling injection into both the intact and broken loops. Coolant injection was continued until testtermination at 200 seconds after initiation of blowdown. The purpose of the report is to make available the uninterpreted data from Test S-29-3 for future data analysis and test results reporting activites. The data, presented in the form of graphs in engineering units, have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to assure that they are reasonable and consistent.

  19. Dynamic Simulation of the Water-steam System in Once-through Boilers - Sub-critical Power Boiler Case -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seongil; Choi, Sangmin [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The dynamics of a water-steam system in a once-through boiler was simulated based on the physics-based modeling approach, representing the system in response to large load change or scale disturbance simulations. The modeling considered the mass, energy conservation, and momentum equation in the water pipe and the focus was limited to the sub-critical pressure region. An evaporator tube modeling was validated against the reference data. A simplified boiler system consisting of economizer, evaporator, and superheater was constructed to match a 500 MW power boiler. The dynamic response of the system following a disturbance was discussed along with the quantitative response characteristics. The dynamic response of the boiler system was further evaluated by checking the case of an off-design point operation of the feedwater-to-fuel supply ratio. The results re-emphasized the significance of controlling the feedwater-to-fuel supply ratio and additional design requirements of the water-steam separator and spray attemperator.

  20. Molecular modification of native coffee polysaccharide using subcritical water treatment: Structural characterization, antioxidant, and DNA protecting activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getachew, Adane Tilahun; Chun, Byung Soo

    2017-06-01

    Polysaccharides are an abundant resource in coffee beans and have proved to show numerous bioactivities. Despite their abundance, their activities are not always satisfactory mostly due to their structure and large molecular size. Molecular modifications of native polysaccharides can overcome this problem. In this study, we used a novel and green method to modify native coffee polysaccharides using subcritical water (SCW) treatment. The SCW treatment was used at the temperature of 180°C-220°C and pressure of 30-60bar. The molecular and structural modification of the polysaccharides was confirmed using several techniques such as FT-IR, UV spectroscopy, XRD, and TGA. The antioxidant activity of the modified polysaccharides was evaluated using several chemical and Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based high throughput assays. The modified polysaccharides showed high antioxidant activities in all tested assays. Moreover, the polysaccharides showed high DNA protection activities. Therefore, SCW could be employed as a green solvent for molecular modification of polysaccharides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Solvent tailoring in coal liquefaction. Quarterly report, May 1982-August 1982. [Comparison of subcritical and supercritical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarrer, A.R.; Guin, J.A.; Curtis, C.W.; Williams, D.C.

    1982-01-01

    The initial objective of this work was to study the phase distribution of donor solvents and solvent mixtures during the liquefaction of coal, to investigate the effects of phase distribution on coal conversion, and to determine the advantages, if any, of operating at subcritical and/or supercritical conditions. Computer simulations were used to predict the phase distribution, for various binary systems, as a function of temperature. The FLASH program was used to theoretically predict phase distribution for various model systems. Due to limitations in the computer program, success was achieved only in a few cases. Even in these cases, the existence of two-phase regions was observed only at temperatures and pressures far below normal liquefaction conditions. An extensive review of the literature was carried out in order to survey methods of experimentally studying vapor-liquid equilibria. Finally, some preliminary laboratory studies were carried out with the use of benzothiophene-dodecane as the model reaction system. It was felt that the study of the effect of reactor configuration on conversion would provide insight into whether phase distribution or mass transfer was the limiting consideration for coal conversion. However, no conclusive results were obtained from these studies.

  2. TRITIUM UNCERTAINTY ANALYSIS FOR SURFACE WATER SAMPLES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atkinson, R.

    2012-07-31

    Radiochemical analyses of surface water samples, in the framework of Environmental Monitoring, have associated uncertainties for the radioisotopic results reported. These uncertainty analyses pertain to the tritium results from surface water samples collected at five locations on the Savannah River near the U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). Uncertainties can result from the field-sampling routine, can be incurred during transport due to the physical properties of the sample, from equipment limitations, and from the measurement instrumentation used. The uncertainty reported by the SRS in their Annual Site Environmental Report currently considers only the counting uncertainty in the measurements, which is the standard reporting protocol for radioanalytical chemistry results. The focus of this work is to provide an overview of all uncertainty components associated with SRS tritium measurements, estimate the total uncertainty according to ISO 17025, and to propose additional experiments to verify some of the estimated uncertainties. The main uncertainty components discovered and investigated in this paper are tritium absorption or desorption in the sample container, HTO/H{sub 2}O isotopic effect during distillation, pipette volume, and tritium standard uncertainty. The goal is to quantify these uncertainties and to establish a combined uncertainty in order to increase the scientific depth of the SRS Annual Site Environmental Report.

  3. Habitat Use Patterns of Bobolinks and Savannah Sparrows in the Northeastern United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel P. Shustack

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the northeastern United States, grassland birds regularly use agricultural fields as nesting habitat. However, birds that nest in these fields regularly experience nest failure as a result of agricultural practices, such as mowing and grazing. Therefore, information on both spatial and temporal patterns of habitat use is needed to effectively manage these species. We addressed these complex habitat use patterns by conducting point counts during three time intervals between May 21, 2002 and July 2, 2002 in agricultural fields across the Champlain Valley in Vermont and New York. Early in the breeding season, Bobolinks (Dolichonyx oryzivorus used fields in which the landscape within 2500 m was dominated by open habitats. As mowing began, suitable habitat within 500 m became more important. Savannah Sparrows (Passerculus sandwichensis initially used fields that contained a high proportion of suitable habitat within 500 m. After mowing, features of the field (i.e., size and amount of woody edge became more important. Each species responded differently to mowing: Savannah Sparrows were equally abundant in mowed and uncut fields, whereas Bobolinks were more abundant in uncut fields. In agricultural areas in the Northeast, large areas (2000 ha that are mostly nonforested and undeveloped should be targeted for conservation. Within large open areas, smaller patches (80 ha should be maintained as high-quality, late-cut grassland habitat.

  4. Annual review of cultural resource investigations by the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program. Fiscal year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, M.J.; Brooks, R.D.; Sassaman, K.E.; Crass, D.C. [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) continued through FY95 with the United States Department of Energy to fulfill a threefold mission of cultural resource management, research, and public education at the Savannah River Site. Over 2,300 acres of land on the SRS came under cultural resources review in FY95. This activity entailed 30 field surveys, resulting in the recording of 86 new sites. Twenty-two existing sites within survey tract boundaries were revisited to update site file records. Research conducted by SRARP was reported in 11 papers and monographs published during FY95. SRARP staff also presented research results in 18 papers at professional meetings. Field research included several testing programs, excavations, and remote sensing at area sites, as well as data collection abroad. Seven grants were acquired by SRARP staff to support off-site research. In the area of heritage education, the SRARP expanded its activities in FY95 with a full schedule of classroom education, public outreach, and on-site tours. Volunteer excavations at the Tinker Creek site were continued with the Augusta Archaeological Society and other avocational groups, and other off-site excavations provided a variety of opportunities for field experience. Some 80 presentations, displays and tours were provided for schools, historical societies, civic groups, and environmental and historical awareness day celebrations. Additionally, SRARP staff taught four anthropology courses at area colleges.

  5. "Language Must Be Raked": Experience, Race, and the Pressure of Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standish, Paul

    2018-01-01

    This article begins by clarifying the notion of what Stanley Cavell has called "Emersonian moral perfectionism." It goes on to explore this through close analysis of aspects of Emerson's essay "Experience," in which ideas of trying or attempting or experimenting bring out the intimate relation between perfectionism and styles…

  6. Development of a Facility for Combustion Stability Experiments at Supercritical Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    piezo- sirens , allowing monochromatic excitation across a range of amplitudes at a number of discrete frequencies. The location of the flame within the...piezo- sirens , allowing monochromatic excitation across a range of amplitudes at a number of discrete frequencies. The location of the flame within...desired temperatures. Lastly, a pair of piezoelectric sirens serve as acoustic sources with variable acoustic pressure amplitudes and a range of forcing

  7. The effect of user experience and inflation technique on endotracheal tube cuff pressure using a feline airway simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Donna M; Redondo, José I; Mair, Alastair R; Martinez-Taboada, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    The effect of user experience and inflation technique on endotracheal tube cuff pressure using a feline airway simulator. Prospective, experimental clinical study. Participants included veterinary students at the beginning (group S1) and end (group S2) of their 2-week anaesthesia rotation and veterinary anaesthetists (group A). The feline airway simulator was designed to simulate an average size feline trachea, intubated with a 4.5 mm low-pressure, high-volume cuffed endotracheal tube, connected to a Bain breathing system with oxygen flow of 2 L minute-1. Participants inflated the on-endotracheal tube cuff by pilot balloon palpation and by instilling the minimum occlusive volume (MOV) required for loss of airway leaks during manual ventilation. Intracuff pressures were measured by manometers obscured to participants and ideally were 20-30 cm H2O. Student t, Fisher exact, and Chi-squared tests were used where appropriate to analyse data (p Experience had no effect on this skill and, as such, a cuff manometer is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Six-axis multi-anvil press for high-pressure, high-temperature neutron diffraction experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sano-Furukawa, A., E-mail: sano.asami@jaea.go.jp; Hattori, T. [Quantum Beam Science Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Arima, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Yamada, A. [The University of Shiga Prefecture, Shiga 522-8533 (Japan); Tabata, S.; Kondo, M.; Nakamura, A. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Ehime 792-0001 (Japan); Kagi, H.; Yagi, T. [Geochemical Research Center, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    We developed a six-axis multi-anvil press, ATSUHIME, for high-pressure and high-temperature in situ time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction experiments. The press has six orthogonally oriented hydraulic rams that operate individually to compress a cubic sample assembly. Experiments indicate that the press can generate pressures up to 9.3 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K using a 6-6-type cell assembly, with available sample volume of about 50 mm{sup 3}. Using a 6-8-type cell assembly, the available conditions expand to 16 GPa and 1273 K. Because the six-axis press has no guide blocks, there is sufficient space around the sample to use the aperture for diffraction and place an incident slit, radial collimators, and a neutron imaging camera close to the sample. Combination of the six-axis press and the collimation devices realized high-quality diffraction pattern with no contamination from the heater or the sample container surrounding the sample. This press constitutes a new tool for using neutron diffraction to study the structures of crystals and liquids under high pressures and temperatures.

  9. Six-axis multi-anvil press for high-pressure, high-temperature neutron diffraction experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano-Furukawa, A; Hattori, T; Arima, H; Yamada, A; Tabata, S; Kondo, M; Nakamura, A; Kagi, H; Yagi, T

    2014-11-01

    We developed a six-axis multi-anvil press, ATSUHIME, for high-pressure and high-temperature in situ time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction experiments. The press has six orthogonally oriented hydraulic rams that operate individually to compress a cubic sample assembly. Experiments indicate that the press can generate pressures up to 9.3 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K using a 6-6-type cell assembly, with available sample volume of about 50 mm(3). Using a 6-8-type cell assembly, the available conditions expand to 16 GPa and 1273 K. Because the six-axis press has no guide blocks, there is sufficient space around the sample to use the aperture for diffraction and place an incident slit, radial collimators, and a neutron imaging camera close to the sample. Combination of the six-axis press and the collimation devices realized high-quality diffraction pattern with no contamination from the heater or the sample container surrounding the sample. This press constitutes a new tool for using neutron diffraction to study the structures of crystals and liquids under high pressures and temperatures.

  10. Research Programme for the 660 Mev Proton Accelerator Driven MOX-Plutonium Subcritical Assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Barashenkov, V S; Buttseva, G L; Dudarev, S Yu; Polanski, A; Puzynin, I V; Sissakian, A N

    2000-01-01

    The paper presents a research programme of the Experimental Acclerator Driven System (ADS), which employs a subcritical assembly and a 660 MeV proton acceletator operating at the Laboratory of Nuclear Problems of the JINR, Dubna. MOX fuel (25% PuO_2 + 75% UO_2) designed for the BN-600 reactor use will be adopted for the core of the assembly. The present conceptual design of the experimental subcritical assembly is based on a core of a nominal unit capacity of 15 kW (thermal). This corresponds to the multiplication coefficient k_eff = 0.945, energetic gain G = 30 and the accelerator beam power 0.5 kW.

  11. Tuning colloidal interactions in subcritical solvents by solvophobicity: explicit versus implicit modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzubiella, J; Chakrabarti, J; Löwen, H

    2009-07-28

    The distance-resolved effective interaction between two colloidal particles in a subcritical solvent is explored both by an explicit and implicit modeling. An implicit solvent approach based on a simple thermodynamic interface model is tested against grand-canonical Monte Carlo computer simulations using explicit Lennard-Jones solvent molecules. Close to liquid-gas coexistence, a joint gas bubble surrounding the colloidal particle pair yields an effective attraction between the colloidal particles, the strength of which can be vastly tuned by the solvophobicity of the colloids. The implicit model is in good agreement with our explicit computer simulations, thus enabling an efficient modeling and evaluation of colloidal interactions and self-assembly in subcritical solvent environments.

  12. A fusion-driven subcritical system concept based on viable technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Jiang, J.; Wang, M.; Jin, M.; FDS Team

    2011-10-01

    A fusion-driven hybrid subcritical system (FDS) concept has been designed and proposed as spent fuel burner based on viable technologies. The plasma fusion driver can be designed based on relatively easily achieved plasma parameters extrapolated from the successful operation of existing fusion experimental devices such as the EAST tokamak in China and other tokamaks in the world, and the subcritical fission blanket can be designed based on the well-developed technologies of fission power plants. The simulation calculations and performance analyses of plasma physics, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, thermomechanics and safety have shown that the proposed concept can meet the requirements of tritium self-sufficiency and sufficient energy gain as well as effective burning of nuclear waste from fission power plants and efficient breeding of nuclear fuel to feed fission power plants.

  13. Influence of moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) on burning thorium in a subcritical assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojciechowski, Andrzej, E-mail: andrzej.wojciechowski@ncbj.gov.pl [National Center for Nuclear Research, Otwock-Swierk (Poland); Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2014-10-15

    The conversion ratio (CR) of Th-232 to U-233 calculation results for a subcritical reactor assembly is presented as a function of MFR, burnup, power density (PD) and fissile concentration. The calculated model is based on subcritical assembly which makes configuration of fuel rods and volumes of moderator and coolant changes possible. This comfortable assembly enables investigation of CR in a thorium cycle for different value of MFR. Additionally, the calculation results of U-233 saturation concentration are explained by mathematical model. The value of MFR main influences the saturation concentration of U-233 and fissile and the fissile concentration dependence of CR. The saturation value of CR is included in the range CR ∈ (0.911, 0.966) and is a slowly increasing function of MFR. The calculations were done with a MCNPX 2.7 code.

  14. Subcritical ethanol extraction of flavonoids from Moringa oleifera leaf and evaluation of antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Yujie; Ding, Hui; Liu, Shejiang; Han, Xu; Gui, Jianzhou; Liu, Dan

    2017-03-01

    A large-scale process to extract flavonoids from Moringa oleifera leaf by subcritical ethanol was developed and HPLC-MS analysis was conducted to qualitatively identify the compounds in the extracts. To optimize the effects of process parameters on the yield of flavonoids, a Box-Behnken design combined with response surface methodology was conducted in the present work. The results indicated that the highest extraction yield of flavonoids by subcritical ethanol extraction could reach 2.60% using 70% ethanol at 126.6°C for 2.05h extraction. Under the optimized conditions, flavonoids yield was substantially improved by 26.7% compared with the traditional ethanol reflux method while the extraction time was only 2h, and obvious energy saving was observed. FRAP and DPPH assays showed that the extracts had strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis by subcritical carbon dioxide pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongdan; Wu, Shubin

    2014-04-01

    Most biomass pretreatment processes for sugar production are run at low-solid concentration (carbon dioxide (CO2) could provide a more sustainable pretreatment medium while using relative high-solid contents (15 wt.%). The effects of subcritical CO2 pretreatment of sugarcane bagasse to the solid and glucan recoveries at different pretreatment conditions were investigated. Subsequently, enzymatic hydrolysis at different hydrolysis time was applied to obtain maximal glucose yield, which can be used for ethanol fermentation. The maximum glucose yield in enzyme hydrolyzate reached 38.5 g based on 100g raw material after 72 h of enzymatic hydrolysis, representing 93.0% glucose in sugarcane bagasse. The enhanced digestibilities of subcritical CO2 pretreated sugarcane bagasse were due to the removal of hemicellulose, which were confirmed by XRD, FTIR, SEM, and TGA analyses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Sub-Critical Closed String Field Theory in D Less Than 26

    OpenAIRE

    Kaku, Michio

    1993-01-01

    We construct the second quantized action for sub-critical closed string field theory with zero cosmological constant in dimensions $ 2 \\leq D < 26$, generalizing the non-polynomial closed string field theory action proposed by the author and the Kyoto and MIT groups for $D = 26$. The proof of gauge invariance is considerably complicated by the presence of the Liouville field $\\phi$ and the non-polynomial nature of the action. However, we explicitly show that the polyhedral vertex functions ob...

  17. Sensitivity Analysis of Core Neutronic Parameters in Electron Accelerator-driven Subcritical Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimkhani, Marziye; Hassanzadeh, Mostafa; Feghhi, Sayed Amier Hossian; Masti, Darush

    2016-01-01

    Calculation of the core neutronic parameters is one of the key components in all nuclear reactors. In this research, the energy spectrum and spatial distribution of the neutron flux in a uranium target have been calculated. In addition, sensitivity of the core neutronic parameters in accelerator-driven subcritical advanced liquid metal reactors, such as electron beam energy (Ee) and source multiplication coefficient (ks), has been investigated. A Monte Carlo code (MCNPX_2.6) has been used to ...

  18. Subcritical mineralization of sodium salt of dodecyl benzene sulfonate using sonication-wet oxidation (SONIWO) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhale, A D; Mahajani, V V

    2001-06-01

    Subcritical mineralization of sodium salt of dodecyl benzene sulfonate via hybrid process-sonication followed by wet oxidation (SONIWO) has been investigated. Sonication of the compound enhanced the rates and % COD reduction during wet oxidation. In this process, homogenous CuSO4 catalyst was found to be effective. In wet oxidation studies, phenol, hydroquinone, maleic acid, oxalic acid, propionic acid, and acetic acid were identified as intermediates. The global rate equations for wet oxidation in terms of COD reduction were developed.

  19. Degradation of Acid Red 274 using H2O2 in subcritical water: application of response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayan, Berkant; Gözmen, Belgin

    2012-01-30

    In this research, the degradation of Acid Red 274 (AR 274) was investigated under subcritical water conditions using H(2)O(2), which led to the oxidative degradation of Acid Red 274 up to its 80% of mineralization. The Box-Behnken design matrix and response surface methodology (RSM) were applied in designing the experiments for evaluating the interactive effects of the three most important operating variables. Thus, the interactive effects of temperature (100-250°C), oxidant (H(2)O(2)) concentration (50-250 mM), and time (30-60 min.) on the degradation of AR 274 were investigated. A total of 17 experiments were conducted in this research, and the analysis of variance (ANOVA) indicated that the proposed quadratic model could be used for navigating the design space. The proposed model was essentially in accordance with the experimental case with correlation coefficient R(2)=0.9930 and Adj-R(2)=0.9839, respectively. The results confirmed that RSM based on the Box-Behnken design was a compatible method for optimizing the operating conditions of AR 274 degradation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. STUDY OF THE PREPARATION OF SUGAR FROM HIGH-LIGNIN LIGNOCELLULOSE APPLYING SUBCRITICAL WATER AND ENZYMATIC HYDROLYSIS: SYNTHESIS AND CONSUMABLE COST EVALUATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HANNY F. SANGIAN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study concern sugars hydrolyzed from the high-lignin coconut coir dust using moderate subcritical water (SCW hydrolysis at pressures 20-40 bar for 1 h and to evaluate the consumable costs driver generated. The SCW method produced two products, sugar liquid and solid (SCW-treated substrate. The solid was proceeded to prepare the sugar via enzymatic hydrolysis using pure cellulase. Yield of sugar hydrolyzed from lignocellulose by SCW technique was 0.25 gram sugar/gram cellulose +hemicellulose, or 0.09-gram sugar/gram lignocellulose at 160 °C and 40 bar. While, the maximum yield of sugar liberated enzymatically from SCW-treated solid was 0.35-gram sugar/gram cellulose+hemicellulose, or 0.13-gram sugar/gram SCW-treated solid. It was found that carbon dioxide gas was the highest cost driving in SCW hydrolysis.

  1. Observation of subcritical geodesic acoustic mode excitation in the large helical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ido, T.; Itoh, K.; Lesur, M.; Osakabe, M.; Shimizu, A.; Ogawa, K.; Nishiura, M.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Kosuga, Y.; Sasaki, M.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.; the LHD Experiment Group

    2017-07-01

    The abrupt and strong excitation of the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) has been found in the large helical device (LHD), when the frequency of a chirping energetic particle-driven GAM (EGAM) approaches twice that of the GAM frequency. The temporal evolution of the phase relation between the abrupt GAM and the chirping EGAM is common in all events. The result indicates a coupling between the GAM and the EGAM. In addition, the nonlinear evolution of the growth rate of the GAM is observed, and there is a threshold in the amplitude of the GAM for the appearance of nonlinear behavior. A threshold in the amplitude of the EGAM for the abrupt excitation of the GAM is also observed. According to one theory (Lesur et al 2016 Phys. Rev. Lett. 116 015003, Itoh et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Rep. 42 418) the observed abrupt phenomenon can be interpreted as the excitation of the subcritical instability of the GAM. The excitation of a subcritical instability requires a trigger and a seed with sufficient amplitude. The observed threshold in the amplitude of the GAM seems to correspond with the threshold in the seed, and the threshold in the amplitude of the EGAM seems to correspond with the threshold in the magnitude of the trigger. Thus, the observed threshold supports the interpretation that the abrupt phenomenon is the excitation of a subcritical instability of the GAM.

  2. Efficient decomposition of perchlorate to chloride ions in subcritical water by use of steel slag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Hisao; Kamijo, Ayae; Inoue, Miki; Chino, Asako; Wu, Qian; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2016-08-03

    Decomposition of perchlorate (ClO4(-)) in subcritical water in the presence of steel slag, a by-product of the steel industry, was investigated. Reactivity of ClO4(-) was low in pure subcritical water state up to 300 °C, whereas adding steel slag efficiently accelerated the decomposition of ClO4(-) to Cl(-), with no leaching of heavy metals such as chromium and other environmentally undesirable elements (boron and fluorine). When the reaction was performed in subcritical water at a relatively low temperature (250 °C) for 6 h, virtually all ClO4(-) ions were removed from the reaction solution. The concentration of Cl(-) after the reaction was well accounted for by the sum of the amount of Cl(-) ascribed to the decomposition of ClO4(-) and the amount of Cl(-) leached from the slag. This method was successfully applied to decompose ClO4(-) in water samples collected from a man-made reflection pond following a fireworks display, even though these samples contained much higher concentrations of Cl(-) and SO4(2-) than ClO4(-).

  3. Neutron Detector Signal Processing to Calculate the Effective Neutron Multiplication Factor of Subcritical Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talamo, Alberto [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division; Gohar, Yousry [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Nuclear Engineering Division

    2016-06-01

    This report describes different methodologies to calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor of subcritical assemblies by processing the neutron detector signals using MATLAB scripts. The subcritical assembly can be driven either by a spontaneous fission neutron source (e.g. californium) or by a neutron source generated from the interactions of accelerated particles with target materials. In the latter case, when the particle accelerator operates in a pulsed mode, the signals are typically stored into two files. One file contains the time when neutron reactions occur and the other contains the times when the neutron pulses start. In both files, the time is given by an integer representing the number of time bins since the start of the counting. These signal files are used to construct the neutron count distribution from a single neutron pulse. The built-in functions of MATLAB are used to calculate the effective neutron multiplication factor through the application of the prompt decay fitting or the area method to the neutron count distribution. If the subcritical assembly is driven by a spontaneous fission neutron source, then the effective multiplication factor can be evaluated either using the prompt neutron decay constant obtained from Rossi or Feynman distributions or the Modified Source Multiplication (MSM) method.

  4. Th and U fuel photofission study by NTD for AD-MSR subcritical assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sajo-Bohus, Laszlo; Greaves, Eduardo D.; Barros, Haydn; Pino, Felix; Barrera, Maria T.; Farina, Fulvio [Universidad Simón Bolívar, Nuclear Physics Laboratory, Apdo 89000, Caracas 1080A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Davila, Jesus [Física Médica C. A. and Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2015-07-23

    During the last decade a considerable effort has been devoted for developing energy generating systems based on advanced nuclear technology within the design concepts of GEN-IV. Thorium base fuel systems such as accelerator driven nuclear reactors are one of the often mentioned attractive and affordable options. Several radiotherapy linear accelerators are on the market and due to their reliability, they could be employed as drivers for subcritical liquid fuel assemblies. Bremsstrahlung photons with energies above 5.5MeV, induce (γ,n) and (e,e’n) reactions in the W-target. Resulting gamma radiation and photo or fission neutrons may be absorbed in target materials such as thorium and uranium isotopes to induce sustained fission or nuclear transmutation in waste radioactive materials. Relevant photo driven and photo-fission reaction cross sections are important for actinides {sup 232}Th, {sup 238}U and {sup 237}Np in the radiotherapy machines energy range of 10-20 MV. In this study we employ passive nuclear track detectors (NTD) to determine fission rates and neutron production rates with the aim to establish the feasibility for gamma and photo-neutron driven subcritical assemblies. To cope with these objectives a 20 MV radiotherapy machine has been employed with a mixed fuel target. Results will support further development for a subcritical assembly employing a thorium containing liquid fuel. It is expected that acquired technological knowledge will contribute to the Venezuelan nuclear energy program.

  5. Environmental audit of the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of the environmental audit conducted at the Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), principally in Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. The audit was conducted by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s), Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24), beginning September 13, 1993, and ending September 23, 1993. The scope of the audit at SREL was comprehensive, addressing environmental activities in the technical areas of air; surface water/drinking water; groundwater/soil, sediment, and biota; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; inactive Waste sites; radiation; quality assurance; and environmental management. Specifically assessed was the compliance of SREL operations and activities with Federal, state, and local regulations; DOE Orders; and best management practices.

  6. Environmental information document: Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, B.F.; Looney, B.B.; Simmons, R.V.; Bledsoe, H.W.

    1987-03-01

    This document provides environmental information on postulated closure options for the Savannah River Laboratory Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Plant and was developed as background technical documentation for the Department of Energy`s proposed Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on waste management activities for groundwater protection at the plant. The results of groundwater and atmospheric pathway analyses, accident analysis, and other environmental assessments discussed in this document are based upon a conservative analysis of all foreseeable scenarios as defined by the National Environmental Policy Act (CFR, 1986). The scenarios do not necessarily represent actual environmental conditions. This document is not meant to be used as a closure plan or other regulatory document to comply with required federal or state environmental regulations.

  7. The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

  8. Worker Alienation and Compensation at the Savannah River Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwood, Loka; Wing, Steve

    2016-05-01

    Corporations operating U.S. nuclear weapons plants for the federal government began tracking occupational exposures to ionizing radiation in 1943. However, workers, scholars, and policy makers have questioned the accuracy and completeness of radiation monitoring and its capacity to provide a basis for workers' compensation. We use interviews to explore the limitations of broad-scale, corporate epidemiological surveillance through worker accounts from the Savannah River Site nuclear weapons plant. Interviewees report inadequate monitoring, overbearing surveillance, limited venues to access medical support and exposure records, and administrative failure to report radiation and other exposures at the plant. The alienation of workers from their records and toil is relevant to worker compensation programs and the accuracy of radiation dose measurements used in epidemiologic studies of occupational radiation exposures at the Savannah River Site and other weapons plants. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Remote sensing-based fire frequency mapping in a savannah ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    vb

    the major threats causing the loss of forests in sub-Saharan Africa (Silva et al., 2003). On the other hand ... The fires, especially in the savannah biome, have led to Africa often being referred to as the “fire ... Botswana in the West, Matetsi and Deka safari areas in the North, state forest land and farms in the North-east and ...

  10. New computer-controlled precipitator at the Savannah River Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, E N; Robbins, C C; Murdock, D W

    1988-01-01

    A new plutonium triflouride preciptation facility was successfully started up on the first attempt May 13, 1987 at the Savannah River Plant (SRP). This new facility provided a 75% reduction in radiation exposure, a substantial improvement in process performance, and elimination of the major SRP process bottleneck. This was accomplished through sound engineering, improved process control, process automation, and extensive testing of components, assemblies, and entire system prior to ''hot'' startup.

  11. Assessment of Noble Gases in the Savannah River Site Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlton, W.H.; Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1995-04-01

    A series of documents has been published that assesses the impact of various radionuclides released to the environment by Savannah River Site operations. The quantity released, the disposition of the radionuclides in the environment, and the dose to offsite individuals has been presented for carbon, cesium, iodine, plutonium, strontium, technetium, tritium, and uranium. An assessment of the impact of non-radioactive mercury also has been published.

  12. Remote video radioactive systems evaluation, Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heckendorn, F.M.; Robinson, C.W.

    1991-12-31

    Specialized miniature low cost video equipment has been effectively used in a number of remote, radioactive, and contaminated environments at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The equipment and related techniques have reduced the potential for personnel exposure to both radiation and physical hazards. The valuable process information thus provided would not have otherwise been available for use in improving the quality of operation at SRS.

  13. Archaeological Survey and Testing at Hunter Army Airfield, Savannah, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    sites of a similar form and age occur on the Carribean coast of South America (Marrinan 1975; DePratter 1976; Relchel-Dolmatoff 1972). Other Late...prehistoric sites, six are historic, and one has components from both periods. The prehistoric sites are a Deptford period campsite and a Savannah period...shellfishing station. The historic sites are all small rural farmsteads oc- - cupied between 1775 and 1850 or later. All sites are relatively small andhave

  14. 1997 Savannah River Site annual epidemiologic surveillance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-06-01

    This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Savannah River Site from January 1, 1997 through December 31, 1997. The data were collected by a coordinator at Savannah River Site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and preliminary data analyses were carried out. The analyses were interpreted and the final report prepared by the DOE Office of Epidemiologic Studies. The information in this report provides highlights of the data analyses conducted on the 1997 data collected from Savannah River Site. The main sections of the report include: work force characteristics; absences due to injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays; workplace illnesses, injuries, and deaths that were reportable to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (''OSHA-recordable'' events); and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The 199 7 report includes a section on time trends that provides comparative information on the health of the work force from 1994 through 1997.

  15. 1996 Savannah River Site annual epidemiologic surveillance report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-03-01

    This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Savannah River Site from January 1, 1996 through December 31, 1996. The data were collected by a coordinator at Savannah River Site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and preliminary data analyses were carried out. The analyses were interpreted and the final report prepared by the DOE Office of Epidemiologic Studies. The information in this report provides highlights of the data analyses conducted on the 1996 data collected from Savannah River Site. The main sections of the report include: work force characteristics; absences due to injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays; workplace illnesses, injuries, and deaths that were reportable to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (''OSHA-recordable'' events); and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The 1996 report includes a new section on time trends that provides comparative information on the health of the work force from 1994 through 1996.

  16. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  17. Position reconstruction in fission fragment detection using the low pressure MWPC technique for the JLab experiment E02-017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xi-Yu, Qiu [Lanzhou U.; Tang, Liguang [JLAB; Margaryan, Amur T. [Yerevan; Jin-Zhang, Xu [Lanzhou; Bi-Tao, Hu [Lanzhou; Xi-Meng, Chen [Lanzhou

    2014-07-01

    When a lambda hyperon was embedded in a nucleus, it can form a hypernucleus. The lifetime and its mass dependence of stable hypernuclei provide information about the weak decay of lambda hyperon inside nuclear medium. This work will introduce the Jefferson Lab experiment (E02-017) which aims to study the lifetime of the heavy hypernuclei using a specially developed fission fragment detection technique, a multi-wire proportional chamber operated under low gas pressure (LPMWPC). Presented here are the method and performance of the reconstruction of fission position on the target foil, the separation of target materials at different regions and the comparison and verification with the Mote Carlo simulation.

  18. The study of isochoric subcritical water using power series: A potential of energy generation with ISCW reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangian, Hanny F.; Tunena, Mercyas; Pani, Sutaryono

    2017-09-01

    The present study was aimed to analyze the behaviors of PVT and Z of ISCW (isochoric subcritical water) condition using mathematical series. The data showed that the pressure extremely increased from 15 bars until 80 bars taking only a few seconds that was probably to generate energy. The study was initiated by formulating power series in term of P and T with parameters, a0, a1, a2, a3, a4, a5, a6, and a7 whereas they were solved by performing the fitting method. By employing that technique, parameters were obtained as follows: a0= 7.63x-6, a1=0.23K/bar, a2=0.0035K2/bar2, a3=0.0068 K3/bar3, a4=8.27x10-7K4/bar4, a5=1.33x10-7K5/bar5, a6=2.18x10-8K6/bar6, and a7=3.64x10-9K7/bar7. Compressibility factor increased as pressure and temperature improved. In an isochoric condition, there was extremity that was located at a temperature above 450K in which compressibility factor abruptly increased with the tangent of the line was infinity. All parameters attaching on terms of a mathematical model proposed were assumed constant during P and T increase. At the request of the authors of the paper and with the agreement of the proceedings editor, an updated version of this article was published on 4 October 2017. The original version supplied to AIP Publishing included an incorrect spelling in the name of the first author. This has been corrected in the updated and re-published version.

  19. Interaction of pressure and momentum driven flows with thin porous media: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naaktgeboren, Christian

    Flow interaction with thin porous media arise in a variety of natural and man-made settings. Examples include flow through thin grids in electronics cooling, and NOx emissions reduction by means of ammonia injection grids, pulsatile aquatic propulsion with complex trailing anatomy (e.g., jellyfish with tentacles) and microbursts from thunderstorm activity over dense vegetation, unsteady combustion in or near porous materials, pulsatile jet-drying of textiles, and pulsed jet agitation of clothing for trace contaminant sampling. Two types of interactions with thin porous media are considered: (i) forced convection or pressure-driven flows, where fluid advection is maintained by external forces, and (ii) inertial or momentum-driven flows, in which fluid motion is generated but not maintained by external forces. Forced convection analysis through thin permeable media using a porous continuum approach requires the knowledge of porous medium permeability and form coefficients, K and C, respectively, which are defined by the Hazen-Dupuit-Darcy (HDD) equation. Their determination, however, requires the measurement of the pressure-drop per unit of porous medium length. The pressure-drop caused by fluid entering and exiting the porous medium, however, is not related to the porous medium length. Hence, for situations in which the inlet and outlet pressure-drops are not negligible, e.g., for short porous media, the definition of Kand C via the HDD equation becomes ambiguous. This aspect is investigated analytically and numerically using the flow through a restriction in circular pipe and parallel plates channels as preliminary models. Results show that inlet and outlet pressure-drop effects become increasingly important when the inlet and outlet fluid surface fraction φ decreases and the Reynolds number Re increases for both laminar and turbulent flow regimes. A conservative estimate of the minimum porous medium length beyond which the core pressure-drop predominates over the

  20. Hydrogen/Oxygen Reactions at High Pressures and Intermediate Temperatures: Flow Reactor Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Glarborg, Peter

    of the mixture was varied from oxidizing to reducing conditions. Moreover, a series of experiments in an oxygen atmosphere instead of a nitrogen atmosphere has been done. A reaction mechanism based on a recent work by Burke et al. has been developed. In addition to modeling of the present experiments......, ignition occurs at the temperature of 775–800 K. In general, the present model provides a good agreement with the measurements in the flow reactor and with recent data on laminar burning velocity and ignition delay time....

  1. An easy game for frauds? Effects of professional experience and time pressure on passport-matching performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Benedikt Emanuel; Carbon, Claus-Christian

    2017-06-01

    Despite extensive research on unfamiliar face matching, little is known about factors that might affect matching performance in real-life scenarios. We conducted 2 experiments to investigate the effects of several such factors on unfamiliar face-matching performance in a passport-check scenario. In Experiment 1, we assessed the effect of professional experience on passport-matching performance. The matching performance of 96 German Federal Police officers working at Munich Airport was compared with that of 48 novices without specific face-matching experience. Police officers significantly outperformed novices, but nevertheless missed a high ratio of frauds. Moreover, the effects of manipulating specific facial features (with paraphernalia like glasses and jewelry, distinctive features like moles and scars, and hairstyle) and of variations in the physical distance between the faces being matched were investigated. Whereas manipulation of physical distance did not have a significant effect, manipulations of facial features impaired matching performance. In Experiment 2, passport-matching performance was assessed in relation to time constraints. Novices matched passports either without time constraints, or under a local time limit (which is typically used in laboratory studies), or under a global time limit (which usually occurs during real-life border controls). Time pressure (especially the global time limit) significantly impaired matching performance. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Alkaline subcritical water gasification of dairy industry waste (Whey).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muangrat, Rattana; Onwudili, Jude A; Williams, Paul T

    2011-05-01

    The near-critical water gasification of dairy industry waste in the form of Whey, a product composed of mixtures of carbohydrates (mainly lactose) and amino acids such as glycine and glutamic acid, has been studied. The gasification process involved partial oxidation with hydrogen peroxide in the presence of NaOH. The reactions were studied over the temperature range from 300°C to 390°C, corresponding pressures of 9.5-24.5 MPa and reaction times from 0 min to 120 min. Hydrogen production was affected by the presence of NaOH, the concentration of H(2)O(2), temperature, reaction time and feed concentration. Up to 40% of the theoretical hydrogen gas production was achieved at 390°C. Over 80% of the Whey nitrogen content was found as ammonia, mainly in the liquid effluent. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Thermal Cook-off of an HMX Based Explosive: Pressure Gauge Experiments and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urtiew, P A; Forbes, J W; Tarver, C M; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Vandersall, K S

    2002-04-02

    Safety issues related to thermal cook-off are important for handling and storing explosive devices. Violence of event as a function of confinement is important for prediction of collateral events. There are major issues, which require an understanding of the following events: (1) transit to detonation of a pressure wave from a cook-off event, (2) sensitivity of HMX based explosives changes with thermally induced phase transitions and (3) the potential danger of neighboring explosive devices being affected by a cook-off reaction. Results of cook-off events of known size, confinement and thermal history allows for development and/or calibrating computer models for calculating events that are difficult to measure experimentally.

  4. Natural Circulation Characteristics at Low-Pressure Conditions through PANDA Experiments and ATHLET Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Paladino

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural circulation characteristics at low pressure/low power have been studied by performing experimental investigations and numerical simulations. The PANDA large-scale facility was used to provide valuable, high quality data on natural circulation characteristics as a function of several parameters and for a wide range of operating conditions. The new experimental data allow for testing and improving the capabilities of the thermal-hydraulic computer codes to be used for treating natural circulation loops in a range with increased attention. This paper presents a synthesis of a part of the results obtained within the EU-Project NACUSP “natural circulation and stability performance of boiling water reactors.” It does so by using the experimental results produced in PANDA and by showing some examples of numerical simulations performed with the thermal-hydraulic code ATHLET.

  5. Numerical Simulation and Experiment for Underwater Shock Wave in Newly Designed Pressure Vessel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shibuta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern eating habits depend in large part on the development of food processing technology. Thermal treatments are often performed in the conventional food processing, but it can cause discoloration and loss of nutrients of the food by thermal processing or treatment. On the other hand, food processing using an underwater shock wave has little influence of heat and its processing time is very short, preventing the loss of nutrients. In this research optical observation experiment and the numerical simulation were performed, in order to understand and control the behavior of the underwater shock wave in the development of the processing container using an underwater shock wave for the factory and home. In this experiment a rectangular container was used to observe the behavior of the underwater shock wave. In the experiment, the shock wave was generated by using explosive on the shock wave generation side. The shock wave, which passed through the phosphor bronze and propagated from the aluminum sidewall, was observed on the processing container side. Numerical simulation of an analogous experimental model was investigated, where LS-DYNA software was used for the numerical simulation. The comparative study of the experiment and the numerical simulation was investigated. The behavior of a precursor shock wave from the device wall was able to be clarified. This result is used for development of the device in numerical simulation.

  6. Pressure to Assimilate: Students of Color Make Sense of Their Experiences at a Historically White College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonderoff, Mary H.

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the experiences students of color have at a historically white college campus in the Northeast. The participants studied a variety of academic disciplines and comprised a broad spectrum of ethnicities. An interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) methodology was employed to investigate the participants' lived…

  7. Savannah River Plant Works Technical Department monthly progress report for May 1958: Deleted Version

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-06-17

    This progress report by the Atomic Energy Division of the Savannah River Plant covers: Reactor Technology; Separation Technology; Engineering Assistance; Health Physics; and General Laboratory Work. (JT)

  8. Discharge Computation of Trapezoidal Side Weir in Subcritical Flow Regime Using Conventional Weir Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Riahi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Side weir structures are extensively used in hydraulic engineering, irrigation and environmental engineering, and it usually consists of a main weir and a lateral channel. Side weirs are also used as an emergency structure. This structure is installed on one side or both sides of the main channel to divert the flow from the main channel to the side channel. Lateral outflow takes place when the water surface in the main channel rises above the weir sill. Flow over a side weir is a typical case of spatially varied flow with decreasing discharge. There have been extensive studies on side weir overflows. Most of the previous theoretical analysis and experimental research works are related to the flow over rectangular side weirs in rectangular main channels. In the current study, the flow conditions over a trapezoidal side weir located in a rectangular main channel in subcritical flow regime is considered. Materials and Methods: The experiments were performed in a rectangular open channel having provisions for a side weir at one side of the channel. The main channel was horizontal with 12 m length, 0.25 m width, and 0.5 m height, and it was installed on a frame; lateral channel that has a length of 6 m, width of 0.25 m, and height of 1 m. It was set up parallel to the main channel; walls and its bed were made up of Plexiglas plates. The side weir was positioned at a distance of 6 m from the channel’s entrance. A total of 121 experiments on trapezoidal side weirs were carried out. Results and Discussion: For trapezoidal side weir, effective non-dimensionnal parameters were identified using dimensional analysis and Buckingham's Pi-Theorem. Finally, the following non-dimensional parameters were considered as the most effective ones on the discharge coefficient of the trapezoidal side weir flow. in which Fr1= upstream Froude number, P= hight of the trapezoidal side weir, y1= upstream water depth, z=side slope of the trapezoidal side weir

  9. Subcritical, nontypical and period-doubling bifurcations of a delta wing in a low speed wind tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbahti, Banu; Kagambage, Emile; Andrianne, Thomas; Abdul Razak, Norizham; Dimitriadis, Grigorios

    2011-04-01

    Limit Cycle Oscillations (LCOs) involving Delta wings are an important area of research in modern aeroelasticity. Such phenomena can be the result of geometric or aerodynamic nonlinearity. In this paper, a flexible half-span Delta wing is tested in a low speed wind tunnel in order to investigate its dynamic response. The wing is designed to be more flexible than the models used in previous research on the subject in order to expand the airspeed range in which LCOs occur. The experiments reveal that this wing features a very rich bifurcation behavior. Three types of bifurcation are observed for the first time for such an aeroelastic system: subcritical bifurcations, period-doubling/period-halving and nontypical bifurcations. They give rise to a great variety of LCOs, even at very low angles of attack. The LCOs resulting from the nontypical bifurcation display Hopf-type behavior, i.e. having fundamental frequencies equal to one of the linear modal frequencies. All of the other LCOs have fundamental frequencies that are unrelated to the underlying linear system modes.

  10. Preparation and characterization of single crystal samples for high-pressure experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farber, D; Antonangeli, D; Aracne, C; Benterou, J

    2005-10-26

    To date, most research utilizing the diamond anvil cell (DAC) has been conducted with polycrystalline samples, thus the results are limited to addressing average bulk properties. However, experiments on single crystals can yield data on a range of orientation dependent properties such as thermal and electrical conductivity, magnetic susceptibility, elasticity and plasticity. Here we report new procedures to produce extremely high-quality metallic single crystal samples of size compatible with DAC experiments in the Mbar range. So far, we have produced samples of zinc, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, cobalt, molybdenum and cerium, and have evaluated the quality of the finished samples with white-light interferometry, synchrotron x-ray diffraction and inelastic x-ray scattering.

  11. Topical negative pressure therapy Recent experience of the department of plastic surgery at Ibn Sina University Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmoughit Echchaoui

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionThe topical negative pressure therapy (TNP is a non-invasive method to treat chronic and acute wounds locally, using a continuous or intermittent negative pressure.The objective of this study is to present the first experience of this type of treatment used in clinical cases in our department. By presenting these cases, we highlight indication and efficiency of this new technique applied in relatively complicated situations, at the same time it also allows a significant improvement in treating injuries and chronic wounds.Materials and methodsIn this study, we present the recent experience of the Department of Reconstructive and Plastic Surgery of the University Hospital Center of Avicenne in Rabat. This therapy was used for the first time this year (in 2014, in three young patients who presented with chronic wounds associated with local and general factors that are unfavorable for the healing process.ResultsIn all three of our cases we obtained highly satisfactory clinical results.TNP allows wounds to bud in a shorter time, as well as a fast healing by second intention due to controlled wound healing or split-skin graft without using flaps. This enables to decrease the margin of error, the time and the number of dressing replacements, and to reduce the length of hospital stay.ConclusionThis is an expensive and specific equipment. However, the cost-benefit ratio analysis shows that it is an essential method that should be part of our therapeutic strategies.Keywords: loss of substance, negative pressure, budding, healing.  

  12. Scoping Experiments for Pressure Drop Measurement for the Ex-Vessel Debris Bed Coolability in Severe Accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin Ho; Kim, Eun Ho; Park, Hyun Sun [POSTECH, Pohang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ma, Weimin; Bechta, Sevostian [Nuclear Power Safety Division, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-05-15

    To ensure the long-term cooling of corium in the reactor cavity, it is important to ensure the coolant ingression into the internally heat generated corium debris bed governed by pressure drop in the porous media. According to the previous investigations on molten fuel-coolant interactions (FCIs) experiments, the debris beds are expected to form channels in the bed due to intensive boiling and flow. And also, it was found that quenched particulate debris bed was composed of multi-sized (0∼10 mm), irregular shape particles and it has a micro/macro inhomogeneity such as axially and radially stratified debris bed, where a layer of smaller particles covers the main bed part. In this particulate debris bed with the internal heat generation by decay heat, not only co- but also counter-current two-phase flow may be occurred by the water inflow through sides of bed combined with steam outflow to top of bed. To investigate the effect of each characteristics of heterogeneous debris bed expected in real severe accident scenarios on pressure drop with various conditions, an experimental facility called as PICASSO (Pressure drop Investigation and Coolability ASSessment through Observation) facility was constructed. With the experimental facility, the scoping test was conducted as injecting upward air flow into the bottom of particle bed composed of 2 mm, 5 mm spherical SUJ-2 balls respectively, and the experimental data compared with Ergun equation. As a result of the single phase flow experiment using air, Ergun equation predicts the experimental data for the spherical particles with the diameter of 2 mm and 5 mm with a mean deviation of 14.62 %.

  13. Patterns of gall infestation in Heteropterys byrsonimifolia A. Juss. in a forest-savannah ecotone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Nunes Santos Terra

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Galls are the result of a specific interaction between an inducer and a host plant. The species Heteropterys byrsonimifolia A. Juss. occurs in abundance in semideciduous seasonal forest ecotones and adjacent open formations. In the ecological reserve Quedas do Rio Bonito, located in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil, this species is affected by a single gall morphotype. The present study aimed to evaluate whether the structural complexity of the host (test of the structural complexity hypothesis and the distance between hosts (test of the resource concentration hypothesis affect gall density in H. byrsonimifolia and to characterize the spatial distribution of the infestation. The results corroborate the two hypotheses tested, suggesting a metapopulation pattern of gall infestation in H. byrsonimifolia. Gallers were more successful in abrupt forest-savannah transition environments, which may be associated with greater stress-induced host vulnerability that plants usually experience in ecotones.

  14. Gallery of melt textures developed in Westerly Granite during high-pressure triaxial friction experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.; Kilgore, Brian D.; Beeler, Nicholas M.

    2016-09-23

    IntroductionMelting occurred during stick-slip faulting of granite blocks sheared at room-dry, room-temperature conditions in a triaxial apparatus at 200–400 megapascals (MPa) confining pressure. Petrographic examinations of melt textures focused largely on the 400-MPa run products. This report presents an overview of the petrographic data collected on those samples, followed by brief descriptions of annotated versions of all the images.Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the starting materials and the three examined 400-MPa samples are presented in this report. Secondary-electron (SE) and backscattered-electron (BSE) imaging techniques were used on different samples. The SE images look down on the sawcut surfaces, yielding topographic and three-dimensional textural information. The BSE imaging was done on samples cut to provide cross-sectional views of the glass-filled shear band (or zone) that developed along the sawcut. Brightness in the BSE images increases with increasing mean atomic number of the material. Additional chemical information about the quenched melt and adjoining minerals was obtained using the energy dispersive system of the SEM during BSE examinations. However, the very narrow shear-band thicknesses and common occurrence of very fine lamellar compositional layering limited the usefulness of this technique for estimating melt chemistry.

  15. Experiments and modeling of the autoignition of methylcyclohexane at high pressure

    KAUST Repository

    Weber, Bryan W.

    2014-08-01

    New experimental data are collected for methyl-cyclohexane (MCH) autoignition in a heated rapid compression machine (RCM). Three mixtures of MCH/O2/N2/Ar at equivalence ratios of φ=0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 are studied and the ignition delays are measured at compressed pressure of 50bar and for compressed temperatures in the range of 690-900K. By keeping the fuel mole fraction in the mixture constant, the order of reactivity, in terms of inverse ignition delay, is measured to be φ=0.5>φ=1.0>φ=1.5, demonstrating the dependence of the ignition delay on oxygen concentration. In addition, an existing model for the combustion of MCH is updated with new reaction rates and pathways, including substantial updates to the low-temperature chemistry. The new model shows good agreement with the overall ignition delays measured in this study, as well as the ignition delays measured previously in the literature using RCMs and shock tubes. This model therefore represents a strong improvement compared to the previous version, which uniformly over-predicted the ignition delays. Chemical kinetic analyses of the updated mechanism are also conducted to help understand the fuel decomposition pathways and the reactions controlling the ignition. Combined, these results and analyses suggest that further investigation of several of the low-temperature fuel decomposition pathways is required. © 2014 The Combustion Institute.

  16. [Mobile intraocular pressure measurement. From palpation to initial clinical experience with the handheld dynamic contour tonometer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, U; Kniestedt, C

    2010-07-01

    Goldmann applanation tonometry is still the gold standard of intraocular pressure measurement (IOP) and an essential part in the diagnosis of glaucoma. Applanation tonometry is usually performed on a sitting patient at the slit lamp. However, under certain circumstances it is necessary to measure the IOP outside the office setting. With handheld devices the measuring procedure is brought to bedside and surgery theatres, as well as to patients who are not able to sit behind the slit lamp. The dynamic contour tonometer (DCT) represents a new method of direct IOP measurement. Its physical principle is based on piezo-electronic contour matching tonometry and is claimed to be less dependent on biochemical properties of the cornea. Besides the IOP, the ocular pulse amplitude can also be measured. Until now, the DCT had been available as a slit lamp mounted device. In this report, we present a portable prototype of the device. In comparison with the Perkins tonometer and the TONO-PEN XL, the handheld DCT shows smaller intra- and inter-examiner variability. Additionally, the device offers the unique possibility to display the ocular pulse amplitude while the patient is in a horizontal position.

  17. Stabilization of Savannah River National Laboartory (SRNL) Aqueous Waste by Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jantzen, C

    2004-11-01

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory operated by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) in Aiken, South Carolina. Research and development programs have been conducted at SRNL for {approx}50 years generating non-radioactive (hazardous and non-hazardous) and radioactive aqueous wastes. Typically the aqueous effluents from the R&D activities are disposed of from each laboratory module via the High Activity Drains (HAD) or the Low Activity Drains (LAD) depending on whether they are radioactive or not. The aqueous effluents are collected in holding tanks, analyzed and shipped to either H-Area (HAD waste) or the F/H Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) (LAD waste) for volume reduction. Because collection, analysis, and transport of LAD and HAD waste is cumbersome and since future treatment of this waste may be curtailed as the F/H-Area evaporators and waste tanks are decommissioned, SRNL laboratory operations requested several proof of principle demonstrations of alternate technologies that would define an alternative disposal path for the aqueous wastes. Proof of principle for the disposal of SRNL HAD waste using a technology known as Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is the focus of the current study. The FBSR technology can be performed either as a batch process, e.g. in each laboratory module in small furnaces with an 8'' by 8'' footprint, or in a semi-continuous Bench Scale Reformer (BSR). The proof of principle experiments described in this study cover the use of the FBSR technology at any scale (pilot or full scale). The proof of principle experiments described in this study used a non-radioactive HAD simulant.

  18. Sorption and Transport of Iodine Species in Sediments from the Savannah River and Hanford Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q; Zhao, P; Moran, J; Seaman, J

    2004-05-20

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we focused on the sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at the Savannah River and Hanford Sites, where anthropogenic {sup 129}I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. We conducted both column and batch experiments to investigate the sorption and transport behavior of iodine, and the sediments we examined exhibit a wide range in organic matter, clay mineralogy, soil pH, and texture. The results of our experiments illustrate complex behavior with various processes occurring, including iodate reduction, irreversible retention or mass loss of iodide, and rate-limited and nonlinear sorption. There was an appreciable iodate reduction to iodide, presumably mediated by the structural Fe(II) in some clay minerals; therefore, careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. The different iodine species exhibited dramatically different sorption and transport behavior in three sediment samples collected from different depths at the Savannah River Site. This indicates that, when anthropogenic {sup 129}I is deposited on the surface at this site, the different iodine species will have different residence times as they migrate through the various sediment regimes. Our study results yielded additional insight into processes and mechanisms affecting the geochemical cycling of iodine in the environment, and provided quantitative estimates of key parameters (e.g., extent and rate of sorption) for risk assessment at these sites.

  19. Susceptibility of experimental faults to pore pressure increase: insights from load-controlled experiments on calcite-bearing rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spagnuolo, Elena; Violay, Marie; Nielsen, Stefan; Cornelio, Chiara; Di Toro, Giulio

    2017-04-01

    Fluid pressure has been indicated as a major factor controlling natural (e.g., L'Aquila, Italy, 2009 Mw 6.3) and induced seismicity (e.g., Wilzetta, Oklahoma, 2011 Mw 5.7). Terzaghi's principle states that the effective normal stress is linearly reduced by a pore pressure (Pf) increase σeff=σn(1 - αPf), where the effective stress parameter α, may be related to the fraction of the fault area that is flooded. A value of α =1 is often used by default, with Pf shifting the Mohr circle towards lower normal effective stresses and anticipating failure on pre-existing faults. However, within a complex fault core of inhomogeneous permeability, α may vary in a yet poorly understood way. To shed light on this problem, we conducted experiments on calcite-bearing rock samples (Carrara marble) at room humidity conditions and in the presence of pore fluids (drained conditions) using a rotary apparatus (SHIVA). A pre-cut fault is loaded by constant shear stress τ under constant normal stress σn=15 MPa until a target value corresponding roughly to the 80 % of the frictional fault strength. The pore pressure Pf is then raised with regular pressure and time steps to induce fault instability. Assuming α=1 and a threshold for instability τp_eff=μp σeff, the experiments reveal that an increase of Pf does not necessarily induce an instability even when the effective strength threshold is largely surpassed (e.g., τp_eff=1.3 μpσeff). This result may indicate that the Pf increase did not instantly diffuse throughout the slip zone, but took a finite time to equilibrate with the external imposed pressure increase due to finite permeability. Under our experimental conditions, a significant departure from α=1 is observed provided that the Pf step is shorter than about < 20s. We interpret this delay as indicative of the diffusion time (td), which is related to fluid penetration length l by l = √ κtd-, where κ is the hydraulic diffusivity on the fault plane. We show that a

  20. Unifying expression scale for peptide hydrophobicity in proteomic reversed phase high-pressure liquid chromatography experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Marine; Shamshurin, Dmitry; Spicer, Victor; Krokhin, Oleg V

    2013-11-19

    As an initial step in our efforts to unify the expression of peptide retention times in proteomic liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) experiments, we aligned the chromatographic properties of a number of peptide retention standards against a collection of peptides commonly observed in proteomic experiments. The standard peptide mixtures and tryptic digests of samples of different origins were separated under the identical chromatographic condition most commonly employed in proteomics: 100 Å C18 sorbent with 0.1% formic acid as an ion-pairing modifier. Following our original approach (Krokhin, O. V.; Spicer, V. Anal. Chem. 2009, 81, 9522-9530) the retention characteristics of these standards and collection of tryptic peptides were mapped into hydrophobicity index (HI) or acetonitrile percentage units. This scale allows for direct visualization of the chromatographic outcome of LC-MS acquisitions, monitors the performance of the gradient LC system, and simplifies method development and interlaboratory data alignment. Wide adoption of this approach would significantly aid understanding the basic principles of gradient peptide RP-HPLC and solidify our collective efforts in acquiring confident peptide retention libraries, a key component in the development of targeted proteomic approaches.

  1. Transient radon signals driven by fluid pressure pulse, micro-crack closure, and failure during granite deformation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, Frédéric; Schubnel, Alexandre; Pili, Éric

    2017-09-01

    In seismically active fault zones, various crustal fluids including gases are released at the surface. Radon-222, a radioactive gas naturally produced in rocks, is used in volcanic and tectonic contexts to illuminate crustal deformation or earthquake mechanisms. At some locations, intriguing radon signals have been recorded before, during, or after tectonic events, but such observations remain controversial, mainly because physical characterization of potential radon anomalies from the upper crust is lacking. Here we conducted several month-long deformation experiments under controlled dry upper crustal conditions with a triaxial cell to continuously monitor radon emission from crustal rocks affected by three main effects: a fluid pressure pulse, micro-crack closure, and differential stress increase to macroscopic failure. We found that these effects are systematically associated with a variety of radon signals that can be explained using a first-order advective model of radon transport. First, connection to a source of deep fluid pressure (a fluid pressure pulse) is associated with a large transient radon emission increase (factor of 3-7) compared with the background level. We reason that peak amplitude is governed by the accumulation time and the radon source term, and that peak duration is controlled by radioactive decay, permeability, and advective losses of radon. Second, increasing isostatic compression is first accompanied by an increase in radon emission followed by a decrease beyond a critical pressure representing the depth below which crack closure hampers radon emission (150-250 MPa, ca. 5.5-9.5 km depth in our experiments). Third, the increase of differential stress, and associated shear and volumetric deformation, systematically triggers significant radon peaks (ca. 25-350% above background level) before macroscopic failure, by connecting isolated cracks, which dramatically enhances permeability. The detection of transient radon signals before rupture

  2. Subcritical CO{sub 2} sintering of microspheres of different polymeric materials to fabricate scaffolds for tissue engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhamidipati, Manjari; Sridharan, BanuPriya [Bioengineering Graduate Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Scurto, Aaron M. [Bioengineering Graduate Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Detamore, Michael S., E-mail: detamore@ku.edu [Bioengineering Graduate Program, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to use CO{sub 2} at sub-critical pressures as a tool to sinter 3D, macroporous, microsphere-based scaffolds for bone and cartilage tissue engineering. Porous scaffolds composed of ∼ 200 μm microspheres of either poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or polycaprolactone (PCL) were prepared using dense phase CO{sub 2} sintering, which were seeded with rat bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells (rBMSCs), and exposed to either osteogenic (PLGA, PCL) or chondrogenic (PLGA) conditions for 6 weeks. Under osteogenic conditions, the PLGA constructs produced over an order of magnitude more calcium than the PCL constructs, whereas the PCL constructs had far superior mechanical and structural integrity (125 times stiffer than PLGA constructs) at week 6, along with twice the cell content of the PLGA constructs. Chondrogenic cell performance was limited in PLGA constructs, perhaps as a result of the polymer degradation rate being too high. The current study represents the first long-term culture of CO{sub 2}-sintered microsphere-based scaffolds, and has established important thermodynamic differences in sintering between the selected formulations of PLGA and PCL, with the former requiring adjustment of pressure only, and the latter requiring the adjustment of both pressure and temperature. Based on more straightforward sintering conditions and more favorable cell performance, PLGA may be the material of choice for microspheres in a CO{sub 2} sintering application, although a different PLGA formulation with the encapsulation of growth factors, extracellular matrix-derived nanoparticles, and/or buffers in the microspheres may be advantageous for achieving a more superior cell performance than observed here. - Highlights: • The first long-term culture of CO{sub 2}-sintered microsphere-based scaffolds. • Established important thermodynamic differences between sintering PLGA and PCL. • PCL sintering with CO{sub 2} required manipulation of both

  3. Selection of sugar cane families by using BLUP and multi-diverse analyses for planting in the Brazilian savannah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, M H P; Ferreira, A; Peixoto, L A; Resende, M D V; Nascimento, M; Silva, F F

    2014-03-12

    This study evaluated different strategies to select sugar cane families and obtain clones adapted to the conditions of the Brazilian savannah. Specifically, 7 experiments were conducted, with 10 full sib families, and 2 witnesses in common to all experiments, in each experiment. The plants were grown in random blocks, with witnesses in common (incomplete blocks), and 6 repetitions of each experiment. The data were analyzed through the methodology of mixed patterns, in which the matrices of kinship between the families were identified by the method of restricted maximum likelihood. The characteristics that were evaluated included soluble solids content (BRIX), BRIX ton/ha, average mass of a culm, number of culms/m, and tons of culms/ha. A multi-diverse alternative based on the analysis of groupings by using the UPGMA method was used to identify the most viable families for selection, when considering the genotypic effects on all characteristics. This method appeared suitable for the selection of families, with 5 family groups being formed. The families that formed Group 2 appeared superior to all other families for all the evaluated characteristics. It is recommended that the families in Group 2 are preferentially used in sugar cane improvement programs to obtain varieties optimally adapted to the conditions of the Brazilian savannah.

  4. Modeling and experiments with low-frequency pressure wave propagation in liquid-filled, flexible tubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelland, C; Bjarnø, Leif

    1992-01-01

    A model for wave propagation in a liquid-filled viscoelastic tube with arrays of receivers inside, is being used to analyze the influence of noise generated by in-line vibrational noise sources. In this model, distensibility is of greater importance than compressibility of the liquid...... accelerometers and arrays of hydrophones inside are compared to the theoretical model for wave propagation. A good agreement between experimental data and theoretical predictions is found........ The dispersion and attenuation is shown to be strongly dependent on the viscoelastic properties of the tube wall. The complex, frequency-dependent moduli of relevant tube materials have been measured in stress wave transfer function experiments. The moduli are used in the model to produce realistic dispersion...

  5. Compilation of Data on the Middle Savannah River for the Analysis of Sub-Daily Flow Variation, 2011-2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — The Nature Conservancy (TNC) has been working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the U.S Army Corps of Engineers – Savannah District (USACE - Savannah)...

  6. Deployment of Performance Management Methodology as part of Liquid Waste Program at Savannah River Site - 12178

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prod' homme, A.; Drouvot, O.; Gregory, J. [AREVA, Paris (France); Barnes, B.; Hodges, B.; Hart, M. [SRR, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In 2009, Savannah River Remediation LLC (SRR) assumed the management lead of the Liquid Waste (LW) Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The four SRR partners and AREVA, as an integrated subcontractor are performing the ongoing effort to safely and reliably: - Close High Level Waste (HLW) storage tanks; - Maximize waste throughput at the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF); - Process salt waste into stable final waste form; - Manage the HLW liquid waste material stored at SRS. As part of these initiatives, SRR and AREVA deployed a performance management methodology based on Overall Equipment Effectiveness (OEE) at the DWPF in order to support the required production increase. This project took advantage of lessons learned by AREVA through the deployment of Total Productive Maintenance and Visual Management methodologies at the La Hague reprocessing facility in France. The project also took advantage of measurement data collected from different steps of the DWPF process by the SRR team (Melter Engineering, Chemical Process Engineering, Laboratory Operations, Plant Operations). Today the SRR team has a standard method for measuring processing time throughout the facility, a reliable source of objective data for use in decision-making at all levels, and a better balance between engineering department goals and operational goals. Preliminary results show that the deployment of this performance management methodology to the LW program at SRS has already significantly contributed to the DWPF throughput increases and is being deployed in the Saltstone facility. As part of the liquid waste program on Savannah River Site, SRR committed to enhance production throughput of DWPF. Beyond technical modifications implemented at different location of the facility, SRR deployed performance management methodology based on OEE metrics. The implementation benefited from the experience gained by AREVA in its own facilities in France. OEE proved to be a valuable tool in order

  7. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical, and ultrasupercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, David; Merwin, Augustus; Karmiol, Zachary; Chidambaram, Dev, E-mail: dcc@unr.edu

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Mixtures of oxides containing Ni, Fe, Cr and Nb formed on the surface. • Short term exposure tests observed breakdown of native film. • Formation of a Fe rich oxide layer on Inconel 718 prevents mass loss. - Abstract: Corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and time. The change in the chemistry of the as-received surface film on Inconel 625 and 718 after exposure to subcritical water at 325 °C and supercritical water at 425 °C and 527.5 °C for 2 h was studied. After exposure to 325 °C subcritical water, the CrO{sub 4}{sup 2−} based film formed; however minor quantities of NiFe{sub x}Cr{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} spinel compounds were observed. The oxide film formed on both alloys when exposed to supercritical water at 425 °C consisted of NiFe{sub x}Cr{sub 2-x}O{sub 4} spinel. The surface films on both alloys were identified as NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} when exposed to supercritical water at 527.5 °C. To characterize the fully developed oxide layer, studies were conducted at test solution temperatures of 527.5 and 600 °C. Samples were exposed to these temperatures for 24, 96, and 200 h. Surface chemistry was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Inconel 718 exhibited greater mass gain than Inconel 625 for all temperatures and exposure times. The differences in corrosion behavior of the two alloys are attributed to the lower content of chromium and increased iron content of Inconel 718 as compared to Inconel 625.

  8. Surface chemistry and corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical, and ultrasupercritical water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, David; Merwin, Augustus; Karmiol, Zachary; Chidambaram, Dev

    2017-05-01

    Corrosion behavior of Inconel 625 and 718 in subcritical, supercritical and ultrasupercritical water was studied as a function of temperature and time. The change in the chemistry of the as-received surface film on Inconel 625 and 718 after exposure to subcritical water at 325 °C and supercritical water at 425 °C and 527.5 °C for 2 h was studied. After exposure to 325 °C subcritical water, the CrO42- based film formed; however minor quantities of NiFexCr2-xO4 spinel compounds were observed. The oxide film formed on both alloys when exposed to supercritical water at 425 °C consisted of NiFexCr2-xO4 spinel. The surface films on both alloys were identified as NiFe2O4 when exposed to supercritical water at 527.5 °C. To characterize the fully developed oxide layer, studies were conducted at test solution temperatures of 527.5 and 600 °C. Samples were exposed to these temperatures for 24, 96, and 200 h. Surface chemistry was analyzed using X-ray diffraction, as well as Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Inconel 718 exhibited greater mass gain than Inconel 625 for all temperatures and exposure times. The differences in corrosion behavior of the two alloys are attributed to the lower content of chromium and increased iron content of Inconel 718 as compared to Inconel 625.

  9. FACILITY DEACTIVATION AND DECOMMISSIONING AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmour, J; William Austin, W; Cathy Sizemore, C

    2007-01-31

    In February 2002, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated actions to expedite Cleanup, focus on significant and early risk reduction, and reduce costs at the Savannah River Site (SRS). In response SRS started on a project focused on completing the decommissioning of inactive facilities in T, D, and M Areas, areas that on the perimeter of the Site, by the end of 2006. In June 2003, the Department of Energy Savannah River Operations Office (DOE-SR), the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), and the Environmental Protection Agency, Region 4 (EPA-4) endorsed a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) concerning cleanup at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The vision of the Agreement is that SRS will reduce its operations footprint to establish a buffer zone at the perimeter if the Site, while the central core area of the Site will be reserved for continuing or future long-term operations. DOE-SR, EPA-4, and SCDHEC agreed that establishing this buffer zone and appropriately sequencing environmental restoration and decommissioning activities can lead to greater efficiency and accelerate completion of entire site areas. This vision is embodied in the concept of Area Completion--which integrated operations, deactivation and decommissioning (D&D), and soils and groundwater cleanup into a time-phased approach to completing all the work necessary to address the Cold War legacy. D&D addresses the ''footprint'' of the building or structure, while the soils and groundwater project addresses any environmental remediation that may be required in the underlying and surrounding soils and groundwater. Since then, {approx}250 facilities have been decommissioned at the SRS, ranging from guard stations to nuclear fuel production facilities.

  10. Assessment of mercury in the Savannah River Site environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kvartek, E.J.; Carlton, W.H.; Denham, M.; Eldridge, L.; Newman, M.C.

    1994-09-01

    Mercury has been valued by humans for several millennia. Its principal ore, cinnabar, was mined for its distinctive reddish-gold color and high density. Mercury and its salts were used as medicines and aphrodisiacs. At SRS, mercury originated from one of the following: as a processing aid in aluminum dissolution and chloride precipitation; as part of the tritium facilities` gas handling system; from experimental, laboratory, or process support facilities; and as a waste from site operations. Mercury is also found in Par Pond and some SRS streams as the result of discharges from a mercury-cell-type chlor-alkali plant near the city of Augusta, GA. Reactor cooling water, drawn from the Savannah River, transported mercury onto the SRS. Approximately 80,000 kg of mercury is contained in the high level waste tanks and 10,000 kg is located in the SWDF. Additional quantities are located in the various seepage basins. In 1992, 617 wells were monitored for mercury contamination, with 47 indicating contamination in excess of the 0.002-ppm EPA Primary Drinking Water Standard. More than 20 Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) reports and publications pertinent to mercury (Hg) have been generated during the last two decades. They are divided into three groupings: SRS-specific studies, basic studies of bioaccumulation, and basic studies of effect. Many studies have taken place at Par Pond and Upper Three Runs Creek. Mercury has been detected in wells monitoring the groundwater beneath SRS, but not in water supply wells in excess of the Primary Drinking Water Limit of 0.002 ppm. There has been no significant release of mercury from SRS to the Savannah River. While releases to air are likely, based on process knowledge, modeling of the releases indicates concentrations that are well below the SCDHEC ambient standard.

  11. Hydrothermal decomposition of liquid crystal in subcritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Xuning [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, No. 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shanghai Cooperative Centre for WEEE Recycling, Shanghai Second Polytechnic University, No. 2360 Jinhai Road, Shanghai 201209 (China); He, Wenzhi, E-mail: hithwz@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, No. 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Li, Guangming; Huang, Juwen; Lu, Shangming; Hou, Lianjiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, No. 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Hydrothermal technology can effectively decompose the liquid crystal of 4-octoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl. • The decomposition rate reached 97.6% under the optimized condition. • Octoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl was mainly decomposed into simple and innocuous products. • The mechanism analysis reveals the decomposition reaction process. - Abstract: Treatment of liquid crystal has important significance for the environment protection and human health. This study proposed a hydrothermal process to decompose the liquid crystal of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl. Experiments were conducted with a 5.7 mL stainless tube reactor and heated by a salt-bath. Factors affecting the decomposition rate of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl were evaluated with HPLC. The decomposed liquid products were characterized by GC-MS. Under optimized conditions i.e., 0.2 mL H{sub 2}O{sub 2} supply, pH value 6, temperature 275 °C and reaction time 5 min, 97.6% of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl was decomposed into simple and environment-friendly products. Based on the mechanism analysis and products characterization, a possible hydrothermal decomposition pathway was proposed. The results indicate that hydrothermal technology is a promising choice for liquid crystal treatment.

  12. Conclusions drawn from subcritical multiplication results in ZPPR. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, S. G.; McFarlane, H. F.; Lineberry, M. J.; Beck, C. L.

    1978-01-01

    Modified source multiplication (MSM) has been investigated as a measurement technique for several LMFBR designs in the 1000 MWt class. This investigation has been based on the results of hundreds of measurements in ZPPR as well as on detailed analysis of some of the components of the method. The results of this study have special significance for critical-experiment planning and for the use of ex-vessel detectors in operating LMFBRs. The calculated factors that are applied in the MSM technique for ex-core detectors were found to be particularly insensitive to the calculational method. This apparently resulted from two facts: (1) the calculated factors are ratios of ratios, which reduce the sensitivity to first order corrections, and (2) most neutrons which cause reactions in an ex-core detector originate in the small volume of core nearest to the detector. Maps of key parameters in the MSM technique have been generated to promote a general understanding of the method and to assure its proper application.

  13. Gas evolution in eruptive conduits: Combining insights from high temperature and pressure decompression experiments with steady-state flow modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangan, M.; Mastin, L.; Sisson, T.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we examine the consequences of bubble nucleation mechanism on eruptive degassing of rhyolite magma. We use the results of published high temperature and pressure decompression experiments as input to a modified version of CONFLOW, the numerical model of Mastin and Ghiorso [(2000) U.S.G.S. Open-File Rep. 00-209, 53 pp.] and Mastin [(2002) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 3, 10.1029/2001GC000192] for steady, two-phase flow in vertical conduits. Synthesis of the available experimental data shows that heterogeneous nucleation is triggered at ??P 120-150 MPa, and leads to disequilibrium degassing at extreme H2O supersaturation. In this latter case, nucleation is an ongoing process controlled by changing supersaturation conditions. Exponential bubble size distributions are often produced with number densities of 106-109 bubbles/cm3. Our numerical analysis adopts an end-member approach that specifically compares equilibrium degassing with delayed, disequilibrium degassing characteristic of homogeneously-nucleating systems. The disequilibrium simulations show that delaying nucleation until ??P =150 MPa restricts degassing to within ???1500 m of the surface. Fragmentation occurs at similar porosity in both the disequilibrium and equilibrium modes (???80 vol%), but at the distinct depths of ???500 m and ???2300 m, respectively. The vesiculation delay leads to higher pressures at equivalent depths in the conduit, and the mass flux and exit pressure are each higher by a factor of ???2.0. Residual water contents in the melt reaching the vent are between 0.5 and 1.0 wt%, roughly twice that of the equilibrium model. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Odd-number theorem: Optical feedback control at a subcritical Hopf bifurcation in a semiconductor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schikora, S.; Wünsche, H.-J.; Henneberger, F.

    2011-02-01

    A subcritical Hopf bifurcation is prepared in a multisection semiconductor laser. In the free-running state, hysteresis is absent due to noise-induced escape processes. The missing branches are recovered by stabilizing them against noise through application of phase-sensitive noninvasive delayed optical feedback control. The same type of control is successfully used to stabilize the unstable pulsations born in the Hopf bifurcation. This experimental finding represents an optical counterexample to the so-called odd-number limitation of delayed feedback control. However, as a leftover of the limitation, the domains of control are extremely small.

  15. Numerical simulations of flow field in the target region of accelerator-driven subcritical reactor system

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Hai Yan

    2002-01-01

    Numerical simulations of flow field were performed by using the PHOENICS 3.2 code for the proposed spallation target of accelerator-driven subcritical reactor system (ADS). The fluid motion in the target is axisymmetric and is treated as a 2-D steady-state problem. A body-fitted coordinate system (BFC) is then chosen and a two-dimensional mesh of the flow channel is generated. Results are presented for the ADS target under both upward and downward flow, and for the target with diffuser plate installed below the window under downward flow

  16. Study on design of superconducting proton linac for accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system

    CERN Document Server

    Yu Qi; Xu Tao Guang

    2002-01-01

    As a prior option of the next generation of energy source, the accelerator driven subcritical nuclear power system (ADS) can use efficiently the uranium and thorium resource, transmute the high-level long-lived radioactive wastes and raise nuclear safety. The ADS accelerator should provide the proton beam with tens megawatts. The superconducting linac (SCL) is a good selection of ADS accelerator because of its high efficiency and low beam loss rate. It is constitute by a series of the superconducting accelerating cavities. The cavity geometry is determined by means of the electromagnetic field computation. The SCL main parameters are determined by the particle dynamics computation

  17. PRACTICAL APPLICATION OF THE SINGLE-PARAMETER SUBCRITICAL MASS LIMIT FOR PLUTONIUM METAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MITCHELL, MARK VON [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-10

    According to ANS-8.1, operations with fissile materials can be performed safely by complying with any of the listed single-parameter subcritical limits. For metallic units, when interspersed moderators are present, the mass limits apply to a single piece having no concave surfaces. On a practical level, when has any operation with fissile metal involved a single piece and absolutely no moderating material, e.g., water, oil, plastic, etc.? This would be rare. This paper explores the application of the single-parameter plutonium metal mass limit for realistic operational environments.

  18. Semiclassical Limit of the Non-linear Schroedinger-Poisson Equation With Subcritical Initial Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-12-01

    lim ∇xargψ. As noted earlier, this argument is self - consistent as long as the solution of the Euler- Poisson system (1.5)-(1.6) remains classical...00-2003 to 00-00-2003 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Semiclassical Limit of the Non-linear Schrodinger - Poisson Equation with Subcritical Initial Data 5a...classical limit of a self - consistent quantum-Vlasov equation in 3-D, Math. Models Methods Appl. Sci., 3 (1993), pp. 109–124. [SMM] C. Sparber, P. Markowich

  19. Criticality Safety Evaluation of the LLNL Inherently Safe Subcritical Assembly (ISSA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percher, Catherine [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-06-19

    The LLNL Nuclear Criticality Safety Division has developed a training center to illustrate criticality safety and reactor physics concepts through hands-on experimental training. The experimental assembly, the Inherently Safe Subcritical Assembly (ISSA), uses surplus highly enriched research reactor fuel configured in a water tank. The training activities will be conducted by LLNL following the requirements of an Integration Work Sheet (IWS) and associated Safety Plan. Students will be allowed to handle the fissile material under the supervision of LLNL instructors. This report provides the technical criticality safety basis for instructional operations with the ISSA experimental assembly.

  20. Estimating and analyzing savannah phenology with a lagged time series model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boke-Olén, Niklas; Lehsten, Veiko; Ardö, Jonas; Beringer, Jason; Eklundh, Lars; Holst, Thomas; Veenendaal, Elmar; Tagesson, Torbern

    2016-01-01

    Savannah regions are predicted to undergo changes in precipitation patterns according to current climate change projections. This change will affect leaf phenology, which controls net primary productivity. It is of importance to study this since savannahs play an important role in the global

  1. The Savannah River Site: site description, land use, and management history

    Science.gov (United States)

    David L. White; Karen F. Gaines

    2000-01-01

    The 78,000-ha Savannah River Site, which is located in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina along the Savannah River, was established as a nuclear production facility in 1951 by the Atomic Energy Commission. The site's physical and vegetative characteristics, land use history, and the impacts of management and operations are described. Aboriginal and early...

  2. Waterfowl of the Savannah River Plant: Comprehensive cooling water study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayer, J.J.; Kennamer, R.A.; Hoppe, R.T.

    1986-06-01

    Thirty-one species of waterfowl have been documented on the Savannah River Plant (SPR). The Savannah River Ecology Laboratory (SREL) has been conducting waterfowl research on the site for the past 15 years. This research has included work on waterfowl utilization of the SRP, wood duck reproductive biology, and waterfowl wintering ecology. Results are described.

  3. Enhanced use of beneath-canopy vegetation by grazing ungulates in African savannahs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treydte, A.C.; Riginos, C.; Jeltsch, F.

    2010-01-01

    The cover of large trees in African savannahs is rapidly declining, mainly due to human land-use practices. Trees improve grass nutrient quality and contribute to species and structural diversity of savannah vegetation. However, the response of herbivores to trees as habitat features is unknown. We

  4. Evaporation, sensible heat and canopy conductance of fallow savannah and patterned woodland in the Sahel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabat, P.; Dolman, A.J.; Elbers, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The behaviour of evaporation, sensible heat and canopy conductance of fallow savannah and patterned woodland in the Sahel is studied for the HAPEX-Sahel Intensive Observation Period. Both fallow savannah and patterned woodland reach evaporation rates of 4–5 mm day−1 during the rainy part of the IOP

  5. 33 CFR 100.724 - Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. 100.724 Section 100.724 Navigation and Navigable Waters... WATERS § 100.724 Annual Augusta Invitational Rowing Regatta; Savannah River, Augusta, GA. (a) Definitions... all non-participants. (2) After the termination of the Invitational Rowing Regatta each day, and...

  6. Savannah River Site K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandyberry, M.D.; Bailey, R.T.; Baker, W.H.; Kearnaghan, D.P.; O`Kula, K.R.; Wittman, R.S.; Woody, N.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Amos, C.N.; Weingardt, J.J. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States)

    1992-12-01

    This report gives the results of a Savannah River Site (SRS) K-Reactor Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA). Measures of adverse consequences to health and safety resulting from representations of severe accidents in SRS reactors are presented. In addition, the report gives a summary of the methods employed to represent these accidents and to assess the resultant consequences. The report is issued to provide useful information to the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) on the risk of operation of SRS reactors, for insights into severe accident phenomena that contribute to this risk, and in support of improved bases for other DOE programs in Heavy Water Reactor safety.

  7. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This report contains the preliminary findings based on the first phase of an Environmental Survey at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Plant (SRP), located at Aiken, South Carolina. The Survey is being conducted by DOE's Office of Environment, Safety and Health. The following topics are discussed: general site information; air, soil, surface water and ground water; hydrogeology; waste management; toxic and chemical materials; release of tritium oxides; radioactivity in milk; contamination of ground water and wildlife; pesticide use; and release of radionuclides into seepage basins. 149 refs., 44 figs., 53 tabs.

  8. Inspection Report on "Employment Verification at Savannah River Site"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-11-01

    We conducted a review at the Savannah River Site to determine if Site subcontractors verified the employment status of all employees in accordance with Federal requirements and, if unauthorized individuals accessed the site. During our field work, we reviewed 600 I-9 Forms from 21 subcontractors to verify whether Site subcontractors were using the I-9 Forms; and if the forms were accurate and complete. We also conducted a judgmental sample of individuals who accessed the Site during a six-month period to determine if there were any documentation anomalies.

  9. Savannah River Site environmental report for 1991. [Contains Glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R.; Todd, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    This report describes environmental activities conducted on and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, S.C., from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1991, with an update on compliance activities through April 1, 1992. The report is a single volume with a separate summary pamphlet highlighting the major findings for 1991. The report is divided into an executive summary and 14 chapters containing information on environmental compliance issues, environmental monitoring methods and programs, and environmental research activities for 1991, as well as historical data from previous years. Analytical results, figures, charts, and data tables relevant to the environmental monitoring program for 1991 at SRS are included.

  10. Savannah River Plant history plantwide activities, July 1954--December 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    1972-12-31

    This report recounts the yearly activities of the Savannah River Plant nonproduction agencies and is concerned mainly with Plant personnel and items of general interest. The ``History of Plantwide Activities`` is published as an accumulative document; at the end of each year a new writeup is added to the volume to bring it up to date. Writeups for 1955 and 1956 are based on the governmental fiscal year; those for 1957 and subsequent years are on a calendar year basis. The history of the period from prestartup through June 30, 1953, is presented in DPSP 53-368; the history from July 1953 through June 1954 is presented in DPSP 54-448.

  11. Position reconstruction in fission fragment detection using the low pressure MWPC technique for the JLab experiment E02-017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xi-Yu; Tang, L.; Margaryan, A.; Xu, Jin-Zhang; Hu, Bi-Tao; Chen, Xi-Meng

    2014-07-01

    When a Λ hyperon is embedded in a nucleus it can form a hypernucleus. The lifetime and its mass dependence of stable hypernuclei provide information about the ΛN interaction in the nuclear medium. This work will introduce the Jefferson Lab experiment (E02-017), which aims to study the lifetime of the heavy hypernuclei using a specially developed fission fragment detection technique: a multi-wire proportional chamber operating under low gas pressure (LPMWPC). The trajectory of the detected fragment is reconstructed and used to find the fission point on the target foil, the position resolution is less than 1 mm, which meets the original design, the separation of target materials and events mixture percentage in different regions are verified by Monte Carlo simulation.

  12. RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRENGTH EXPERIMENTS OF THE PRESSURE-INDUCED alpha->epsilon->alpha' PHASE TRANSITION IN IRON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belof, J L; Cavallo, R M; Olson, R T; King, R S; Gray, G T; Holtkamp, D B; Chen, S R; Rudd, R E; Barton, N R; Arsenlis, A; Remington, B A; Park, H; Prisbrey, S T; Vitello, P A; Bazan, G; Mikaelian, K O; Comley, A J; Maddox, B R; May, M J

    2011-08-10

    We present here the first dynamic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) strength measurement of a material undergoing solid-solid phase transition. Iron is quasi-isentropically driven across the pressure-induced bcc ({alpha}-Fe) {yields} hcp ({var_epsilon}-Fe) phase transition and the dynamic strength of the {alpha}, {var_epsilon} and reverted {alpha}{prime} phases have been determined via proton radiography of the resulting Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface between the iron target and high-explosive products. Simultaneous velocimetry measurements of the iron free surface yield the phase transition dynamics and, in conjunction with detailed hydrodynamic simulations, allow for determination of the strength of the distinct phases of iron. Forward analysis of the experiment via hydrodynamic simulations reveals significant strength enhancement of the dynamically-generated {var_epsilon}-Fe and reverted {alpha}{prime}-Fe, comparable in magnitude to the strength of austenitic stainless steels.

  13. The glass transition in a nutshell: a source of inspiration to describe the subcritical transition to turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauchot, Olivier; Bertin, Eric

    2014-04-01

    The starting point of the present work is the observation of possible analogies, both at the phenomenological and at the methodological level, between the subcritical transition to turbulence and the glass transition. Having recalled the phenomenology of the subcritical transition to turbulence, we review the theories of the glass transition at a very basic level, focusing on the history of their development as well as on the concepts they have elaborated. Doing so, we aim at attracting the attention on the above-mentioned analogies, which we believe could inspire new developments in the theory of the subcritical transition to turbulence. We then briefly describe a model inspired by one of the simplest and most inspiring models of the glass transition, the so-called Random Energy Model, as a first step in that direction.

  14. Applications of subcritical and supercritical water conditions for extraction, hydrolysis, gasification, and carbonization of biomass: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lachos-Perez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the recent essential aspects of subcritical and supercritical water technology applied tothe extraction, hydrolysis, carbonization, and gasification processes. These are clean and fast technologies which do not need pretreatment, require less reaction time, generate less corrosion and residues, do not usetoxic solvents, and reduce the synthesis of degradation byproducts. The equipment design, process parameters, and types of biomass used for subcritical and supercritical water process are presented. The benefits of catalysis to improve process efficiency are addressed. Bioactive compounds, reducing sugars, hydrogen, biodiesel, and hydrothermal char are the final products of subcritical and supercritical water processes. The present review also revisits advances of the research trends in the development of subcriticaland supercritical water process technologies.

  15. Small Gas Bubble Experiment for Mitigation of Cavitation Damage and Pressure Waves in Short-pulse Mercury Spallation Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Sangrey, Robert L [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL; Shea, Thomas J [ORNL; Hasegawa, Shoichi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Kogawa, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Naoe, Dr. Takashi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA); Farny, Dr. Caleb H. [Boston University; Kaminsky, Andrew L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Populations of small helium gas bubbles were introduced into a flowing mercury experiment test loop to evaluate mitigation of beam-pulse induced cavitation damage and pressure waves. The test loop was developed and thoroughly tested at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) prior to irradiations at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center - Weapons Neutron Research Center (LANSCE-WNR) facility. Twelve candidate bubblers were evaluated over a range of mercury flow and gas injection rates by use of a novel optical measurement technique that accurately assessed the generated bubble size distributions. Final selection for irradiation testing included two variations of a swirl bubbler provided by Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) collaborators and one orifice bubbler developed at SNS. Bubble populations of interest consisted of sizes up to 150 m in radius with achieved gas void fractions in the 10^-5 to 10^-4 range. The nominal WNR beam pulse used for the experiment created energy deposition in the mercury comparable to SNS pulses operating at 2.5 MW. Nineteen test conditions were completed each with 100 pulses, including variations on mercury flow, gas injection and protons per pulse. The principal measure of cavitation damage mitigation was surface damage assessment on test specimens that were manually replaced for each test condition. Damage assessment was done after radiation decay and decontamination by optical and laser profiling microscopy with damaged area fraction and maximum pit depth being the more valued results. Damage was reduced by flow alone; the best mitigation from bubble injection was between half and a quarter that of flow alone. Other data collected included surface motion tracking by three laser Doppler vibrometers (LDV), loop wall dynamic strain, beam diagnostics for charge and beam profile assessment, embedded hydrophones and pressure sensors, and sound measurement by a suite of conventional and contact microphones.

  16. The composition of ambient and fresh biomass burning aerosols at a savannah site, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minna Aurela

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in climate change, and have adverse effects on human health. Given South Africa�s status as a rapidly-developing country with increasing urbanisation and industrial growth, information on the quality of ambient air is important. In this study, the chemical composition of ambient particles and the particles in fresh biomass burning plumes were studied at a savannah environment in Botsalano, South Africa. The results showed that Botsalano was regularly affected by air masses that had passed over several large point sources. Air masses that had passed over the coal-fired Matimba power station in the Waterberg, or over the platinum group metal smelters in the western Bushveld Igneous Complex, contained high sulfate concentrations in the submicron ranges. These concentrations were 14 to 37 times higher compared with air masses that had passed only over rural areas. Because of the limited nature of this type of data in literature for the interior regions of southern Africa, our report serves as a valuable reference for future studies. In addition, our biomass burning study showed that potassium in the fresh smoke of burning savannah grass was likely to take the form of KCl. Clear differences were found in the ratios for potassium and levoglucosan in the smouldering and flaming phases. Our findings highlight the need for more comprehensive chamber experiments on various fuel types used in southern Africa, to confirm the ratio of important biomass burning tracer species that can be used in source apportionment studies in the future.

  17. Spatial effects of aboveground biomass on soil ecological parameters and trace gas fluxes in a savannah ecosystem of Mount Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Joscha; Gütlein, Adrian; Sierra Cornejo, Natalia; Kiese, Ralf; Hertel, Dietrich; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    The savannah biome is a hotspot for biodiversity and wildlife conservation in Africa and recently got in the focus of research on carbon sequestration. Savannah ecosystems are under strong pressure from climate and land-use change, especially around populous areas like the Mt. Kilimanjaro region. Savannah vegetation in this area consists of grassland with isolated trees and is therefore characterized by high spatial variation of canopy cover, aboveground biomass and root structure. Canopy structure is known to affect microclimate, throughfall and evapotranspiration and thereby controls soil moisture conditions. Consequently, the canopy structure is a major regulator for soil ecological parameters and soil-atmospheric trace gas exchange (CO2, N2O, CH4) in water limited environments. The spatial distribution of these parameters and the connection between above and belowground processes are important to understand and predict ecosystem changes and estimate its vulnerability. Our objective was to determine trends and changes of soil parameters and relate their spatial variability to the vegetation structure. We chose three trees from each of the two most dominant species (Acacia nilotica and Balanites aegyptiaca) in our research area. For each tree, we selected transects with nine sampling points of the same relative distances to the stem. Distances were calculated in relation to the crown radius. At these each sampling point a soil core was taken and separated in 0-10 cm and 10-30 cm depth. We measured soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) storage, microbial biomass carbon C and N, soil respiration as well as root biomass and -density, soil temperature and soil water content. Each tree was characterized by crown spread, leaf area index and basal area. Preliminary results show that C and N stocks decreased about 50% with depth independently of distance to the tree. Soil water content under the tree crown increased with depth while it decreased under grass cover. Microbial

  18. Bats of the Savannah River Site and vicinity.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Menzel; J.M. Menzel; J.C. Kilgo; W.M. Ford; T.C. Carter; J.W. Edwards

    2003-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Savannah River Site supports a diverse bat community. Nine species occur there regularly, including the eastern pipistrelle (Pipistrellus subflavus), southeastern myotis (Myotis austroriparius), evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis), Rafinesque's big-eared bat (Corynorhinus rafinesquii), silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans), eastern red bat (Lasiurus borealis), Seminole bat (L. seminolus), hoary bat (L. cinereus), and big brown bat (Eptesicus fuscus). There are extralimital capture records for two additional species: little brown bat (M. lucifigus) and northern yellow bat (Lasiurus intermedius). Acoustical sampling has documented the presence of Brazilian free-tailed bats (Tadarida brasiliensis), but none has been captured. Among those species common to the Site, the southeastern myotis and Rafinesque's big-eared bat are listed in South Carolina as threatened and endangered, respectively. The presence of those two species, and a growing concern for the conservation of forest-dwelling bats, led to extensive and focused research on the Savannah River Site between 1996 and 2002. Summarizing this and other bat research, we provide species accounts that discuss morphology and distribution, roosting and foraging behaviors, home range characteristics, habitat relations, and reproductive biology. We also present information on conservation needs and rabies issues; and, finally, identification keys that may be useful wherever the bat species we describe are found.

  19. Savannah River Site Approved Site Treatment Plan, 1998 Annual Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, B. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Berry, M.

    1998-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Savannah River Operations Office (DOE- SR),has prepared the Site Treatment Plan (STP) for Savannah River Site (SRS) mixed wastes in accordance with RCRA Section 3021(b), and SCDHEC has approved the STP (except for certain offsite wastes) and issued an order enforcing the STP commitments in Volume I. DOE-SR and SCDHEC agree that this STP fulfills the requirements contained in the FFCAct, RCRA Section 3021, and therefore,pursuant to Section 105(a) of the FFCAct (RCRA Section 3021(b)(5)), DOE`s requirements are to implement the plan for the development of treatment capacities and technologies pursuant to RCRA Section 3021.Emerging and new technologies not yet considered may be identified to manage waste more safely, effectively, and at lower cost than technologies currently identified in the plan. DOE will continue to evaluate and develop technologies that offer potential advantages in public acceptance, privatization, consolidation, risk abatement, performance, and life-cycle cost. Should technologies that offer such advantages be identified, DOE may request a revision/modification of the STP in accordance with the provisions of Consent Order 95-22-HW.The Compliance Plan Volume (Volume I) identifies project activity schedule milestones for achieving compliance with Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). Information regarding the technical evaluation of treatment options for SRS mixed wastes is contained in the Background Volume (Volume II) and is provided for information.

  20. Disposal of Draeger Tubes at Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, N.P.

    2000-10-13

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Aiken, South Carolina that is operated by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). At SRS Draeger tubes are used to identify the amount and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Draeger tubes rely on a chemical reaction to identify the nature and type of a particular chemical constituent in the atmosphere. Disposal practices for these tubes were identified by performing a hazardous waste evaluation per the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Additional investigations were conducted to provide guidance for their safe handling, storage and disposal. A list of Draeger tubes commonly used at SRS was first evaluated to determine if they contained any material that could render them as a RCRA hazardous waste. Disposal techniques for Draeger tubes that contained any of the toxic contaminants listed in South Carolina Hazardous Waste Management Regulations (SCHWMR) R.61-79. 261.24 (b) and/or contained an acid in the liquid form were addressed.