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Sample records for saudi males older

  1. Acne vulgaris: Perceptions and beliefs of Saudi adolescent males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Natour, Sahar H.

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Although acne vulgaris is common in adolescents, information on their understanding of acne is minimal. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the perceptions and beliefs of Saudi youth on acne. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Three hundred twenty-nine male students (aged 13–22 years) from 6 secondary schools in the Eastern Saudi Arabia completed a self-reported questionnaire on knowledge, causation, exacerbating and relieving factors of acne. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 15.0. Results of subjects with acne, a family history of acne, and parents' educational levels were compared. Differences between the analyzed groups were assessed by a Chi-square test; p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Over half (58.9%) of the participants considered acne a transient condition not requiring therapy. Only 13.1% knew that the proper treatment of acne could take a long time, even several years. Over half (52%) thought acne can be treated from the first or after few visits to the doctor. Popular sources of information were television/radio (47.7%), friends (45.6%), and the internet (38%). Only 23.4% indicated school as a source of knowledge. Reported causal factors included scratching (88.5%) and squeezing (82.1%) of pimples, poor hygiene (83.9%), poor dietary habits (71.5%), and stress (54.1%). Ameliorating factors included frequent washing of the face (52.9%), exercise (41.1%), sunbathing (24.1%), and drinking of mineral water (21%). The correlations of these facts are discussed. CONCLUSION: Results of this study point out that misconceptions of acne are widespread among Saudi youth. A health education program is needed to improve the understanding of the condition. PMID:28163574

  2. Predictors of smoking among male college students in Saudi Arabia.

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    Almogbel, Y S; Abughosh, S M; Almogbel, F S; Alhaidar, I A; Sansgiry, S S

    2013-11-01

    Identifying the predictors of smoking in one of the top cigarette-consuming countries in the world is a vital step in smoking prevention. A cross-sectional study assessed the predictors of smoking in a cohort of male students in 3 universities in Saudi Arabia. A pre-tested, validated questionnaire was used to determine sociodemographic characteristics, academic performance, peers' smoking, and presence of a smoker within the family. Of the 337 participants, 30.9% were current smokers (smoked 1 or more cigarettes within the last 30 days). Lower academic performance (OR = 2.29, 95% CI: 1.02-5.17), peer smoking (OR = 4.14, 95% CI: 1.53-11.3) and presence of other smokers in the family (OR = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.37-5.64) were the significant predictors of smoking status identified using multiple logistic regression analysis. These findings highlight the influence of family and peer pressure in initiating cigarette use among the youth of Saudi Arabia.

  3. Assessment of physical health status and quality of life among Saudi older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Al Senany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated physical health status and quality of life among older Saudi adults. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included older adults (N = 55) aged 60?90?years (mean = 67.9? 7.71) from a major hospital in Jeddah. Subjects completed surveys and evaluations including assessments of personal and socio-demographic characteristics, caregiver presence, personal habits, perceived health, primary physical and psychological complaints, physician-diagnosed chronic diseases, a...

  4. Perceived stress among male medical students in Egypt and Saudi Arabia: effect of sociodemographic factors.

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    El-Gilany, Abdel-Hady; Amr, Mostafa; Hammad, Sabry

    2008-01-01

    In Arab countries, epidemiological data about psychological morbidity among medical undergraduate students are scarce. This study sought to determine whether there was a difference in perceived stress levels of male medical students at Mansoura University, Egypt, compared with male medical students at King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. The sample consisted of 304 male medical students in Egypt and and 284 male medical students in Saudi Arabia. The self-reported questionnaire covered four categories, including 15 items, on sources of stress (stressors). The perceived stress scale and hospital anxiety and depression scale were used to measure stress, anxiety and depression. There was no significant difference between the two groups in number of stressors. However, Egyptian students were more likely to cite relationship, academic and environmental problems than Saudis. The prevalence of high stress was nearly equal in both groups. However, anxiety and depression were significantly higher among Egyptian than Saudi students. A logistic regression analysis of independent predictors of severe stress among both groups combined revealed that a satisfactory family income and university-graduated father were independent protective factors. The independent risk predictors were anxiety and number of stressors. Stress, anxiety and depression are frequent among medical students. Counseling and preventive mental health services should be an integral part of the routine clinical facilities caring for medical students.

  5. Male Saudi Arabian Freshman Science Majors at Jazan University: Their Perceptions of Parental Educational Practices on Their Science Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrehaly, Essa D.

    2012-01-01

    Examination of Saudi Arabian educational practices is scarce, but increasingly important, especially in light of the country's pace in worldwide mathematics and science rankings. The purpose of the study is to understand and evaluate parental influence on male children's science education achievements in Saudi Arabia. Parental level of education…

  6. Assessment of physical health status and quality of life among Saudi older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Senany, Samira; Al Saif, Amer

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated physical health status and quality of life among older Saudi adults. [Subjects and Methods] Participants included older adults (N = 55) aged 60-90 years (mean = 67.9± 7.71) from a major hospital in Jeddah. Subjects completed surveys and evaluations including assessments of personal and socio-demographic characteristics, caregiver presence, personal habits, perceived health, primary physical and psychological complaints, physician-diagnosed chronic diseases, and functional capacity (i.e., activities of daily living). [Results] Results showed a significant positive correlation between age and ADL; age and memory problems, anxiety, and loneliness; and sleep disturbance and falls. Main factors contributing to quality of life decline were chronic disease, falls, sedentary lifestyle, sleep disturbances, and financial concerns. Participants with diabetes mellitus (58.18%) and hypertension (29.0%) had a very high fall rate. Participants engaged in minimal physical activity (63%), often due to bone and joint pain (90.0%), and led sedentary lives (69%). Single sensory impairments were significantly and independently linked to high depression risk and decreased self-sufficiency. [Conclusion] Healthy lifestyle and behavioral changes should be promoted through community-based health education programs for older Saudi adults. Chronic disease screening programs for the elderly population (especially diabetes and hypertension) are recommended.

  7. Predicting Relationship of Smoking Behavior Among Male Saudi Arabian College Students Related to Their Religious Practice.

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    Almutairi, Khalid M

    2016-04-01

    This study describes the relationships of smoking behavior among a sample of male college students in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) to their religious practice, parents' smoking behaviors and attitudes, peers' smoking behaviors and attitudes, and knowledge about the dangers of smoking. A 49-item questionnaire was developed and pilot tested in KSA. This questionnaire was completed during the academic year 2013 by 715 undergraduate male students at the King Saud University in Riyadh. 29.8% of the students were smokers (13.8% cigarette smokers, 7.3% sheesha smokers, and 27% cigarette and sheesha smokers). Students in the College of Education were much more likely to be smokers than the students in the College of Science. The differences between the College of Education and the College of Science was statistically significant (χ (2) = 16.864. df = 1, p = .001). Logistic regression analysis suggested that students who were more faithful in their practice of Islam were 15% less likely to smoke. Students who were more knowledgeable about the dangers of smoking were 8% less likely to smoke. The logistic analysis identified peers (friends) as the most powerful factor in predicting smoking. The four-factor model had an overall classification accuracy of 78%. The need to understand more fully the dynamics of peer relations among Saudi Arabian males as a basis for developing tobacco education/prevention programs. Prevention programs will need to include education and changes in the college level or earlier in KSA.

  8. Family Context Factors and the Risk of Smoking among Male Adolescents in Saudi Arabia.

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    Al-Zalabani, Abdulmohsen H

    2015-01-01

    Smoking behavior is related to numerous factors, including psychosocial parameters. This study investigated the association between family context factors and smoking among male adolescents. A cross-sectional, school-based study was conducted during 2014. The study sampled 900 students from intermediate and secondary schools in Madinah City, Saudi Arabia. Data concerning smoking status, sociodemographic, parental and friends' smoking behavior, and family factors were collected using a self- administered questionnaire. These data were employed to estimate the prevalence of smoking using appropriate statistical analyses including multivariate logistic regression. Of 900 students, 870 completed the study questionnaire (96.7%). Of the respondents, 181 students (20.8%, 95% CI=18.1%-23.5%) were current smokers, and a much higher prevalence was observed among adolescents with most or all of their friends smoking (48.1%) and those living with neither parent (47.4%). The adjusted risk of smoking increased significantly among adolescents who lived with neither parent (OR=3.3; 95% CI=1.1-9.2) and among those who reported little or no parental supervision (OR=1.5; 95% CI=1.0-2.1). Family context factors are associated with an increased risk of smoking behavior among male adolescents in Saudi Arabia.

  9. Loneliness, health and depression in older males.

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    Alpass, F M; Neville, S

    2003-05-01

    Loneliness and social isolation, particularly in the older adult, have been shown to influence psychosocial well-being. Loneliness has been related to chronic illness and self-rated health in older adults, and researchers suggest there is an important relationship between loneliness and psychological well-being in older adults particularly in the area of depression. This study investigated relationships between loneliness, health, and depression in 217 older men (> 65 years). Participants completed self-report measures of loneliness, social support, depression, and physical health. Regression analysis showed that a diagnosis of illness or disability was unrelated to depression, however self-reported health was associated with depression, with those reporting poorer health experiencing greater depression. Social support variables were unrelated to depression. The most significant relationship to depression was that of loneliness, with lonelier men reporting higher scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS). Although research suggests that depression is often a response to declining health and functional impairment in the older adult, the present findings suggest that social isolation may also influence the experience of depression. Age-related losses such as loss of professional identity, physical mobility and the inevitable loss of family and friends can affect a person's ability to maintain relationships and independence, which in turn may lead to a higher incidence of depressive symptoms.

  10. The prevalence of obesity among saudi males in the Riyadh region.

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    Al-Shammari, S A; Khoja, T A; Al-Maatouq, M A

    1996-05-01

    Attendees of 15 health centers in urban and rural areas in the Riyadh region were screened for obesity during May and June 1994. Systemic selection yielded 1580 Saudi males for analysis. The mean age was 33.6 +/- 13.5 years and body mass index (BMI) was 26.9 +/- 5.7 kg/m(2). Only 36.6% of subjects were their ideal weight (BMI 40 kg/m(2)). Middle age, lower education and joblessness predicted a higher risk for obesity. Patients living in a rural areas had greater BMIs than those living in urban areas (P diabetis mellitus, hypertension, stroke, heart disease, sleep apnea syndrome and osteoarthritis of the knees. Young parents who are at risk of developing obesity and who play a central role in perpetuating it in their offspring should be the target of obesity-prevention programs.

  11. Brief Arabic tobacco craving questionnaire: An investigation into craving and heavy smoking in Saudi Arabian males

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    Abdulaziz A Albrithen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Research in the United States has shown that craving tobacco is associated with smoking, yet no investigation has been done into the relationship between craving and the use of tobacco in Saudi Arabian smokers. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the craving of tobacco by Saudi males and its influence on daily smoking. Subjects were recruited under the auspices of the Tobacco Control Program in Jeddah City and Riyadh. Methods: The American English version of the tobacco craving questionnaire (TCQ-12 is a valid measure of four distinct aspects (factors of tobacco craving. The TCQ-12 was translated into Arabic tobacco craving questionnaire (ATCQ-12 and administered to a sample of 322 male smokers. Predictive validity was determined by examining the relationship between the factors and the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD. Results: In a general linear multivariate analysis of variance model, CPD increased significantly as either ATCQ-12 Factor 1 (emotionality or Factor 3 (compulsiveness increased. A significant Factor 1 by Factor 3 interaction indicated that Factor 1 was a better predictor of heavy smoking, but only when Factor 3 was low. Factor 3 was a better predictor of heavy smoking, but only when Factor 1 was low. Conclusions: The ATCQ-12 is a rapid measure of craving and valid predictor of CPD and heavy smoking. Craving in anticipation of smoking as relief from a negative mood (emotionality is an indicator of psychological withdrawal symptoms, while craving in anticipation of the inability to control tobacco use (compulsiveness is an indicator of physical dependence.

  12. Selected dietary nutrients and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in adult males and females in Saudi Arabia: a pilot study.

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    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Khan, Nasiruddin; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Al-Attas, Omar S; Alokail, Majed S; Alfawaz, Hanan A; Alothman, Abdulaziz; Vanhoutte, Paul M

    2013-11-19

    During the last decade, the rapid economic development in Saudi Arabia resulted in an unbalanced dietary intake pattern within the general population. Consequently, metabolic syndrome was also documented to be highly prevalent in the Middle-East region. We aimed to examine the relationship between selected dietary nutrient intakes and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the general adult population of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, 185 adult Saudis aged 19 to 60 years (87 males and 98 females (mean age 35.6 ± 13.2 and 37.6 ± 11.7 years, respectively)) were included. The criteria for metabolic syndrome were based on the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) criteria, and the dietary food intake was assessed by two 24-h dietary recall methods. The odd ratios (ORs) of metabolic syndrome risk across quartiles of selected dietary nutrients were significantly lower for carbohydrates and proteins, as well as for vitamins A, C, E and K, calcium, zinc and magnesium (p nutrients among the general population of Saudi Arabia raises concern, and this dietary imbalance could increase the risk of metabolic syndrome, particularly in adult Saudi females.

  13. Selected Dietary Nutrients and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Males and Females in Saudi Arabia: A Pilot Study

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    Nasser M. Al-Daghri

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, the rapid economic development in Saudi Arabia resulted in an unbalanced dietary intake pattern within the general population. Consequently, metabolic syndrome was also documented to be highly prevalent in the Middle-East region. We aimed to examine the relationship between selected dietary nutrient intakes and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the general adult population of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, 185 adult Saudis aged 19 to 60 years (87 males and 98 females (mean age 35.6 ± 13.2 and 37.6 ± 11.7 years, respectively were included. The criteria for metabolic syndrome were based on the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF criteria, and the dietary food intake was assessed by two 24-h dietary recall methods. The odd ratios (ORs of metabolic syndrome risk across quartiles of selected dietary nutrients were significantly lower for carbohydrates and proteins, as well as for vitamins A, C, E and K, calcium, zinc and magnesium (p < 0.05 for all in the female group with metabolic syndrome than those without. The pattern of daily dietary intake of selected nutrients among the general population of Saudi Arabia raises concern, and this dietary imbalance could increase the risk of metabolic syndrome, particularly in adult Saudi females.

  14. Selected Dietary Nutrients and the Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome in Adult Males and Females in Saudi Arabia: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M.; Khan, Nasiruddin; Alkharfy, Khalid M.; Al-Attas, Omar S.; Alokail, Majed S.; Alfawaz, Hanan A.; Alothman, Abdulaziz; Vanhoutte, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    During the last decade, the rapid economic development in Saudi Arabia resulted in an unbalanced dietary intake pattern within the general population. Consequently, metabolic syndrome was also documented to be highly prevalent in the Middle-East region. We aimed to examine the relationship between selected dietary nutrient intakes and the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the general adult population of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In this cross-sectional study, 185 adult Saudis aged 19 to 60 years (87 males and 98 females (mean age 35.6 ± 13.2 and 37.6 ± 11.7 years, respectively)) were included. The criteria for metabolic syndrome were based on the International Diabetes Foundation (IDF) criteria, and the dietary food intake was assessed by two 24-h dietary recall methods. The odd ratios (ORs) of metabolic syndrome risk across quartiles of selected dietary nutrients were significantly lower for carbohydrates and proteins, as well as for vitamins A, C, E and K, calcium, zinc and magnesium (p metabolic syndrome than those without. The pattern of daily dietary intake of selected nutrients among the general population of Saudi Arabia raises concern, and this dietary imbalance could increase the risk of metabolic syndrome, particularly in adult Saudi females. PMID:24284611

  15. Correlation between transient ischemic dilatation (TID) and coronary artery disease in Saudi male patients.

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    Aldhilan, Asim; Syed, Ghulam M S; Suleiman, Ihab; Al Zaibag, M; Fielding, Henry

    2014-01-01

    A high transient ischemic dilatation ratio (TID) for the left ventricle (LV) from a gated myocardial perfusion imaging (G-MPI) study is widely believed to be associated with significant coronary artery disease (CAD). We have investigated the relationship between TID and CAD for our male Saudi Arabian patient population. In this retrospective study, all male Saudi Arabian patients who underwent a two-day G-MPI study using Tc99m MIBI during the year 2011 having a TID ⩾ 1.20 were included. Quantitative perfusion and gated parameters were obtained using Cedar Sinai's AutoQuant software version 3.0, 2003, Means of summed stress scores, summed rest scores and summed difference scores (SSS, SRS, SDS, respectively), stress and rest ejection fraction (EF) were calculated. Visual interpretation was performed to classify the perfusion as normal, fixed, mixed (fixed and reversible defects), single reversible or multiple reversible defects. Coronary angiograms were assessed as normal with no CAD, single vessel, two-vessel or three-vessel disease. Correlations between the TID and other parameters were studied using analysis of variance (ANOVA) with IBM-SPSS version 20. A total of 52 male patients had a high TID of ⩾1.20 (mean 1.30 ± 0.13). Ten patients had a SSS of 0-3 and 16 were classified as normal by visual assessment. Stress EF (mean 50.4 ± 12%) was lower than the rest EF (mean 56.6 ± 12.8%) with the difference being statistically significant (Students paired t-test, p = 0.001). Angiography results were available in 44 patients, 3 having a normal angiogram, 24 having three vessel disease, 7 having two vessel disease and 10 having one vessel disease. Five patients with normal perfusion and SSS = 0-3 had CAD as seen on a coronary angiography. CAD on coronary angiography showed a significant correlation with perfusion abnormalities as assessed by visual interpretation (p = 0.002). TID showed a significantly correlation with both perfusion abnormalities (p

  16. Male Saudi Arabian freshman science majors at Jazan University: Their perceptions of parental educational practices on their science achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrehaly, Essa D.

    Examination of Saudi Arabian educational practices is scarce, but increasingly important, especially in light of the country's pace in worldwide mathematics and science rankings. The purpose of the study is to understand and evaluate parental influence on male children's science education achievements in Saudi Arabia. Parental level of education and participant's choice of science major were used to identify groups for the purpose of data analysis. Data were gathered using five independent variables concerning parental educational practices (attitude, involvement, autonomy support, structure and control) and the dependent variable of science scores in high school. The sample consisted of 338 participants and was arbitrarily drawn from the science-based colleges (medical, engineering, and natural science) at Jazan University in Saudi Arabia. The data were tested using Pearson's analysis, backward multiple regression, one way ANOVA and independent t-test. The findings of the study reveal significant correlations for all five of the variables. Multiple regressions revealed that all five of the parents' educational practices indicators combined together could explain 19% of the variance in science scores and parental attitude toward science and educational involvement combined accounted for more than 18% of the variance. Analysis indicates that no significant difference is attributable to parental involvement and educational level. This finding is important because it indicates that, in Saudi Arabia, results are not consistent with research in Western or other Asian contexts.

  17. Overweight and obesity and their relation to dietary habits and socio-demographic characteristics among male primary school children in Al-Hassa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

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    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Al-Sultan, Ali Ibrahim; Ali, Ayub

    2008-09-01

    Several studies were carried out to study the prevalence of overweight and obesity among Saudi children, but those assessed the association between eating habits, socio-demographic differentials and obesity in these children are scarce. To assess the magnitude of obesity and overweight among male primary schoolchildren and to find the possible association between obesity/overweight with dietary habits and socio-demographic differentials among them. A cross-sectional descriptive study including 1,139 Saudi male enrolled in the fifth and sixth grades in public primary schools in Al Hassa, KSA, through a multistage random sampling technique, submitted to interview using Youth and Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire, gathering data regarding dietary intake, some dietary habits, followed by anthropometric measurements with calculation of body mass index, the interpretation of which was based on using Cole's tables for standard definition of overweight and obesity. Socio-demographics data were collected through parental questionnaire form. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS 12 (SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL, USA), univariate as well as multivariate analyses were conducted. The age ranged from 10 to 14 years. The prevalence of overweight among the included subjects was 14.2% while obesity was 9.7%, more in urban, older age students, mothers of obese and overweight were less educated, more working. Missing and or infrequent intake of breakfast at home, frequent consumption of fast foods, low servings of fruits, vegetables, milk and dairy product per day, with frequent consumption of sweets/candy and carbonated drinks were all predictors of obesity and overweight among the included male schoolchildren. The prevalence of childhood obesity is escalating and approaching figures reported in the developed countries. Less healthy dietary habits and poor food choices may be responsible for this high prevalence.

  18. Prevalence of smoking among male secondary school students in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

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    Hashim R Fida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study was conducted to examine the prevalence of smoking and habits of smoking among male secondary school students in Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA and to assess their knowledge and attitudes toward it. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in Jeddah, using a two-stage cluster sampling, randomly selecting 4 out of 85 government male secondary schools. Data were obtained through a self-administered questionnaire eliciting responses to questions on personal background, smoking behavior, knowledge, behavior, and attitude toward smoking. A total of 695 students responded to the questionnaires with 87.4% response rate. Results: Of the studied group, 258 (37% currently smoked, and of these, 83.7% had started smoking at the age of 14 years or less. The most common reason for smoking was the influence of family, especially the presence of someone at home who smoked (65, 9% and friends who smoked (42.5%. Many of the students search for information on the risks of smoking (66.3%, and only (45.3% knew about the bad effects of passive smoking on others. Two-third of the students who smoked wanted to quit smoking (63.2%, especially if suitable help was offered, whereas (60.9% had tried to quit. While 50% of students smoked for recreation and entertainment, and (33.6% had difficulty avoiding smoking in no smoking areas. Conclusion: A well-planned integrated antismoking campaign is urgently required, especially among students and teachers. The study revealed that the prevalence of smoking was high. This will contribute to an increase in smoking-related health problems in the future if proper preventive measures are not taken.

  19. Overweight and obesity and their association with dietary habits, and sociodemographic characteristics among male primary school children in Al-Hassa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

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    Amin Tarek

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the magnitude of obesity and overweight among male primary school children, and to find the possible association between obesity/overweight and dietary habits and sociodemographic differentials among them. Study design and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study, including 1139 Saudi male children enrolled in the 5 th and 6 th grades in public primary schools in Al Hassa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, was conducted. The test included a multistage random sampling technique, based on interview using Youth and Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire, gathering data regarding dietary intake, dietary habits, followed by anthropometric measurements with the calculation of body mass index (BMI, the interpretation of which was based on Cole′s tables for the standard definition of overweight and obesity. Sociodemographic data were collected through a parental questionnaire from. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS 12 software (SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL, USA; both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Results: The age of the school children ranged from 10-14 years. The prevalence of overweight among the subjects was 14.2%, while that of obesity was 9.7%; the prevalence was more in the urban, older age students. The mothers of obese and overweight children were less educated and more working. Missing and or infrequent intake of breakfast at home, frequent consumption of fast foods, low servings per day of fruits, vegetables, milk and dairy products, with frequent consumption of sweets/candy and carbonated drinks were all predictors of obesity and overweight among the schoolchildren studied. Conclusion: The prevalence of childhood obesity is escalating and approaching figures that have been reported till now from the developed countries. Less healthy dietary habits and poor selection of food may be responsible for this high prevalence.

  20. Overweight and Obesity and their Association with Dietary Habits, and Sociodemographic Characteristics Among Male Primary School Children in Al-Hassa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

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    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Al-Sultan, Ali Ibrahim; Ali, Ayub

    2008-07-01

    To assess the magnitude of obesity and overweight among male primary school children, and to find the possible association between obesity/overweight and dietary habits and sociodemographic differentials among them. A cross-sectional descriptive study, including 1139 Saudi male children enrolled in the 5(th) and 6(th) grades in public primary schools in Al Hassa, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), was conducted. The test included a multistage random sampling technique, based on interview using Youth and Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaire, gathering data regarding dietary intake, dietary habits, followed by anthropometric measurements with the calculation of body mass index (BMI), the interpretation of which was based on Cole's tables for the standard definition of overweight and obesity. Sociodemographic data were collected through a parental questionnaire from. Data analysis was performed using the SPSS 12 software (SPSS Inc. Chicago, IL, USA); both univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. The age of the school children ranged from 10-14 years. The prevalence of overweight among the subjects was 14.2%, while that of obesity was 9.7%; the prevalence was more in the urban, older age students. The mothers of obese and overweight children were less educated and more working. Missing and or infrequent intake of breakfast at home, frequent consumption of fast foods, low servings per day of fruits, vegetables, milk and dairy products, with frequent consumption of sweets/candy and carbonated drinks were all predictors of obesity and overweight among the schoolchildren studied. The prevalence of childhood obesity is escalating and approaching figures that have been reported till now from the developed countries. Less healthy dietary habits and poor selection of food may be responsible for this high prevalence.

  1. The personal and workplace characteristics of uninsured expatriate males in Saudi Arabia.

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    Alkhamis, Abdulwahab; Cosgrove, Peter; Mohamed, Gamal; Hassan, Amir

    2017-01-19

    A major concern by the health decision makers in Gulf Cooperative Council (GCC) countries is the burden of financing healthcare. While other GCC countries have been examining different options, Saudi Arabia has endeavoured to reform its private healthcare system and control expatriate access to government resources through the provision of Compulsory Employment-Based Health Insurance (CEBHI). The objective of this research was to investigate, in a natural setting, the characteristics of uninsured expatriates based on their personal and workplace characteristics. Using a cross-sectional survey, data were collected from a sample of 4,575 male expatriate employees using a multi-stage stratified cluster sampling technique. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize all variables, and the dependent variable was tabulated by access to health insurance and tested using Chi-square. Logistic analysis was performed, guided by the conceptual model. Of survey respondents, 30% were either uninsured or not yet enrolled in a health insurance scheme, 79.4% of these uninsured expatriates did not have valid reasons for being uninsured, with Iqama renewal accounting for 20.6% of the uninsured. The study found both personal and workplace characteristics were important factors influencing health insurance status. Compared with single expatriates, married expatriates (accompanied by their families) are 30% less likely to be uninsured. Moreover, workers occupying technical jobs requiring high school level of education or above were two-thirds more likely to be insured compared to unskilled workers. With regard to firm size, respondents employed in large companies (more than 50 employees) are more likely to be insured compared to those employed in small companies (less than ten employees). In relation to business type, the study found that compared to workers from the agricultural sector, industrial/manufacturing, construction and trading sectors, workers were, respectively, 76%, 85

  2. Influences of parents, close friends and classmates on four co-existing oral health practices in Saudi male teenagers.

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    El Tantawi, Maha; Bakhurji, Eman; Al-Ansari, Asim; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa S; AlSubaie, Abdulelah

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the association between oral health practices and similar practices adopted by parents, close friends and classmates in a group of Saudi male teenagers. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, in 2016 including 12-14-year-old intermediate school students (n = 478). A questionnaire assessed socioeconomic background, whether participants, their parents, close friends and classmates brushed twice daily, used tobacco, snacked on sugary foods or sugary drinks and perceiving a supportive classroom environment. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models assessed the association of parents', close friends', classmates' practices and classroom support with participants' four practices, controlling for socioeconomic factors. The response rate was 93.9%. In multivariate regression, close friends' practices had a strong significant association with teenagers' tooth brushing (OR = 4.45; 95%CI = 1.09, 18.12), tobacco use (OR = 5.63; 95%CI = 3.44, 7.88), snacking on sugary foods (OR = 14.42; 95%CI = 7.89, 21.89) and sugary drinks (OR = 7.05; 95%CI = 5.97, 9.20). The percentages of classmates perceived to brush their teeth and use tobacco were significantly associated with the respective practices in teenagers (OR = 1.03 and 1.02). Fathers' snacking on sugary drinks was significantly associated with that of the teenagers (OR = 4.04; 95%CI= 1.03, 15.85). In early adolescence, four oral health practices of Saudi males were associated with those perceived to be adopted by their close friends. Fathers' use of sugary drinks was also significantly associated with that of teenagers.

  3. Characteristics and Behaviors of Older Male Anabolic Steroid Users.

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    Ip, Eric J; Trinh, Karen; Tenerowicz, Michael J; Pal, Jai; Lindfelt, Tristan A; Perry, Paul J

    2015-10-01

    To compare and contrast the characteristics of 2 groups of men ≥40 years old: reported anabolic-androgenic steroid (AAS) users and nonusers. Cross-sectional survey. Thirty-eight online fitness, weight lifting, bodybuilding, and steroid Web sites. A total of 67 male AAS users and 76 male nonusers ≥40 years old. Demographics, utilization of AAS and other performance-enhancing agents (PEAs), exercise patterns, history of illicit drugs and alcohol use, and psychiatric traits/diagnoses. The majority of AAS users ≥40 years old were caucasian (92.5%), heterosexual (97.0%), and classified themselves as recreational exercisers (79.1%). AAS users took more PEAs (11.5 ± 5.6 vs 4.6 ± 2.7; P abuse among older men. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. A Clinical Score to Predict Appendicitis in Older Male Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharbanda, Anupam B; Monuteaux, Michael C; Bachur, Richard G; Dudley, Nanette C; Bajaj, Lalit; Stevenson, Michelle D; Macias, Charles G; Mittal, Manoj K; Bennett, Jonathan E; Sinclair, Kelly; Dayan, Peter S

    2017-04-01

    To develop a clinical score to predict appendicitis among older, male children who present to the emergency department with suspected appendicitis. Patients with suspected appendicitis were prospectively enrolled at 9 pediatric emergency departments. A total of 2625 patients enrolled; a subset of 961 male patients, age 8-18 were analyzed in this secondary analysis. Outcomes were determined using pathology, operative reports, and follow-up calls. Clinical and laboratory predictors with  0.4 were entered into a multivariable model. Resultant β-coefficients were used to develop a clinical score. Test performance was assessed by calculating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and likelihood ratios. The mean age was 12.2 years; 49.9% (480) had appendicitis, 22.3% (107) had perforation, and the negative appendectomy rate was 3%. In patients with and without appendicitis, overall imaging rates were 68.6% (329) and 84.4% (406), respectively. Variables retained in the model included maximum tenderness in the right lower quadrant, pain with walking/coughing or hopping, and the absolute neutrophil count. A score ≥8.1 had a sensitivity of 25% (95% confidence interval [CI], 20%-29%), specificity of 98% (95% CI, 96%-99%), and positive predictive value of 93% (95% CI, 86%-97%) for ruling in appendicitis. We developed an accurate scoring system for predicting appendicitis in older boys. If validated, the score might allow clinicians to manage a proportion of male patients without diagnostic imaging. Copyright © 2016 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Incidence rate of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas among males in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from the Saudi Cancer Registry, 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1,2 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,3 Ahlam A Dohal,4 Mansour M Alghamdi,4 Mohammed A El-Sheemy5 1School of Life Sciences, University of Lincoln, Lincoln, UK; 2Albaha University, Al Baha city, Saudi Arabia; 3General Directorate of Health Affairs, Ministry of Health, Al Baha, 4King Fahad Specialist Hospital, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 5Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHSTrust, Lincoln, UK Background: This study describes epidemiological data of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi men. Materials and methods: Retrospective data from all NHL cancer cases among Saudi men recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR between January 2001 and December 2008 were used. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and simple linear regression were also used. Results: In total, 2,555 new cases of NHL were recorded between January 2001 and December 2008. The region of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia had the highest overall age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR at 7.8, followed by the Eastern region at 6.8, and Makkah at 6.1 per 100,000 men; however, Jazan, Hail, and Baha had the lowest average ASIRs at 2.5, 3.7, and 3.9 per 100,000 men, respectively. The incidence-rate ratio for the number of NHL cases was significantly higher in Riyadh (4.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.11–5.32, followed by Makkah (4.47, 95% CI 3.94–5.07, and the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia (3.27, 95% CI 2.90–3.69 than that in the reference region of Jazan. Jouf had the highest changes in the ASIRs of NHL among Saudi men from 2001 and 2008 (5.0 per 100,000 men. Conclusion: A significant increase in the crude incidence rate and ASIR for NHL in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008 was found. Riyadh, the Eastern region, and Makkah had the highest overall ASIR in Saudi Arabia. Jazan, Hail, and Baha had the lowest rates. Additionally, Riyadh, Makkah, and the Eastern region had the

  6. Carious lesions of permanent molars and oral health practices of parents and peers in Saudi male adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhurji, Eman; El Tantawi, Maha M; Gaffar, Balgis O; Al-Khalifa, Khalifa S; Al-Ansari, Asim A

    2017-07-01

    To assess the association between carious lesions in first and second permanent molars in adolescents and their parents' and peers' oral health practices. Methods: This cross-sectional study of 12-15 year-old male adolescents was conducted in  Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, on February 2016. Data collection included dental examination to measure carious lesions and plaque. There was a questionnaire to assess oral health practices such as brushing with fluoridated toothpaste, current daily tobacco use, and daily consumption of sugary food and drinks. Logistic regression models assessed the association between first and second molars carious lesions with adolescents', parents', and peers' oral health practices. Results: Of 302 students, 294 participated. The mother's brushing was significantly associated with a lower odds of carious lesions in the first molar (odds ratio [OR] = 0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.04 - 0.77). The mothers' sugary food intake and students' own brushing were significantly associated with carious lesions in the second molar (OR = 1.95 and 0.36, 95% CI: 1.01-9.89 and 0.12-0.89). Friends' intake of sugary drinks had a strong, but non-significant, association with second molar's carious lesions (OR=3.61, 95% CI: 0.35 - 7.44). Conclusion: In Saudi society, mothers have a major influence on their adolescent sons' carious lesions. Adolescents' oral health strategies should involve parents to reduce their risk of caries.

  7. Sexual Behavior in Male Adolescents with Autism and Its Relation to Social-Sexual Skills in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwaidi, Mohamed A.; Daghustani, Wid H.

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify common sexual behavior among adolescents with autism, where parents and teachers of sixty-one male adolescents from twelve to twenty-one years of age were recruited from three cities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. They were asked to respond to a sexual behavior questionnaire, and a social-sexual skills…

  8. Physical Activity Behavior Predictors, Reasons and Barriers among Male Adolescents in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: Evidence for Obesogenic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsubaie, Ali S R; Omer, Eltigani O M

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess physical activity, socio-demographic predictors and to determine reasons for practicing and/or not practicing physical activities. Cross-sectional study was conducted among male high school students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data using stratified cluster sampling technique (N= 453 students). Although 36.4% of the student reported that they practiced enough exercise during their usual week days, only 15.5% of the students were found to be practicing physical activity at a recommended level (≥5 days/week). On the other hand, 20.1% of the students were found to be inactive and not practicing physical activity at any day. Among the factors that associated with adolescents physical activity, logistic regression showed that students age was associated negatively with physical activity behaviour (OR= 0.6, P obesogenic environmental factors are required.

  9. Sarcopenia and physical activity in older male cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oka, Koichiro; Kasahara, Yusuke; Morio, Yuji; Hiraki, Koji; Hirano, Yasuyuki; Omori, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norio; Kida, Keisuke; Suzuki, Kengo; Akashi, Yoshihiro J

    2016-11-01

    There is little information on the association of sarcopenia with physical activity in elderly cardiac patients. This study determined differences in physical activity and cutoff values for physical activity according to the presence or absence of sarcopenia in elderly male cardiac patients. Sixty-seven consecutive men aged ≥65 years with cardiac disease were enrolled. We defined sarcopenia using the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People algorithm. Patients were divided into the sarcopenia group (n=25) and the non-sarcopenia group (n=42). In the patients with and without sarcopenia of physical activities were evaluated to determine cutoff values of physical activity. After adjusting for patient characteristics, both the average daily number of steps (3361.43±793.23 vs. 5991.55±583.57 steps, P=0.021) and the average daily energy expenditure of physical activity (71.84±22.19 vs. 154.57±16.18kcal, P=0.009) were significantly lower in the sarcopenia versus non-sarcopenia group. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis identified a cutoff value for steps of physical activity of 3551.80steps/day for 1 week, with a sensitivity of 0.73 and 1-specificity of 0.44 and a cutoff value for energy expenditure of physical activity of 85.17kcal/day for 1 week, with a sensitivity of 0.73 and 1-specificity of 0.27. Physical activity in the male cardiac patients with sarcopenia was significantly lower than that in those without sarcopenia. The cutoff values reported here may be useful values to aid in the identification of elderly male cardiac patients with sarcopenia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Incidence rate of non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas among males in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from the Saudi Cancer Registry, 2001–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; Dohal, Ahlam A; Alghamdi, Mansour M; El-Sheemy, Mohammed A

    2014-01-01

    Background This study describes epidemiological data of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi men. Materials and methods Retrospective data from all NHL cancer cases among Saudi men recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) between January 2001 and December 2008 were used. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and simple linear regression were also used. Results In total, 2,555 new cases of NHL were recorded between January 2001 and December 2008. The region of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia had the highest overall age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR) at 7.8, followed by the Eastern region at 6.8, and Makkah at 6.1 per 100,000 men; however, Jazan, Hail, and Baha had the lowest average ASIRs at 2.5, 3.7, and 3.9 per 100,000 men, respectively. The incidence-rate ratio for the number of NHL cases was significantly higher in Riyadh (4.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 4.11–5.32), followed by Makkah (4.47, 95% CI 3.94–5.07), and the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia (3.27, 95% CI 2.90–3.69) than that in the reference region of Jazan. Jouf had the highest changes in the ASIRs of NHL among Saudi men from 2001 and 2008 (5.0 per 100,000 men). Conclusion A significant increase in the crude incidence rate and ASIR for NHL in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008 was found. Riyadh, the Eastern region, and Makkah had the highest overall ASIR in Saudi Arabia. Jazan, Hail, and Baha had the lowest rates. Additionally, Riyadh, Makkah, and the Eastern region had the highest incidence-rate ratio for the number of NHL cases. Finally, Jouf had the highest changes in crude incidence rate and ASIR from 2001 to 2008. Further analytical studies are needed to determine the potential risk factors of NHL among Saudi men. PMID:25028562

  11. Aging in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy J. Karlin PhD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This exploratory study sought to measure current self-reported experiences of older Saudi adults. Method: Self-reported aging perceptions and demographic data from semistructured questions were obtained from 52 community-dwelling older Saudi adults aged 50 or older. A thematic content analysis was completed around issues of family life/social support, daily/weekly activities, health and health programs, and older adults’ own thoughts about aging and the experience and future of personal aging. Results: Several key themes emerged from the interviews. The majority of respondents in this preliminary study acknowledge a preference for family care. Formal programs in Saudi Arabia are attended with relative infrequency while older adults recognize family support as the preferred method of support. Older Saudi interviewees hold a positive view of aging, but physical functioning, varying financial resources, and other daily obligations are a concern for those in this study. Discussion: Data suggest as the Saudi population ages, more research is needed on the aging experience with particiular emphasis on issues relevant to older adults . Future research must work to clarify the aging experience as cultural context changes.

  12. Perfluoroalkyl substances in older male anglers in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Krista Y; Raymond, Michelle; Thompson, Brooke A; Anderson, Henry A

    2016-05-01

    Perfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) are an emerging class of contaminants. Certain PFAS are regulated or voluntarily limited due to concern about environmental persistence and adverse health effects, including thyroid disease and to dyslipidemia. The major source of PFAS exposure in the general population is seafood. In this analysis we examine PFAS levels and their determinants, as well as associations between PFAS levels and self-reported health outcomes, in a group of older male anglers in Wisconsin with high fish consumption. A biomonitoring study of male anglers aged 50 and older living in Wisconsin collected detailed information on fish consumption, demographics and self-reported health outcomes, along with hair and blood samples for biomarker analysis. Sixteen different PFAS were extracted from serum samples. Regression models were used to identify factors (demographic characteristics and fish consumption habits) associated with PFAS biomarker levels in blood, as well as associations between PFAS and self-reported health outcomes, adjusting for potential confounders. Seven PFAS were detected in at least 30% of participants and were used in subsequent analyses (PFDA, PFHpS, PFHxS, PFNA, PFOA, PFOS, PFuDA). The PFAS with the highest levels were PFOS, followed by PFOA, PFHxS and PFNA (medians of 19.0, 2.5, 1.8 and 1.4ng/mL). In general, increasing age was associated with higher PFAS levels, while increasing BMI were associated with lower PFAS levels. Greater alcohol consumption was associated with higher levels of PFHpS, PFHxS and PFOA. Associations with smoking and employment did not show a consistent pattern. Associations between fish consumption and PFAS were generally weak, with the exception of notably higher PFDA and PFHpS with both other locally-caught fish, and restaurant-purchased fish. Regarding associations with health outcomes, PFuDA, PFNA and PFDA were all associated with increased risk of pre-diabetes and/or diabetes. PFHpS was associated with a

  13. The Outcome of Assisted Reproductive Techniques among Couples with Male Factors at Prince Khalid Bin Sultan Fertility Centre, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Hytham Bahaeldin Mukhtar; Amani Shaman; Hyder Osman Mirghani; Ayman Adnan Almasalmah

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Thirty-three percent of infertility due to paternal factors, there are an increasing proportion of couples who decide to conceive by assisted reproductive techniques (ART). The outcome prediction is pivotal for decision making. AIM: We aimed to study the pregnancy outcomes of different ART with male factors infertility. METHODS: This retrospective cross-sectional study conducted at Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. One hundred fifteen patients' records reviewed using a struc...

  14. Treatment of Light Chain Deposition Disease Using Bortezomib-Based Regimen Followed by Thalidomide-Based Regimen in a Saudi Male

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bappa Adamu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Light chain deposition disease (LCDD is a rare illness with, as yet, no clear evidence-based guidelines for its treatment. To the best of our knowledge, LCDD has not been previously reported from Saudi Arabia. We present in this report, a 38-year-old Saudi male who presented with clinical features suggestive of hypertensive nephropathy but kidney biopsy later revealed the diagnosis of LCDD. His serum creatinine at presentation was 297 μmol/L which came down to 194 μmol/L on treatment with Bortezomib, Cyclophosphamide and Dexamethasone. His 24-hour protein excretion at presentation was 6 g/L which also came down to less than 1 g/day. He was later placed on Cyclophosphamide, Thalidomide, and Dexamethasone regimen because of persistent high titres of serum free light chains. He went into remission with undetectable serum free light chains and remained so for three years at the time of writing this report. We conclude that LCDD, though rare, does occur in Saudi population. The treatment of LCDD is challenging but the use of Bortezomib, a proteosome inhibitor, is promising. However, suboptimal response may require further treatment with other therapeutic options such as chemotherapy with alkylating agents or high-dose Melphalan with autologous stem cell transplant.

  15. Assessment of the Medmont C100 test for colour vision screening of male Saudi Arabians

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    Abdullah Z. Alotaibi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the Medmont C100 test as a colour vision screening tool. Methods: One hundred and seventeen young male adults were screened with the Medmont C100, Ishihara plates, and the screening mode of the Oculus Anomaloscope tests. All subjects were tested under constant room illumination, namely that of a day light fluorescent lamp at 200 lux. Inclusion criteria were visual acuities (VA of 20/20 or better with or without correction and absence of known ocular pathologies.Aided and unaided visual acuities were measured with the Snellen VA chart. Results: Five out of the117 subjects, were found to have red-green colour vision deficiency (CVD with Ishihara and anomaloscope tests indicating a 4.7% CVD prevalence, while the Medmont C100 test yielded 33 cases of red-green deficiency indicating CVD prevalence of 28%.  With the Ishihara test, all five subjects were identified as deutans, while the anomaloscope revealed three as deutans and two as protans, and the Medmont C100 test identified all 33 cases as protans. Conclusion:  The Medmont C100 test yielded significantly higher prevalence of protan CVD compared with the Ishihara platesand Anomaloscope tests. These findings suggest that caution should be taken when using Medmont C100 test for colour vision screening as it tends togive more false positive results with bias for protans.  (S Afr Optom 2011 70(1 14-20

  16. Relationship of thresholds of physical performance to nutritional status in older hospitalized male cardiac patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, Kazuhiro P; Watanabe, Satoshi; Oka, Koichiro

    2015-02-01

    Nutrition is the focus of a new treatment target in older hospitalized cardiac patients. However, little is known about the differences in nutritional status in relation to physical performance in these inpatients. We determined the differences in physical performance based on the Geriatric Nutritional Risk Index (GNRI) and physical performance cut-off values according to the GNRI in older male cardiac inpatients. We enrolled 251 Japanese male inpatients aged ≥65 years (mean age 74.7 years) with cardiac disease in the present cross-sectional study. We divided the patients into two groups according to GNRI: high-GNRI group (≥92 points; n=178) and low-GNRI group (nutrition, as shown by a low GNRI, could be a useful predictor of physical performance. The cut-off values determined in the present study might be expected minimum target values that can be attained by Japanese older male cardiac inpatients. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Oral hygiene practices, dental knowledge, dietary habits and their relation to caries among male primary school children in Al Hassa, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, T T; Al-Abad, B M

    2008-11-01

    To assess the frequency of consumption of cariogenic foods, oral hygiene practices and dental health knowledge among Saudi male primary school children in relation to socio-demographics and to find the possible predictors for dental caries among them. The cross-sectional descriptive study included 1115 Saudi male selected by multistage random sample from 18 public primary schools. Subjects were interviewed by closed ended questionnaire gathering data regarding frequency consumption of some cariogenic foods, oral hygiene practices and dental health knowledge. Students were submitted to dental screening to detect the clinically evident caries lesion. The clinically decayed tooth was diagnosed in 68.9% of the included children, more in urban and younger students. Caries affected the subjects consumed cariogenic foods at greater frequency compared with caries-free children. Only 24.5% of the students brushed their teeth twice or more per day, and 29% of them never received instructions regarding oral hygiene practices. Miswak as an alternative and/or additional method of dental cleaning was used by 44.6%. Stepwise logistic regression analysis revealed that maternal working conditions, large family size and poor oral hygiene practices were the chief predictors for dental caries among the included school children. The poor oral hygiene practices, lack of parental guidance and appropriate dental health knowledge with frequent exposure to cariogenic foods in addition to socio-demographics are the main risk factors for dental decay among the surveyed students.

  18. Factors influencing suicide in older rural males: a review of Australian studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crnek-Georgeson, Kylie T; Wilson, Leigh A; Page, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Suicide remains an important public health issue in Australia, responsible for around 2500 deaths each year. Although suicide only accounts for around 1.7% of total mortality in Australia per year, 75% of suicide deaths are in males. This article reviews the factors contributing to suicide in older rural males in Australia and then categorises the papers into themes for ease of explanation. Living with experiences of drought, dramatic weather change, lower employment opportunities, out-migration, changing family dynamics, ageism in the community, economic change and competitive labour markets, all add to the diverse experience for an older person who is ageing in a rural setting. A literature search was conducted in March 2015, using the terms 'elderly' and 'older males' and then combined with 'rural', 'suicide' and 'Australia', to investigate the amount of research that has been conducted on the factors relating to suicide in older rural Australian males. Reviewed articles consisted of research using either quantitative or qualitative approaches, which investigated suicide in older Australians published between 1950 and 2014. With strict adherence to the selection criteria, articles (21 in total) were removed because they were a literature review; a narrative review; they focused predominantly on youth or suicide risk, suicidal ideation or suicide attempts; or they discussed reasons for living. This article discusses the researcher's recommendations for further research into employment transitions for older Australian males, and the need to review policy change for further intervention in the future. This article highlights factors that may cause older rural Australians to be placed at a higher risk of suicide than their urban-dwelling counterparts. With the impact of the changing economy, unpredictable climatic conditions and dynamic changes in rural Australian families, there is a need to highlight research that has been conducted in this area. Future research

  19. Predictors of Self-Efficacy and Self-Rated Health for Older Male Inmates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensmeier, Darrell; Kassab, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Aims To examine: (1) the relationships between self-efficacy for health management and (a) health-promoting behaviors, (b) health-monitoring behaviors, and (c) self-rated health status in older male prisoners; and (2) the variations in self-rated health status and self-efficacy for health management by inmate characteristics of older men in prison. Background The graying of the inmate population around the globe can be attributed to increases in punitive crime control practices, life expectancy; and the aging baby boom generation. Older inmates are typically not a healthy group. Therefore, the needs of burgeoning numbers of older, sicker inmates are issues of international significance. Methods A descriptive, correlational, survey was conducted from late 2007 to mid-2008 with Bandura’s self-efficacy model as the guiding framework. Results/Findings Participants were 131 male inmates, age 50 and older. A significant positive relationship was found between self-efficacy for health management and the indexes measuring health-promoting behaviors (r=0.550; Pprisons. Nurses are front line health care providers in prison, who are in a key position to implement interventions that promote greater inmate self-efficacy for healthy behaviors and chronic disease management. PMID:21198807

  20. Older male mentors' perceptions of a Men's Shed intergenerational mentoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Nathan J; Cordier, Reinie; Wilson Whatley, Lisa

    2013-12-01

    The National Male Health Policy identifies several groups of males at different transitional life stages that are at particular risk, including teenage boys at risk of social exclusion and recently retired older men. A novel intergenerational mentoring program was developed to bring these groups together through participation in meaningful occupation. This research aimed to investigate the mentors' experiences of the program, their views about the teenage boys and the structure of the program. Nine teenage boys (14-16 years) at risk of social exclusion participated in a weekly shared construction project with older male mentors (60-75 years) at a local Sydney school over one school term. A post-project focus group and individual interviews were conducted with six of the mentors pre- and post-project. Data were analysed using the constant comparative method of grounded theory; all authors developed themes individually and then collectively. The core theme that emerged was a values-led male reconnection. Centred in themes of gendered valuing, respect, tradition and the handing down of life experience, occupational engagement was integral to bridging the generational gap and facilitating intergeneration discourse. Older males with a strong sense of generativity are a valuable resource in delivering such programs, and reported a sense of accomplishment and enhanced self-worth. Given the central role that occupational engagement played in fusing the project, this study highlights the untapped role of occupational therapy in developing programs aimed at promoting the health and wellbeing of Australian men. © 2013 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  1. Frequency of vitamin D inadequacy among Saudi males visiting a Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of a tertiary hospital in Al-Qassim region: Effect of vitamin D supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala Lotfy Fayed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vitamin D inadequacy (deficiency and insufficiency has become an epidemic with the assumption that women in Arab countries are at a higher risk due to their clothing style of wearing dark colored suits or a veil. Aim of the work: To determine the frequency of vitamin D inadequacy among young adult and early middle-aged males in Al-Qassim region and to study the effect of vitamin D supplementation. Patients and methods: Sixty Saudi males visiting Rheumatology Outpatient Clinic of a tertiary hospital in Al-Qassim region were enrolled and evaluated for musculoskeletal state including assessment of chronic diffuse musculoskeletal pains using Numeric Rating Pain Scale (NRPS and functional evaluation of lower limb proximal muscle power using chair–rise performance test. Serum 25(OHD was evaluated. Vitamin D supplementation was provided for symptomatic subjects. Follow-up clinical evaluation as well as serum 25(OHD measurement after 12 weeks vitamin D3 supplementation was performed. Results: The mean age of the patients was 43.2 ± 6.4 years. 54 (90% had vitamin D inadequacy; 42 (70% deficiency and 12 (20% had insufficiency. Significant increase in baseline serum 25(OHD (13.92 ± 5.67 ng/ml after 12 weeks of supplementation (35.94 ± 4.11 ng/ml with significant decrease in NPRS (7.42 ± 2.12 vs 2.06 ± 2.04 (p < 0.001, as well as significant improvement of functional status scores of chair–rise performance test (93.95 ± 23.56 vs 203.1 ± 58.6 (p < 0.001. Conclusion: Vitamin D inadequacy is a major health problem not only in elderly people or women with in-door residency and dark-colored clothes, but also in Saudi male young adults in Al-Qassim region.

  2. The male-female health-survival paradox in hospitalised older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Emily H; Peel, Nancye M; Hubbard, Ruth E

    2018-01-01

    To determine whether the 'male-female health-survival paradox' is present in older hospitalised adults and to examine whether sex differences in the 'lethality' of acute medical conditions influence the relationship between sex and mortality. This study was a secondary analysis of prospective cohort data collected from 1418 Australian inpatients aged 70 years and over. Frailty was measured using a 39-variable Frailty Index (FI-AC). Analyses examined the relationship between sex, age, FI-AC and 28-day mortality. Survival models were adjusted for 'lethality' of acute conditions (high versus low mortality risk). The FI-AC had a normal distribution in both sexes (female mean=0.34 (±0.13); male mean=0.31 (±0.15)). When adjusted for age, females had similar FI-AC scores to males (β coefficient=0.014, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.00-0.028, p=0.056). There were 80 deaths in the sample, with females facing a significantly lower mortality risk than males of the same FI-AC and age (HR=0.39, 95% CI=0.25-0.63, p<0.001). Females were less likely than males to be admitted with a high-risk acute condition. Even so, this did not significantly reduce their survival advantage (HR=0.46, 95% CI=0.29-0.73, p=0.001). The male-female health-survival paradox was not demonstrated in this study of older inpatients. Whilst females faced a significantly lower risk of near-term mortality, the sexes were found to have similar levels of frailty on admission to hospital. The sex mortality gap was not explained by sex differences in the 'lethality' of acute medical conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The Outcome of Assisted Reproductive Techniques among Couples with Male Factors at Prince Khalid Bin Sultan Fertility Centre, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Hytham Bahaeldin; Shaman, Amani; Mirghani, Hyder Osman; Almasalmah, Ayman Adnan

    2017-08-15

    Thirty-three percent of infertility due to paternal factors, there are an increasing proportion of couples who decide to conceive by assisted reproductive techniques (ART). The outcome prediction is pivotal for decision making. We aimed to study the pregnancy outcomes of different ART with male factors infertility. This is retrospective cross-sectional study conducted at Tabuk, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. One hundred fifteen patients' records reviewed using a structured checklist to collect demographic data, sperm (concentration, motility, and morphology). Female with significant infertility factor were excluded. Chi-square was used for the outcome of various ART. Out of 115 couples with male factors; treated by Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection (ICSI), In Vitro Fertilization (IVF) and Intrauterine Insemination (IUI); the mean age was 35.2 ± 6.3 years for men and 29.7 ± 5.1 for females. IVF had the highest success rate overall and had a high pregnancy rate with oligospermia and asthenospermia. ICSI has a good outcome for those with azoospermia, severe oligospermia, and teratozoospermia. IUI must be tried as a first line treatment when semen concentration is more than 10 million sperm/ml. all are not significant (P > 0.05). No significant differences were reported in the pregnancy outcome between various assisted reproductive techniques, smoking, type of infertility and medication.

  4. Veiled Delusions: Gender, Education, and Employment in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Patricia; Caram, Chris A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the oppression endured by Saudi Arabian women, and discusses the state of education, higher education, and employment for them. States that it will be difficult for Saudi women to achieve their aspirations brought about by higher education due to the growing number of unemployed Saudi males and the heavy rule of the monarchist…

  5. Foreign Language Anxiety among First-Year Saudi University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanielian, Adam R.

    2017-01-01

    This study surveys 156 Saudi male and 131 Saudi female students in their first year at King Faisal University in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia. Demographic data is collected along with quantitative data using a self-reporting Foreign Language Classroom Anxiety Scale (FLCAS) with a 5- point Likert scale. English performance data is collected…

  6. Social Security Contributions and Return Migration Among Older Male Mexican Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguila, Emma; Vega, Alma

    2017-06-01

    For decades, scholars have studied the effects of immigration on the U.S. social security system. To date, this research has been primarily limited to migrants within the United States and does not consider those who return to their countries of origin. We estimate the proportion of male Mexican return migrants who contributed to the U.S. social security system and analyze their socioeconomic characteristics and migration histories. We also estimate the proportion that receive or expect to receive U.S. social security benefits. Using probit regression on the 2012 Mexican Health and Aging Study (MHAS), we describe the predictors of having contributed to the U.S. social security system among Mexican males in Mexico aged 50 years and older who at some point lived in the United States. We find that 32% of male return migrants reported having contributed to the U.S. social security system, but only 5% of those who contributed, received or expected to receive benefits. Those who reported having contributed spent more years in the United States and were more likely to be U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents than those who did not contribute. Immigrants often pay Old-Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance taxes using legitimate or illegitimate social security numbers and return to their home countries without collecting U.S. social security benefits.

  7. Cervical and lumbar MRI in asymptomatic older male lifelong athletes: Frequency of degenerative findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, J.F.; Healy, B.B.; Wong, W.H.M.; Olson, E.M. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The athletic activity of the adult U.S. population has increased markedly in the last 20 years. To evaluate the possible long-term effects of such activity on the cervical and lumbar spine, we studied a group of asymptomatic currently very active lifelong male athletes over age 40 (41-69 years old, av. age 53). Nineteen active, lifelong male athletes were studied with MRI and the results compared with previous imaging studies of other populations. An athletic history and a spine history were also taken. Evidence of asymptomatic degenerative spine disease was similar to that seen in published series of other populations. Degenerative changes including disk protrusion and herniation, spondylosis, and spinal stenosis were present and increased in incidence with increasing patient age. In this group, all MRI findings proved to be asymptomatic and did not limit athletic activity. The incidence of lumbar degenerative changes in our study population of older male athletes was similar to those seen in other populations. 14 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Saudi Arabia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Objective: To compare the pregnancy outcome in women with singleton breech presentation at term delivered by caesarean section (CS) and vaginal breech delivery. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Abha Maternity hospital, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods: 573 women with singleton breech.

  9. Levels of nutrients in relation to fish consumption among older male anglers in Wisconsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Krista Y; Thompson, Brooke A; Werner, Mark; Malecki, Kristen; Imm, Pamela; Anderson, Henry A

    2015-10-01

    Fish is an important source of nutrients including omega-3 fatty acids, which may reduce risk of adverse health outcomes such as cardiovascular disease; however, fish may also contain significant amounts of environmental pollutants. The Wisconsin Departments of Health Services and Natural Resources developed a survey instrument, along with a strategy to collect human biological samples to assess the risks and benefits associated with long-term fish consumption among older male anglers in Wisconsin. The target population was men aged 50 years and older, who fish Wisconsin waters and live in the state of Wisconsin. Participants provided blood and hair samples and completed a detailed (paper) questionnaire, which included questions on basic demographics, health status, location of catch and species of fish caught/eaten, consumption of locally caught and commercially purchased fish, and awareness and source of information for local and statewide consumption guidelines. Biological samples were used to assess levels of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), docosapentaenoic acid (DPA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA); vitamin D; and selenium in blood. Quantile regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between biomarker levels and self-reported consumption of fish from the Great Lakes and other areas of concern, other locally caught fish, and commercially purchased fish (meals per year). Respondents were largely non-Hispanic white men in their 60's with at least some college education, and about half were retired. Fish consumption was high (median of 54.5 meals per year), with most fish meals coming from locally-caught fish. Multivariate regression models showed that the effect of supplement use was much greater than that of fish consumption, on nutrient levels, although consumption of fish from the Great Lakes and areas of concern was significantly associated with higher levels of vitamin D even after controlling for supplement usage. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Graded Exercise Testing Versus Simulated Competition Exercise in Trained Older Males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwaard, Stephan; Rougoor, Guus; van Kasteel, Paul Y; Greany, John; de Koning, Jos J; Hill, Ethan; Porcari, John P; Allen, Brian; Foster, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Exercise-based rehabilitation is a standard therapy for patients with heart disease. Despite examples of patients who have extended normal rehabilitation exercise into competitive participation, there are no clear-cut guidelines for patients whether they should participate in competitive-level exercise. This study investigated the occurrence of complications, physiologic responses, and exercise patterns during simulated competitive exercise in active, older nonathletes (most with a history of cardiovascular disease) and compared these with responses during maximal incremental exercise. Fourteen trained older males, 7 with stable cardiovascular disease, performed an incremental exercise test and time trial of 55 kJ (equivalent to running ∼1 mile) on a semirecumbent stepping ergometer. Variables of gas exchange, hemodynamics, perception, and power output were measured in both tests. Subjects attained a remarkably high physiologic and psychologic strain (respiratory exchange ratio >1.0; average peak rating of perceived exertion >8) in both tests, with no evidence of symptomatic, hemodynamic, or electrocardiographic abnormalities. Peak physiologic responses were not significantly different between simulated competition and incremental exercise. The fixed-work time trial was finished in 8.97 ± 1.85 minutes, mean power output of 100 ± 26 W. Results showed a distinct pacing pattern in the relative power output, consisting of a conservative start, an even-paced middle portion, and an end spurt. Results suggest that in trained individuals with normal incremental exercise test results, competitive-level efforts may be undertaken with no apparent side effects. This may provide a strategy whereby physicians can advise patients concerning their decision to perform in competitive events.

  11. Older Male Clients of Female Sex Workers in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milrod, Christine; Monto, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Recent research has provided increased information about the clients of sex workers; however, little is known about the population of older male customers who contract for heterosexual services online. Clients (N = 208) between 60 and 84 years of age were obtained through sex work review sites and online discussion forums. Participants completed a 129-item questionnaire focusing on physical health, sexual and non-sexual behaviors with sex providers, and the qualities sought in the same. More than half reported having visited sex providers between 13 and 24 times or more during the past 12 months. Participants' advancing age was positively associated with frequency of paid sex. Most frequent sexual activities with providers were fellatio without a condom, followed by penile-vaginal sex with a condom. Analyses also examine the relationship between aging and buying sex. Those with higher incomes and without spouses or partners were more likely to report non-sexual activities with providers, and many participants sought a "GFE" or girlfriend experience, in which paid sexual exchanges are part of a relationship that mirrors conventional non-remunerative relationships.

  12. Strength, Size, and Muscle Quality in the Upper Arm following Unilateral Training in Younger and Older Males and Females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah C. Tanton

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To assess strength, size, and muscle quality differences between younger and older males and females in response to training. Methods The bicep and tricep of the non-dominant arm were trained for twelve weeks in younger and older males and females (n = 41. The bicep of both arms were assessed pre and post for muscle strength using one-repetition maximum (1 RM testing, and size using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Results Strength (p < 0.05, mCSA (p < 0.05, and 1 RM MQ (p < 0.00 increased in response to training in all subjects regardless of age or gender. Younger and older subjects had similar increases in strength (45.49 ± 15.30% vs. 42.67 ± 26.67% respectively, mCSA (16.22 ± 7.98% vs. 19.17 ± 6.19% respectively, and 1RM MQ (25.73 ± 15.76 vs. 19.67 ± 20.66 respectively. Women increased their strength (55.59 ± 19.45% vs. 32.87 ± 15.66% p < 0.00 respectively, size (20.36 ± 6.29% vs. 14.72 ± 7.28% p < 0.02 respectively, and 1 RM MQ (29.74 ± 18.33% vs. 16.30 ± 15.59% p <.02 more than men. In comparing age and gender, younger females increased their strength more than older males (56.42 ± 12.92% vs. 29.17 ± 21.8% p <.02 respectively. Older females also increased their strength more than older males (54.68 ± 25.73 vs. 29.17 ± 21.80% respectively. Younger females increased their 1 RM MQ more than older males (.18 ± .08 kg/cm vs. .06 ± .08 kg/cm p <.02 respectively. Conclusion Strength and mCSA increases similarly in older and younger subjects. However, the overall strength and quality of the muscle seems to improve more in women than in men.

  13. Saudi Arabia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    . Private sector focus, privatization of state owned entities and salary cuts in the public sector were proposed. But the item that drew most attention was the plan to sell a 5 per cent stake in the oil company Saudi Aramco, the national pride of the Kingdom, which was seen by many as selling the family...... silver. Later in 2016 the Vision 2030 plan was followed by the National Transformation Plan 2020 which is a far more detailed plan or operational plan, posting specific benchmarks and targets for the economy in order to fulfill the aims of the Vision 2030....

  14. Knowledge and awareness of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus among Saudi and Non-Saudi Arabian pilgrims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althobaity, Hosam M; Alharthi, Raed A S; Altowairqi, Mohammed H; Alsufyani, Ziyad A; Aloufi, Nahar S; Altowairqi, Abdulrahman E; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman S; Alzahrani, Ali K; Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S

    2017-01-01

    The current study was intended to evaluate the knowledge and awareness toward Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) of pilgrims from Saudi Arabia and from different Arabian countries. A prospective study was conducted among pilgrims from Saudi Arabia and those from other Arab nations. A total number of 2120 participants including 736 Saudi pilgrims (436 males and 300 females) and 1384 non-Saudi Arabian pilgrims (1384; 909 males and 475 females) were included in the study. The responses of the participants were descriptively analyzed. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to screen the possible correlations among different variables. The differences in the responses between the two groups were evaluated using Mann-Whitney analysis. The responses of the Saudi pilgrims showed statistically significant results in comparison to non-Saudi pilgrims in answering all questions except those related to the presence of efficient vaccination or treatment and the source of information. It was clear that the Saudi pilgrims were more oriented about different aspects of MERS-CoV including the nature of the causative agent, the signs, the severity of the disease, the animals that can transmit the infection to humans, the risk groups, and when one need to be screened for infection. In both Saudi and non-Saudi pilgrims, the official websites of health organizations constitute the main source of their information. It was concluded that Saudi pilgrims possess good knowledge about the MERS-CoV although more orientation is still required.

  15. Nuptiality pattern in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, M K; al-Mazrou, Y Y; Baldo, M H; Aziz, K M; al-Shehri, S N

    1995-01-01

    The data of this work are based on the 'Saudi Maternal and Child Health Survey' conducted in 1991. This was a nationwide house to house field survey. The study included 6294 ever-married Saudi female in the childbearing age who represent the target population. They were randomly selected from both urban and rural settings of the five geographical areas of Saudi Arabia. The mean current age of the sample of ever-married women was 31 years and the mean age at first marriage was 17 and 16 years for urban and rural females, respectively. Education was associated with upward shift of the age at first marriage. About 20 per cent of the sampled ever-married Saudi females got married before their 15th birthday and 83 per cent before reaching 20 years of age. These percentages are even higher in rural than urban settings. The overall percentage of women who were currently married at the time of the survey was 96 per cent. The divorced and widowed women of childbearing age were 2 and 3 per cent, respectively, of the total. Husband's educational level had positive impact on the frequency of divorce. The latter was highest among women married to illiterate husbands with a dose response pattern. Comparison has been made with the situation 4 years ago. An increase in literacy rates among Saudi ever-married women and their husbands was observed, however, a significant (P < 0.05) difference still exists between female and male literacy rates (38 and 71 per cent, respectively). The events of early marriage, before the age of 15 years, became less frequent. There is an overall decline in teenage marriages which explains a large part of the recent changes observed in nuptiality and pattern of birth in Saudi Arabia.

  16. The Effect of Whole Body Vibration Training and Detraining Periods on Neuromuscular Performance in Male Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Abbasi

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to evaluatethe the effect of eight weeks whole body vibration training (WBVT and detraining periods on neuromuscular performance male healthy older people. Methods & Materials: Thirty male subjects (70±9.6 years old were randomly allocated into two groups of WBVT and control (n=15 per group. Timed Up & Go and 5-Chair stand tests, as indicators of neuromuscular performance in older subjects, were taken as pretest and posttest and also after four, six, and eight weeks of detraining. Results: Results of Repeated-measure ANOVA and one-way ANOVA showed that neuromuscular performance improved significantly in WBVT group (P<0.05. There were also significant differences between posttest and six and eight weeks of detraining periods in WBVTgroup (P<0.05. Conclusion: WBVT could affect neuromuscular performance in healthy subjects and reduce the probability of falling among them. However, the effects of this training are not persistent, goes back to the early levels after six weeks of detraining. Hence, it is possible that WBVT can be recommended as a safe balance training to older people.

  17. Older Male Physicians Have Lower Risk of Trochanteric but Not Cervical Hip Fractures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Nien Shen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Osteoporosis is pathophysiologically related to trochanteric fractures, and this condition is more preventable by lifestyle modifications than cervical fractures. We investigated whether older physicians, who are health-conscious people, are at a lower risk of hip fractures because of fewer trochanteric fractures. Methods: Data regarding older (≥65 years physicians (n = 4303 and matched non-medical persons (control were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance claims. All of the subjects were obtained from NHIRD with index dates from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2008. Cox proportional hazard and competing risk regression models were established to estimate the hazard ratio (HR of hip fracture associated with older physicians. Results: The incidence rates of trochanteric fractures were lower in older physicians than in controls (1.73 and 3.07 per 1000 person-years, respectively, whereas the rates of cervical fractures were similar between the two groups (2.45 and 2.12 per 1000 person-years, respectively. Older physicians yielded 46% lower hazard of trochanteric fractures than controls (adjusted HR 0.54, 95% confidence interval 0.37–0.79; by contrast, hazards of cervical fractures were comparable between the two groups. The HRs estimated from the competing risk models remained unchanged. Conclusions: Our findings indicated that health risk awareness may pose a significant preventive effect on trochanteric hip fractures.

  18. Report of Bufo tihamicus karyotype from Saudi Arabia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abdulaziz

    2013-04-17

    Apr 17, 2013 ... This study gives a description of the Karyotype of the Tihama toad Bufo tihamicus from Saudi Arabia. Samples of males and females of Bufo tihamicus Parker were collected from Gazan Province of. Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The karyotype consists of a diploid number 2n = 22 and the fundamental number ...

  19. The Effect of Aquatic and Land-Based Exercises on Static and Dynamic Balance of Healthy Male Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sohbatiha

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of exercise in and out of the water on balance level of healthy male older people. Methods & Materials: A total of 40 healthy and physically active males aged more than 65 years old, who had not previously experienced the study exercises were recruited. The subjects were randomly assigned into three different groups: aquatic exercise group (n=13, land-based exercise group (n=12 and control group (n=15. The aquatic exercise and land-based exercise groups participated in a 6 weeks similar exercise program of 3 times per week and 60 minutes per session. Each exercise session consisted of three main phases (warm up, main exercise program and cool down. Both experimental groups were assessed before and after the exercises. The Sharpened Romberg Test and Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT were used to measure changes in balance level of the subjects before and after exercise. SPSS software version 16. 00 was used for statistical analysis and the significance level was set as P0.05. Conclusion: The static and dynamic balance level improves in healthy male older people as a result of aquatic and land-based exercises. However, further evaluations are needed to assess the long-term effects of these exercises.

  20. Differences in body composition and risk of lifestyle-related diseases between young and older male rowers and sedentary controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanada, Kiyoshi; Miyachi, Motohiko; Tabata, Izumi; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Yamamoto, Kenta; Kawano, Hiroshi; Usui, Chiyoko; Higuchi, Mitsuru

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to compare body composition and risk factors of lifestyle-related diseases between young and older male rowers and sedentary controls. Healthy males aged 19-73 years participated in the study, and were divided into four groups: 26 young rowers, 24 senior rowers, 23 young sedentary controls, and 22 senior sedentary controls. Total and regional lean soft tissue, fat mass, and bone mineral density were measured using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. The HDL-cholesterol of senior rowers (67.4 +/- 13.4 mg . dl(-1)) was significantly (P sedentary controls (59.2 +/- 11.9 mg . dl(-1)), while HDL-cholesterol was similar in senior rowers and young rowers (66.1 +/- 10.8 mg . dl(-1)). Arm, leg, and trunk lean soft tissue mass were significantly higher in senior rowers (5.6 +/- 0.6 kg, 18.2 +/- 1.8 kg, and 27.3 +/- 3.2 kg respectively) than in senior sedentary controls (5.1 +/- 0.4 kg, 16.3 +/- 1.4 kg, and 24.6 +/- 1.7 kg respectively; P sedentary controls (ribs, lumbar spine, and pelvic segments; P lifestyle-related diseases, such as osteoporosis and sarcopenia, are attenuated in male rowers. These results suggest that regular rowing exercise may have a positive influence in the prevention of lifestyle-related diseases in older Japanese people.

  1. Attitudes, perceptions and potential uptake of male circumcision among older men in Turkana County, Kenya using qualitative methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Macintyre

    Full Text Available In many communities, older men (i.e., over 25 years of age have not come forward for Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision (VMMC services. Reasons for low demand among this group of men are not well understood, and may vary across geographic and cultural contexts. This paper examines the facilitators and barriers to VMMC demand in Turkana County, Kenya, with a focus on older men. This is one of the regions targeted by the VMMC program in Kenya because the Turkana ethnic group does not traditionally circumcise, and the rates of HIV and STD transmission are high.Twenty focus group discussions and 69 in-depth interviews were conducted with circumcised and uncircumcised men and their partners to elicit their attitudes and perceptions toward male circumcision. The interviews were conducted in urban, peri-urban, and rural communities across Turkana. Our results show that barriers to circumcision include stigma associated with VMMC, the perception of low risk for HIV for older men and their "protection by marriage," cultural norms, and a lack of health infrastructure. Facilitators include stigma against not being circumcised (since circumcision is associated with modernity, protection against disease including HIV, and cleanliness. It was also noted that older men should adopt the practice to serve as role models to younger men.Both men and women were generally supportive of VMMC, but overcoming barriers with appropriate communication messages and high quality services will be challenging. The justification of circumcision being a biomedical procedure for protection against HIV will be the most important message for any communication strategy.

  2. Fracture risk among older men: osteopenia and osteoporosis defined using cut-points derived from female versus male reference data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, J A; Lane, S E; Brennan, S L; Timney, E N; Bucki-Smith, G; Dobbins, A G; Nicholson, G C; Kotowicz, M A

    2014-03-01

    We explored the effect of using male and female reference data in a male sample to categorise areal bone mineral density (BMD). Using male reference data, a large proportion of fractures arose from osteopenia, whereas using female reference data shifted the fracture burden into normal BMD. The purpose of this study was to describe fracture risk associated with osteopenia and osteoporosis in older men, defined by areal BMD and using cut-points derived from male and female reference data. As part of the Geelong Osteoporosis Study, we followed 619 men aged 60-93 years after BMD assessments (performed 2001-2006) until 2010, fracture, death or emigration. Post-baseline fractures were radiologically confirmed, and proportions of fractures in each BMD category were age-standardised to national profiles. Based on World Health Organization criteria, and using male reference data, 207 men had normal BMD at the femoral neck, 357 were osteopenic and 55 were osteoporotic. Using female reference data, corresponding numbers were 361, 227 and 31. During the study, 130 men died, 15 emigrated and 63 sustained at least one fracture. Using male reference data, most (86.5 %) of the fractures occurred in men without osteoporosis on BMD criteria (18.4 % normal BMD, 68.1 % osteopenia). The pattern differed when female reference data were used; while most fractures arose from men without osteoporosis (88.2 %), the burden shifted from those with osteopenia (34.8 %) to those with normal BMD (53.4 %). Decreasing BMD categories defined increasing risk of fracture. Although men with osteoporotic BMD were at greatest risk, they made a relatively small contribution to the total burden of fractures. Using male reference data, two-thirds of the fractures arose from men with osteopenia. However, using female reference data, approximately half of the fractures arose from those with normal BMD. Using female reference data to define osteoporosis in men does not appear to be the optimal approach.

  3. Anxiety disorders, physical illnesses, and health care utilization in older male veterans with Parkinson disease and comorbid depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Salah U; Amspoker, Amber B; Calleo, Jessica S; Kunik, Mark E; Marsh, Laura

    2012-12-01

    This study examined the rates of anxiety and depressive disorders, physical illnesses, and health service use in male patients 55 years or older with a diagnosis of Parkinson disease who were seen at least twice at the 10 medical centers in the Veterans Affairs Healthcare Network of the South Central region of the United States. Of the 273 male patients diagnosed between October 1, 1997, and September 30, 2009, 62 (22.7%) had a depressive disorder. The overall prevalence of anxiety disorders was 12.8%; patients with comorbid depression had a 5-fold greater prevalence of anxiety disorders than those without depression (35.5% vs 6.2%, Pdisease and comorbid depression are more likely to have anxiety disorders and several physical illnesses, to be using antipsychotic and dementia medicines, and to have increased health service utilization than those without depression.

  4. [Health in peril: repercussions of ageism on the psychological disengagement of male nurses aged 45 years and older].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagacé, Martine; Tougas, Francine; Laplante, Joelle; Neveu, Jean-François

    2008-01-01

    These two studies are designed to evaluate the reactions of male nurses aged 45 years and older toward ageism. The goal of the first study is to test the prestigious work domain model of psychological disengagement resulting from a previous study conducted among female nurses. This model has been confirmed through path analyses conducted on a sample of 236 male nurse technicians; by the same token, it has been shown to apply in the case of lower-status employees working in a prestigious field. In particular, the more a male nurse aged 45 and older experiences relative personal deprivation, the more he discredits feedback from his co-workers and superiors; such discrediting, in turn, leads to devaluation of the domain of work, which in turn lowers self-esteem. The goal of the second study is three-fold, namely: (a) testing the disengagement model among 419 male nurse clinicians; (b) extending this model through the addition of ageist communication as a variable triggering personal relative deprivation; and (c) constructing a scale of ageist communication. Path analyses have again confirmed that the way a domain is appreciated influences the negative impact that devaluation can produce on self-esteem, regardless of the gender or status of the employee working in that field. In addition, these results demonstrate the central role played by communication in the workplace as a vehicle of ageism and as a precursor of ageing employees' discomfort. The discussion covers the implications of ageing employees' reactions toward ageism as well as the consequences of depreciatory language and exclusionary communication practices in the workplace.

  5. Construct Validation of Three Nutrition Questions Using Health and Diet Ratings in Older Canadian Males Living in the Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Usman; Keller, Heather H; Tate, Robert B; Lengyel, Christina O

    2015-12-01

    Brief nutrition screening tools are desired for research and practice. Seniors in the Community: Risk Evaluation for Eating and Nutrition (SCREEN-II, 14 items) and the abbreviated version SCREEN-II-AB (8 items) are valid and reliable nutrition screening tools for older adults. This exploratory study used a retrospective cross-sectional design to determine the construct validity of a subset of 3 items (weight loss, appetite, and swallowing difficulty) currently on the SCREEN-II and SCREEN-II-AB tools. Secondary data on community-dwelling senior males (n = 522, mean ± SD age = 86.7 ± 3.0 years) in the Manitoba Follow-up Study (MFUS) study were available for analysis. Participants completed the mailed MFUS Nutrition Survey that included SCREEN-II items and questions pertaining to self-rated health, diet healthiness, and rating of the importance of nutrition towards successful aging as the constructs for comparison. Self-perceived health status (F = 14.7, P diet healthiness (ρ = 0.17, P = 0.002) and the rating of nutrition's importance to aging (ρ = 0.10, P = 0.03) were correlated with the 3-item score. Inferences were consistent with associations between these construct variables and the full SCREEN-II. Three items from SCREEN-II and SCREEN-II-AB demonstrate initial construct validity with self-perceived health status and diet healthiness ratings by older males; further exploration for criterion and predictive validity in more diverse samples is needed.

  6. Queering the Adult Gaze: Young Male Hustlers and Their Alliances with Older Gay Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raible, John

    2011-01-01

    Based on ethnographic data collected at a gay bar with sexual minority youths as dancers or strippers, this study calls attention to the gazes through which adults view and position male youths. It highlights a dancer named Austin, who at times engaged in the underground hustling economy centered in the bar. The findings suggest that the social…

  7. Subthreshold depressive symptoms have a negative impact on cognitive functioning in middle-aged and older males.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erlend Joramo Brevik

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cognitive aging is associated with a decline on measures of fluid intelligence (gF, whereas crystallized intelligence (gC tends to remain stable. In the present study we asked if depressive symptoms might contribute to explain the decline on gF in a sample of healthy, middle-aged and older adults. Method. The Norwegian sample included 83 females and 42 males (M = 60, SD = 7.9 yrs. gF was calculated from factor-analysis, including tests of matrix reasoning (WASI, memory function (California Verbal Learning Test, processing speed and executive function (Cued Discrimination Task; Color-Word Interference Test. gC was derived from a Vocabulary subtest (WASI. Depressive symptoms were assessed by self-reports on Beck’s Depression Index (BDI and ranged from 0 to 21 (M = 6, SD = 4.5. Results. Increased age was correlated with a decline on gF (r=-.436, p<.001, but not gC (r=-.103, p=ns.. The BDI score in the whole sample was correlated with gF (r=-.313, p<.001. A more detailed analysis showed that the BDI score correlated with measures of both gF and gC in males. The correlations were non-significant for females on all measures, with the exception of a measure of processing speed/executive function. A regression analysis including age and sex in the first step, showed that symptoms of depression significantly contributed to explain decline on gF, F(3,124=16.653, p < .001, R² = .292, ∆R² = .054. Discussion. The results showed that symptoms of depression have a negative impact on cognitive functioning in males even when the symptom-level was below clinical threshold. This indicates that minimal symptoms of depression in older men are clinically relevant to address.

  8. Will any future increase in cigarette price reduce smoking in Saudi Arabia?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Al-Mohrej

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In Saudi Arabia, no studies have been conducted on the correlation between any possible cigarette′s price increase and its effects on cigarette consumption. Aims: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of cigarette smoking in Saudi Arabia and to predict the effect of price increase on cigarette consumption. Settings and Design: A cross-sectional study was conducted in April and May 2013. Methods: We developed an Arabic questionnaire with information on demographic and socioeconomic factors, smoking history, and personal opinion on the effect of price increase on cigarette consumption. The questionnaire was distributed in public places such as malls and posted on famous Saudi athlete media′s twitter accounts. Results: Among the 2057 included responses, 802 (39% were current smokers. The smokers′ population constituted of 746 (92% males, of which 546 (68% had a monthly income equal or greater to 800 US dollars, and 446 (55% were aged between 21 and 30 years. Multivariate analyses of the risk factors for smoking showed that male gender and older age were associated with greater risk. Despite the current low prices of 2.67 US dollars, 454 smokers (56% thought that cigarette prices are expensive. When asked about the price of cigarettes that will lead to smoking cessation, 443 smokers (55% expected that a price of 8.27 US dollars and more per pack will make them quit. Conclusions: Increasing the price of popular cigarettes pack from 2.67 US dollars to 8.27 US dollars is expected to lead to smoking cessation in a large number of smokers in the Saudi population.

  9. Shared clinical decision making. A Saudi Arabian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali I. AlHaqwi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%, followed by paternalistic (28%, and informed consumerism (14%. The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04, and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04, and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008. Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes.

  10. Dry eye syndrome, posttraumatic stress disorder, and depression in an older male veteran population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Cristina A; Galor, Anat; Arheart, Kristopher L; Musselman, Dominique L; Venincasa, Vincent D; Florez, Hermes J; Lee, David J

    2013-05-01

    To evaluate whether veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or depression have differences in dry eye symptoms and signs compared to a population without these conditions. Male patients aged ≥50 years with normal eyelid, conjunctival, and corneal anatomy were recruited from the Miami Veterans Affairs Eye Clinic (N = 248). We compared dry eye symptoms (determined by the Dry Eye Questionnaire 5 [DEQ5] score) to tear film indicators obtained by clinical examination (i.e., tear osmolarity, corneal staining, tear breakup time, Schirmer's, meibomian gland quality, orifice plugging, lid vascularity) between patients with PTSD or depression and those without these conditions. Student's t-tests, χ(2) analyses, and linear and logistic regressions were used to assess differences between the groups. DEQ5 scores were higher in the PTSD (mean = 13.4; standard error [SE] = 1.1; n = 22) and depression (mean = 12.0; SE = 0.8; n = 40) groups compared to the group without these conditions (mean = 9.8; SE = 0.4; n = 186; P depression groups had severe dry eye symptoms, defined as a DEQ5 score ≥ 12 (77% and 63% vs. 41%; P < 0.01 and P = 0.02, respectively). No significant differences in tear film indicators were found among the three groups. Multivariable logistic regression indicated that a PTSD diagnosis (odds ratio [OR] = 4.08; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10-15.14) and use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (OR = 2.66; 95% CI = 1.01-7.00) were significantly associated with severe symptoms. Patients with PTSD have ocular surface symptoms that are not solely explained by tear indicators. Identifying underlying conditions associated with ocular discomfort is essential to better understand the mechanisms behind ocular pain in dry eye syndrome.

  11. Demographic profile and pregnancy outcomes of adolescents and older mothers in Saudi Arabia: analysis from Riyadh Mother (RAHMA) and Baby cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayed, Amel A; Wahabi, Hayfaa; Mamdouh, Heba; Kotb, Reham; Esmaeil, Samia

    2017-09-11

    To investigate the impact of maternal age on pregnancy outcomes with special emphasis on adolescents and older mothers and to investigate the differences in demographic profile between adolescents and older mothers. This study is a secondary analysis of pregnancy outcomes of women in Riyadh Mother and Baby cohort study according to maternal age. The study population was grouped according to maternal age into five subgroups; <20, 20-29, 30-34, 35-39 and 40+years. The age group 20-29 years was considered as a reference group. Investigation of maternal age impact on maternal and neonatal outcomes was conducted with adjustment of confounders using regression models. All mothers were married when conceived with the index pregnancy. Young mothers were less likely to be illiterate, more likely to achieve higher education and be employed compared with mothers ≥ 40 years. Compared with the reference group, adolescents were more likely to have vaginal delivery (and least likely to deliver by caesarean section (CS); OR=0.6, 95% CI 0.4 to 0.9, while women ≥40 years, were more likely to deliver by CS; OR 2.9, 95% CI 2.3 to 3.7. Maternal age was a risk factor for gestational diabetes in women ≥40 years; OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.3 to 2.1. Adolescents had increased risk of preterm delivery; OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.1 and women ≥40 years had similar risk; OR, 1.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.6. Adverse pregnancy outcomes show a continuum with the advancement of maternal age. Adolescents mother are more likely to have vaginal delivery; however, they are at increased risk of preterm delivery. Advanced maternal age is associated with increased risk of preterm delivery, gestational diabetes and CS. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  12. Condom Use, Sexual Risk, and Self-Reported STI in a Sample of Older Male Clients of Heterosexual Prostitution in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milrod, Christine; Monto, Martin

    2016-07-01

    While there is evidence of increasing rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among older men in the United States, there has been little research on older male clients of female sex providers. The purpose of the current study was to understand the sexual risk behaviors and psychosocial correlates among older men hiring sex providers through provider review websites and discussion boards. A convenience sample of 208 male clients ages 60 to 84 completed online surveys about their sexual behavior and psychosocial factors. Participants indicated the most common sexual activities with providers in the past 12 months were receiving condomless fellatio (33.7%) and having penile-vaginal intercourse with a condom (31.7%). Although condomless penile-vaginal sex with a provider in the past 12 months was only reported by 2.9%, about half (51%) of the respondents indicated that they had experienced this at least once during their lifetime. This was associated with a preference for providers who do not require condoms, having been previously diagnosed with an STI, and perceiving one's HIV risk to be higher, as well as advancing age and having more emotional relationships with providers. Findings demonstrate the need for general and sexual health care practitioners to openly discuss protective measures and strategies for avoiding STIs among their older-to-elderly male patients. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Moderate sleep restriction in treated older male OSA participants: greater impairment during monotonous driving compared with controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filtness, Ashleigh J; Reyner, Louise A; Horne, James A

    2011-10-01

    To examine the effects on monotonous driving of normal sleep versus one night of sleep restriction in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treated obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients compared with age matched healthy controls. Nineteen CPAP treated compliant male OSA patients (OSA-treated patients (OPs)), aged 50-75 years, and 20 healthy age-matched controls underwent both a normal night's sleep and sleep restriction to 5h (OPs remained on CPAP) in a counterbalanced design. All participants completed a 2h afternoon monotonous drive in a realistic car simulator. Driving was monitored for sleepiness-related minor and major lane deviations, with 'safe' driving time being total time driven prior to first major lane deviation. EEGs were recorded continuously, and subjective sleepiness ratings were taken at regular intervals throughout the drive. After a normal night's sleep, OPs and controls did not differ in terms of driving performance or in their ability to assess the levels of their own sleepiness, with both groups driving 'safely' for approximately 90 min. However, after sleep restriction, OPs had a significantly shorter (65 min) safe driving time and had to apply more compensatory effort to maintain their alertness compared with controls. They also underestimated the enhanced sleepiness. Nevertheless, apart from this caveat, there were generally close associations between subjective sleepiness, likelihood of a major lane deviation and EEG changes indicative of sleepiness. With a normal night's sleep, effectively treated older men with OSA drive as safely as healthy men of the same age. However, after restricted sleep, driving impairment is worse than that of controls. This suggests that, although successful CPAP treatment can alleviate potential detrimental effects of OSA on monotonous driving following normal sleep, these patients remain more vulnerable to sleep restriction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A study of some psycho-social characteristics of blind and deaf male students in Abha City, Asir region, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfotouh, M A; Telmesani, A

    1993-07-01

    Psychosocial characteristics including depression, attitude towards their handicap, hobbies and problems of living situations have been studied among 152 male students in the Institute for the Blind (n = 44) and in the Institute for the Deaf (n = 108) in Abha City. All students were subjected to a constructed Arabic version of the rating scale 'Children Depression Inventory (CDI)'. They were categorised according to their scores on this CDI, into depressed and non-depressed. Also, an interview questionnaire was administered to collect data related to the handicap, such as age of onset, and its cause and family history of the same handicap. The effect of the handicap upon the attitudes of students in relation to their social tendencies, hobbies and problems in living situations was studied. The mean ages for blind and deaf students were 15.70 and 13.04 years respectively. About 91.% and 75.% of blind and deaf students respectively were born with their handicap. Depression was more prevalent among the blind (14%) than among the deaf (6.5%) students. Difficulty in mobility was the main problem among blind students (44%) while difficulty in communication with people was the main problem among the deaf (52%). Reading was the commonest hobby for the blind (51%), while playing football was the commonest among the deaf (62%). This information should be considered when planning for rehabilitative services for these groups.

  15. Report of Bufo tihamicus karyotype from Saudi Arabia | Al-Shehri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study gives a description of the Karyotype of the Tihama toad Bufo tihamicus from Saudi Arabia. Samples of males and females of Bufo tihamicus Parker were collected from Gazan Province of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The karyotype consists of a diploid number 2n = 22 and the fundamental number NF = 44 in both of ...

  16. Saudi Elementary School Science Teachers' Beliefs: Teaching Science in the New Millennium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Amani K. Hamdan; Al-Salouli, Misfer Saud

    2013-01-01

    This study explored Saudi elementary school science teachers' beliefs about the process of teaching and learning science. This involved the exploration of their views about the new Saudi science curriculum, which emphasizes critical thinking and problem solving. Comprehensive interviews were held in 8 schools with 4 male and 6 female--2 of whom…

  17. Validity and reliability of an Arabic version of the state-trait anxiety inventory in a Saudi dental setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Maha A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To test the psychometric properties of an adapted Arabic version of the state trait anxiety-form Y (STAI-Y) in Saudi adult dental patients. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, the published Arabic version of the STAI-Y was evaluated by 2 experienced bilingual professionals for its compatibility with Saudi culture and revised prior to testing. Three hundred and eighty-seven patients attending dental clinics for treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry Hospital, King Abdullah University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, participated in the study. The Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS) and visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of anxiety were used to assess the concurrent criterion validity. Results: The Arabic version of the STAI-Y had high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach’s alpha: 0.989) for state and trait subscales. Factor analysis indicated unidimensionality of the scale. Correlations between STAI-Y scores and both MDAS and VAS scores indicated strong concurrent criterion validity. Discriminant validity was supported by the findings that higher anxiety levels were present among females as opposed to males, younger individuals as compared to older individuals, and patients who do not visit the dentist unless they have a need as opposed to more frequent visitors to the dental office. Conclusion: The Arabic version of the STAI-Y has an adequate internal consistency reliability, generally similar to that reported in the international literature, suggesting it is appropriate for assessing dental anxiety in Arabic speaking populations. PMID:27279514

  18. Validity and reliability of an Arabic version of the state-trait anxiety inventory in a Saudi dental setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Maha A

    2016-06-01

    To test the psychometric properties of an adapted Arabic version of the state trait anxiety-form Y (STAI-Y) in Saudi adult dental patients.  In this cross-sectional study, the published Arabic version of the STAI-Y was evaluated by 2 experienced bilingual professionals for its compatibility with Saudi culture and revised prior to testing. Three hundred and eighty-seven patients attending dental clinics for treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry Hospital, King Abdullah University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, participated in the study. The Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS) and visual analogue scale (VAS) ratings of anxiety were used to assess the concurrent criterion validity. The Arabic version of the STAI-Y had high internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha: 0.989) for state and trait subscales. Factor analysis indicated unidimensionality of the scale. Correlations between STAI-Y scores and both MDAS and VAS scores indicated strong concurrent criterion validity. Discriminant validity was supported by the findings that higher anxiety levels were present among females as opposed to males, younger individuals as compared to older individuals, and patients who do not visit the dentist unless they have a need as opposed to more frequent visitors to the dental office. The Arabic version of the STAI-Y has an adequate internal consistency reliability, generally similar to that reported in the international literature, suggesting it is appropriate for assessing dental anxiety in Arabic speaking populations.

  19. Extra-pulmonary tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Fawzia; El Hazmi, Malak M

    2010-01-01

    Studies from developed countries have reported that extra-pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) is on the rise due to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, similar studies from high-burden countries with low prevalence of HIV like Saudi Arabia are lacking. Therefore, we conducted this study to investigate demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis. A retrospective analysis was carried out on all patients (n=431) with a culture - proven diagnosis of tuberculosis seen at University teaching hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from January 2001 to December 2007. A total of 183 (42.5%) pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and 248 (57.5%) extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) cases were compared in terms of age, sex, and nationality. There were 372 Saudis (SA) (86.3%) and the remaining non-Saudis (NSA) 59 (13.7%). The age distribution of the PTB patients had a bimodal distribution. EPTB was more common at young age (20-29 years). The proportion of EPTB cases was significantly higher among NSA patients (72.9%) compared to SA patients (55.1%). Females had higher proportion (59.5%) of EPTB than males (55.6%). The most common site was lymph node tuberculosis (42%). In conclusion, our data suggest that EPTB was relatively common in younger age, female gender and NSA. Tuberculosis (TB) control program may target those populations for EPTB case-finding.

  20. Buying success, Saudi style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-11-01

    Oil - it is what has made Saudi Arabia rich. Without this black gold, none of the country's shopping malls, luxury hotels, six-lane highways or the airconditioned comfort that keeps the terrible heat at bay would be possible. From the first deposits harvested in the early 1950s, Saudi Arabia is now the world's leading exporter of petroleum, which accounts for nearly three-quarters of government revenue. And without the wealth from oil, the huge new King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), built on hard, desert soil in less than two years, would have been impossible.

  1. Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension among Saudi Adult Population: A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdalla A. Saeed

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study aimed at estimating prevalence, awareness, treatment, control, and predictors of hypertension among Saudi adult population. Multistage stratified sampling was used to select 4758 adult participants. Three blood pressure measurements using an automatic sphygmomanometer, sociodemographics, and antihypertensive modalities were obtained. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 25.5%. Only 44.7% of hypertensives were aware, 71.8% of them received pharmacotherapy, and only 37.0% were controlled. Awareness was significantly associated with gender, age, geographical location, occupation, and comorbidity. Applying drug treatment was significantly more among older patients, but control was significantly higher among younger patients and patients with higher level of physical activity. Significant predictors of hypertension included male gender, urbanization, low education, low physical activity, obesity, diabetes, and hypercholesterolemia. In conclusion prevalence is high, but awareness, treatment, and control levels are low indicating a need to develop a national program for prevention, early detection, and control of hypertension.

  2. Acne neonatorum in the eastern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alakloby Omar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acne neonatorum (AN is characterized by a facial eruption of inflammatory and noninflammatory acne lesions in a neonate. Hyperactivity of sebaceous glands, stimulated by neonatal androgens, is implicated in its pathogenesis. Aim: To elucidate the clinical profile of AN in eastern Saudi Arabia. Methods: All patients diagnosed with AN in King Fahd Hospital of the University in Khobar, Saudi Arabia, during the year 2005 were evaluated clinically. Results: AN was diagnosed in 26 patients (male/female ratio 1:1. The lesions included mainly facial comedones (30.8%; papules and pustules (15.3% each; and combination of papules, pustules, and cysts (53.4%. Conclusion: All patients recovered spontaneously. In 50% of the cases, one of the parents reported having had acne vulgaris during adolescence. Hereditary factors seem to play a significant role in our series.

  3. Clinical presentation of inflammatory bowel disease in Saudi children (Single centre experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Alreheili

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions: CD is the most prevalent form of IBD in Saudi children. Male predominance and a high rate of growth failure were documented in children with CD. Clinical presentation, family history, and disease localization are comparable to international data.

  4. Apology Strategies Employed by Saudi EFL Teachers

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    Marzouq Nasser Alsulayyi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the apology strategies used by 30 Saudi EFL teachers in Najran, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA, paying special attention to variables such as social distance and power and offence severity. The study also delineates gender differences in the respondents’ speech as opposed to studies that only examined speech act output by native and non-native speakers of English. To this end, the study employs a Discourse Completion Task (DCT that consists of 10 situations designed to test how the respondents would react if they imagine that they belong to different types of social status whether higher, lower or equal. In addition, social distance and power have been taken into consideration in designing the ten situations included in the test used in this study. The results reveal that Illocutionary Force Indicating Device (IFID is the most used apology strategy by the Saudi respondents followed by downgrading responsibility (DR, upgrader, offer of repair, taking on responsibility and then verbal redress. The results also reveal that gender has a great impact on the use of apology strategies in various ways. For instance, the IFID strategy and the upgrader strategy are used by males more than their female counterparts, whereas females use the DR strategy more than their male counterparts. It has been argued that some of the respondents’ answers to the test were influenced by their mother tongue, as reported in previous studies conducted on apology strategies. The study discusses the results elicited via the DCT and compares them with those of previous studies on apology strategies and other speech acts. Finally, the study concludes with recommendations for further research. Keywords: pragmatics, apology strategies, Saudi EFL teachers, interlanguage pragmatics, target culture

  5. Proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease is not associated with identifiable risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Aamer

    2010-09-01

    Renal involvement in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Proteinuria is common in patients with SCD and is a risk factor for future development of renal failure. We sought to identify risk factors, if any, associated with proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with SCD. We studied 67 patients with SCD followed-up at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All patients underwent 24-hour urine collection to measure creatinine clearance and to quantify proteinuria. In addition, blood was examined for evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Clinical information was gathered from review of the patients' charts. A urine protein level of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours was considered abnormal. Urine protein was correlated with various clinical and laboratory parameters. Thirty-one males and 36 females were evaluated. The mean age of the cohort was 23.8 (± 7.2) years. Twenty-seven patients (40.3%) had proteinuria of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours. The study group had a mean hemoglobin level of 8.5 (± 2.8) g/dL and mean fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level of 14.4% (± 7.3%). Majority of the patients (61) had hemoglobin SS genotype and six patients had S-ß⁰ thalassemia. None of the parameters evaluated correlated with proteinuria although there was a borderline association with older age and higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.073 and 0.061 respectively). Hydroxyurea use for more than a year was not beneficial. In conclusion, our study suggests that proteinuria in adult Saudi patients is not associated with any clear identifiable risk factors.

  6. Puitsillad Saudi Araabiasse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Projektbüroo AS Resandi osalusel on rajatud Saudi Araabiasse Jiddahi kaheksa puidust jalgteesilda: kuus talasilda ja kaks kaarsilda. Ideekavandi valmistab ette Risto Mäkipuro, OÜ NuvoEst. Inseneriarvutused ja silla projekt tehakse AS-s Resand (insenerid Ragnar Pabort, Alar Just). Silla detailid valmistatakse Soomes. Ill: 2 joonist, värv. foto

  7. Typology of end-of-life priorities in Saudi females: averaging analysis and Q-methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, Muhammad M; Hammami, Safa; Amer, Hala A; Khodr, Nesrine A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding culture-and sex-related end-of-life preferences is essential to provide quality end-of-life care. We have previously explored end-of-life choices in Saudi males and found important culture-related differences and that Q-methodology is useful in identifying intraculture, opinion-based groups. Here, we explore Saudi females' end-of-life choices. A volunteer sample of 68 females rank-ordered 47 opinion statements on end-of-life issues into a nine-category symmetrical distribution. The ranking scores of the statements were analyzed by averaging analysis and Q-methodology. The mean age of the females in the sample was 30.3 years (range, 19-55 years). Among them, 51% reported average religiosity, 78% reported very good health, 79% reported very good life quality, and 100% reported high-school education or more. The extreme five overall priorities were to be able to say the statement of faith, be at peace with God, die without having the body exposed, maintain dignity, and resolve all conflicts. The extreme five overall dis-priorities were to die in the hospital, die well dressed, be informed about impending death by family/friends rather than doctor, die at peak of life, and not know if one has a fatal illness. Q-methodology identified five opinion-based groups with qualitatively different characteristics: "physical and emotional privacy concerned, family caring" (younger, lower religiosity), "whole person" (higher religiosity), "pain and informational privacy concerned" (lower life quality), "decisional privacy concerned" (older, higher life quality), and "life quantity concerned, family dependent" (high life quality, low life satisfaction). Out of the extreme 14 priorities/dis-priorities for each group, 21%-50% were not represented among the extreme 20 priorities/dis-priorities for the entire sample. Consistent with the previously reported findings in Saudi males, transcendence and dying in the hospital were the extreme end-of-life priority and dis

  8. Health-enhancing physical activity among Saudi adults using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2007-01-01

    To describe the physical activity profile of Saudi adults living in Riyadh, using the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) short-version telephone format. Physical activity was assessed using the official Arabic short form of IPAQ, intended for use in telephone interview. The instrument asks for times spent in walking, moderate- and vigorous-intensity physical activity of at least 10 min duration. The sample consisted of 1616 Saudis, between 15 and 78 years of age, living in Riyadh. Participants were drawn from a list of names in the telephone book using a simple random method. Telephone interviews were administered during the spring of 2003 by trained male interviewers. The final sample size was 1064 Saudi males and females (response rate of 66%), with males comprising about 66% of the respondents. Over 43% of Saudis did not participate in any type of moderate-intensity physical activity lasting for at least 10 min. More than 72% of the sample did not engage in any type of vigorous-intensity physical activity lasting for at least 10 min. The proportion of Saudis who walked for 150 min or more per week was 33.3%. Females were engaged more in moderate physical activity than males, whereas males participated more in vigorous activity compared with females. Activity levels did not show significant relationships with education level or job hours per week. Based on the three activity categories established by IPAQ, 40.6% of Saudis were inactive, 34.3% were minimally active and 25.1% were physically active. Physical inactivity increased with advancing age. The data suggest that the prevalence of physical inactivity among Saudis adults is relatively high. Efforts are needed to encourage Saudis to be more physically active, with the goal of increasing the proportion of Saudis engaging in health-enhancing physical activity.

  9. Serum uric acid is associated with lumbar spine bone mineral density in healthy Chinese males older than 50 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing; Chen, Weijun; Feng, Xinhui; Liu, Wenyi; Zhang, Zhenxing; He, Li; Ye, Zhibin

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the association of serum uric acid (UA) levels with bone mineral density (BMD) at all skeletal sites in healthy Chinese males >50 years of age. A cross-sectional study of 385 Chinese males >50 years of age who underwent health checkup in Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University in Shanghai, China, was conducted. Clinical and bone characteristics were compared in different UA tertiles (UA1: UA 50 years that serum UA levels are positively correlated with lumbar spine BMD and T-values, suggesting that UA may exert protective effect on bone density at the lumbar spine in Chinese males >50 years of age.

  10. Metacognitive Listening Strategies Used by Saudi EFL Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhaison, Eid

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the metacognitive listening strategies among Saudi EFL medical students. The participants were 104 males and females, randomly selected to fill in the Metacognitive Awareness Listening Questionnaire (MALQ), developed and validated Vandergrift Goh, Mareschal, and Tafaghodtari (2006). The results revealed that…

  11. Quality of life in Saudi vitiligo patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luluah Al-Mubarak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Vitiligo has a devastating psychosocial effect. The cultural traditions of Saudi society are quite different compared with the western world. Hence, a quality of life study using a different questionnaire suitable to the cultural traditions of the society is necessary to measure qualify of life in vitiligo patients. Objective : This study was conducted to assess the quality of life (QOL in Saudi vitiligo patients and their family. Materials and Methods : A prospective cross-sectional study at National Center for Vitiligo and Psoriasis, Saudi Arabia. A validated Arabic questionnaire of 41 questions was developed and utilized specifically for this study. Arabic language instrument was distributed to 260 vitiligo patients. Scores were compared in relation to demographic, clinical, and social variables in 4 dimensions of scale (relationship with colleagues, family relationship, social relationship, and self respect. Results : Overall score QOL was 17.1. Mean score for males was 11.1, whereas that for females was 23.9 (P < 0.05. Females scored significantly higher in all the 4 dimensions. Patients with exposed disease lesions scored significantly higher than those with unexposed lesions 5 vs 3.4 (P < 0.05. Conclusion : The overall score of QOL in vitiligo is relatively high, indicating a negative impact of the disease on QOL. QOL in women is significantly more affected than in men.

  12. Disparities in HIV and syphilis prevalence and risk factors between older male clients with and without steady sex partners in southwestern rural China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; His, Jenny H; Wu, Xinghua; Shen, Zhiyong; Lu, Huaxiang; Chen, Huanhuan; Huang, Hui; Zhang, Heng; Ruan, Yuhua; Shao, Yiming; Tang, Zhenzhu

    2017-04-12

    Heterosexual intercourse accounted for 93% of reported HIV cases in Guangxi, and Guangxi had 10% of China's total number of reported HIV cases. Older men are particularly vulnerable to STIs, for example, 46% of Guangxi's HIV cases were men over 50 years of age. As this is an under-studied population in China, effective prevention and control policies have yet to be developed. Thus, the aim of this study was to use a large-scale cross-sectional survey to understand the demographic and behavior factors associated with HIV and syphilis infections among older male clients of female sex workers (FSWs) in a high epidemic area of rural Guangxi, China. A large-scale cross-sectional survey was conducted in 2012 among older male clients of FSWs in low-cost commercial sex venues. Questionnaire interviews were administered to collect sociodemographic and sexual behavior information. Blood samples were collected for HIV and syphilis infection tests. Of the 3485 participants, 2509 (72.0%) clients had a steady sex partner and 976 (28.0%) clients had no steady sex partner. The overall prevalence of HIV and syphilis infection were 3.0% and 3.2%, respectively. Compared to those with a steady sex partner, clients with no steady partner had higher odds of HIV infection (AOR: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.27-2.86), syphilis infection (AOR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.02-2.30), and having factors associated with HIV or syphilis infection, including non-commercial casual sex encounters in last month (AOR: 3.29, 95% CI: 2.42-4.46), >10 years of commercial sex history (AOR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.12-1.53), >2 incidents of commercial sex in last month (AOR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.19-1.96), and aphrodisiac use in last month (AOR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.16-1.70). Clients with no steady partner had lower odds of having heterosexual intercourse (AOR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.56-0.79), awareness and knowledge of HIV/AIDS (AOR: 0.75, 95% CI: 0.64-0.88), and having had HIV tests (AOR: 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44-0.98). Older male clients of low

  13. Co-occurrence of antisocial behavior and substance use: testing for sex differences in the impact of older male friends, low parental knowledge and friends' delinquency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, Tom A; Salekin, Randall T; Marti, C Nathan; Lester, Whiney S; Barker, Edward D

    2014-04-01

    Delinquency and substance use (SU) are commonly comorbid during adolescence. In the present study we investigate this co-morbidity with 3 main objectives: 1. Evaluate reciprocal relationships between delinquency/SU across early adolescence. 2. Assess the impact of older male friends, low parental knowledge and friends' delinquency on subsequent development and inter-relationships of delinquency and SU. 3. Evaluate sex differences in these relationships. We applied cross-lagged structural equation models to the analysis of a longitudinal sample (n=3699). Findings demonstrated: (1) At ages 13-14 delinquency predicted SU more so than vice versa but effects became equal between ages 14 and 15. (2) Low parental knowledge and friends' delinquency predicted delinquency and SU. Older male friends predicted ASB. (3) Sex differences were present. For example, in the absence of antisocial friends low parent knowledge at age 12 indirectly predicted increased age 15 SU for girls more than boys. Copyright © 2014 The Foundation for Professionals in Services for Adolescents. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. 30. Cardiovascular risk factors burden in Saudi Arabia: The africa middle east cardiovascular epidemiological (ace study

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    A. Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Limited data exit on the epidemiology of cardiovascular risk factors in Saudi Arabia particularly in relation to the differences between local citizens and expatriates. The aim of this analysis is to describe the current prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among patients attending general practice clinics in Saudi Arabia. In a cross- sectional epidemiological study, the presence of cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidaemia, obesity, smoking, and abdominal obesity was evaluated in stable adult outpatients attending primary care clinics in Saudi Arabia. Groups comparison were made between local Saudi patients and expatriates. A total of 550 participant were enrolled form different clinics in Saudi Arabia (71% were male, mean age was 43 ± 10 years. Nearly half of the study cohort had more than two cardiovascular risk factors (49.6%. Dyslipidemia had the highest prevalence (68.4%. Furthermore, prevalence of hypertension (47.5% vs. 31.4%, dyslipidaemia (75.2% vs. 55.1% and abdominal obesity (63.9% vs. 52.2% were higher among expatriates compare to Saudis (p-value < 0.001. This analysis clearly shows that there is a high prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors prevalence in Saudi population. In addition, a significant proportion of patients with risk factors have poor overall control. Programmed community based screening is needed for all cardiovascular risk factors in Saudi Arabia. Increased awareness and improved primary care services may decrease incidence of coronary artery disease and improve overall quality of life.

  15. Typology of end-of-life priorities in Saudi females: averaging analysis and Q-methodology

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    Hammami MM

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muhammad M Hammami,1,2 Safa Hammami,1 Hala A Amer,1 Nesrine A Khodr1 1Clinical Studies and Empirical Ethics Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, 2College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: Understanding culture-and sex-related end-of-life preferences is essential to provide quality end-of-life care. We have previously explored end-of-life choices in Saudi males and found important culture-related differences and that Q-methodology is useful in identifying intraculture, opinion-based groups. Here, we explore Saudi females’ end-of-life choices.Methods: A volunteer sample of 68 females rank-ordered 47 opinion statements on end-of-life issues into a nine-category symmetrical distribution. The ranking scores of the statements were analyzed by averaging analysis and Q-methodology.Results: The mean age of the females in the sample was 30.3 years (range, 19–55 years. Among them, 51% reported average religiosity, 78% reported very good health, 79% reported very good life quality, and 100% reported high-school education or more. The extreme five overall priorities were to be able to say the statement of faith, be at peace with God, die without having the body exposed, maintain dignity, and resolve all conflicts. The extreme five overall dis-priorities were to die in the hospital, die well dressed, be informed about impending death by family/friends rather than doctor, die at peak of life, and not know if one has a fatal illness. Q-methodology identified five opinion-based groups with qualitatively different characteristics: “physical and emotional privacy concerned, family caring” (younger, lower religiosity, “whole person” (higher religiosity, “pain and informational privacy concerned” (lower life quality, “decisional privacy concerned” (older, higher life quality, and “life quantity concerned, family dependent” (high life quality, low life satisfaction. Out of the

  16. Factors affecting Saudi hemodialysis patients' perception of healthcare providers' empathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Onazi, Mariam; Al Jondeby, Mohamed; Azeem, Mubashar; Al Sayyari, Abdulla

    2011-05-01

    We aimed to assess the empathy level of healthcare providers as perceived by hemodialysis (HD) patients and its determinants. This survey included 100 hemodialysis patients from two major dialysis units in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (Units A and B). Patients were asked to score their perception of empathy by health care providers in 13 areas using 1 to 5 Likert Scale. Unit "A" contained more patients with diabetic nephropathy than unit "A". Unit "B" contained a higher number of native Arabic speaking nurses and its patients had longer mean duration on dialysis compared to unit "A". The overall score given for doctors empathy was 81.6% (84.5% for Unit "A" doctors and 78.8% for Unit "B" doctors (P=0.01). The overall score given for nurses empathy was 73.6% (76.2% for Unit "A" nurses and 70.9% for Unit "B" nurses (P=0.002). Female patients' perception of empathy was significantly greater than male patients in 8 out of 13 questions. Older patients gave higher score than younger patients. Patients with lower educational level perceived higher empathy levels than patients with higher education. Significantly lower scores were given by patients who received their dialysis treatment at night. We observed no differences in scores in relation to patients' duration on dialysis, diabetic status or Charlson Co-morbidity Index (CCI). Empathy goes beyond the language barrier. Patients dialyzed in evening shifts perceive less empathy from healthcare workers. The higher scores given by older, female and less educated patients might simply reflect their lower expectation of empathy.

  17. Circulating biologically active oxidized phospholipids show on-going and increased oxidative stress in older male mice

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    Jinbo Liu

    2013-01-01

    Significance: Oxidatively modified phospholipids are increased in the circulation during common, mild oxidant stresses of aging, or in male compared to female animals. Turnover of these biologically active phospholipids by rapid transport into liver and kidney is unchanged, so circulating levels reflect continuously increased production.

  18. Saudi Children's Thoughts on Inclusive Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Lynn; Nowicki, Elizabeth; Felimban, Huda

    2017-01-01

    Saudi Arabia has followed the global trend towards inclusive education; however, few researchers have examined the lived reality of inclusion in Saudi schools. In this study, we interviewed 31 girls and 34 boys in grades 5 and 6 who attended an inclusive school in Saudi. The overarching research question was, "How do Saudi children perceive…

  19. Influence of Family on Saudi Arabian Emergency Medical Services Students

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    William Leggio

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify influences on learning for Saudi male students studying Emergency Medical Services at a college in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Previous research on influences on student learning in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia focused on the historical development of education in Saudi Arabia, English language development, and intrinsic motivations of students and excluded a focus on students studying Emergency Medical Services. Methods: Exploratory sequential mixed-methods study was deployed. Results: Family support was an exceptionally strong predictor of student confidence in both skills and post-graduate EMS employment. Concepts involving application, memorization, motivation, and English language did not present as statically significant. The discovery of the strong influences that a family can have on Saudi EMS student’s confidence is noteworthy, as this was not previously discovered in the literature. Conclusion: This discovery holds practical implications for EMS education and training programs as emphasizes the importance of developing practical ways to include a student’s family as a source of support in ensuring student success and confidence.

  20. Puberty Onset among Boys in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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    Ibrahim Al Alwan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The ages of onset of pubertal characteristics are influenced by genetic, geographic, dietary and socioeconomic factors; however, due to lack of country-specific norms, clinicians in Saudi Arabia use Western estimates as standards of reference for local children. Aims The aim of the Riyadh Puberty Study was to provide data on pubertal development to determine the average age of onset of pubertal characteristics among Saudi boys. Methods Cross-sectional study among male school children in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2006, 542 schoolboys, aged 6 to 16 years old, from diverse socioeconomic levels were selected into the sample using a cluster sample design. Tanner stages were ascertained during physical examination by pediatric endocrine consultants, and also trained pediatric residents and fellows. Results The mean age (standard deviation at Tanner Stages 2, 3, 4, and 5 for pubic hair development of Saudi boys was 11.4 (1.6, 13.3 (1.3, 14.4 (1.0 and 15.1 (0.8 years old, respectively. For gonadal development, the mean age (standard deviation at stages 2, 3, 4, and 5 were 11.4 (1.5, 13.3 (1.2, 14.3 (1.1 and 15.0 (0.9 years old, respectively. Conclusion The ages of onset of pubertal characteristics, based on gonadal development, among Saudi boys are comparable to those reported in Western populations.

  1. Sources of Stress among Parents of Children with Intellectual Disabilities: A Preliminary Investigation in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldosari, Mubarak S.; Pufpaff, Lisa A.

    2014-01-01

    This study identified differences in sources of stress between parents of male children with intellectual disabilities in Saudi Arabia. Seventeen pairs of parents completed the Parent Stress Index (Abidin, 1995). Each pair of parents had a male child diagnosed with intellectual disability who either attended an institute for male children with…

  2. Technology Leadership in Saudi Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alenezi, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    This paper demonstrates the potential of Saudi schools for technology leadership provided by Learning Resource Centres (LRCs) to enhance the formation of a technology-motivated educational environment. Using the grounded theory methodology and the CBAM stages of concern and levels of use this study sheds light on Saudi LRCs and their leadership…

  3. Adult Education in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Tim D.; Algren, Mark S.

    Religion pervades all aspects of Saudi Arabia, the conservative home of Islam, where the constitution is the Quran and law is interpreted by religious scholars. A formal adult basic education program was initiated in 1960. As part of the country's modernization since the early 1970s, the Saudi government has begun an enormous nation-building plan…

  4. Women's Education in Saudi Arabia

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    Alsuwaida, Nouf

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the historical, political, ideological (value), and government policies of women's education in Saudi Arabia implicated within teaching and learning, how women's higher education has changed over time in the realm of Saudi cultural traditions and religious norms. It also highlights the golden era of women's higher education.…

  5. Public awareness of blood donation in Central Saudi Arabia

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    Abolfotouh MA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1,2 Mohammed H Al-Assiri,1 Manar Al-Omani,2 Alwaleed Al Johar,3 Abdulaziz Al Hakbani,3 Ahmed S Alaskar1,2 1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, 2King Saud bin-Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, 3College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: In Saudi Arabia, voluntary donors are the only source of blood donation. The aim of this study was to assess the level of public knowledge and attitude toward blood donation in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Using a previously validated questionnaire that comprises 38 questions to assess the levels of knowledge, attitudes, and motivations towards blood donation, 469 Saudi adults who attended different shopping malls in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were surveyed. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify the significant predictors of blood donation, with the significance set at P<0.05. Results: Approximately half of all subjects (53.3% reported that they had previously donated blood, 39% of whom had donated more than once. The knowledge percentage mean score was 58.07%, denoting a poor level of knowledge, with only 11.9% reporting a good level of knowledge. The attitude percentage mean score towards donation was 75.45%, reflecting a neutral attitude towards donating blood, with 31.6% reporting a positive attitude. Donation was significantly more prevalent among males than females (66% versus 13.3%; P<0.001. After adjustment for confounders, a higher knowledge score (t=2.59; P=0.01, a higher attitude score (t=3.26; P=0.001, and male sex (t=10.45; P<0.001 were significant predictors of blood donation. An inability to reach the blood donation centers and a fear of anemia were the main reasons for females not donating blood (49.9% and 35.7%, respectively, whereas a lack of time was the main reason for males (59.5%. Conclusion: Prevalence of blood donation was less than satisfactory among the Saudi public, probably due to misconceptions, poor

  6. Serum uric acid is associated with lumbar spine bone mineral density in healthy Chinese males older than 50 years

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    Xiao J

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Jing Xiao, Weijun Chen, Xinhui Feng, Wenyi Liu, Zhenxing Zhang, Li He, Zhibin Ye Department of Nephrology, Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Objectives: We aimed to investigate the association of serum uric acid (UA levels with bone mineral density (BMD at all skeletal sites in healthy Chinese males >50 years of age. Methods: A cross-sectional study of 385 Chinese males >50 years of age who underwent health checkup in Huadong Hospital Affiliated to Fudan University in Shanghai, China, was conducted. Clinical and bone characteristics were compared in different UA tertiles (UA1: UA <4.7 mg/dL, UA2: 4.7 mg/dL ≤ UA <6 mg/dL and UA3: UA ≥6 mg/dL. Pearson correlation and multiple regression analysis were used to study the correlation of UA with BMD at various skeletal sites. Results: Serum UA levels were positively associated with higher BMD and T-values at the lumbar spine, but not at other skeletal sites, after adjusting for multiple confounding factors. Lumbar spine BMD; the T- and Z-values at the lumbar spine, total hip and femoral neck; as well as intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH levels are higher in the highest tertile of UA than in the second tertile of UA. Conclusion: Our results provide epidemiological evidence in Chinese Han males aged >50 years that serum UA levels are positively correlated with lumbar spine BMD and T-values, suggesting that UA may exert protective effect on bone density at the lumbar spine in Chinese males >50 years of age. Keywords: T-value, Z-value, parathyroid hormone, bone turnover marker

  7. Anthropometric and lifestyle characteristics of active and inactive Saudi and British adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Michael J; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M; Al-Nakeeb, Yahya; Al-Sobayel, Hana I; Abahussain, Nada A; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O; Lyons, Mark; Collins, Peter; Nevill, Alan

    2014-01-01

    To compare the anthropometric and lifestyle characteristics of active and inactive adolescents in Saudi Arabia and Britain. A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted at four cities in Saudi Arabia (Riyadh and Al-Khobar; N = 1,648) and Britain (Birmingham and Coventry; N = 1,158). The participants (14- to 18-year-olds) were randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster sampling. Measurements included anthropometric [BMI, Waist circumference (WC), Waist to height ratio], screen time, validated physical activity questionnaire and dietary habits. British males were lighter (P = 0.04, 64.4 vs. 68.2 kg), and had lower values for WC (P = 0.003, 77.1 vs. 78.7 cm) than Saudi males. Males (P = 0.0001) were significantly more active than females but the difference between inactive Saudi and British females was greater than that between inactive Saudi and British males. Being female was significantly (P crosscultural differences and similarities in lifestyle habits in adolescents from Britain and Saudi Arabia. Activity status (active vs. inactive) appears to play an important role in other lifestyle related behaviors, with active adolescent more likely to engage in healthy dietary behavior than their inactive peers, irrespective of country of origin. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Recalled sexual experiences in childhood with older partners: a study of Brazilian men who have sex with men and male-to-female transgender persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Balan, Ivan; Dolezal, Curtis; Mello, Maeve B

    2012-04-01

    This study assessed the prevalence of recalled childhood sexual experiences with an older partner among men who have sex with men (MSM) and/or male-to-female transgender persons recruited in Campinas, Brazil. It also analyzed associations between such recalled experiences and sexual risk behavior in adulthood. Participants recruited using respondent driven sampling completed a self-administered, computer-based questionnaire, and underwent HIV testing. For data analysis, raw scores were weighted based on participants' reported network size. Of 575 participants (85% men and 15% transgender), 32% reported childhood sexual experiences with an older partner. Mean age at first experience was 9 years, partners being, on average, 19 years old, and mostly men. Most frequent behaviors were partners exposing their genitals, mutual fondling, child masturbating partner, child performing oral sex on partner, and child being anally penetrated. Only 29% of the participants who had had such childhood sexual experiences considered it abuse; 57% reported liking, 29% being indifferent and only 14% not liking the sexual experience at the time it happened. Transgender participants were significantly more likely to report such experiences and, compared with men, had less negative feelings about the experience at the time of the interview. No significant associations were found between sexual experiences in childhood and unprotected receptive or insertive anal intercourse in adulthood. Results highlight the importance of assessing participants' perception of abuse, regardless of researchers' pre-determined criteria to identify abuse. MSM and transgender people may experience childhood sexual experiences with older partners differently from other populations (e.g., heterosexuals), particularly in countries with different cultural norms concerning sexuality than those prevalent in Europe and the U.S.

  9. The factors driving online shopping in Saudi Arabia: Gender differences and behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Al-maghrabi, T.; Dennis, C.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose — This study proposes a revised technology acceptance model that integrates expectation confirmation theory to measure gender differences with regard to continuance online shopping intentions in Saudi Arabia. Design/Methodology — The 465-respondent sample consists of 68.8% women and 31.4% men. A structural equation model confirms model fit. Findings — Perceived usefulness, enjoyment, and subjective norms are determinants of online shopping continuance in Saudi Arabia. Both male...

  10. Nocturnal Hypoxemia is Associated With Low Testosterone Levels in Overweight Males and Older Men With Normal Weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Alonço; Daflon, Ana Carolina; Couto, Arnaldo; Neves, Denise; de Araujo-Melo, Maria Helena; Capasso, Robson

    2017-12-15

    The relationship among obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), body mass index (BMI), and testosterone levels has long been suggested. Obese men have shown a negative correlation between testosterone level and sleep apnea severity. Yet, little is known about the association between testosterone levels and sleep apnea in men who are not obese. This study evaluated the association between the total testosterone (TT) level and OSA in patients who are not obese. A retrospective review of 523 records of patients in whom OSA was diagnosed from 2013-2016 was performed. The study included men with a BMI sleep study. In all, 153 nonobese men met inclusion criteria, of whom 47 (30.7%) had testosterone levels below the reference values; 44 of these individuals (93.6%) were overweight (P = .029). Reduced testosterone levels showed significant correlations with the oxygen desaturation index, the lowest oxygen saturation sleep duration, after adjusting for BMI. Among patients with normal weight, only 3 who had O2 nadir weight individuals older than 50 years.

  11. Fruit and vegetable consumption among adults in Saudi Arabia, 2013

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    El Bcheraoui C

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Charbel El Bcheraoui,1 Mohammed Basulaiman,2 Mohammad A AlMazroa,2 Marwa Tuffaha,1 Farah Daoud,1 Shelley Wilson,1 Mohammad Y Al Saeedi,2 Faisal M Alanazi,2 Mohamed E Ibrahim,2 Elawad M Ahmed,2 Syed A Hussain,2 Riad M Salloum,2 Omer Abid,2 Mishal F Al-Dossary,2 Ziad A Memish,2 Abdullah A Al Rabeeah,2 Ali H Mokdad1 1Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; 2Ministry of Health of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: Dietary risks were the leading risk factors for death worldwide in 2010. However, current national estimates on fruit and vegetable consumption in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA are nonexistent. We conducted a large household survey to inform the Saudi Ministry of Health (MOH on a major modifiable risk factor: daily consumption of fruits and vegetables. Methods: The Saudi Health Interview Survey is a national multistage survey of individuals aged 15 years or older. It includes questions on sociodemographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, diet, physical activity, health care utilization, different health-related behaviors, and self-reported chronic conditions. We used a backward elimination multivariate logistic regression model to measure association between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC-recommended daily consumption of fruits and vegetables and different factors. Results: Between April and June 2013, a total of 10,735 participants completed the survey. Overall, 2.6% of Saudis aged 15 years or older met the CDC guidelines for daily consumption of fruits and vegetables. The likelihood of meeting the CDC guidelines increased with age; among women; among persons who graduated from elementary or high school or had a higher education; among residents of Makkah, Al Sharqia, Ha’il, or Jizan; among those who consumed at least two servings of meat or chicken per day; among those who visited a health care facility for a routine medical exam

  12. Physical activity, sedentary behaviors and dietary habits among Saudi adolescents relative to age, gender and region

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    Al-Hazzaa Hazzaa M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few lifestyle factors have been simultaneously studied and reported for Saudi adolescents. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to report on the prevalence of physical activity, sedentary behaviors and dietary habits among Saudi adolescents and to examine the interrelationships among these factors using representative samples drawn from three major cities in Saudi Arabia. Methods This school-based cross-sectional study was conducted during the years 2009-2010 in three cities: Al-Khobar, Jeddah and Riyadh. The participants were 2908 secondary-school males (1401 and females (1507 aged 14-19 years, randomly selected using a multistage stratified sampling technique. Measurements included weight, height, sedentary behaviors (TV viewing, playing video games and computer use, physical activity using a validated questionnaire and dietary habits. Results A very high proportion (84% for males and 91.2% for females of Saudi adolescents spent more than 2 hours on screen time daily and almost half of the males and three-quarters of the females did not meet daily physical activity guidelines. The majority of adolescents did not have a daily intake of breakfast, fruit, vegetables and milk. Females were significantly (p p p p Conclusions The high prevalence of sedentary behaviors, physical inactivity and unhealthy dietary habits among Saudi adolescents is a major public health concern. There is an urgent need for national policy promoting active living and healthy eating and reducing sedentary behaviors among children and adolescents in Saudi Arabia.

  13. Physical fitness and indices of lifestyle-related diseases before and after interval walking training in middle-aged and older males and females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morikawa, M; Okazaki, K; Masuki, S; Kamijo, Y; Yamazaki, T; Gen-no, H; Nose, H

    2011-03-01

    Whether increasing peak aerobic capacity for walking (VO(2peak)) by interval walking training (IWT) is closely linked with decreasing the indices of lifestyle-related diseases (LSDs) in middle-aged and older people were examined. For 4 months from April to September 2005 or 2006, 246 males and 580 females (∼65 years) performed IWT consisting of ≥5 sets of fast walking at ≥70% VO(2peak) for 3 min followed by slow walking at ≤40% VO(2peak) for 3 min ≥4 days/week. Before and after IWT, we measured VO(2peak), body mass index (BMI), %body fat, arterial blood pressure, thigh muscle strength and blood parameters. We analysed 198 males and 468 females who had undergone all the measurements both before and after IWT. To examine the hypothesis, we divided the subjects equally into three groups according to their pretraining VO(2peak): low, middle and high groups for each sex. Before training, it was found that thigh muscle strength and blood high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration were lower, whereas body weight, BMI, %body fat, arterial blood pressure and blood glucose were higher in the low group than the high group (all, pchanges were greatest in the low group for both sexes. VO(2peak) at baseline and changes in response to training were closely linked with indices of LSDs.

  14. Short-term testosterone manipulations do not affect cognition or motor function but differentially modulate emotions in young and older male rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Brian; Maguire-Herring, Vanessa; Rose, Christian M; Gore, Heather E; Ferrigno, Stephen; Novak, Melinda A; Lacreuse, Agnès

    2014-11-01

    Human aging is characterized by declines in cognition and fine motor function as well as improved emotional regulation. In men, declining levels of testosterone (T) with age have been implicated in the development of these age-related changes. However, studies examining the effects of T replacement on cognition, emotion and fine motor function in older men have not provided consistent results. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are excellent models for human cognitive aging and may provide novel insights on this issue. We tested 10 aged intact male rhesus monkeys (mean age=19, range 15-25) on a battery of cognitive, motor and emotional tasks at baseline and under low or high T experimental conditions. Their performance was compared to that of 6 young males previously tested in the same paradigm (Lacreuse et al., 2009; Lacreuse et al., 2010). Following a 4-week baseline testing period, monkeys were treated with a gonadotropin releasing hormone agonist (Depot Lupron, 200 μg/kg) to suppress endogenous T and were tested on the task battery under a 4-week high T condition (injection of Lupron+T enanthate, 20 mg/kg, n=8) or 4-week low T condition (injection of Lupron+oil vehicle, n=8) before crossing over to the opposite treatment. The cognitive tasks consisted of the Delayed Non-Matching-to-Sample (DNMS), the Delayed Response (DR), and the Delayed Recognition Span Test (spatial-DRST). The emotional tasks included an object Approach-Avoidance task and a task in which monkeys were played videos of unfamiliar conspecifics in different emotional context (Social Playbacks). The fine motor task was the Lifesaver task that required monkeys to remove a Lifesaver candy from rods of different complexity. T manipulations did not significantly affect visual recognition memory, working memory, reference memory or fine motor function at any age. In the Approach-Avoidance task, older monkeys, but not younger monkeys, spent more time in proximity of novel objects in the high T condition

  15. Pharmacovigilance system in Saudi Arabia

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    Thamir M. Alshammari

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pharmacovigilance plays an important role in ensuring that patients are receiving safe drugs. In Saudi Arabia, Saudi Food and Drug Authority, health institutions, marketing authorization holders and healthcare professional are involved in pharmacovigilance activities regardless of the level of the involvement. Although pharmacovigilance is well established in developed nations and it is considered a new concept in Saudi Arabia. It is a collective effort from various stakeholders to make pharmacovigilance successful toward promoting safe and effective use of medicines among the population. However, the practice of pharmacovigilance still needs more attention especially from marketing authorization holders and healthcare professionals. The aim of this review was to describe the current situation of pharmacovigilance in Saudi Arabia and the activities that have been conducted by the stakeholders.

  16. The characteristics and distribution of dentist workforce in Saudi Arabia: A descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlBaker, Abdulaziz A; Al-Ruthia, Yazed Sulaiman H; AlShehri, Mohammed; Alshuwairikh, Samar

    2017-12-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has shown steady growth in the dental workforce over the last 20 years. Although the number of dental colleges has significantly increased in the last decade, there is not any study so far that described the status of the licensed dentist workforce in the kingdom. The present study aimed to explore the demographic distribution and professional characteristics of licensed dentist workforce in Saudi Arabia. This was a descriptive cross-sectional study using the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties (SCFHS) database to identify the number of licensed dentists in Saudi Arabia as well as their professional and demographic characteristics as of December 2016. The data was categorized based on gender, nationality, dental specialty, health sector, geographic location, and professional rank. The number of licensed dentists working in the kingdom as of December 2016 was 16887 dentists, and the vast majority of them are professionally registered as general dentists (70.27%). The percentage of general dentists among the professionally registered female dentists is significantly higher than their male counterparts (79.71% vs. 64.80%; P dentists working in the kingdom are Saudi. Most of the dentist workforce in the kingdom are male (61.06%). The mean age of the Saudi dentists is slightly but significantly younger than non-Saudi dentists (37.7 vs. 40.7 years; P dentists are working in the regions of Riyadh, Makkah, and Eastern province. About 66% of the Saudi dentists are working in the public health sector in comparison to only 20.46% of the non-Saudi dentists (P dentists in both private and public health sectors. With the rising unemployment rate among Saudi dentists, the governmental bodies that are responsible of dental labor market regulations such as the ministries of health, economy and planning, and labor should come up with a policy to gradually but carefully replace the non-Saudi dentists in both public and private sectors with Saudi

  17. Diet in Saudi Arabia: findings from a nationally representative survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; El Bcheraoui, Charbel; Afshin, Ashkan; Daoud, Farah; AlMazroa, Mohammad A; Al Saeedi, Mohammad; Basulaiman, Mohammed; Memish, Ziad A; Al Rabeeah, Abdullah A; Mokdad, Ali H

    2017-04-01

    No recent original studies on the pattern of diet are available for Saudi Arabia at the national level. The present study was performed to describe the consumption of foods and beverages by Saudi adults. The Saudi Health Interview Survey (SHIS) was conducted in 2013. Data were collected through interviews and anthropometric measurements were done. A diet history questionnaire was used to determine the amount of consumption for eighteen food or beverage items in a typical week. The study was a household survey in all thirteen administrative regions of Saudi Arabia. Participants were 10 735 individuals aged 15 years or older. Mean daily consumption was 70·9 (se 1·3) g for fruits, 111·1 (se 2·0) g for vegetables, 11·6 (se 0·3) g for dark fish, 13·8 (se 0·3) g for other fish, 44·2 (se 0·7) g for red meat, 4·8 (se 0·2) g for processed meat, 10·9 (se 0·3) g for nuts, 219·4 (se 5·1) ml for milk and 115·5 (se 2·6) ml for sugar-sweetened beverages. Dietary guideline recommendations were met by only 5·2 % of individuals for fruits, 7·5 % for vegetables, 31·4 % for nuts and 44·7 % for fish. The consumption of processed foods and sugar-sweetened beverages was high in young adults. Only a small percentage of the Saudi population met the dietary recommendations. Programmes to improve dietary behaviours are urgently needed to reduce the current and future burden of disease. The promotion of healthy diets should target both the general population and specific high-risk groups. Regular assessments of dietary status are needed to monitor trends and inform interventions.

  18. Radon in Saudi houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Jarallah, M.I.

    1986-01-01

    A total of 637 passive radon dosemeters (CR-39 nuclear track detectors in a closed chamber) were used in a survey in 400 houses in Saudi Arabia. The radon concentration was found to vary from 5 to 36 Bq.m/sup -3/ (0.13 to 0.98 pCi.l/sup -1/) with a mean of 16 Bq.m/sup -3/ (0.43 pCi.l/sup -1/). The unoccupied houses showed a concentration of 29+-7 Bq.m/sup -3/ (0.78+-0.19 pCi.l/sup -1/) double that of the occupied houses, 14+-1 Bq.m/sup -3/ (0.39+-0.02 pCi.l/sup -1/), in the same area. The radon daughter concentration measured with a Working Level monitor in 17 unoccupied houses was found to vary from 1.35x10/sup -3/ to 24x10/sup -3/ WL with an average of 6.9+-1.4x10/sup -3/ WL. The average exhalation rate measured in 37 houses by 95 passive detectors in cans sealed to the walls ranged from 0.013 to 0.044 Bq.m/sup -2/.h/sup -1/(0.35 to 1.2 pCi.m/sup -2/.h/sup -1/) with an average of 0.021+-0.003 Bq.m/sup -2/.h/sup -1/(0.56+-0.09 pCi.m/sup -2/.h/sup -1/). This survey is the first in Saudi Arabia (a hot climate) and can usefully be compared with similar surveys in countries with cold climates.

  19. Bullying among medical students in a Saudi medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Hasan Ali

    2012-07-02

    Bullying and sexual harassment of medical students by their teachers appears to be widespread phenomenon. However, nothing is published about its prevalence in conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia. This survey aims to ascertain the extent of these mistreatments among students in a Saudi medical school. A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a group of 542 clinical years' medical students in a Saudi medical school to explore students' perceptions of their educational environment including exposure to different kinds of bullying. Bullying was defined as "a "persistent behaviour against a medical student that is intimidating, degrading, offensive or malicious and undermines the confidence and self- esteem of the recipient". Results revealed that more than one quarter (28.0%) of the surveyed students reported exposure to some sort of bullying during their clinical. Ninety percent of the reported insults were verbal, 6% sexual and 4% physical. Males were more exposed but difference was not statistically significant. Bullying among Saudi medical students is an existing problem. A policy against bullying and harassment should be adopted in all of medical colleges to monitor this phenomenon and support students who have been bullied.

  20. Bullying among medical students in a Saudi medical school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alzahrani Hasan

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bullying and sexual harassment of medical students by their teachers appears to be widespread phenomenon. However, nothing is published about its prevalence in conservative countries such as Saudi Arabia. This survey aims to ascertain the extent of these mistreatments among students in a Saudi medical school. Findings A cross-sectional questionnaire survey was conducted on a group of 542 clinical years’ medical students in a Saudi medical school to explore students' perceptions of their educational environment including exposure to different kinds of bullying. Bullying was defined as “a “persistent behaviour against a medical student that is intimidating, degrading, offensive or malicious and undermines the confidence and self- esteem of the recipient”. Results revealed that more than one quarter (28.0% of the surveyed students reported exposure to some sort of bullying during their clinical. Ninety percent of the reported insults were verbal, 6% sexual and 4% physical. Males were more exposed but difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions Bullying among Saudi medical students is an existing problem. A policy against bullying and harassment should be adopted in all of medical colleges to monitor this phenomenon and support students who have been bullied.

  1. The demographic and clinical characteristics of leprosy in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Mohammad H; Bahammam, Salman A; Ur Rahman, Saeed; Bahnassy, Ahmed A; Hassan, Imad S; Alothman, Adel F; Alkayal, Abdulkareem M

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic disease caused by Mycobacterium leprae. Although the occurrence of leprosy has declined in Saudi Arabia, it has not yet been eradicated. To our knowledge, this descriptive retrospective study is the first to assess the clinical presentation of leprosy at the time of diagnosis in Saudi Arabia. All study subjects were leprosy patients admitted to Ibn Sina hospital, the only referral hospital for leprosy in Saudi Arabia, between January 2000 and May 2012. A total of 164 subjects, the majority of whom (65%) were between 21 and 50 years of age, were included, and the male-to-female ratio was 2.8:1. Of these 164 patients, 63% were Saudis, and 77% of all admitted patients were from the western region. Lepromatous leprosy was observed most frequently (33%), and 31% of cases had a positive history of close contact with leprosy. At the time of diagnosis, 84% of all subjects presented with skin manifestation. The prevalence of neurological deficit at the time of diagnosis was 87%. Erythema nodosum leprosum (E.N.L.) developed in only 10% of all subjects. Further studies are needed to determine the clinical characteristics pertaining to each type of leprosy in the region, and training courses in caring for and diagnosing patients with leprosy should be organized for health workers. Copyright © 2016 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Distinctiveness of Saudi Arabian EFL Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Manssour Habbash; Srinivasa Rao Idapalapati

    2016-01-01

    In view of the increasing concern among English language teachers dealing with students from Saudi Arabia, as it manifests in TESOL community discussions, about the uniqueness of Saudi Arabian EFL learners, this paper attempts to document the outcome of a study of their distinctiveness from the perspective of expatriate teachers working for PYPs (Preparatory Year Programs) in Saudi Arabia. This study examines the distinctiveness with regard to the learning attitudes of Saudi students that are...

  3. Does Saudi school furniture meet ergonomics requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Mohamed Zaki

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this research was to study the effect of adjustable imported desk and chair combinations available in the market on student performance. Six sets of chairs and tables within three different activities (reading, writing, and looking to the blackboard) were the independent variables. Evaluation of back force at 5th lumbar vertebrae and the 1st sacrum (L5/S1), subjective measures of discomfort, and the mismatch between student body dimension and classroom furniture analysis were measured. A total of 124 young male students (first through sixth-grade) participated in this experiment. The results revealed too low or too high chair and table heights relative to the students' body dimensions increased the stresses acting at L5/S1 as well as discomfort ratings. This study indicated there was a high level of body mismatch in desk-chair combinations even with the adjustable imported furniture available in the local market. Anthropometric data of Saudi students should be collected from different regions in the Kingdom and then design and development of desk-chair combinations could follow the development of a standard procedure to adapt to the needs of Saudi school children.

  4. Burden of traumatic injuries in Saudi Arabia: lessons from a major trauma registry in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghnam, Suliman; Alkelya, Muhamad; Al-Bedah, Khalid; Al-Enazi, Saleem

    2014-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia (SA), injuries are the second leading cause of death; however, little is known about their frequencies and outcomes. Trauma registries play a major role in measuring the burden on population health. This study aims to describe the population of the only hospital-based trauma registry in the country and highlight challenges and potential opportunities to improve trauma data collection and research in SA. Using data between 2001 and 2010, this retrospective study included patients from a large trauma center in Riyadh, SA. A staff nurse utilized a structured checklist to gather information on patients' demographic, physiologic, anatomic, and outcome variables. Basic descriptive statistics by age group ( 14 years) were calculated, and differences were assessed using student t and chi-square tests. In addition, the mechanism of injury and the frequency of missing data were evaluated. 10 847 patients from the trauma registry were included. Over 9% of all patients died either before or after being treated at the hospital. Patients who were older than 14 years of age (more likely to be male) sustained traffic-related injuries and died in the hospital as compared to patients who were younger than or equal to years of age. Deceased patients were severely injured as measured by injury severity score and Glasgow Coma Scale (P < .001). Overall, the most frequent type of injury was related to traffic (52.0%), followed by falls (23.4%). Missing values were mostly prevalent in traffic-related variables, such as seatbelt use (70.2%). This registry is a key step toward addressing the burden of injuries in SA. Improved injury classification using the International Classification of Disease-external cause codes may improve the quality of the registry and allow comparison with other populations. Most importantly, injury prevention in SA requires further investment in data collection and research to improve outcomes.

  5. Saudi Arabian Women Dispel Myths and Stereotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanley, Delinda C

    2001-01-01

    ..., "Brilliant Saudi Woman Breaks the Stereotype." It soon dawned on me, however, that it's the Western stereotype of the veiled Saudi woman hidden away from modern-day opportunities that needs to change. No one I met felt oppressed or excluded. On the contrary, every woman I interviewed personified the fact that many Saudi women have received...

  6. Attitudes of Saudi medical students toward the disclosure of information on cancer in eastern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M Al-Amri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the attitude of future physicians regarding the disclosure of diagnosis, prognosis, benefits, and adverse effects of therapeutic intervention if they happen to have cancer. It also examined the differences if any between regions or gender. Materials and Methods: A total of 332 medical students from University of Dammam, in the Eastern Province of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire consisted of nine questions on the attitudes to disclosure of information on cancer. This self-administered questionnaire was completed by the students in the presence of an investigator. Results: The vast majority of Saudi medical students stated that they would like to know about diagnosis of cancer (92.8% and only 7.2% wanted information withheld from them. Further, 67% of the males and 74.1% of the females wanted family members to know (P = 0.01, but one-third (33% did not want their family to know. Only 24.1% of the male and 21.1% of female students wanted their friends to know. In addition, -97% of the males and 98.8% of the females wanted to know the diagnosis, and 97% and 95.8% of females and males, respectively, would like to know the side effects of the therapy. Almost 95% of male and 93.4% of female students wanted to know the prognosis. Also, 98% of medical students from the Eastern Region would want the diagnosis of cancer to be disclosed compared to 73.6% of those from other regions (P = 0.01. There is no difference between the genders in attitudes toward the disclosure of the diagnosis, 94.6% and 92.2% (P = 0.38. Conclusions: There was a consensus among Saudi medical students on the knowledge of the benefits of treatment, adverse effects of therapy, and prognosis. Female students significantly more than males would like their families to be informed. Significantly more medical students from the Eastern Region than those from other regions would like the diagnosis of

  7. Satisfaction of trainees of Saudi Diploma Family Medicine, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaldi, Yahia M; AlDawood, Kassim M; AlKhudeer, Basima K; AlSaqqaf, Abdullah A

    2016-09-01

    This paper aims to assess trainees' satisfaction with the process and assessment aspects of the Saudi Diploma of Family Medicine (SDFM). This cross-sectional study was conducted in February 2015 among trainees undertaking the SDFM. A questionnaire was distributed to all trainees in four examination centres in Saudi Arabia, under the supervision and guidance of the investigators (four members of the scientific committee of SDFM). There was a total of 97 participants in this study, the majority of whom were Saudis. More than 85% were satisfied with most elements of training including; an adequate number and variety of patients and cases, allocating time for training, giving regular written evaluation. Satisfaction with mentoring and giving constructive feedback scored less well and trainees were less satisfied with some hospital clinical rotations, which requires further exploration.

  8. Growth and Maturation of Plectropomus spp. in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    DesRosiers, Noah

    2011-05-01

    Two species of plectropomid grouper (Plectropomus areolatus and P. pessuliferus) are found in the Red Sea. In Saudi Arabia these are the most valuable fishes by weight, averaging wholesale prices around US $15 per kilogram (personal observation). Over the past two decades, the number of fishing vessels in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea has tripled. Despite this increase in fishing effort Saudi Arabia has not implemented any marine resource management for Red Sea fisheries. Little biological data are currently available to inform managers. The research presented here addresses knowledge gaps on the growth pattern, longevity and sexual ontogeny of Plectropomus spp. in the Red Sea. Collections of each species were established by purchasing landed individuals from fishermen and fish markets distributed evenly between three latitudinal regions around the country. The total length of each fish was measured to the nearest millimeter. Age was estimated by enumerating annual bands visualized in transverse sections of sagittal otoliths. Sexual stage was determined via histological examination of gonadal tissue. Plots of total length versus age were fitted with reparameterized von Bertalanffy growth functions constrained to a size-at-settlement estimate of 20 mm. P. pessuliferus achieved a larger size (maximum 960 mm) and an older age (maximum 19 years) than P. areolatus (maximum size 570 mm, maximum age 9 years). While no regional patterns were found for P. pesuliferus, likelihood ratio tests revealed regional differences in growth pattern for P. areolatus, finding an increasing mean age, increasing mean length, and decreasing growth rate with decreasing latitude. In addition, males of P. areolatus were more abundant in the Southern region. These findings contradict existing theories about the effects of latitudinal temperature gradients on life history. It is hypothesized that the broader continental shelf in the Southern region may be providing a haven for these species in the

  9. The Global Youth Tobacco Survey: 2001–2002 in Riyadh region, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Bedah AM

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abdullah Mohammed Al-Bedah1, Naseem Akhtar Qureshi21Arabian Center for Tobacco Control, 2General Administration for Medical Research and Mental Health and Social Services, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: Tobacco use is a major public health problem, and its prevalence is globally increasing, especially among children and adolescents.Objective: The Global Youth Tobacco Survey aimed to explore the epidemiological trends and risk factors of tobacco smoking among intermediate school boys in Riyadh region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.Method: A two-stage cluster sample design was used to produce a representative sample of male students from selected schools. The participants (n = 1830 self recorded their responses on the Global Youth Tobacco Survey questionnaire.Results: Lifetime prevalence of cigarette smoking was 35%, while 13% of students currently used other tobacco products. About 16% of students currently smoked at home, and 84% of students bought cigarettes without any refusal from storekeepers. Thirty-one percent and 39% of students were exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke inside and outside the house, respectively, which was definitely or probably harmful to health as opined by 87% of participants, and 74% voiced to ban smoking from public places. Among current smokers, 69% intended (without attempt to quit and 63% attempted (but failed to quit during the past year. Almost an equal number of students saw antismoking and prosmoking media messages in the last month, and 28% of students were offered free cigarettes by a tobacco company representative. In schools, more than 50% of students were taught about the dangers of cigarette smoking in the last year. Smoking by parents, older brothers, and close friends, watching prosmoking cigarette advertisements, free offer of cigarettes by tobacco company representatives, perception of smoking being not harmful, and continuing smoking which can be easily quit significantly

  10. Attitude of Saudi Arabian adults towards consanguineous marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Omar A.; Al-Shaia, Walaa A.; Al-Hamam, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Marzoug, Hala M.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Bagha, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on the attitudes of Saudi adults towards consanguinity is scarce. The study aimed to explore the attitudes towards consanguinity and its associations with socio-demographic characteristics in a sample of Saudi adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 386 outpatient waiting-area attendees at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City-Riyadh were included. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics, attitude towards consanguinity and the reasons behind this. Results: The positive attitude towards consanguinity among the study respondents was 48.1% with 95% confidence interval (42.91–53.33%). Social and traditional culture (59.9%) were found to be the predominant reasons for favoring consanguinity in Saudi Arabia. Evidence against a positive attitude towards consanguinity was noted in respondents who received medical information about consanguinity versus those who had not received medical information (42.3% vs. 57%, p-value = 0.008). According to the multivariate logistic model, the odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 2 times higher for males (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.147, 4.290) and 4.1 times higher in respondents in consanguineous marriages (aOR: 4.1; 95% CI: 2.350, 7.156). The odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 50% less in respondents who received health information on consanguinity compared to those who had not received health information about consanguinity (aOR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.253, 0.863). Conclusion: One in every two Saudi adults favors consanguinity however, Saudi men and women differ in their attitudes towards consanguinity. Receiving health information on consanguinity was associated with a negative attitude towards this practice. PMID:26835408

  11. The dynamics of male male competition in Cardiocondyla obscurior ants

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer Sylvia; Suefuji Masaki; Schrempf Alexandra; Heinze Jürgen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The outcome of male-male competition can be predicted from the relative fighting qualities of the opponents, which often depend on their age. In insects, freshly emerged and still sexually inactive males are morphologically indistinct from older, sexually active males. These young inactive males may thus be easy targets for older males if they cannot conceal themselves from their attacks. The ant Cardiocondyla obscurior is characterised by lethal fighting between wingless ...

  12. First dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Kear

    Full Text Available Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (~ 75 Ma deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titanosaur caudal vertebrae, and some isolated theropod marginal teeth that share unique character states and metric parameters (analyzed using multivariate statistical methods with derived abelisaurids - this is the first justifiable example of a non-avian carnivorous dinosaur clade from Arabia. The recognition of titanosaurians and abelisaurids from Saudi Arabia extends the palaeogeographical range of these groups along the entire northern Gondwanan margin during the latest Cretaceous. Moreover, given the extreme paucity of coeval occurrences elsewhere, the Saudi Arabian fossils provide a tantalizing glimpse into dinosaurian assemblage diversity within the region.

  13. First dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kear, Benjamin P; Rich, Thomas H; Vickers-Rich, Patricia; Ali, Mohammed A; Al-Mufarreh, Yahya A; Matari, Adel H; Al-Massari, Abdu M; Nasser, Abdulaziz H; Attia, Yousry; Halawani, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (~ 75 Ma) deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titanosaur caudal vertebrae, and some isolated theropod marginal teeth that share unique character states and metric parameters (analyzed using multivariate statistical methods) with derived abelisaurids - this is the first justifiable example of a non-avian carnivorous dinosaur clade from Arabia. The recognition of titanosaurians and abelisaurids from Saudi Arabia extends the palaeogeographical range of these groups along the entire northern Gondwanan margin during the latest Cretaceous. Moreover, given the extreme paucity of coeval occurrences elsewhere, the Saudi Arabian fossils provide a tantalizing glimpse into dinosaurian assemblage diversity within the region.

  14. Descriptive scientific analysis: progress of the educational system of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemarie PROFANTER

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Saudi Arabia has set itself the goal of developing a knowledge-based society. Demographic changes and economic growth within short time in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia led to radical changes of the educational system. Higher education institutions are in expansion and international collaborations are being intensified. The policy of gender segregation based on a neopatriarchal society favored by the tribal system is an important cultural element of Saudi society and influences the Saudi educational culture.This article provides a scientific description and analyzes the main elements of the Saudi higher education system using the few data available due to the limited release of official statistics. Prince Mohammad Bin Fahd University is analyzed as a case study based on the author’s experience who taught there as an academic years of 2006 and 2008. Being the first private institution to admit both male and female students it had to face several challenges. Furthermore, the impact of international collaborations is identified by exploring the «King Abdullah Scholarship Programme» which gives thousands of students the opportunity to study abroad.Education while having a global function also fulfills a national function. Therefore, collaborations with Western universities in the Kingdom have created challenges for the recent generations in balancing Western values imposed throughout their higher education with their traditional culture. Due to the policy of gender segregation, the Saudi educational system represents different obstructions and opportunities particularly for female students.

  15. Saudi Arabian Woman's Marriage Life in Girls of Riyadh, a Novel by Rajaa Alsanea: Subordination and Struggle

    OpenAIRE

    THALIB, AMIRAH ANIS

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that implementation of Pre-Islamic tradition and culture emerges subordination toward woman in Saudi Arabia. They face subordination in many aspects of life. This phenomenon can be found in Girls of Riyadh novel. In this novel, Rajaa Alsanea, a Saudi Arabian woman writer tells how women live under male domination. In analyzing the phenomena, the writer used feminist approach by applying feminism theory which is combined with Islamic references to reveal subordination and s...

  16. The incidence rate of corpus uteri cancer among females in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghamdi IG

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ibrahim G Alghamdi,1 Issam I Hussain,1 Mohamed S Alghamdi,2 Mohamed A El-Sheemy1,3 1University of Lincoln, Brayford Pool, Lincoln, UK; 2Ministry of Health, General Directorate of Health Affairs, Al-Baha, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3Research and Development, Lincoln Hospital, Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust, Lincoln, UK Background: The present study reviews the epidemiological data on corpus uteri cancer among Saudi women, including its frequency, crude incidence rate, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR, adjusted by region and year of diagnosis. Methods: A retrospective, descriptive epidemiological analysis was conducted of all the corpus uteri cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry between January 2001 and December 2008. The statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and a simple linear model. Results: A total of 1,060 corpus uteri cancer cases were included. Women aged 60–74 years of age were most affected by the disease. The region of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 4.4 cases per 100,000 female patients, followed by the eastern region, at 4.2, and Makkah, at 3.7. Jazan, Najran, and Qassim had the lowest average ASIRs, ranging from 0.8 to 1.4. A Poisson regression model using Jazan as the reference revealed that the corpus uteri cancer incidence rate ratio was significantly higher for the regions of Makkah, at 16.5 times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0–23.0, followed by Riyadh, at 16.0 times (95% CI: 9.0–22.0, and the eastern region, at 9.9 times (95% CI: 5.6–17.6. The northern region experienced the highest changes in ASIRs of corpus uteri cancer among female Saudi patients between 2001 and 2008. Conclusion: There was a slight increase in the crude incidence rates and ASIRs for corpus uteri cancer in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008. Older Saudi women were most affected by the disease. Riyadh, the eastern region, and Makkah

  17. Awareness and Use of Contraceptives Among Saudi Women Attending Primary Care Centers in Al-Qassim, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Sheeha, Mounira

    2010-01-01

    Background: The overall rapid change in the socio-demographic pattern of the Saudi Arabian community, especially the changes concerned with women’s education and work will be an important factor in changing fertility beliefs and behaviors with more tendencies to birth spacing and, consequently, the use of contraceptives. Objectives: The study aimed to identify the perception of Saudi women regarding the use of contraceptives Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among Saudi women attending primary care centers of Al-Qassim Region. A structured questionnaire was developed to cover the research objectives. The dependant variable was the utilization of contraceptive methods and the socioeconomic variables were the independent variables. Results: The results identified the low knowledge level of the participant women regarding the variety of contraceptive methods. Most participants and their husbands showed acceptance to the use of contraceptives for birth spacing. They preferred birth interval of 2–3 years. They intended to have from 5 to 10 children. There was a significant increase in contraceptive use among working women, 30 years and older, with a higher level of education, and those having a large number of children. Multiple regression models revealed that the significant determinants of the use of contraceptives were women’s working and education. The study recommended sustained efforts to increase awareness and motivation for proper contraceptive use. PMID:21475521

  18. Pattern of third molar impaction in a Saudi population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali H Hassan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Ali H Hassan11Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To evaluate the current pattern of third molar impaction in a sample of Saudi patients.Methods: One thousand thirty-nine orthopantomograms (OPG of patients ranging in age from 19 to 46 years (536 males and 503 females were evaluated to determine the frequency of impacted third molars, their levels of eruption, and their angulations.Results: Four hundred twenty-two (40.5% of the 1039 OPG showed at least one impacted third molar, with no significant difference between males (222; 52.6% and females (200; 47.4% (P = 0.284. The most common number of impacted third molars per OPG was one (72.5%. Impacted third molars were 1.64 times more likely to occur in the mandible than in the maxilla. The most common angulation of impaction in the mandible was the mesial (33.4%, while the most common angulation in the maxilla, was the vertical (49.6%. Level B impaction was the most common in both maxilla (48.2% and mandible (67.7%. There was no significant difference in the frequency of impaction between the right and left sides in both jaws.Conclusion: The pattern of third molar impaction in the western region of Saudi Arabia is characterized by a high prevalence of impaction that is greater in the mandibles and with no sex predilection.Keywords: third molar, impaction, prevalence, Saudi 

  19. Prevalence and causes of visual impairment among Saudi adults attending primary health care centers in northern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaaln, Farhan Fayez; Bakrman, Marwan Abdurrahman; Ibrahim, Adel Mohammad; Aljoudi, Abdullah Srour

    2011-01-01

    Few studies have been conducted in Saudi Arabia to estimate the prevalence of visual impairment and its causes. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of visual impairment, and identify its causes and associated factors among the adult population attending primary health care (PHC) centers in Aljouf province, in northern Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study during the year 2005 in PHC centers in Aljouf province in northern Saudi Arabia. A sample of 620 Saudi adults, of age 18 years and older, from the catchment area of the Aljouf PHC centers, were randomly selected through a multistage random sampling technique. Data were collected using a questionnaire about socioeconomic and related information and a visual acuity test was performed using the Snellen chart (E). Diagnosis was established according to World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Visual impairment was categorized into blindness for a visual acuity of less than 3/60 (20/400, 0.05) in the better eye with the best correction and low vision for a best corrected visual acuity of less than 6/18 (20/60, 0.3) but not less than 3/60 (20/400, 0.05) in the better eye. Regression analysis was used to identify the predictors of visual impairment. Of 617 adult Saudis interviewed and examined, 269 (43.6%) were females. The mean (SD) age was 38.6 (16.2) years. The overall prevalence of visual impairment was 13.9% (95% CI: 11.4%-16.9%). The main medical causes of visual impairments were refractive errors (36.0%) followed by cataract (29.1%) and diabetic retinopathy (20.9%), and the least leading cause was glaucoma (5.8%). The most prominent determinants of visual impairment were age (Pvisual impairment in the study population from the Aljouf area is high. It is recommended that regular checks of visual acuity be conducted for all Saudis of age 50+ years, who attend the PHC centers.

  20. Changing attitudes in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martiradonna, Luigi

    2014-04-01

    Jean M. J. Fréchet, vice-president for research at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), talked to Nature Materials about the achievements of this institution since its foundation in 2009 and its contribution to shaping research attitudes in Saudi Arabia.

  1. Environmental Determinants of Bronchial Asthma among Saudi School Children in Southwestern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobran M. Alqahtani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim here was to study the possible environmental and dietary determinants of asthma among school-aged children in Southwestern Saudi Arabia. In a cross-sectional study on a representative sample in Najran in Southwestern Saudi Arabia using an Arabic version of the modified ISAAC Phase III, parent-administered questionnaire data were collected. Skin prick tests (SPTs were performed. The study included 1700 school children, out of them 468 (27.5% were diagnosed with, cases of bronchial asthma and 20.8% (353 reported a 12-month nocturnal cough (as a proxy of severe asthma. In multivariable analysis, the study identified the following risk factors for having asthma or severe asthma: having dogs in the house, being male, being exposed to dense truck traffic on the street, using wood as a cooking fuel, conducting vigorous exercise, consuming eggs, consuming vegetables, having an allergic sensitization to dog hair, and being exposed to Cladosporium, pigweed, and Bermuda grass. On the other hand, the following food stuffs were found to be protective: seafood, fruit, and dairy products. Comprehensive school educational programs for both children and their parents should be adopted to prevent the use of wood in cooking and heating, to ensure that house pets are properly cared for, and to encourage proper dietary habits. Physicians should be informed of the patterns of allergens in order to improve asthma diagnosis and management.

  2. The Saudi Tatweer Education Reforms: Implications of Neoliberal Thought to Saudi Education Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tayan, Bilal M.

    2017-01-01

    The King Abdullah Public Education Development Project or the "Tatweer" education reforms were created to improve the quality of teaching and learning in Saudi Arabia. It was a response to develop generations of Saudis who would contribute to the economic well-being of the nation. The Saudi Tatweer education reforms have been important…

  3. Saudi Arabia and CERN sign protocol

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On 9 May 2008, Mohammed I. Al Suwaiyel, President of the King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology, representing the Government of Saudi Arabia, and CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar, signed a protocol to the 2006 cooperation agreement between CERN and Saudi Arabia. Members of the Saudi Arabian Government visit ATLAS.The purpose of the protocol is to define the operational framework needed to carry out various specific tasks provided for in the cooperation agreement in order to promote the development of a high energy particle physics community in Saudi Arabia and its ultimate visible participation as a member of the global CERN community. Signing the protocol, Mohammed I. Al-Suwaiyel said: "The Saudi Arabian Government has taken a number of initiatives to promote R&D in the interests of our country’s development and the advancement of science. Thanks to this protocol, Saudi scientists will be able to work towards this go...

  4. Prevalence of amblyopia in primary school children in Qassim province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldebasi, Yousef Homood

    2015-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and causes of amblyopia in primary school children in Qassim province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). In this cross sectional study, 5176 children, aged 6 to 13 years (mean - 9.53 ± 1.88 years) were evaluated. There were 2573 (49.71%) males and 2603 (50.29%) females. Distance visual acuity (V/A) was tested monocularly using a logMAR chart with and without correction. Cycloplegic refraction was performed in children with reduced vision. To determine the etiology of amblyopia, children were enrolled if there was a difference in V/A of two or more lines between eyes or an absolute reduction in acuity 0.05). The prevalence of amblyopia was statistically significant higher in the older age group (10-13 year) compared to younger age group (6 to 9 years) (P amblyopia (3.24%) was more frequent than bilateral amblyopia (0.66%). The most frequent causes of amblyopia were refractive error (94.56%), of which anisometropic amblyopia was present in 77.72%, isoametropic amblyopia in 16.84% and strabismus in 5.44%. The prevalence of amblyopia in Qassim province, KSA, is 3.9% which is similar or higher than other published studies on amblyopia. Anisometropic refractive errors are the most common underlying cause for this population. We recommend implementation of visual screening programs for children with appropriate clinical and social settings for early detection and proper management of amblyopia.

  5. Validity and reliability of an Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale in Saudi adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Maha A.; Hassan, Mona H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To test the reliability and validity of an Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and to correlate it with other demographic data. Methods: The original English version of the MDAS was translated into Arabic, and then translated back into English by experienced bilingual professionals. Four hundred and seventy-four patients referred to dental clinics for treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from November 2012 to June 2013 participated in the study. The assessment tool included questions regarding demographic characteristics, frequency of dental visits, the Arabic version of the MDAS, and the patient's rating of their current level of anxiety using a visual analogue scale (VAS). Results: The Arabic version of the MDAS had excellent internal consistency and reliability (Alpha coefficients >0.90). The scale was unidimensional, and the percentage of patients with dental anxiety was 48.3% (using a cutoff total score of >15) and with dental phobia was 2.5% (using a cutoff total score of >16). Younger patients, females, and infrequent visitors to the dentist were more anxious than those who were older, male, and frequent visitors. Visual analogue scale scores correlated significantly with individual items on the MDAS questionnaire and total anxiety score, supporting the criterion validity. Conclusion: The Arabic version of the MDAS presented adequate internal consistency reliability, allowing its safe use to assess levels of dental anxiety in Arabic-speaking populations. PMID:25399217

  6. Validity and reliability of an Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale in Saudi adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahammam, Maha A; Hassan, Mona H

    2014-11-01

    To test the reliability and validity of an Arabic version of the modified dental anxiety scale (MDAS), and to correlate it with other demographic data. The original English version of the MDAS was translated into Arabic, and then translated back into English by experienced bilingual professionals. Four hundred and seventy-four patients referred to dental clinics for treatment at the Faculty of Dentistry Hospital, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia from November 2012 to June 2013 participated in the study. The assessment tool included questions regarding demographic characteristics, frequency of dental visits, the Arabic version of the MDAS, and the patient's rating of their current level of anxiety using a visual analogue scale (VAS). The Arabic version of the MDAS had excellent internal consistency and reliability (Alpha coefficients >0.90). The scale was unidimensional, and the percentage of patients with dental anxiety was 48.3% (using a cutoff total score of >15) and with dental phobia was 2.5% (using a cutoff total score of >16). Younger patients, females, and infrequent visitors to the dentist were more anxious than those who were older, male, and frequent visitors. Visual analogue scale scores correlated significantly with individual items on the MDAS questionnaire and total anxiety score, supporting the criterion validity. The Arabic version of the MDAS presented adequate internal consistency reliability, allowing its safe use to assess levels of dental anxiety in Arabic-speaking populations.

  7. Self-medication in Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljadhey, Hisham; Assiri, Ghada A.; Mahmoud, Mansour A.; Al-Aqeel, Sinaa; Murray, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of self-medication and assess the knowledge, attitudes, and perception of consumers toward self-medication. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was conducted over 4 weeks in May 2011 in Riyadh city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Community pharmacies within 5 areas of the city (North, South, West, East, and Middle) were randomly selected for the study. All consumers were approached to participate in the study, with the exception of those buying cosmetic and medicinal equipments. A validated self-administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Results: A total of 538 out of 707 consumers attending community pharmacies in Riyadh city, agreed to participate in the study. Most responders were male (73%), 23-33 years old (35%), and college graduates (42%). A total of 285 medications were bought without a prescription. Of these, 149 (49%) medications should be dispensed by prescription only, and 155 (51%) were over the counter medications. The most common prescription medications dispensed without prescriptions were antibiotics (22%) and analgesics/antipyretics (19%). The most common reasons for buying medications without a prescription were that the symptoms were too minor to visit a doctor (54%), time saving (40%), and minor illnesses for which the participants knew the required treatment (40%). Overall, most participants had poor knowledge, and negative perceptions regarding self-medication. More than 68% of participants did not know whether the medicine they bought is a prescription-only or over the counter medication. Conclusion: Irresponsible self-medication is common in Saudi Arabia. Future studies should focus on improving the consumers’ awareness of self-medication and the proper use of medications. PMID:25737176

  8. Is Saudi Arabia a Nuclear Threat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Jerusalem by the Israeli leader Ariel Sharon, Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah advanced his anti-Israeli rhetoric by accusing Israel of Palestinian...205 Alfred B. Prados , “Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations.” Congressional Research Service, (Updated 06 March 2002) at < http...Vol. 6 No. 3 (September 2002), 85. 208 Ibid, 86. 209 Alfred B. Prados , “Saudi Arabia: Current Issues and U.S. Relations,” Congressional Research

  9. Smoking uptake among Saudi adolescents: tobacco epidemic indicators and preventive actions needed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammed, M.; Eggers, S.M.; Alotaiby, F.F.; de Vries, N.; de Vries, H.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional school-based study was to assess smoking prevalence, indicators for the smoking epidemic and determinants of smoking among Saudi adolescents. The study included 695 male adolescents from 11 to 16 years of age who filled out self-report questionnaires based on the

  10. The L2 Motivational Self System and L2 Achievement: A Study of Saudi EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovsky, Christo; Assulaimani, Turki; Racheva, Silvia; Harkins, Jean

    2016-01-01

    The research reported in this article explores the relationship between Dörnyei's (2005, 2009) Second Language Motivational Self System (L2MSS) and the L2 proficiency level of Saudi learners of English as a foreign language (EFL). Male and female participants (N = 360) responded to a questionnaire relating to the main components of L2MSS, the…

  11. Measurement of Perceived Parenting Style Influence on Academic Achievement among Saudi College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanizi, Faris Mayoof Mokheimer

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relation between academic achievement and parenting styles among Saudi college students. The participants in this study consisted of 349 male and 219 female college students, whose age ranged from 18-25 years. The instruments for the current study were: (a) an Arabic translation of the Revised Parental…

  12. Standardization of nasalance scores in normal Saudi speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kassabi, Rasha M; Hassan, Sabah; Mesallam, Tamer A; Malki, Khalid H; Farahat, Mohamed; Alfaris, Abdullah

    2015-07-01

    The aims of this study were to obtain normative nasalance scores for a normal Saudi population with different ages and genders, to develop nasometric Arabic speech materials, and to make cross-linguistic comparison. Participants included 219 normal Saudi native monolingual Arabic speakers of different ages. Subjects were classified into four groups according to age and gender. Subjects did not have any history of oral, nasal, or velopharyngeal abnormality. Arabic speech samples were developed to evaluate nasalance scores, which included syllables repetition, three oral sentences, three oro-nasal sentences, and three nasal sentences. Nasalance data were obtained using Nasometer II-6400. Normative nasalance values were determined. Significant differences between the male and female children groups were noticed in many parameters. Nasalance scores were higher in adults, with significant differences between all groups. Normative nasalance scores for Saudi Arabic speakers have been developed for both adults and children. The Arabic speech materials developed in this study appear to be easy to use and applicable for different age groups.

  13. First Dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin P Kear; Rich, Thomas H; Patricia Vickers-Rich; Mohammed A. Ali; Yahya A Al-Mufarreh; Matari, Adel H.; Al-Massari, Abdu M.; Abdulaziz H Nasser; Yousry Attia; Mohammed A Halawani

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (similar to 75 Ma) deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titan...

  14. The Saudi Initiative for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Moamary Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system.

  15. Attitudes of medical students toward communication skills learning in Western Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Fawaz S; Alsaeedi, Abdullah

    2016-07-01

    To explore medical students' attitudes towards communication skills learning in Western Saudi Arabia and to examine impact of socio-demographic variables on the attitudes towards learning these skills.   In this cross-sectional study, sample of medical students were recruited from Taif University, Taif, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the second semester (January-May 2014). Participants were all year 2 (197 students) and year 5 (151 students). The study utilize the Communication Skills Attitude Scale (CSAS) to measure students' attitudes toward communication skills learning. The response rate was 93.9%.  The study showed that Taif medical students hold highly positive attitudes towards learning communication skills. Positive attitude score (PAS) was significantly higher in level 5 students, older age group.   Significant positive attitude toward learning communication skills clearly observed in target group. Students with more positive attitudes towards communication skills learning tended to be higher level and older age.

  16. Dental maturity of Saudi children: Role of ethnicity in age determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baghdadi, Ziad D. [Dept. of Preventive Dentistry, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-12-15

    Demirjian's dental maturity scores and curves have been widely used for human age determination. Several authors have reported considerable differences between the true and estimated age based on the Demirjian curves, which have been accounted for by ethnicity. The purpose of the current study was to assess the role of ethnicity-specific dental maturation curves in age estimation of Saudi children. A sample of 452 healthy Saudi children aged 4 to 14 years were aged based on the original French-Canadian Demirjian curves and several modified Demirjian curves specified for certain ethnic groups: Saudi, Kuwaiti, Polish, Dutch, Pakistani, and Belgian. One-way ANOVA and a post hoc Scheffe's test were used to assess the differences between chronological age and dental age estimated by the different curves (P<0.05). The curves designed for Dutch, Polish, Saudi, and Belgian (5th percentile) populations had a significantly lower error in estimating age than the original French-Canadian and Belgian (50th percentile) curves. The optimal curve for males was the Saudi one, with a mean absolute difference between estimated age and chronological age of 8.6 months. For females, the optimal curve was the Polish one, with a mean absolute difference of 7.4 months. It was revealed that accurate age determination was not related to certain ethnicity-specific curves. We conclude that ethnicity might play a role in age determination, but not a principal one.

  17. The Profile of Saudi Nursing Workforce: A Cross-Sectional Study

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    Mohammad Alboliteeh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The Royal Monarchy in Saudi Arabia decreed that all sectors of the workforce would be subject to a policy of “Saudisation” to reduce the reliance on the expatriate workforce and to reduce the unemployment rate of Saudi nationals (Al-Mahmoud et al., 2012. Methodology. A cross-sectional design was chosen to investigate the research questions. The population of this study comprised Saudi Registered Nurses working in MOH hospitals in Riyadh which is the main health care provider in Saudi Arabia (Aboul-Enein, 2002; MOH, 2009. Results and Findings. A total number of 1,198 questionnaires were distributed and 61.2% (n=741 were returned. The findings of the study showed that the questionnaires were collected from an equal portion of the study locale and that a sample of 741 is enough to create a strong conclusion and answer the problem set in this study and all the questions in the study have been provided with answers with enough data and literatures to supports its findings. Conclusion and Recommendations. The results indicate that an increase in the recruitment of Saudi males may simply reflect cultural issues such as gender specific facilities and the Saudisation program’s nondiscriminatory approach to employment of both genders into nursing.

  18. Social Support, Religious Endorsement, and Career Commitment: A Study on Saudi Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azim, Mohammad T; Islam, Mazharul M

    2018-01-10

    The present study investigates the effect of perceived social support (PSS) and perceived religious endorsement (PRE) on career commitment (CC) of Saudi nurses. The investigation also extends to the moderating role of different demographic and organizational factors in the extent of PSS, and career commitment these nurses report. Data required for meeting these study objectives were collected from male and female Saudi nurses through a structured questionnaire. Multiple regressions using Partial Least Squares based Structural Equation Model, Smart-PLS version 3.0, and independent sample t -test using SPSS version 22.0, were used to analyze data. The study findings reveal that both perceived social support and perceived religious endorsement are important antecedents of career commitment of Saudi nurses. However, private-sector nurses are found to exhibit a significantly higher level of career commitment compared to their public-sector counterparts. Nurses with greater educational attainment perceive higher level of social support and express greater career commitment than their less educated peers. These findings suggest that nursing as a profession should be more openly discussed in both secular and religious contexts, to ensure an adequate level of respect and compassion on behalf of the public. In particular, endorsement from the individual nurses' social networks is vital in maintaining their wellbeing and career commitment. Given the religious influence in all aspects of life in the Saudi society, the current practice of gender-based segregation in Saudi hospitals and clinics seems to be meaningful for sustaining the career commitment of the nurses.

  19. Some Silurian (Llandovery) monograptids from Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Khayal, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Three species of Monograptus are recognized from Qusayba, Al-Qasim Province, Saudi Arabia. The Qusayba Shales Member of the Tabuk Formation in central Saudi Arabia contains M. decipiens decipiens, M. ex gr. barrandei and M. elongatus, associated with other graptolites. This assemblage is indicative

  20. Partial Immersion Program for Saudi Bilinguals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulami, Sumayyah Qaed

    2017-01-01

    English is taught as a foreign language in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Although the government tries gradually to integrate teaching English in all grades: secondary, intermediate and elementary, learning English is still limited and need more developing. This essay is a brief review about bilingualism in Saudi education. This essay will be divided…

  1. Apology Strategies Employed by Saudi EFL Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulayyi, Marzouq Nasser

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the apology strategies used by 30 Saudi EFL teachers in Najran, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), paying special attention to variables such as social distance and power and offence severity. The study also delineates gender differences in the respondents' speech as opposed to studies that only examined speech act output by…

  2. Toward a Constructivist Approach in Saudi Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsulami, Sumayyah

    2016-01-01

    In the way to develop the educational system in Saudi Arabia, the emphasis was only on the materials with no more attention for the role of the learner and the teacher in the learning process or even the external factors around them. However, there are many theories and approaches that may help the Saudi students in different levels to understand…

  3. Examination of Chronic Smoking Behavior and Eligibility for Low-Dose Computed Tomography for Lung Cancer Screening Among Older Chinese Male Smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chien-Ching; Matthews, Alicia K; Dong, XinQi

    2017-07-01

    Low-dose computed tomography lung cancer (LDCT) screening is an effective way to decrease lung cancer mortality. Both Medicare and private insurers offer coverage of LDCT screening to beneficiaries who are at high risk of developing lung cancer. In this study, we examined rates and predictors of chronic smoking behavior and eligibility for coverage of LDCT screening among older Chinese men living in the greater Chicago area. Data were obtained from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago, a population-based survey of community-dwelling, older Chinese adults in the Chicago metropolitan area. Eligibility criteria according to Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) for LDCT screening were used. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to determine predictors of chronic smoking behavior which was operationalized as meeting criteria for LDCT screening. A quarter of the sample were current smokers and 42.5% reported a prior history of smoking. Eighteen percent and 22% of older Chinese men met the eligibility criteria for appropriateness for CMS and USPSTF LDCT screening, respectively. Furthermore, education, marital status, and number of children were significantly associated with chronic smoking behavior. Older Chinese men with chronic smoking behavior are at high risk of developing lung cancer and nearly one in five meet eligibility for LDCT screening. Increased outreach and education regarding early detection of lung cancer and smoking cessation are needed for this vulnerable and high-risk population.

  4. Anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth in healthy Saudi females

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Agamy A

    2017-06-01

    inferior planes (P=0.013. Using the same test, no significant difference between superior and inferior planes (P=0.820 was observed. Generally, the largest ALCSD was in the middle plane. In addition, linear regression analysis showed no significant correlation between ALCSD and associated clinical factors.Conclusion: This work is the first to provide the normative profile of ALCSD in Saudi females using Topcon 3D OCT-2000. Further studies are recommended for males, different ethnic populations, high myopic eyes, and different age groups using advanced imaging techniques such as enhanced depth imaging OCT. Keywords: optical coherence tomography, anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth

  5. Lifestyle factors associated with overweight and obesity among Saudi adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background A better understanding of the relationships between obesity and lifestyle factors is necessary for effective prevention and management of obesity in youth. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the associations between obesity measures and several lifestyle factors, including physical activity, sedentary behaviors and dietary habits among Saudi adolescents aged 14–19 years. Methods This was a school-based cross-sectional study that was conducted in three cities in Saudi Arabia (Al-Khobar, Jeddah and Riyadh). The participants were 2906 secondary school males (1400) and females (1506) aged 14–19 years, who were randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster sampling technique. Measurements included weight, height, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference, waist/height ratio (WHtR), screen time (television viewing, video games and computer use), physical activity (determined using a validated questionnaire), and dietary habits (intake frequency per week). Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between obesity and lifestyle factors. Results Compared with non-obese, obese males and females were significantly less active, especially in terms of vigorous activity, had less favorable dietary habits (e.g., lower intake of breakfast, fruits and milk), but had lower intake of sugar-sweetened drinks and sweets/chocolates. Logistic regression analysis showed that overweight/obesity (based on BMI categories) or abdominal obesity (based on WHtR categories) were significantly and inversely associated with vigorous physical activity levels (aOR for high level = 0.69, 95% CI 0.41–0.92 for BMI and 0.63, 95% CI 0.45–0.89 for WHtR) and frequency of breakfast (aOR for obesity that may represent valid targets for the prevention and management of obesity among Saudi adolescents. Primary prevention of obesity by promoting active lifestyles and healthy diets should be a national public health priority. PMID:22591544

  6. Perceived stress in Saudi undergraduate medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aesha Farheen Siddiqui

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the prevalence and magnitude of stress in Saudi undergraduate medical students and its associated socio-demographic factors using a cross-sectional design. It was conducted at King Khalid University Medical College during September-October 2016, including 267 students of both sexes and all study levels. Data was collected using an anonymous self administered questionnaire including socio-demographic information like participant details and family details, along with the Kessler -10 scale for measuring stress. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS 17.0. Results were de-scribed as frequencies, percentages, mean±SD. Independent samples t test and ANOVA were used to study the relationship of stress with various social and demographic factors. A mean stress score of 23.46±7.77 was observed. This is graded as mild stress according to Kessler scale classification. Forty four students, i.e. 16.5% reported perception of high stress, while 23.6% students perceived mild and 26.6% reported moderate stress. Students who perceived no stress comprised one third (33.3% of the study population. A significant relationship of female gender with stress was observed (p˂0.0001. It was concluded that most of the medical students undergo some degree of stress during their study period and female students have significantly more stress than their male counterparts. [J Med Allied Sci 2017; 7(1.000: 41-47

  7. The incidence rate of corpus uteri cancer among females in Saudi Arabia: an observational descriptive epidemiological analysis of data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ibrahim G; Hussain, Issam I; Alghamdi, Mohamed S; El-Sheemy, Mohamed A

    2014-01-01

    Background The present study reviews the epidemiological data on corpus uteri cancer among Saudi women, including its frequency, crude incidence rate, and age-standardized incidence rate (ASIR), adjusted by region and year of diagnosis. Methods A retrospective, descriptive epidemiological analysis was conducted of all the corpus uteri cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry between January 2001 and December 2008. The statistical analyses were performed using descriptive statistics, analysis of variance, Poisson regression, and a simple linear model. Results A total of 1,060 corpus uteri cancer cases were included. Women aged 60–74 years of age were most affected by the disease. The region of Riyadh in Saudi Arabia had the highest overall ASIR, at 4.4 cases per 100,000 female patients, followed by the eastern region, at 4.2, and Makkah, at 3.7. Jazan, Najran, and Qassim had the lowest average ASIRs, ranging from 0.8 to 1.4. A Poisson regression model using Jazan as the reference revealed that the corpus uteri cancer incidence rate ratio was significantly higher for the regions of Makkah, at 16.5 times (95% confidence interval [CI]: 8.0–23.0), followed by Riyadh, at 16.0 times (95% CI: 9.0–22.0), and the eastern region, at 9.9 times (95% CI: 5.6–17.6). The northern region experienced the highest changes in ASIRs of corpus uteri cancer among female Saudi patients between 2001 and 2008. Conclusion There was a slight increase in the crude incidence rates and ASIRs for corpus uteri cancer in Saudi Arabia between 2001 and 2008. Older Saudi women were most affected by the disease. Riyadh, the eastern region, and Makkah had the highest overall disease ASIRs and incidence rate ratios, while Jazan, Najran, and Qassim had the lowest rates. Finally, the northern region experienced the greatest changes in ASIR during the studied period. Further analytical studies are necessary to determine potential risk factors of corpus uteri cancer among female Saudi

  8. The effect of gender on transformational leadership and job satisfaction among Saudi nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Mohammed G; Topp, Robert; AlYami, Mansour S

    2018-01-01

    To compare nurses' job satisfaction and perceptions of transformational leadership style of their manager among four different nurse/manager gender dyads in Saudi Arabia. Women and men differ on many behavioural characteristics and are influenced by the cultural environment. Understanding these differences may have an impact on leadership behaviours and job satisfaction. A descriptive analysis of one-time survey data collected in 2011 from Saudi nurses employed in six general public hospitals located in three cities. Three hundred and eight (51.3%) of 600 Saudi nurses solicited to participate completed anonymous questionnaires that measured their job satisfaction and perceptions of transformational leadership style of their manager. Factorial ANOVA tested the main effects of gender of the nurse, gender of the manager and the interaction term on the nurse's job satisfaction, and perceived transformational leadership style of their manager. These analyses indicated a main effect of gender of the manager on both job satisfaction and perceived transformational leadership style of the manager (p transformational leadership style of their manager when their manager was male. These findings contrast with what other researchers have reported that nurse job satisfaction and perceived leadership characteristics of their manager are independent of the gender of the manager. These perceptions of Saudi nurses may be a result of "sex-role spillover" in a male-dominated, gender-segregated society. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: a BOLD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Ghobain, M; Alhamad, E H; Alorainy, H S; Al Kassimi, F; Lababidi, H; Al-Hajjaj, M S

    2015-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence and associated risk factors of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Saudi adults aged ⩾40 years using standardised post-bronchodilator spirometry according to the Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease (BOLD) protocol. Saudi men and women aged ⩾40 years were recruited by stratified multistage random sampling in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Participants completed questionnaires on respiratory symptoms and exposure to risk factors for COPD. Spirometry was performed according to standard methods. COPD was defined as post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC (forced expiratory volume in 1 s/forced vital capacity) ratio prevalence of GOLD COPD was 4.2% (men 5.7%, women 2.5%). The overall prevalence of COPD stage 1 or higher using the LLN was lower than estimates using the GOLD criteria (3.2%). The overall prevalence of GOLD stage 2 or higher COPD was 3.7%. Male sex, increasing age and smoking were significantly associated with COPD diagnosis. The overall prevalence of COPD in Saudi Arabia is 4.2%. Male, increasing age and smoking were the main risk factors for COPD.

  10. A Topic Diathesis In Hereditary Ichthyosis Patients Attending A Tertiary Health Care Center In Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Akloby Omar M Al-Amro

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of atopic diathesis in hereditary ichthyosis (HI has not been documented in Saudi patients. The atopic manifestations in histopathologically confirmed HI patients attending the dermatology clinic of king Fahad Hospital of the University at Al-Khobar city, Saudi Arabia is discussed in this study. From the dermatology OPD logbook, all Saudi patients with confirmed HI seen between January 1990 to December 1995 were included in the study. The findings regarding atopic manifestations were extracted into data collection forms and analyzed. During the 5 year study period, 10,455 new cases were seen in our dermatology OPD. Of these, 61 had hereditary icthyosis, with 37 males and 24 females with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1. Thus, the frequency of HI among Saudi hospital attendees was 6 per 1000 new cases. The type of HI was ichthyosis vulgaris in 25 (41% patients, X-linked recessive ichthyosis in 11 (18%, lamellar ichthyosis in 4(7%, bullous ichthyosiform erythroderma in 2 (3% and nonbullous ichthyosiform erythroderma was seen in 19 (31%. Generalized pruritus was present in 49 (80% cases, atopic dermatitis in , elevated serum IgE level was noted in 27 and bronchial asthma in 3 cases. Dandruff was reported in 24 cases, keratosis pilaris in15, recurrent skin infection in 7. Combination of hereditary ichthyosis, generalized pruritus and high serum IGE level was reported in 27 (44.3% patient.

  11. Saudi dental students’ opinions on the qualities and attributes of an effective dental teacher

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    Al-Jobair AM

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Asma M Al-Jobair, Maha A AlSarheed Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Objective: To evaluate Saudi dental students’ opinions on the qualities and attributes of an effective dental teacher.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted between March and May 2014 at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University. Self-administered questionnaires were distributed to all students enrolled in the 2013/2014 academic year. The questionnaire contained 43 items regarding students’ opinions on the qualities and attributes of a good dental teacher. The attributes were grouped into two main categories: performance and personality. Mean and standard deviations were calculated for each item and then for the whole category. Performance and personality were compared between male and female students and between junior and senior students using Mann–Whitney U test.Results: Four hundred and seventy-seven questionnaires were completed, representing a response rate of 79%. Performance attributes were significantly more important than personality attributes to Saudi dental students (P<0.001. Perceptions of performance and personality attributes did not differ between male and female students; however, junior students put more emphasis on personality attributes than senior students.Conclusion: Saudi dental students consider performance attributes more important than personality attributes for their successful learning. Teachers’ educational skills are valued more than the attributes, which do not connect directly to students’ learning process. Keywords: perceptions, dental students, characteristics, dental teacher

  12. Performance of Massachusetts Male Aging Study (MMAS) and androgen deficiency in the aging male (ADAM) questionnaires in the prediction of free testosterone in patients aged 40 years or older treated in outpatient regimen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Renan Desimon; Busin, Luciane; Rosito, Tiago Elias; Koff, Walter José

    2014-09-01

    At present, calculated free testosterone assessment is considered as the gold standard in diagnosing male hypogonadism. However, this assessment is not available for all the individuals diagnosed with decreased testicular function. The investigators of this study were, thus, prompted to evaluate whether the androgen deficiency in the aging male (ADAM) and the Massachusetts Male Ageing Study (MMAS) questionnaires could be used to replace biochemical parameters in the diagnosis for hypogonadism in men aged 40 years and above. We evaluated 460 men, aged 40 years and above, all volunteers of a screening program for prostate cancer based at the Hospital de Clínicas of Porto Alegre. In this study, we assessed the efficiency of the ADAM and MMAS questionnaires in diagnosing Brazilian men with low levels of total, calculated free and bioavailable testosterone. The sensitivity of the ADAM questionnaire in diagnosing the calculated free testosterone was 73.6%, whereas specificity was 31.9%. ADAM could be used to properly classify our cohort into normal or hypogonadal individuals in 52.75% of the cases. The sensitivity of the MMAS questionnaire was 59.9%, whereas the specificity was 42.9%, resulting in a successful classification of 51.4% of the patients. The ADAM and MMAS questionnaires showed adequate sensitivity in diagnosing male patients with low levels of free testosterone. However, because of the lack of specificity, these tools cannot replace calculated free testosterone assessments in men aged 40 years and above.

  13. Knowledge of healthy diets among adolescents in eastern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Almaie, Sameeh

    2005-01-01

    Bad dietary habits, such as eating high-fat/high-energy food, can contribute to obesity in adolescents, which tends to persist into adulthood. The objective of this study was to determine the level and sources of knowledge about foods and healthy diets among male and female adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study of a sample of male (n=1240) and female (n=1331) adolescents from third grade, intermediate and all three grades of secondary school students in the Al-Khobar Area, eastern province of Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect information. Approximately 51% of the male and 65% of the female students recognized unsaturated fats as healthy foods. However, 10% of the males and 8% of females reported saturated fats as healthy food items. About 49% of the males and 66% of the females correctly defined cholesterol. Dietary knowledge of both male and female students on the dangers of unhealthy foods and the benefits of fiber-rich diets was found to be unsatisfactory. The main sources of knowledge about health and disease reported by the male and female respondents were television (58% and 61%, respectively), magazines (31% and 39%) and daily newspaper (33% and 34%). Primary health care centers (PHCCs) staff were the least source of knowledge (17% and 16%). Knowledge of healthy diets among school students was inadequate. It is recommended that health education and information about healthy eating habits and lifestyle be included in school curricula.

  14. Fish consumption behavior and rates in native and non-native people in Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Joanna

    2014-08-01

    Fish are a healthy source of protein and nutrients, but contaminants in fish may provide health risks. Determining the risk from contaminants in fish requires site-specific information on consumption patterns. We examine consumption rates for resident and expatriates in the Jeddah region of Saudi Arabia, by species of fish and fishing location. For Saudis, 3.7% of males and 4.3% of females do not eat fish; for expatriates, the percent not eating fish is 6.6% and 6.1% respectively. Most people eat fish at home (over 90%), and many eat fish at restaurants (65% and 48%, respectively for Saudis and expatriates). Fish eaten at home comes from local fish markets, followed by supermarkets. Saudis included fish in their diets at an average of 1.4±1.2 meals/week at home and 0.8±0.7 meals/week at restaurants, while expats ate 2.0±1.7 meals/week at home and 1.1±1.1 meals/week in restaurants. Overall, Saudis ate 2.2 fish meals/week, while expats ate 3.1 meals/week. Grouper (Epinephelus and Cephalopholis) were eaten by 72% and 60% respectively. Plectropomus pessuliferus was the second favorite for both groups and Hipposcarus harid and Lethrinus lentjan were in 3rd and 4th place in terms of consumption. Average meal size was 68. g for Saudis and 128. g for expatriates. These data can be used by health professionals, risk assessors, and environmental regulators to examine potential risk from contaminants in fish, and to compare consumption rates with other sites. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Cholelithiasis in young Saudi women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiedozi, L C; al Hadi, F H; Salem, M; Desouky, M M

    1998-03-01

    We studied some of the factors associated with gallstones in a sub population of Saudi women who presented with cholelithiasis at a rather young age, 17-30 years. We determined the weight, height, ideal weight, overweight, Quetelet index, ideal Quetelet index, and parity in 152 such women designated the study group and in another aged matched group of 152 women without biliary disease designated the control group. Although the mean weights of both groups were greater than ideal, the mean weight, level of overweight, and mean Quetelet index in the study group were greater than those of the controls at virtually all age groups (p > 0.001). In the study group, comparison of the 17-25 year olds with the 26-30 year olds showed close similarity in weight, Q index, and level of overweight (p = 0.50). There was no significant difference in parity between the study group and the controls. We conclude that obesity is a significant factor in the development of cholelithiasis in Saudi women who develop symptomatic gallstones in the age group 17-30 years.

  16. A high prevalence of carotid artery stenosis in male patients older than 65 years, irrespective of presenting clinical manifestation of atherosclerotic diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazemi-Bajestani, S.M.; Vlugt, M.J. van der; Leeuw, F.E. de; Blankensteijn, J.D.; Bredie, S.J.H.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of carotid artery stenosis (CS) and the association with various risk factors in male patients (>65 years) diagnosed with cardiovascular diseases. Duplex sonography of the carotid arteries was performed in 434 of 473 eligible patients of whom 118 (27.8%)

  17. Determinants of birth spacing among Saudi Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moataz Abdel-Fattah

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: This study showed that certain factors were significant predictors of interbirth spacing for the Saudi women. This should lead to the encouragement of longer intervals between births. However, further studies are needed to ascertain a cause-effect association..

  18. Saudi Arabia Policy after the Iraq War

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    - Salum Hossam Eddin

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The author analyses Saudi Arabia position in the conflict on the Middle East, examines the influence of this conflict on the formation of the country's domestic and foreign policy.

  19. Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Abdominal Obesity among Urban Saudi Adolescents: Gender and Regional Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abahussain, Nada A.; Al-Sobayel, Hana I.; Qahwaji, Dina M.; Alsulaiman, Nouf A.; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The nutrition transition with associated lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases has rapidly reached many developing countries, including Saudi Arabia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity among Saudi adolescents. This school-based multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted during 2009-2010 in three major cities in Saudi Arabia: Al-Khobar, Jeddah, and Riyadh. Participants included 2,908 students of secondary schools (1,401 males and 1,507 females) aged 14 to 19 years, randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster-sampling technique. Weight, height, and waist-circumference were measured; prevalence of overweight and obesity was determined using age- and sex-specific BMI cutoff reference standards of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF). Abdominal obesity was determined using waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) cutoffs (above 0.5). The prevalence of overweight was 19.5% in males and 20.8% in females while that of obesity was 24.1% in males and 14% in females. The prevalence of abdominal obesity in males and females was 35.9% and 30.3% respectively. Higher prevalence of obesity was observed among adolescents in private schools. Across all ages, overweight and obesity ranged from 39.9% to 45.6% in males and from 30.4% to 38.7% in females. ANCOVA, controlling for age, showed significant interaction effects (city by gender). It is concluded that the proportions of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity, observed among Saudi adolescents were remarkably high. Such high prevalence of overweight and obesity is a major public-health concern. PMID:25895197

  20. Prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity among urban Saudi adolescents: gender and regional variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M; Abahussain, Nada A; Al-Sobayel, Hana I; Qahwaji, Dina M; Alsulaiman, Nouf A; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O

    2014-12-01

    The nutrition transition with associated lifestyle-related non-communicable diseases has rapidly reached many developing countries, including Saudi Arabia. Therefore, the objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity among Saudi adolescents. This school-based multicentre cross-sectional study was conducted during 2009-2010 in three major cities in Saudi Arabia: Al-Khobar, Jeddah, and Riyadh. Participants included 2,908 students of secondary schools (1,401 males and 1,507 females) aged 14 to 19 years, randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster-sampling technique. Weight, height, and waist-circumference were measured; prevalence of overweight and obes- ity was determined using age- and sex-specific BMI cutoff reference standards of the International Obesity Task Force (IOTF). Abdominal obesity was determined using waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) cutoffs (above 0.5). The prevalence of overweight was 19.5% in males and 20.8% in females while that of obesity was 24.1% in males and 14% in females. The prevalence of abdominal obesity in males and females was 35.9% and 30.3% respectively. Higher prevalence of obesity was observed among adolescents in private schools. Across all ages, overweight and obesity ranged from 39.9% to 45.6% in males and from 30.4% to 38.7% in females. ANCOVA, controlling for age, showed significant interaction effects (city by gender). It is concluded that the proportions of overweight, obesity, and abdominal obesity, observed among Saudi adolescents were remarkably high. Such high prevalence of overweight and obesity is a major public-health concern.

  1. Characteristic of Malocclusion among Saudi Special Need Group Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhadra, Thamer

    2017-10-01

    The present study analyzed the characteristics of malocclusions, occlusal traits among Special Health care Needs (SHCN) children with Down syndrome (DS) and autism disorder (AD) in Riyadh City, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A total of 100 DS and 100 AD children from five rehabilitation centers in and around Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, were included in the study. Any children with history of ongoing medical treatment, extraction, or orthodontic treatment were excluded from the study. Out of the 200 patients examined, 131 were males and 69 were females and the age of the children ranged from 6 to 14 years. The children were examined for malocclusion characteristics using the Angle's classification of malocclusion, and also other occlusal traits, such as overjet, overbite, cross bite, and open bite were also determined. The data obtained were analyzed using Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 16 to generate descriptive statistics for each variable. The analyzed data of the right and left permanent molar relation showed higher incidence of class III malocclusion (66%) in DS children as compared with (3-4%) AD children. The AD children presented with higher percentage of class I malocclu-sion (40-41%) as compared with (10-14%) DS children. During examination of the primary molars, the analyzed data showed that left primary molar had more mesial shift in AD children as compared with DS children. Down syndrome children had high incidence of class III malocclusion and autistic children had high incidence of class I malocclusion. Overall, the DS children were more prone to malocclusion. This study provides database for health professionals in Saudi Arabia in regard to malocclusion of autis-tics and DS patients.

  2. Sarcoidosis in the eastern region of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Khouzaie Thamer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To review a general hospital′s experience with sarcoidosis and the clinical pattern of the disease among Saudis. Methods: A retrospective file review was carried out on all patients with a proven diagnosis of sarcoidosis in a general hospital in Eastern Saudi Arabia over a period of 11 years (1998-2008. Results: Sixty-nine patients, of whom 33 cases were included in the analyses, were diagnosed to have sarcoidosis during the study period. There were 18 females and 15 males. The mean age was 44.5 years (SD 17. The most common presentations were cough (48%, dyspnea (21%, joint pain (18%, splenomegaly (12%, hepatomegaly (9%, and lymphadenopathy (5%. The biochemical analysis showed elevated calcium levels in 6% and elevated angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE in 14 (46.7%. The tuberculin skin test was negative in all tested patients (n = 29 except one patient. The patients were classified using the modified Scadding classification system. None of the patients was in stage 0, 39.4% were in stage 1, 45% were in stage 2 and 15% were in stage 3.. The diagnosis in all patients was proven histologically. The outcome was favorable in most patients (85%, and in 6% of the patients, the course was chronic and progressive, although 66% received active treatment. Conclusion: Sarcoidosis does occur in native Saudis. The clinical presentation of these patients was similar to the western pattern of disease with some differences such as relative lack of cardiac, eye, parotid, and central nervous system involvement. The rarity of cardiac and central nervous system involvement was comparable with other Middle Eastern studies. Sarcoidosis, though rare in our community, should still be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with the typical presentation after excluding tuberculosis.

  3. Anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth in healthy Saudi females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Agamy, Amira; Oteaf, Fayrouz; Berika, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine normative profile of anterior lamina cribrosa surface depth (ALCSD) in healthy Saudi females using Topcon Three-Dimensional (3D) Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) 2000 - Spectral Domain (SD-OCT). In addition, the correlation between ALCSD and other clinical factors such as age, refractive error, intraocular pressure (IOP), central corneal thickness, anterior chamber depth, axial length, retinal nerve fiber layer thickness, and disk area was also assessed. This study was a prospective, nonrandomized, cross-sectional, observational, and quantitative study. This study included 191 eyes of 191 healthy Saudi females from the College of Applied Medical Sciences of King Saud University. Stereoscopic disk photographs were reconstructed using Topcon 3D OCT-2000 for all subjects. ALCSD was measured at three planes (superior, middle, and inferior) and defined as the distance from Bruch's membrane opening level (reference line) to anterior lamina cribrosa surface. Average of ALCSD at all planes was defined as mean ALCSD of the eye. Correlation between ALCSD and all the clinical factors was performed by linear regression analysis. Paired t -test was performed in order to compare ALCSD at all planes. In this study, the average ALCSD was 371.88±114.62 μm (range, 155-647.6 μm). Paired t -test showed a significant difference between superior and middle planes ( P =0.004) and middle and inferior planes ( P =0.013). Using the same test, no significant difference between superior and inferior planes ( P =0.820) was observed. Generally, the largest ALCSD was in the middle plane. In addition, linear regression analysis showed no significant correlation between ALCSD and associated clinical factors. This work is the first to provide the normative profile of ALCSD in Saudi females using Topcon 3D OCT-2000. Further studies are recommended for males, different ethnic populations, high myopic eyes, and different age groups using advanced imaging

  4. Saudi dental students' perceptions of pediatric behavior guidance techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jobair, Asma M; Al-Mutairi, Manal A

    2015-09-10

    Dental students receive theoretical and clinical training in pediatric behavioral guidance techniques at university. Therefore, the content of the educational course and the degree of training in behavioral techniques may have an impact on the students' perceptions and practice of such techniques. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Saudi dental students' perceptions of behavior guidance techniques used in pediatric dentistry, and to assess the changes in their perceptions after 1 academic year of a didactic and clinical educational course. This longitudinal study was carried out once at the beginning and once at the end of the 2013/2014 academic year at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire measuring the perceived acceptability of behavior guidance techniques was completed by 78 fourth-year dental students before and after a pediatric dental course. Acceptability ratings were scored on a 5-point Likert scale and compared and evaluated in relation to demographic data. Paired t-test and one-way analysis of variance were used for the statistical analyses. Before the course, the highest scores were for reinforcement and desensitizing techniques and the lowest were for aversive and communicative techniques. After the course, statistically significant increases were found in the acceptability of aversive techniques (voice control and hand-over-mouth), all pharmacological techniques, and modeling. Most communicative techniques and clinical situations were also rated as significantly more acceptable. Statistically significant decreases in acceptability ratings were found in promising a toy, and immobilization by staff or a parent. Immobilization using a papoose board, modeling, the presence of parents during the child's treatment, and most communicative techniques were rated as significantly more acceptable by male students than female students. In general, Saudi dental students rated most basic behavior guidance

  5. Distinctiveness of Saudi Arabian EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manssour Habbash

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In view of the increasing concern among English language teachers dealing with students from Saudi Arabia, as it manifests in TESOL community discussions, about the uniqueness of Saudi Arabian EFL learners, this paper attempts to document the outcome of a study of their distinctiveness from the perspective of expatriate teachers working for PYPs (Preparatory Year Programs in Saudi Arabia. This study examines the distinctiveness with regard to the learning attitudes of Saudi students that are often cultivated by the culture and academic environment in their homeland. Employing an emic approach for collecting the required data an analysis was carried out in light of the other studies on ‘education’ in Saudi Arabia that have particular reference to the factors that can positively influence student motivation, student success and the academic environment. The findings were used in constructing the rationale behind such distinctiveness. Assuming that the outcome of the discussion on the findings of this exploration can be helpful for teachers in adapting their teaching methodology and improving their teacher efficacy in dealing with students both from the kingdom and in the kingdom, some recommendations are made. Keywords: China Distinctiveness, Saudi Arabian University context, Expatriate teachers’ perspective, Distinctiveness Theory

  6. Empowered but Not Equal: Challenging the Traditional Gender Roles as Seen by University Students in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-bakr, Fawziah; Bruce, Elizabeth R.; Davidson, Petrina M.; Schlaffer, Edit; Kropiunigg, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    This study examines perspectives of Saudi university students regarding changing gender roles as affected by women's rights, education, employment, and activity in the public sphere. Results from a questionnaire distributed among 4,455 male and female students indicate students are confident and optimistic about improving gender equity, however…

  7. Citizenship among a Sample of Hearing and Hearing Impaired Kindergarten's Children in Al-Riyadh Saudi Arabia "Comparative Study"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkestani, Maryam Hafez; Bahatheg, Raja' Omar

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at identifying statistically significant differences in citizenship between Saudi hearing and hearing impaired children. The study sample consisted of (167) hearing and (42) hearing impaired children at public kindergartens in Al-Riyadh city, (82) of whom were males and (127) were female children. Data was collected using…

  8. Empowering Saudi patients: how do Saudi health websites compare to international health websites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Househ, Mowafa; Alsughayar, Abdulrahman; Al-Mutairi, Maha

    2013-01-01

    Little information is known about how Saudi health websites compare internationally. The purpose of this paper is to compare two leading Saudi health websites with leading international health websites. The study was conducted as a convenience sample at a graduate health college in Saudi Arabia. A total of 42 students participated in the study. The study found that, in general, English websites have higher levels of performance with regard to quality of information, authority and objectivity, coverage and currency, and design. However, the respondents considered Saudi health websites to be superior with regard to maintaining privacy and security. The results indicate that much more work is needed in designing Saudi Health to make them more trustworthy and credible. The limitations of this work and future research directions are also discussed.

  9. Radon activity in Saudi houses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Jarallah, M.I. (University of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Physics)

    1984-01-01

    Long term measurements of radon's concentrations inside Saudi houses being studied using CR-39 Plastic Track Detectors fixed inside sealed plastic cups. The cups were left for about 7 months in the houses. The measurements were done in different cities of different provinces in the country. The analysis of 636 cups showed that the radon concentration in different cities was ranging from 0.27 pCi/l (in Khobar) to 0.98 pCi/l (in Taif). In exceptional places in Eastern Province, it is found that the lowest concentration was in the University offices (0.13 pCi/l) and the highest was in the University unoccupied houses (0.81 pCi/l). It is found that the ventilation is the main factor affecting the radon concentration in houses.

  10. Portfolios in Saudi medical colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fida, Nadia M.; Shamim, Muhammad S.

    2016-01-01

    Over recent decades, the use of portfolios in medical education has evolved, and is being applied in undergraduate and postgraduate programs worldwide. Portfolios, as a learning process and method of documenting and assessing learning, is supported as a valuable tool by adult learning theories that stress the need for learners to be self-directed and to engage in experiential learning. Thoughtfully implemented, a portfolio provides learning experiences unequaled by any single learning tool. The credibility (validity) and dependability (reliability) of assessment through portfolios have been questioned owing to its subjective nature; however, methods to safeguard these features have been described in the literature. This paper discusses some of this literature, with particular attention to the role of portfolios in relation to self-reflective learning, provides an overview of current use of portfolios in undergraduate medical education in Saudi Arabia, and proposes research-based guidelines for its implementation and other similar contexts. PMID:26905344

  11. Awareness, attitudes, and practices related to the swine influenza pandemic among the Saudi public

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background During an infectious disease outbreak, it is critical to learn as much as possible about the concerns, knowledge, attitudes, and behavior of the public. Such information can be crucial to the improvement of communication efforts by public health officials and clinicians. The aim of this study was to identify awareness, attitudes, and practices related to influenza A (H1N1) among the Saudi public. Methods A cross-sectional study of 1,548 adult subjects recruited from various shopping malls in Riyadh and Jeddah was conducted. All of the subjects were interviewed using a questionnaire that tested their knowledge, attitudes, and use of precautionary measures in relation to the H1N1 influenza pandemic. Results More than half (54.3%, 840/1548) of the participants showed high concern, 43.7%(677/1548) showed a low level of knowledge, and 60.8%(941/1548) had taken minimal or no precautionary measures. After adjusting for other variables, education level was the only significant predictor of the level of concern (p < 0.001), while greater precautionary measures were taken by participants who were male (p < 0.001), older (p = 0.047), better educated (p = 0.04), and more knowledgeable (p < 0.001). More than one-third (38.3%) of participants were not convinced that the MOH reports about the disease were true, and only 16.1% of the participants reported receiving information from health providers. Conclusions High concern did not translate into a higher compliance with precautionary recommendations, possibly due to the low level of knowledge about the disease among the public. Frequent communication between physicians and the public is recommended to help dispel myths about the disease and to spread better information about the role that the public can play in limiting the spread of the disease. PMID:20187976

  12. The Global Youth Tobacco Survey: 2001-2002 in Riyadh region, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bedah, Abdullah Mohammed; Qureshi, Naseem Akhtar

    2011-01-01

    Tobacco use is a major public health problem, and its prevalence is globally increasing, especially among children and adolescents. The Global Youth Tobacco Survey aimed to explore the epidemiological trends and risk factors of tobacco smoking among intermediate school boys in Riyadh region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A two-stage cluster sample design was used to produce a representative sample of male students from selected schools. The participants (n = 1830) self recorded their responses on the Global Youth Tobacco Survey questionnaire. Lifetime prevalence of cigarette smoking was 35%, while 13% of students currently used other tobacco products. About 16% of students currently smoked at home, and 84% of students bought cigarettes without any refusal from storekeepers. Thirty-one percent and 39% of students were exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke inside and outside the house, respectively, which was definitely or probably harmful to health as opined by 87% of participants, and 74% voiced to ban smoking from public places. Among current smokers, 69% intended (without attempt) to quit and 63% attempted (but failed) to quit during the past year. Almost an equal number of students saw antismoking and prosmoking media messages in the last month, and 28% of students were offered free cigarettes by a tobacco company representative. In schools, more than 50% of students were taught about the dangers of cigarette smoking in the last year. Smoking by parents, older brothers, and close friends, watching prosmoking cigarette advertisements, free offer of cigarettes by tobacco company representatives, perception of smoking being not harmful, and continuing smoking which can be easily quit significantly increased the odds of smoking by students. The common use of tobacco in school populations needs to be addressed by, among other tobacco control measures, a strict ban on cigarette selling to minors and intensive regular tobacco control campaigns involving health and

  13. Epidemiological study of scorpion stings in Saudi Arabia between 1993 and 1997

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. K. Al-Sadoon

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This investigation evaluated the epidemiological aspects of scorpion stings in different areas of Saudi Arabia. A total of 72,168 cases of scorpion stings recorded in Ministry of Health Medical Centers in 11 selected areas of Saudi Arabia were analyzed based on area, age, sex, time of sting, sting site, treatment outcome, time of year, and scorpion species. Stings occurred throughout the year; the highest frequency was in June (15.08%, the lowest in February (2.52%. Most patients were male (61.8%; the majority of which were more than 15 years old (65.4%. Nocturnal envenomation (47.74% was more common than diurnal (43.91%; most stings were in exposed limbs (90.95%, mainly in the lower limbs (63%. Most envenomings were mild (74.48% and all evolved to cure, except for one death. Envenomation was characterized by local pain, erythema, headache, vomiting, and anxiety. This study found that the Leiurus quinquestriatus (Ehrenberg 1828, Androctonus crassicauda (Olivier 1807, and Apistobuthus pterygocercus (Finnegan 1807 were responsible for most of the stings, indicating their medical importance in Saudi Arabia. The study shows low threat to life despite the high number of stings; this is a result of the availability of medical facilities and the multi-center antivenom use in different areas of Saudi Arabia.

  14. Exploring the Causes of Listening Comprehension Anxiety from EFL Saudi Learners’ Perspectives: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Otair

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety is an important factor in foreign language learning. Very few studies have been done on English as a Foreign Language (EFL Saudi students in listening classes. Therefore, this pilot study was aimed at exploring the causes of listening comprehension anxiety from EFL Saudi learners’ perspectives at Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia. The pilot study involved two students who were selected based on the following criteria: 1 Only Saudi male undergraduate students who enrolled in Preparatory Year Program (PYP at Majmaah University would be involved in this study, 2 The students who had studied or lived in native English speaking countries would be excluded. The researcher used pseudonyms to refer to the participants as Mohammad and Ismail. This study employed a qualitative case study research design. The data were collected through Semi-structured interviews with the participants. The interview sessions were audiotaped and transcribed. The results show that the participants experienced a high level of anxiety when doing the listening comprehension tasks. Three main causes of listening comprehension anxiety emerged from this study: 1 the problematic nature of listening comprehension, 2 the classroom atmosphere, and 3 the low English proficiency of the students.

  15. Association of Sarcopenic Obesity with Higher Serum High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein Levels in Chinese Older Males--A Community-Based Study (Taichung Community Health Study-Elderly, TCHS-E.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Wei Yang

    Full Text Available The prevalence of obesity and sarcopenia is high among the elderly. The simultaneous occurrence of these two disorders results in sarcopenic obesity. Research suggests that inflammation has an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity and sarcopenia. This study explores the impact of sarcopenic obesity on inflammatory markers, including interleukin-6 (IL-6, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α. This study is a community-based cross-sectional study. The study sample consisted of 844 community-dwelling people aged 65 years and older (448 men and 396 women. Sarcopenia was characterized by low muscle mass (skeletal muscle index < 6.87 and 5.46 kg/m2 for men and women, respectively, and obesity was characterized by excess body fat (body fat percentage greater than the 60th percentile of the study sample by sex [27.82% in men and 37.61% in women]. Older individuals identified with sarcopenic obesity were those who had both sarcopenia and obesity. Inflammatory markers such as IL-6, hs-CRP, and TNF-α were measured. The prevalence rates of obesity only, sarcopenia only, and sarcopenic obesity were 32.94%, 11.85%, and 7.23%, respectively. No difference was observed in the serum levels of IL-6 and TNF-α among the four groups of combined sarcopenia and obesity status. After multivariate adjustment, the serum hs-CRP levels in the obesity only and in the sarcopenic obesity groups were 0.14 and 0.16 mg/dL among males, respectively, which were significantly higher than that in the normal group (P=0.012 and 0.036. Our results provide evidence that obesity and sarcopenic obesity are associated with increased levels of serum hs-CRP among males.

  16. Saudi Arabia: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-14

    States Ethnic Groups: (native Saudis only) Arab 90%; Afro - Asian 10% Religion: (native Saudis only) Sunni 85-95%, Shiite 5- 15% Literacy (2003...lack of government transparency. Violence against women, violations of the rights of children, and discrimination on the basis of gender, religion, sect...about backlogs and perceived discrimination , Saudi officials and nationals voiced strong concerns about declines in the number of Saudis visiting the

  17. Blended learning in Saudi universities: challenges and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Reem Alebaikan; Salah Troudi

    2010-01-01

    This study is an attempt to investigate the nature of obstacles and challenges encountered at Saudi universities while implementing a blended learning approach. A literature review of blended learning rationale and designs, and the status of web-based education in Saudi higher education are demonstrated. Three main challenges of applying blended learning in Saudi higher education are addressed. One major challenge to be considered in the implementation of blended learning in Saudi universitie...

  18. Celiac disease presenting as rickets in Saudi children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assiri, Asaad; Saeed, Anjum; AlSarkhy, Ahmed; El Mouzan, Mohammed Issa; El Matary, Wael

    2013-01-01

    Rickets is commonly seen as a sign of malabsorption like celiac disease if it is not treated appropriately with vitamin D and calcium supplements. The aim of this study was to examine the frequency of diagnosis of celiac disease among children with unexplained rickets in Saudi children at a tertiary hospital setting. Retrospective review of records of patients referred over 10 years to a pediatric gastroenterology and hepatology unit. The study included all patients referred for evaluation of unexplained rickets and osteomalacia and screened for celiac disease. The diagnosis of rickets was made on the basis of history, physical examination, biochemical and radiological investigations. The diagnosis of celiac disease was made based on the ESPGHAN (European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition) criteria. Twenty-six children with a mean (SD) age of 9.5 (4.6) years (5 males, range 1-15 years) were referred for evaluation of unexplained rickets and were screened for celiac disease. The diagnosis of celiac disease based on small bowel biopsy findings was confirmed in 10 (38.4%) patients with rickets. Serological markers for celiac disease including antiendomyseal antibodies and antitissue transglutaminase antibodies were positive in all ten children. Rickets is not an uncommon presentation of celiac disease in Saudi children and pediatricians should consider celiac disease as an underlying cause for rickets.

  19. Insomnia in chronic renal patients on dialysis in Saudi Arabia

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    Al-Hejaili Fayez F

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have shown that insomnia is a common sleep disorder among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of insomnia in Saudi patients with ESRD who are on maintenance dialysis. Methods This was an observational cross-sectional study carried out over a period of five months in two hemodialysis centers in Saudi Arabia. To assess the prevalence of insomnia, we used the ICSD-2 definition. We also examined the association between insomnia and other sleep disorders, the underlying causes of renal failure, dialysis duration, dialysis shift, and other demographic data. Results Out of 227 enrolled patients, insomnia was reported by 60.8%. The mean patient age was 55.7 ± 17.2 years; 53.7% were male and 46.3% were female. Insomnia was significantly associated with female gender, afternoon hemodialysis, Restless Legs Syndrome, high risk for obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and excessive daytime sleepiness (P-values: 0.05, 0.01, Conclusion Insomnia is common in dialysis patients and was significantly associated with other sleep disorders. Greater attention needs to be given to the care of dialysis patients with regard to the diagnosis and management of insomnia and associated sleep disorders.

  20. Consanguinity pattern and heritability of Vitiligo in Arar, Saudi Arabia

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    Dhaifallah A Alenizi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Epidemiological studies have shown that vitiligo is a complex trait, involving combinations of pathogenic effects of multiple susceptibility genes as well as environmental risk factors. Aim: To observe whether consanguinity increased the incidence of vitiligo in Saudi patients from Arar. Patients and Methods: This study included 69 Saudi patients with vitiligo and their families. These patients, selected from the experience specialist dermatology center in Arar, from April 2011 to 2012, were interviewed by a dermatologist to confirm the diagnosis and complete a questionnaire. Results: A total of 69 patients, 40 males and 29 females were selected. Their mean age was 34.5 ± 11.8 years with the median age of 23 years. The mean age at onset of disease was 27.9 ± 12.9 years. The mean duration of the disease was 9.7 ± 5.3 years. The frequency of focal, vulgaris, universal, and acrofacial subtypes was 22 (31.9%, 21 (30.4%, 8 (11.6%, and 18 (26.1%, respectively. A positive family history of vitiligo was obtained in 45 (65.2% cases. A comparison of the frequency of vitiligo among siblings in relation to the general population was more in accord with the multifactorial model. Conclusion: Consanguinity in marriage increases the incidence of the disease. Therefore, genetic counseling and premarital examination would be important contributions to lower the prevalence of vitiligo.

  1. Nedtur. Griske prinser svækker Saudi-Arabien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Søren

    2016-01-01

    I analyze the ability of Saudi-Arabia to adjust to present low oil prices. I analyze the political foundations of the Saudi state and its weak autonomy in relation to its power bases: the avaricious princes and the fundamentalist religious Sheikhs. I am pessimistic as to the likelyhood of Saudi...

  2. Treatment patterns, resource utilization, and outcomes among hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus complicated skin and soft tissue infections in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia

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    Matar MJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Madonna J Matar,1 Rima Moghnieh,2 Adel F Alothman,3 Abdulhakeem O Althaqafi,4 Thamer H Alenazi,3 Fayssal M Farahat,4 Shelby Corman,5 Caitlyn T Solem,5 Nirvana Raghubir,6 Cynthia Macahilig,7 Seema Haider,8 Jennifer M Stephens5 1Department of Infectious Diseases, Notre Dame des Secours University Hospital, Jbeil, Lebanon; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Makassed General Hospital, Beirut, Lebanon; 3College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Infection Prevention and Control, King AbdulAziz Medical City, King Saud bin AbdulAziz University for Health Sciences, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 5Pharmerit International, Real-World Evidence/Data Analytics, Bethesda, MD, 6Pfizer, New York, NY, 7Medical Data Analytics, Parsippany, NJ, 8Pfizer, Groton, CT, USA Objectives: To describe treatment patterns and medical resource use for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTI in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon in terms of drug selection against the infecting pathogen as well as hospital resource utilization and clinical outcomes among patients with these infections. Methods: This retrospective chart review study evaluated 2011–2012 data from five hospitals in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon. Patients were included if they had been discharged with a diagnosis of MRSA cSSTI, which was culture-proven or suspected based on clinical criteria. Hospital data were abstracted for a random sample of patients with each infection type to capture demographics, treatment patterns, hospital resource utilization, and clinical outcomes. Statistical analysis was descriptive. Results: Data were abstracted from medical records of 87 patients with MRSA cSSTI; mean age 52.4±25.9 years and 61% male. Only 64% of patients received an MRSA active initial therapy, with 56% of first

  3. Prevalence of restless legs syndrome and associated risk factors among middle-aged Saudi population

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    Siraj Omar Wali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS in the general population ranges from 5 to 15%; however, locally, such data are scarce. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of RLS in the middle-aged Saudi population. Methods : This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted from February 2013 to June 2013 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The target study population was Saudi school employees. Saudi employees aged 30-60 years were randomly selected and interviewed individually. Trained interviewers completed the Wisconsin Sleep Questionnaire, questions about demographics, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale to measure daytime sleepiness, and questions regarding symptoms of RLS based on the criteria defined by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG. Results: This survey revealed that 8.4% (95% confidence interval (CI: (7.35-9.45 of the 2,682 participants (62.5% of them were males had RLS. There was no age effect on the prevalence of RLS. RLS was found to be significantly associated with other sleep disorders, including excessive daytime sleepiness and habitual snoring. A univariate analysis revealed significant correlation of many factors with the RLS, including gender, consanguinity, snoring, diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic bronchitis, and smoking. However, when a multivariate logistic regression analysis performed, RLS continued to be associated with male gender, diabetes, asthma, and habitual snoring only. Conclusion: The prevalence of RLS is 8.4%, which is within the range reported by Western studies. However, unlike findings of most studies, RLS significantly affects males more than females. In addition, snoring, asthma, and consanguinity are potential new risk factors for RLS.

  4. Perceptions of Saudi dental students on cultural competency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shehri, Huda A; Al-Taweel, Sara M; Ivanoff, Chris S

    2016-02-01

    To probe dental students' perceptions on their cultural competency and international student exchange programs as a way of improving cultural competency training. A cross-sectional survey (n=460) was distributed to predoctoral students at the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in May 2014 at the male and female university campuses. Descriptive statistics were carried out using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (p=0.05).  It was found that 79.6% of students think that teaching them regarding cultural diversity is important. Only 41% of students thought their dental education teaches them on the importance of volunteerism and philanthropy. Most students (89.8%) think that international student exchanges can enhance their cultural competence. In this study, it was found that students believe that cultural competence is important and participation in international student exchange programs can enhance their training.

  5. Sustainable Energy Development in Saudi Arabia

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    Mounir Belloumi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this research is to study the role of energy consumption in economic growth in Saudi Arabia over the period of 1971–2012 using the autoregressive distributed lag (ARDL cointegration procedure, and based on neoclassical growth, endogenous growth, and ecological-economics viewpoints. Our empirical results show the existence of a cointegrating relationship between the different variables investigated. In addition, all the inputs (conventional and non-conventional Granger cause economic growth in both the short and long runs. Our findings confirm the energy-led growth hypothesis in the case of Saudi Arabia. Hence, energy conservation policies may deteriorate economic growth in Saudi Arabia if they are not followed by measures that improve energy efficiency, energy saving technologies and encourage the investment and use of renewable energy sources such as solar and wind energies that can participate in the attenuation of climate changes.

  6. Lifestyle factors associated with overweight and obesity among Saudi adolescents

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    Al-Hazzaa Hazzaa M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better understanding of the relationships between obesity and lifestyle factors is necessary for effective prevention and management of obesity in youth. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the associations between obesity measures and several lifestyle factors, including physical activity, sedentary behaviors and dietary habits among Saudi adolescents aged 14–19 years. Methods This was a school-based cross-sectional study that was conducted in three cities in Saudi Arabia (Al-Khobar, Jeddah and Riyadh. The participants were 2906 secondary school males (1400 and females (1506 aged 14–19 years, who were randomly selected using a multistage stratified cluster sampling technique. Measurements included weight, height, body mass index (BMI, waist circumference, waist/height ratio (WHtR, screen time (television viewing, video games and computer use, physical activity (determined using a validated questionnaire, and dietary habits (intake frequency per week. Logistic regression was used to examine the associations between obesity and lifestyle factors. Results Compared with non-obese, obese males and females were significantly less active, especially in terms of vigorous activity, had less favorable dietary habits (e.g., lower intake of breakfast, fruits and milk, but had lower intake of sugar-sweetened drinks and sweets/chocolates. Logistic regression analysis showed that overweight/obesity (based on BMI categories or abdominal obesity (based on WHtR categories were significantly and inversely associated with vigorous physical activity levels (aOR for high level = 0.69, 95% CI 0.41–0.92 for BMI and 0.63, 95% CI 0.45–0.89 for WHtR and frequency of breakfast (aOR for  Conclusions The present study identified several lifestyle factors associated with obesity that may represent valid targets for the prevention and management of obesity among Saudi adolescents. Primary prevention of obesity by

  7. Breast cancer screening in Saudi Arabia: free but almost no takers.

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    Charbel El Bcheraoui

    Full Text Available Mammography ensures early diagnosis and a better chance for treatment and recovery from breast cancer. We conducted a national survey to investigate knowledge and practices of breast cancer screening among Saudi women aged 50 years or older in order to inform the breast cancer national health programs.The Saudi Health Interview Survey is a national multistage survey of individuals aged 15 years or older. The survey included questions on socio-demographic characteristics, tobacco consumption, diet, physical activity, health-care utilization, different health-related behaviors, and self-reported chronic conditions. Female respondents were asked about knowledge and practices of self and clinical breast exams, as well as mammography.Between April and June 2013, a total of 10,735 participants completed the survey. Among respondents, 1,135 were women aged 50 years or older and were included in this analysis. About 89% of women reported not having a clinical breast exam in the past year, and 92% reported never having a mammogram. Women living in Al Sharqia had the highest rate of mammography use. Women who were educated, those who had received a routine medical exam within the last two years, and those who were diagnosed with hypertension were more likely to have had a mammogram in the past two years.Our results show very low rates of breast cancer screening in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, a country with free health services. This calls for educational campaigns to improve breast cancer screening. Addressing the barriers for breast cancer screening is a public health imperative.

  8. Epidemiological aspects of prematurity in the Eastern region of Saudi Arabia

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    Faisal O. Al-Qurashi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the epidemiological characteristics of prematurity and survival rate in preterm infants diagnosed at a university hospital in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective study was carried out of 476 preterm infants who were admitted with the diagnosis of prematurity to King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al-Khobar, Saudi Arabia, between June 2008 and 2013. Demographics, birth weight, and neonatal survival rate were analyzed. Results: Four hundred and seventy-six preterm infants were admitted with a total prevalence of 7.5%. Descriptive analysis revealed 55% were males. Extremely preterm infants (<28 weeks’ gestation comprised 9% and very preterm infants (28 to <32 weeks’ gestation comprised 20%. Extremely low-birth-weight (ELBW infants (<1000 g comprised 11%. One hundred and fifty-seven (32% infants were small for gestational age. Out of the total number of ELBW infants, 58% of them were discharged. The overall mortality was 7.6%. The mortality rate of male infants was 53%. The survival to discharge according to gestational age ranged from 30-97.6%. Conclusion: The estimated prevalence of preterm births in a university hospital in eastern province of Saudi Arabia, is consistent with various studies from different parts of the world.

  9. Prevalence of harassment and discrimination among residents in three training hospitals in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fnais, Naif; al-Nasser, Muhammad; Zamakhshary, Mohammad; Abuznadah, Wesam; Dhukair, Shahla Al; Saadeh, Mayssa; Al-Qarni, Ali; Bokhari, Bayan; Alshaeri, Taqreed; Aboalsamh, Nouf; Binahmed, AbdulAziz

    2013-01-01

    Multiple surveys of medical residents have shown a high incidence of harassment and discrimination in academic health centers. Harassment has a negative effects on residents' health and on their ability to function. No previous study has documented the prevalence of harassment and discrimination among residents in Saudi Arabia. We aimed in this study to assess the prevalence of harassment and discrimination among residents at a tertiary care academic hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Cross-sectional survey conducted at National Guard Hospitals in Riyadh, Jeddah and Al-Ahsa'a from 27 July to 20 August 2010. The survey included questions on the prevalence of harassment of different types, inlcuding verbal, academic, physical and sexual harassment, as well as discrimination on the basis of gender, region of origin or physical appearance. Of 380 residents, 213 (56%) returned a completed questionnaire (123 male, 57.8%). At least one of type of harassment and discrimination was reported by 83.6% of respondents. The most frequently reported forms were verbal harassment and gender discrimination (61.5% and 58.3%, respectively). Sexual harassment was commonly reported (19.3%) and was experienced significantly more often by female residents than by male residents (P=.0061). Harassment and discrimination of Saudi residents is common with more than three-quarters reporting having had such an experience. Identification of the risk factors is a necessary first step in clarifying this issue and could be used when planning strategies for prevention.

  10. Prevalence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis in a Saudi adult population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Majdy M; Azzeghaiby, Saleh N; Hammad, Mohammad M; Kujan, Omar B

    2014-11-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and severity of plaque-induced gingivitis among a Saudi adult population in Riyadh region. Three hundred and eighty-five eligible participants in this cross-sectional study were recruited from routine dental patients attending the oral diagnosis clinic at Al-Farabi College in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia from June 2013 to December 2013. A clinical examination was performed by 2 dentists to measure the gingival and plaque indices of Löe and Silness for each participant. The prevalence of gingivitis was 100% among adult subjects aged between 18-40 years old. Moreover, the mean gingival index was 1.68±0.31, which indicates a moderate gingival inflammation. In fact, males showed more severe signs of gingival inflammation compared with females (p=0.001). In addition, the mean plaque index was 0.875±0.49, which indicates a good plaque status of the participants. Interestingly, the age was not related either to the gingival inflammation (p=0.13), or to the amount of plaque accumulation (p=0.17). However, males were more affected than females (p=0.005). The results of this study show that plaque accumulation is strongly associated with high prevalence of moderate to severe gingivitis among Saudi subjects. 

  11. Analysis of Saudi Arabian middle and high school science teachers' conceptions of the nature of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazroa, Hiya Mohammed

    This study was conducted to explore Saudi middle and high school science teachers' conceptions of the Nature of Science (NOS). It also detected the effects of gender, science content major, and years of teaching experience on teachers' conceptions of the NOS. The study included a sample of 786 science teachers (137 male and 649 female) who were teaching in middle and high schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in the 1995-1996 academic year. The study was conducted using a translated version of the Nature of Science Scale (NOSS) developed by Kimball (1967). The scale contains 29 items ranging from "agree" to "disagree", and the scoring of the items ranged from 29 to 87. The lowest score is 29 (1 x 29) and the highest score possible on the test is 87 (3 x 29 items). The data collected was statistically analyzed using descriptive statistics and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The study revealed that Saudi science teachers as a group hold numerous misconceptions about the NOS with a significant difference in understanding the NOS between the male and female teachers. The study also showed that teachers with a major in physics held more adequate views than did teachers with other majors. In addition, novice teachers were found to have more adequate conceptions of the NOS than did experienced teachers.

  12. Incidence and prevalence rates of diabetes mellitus in Saudi Arabia: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alotaibi, Abdulellah; Perry, Lin; Gholizadeh, Leila; Al-Ganmi, Ali

    2017-12-01

    This study aimed to report on the trends in incidence and prevalence rates of diabetes mellitus in Saudi Arabia over the last 25 years (1990-2015). A descriptive review. A systematic search was conducted for English-language, peer reviewed publications of any research design via Medline, EBSCO, PubMed and Scopus from 1990 to 2015. Of 106 articles retrieved, after removal of duplicates and quality appraisal, 8 studies were included in the review and synthesised based on study characteristics, design and findings. Studies originated from Saudi Arabia and applied a variety of research designs and tools to diagnosis diabetes. Of the 8 included studies; three reported type 1 diabetes and five on type 2 diabetes. Overall, findings indicated that the incidence and prevalence rate of diabetes is rising particularly among females, older children/adolescent and in urban areas. Further development are required to assess the health intervention, polices, guidelines, self-management programs in Saudi Arabia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Unconventional therapy use among asthma patients in a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Moamary, Mohamed S

    2008-04-01

    Unconventional therapy (UT) is a therapeutic practice of alternative and complementary medicine that is not currently considered an integral part of modern medical practice. The aim of this article is to investigate the experience of Saudi patients with UT modalities in the treatment of asthma. We carried out a cross-sectional study of asthma patients referred to King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, during the year 2004. Information was collected using a pre-designed questionnaire administered through interviews. Two hundred consecutive patients with a mean age of 52.3 years (+/-18.7) were included in this study. Sixty-nine (34.5%) of those patients used some form of UT in the previous year. There was a tendency to use UT among the older age group (P = 0.029) and among those with longer duration of disease (P = 0.009). However, there was no significant correlation observed between the use of UT and gender, FEV(1), or disease control. The most commonly used form of UT was recitation of Holy Quran (9%), honey (24.5%), herbs (23.5%), cautery (12%), and blackseed (10%). There was no significant correlation between disease control and the use of modalities. Unconventional therapy is frequently practiced by asthma patients in Saudi Arabia, who commonly believe that UT will lead to improvement. The lack of evidence necessitates the fostering of a national project to address the practice of UT.

  14. Epidemiological trends of cutaneous leishmaniasis in Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah Province, Western Region of Saudi Arabia

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    Miskelyemen Abdelatti Elmekki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the epidemiological trends of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL in Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah, western region of KSA. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and sixty-seven parasitologically confirmed CL cases attending Al-Meeqat Hospital, Al-Madinah, during 2012–2015, were included in this study. Results: Both Saudi and non-Saudi nationals were infected, with the highest infection rate being among Saudis (68.7%. Males were more affected than females as 86.9% of the total CL cases were males. Moreover, CL was prevalent in all age groups with higher frequency among young adults and adolescents (23.1% and 22.7%, respectively. Interestingly, almost all the patients in the adolescent and child age groups were Saudis (96.2% and 93.5%, respectively. Considering geographical distribution, the highest percentage of the cases (40.5% were from the northern parts of Al-Madinah province while the eastern parts reported the least infection rate (7.3%. Few cases (2.5% were supposed to encounter the infection abroad. Additionally, the frequency of infection was found to follow a seasonal distribution. Regarding treatment, pentostam, ketoconazole, or cryotherapy were the treatment options usually used. Conclusion: CL is prevalent in Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah area and new foci are being introduced. Thus, detailed studies with large surveillances regarding vector and reservoir hosts in and around the area are needed.

  15. Association of Interleukin-10 Gene Promoter Polymorphisms in Saudi Patients with Vitiligo

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    Abdullah Abanmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The promoter region of human Interleukin −10 gene is highly polymorphic and has been associated with numerous autoimmune diseases. Recent studies have linked vitiligo with defective autoimmune system. This study is aimed to explore a possible association between IL-10 gene polymorphism and vitiligo in Saudi population. This case control study consisted of 184 Saudi subjects including 83 vitiligo patients (40 males, 43 females mean age 27.85 ± 12.43 years and 101 matched controls. Genomic DNA was extracted from the blood samples of healthy controls and Vitiligo patients visiting out patient clinic of Department of Dermatology, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, using QIA ampR DNA mini kit (Qiagen CA, USA. Interleukin-10 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using Arms primers to detect any polymorphism involved at positions −592, −819 and −1082.

  16. Patterns of violent deaths associated with positive ethanol finding in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia

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    Sahar Y. Issa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The analysis of alcohol exemplifies the principal aim of forensic toxicology worldwide. Detection of ethanol in post-mortem cases is getting more important nowadays due to the upsurge in the number of ethanol related fatalities all over the world. Toxicological analysis is mandatory to diagnose, and interpret the presence and levels of alcohol in different post mortem samples. The difficulties in the interpretation of blood alcohol concentration (BAC are more profound when the body shows signs of putrefaction and the measured BAC is low as sometimes it is false positive due to decomposition. Objective: To investigate ethanol related violent deaths, whether suicidal, homicidal or accidental fatalities with positive analytical results regarding ethanol since start of January 2012, till end of December 2014 in Eastern Province, Saudi Arabia. Methods: Ethanol related violent deaths whether suicidal, homicidal or, accidental fatalities over the period from the start of January 2012, till end of December 2014 in the Eastern region, Saudi Arabia were retrospectively investigated. Results: From a total 1376 cases examined in the Forensic Medical Authority, Eastern Province over the assigned three year period, only 94 ethanol positive fatalities were detected and were investigated retrospectively. Cases with positive ethanol results, were chiefly males between 21 and 30 years of age (28.8%. Accidental causes significantly predominated (47.9% over suicidal and homicidal causes (28.8%, and 23.3%, respectively. Most of the cases were non-Saudi (73.3%, with prevalence of Indian nationality (47.8%. Conclusion: The precise statistical mortality database for ethanol related violent deaths may provide an enormous support for the effect of alcohol on aggressive behavior, human health and mortality. In the current study, ethanol positive deaths were 94 in total, with predominance of non-Saudi Indian males. Majority of the studied cases were between 21

  17. Use of social media in education among medical students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuraihi, Anas Khaleel; Almaqati, Ahmed Saeed; Abughanim, Sultan Adnan; Jastaniah, Nisreen Abdulrahman

    2016-12-01

    Social media (SM), a virtual place where people can share, exchange, and communicate their ideas and knowledge, has become the new trend in communication and learning. This study aims to explore Saudi Arabian medical students' usage of SM and to discover the most common resources used in medical education. Furthermore, it aims to illustrate students' belief about the influence of SM on their learning. This cross-sectional study administered validated questionnaires to medical students from different universities in Saudi Arabia, via emails, Twitter, Facebook, and short message service. A non-probability sampling technique was utilized and a sample size of 381 students was arrived at, using 95% confidence interval and 5% margin of error, since the total number of medical students in Saudi Arabia is approximately 36,000. The total respondents were 657 students from 23 different Saudi Arabian medical schools (females: 60.5%, n=397; males: 39.5%, n=260). The questionnaires of 21% of the students (n=139) were excluded from the analysis since they were incomplete. The most common website used by both genders was YouTube (42.3%, n=185); however, males preferred using Twitter and Wikis (p=0.001). With regard to utilizing SM for learning, 95.8% (n=419) of the students believed that it is beneficial. Females stated that SM helps them link basic and clinical science (p=0.003). Medical schools need to improve the utilization of SM by their faculty and students by developing activities and encouraging the usage of SM in education.

  18. Science misconceptions and working memory capacity among Saudi adolescents: A neo-Piagetian investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jubaili, Ahmad Yahya

    This study was designed to investigate the relationships between science misconceptions and working memory capacity in Saudi adolescent students. The participants in this study were from eleventh and twelfth grades; both male and female students and natural and social science Saudi comprised the sample. Also investigated in this study were the conceptions and misconceptions of gravity in a non-European culture, that is Saudi culture, and the variables that differentiated those individuals who could overcome their misconceptions from those who could not and the gender differences in science misconceptions in the context of Saudi culture. Another important focus of this study was to investigate the participants' responses and explanations on the science misconceptions tasks (WLT and EGT). As would be expected, there was a strong correlation between WLT and EGT in the responses of students and their explanations. The most successful students on the WLT and EGT were natural science students rather than social science students, and there were no gender differences between male and female participants. Also investigated were the correlations between the dependent variables (i.e., the WLT and EGT; the measures of science misconceptions) and the independent variables, which were the visual working memory capacity tasks (i.e., FIT and VPS), the field independence/dependence (FASP), students' grade point average (GPA), age, academic major, gender, and grade level. It was found that both of the dependent variables (i.e., the WLT and EGT) correlated significantly with the same independent variables, the FIT, VPS, FASP, academic major, and students' grade point average (GPA).

  19. Dietary Habits of Saudi Medical Students at University of Dammam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Mohammad H

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the dietary habits and life style of medical students. This is a cross sectional study as self-reported questionnaire for the male and female medical students at College of Medicine University of Dammam, eastern province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, comparing their habits and life style according to their gender and to their academic levels; 1(st), 3(rd) and 6(th) year. 562 students participated in the study with response rate of 91%, average age: 20.2776± 2.06175), males students were 333 (59.25%) and female students were 229 (40.75%) corresponding to the actual male to female ratio in this medical school. The majority of the students (91.3%) were consuming fast foods, majority are males (85%) do it 3 times or more per week, only 8.7% denied eating fast food with no significant difference between the three academic levels. Majority of students are aware of the benefits of the vegetables and fruits and the disadvantage of the soft drinks yet most of them consume a lot of soft drinks and less of vegetables and fruits. Physical exercise was not done regularly in 65% of the male medical students and 80% of the female with almost similar percentage in all the three levels. Contrary to the expectations and regardless of studying in medical college, our medical students; both male and females at different academic levels are having major bad dietary habits and life style that is comparable to the general population in the kingdom.

  20. Saudi Arabic, Urban Hijazi Dialect: Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Margaret K.

    The three major dialect groups of Saudi Arabia are Hijazi, Najdi and Shargi. Hijazi is used for government and commercial purposes and is the most widely understood. This basic course uses the Hijazi dialect of Jidda, which is designated "urban" to distinguish it from Bedouin varieties. The book will provide students with the basic…

  1. Saudi Arabia between conservatism, accomodation and reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Aarts, P.; Wagemakers, J.; Kanie, M.; Geel, A.

    2012-01-01

    Of all the countries in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia seems to have remained immovable since the beginning of the Arab Spring. What does conservatism mean, are reforms possible, and what is the pace of change? The clever mix of conservatism, reform and accommodation are the characteristic features

  2. Online Continuing Medical Education in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwadie, Adnan D.

    2013-01-01

    As the largest country in the Middle East, Saudi Arabia and its health care system are well positioned to embark on an online learning intervention so that health care providers in all areas of the country have the resources for updating their professional knowledge and skills. After a brief introduction, online continuing medical education is…

  3. Archiving Saudi heritage using the holographic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althagafi, A.; Richardson, M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper focuses on the use of the Yuri Nikolaevich DENISYUK holographic recording process to document, archive and display Saudi heritage. The goal of this research is to develop a technique of archiving heritage by using a high-tech holographic process to capture a three-dimensional presentation of ancient jewelry artifacts of the Saudi Heritage in particular. This study concentrates on five particular items of handmade authentic ancient metal jewelry from different parts of Saudi Arabia. When conducting this research experiments were conducted using both red-green sensitive plates sensitive to 633 nm and 532 nm respectively. Material thickness ranged between 1.5 and 3 millimeters were used, consequently in the dark room, varied chemicals for developing the holograms were employed. Red and green laser devices were also used with exposure times between 8 to 18 seconds of laser light dispersion through diffused surfaces in reflection holography. The outcome in each case was varied. The holograms captured the jewelry pieces with all the engravings and minute details, thus archiving the Saudi Heritage of that time. What makes holograms a revolutionary method for presenting valuable and/or ancient artifacts is the fact that they offer a more practical and convenient solution to travel around the world than displaying the originals items. Thus, museum visitors can enjoy and appreciate the precious artifacts otherwise unseen and lost without holography.

  4. Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in Saudi Arabia

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-28

    This podcast looks at the epidemiologic characteristics of Alkhurma Hemorrhagic Fever in humans in Najran City, Saudi Arabia. CDC epidemiologist Dr. Adam MacNeil discusses the severity and risk factors for the illness.  Created: 10/28/2010 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 11/17/2010.

  5. Making a Smart Campus in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuelyaman, Eltayab Salih

    2008-01-01

    Prince Sultan University (PSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, has conceptualized what it means to be a smart campus after surveying similar notions worldwide. A "smart" campus requires smart teachers, smart technology, and smart pedagogical centers. It deploys smart teachers and gives them smart tools and ongoing support to do their jobs…

  6. Vitamin D deficiency in children living in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha M. H. K. Mansour

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vitamin D deficiency is an unrecognized epidemic and a common health problem worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the vitamin D status in children living in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia and to study its relation to various variables. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in the pediatric clinic in Jeddah Clinic Hospital-Kandarah, Jeddah, KSA, from October through December 2010, in which 510 healthy children aged 4-15 years were enrolled. Serum calcium, phosphorus, alkaline phosphatase and 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OHD] were measured. Dietary vitamin D intake and duration of daily sunlight exposure were determined. 25(OHD levels <20 ng/mL and <7 ng/mL were defined as relative and severe vitamin D deficiency, respectively. Results: The mean concentration of 25(OHD was 13.07 ± 7.81 ng/mL. Seventy subjects (13.72% had normal 25(OHD level ranging 20-70 ng/mL. Three hundred (58.82% had relative 25(OHD deficiency and 140 (27.45% had severe deficiency (P=0.000. 220 (43.14% subjects were males and 290 (56.86% were females having a statistically significant higher incidence of 25(OHD deficiency (P=0.019. 54.9% were Saudis, 27.45% were Yemenis and 11.76% were Egyptians. Saudis and Yemenis were more subjected to 25(OHD deficiency in comparison to Egyptians and other nationalities (P=0.01. There were significant inverse correlations between 25(OHD levels and bony aches (P=0.000. 56.25% of asymptomatic children had vitamin D deficiency (P=0.000. Duration of sunlight exposure and daily intake of vitamin D had significant effects on serum level of vitamin D (P=0.000. Conclusions: A high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in children living in Jeddah was observed in this study. Vitamin D supplementation of food products can prevent vitamin D deficiency in these children.

  7. Trend analysis of the correlation of amino acid plasma profile with glycemic status in Saudi diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad A. Al-Abbasi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of amino acids in diabetes mellitus and its metabolic traits have been suggested previously; however, studied to a very limited scale in the Saudi patient population. Patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus were included in the current clinical study. Sample was representative and in accordance with the national population distribution. Blood samples were drawn and assayed for glucose, total cholesterol, triglyceride, high density lipoprotein and low density lipoprotein. General biochemical markers, such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP, creatinine kinase (CK, aspartate transaminase (AST, alanine transaminase (ALT and blood urea nitrogen (BUN were assessed. Serum amino acids of different categories (essential, semi-essential and metabolic indicator amino acids were assessed. Correlation co-efficient between each amino acid and serum glucose level was calculated. The current study showed positive correlation between amino acid level and glucose serum concentration in male while it showed negative correlation in female Saudi diabetic patients. Male patients had significantly higher methionine concentration parallel to their glycemic status. Metabolic indicator amino acids significantly changed in concordance with the glycemic status of female patients more than in male patients. In conclusion, serum amino acid is positively correlated with glycemic status in Saudi male diabetic patients while negatively correlated in female patients. Yet, further study would be recommended to utilize serum amino acid profile as surrogate parameter for the metabolic complications of diabetes mellitus.

  8. Saudi Arabia’s Nuclear Posture: Is Hedging the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    14. SUBJECT TERMS Saudi Arabia, Nuclear, Hedging, Pakistan , Japan 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 161 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...and its allies, which drastically inflated oils prices until 1974. This event highlights Saudi Arabia’s willingness to part from the United States in...explores the implications of Saudi oil policy and the goals of economic reform. Once a swing producer of oil that valued price stability over short-term

  9. Medication burden of Saudi Arabian women receiving antiresorptive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sadat-Ali M; Al-Shafie B; Al-Omran AS; Azam MQ

    2012-01-01

    Mir Sadat-Ali,1 Bader Al-Shafie,2 Abdallah S Al-Omran,1 Mohammed Q Azam11Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmacy, King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, Saudi ArabiaBackground and purpose: Osteoporosis is common in the Saudi Arabian population, and its successful treatment requires full compliance. Patients who require antiresorptive therapy, such as oral bisphosphonates, may suffer from other disease...

  10. Psychiatric disorders among infertile men and women attending three infertility clinics in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosaimi, Fahad Dakheel; Altuwirqi, Maram Hani; Bukhari, Mujahid; Abotalib, Zeinab; BinSaleh, Saleh

    2015-01-01

    No study has assessed psychiatric disorders among infertile men and women seeking fertility treatment in Saudi Arabia. Therefore, we sought to measure the rate of psychiatric disorders in this population. This was a cross-sectional observational study among patients attending infertility clinics at three referral hospitals in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between January 2013 and September 2014. 406 patients (206 women and 200 men) participated in the study. The approved Arabic version of the MINI tool was used to assess 18 common psychiatric illnesses. The response rate was 81%. Of the men surveyed, only 4.5% self-reported having a psychiatric disorder. Of the women surveyed, only 10.2% reported having a psychiatric disorder. However, using the MINI scale, psychiatric illness was documented in 30% of males and 36.9% of females. The most common diagnoses for both genders were depression (21.7%) and anxiety (21.2%). Significantly more females than males exhibited suicidality and depression. In contrast, significantly more males than females had bipolar disorders and substance-related disorders. A low monthly income among male and female participants and polygamy among female participants were significantly associated with psychiatric disorders. This study shows that a higher prevalence of psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, among infertile men and women in Saudi Arabia is associated with lower income and polygamy. This study highlights the importance of integrated care for alleviating the psychological burden of this unfortunate population and improving outcomes and quality of life. This study also encourages follow-up studies that aim to further understand the complex relationship between fertility and psychological well-being.

  11. The Use of Learner Autonomy in English as a Foreign Language Context among Saudi Undergraduates Enrolled in Preparatory Year Deanship at Najran University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzubi, Ali Abbas Falah; Singh, Manjet Kaur Mehar; Pandian, Ambigapathy

    2017-01-01

    This paper explores the current practices of learner autonomy among Saudi undergraduates at Preparatory Year, Najran University. The Short List questionnaire developed by Dixon (2011) was administered to measure the use of autonomous learning in English as a foreign language (EFL) context. Quantitative data were gathered from 208 male students in…

  12. The Potential of Wiki Technology as an E-Learning Tool in Science and Education; Perspectives of Undergraduate Students in Al-Baha University, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzahrani, Ibraheem; Woollard, John

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the potential of wiki technology as an e-learning tool in Al-Baha University, Saudi Arabia with a random sample in two colleges: science and education. 24 male students participated in this survey. The data is collected through interviewer-administered questionnaires with 16 questions divided into four axes. The data is…

  13. 23. Epidemiological aspects and clinical outcomes of mitral valve prolapse in Saudi adults over a 10 year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. alkahtani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mitral valve prolapse (MVP is a well recognized clinical entity that is associated with significant morbidity. Epidemiology, echocardiographic (echo characteristics and clinical outcome of MVP in Saudi Arabia have not been studied. To determine the prevalence, echo features and clinical outcome of MVP among the adult Saudi patients who underwent echo evaluation over a 10-year period.Retrospective review of consecutive cases of MVP or any of its components as diagnose by echocardiogram. Study was conducted in King Abdulaziz Cardiac Center, Riyadh and included 121,419 adult echo studies done between January 2003 and December 2012. Study population consisted of 77,176 patients after removing duplicate studies. Echo parameters for all Saudi nationals ⩾14 y of age were collected from the Xcelera database. Mitral valve disease due to non-myxomatous prolapse were excluded. Among the study population (n = 77,176 600 patients were labled as having MVP or any of its echo features (0.7%. Mean age was 64 years and 62% were males. Majority of patients (54.4% had mild MVP, while moderate and severe prolapse were present in 21.1% and 24.5% respectively. Severe mitral regurgitation was present in 16.5% and chordal rupture was noted in 9%. Left ventricular size was moderately dilated in 7.6% and severely dilated in 1.3%.Prevalence of MVP in Saudi nationals at a referral cardiac center is less than the reported international figure of 1-3%. In contrary to published literature MVP in Saudi population seems to be more common in males and seems to be diagnosed at a later age.

  14. Public awareness of blood donation in Central Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A; Al-Assiri, Mohammed H; Al-Omani, Manar; Al Johar, Alwaleed; Al Hakbani, Abdulaziz; Alaskar, Ahmed S

    2014-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, voluntary donors are the only source of blood donation. The aim of this study was to assess the level of public knowledge and attitude toward blood donation in Saudi Arabia. Using a previously validated questionnaire that comprises 38 questions to assess the levels of knowledge, attitudes, and motivations towards blood donation, 469 Saudi adults who attended different shopping malls in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia were surveyed. Multiple regression analyses were used to identify the significant predictors of blood donation, with the significance set at Pmobile blood collection units nearer to individuals' places of work to reduce their time costs of donating is a necessity.

  15. Providing culturally congruent care for Saudi patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutair, Abbas Saleh Al; Plummer, Virginia; O'Brien, Anthony Paul; Clerehan, Rosemary

    2014-01-01

    This article aims to increase an awareness of caring for Saudi families by non-Saudi nurses to improve their understanding of culturally competent care from a Saudi perspective. Healthcare providers have a duty of a care to deliver holistic and culturally specific health care to their patients. As a consequence of 'duty of care' obligations, healthcare providers must facilitate culturally congruent care for patients of diverse cultural backgrounds. For the Saudi family considerable cultural clashes may arise when Saudi patients are hospitalized and receive care from healthcare professionals who do not understand Islamic principles and Saudi cultural beliefs and values. The healthcare workforce in Saudi Arabia is a unique multicultural workforce that is mix of Saudi and significant other nationalities. Saudi nurses for example represent only 36.3% of the workforce in the different health sectors. Whilst the different ethnic and cultural background expatriate nurses represent 63.7% (Ministry of Health, 2010). This article also could increase the awareness of healthcare professionals caring for Arab and Muslims patients in another context in the world.

  16. Patient preferences in selecting a dentist: survey results from the urban population of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huraib, Sahar Bin; Nahas, Nadia Al; Al-Balbeesi, Hana O; Abu-Aljadayl, Faida Moawia; Vellappally, Sajith; Sukumaran, Anil

    2015-03-01

    Awareness of gender- or nationality-driven preconceptions can help dentists to have a better interpretation of the dentist-patient relationship. It is even more noteworthy to understand these predilections in Saudi society, where women and men are usually segregated due to religion- and culture-based considerations. This study is one of the first to explore the preferences of patients when selecting a dentist with respect to gender and nationality in the city of Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 445 community residents residing in Riyadh were randomly selected for a cross-sectional study. The participants completed a survey designed to assess which of two factors (gender and/or nationality) were perceived as most relevant in choosing a dentist. Statistical analysis of the data was performed using the SPSS 11.5 software. Female participants did not show any preference for the gender of the dentist, whereas 40% of the male participants preferred a male dentist. Participants also favored male dentists in the felds of oral surgery (78.9%), implants (74.1%), endodontics (67.5%), orthodontics (65.8%) and prosthodontics (64.2%). An exception was noted in pediatric dentistry, for which female dentists were favored by 52.8% of the participants. Additionally, most (66.1%) participants did not have any preference for the nationality of the dentist. Riyadh residents showed a general preference for a male dentist but demonstrated no preference for nationality when selecting a dentist.

  17. 2015 Guidelines for Osteoporosis in Saudi Arabia: Recommendations from the Saudi Osteoporosis Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Yousef; Sulimani, Riad; Sabico, Shaun; Raef, Hussein; Fouda, Mona; Alshahrani, Fahad; Al Shaker, Mohammad; Al Wahabi, Basma; Sadat-Ali, Mir; Al Rayes, Hanan; Al Aidarous, Salwa; Saleh, Siham; Al Ayoubi, Fakhr; Al-Daghri, Nasser M

    2015-01-01

    To provide guidelines for medical professionals in Saudi Arabia regarding osteoporosis. A panel of 14 local experts in osteoporosis assembled to provide consensus based on the strength of evidence and expert opinions on osteoporosis treatment. The Saudi Osteoporosis Society (SOS) formed a panel of experts who performed an extensive published studies search to formulate recommendations regarding prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of osteoporosis in Saudi Arabia. Both local and international published studies were utilized whenever available. Dual x-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scanning is still the golden standard for assessing bone mineral density (BMD). In the absence of local, country-specific fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX), the SOS recommends using the USA (White) version of the FRAX tool. All women above 60 years of age should be evaluated for BMD. This is because the panel recognized that osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures occur at a younger age in Saudi Arabia. Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is not recommended for treating postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. BMD evaluation should be performed 1-2 years after initiating intervention, and the assessment of bone turnover biomarkers should be performed whenever available to determine the efficacy of intervention. All Saudi women above the age of 60 years must undergo a BMD assessment using DXA. Therapy decisions should be formulated with the use of the USA (White) version of the FRAX tool.

  18. The prevalence of sexual dysfunction in the female health care providers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzi, Abdulrahim A.; Sahly, Nora; Sawan, Dana; Kafy, Souzan; Alzaban, Faten

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of sexual dysfunction in Saudi and non-Saudi female health care providers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. One -hundred twenty (60 Saudi and 60 non-Saudi) sexually active female health care professionals in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were anonymously surveyed using the English version of the female sexual function index questionnaire. The individual domain scores for pain, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, pain, and overall score for the Saudi and non-Saudi women were calculated and compared. The two groups were comparable in demographic characteristics. No statistically significant differences were found between Saudi and non-Saudi women in desire (P = .22) and arousal scores (P = .47). However, non-Saudi women had significantly higher lubrication (P orgasm (P = .015), satisfaction (P = .004), and pain scores (P = .015). The overall scores in Saudi and non-Saudi women were low (23.40 ± 4.50 compared with 26.18 ± 5.97), but non-Saudi women had a significantly higher overall score (P = .005). Taken together, sexual dysfunction is prevalent among Saudi and non-Saudi female health care providers, with Saudi women demonstrating lower scores in four sexual function domains and the overall score. PMID:25601160

  19. Family profile of victims of child abuse and neglect in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuneef, Maha A.; Alghamdi, Linah A.; Saleheen, Hassan N.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the family profile of child abuse and neglect (CAN) subjects in Saudi Arabia. Methods: Data were collected retrospectively between July 2009 and December 2013 from patients’ files, which were obtained from the Child Protection Centre (CPC) based in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Four main sets of variables were examined: demographics of victim, family profile, parental information, and information on perpetrator and forms of abuse. Results: The charts of 220 CAN cases were retrospectively reviewed. Physical abuse was the most common form of abuse (42%), followed by neglect (39%), sexual abuse (14%), and emotional abuse (4%). Children with unemployed fathers were 2.8 times as likely to experience physical abuse. Children living in single/step-parent households were 4 times as likely to experience physical abuse. Regarding neglect children living in larger households (≥6) were 1.5 times as likely to be neglected by their parents as were children living in smaller households (<6). Regarding sexual abuse, male children were 2.9 times as likely to be abused as were female children. Conclusions: The recent acknowledgment of CAN as a public health problem in Saudi Arabia suggests that time will be needed to employ effective and culturally sensitive prevention strategies based on family risk factors. PMID:27464866

  20. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders among visitors to faith healers in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alosaimi, Fahad D.; Alshehri, Youssef; Alfraih, Ibrahim; Alghamdi, Ayedh; Aldahash, Saleh; Alkhuzayem, Haifa; Albeeeshi, Haneen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among visitors to Faith Healers (FHs) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We also studied the sociodemographic profiles for these visitors, in addition to their past psychiatric history, reason(s) for seeking FH help, and past and current treatment experience with FHs. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among the visitors (n=321) to a number of faith healing settings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia using a specially designed questionnaire and validated Arabic version of The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: Most of the participants were young adults (35.1±10.8 years) and males with intermediate and secondary levels of education who had not sought medical help prior to their visits. A high proportion of the FH visitors have diagnosable mental illnesses. Depressive and anxiety disorders were the most prevalent among the study participants; few visitors were affected by psychotic or bipolar disorders. Conclusions: The present study provides insight for understanding the type of patients with psychiatric disorders who visit Faith Healers.(FHs). The study highlights the tendency of psychiatric patients in Saudi Arabia to visit FHs, which could reflect the importance of further studies to clarify the impact of FHs on the management of those patients. PMID:25225530

  1. Family profile of victims of child abuse and neglect in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almuneef, Maha A; Alghamdi, Linah A; Saleheen, Hassan N

    2016-08-01

    To describe the family profile of child abuse and neglect (CAN) subjects in Saudi Arabia. Data were collected retrospectively between July 2009 and December 2013 from patients' files, which were obtained from the Child Protection Centre (CPC) based in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Four main sets of variables were examined: demographics of victim, family profile, parental information, and information on perpetrator and forms of abuse.  The charts of 220 CAN cases were retrospectively reviewed. Physical abuse was the most common form of abuse (42%), followed by neglect (39%), sexual abuse (14%), and emotional abuse (4%). Children with unemployed fathers were 2.8 times as likely to experience physical abuse. Children living in single/step-parent households were 4 times as likely to experience physical abuse. Regarding neglect children living in larger households (≥6) were 1.5 times as likely to be neglected by their parents as were children living in smaller households (less than 6). Regarding sexual abuse, male children were 2.9 times as likely to be abused as were female children.  The recent acknowledgment of CAN as a public health problem in Saudi Arabia suggests that time will be needed to employ effective and culturally sensitive prevention strategies based on family risk factors.

  2. Population dynamics and tuberculosis: a cross sectional study of an overlooked disease in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bishri, Jamal; Masoodi, Ibrahim; Adnan, Mubarki; Tariq, Malik; Abdullah, Harthi; Abdulgoni, Thubaiti; Bander, Guraibi; Altalhi, Mansoor

    2014-01-01

    International travel, migration and human population movements facilitate the spread of tuberculosis (TB). To study the impact of poorly screened expatriates working in Saudi Arabia on the local incidence of TBs. This cross sectional study was carried out in the Chest Disease Hospital, Taif. All confirmed cases of TB from June 2009 to May 2010 admitted to the hospital were enrolled. Inclusion criteria were diagnosed cases of TB (pulmonary & extra-pulmonary) in patients between the ages of 14 to 65 years. Patients with HIV and coexistent malignancies were excluded. The age, gender and ethnic group of each patient was recorded, and patients were divided into two groups. Of the two groups, Group A consisted of Taif residents and group B of patients referred from other cities in the country. Of the 686 cases studied, 370 (54%) were Saudi nationals (Group A = 80 & Group B = 290) and 316 (46%) cases were from other countries. Males outnumbered females and most of the patients were aged 20 to 29 years. The number of cases from the areas close to the pilgrimage sites, i.e. Makah (233) and Jeddah (275), outnumbered those in Taif (110). Our study identifies an increased prevalence of TB cases in areas close to the pilgrimage (Group B). The higher proportion of non-Saudi TB patients in group B is most likely explained by the higher number of poorly screened illegal expatriates in the region.

  3. Knowledge, attitudes and practices toward energy drinks among adolescents in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaiger, Abdulrahman; Zagzoog, Nisreen

    2013-11-27

    The objective of this study is to explore the knowledge, attitudes and intake of energy drinks among adolescents in Saudi Arabia. A multi-stage stratified sampling procedure was carried out to select 1061 school children aged 12-19 years, from Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia. A short self-reported questionnaire was administrated in order to collect the data. Of adolescents in the study, 45% drank energy drinks (71.3% males and 35.9% females; Penergy drinks (43%). The major reasons for consuming energy drinks were taste and flavour (58%), to 'try them' (51.9%) and 'to get energy' (43%), albeit with significant differences between genders (Pdrinks, and 49% did not know that they contain caffeine (P-values energy drinks to be soft drinks. The study indicates the need for Saudi adolescents to be warned on the over-consumption of energy drinks. The study brings to attention the need for educational programmes related to increasing awareness in the community of the health effects related to high consumption of energy drinks.

  4. Public awareness and attitudes toward epilepsy in Saudi Arabia is improving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthaffar, Osama Y; Jan, Mohammed M

    2014-04-01

    To examine public awareness and attitudes toward epilepsy in Riyadh, the capital city of Saudi Arabia. A focused 10-item questionnaire was designed to survey public awareness and attitudes toward epilepsy. Personal interviews were conducted randomly by one author in preselected public places in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia during March and April 2011. Seven hundred and forty-nine interviews were completed during the study period. Most participants (77.4%) had prior knowledge of epilepsy, and 52% believed that epilepsy is an organic disease. This correlated with their educational level, as those with higher levels of education were more likely to link epilepsy to organic causes (p=0.008). However, 15% also linked epilepsy to evil spirit possession, and up to 37% preferred spiritual rituals and religious healing to medical treatments. Although most respondents (61%) would accept an epileptic patient in a regular job, 71% (particularly males) reported reservations in marrying someone with epilepsy (p=0.001). The awareness and attitudes of the Saudi public toward epilepsy are showing some improvement. However, it is still thought to be linked to evil spirit possession by some, and spiritual rituals and religious healing are commonly believed to be effective treatments. Targeted areas for focused education were identified.

  5. The dynamics of male-male competition in Cardiocondyla obscurior ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Sylvia; Suefuji, Masaki; Schrempf, Alexandra; Heinze, Jürgen

    2012-06-15

    The outcome of male-male competition can be predicted from the relative fighting qualities of the opponents, which often depend on their age. In insects, freshly emerged and still sexually inactive males are morphologically indistinct from older, sexually active males. These young inactive males may thus be easy targets for older males if they cannot conceal themselves from their attacks. The ant Cardiocondyla obscurior is characterised by lethal fighting between wingless ("ergatoid") males. Here, we analyse for how long young males are defenceless after eclosion, and how early adult males can detect the presence of rival males. We found that old ergatoid males consistently won fights against ergatoid males younger than two days. Old males did not differentiate between different types of unpigmented pupae several days before emergence, but had more frequent contact to ready-to-eclose pupae of female sexuals and winged males than of workers and ergatoid males. In rare cases, old ergatoid males displayed alleviated biting of pigmented ergatoid male pupae shortly before adult eclosion, as well as copulation attempts to dark pupae of female sexuals and winged males. Ergatoid male behaviour may be promoted by a closer similarity of the chemical profile of ready-to-eclose pupae to the profile of adults than that of young pupae several days prior to emergence. Young ergatoid males of C. obscurior would benefit greatly by hiding their identity from older, resident males, as they are highly vulnerable during the first two days of their adult lives. In contrast to the winged males of the same species, which are able to prevent ergatoid male attacks by chemical female mimicry, young ergatoids do not seem to be able to produce a protective chemical profile. Conflicts in male-male competition between ergatoid males of different age thus seem to be resolved in favour of the older males. This might represent selection at the colony level rather than the individual level.

  6. The dynamics of male-male competition in Cardiocondyla obscurior ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cremer Sylvia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The outcome of male-male competition can be predicted from the relative fighting qualities of the opponents, which often depend on their age. In insects, freshly emerged and still sexually inactive males are morphologically indistinct from older, sexually active males. These young inactive males may thus be easy targets for older males if they cannot conceal themselves from their attacks. The ant Cardiocondyla obscurior is characterised by lethal fighting between wingless (“ergatoid” males. Here, we analyse for how long young males are defenceless after eclosion, and how early adult males can detect the presence of rival males. Results We found that old ergatoid males consistently won fights against ergatoid males younger than two days. Old males did not differentiate between different types of unpigmented pupae several days before emergence, but had more frequent contact to ready-to-eclose pupae of female sexuals and winged males than of workers and ergatoid males. In rare cases, old ergatoid males displayed alleviated biting of pigmented ergatoid male pupae shortly before adult eclosion, as well as copulation attempts to dark pupae of female sexuals and winged males. Ergatoid male behaviour may be promoted by a closer similarity of the chemical profile of ready-to-eclose pupae to the profile of adults than that of young pupae several days prior to emergence. Conclusion Young ergatoid males of C. obscurior would benefit greatly by hiding their identity from older, resident males, as they are highly vulnerable during the first two days of their adult lives. In contrast to the winged males of the same species, which are able to prevent ergatoid male attacks by chemical female mimicry, young ergatoids do not seem to be able to produce a protective chemical profile. Conflicts in male-male competition between ergatoid males of different age thus seem to be resolved in favour of the older males. This might represent selection

  7. Characteristics of autism spectrum disorders in a sample of egyptian and saudi patients: transcultural cross sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Hanan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autism is a biological disorder with clearly defined phenomenology. Studies from the Middle East on this topic have been particularly rare. Little is known about the influence of culture on clinical features, presentations and management of autism. The current study was done to compare characteristics of autism in two groups of Egyptian as well as Saudi children. Methods The sample included 48 children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. They were recruited from the Okasha Institute of Psychiatry, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt and Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health, Dammam, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. They were grouped into an Egyptian group (n = 20 and a Saudi group (n = 28. They were assessed both clinically and psychometrically using the GARS, the Vineland adaptive behavioral scale, and the Stanford Binnet IQ test. Results Typical autism was more prevalent than atypical autism in both groups. There were no statistically significant differences in clinical variables like regression, hyperactivity, epilepsy or mental retardation. Delayed language development was significantly higher in the Egyptian group while delay in all developmental milestones was more significant in the Saudi group. The Vineland communication subscale showed more significant severe and profound communication defects in the Saudi group while the Gilliam developmental subscale showed significantly more average scores in the Egyptian group. Both groups differed significantly such that the age of noticing abnormality was younger in the Saudi group. The age at diagnosis and at the commencement of intervention was lower in the Egyptian group. The Saudi group showed a higher percentage of missing examinations, older birth order and significantly higher preference to drug treatment, while the Egyptian group showed a high preference to behavioral and phoniatric therapies, higher paternal and maternal education, higher employment among parents and higher family

  8. Health rights knowledge among medical school students at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Amoudi, Samia M; Al-Harbi, Abdullah A; Al-Sayegh, Nasser Y; Eldeek, Basem S; Kafy, Souzan M; Al-Ahwal, Mahmoud S; Bondagji, Nabeel S

    2017-01-01

    Health care is a basic human right, and Saudi Arabia affirms these rights for all its citizens. To assess the knowledge of medical students regarding health rights in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz University (KAU) from September 2015 through November 2015. A questionnaire written in English collected demographic data and included questions about reproductive health care and health rights of women and patients with cancer, senility, or special needs. Of the 267 participants, 184 (68.9%) were female, and 252 (94.4%) were Saudi. Regarding consent, 87 (32.6%) and 113 (42.3%) participants believed a female patient required the consent of a male guardian to receive medical treatment or surgery, respectively, in Saudi Arabia, and only 106 (39.7%) knew that a female patient could provide consent for a caesarean section. Sixty-six (24.7%) believed that abortion is never allowed in Islam. Only 93 (34.8%) were aware that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients had health rights, about half (144, 53.9%) knew that cancer patients have a right to full information, and most (181, 67.8%) believed that a patient had the right to withhold health information from his/her family. Approximately half were aware that cancer patients have the right to free medical treatment (138, 51.7%) or that health rights applied to special needs patients (137, 51.3%) and senile patients (122, 45.7%). The knowledge of KAU medical students regarding health rights of certain patient populations highlights the importance of health rights education in medical school.

  9. Exploring the sociodemographic and clinical features of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hajoj, Sahal; Shoukri, Mohammed; Memish, Ziad; AlHakeem, Raafat; AlRabiah, Fahad; Varghese, Bright

    2015-01-01

    Saudi Arabia annually reports a relatively higher proportion (28-32%) of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) cases in comparison to other global regions. However, there were few studies conducted so far to determine the sociodemographic factors and clinical manifestations associated with EPTB at a nationwide level. A retrospective analysis on culture positive EPTB isolates collected from all the provinces of the country were conducted for a period of 12 months to determine the spectrum of diversity in EPTB infection sites and the confounding factors. A detailed clinical and demographical data analysis was carried out along with first line drug susceptibility testing. Intra-thoracic and extra-thoracic lymph nodes (44.6%) were the most common sites of infection followed by gastrointestinal (17.3%) and central nervous systems (11.8%). Male patients were mostly infected (58.8%), in contrary to the global trend. Any drug resistance was observed in 23.1% isolates with a 2.1% of multi-drug resistance. HIV reactivity was found only in 2.2% cases. A higher proportion of Saudi nationals (58.8%) were infected compared to the immigrants, descending mostly from South Asia (34.4%) and South East Asia (31.2%). The Saudi population predominated with all forms of EPTB while immigrants showed no significant variations. Saudi Arabia faces a serious threat from EPTB, particularly to the central nervous system and gastrointestinal systems. More effective diagnostic strategies and control measures must be implemented to reduce the high rate of EPTB in the country. In addition, these findings warrant further detailed research to explore all related comorbid conditions of EPTB development, particularly the host-related factors.

  10. Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus disease is rare in children: An update from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tawfiq, Jaffar A; Kattan, Rana F; Memish, Ziad A

    2016-11-08

    To summarize the reported Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (MERS-CoV) cases, the associated clinical presentations and the outcomes. We searched the Saudi Ministry of Health website, the World Health Organization website, and the Flutracker website. We also searched MEDLINE and PubMed for the keywords: Middle East respiratory syndrome-coronavirus, MERS-CoV in combination with pediatric, children, childhood, infancy and pregnancy from the initial discovery of the virus in 2012 to 2016. The retrieved articles were also read to further find other articles. Relevant data were placed into an excel sheet and analyzed accordingly. Descriptive analytic statistics were used in the final analysis as deemed necessary. From June 2012 to April 19, 2016, there were a total of 31 pediatric MERS-CoV cases. Of these cases 13 (42%) were asymptomatic and the male to female ratio was 1.7:1. The mean age of patients was 9.8 ± 5.4 years. Twenty-five (80.6%) of the cases were reported from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The most common source of infection was household contact (10 of 15 with reported source) and 5 patients acquired infection within a health care facility. Using real time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction of pediatric patients revealed that 9 out of 552 (1.6%) was positive in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Utilizing serology for MERS-CoV infection in Jordan and Saudi Arabia did not reveal any positive patients. Thus, the number of the pediatric MERS-CoV is low; the exact reason for the low prevalence of the disease in children is not known.

  11. Health rights knowledge among medical school students at King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia M Al-Amoudi

    Full Text Available Health care is a basic human right, and Saudi Arabia affirms these rights for all its citizens.To assess the knowledge of medical students regarding health rights in Saudi Arabia.This cross-sectional study was conducted at King Abdulaziz University (KAU from September 2015 through November 2015. A questionnaire written in English collected demographic data and included questions about reproductive health care and health rights of women and patients with cancer, senility, or special needs.Of the 267 participants, 184 (68.9% were female, and 252 (94.4% were Saudi. Regarding consent, 87 (32.6% and 113 (42.3% participants believed a female patient required the consent of a male guardian to receive medical treatment or surgery, respectively, in Saudi Arabia, and only 106 (39.7% knew that a female patient could provide consent for a caesarean section. Sixty-six (24.7% believed that abortion is never allowed in Islam. Only 93 (34.8% were aware that acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV patients had health rights, about half (144, 53.9% knew that cancer patients have a right to full information, and most (181, 67.8% believed that a patient had the right to withhold health information from his/her family. Approximately half were aware that cancer patients have the right to free medical treatment (138, 51.7% or that health rights applied to special needs patients (137, 51.3% and senile patients (122, 45.7%.The knowledge of KAU medical students regarding health rights of certain patient populations highlights the importance of health rights education in medical school.

  12. Stress among medical Saudi students at College of Medicine, King Faisal University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Rahman, A G; Al Hashim, B N; Al Hiji, N K; Al-Abbad, Z

    2013-12-01

    Sources of student stress can be academic pressures, social or personal issues and medical students have to face the challenge of rigorous curriculum and also have to learn how to deal with emotionally difficult experiences. Determination of the prevalence of stress and to identify the risk factors of stress among Saudi medical students at Faculty of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A survey study design was conducted among medical students at Faculty of Medicine, King Faisal University, Al Ahsaa Governorate, Eastern Province from February-May, 2013. Both male and female students were invited to participate in our study. The total number of students was 650 Saudi medical students, out of them 244 medical students were participated in the current study. All participants were provided a self administered questionnaire. A likert scale with 3 points for responses was used. Questionnaires were given to participants 2 month before end-semester examinations, to minimize the extra stress symptoms A score of stress was calculated. Prevalence of stress was 53% among Saudi students. Gender has no role in stress among medical students (p > 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed the most important risk factors of stress, having places for recreation at the University showed a relationship with stress among medical students with a p value = 0.000, there is a statistically significant relationship between stress and having optimal place for studying outside the university p = 0.001, while, comparing number of sleeping hours with stress, we could not find a statistically significant relationship among medical students, p = 0.744. Medical students who had close friends to share with them their stresses and concerns showed a highly statistically significant relationship between stressed and unstressed students p = 0.001. Medical students reported high levels of stress. The most frequently occurring stressors among the students were related to academic and

  13. Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions of Saudis towards Participating in Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tannir, Mohamad A; El-Bakri, Nahid; Abu-Shaheen, Amani K

    2016-01-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions of Saudis towards participating in clinical trials (CTs). A cross-sectional study was conducted on 232 Saudi adult patients and their companions visiting adult outpatient clinics at King Fahad Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire based on information obtained from the literature. The questionnaire was divided into four sections, one covering the respondents' demographics, and the other three assessing knowledge, attitudes, and perceptions towards participating in CTs. A total of 148 (63.8%) respondents were males, and 52 (22.4%) participants had been invited to participate in a CT previously. Of those, 39 (75%) participated. Knowledge about the essential elements of informed consent ranged from 55.7% (number of participants needed) to 85.7% (confidentiality of personal information). The majority (163, 73.8%) of respondents was willing to participate in a CT after consulting their family physician and 130 (58.0%) respondents would be motivated to participate in a CT if they were healthy. Only 36.8% of the respondents believed that patients who participated in a CT received the best care. Moreover, 110 (48.7%) respondents believed that research was conducted in a responsible and ethical manner. The present study assessed the current understanding of CTs among Saudi participants. Although the majority of participants had an acceptable level of knowledge about CTs, they exhibited conditional attitudes and misperceptions towards participating in a CT. Increased patient awareness may improve patients' attitudes towards ethical conduct of CTs.

  14. Adherence to OTC directory--the perception of community pharmacists in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rukban, Mohammed Othman; Khalil, Mohammad Adnan

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide Ministries of Health (MoH) are encouraged to publish an updated Over-the-Counter (OTC)-Directory that pharmacists should adhere to in dispensing non-prescription medications. The Saudi Ministry of Health has published the OTC-Directory in the year 2000, and since then, it was readily available to all practicing pharmacists at no cost. This study was aimed to investigate the knowledge of practicing pharmacists in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, regarding permitted self-prescription medications (i.e., OTC-Directory), as well as pharmacists professional competence and adherence at dispensing OTC drugs without prescription. The study was cross-sectional by design. A computer generated list of simple random sampling was used to select the pharmacies out of 1,500 working in Riyadh. The data was collected from 384 randomly selected community pharmacies by questionnaire using direct investigation method and the total respondents were 405. Associations between qualitative variables were observed using Pearson Chi-square and Fisher Exact test. Four hundred and five (405) pharmacists participated in the survey of which 100% were males and 362 (89.4%) were below the age of 40 years. Majority of them (361, 88.9%) were holding bachelors degree. Almost one-third of the respondents (123, 30.4%) were not aware of the existence of the Saudi OTC-Directory. The pharmacists' geographical location, nationality and attendance of CME activity had significant association with knowledge about the OTC-directory (p directory did not comply with its guidelines. Pharmacists with higher degrees were more observant of the OTC-Directory as compared to those with diploma and Bachelor Degree (p = 0.014). There is significant non-compliance of OTC-directory by the community pharmacists while providing non-prescription drugs in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

  15. Exploring the sociodemographic and clinical features of extrapulmonary tuberculosis in Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahal Al-Hajoj

    Full Text Available Saudi Arabia annually reports a relatively higher proportion (28-32% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB cases in comparison to other global regions. However, there were few studies conducted so far to determine the sociodemographic factors and clinical manifestations associated with EPTB at a nationwide level.A retrospective analysis on culture positive EPTB isolates collected from all the provinces of the country were conducted for a period of 12 months to determine the spectrum of diversity in EPTB infection sites and the confounding factors. A detailed clinical and demographical data analysis was carried out along with first line drug susceptibility testing.Intra-thoracic and extra-thoracic lymph nodes (44.6% were the most common sites of infection followed by gastrointestinal (17.3% and central nervous systems (11.8%. Male patients were mostly infected (58.8%, in contrary to the global trend. Any drug resistance was observed in 23.1% isolates with a 2.1% of multi-drug resistance. HIV reactivity was found only in 2.2% cases. A higher proportion of Saudi nationals (58.8% were infected compared to the immigrants, descending mostly from South Asia (34.4% and South East Asia (31.2%. The Saudi population predominated with all forms of EPTB while immigrants showed no significant variations.Saudi Arabia faces a serious threat from EPTB, particularly to the central nervous system and gastrointestinal systems. More effective diagnostic strategies and control measures must be implemented to reduce the high rate of EPTB in the country. In addition, these findings warrant further detailed research to explore all related comorbid conditions of EPTB development, particularly the host-related factors.

  16. Women in dentistry: A perspective on major universities in Saudi Arabia. Part 2: Analysis and statistical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Randa E.; Babgi, Amani A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose and significance The purposes of this study were to: (1) report the number of female graduates from the two oldest dental schools in Saudi Arabia; (2) compare the number of male and female graduates per year from these two major schools; and (3) compare these numbers of female dental graduates to those in the United States for the most recent year available, 2007. Methods This study was conducted using a descriptive non-experimental design. The study sample was the number of dental school graduates from the two major dental schools in Saudi Arabia. Results There were 1621 graduates of the College of Dentistry of King Saud University (KSU) since its inception up to 2007 of which 853 graduates were males and 768 were females, respectively. The total number of graduates from the Faculty of Dentistry of King Abdulaziz University (KAU) since its inception up till 2007 was 628 of which 264 were males and 364 were females. There was no statistically significant difference between the total number of male and female dental school graduates, although there was a significant difference between KSU and KAU dental schools. The proportion of female graduates from the two major Saudi dental schools was just over 50 % in 2007, which is slightly higher than the 45% female graduates from dental schools in the United States and Puerto Rico. Conclusions Females currently comprise approximately half of the enrolled dental students at the KSU and KAU, a percentage slightly greater than that in the United States. The substantial enrollments suggested that women in Saudi Arabia consider dentistry to be an excellent career choice. PMID:23960467

  17. Saudi oncology society and Saudi urology association combined clinical management guidelines for prostate cancer

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    Ashraf Abusamra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi oncology society and Saudi urological association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with adenocarcinoma of the prostate to.

  18. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for testicular germ cell tumors

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    Mohammed Alotaibi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor-node-metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and health care policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with testicular germ cell tumors.

  19. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma

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    Abdullah Alghamdi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma (RCC. It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7th edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and healthcare policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with RCC.

  20. Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urology Association combined clinical management guidelines for renal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Abdullah; Alkhateeb, Sultan; Alghamdi, Khalid; Bazarbashi, Shouki; Murshid, Esam; Alotaibi, Mohammed; Abusamra, Ashraf; Rabah, Danny; Ahmad, Imran; Al-Mansour, Mubarak; Saadeddin, Ahmad; Alsharm, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    This is an update to the previously published Saudi guidelines for the evaluation, medical, and surgical management of patients diagnosed with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). It is categorized according to the stage of the disease using the tumor node metastasis staging system 7(th) edition. The guidelines are presented with supporting evidence level, they are based on comprehensive literature review, several internationally recognized guidelines, and the collective expertise of the guidelines committee members (authors) who were selected by the Saudi Oncology Society and Saudi Urological Association. Considerations to the local availability of drugs, technology, and expertise have been regarded. These guidelines should serve as a roadmap for the urologists, oncologists, general physicians, support groups, and healthcare policy makers in the management of patients diagnosed with RCC.

  1. Gender-segregated Education in Saudi Arabia: Its Impact on Social Norms the Saudi Labor Market

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    Roula Baki

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's gender-segregated higher education system and how it is used to transmit the Kingdom's traditional societal expectations to the employment sector. With Saudi Arabia's current need for economic change, the education system is retarding instead of accelerating reform. A background consisting of Saudi Arabian history, governing laws, religious beliefs and women's roles is examined. I then discuss the education system's preservation goal by considering segregation, women's mobility, videoconferencing courses, and the roles of professors. I attempt to explain how the current education system fails to prepare its students for the global economy: by limiting women's access to the labor market, and by not preparing men for the realities of the global market and therefore creating the need for migrant workers. In conclusion, conserving culture is significant, but for economic change to occur, the extent of cultural conservatism and its effect on the education system need to be re-evaluated.

  2. Core inflation indicators for Saudi Arabia

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    Alkhareif Ryadh M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper constructs and analyzes core inflation indicators for Saudi Arabia for the period of March 2012 to May 2014 using two alternative approaches: the exclusion method (ex food and housing/rent and the statistical method. The findings of the analysis suggest that the ex food and housing/ rent inflation is more volatile than the overall CPI inflation over the sample period. In contrast, the statistical core inflation is relatively more stable and less volatile. Moreover, the ex food and housing/rent inflation is only weakly correlated with headline inflation, whereas the statistical core inflation exhibits a stronger correlation. This combination of lower volatility and higher correlation with headline inflation makes the statistical method a much better choice for policymakers. From a monetary policy standpoint, using a bundle of core inflation measures, including both properly constructed exclusion and statistical methods, is more desirable, especially when variation across measures is widespread, as is the case in Saudi Arabia.

  3. Communicating with cancer patients in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younge, D; Moreau, P; Ezzat, A; Gray, A

    1997-02-20

    The following factors are relevant to the communication problems that exist in this country: 1. The impression is that patients here cope better with terminal illness at home than do patients elsewhere. The extended family, with its strong ties, and the strong Islamic faith that encourages its members to provide for parents and children in case of need mean that any input by health professionals is magnified by the family in the care of the patient. At first, it was uncertain if foreign health professionals would be accepted into Saudi homes (which are intensely private and protected for the family) for the purpose of caring for patients. This has proved unfounded. Hospitality is a very important part of Saudi society; nurses and doctors are welcomed and respected. Much of this success is due to the use of Saudi men as drivers and translators. These people provide 24-hour service, act as social workers assessing the needs of the family, and are the link between the patient and family, the nurse, and the doctor. 2. "CURE" OR "PALLIATION": The emphasis for cancer patients in Saudi Arabia is still on "curative treatment," even after any realistic hope of a cure is gone. The problem this causes is compounded by many patients being excluded from the decision-making process. Decisions made by the family may not always reflect the patient's wishes. Greater communication is needed to guide treatment decisions. 3. TRUTH-TELLING: Denying information of the patient's illness is probably more a historical than a cultural phenomenon. Similar attitudes prevailed until very recently in practically all other countries. In this very conservative country, people are committed to preserving Islamic culture in the face of Western technology. As medicine continues to demonstrate its effectiveness as well as its limitations, people will come to realize that the right of patients to know and understand their illness allows them to cope much better, and is compatible with the

  4. An overview of nursing in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Saleh AlYami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Achieving and maintaining a stable nursing workforce is an important issue for the well-being of the rapidly growing population of Saudi Arabia. However, high turnover of expatriate staff and low recruitment of Saudi nationals have led to a serious staff shortage in the professions, particularly of well-qualified and experienced nurses. Nursing leaders need to work to improve the image of nurses and facilitate the recruitment of women into the nursing profession. Reduced working hours and part-time contracts with increased salaries and benefits could attract more young women to the profession, as might the provision of facilities such as private transportation and on-site childcare. Furthermore, establishing a national association for nurses would advance the nursing profession and help to ensure that all nurses undertake fully comprehensive training before entering the workforce.

  5. Saudi National Assessment of Educational Progress (SNAEP

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    Abdullah Saleh Al Sadaawi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available To provide a universal basic education, Saudi Arabia initially employed a rapid quantitative educational strategy, later developing a qualitative focus to improve standards of education delivery and quality of student outcomes. Despite generous resources provided for education, however, there is no national assessment system to provide statistical evidence on students’ learning outcomes. Educators are querying the curricula and quality of delivery for Saudi education, especially following low student performances on the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS in 2003 and 2007. There is a growing demand for national assessment standards for all key subject areas to monitor students’ learning progress. This study acknowledges extant research on this important topic and offers a strategy of national assessment to guide educational reform.

  6. Talent management challenges in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alamri, Muteb Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    This thesis was submitted for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and awarded by Brunel University London. This thesis investigates talent management challenges in public and private organizations in Saudi Arabia. The lack of studies into talent management challenges has motivated the researcher’s work, in particular focusing on whether talent management challenges are applicable to both private and public organizations. In order to answer the research questions, the researcher reviews p...

  7. Perceived stress in Saudi undergraduate medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Aesha Farheen Siddiqui; Saad Abdullah Al-Amri; Assaf Abdullah Al-Katheri; Khalid Hussain Mohammed Al-Hassani

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the prevalence and magnitude of stress in Saudi undergraduate medical students and its associated socio-demographic factors using a cross-sectional design. It was conducted at King Khalid University Medical College during September-October 2016, including 267 students of both sexes and all study levels. Data was collected using an anonymous self administered questionnaire including socio-demographic information like participant details and family details, along with...

  8. Consanguinity among the Saudi Arabian population.

    OpenAIRE

    el-Hazmi, M A; al-Swailem, A R; Warsy, A S; al-Swailem, A M; Sulaimani, R; al-Meshari, A A

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted on 3212 Saudi families to investigate the prevalence of consanguineous marriages. The families were interviewed and the information on the relationship between the husband and wife was obtained. The overall rate of consanguinity shows that 57.7% of the families screened were consanguineous. The most frequent were first cousin marriages (28.4%) followed by distant relative marriages (15.2%) and second cousin marriages (14.6%). The families were grouped according to the...

  9. Radiographic investigation of in vivo endodontically treated maxillary premolars in a Saudi Arabian sub-population

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    Saad Al-Nazhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the prevalence of the number of root canals in permanent maxillary first and second premolars of a Saudi Arabian sub-population. Results will be compared to previous Asian studies. Materials and Methods: A total of 894 periapical radiographs of endodontically treated maxillary first and second premolars of 628 Saudi patients (268 males and 360 females were viewed. The teeth were segregated into maxillary first premolars (463 and maxillary second premolars (431. The diagnostic, working length, master cone and final films with different angles were mounted, projected and, with the utilization of written clinical records, evaluated. Teeth with multiple canal systems were categorized according to whether the canals exited the root by common or separate apical foramen. Data was analyzed statistically using Chi-square test and professional t-test, by comparing pairs of groups with the significant level established at 5% (P < 0.05. Results: More than 90% of first maxillary premolar and more than 50% of the second maxillary premolar was found to have two canals. There was no significant difference between male (92% and female (95% in the distribution of the two root canals of the first maxillary premolar (t-test = 1.21, P value = 0.228, however, there was significant difference between the distributions of male (69.4% and female (52.2% of the two root canals within the second maxillary premolar (t-test = 3.75, P value = 0.000. Few teeth showed three canals. Conclusion: The number of root canals of the maxillary first premolar in Saudi population shows a higher incidence of two canals (93.6% than previously reported. In addition, the figure is higher than most of the Asian countries.

  10. Motives for cosmetic procedures in Saudi women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Natour, Sahar H

    2014-01-01

    The media-fuelled obsession with beauty in modern society has led more women to seek elective cosmetic procedures to meet the portrayed ideals of beauty in different cultures. This study gives insights into incentives and desires to undergo cosmetic procedures in a conservative society with strict religious practices where women are veiled. Questionnaire data were obtained from 509 Saudi women who responded to a survey distributed randomly to a sample of Saudi women aged 17 to 72 years. At least 1 elective cosmetic procedure was performed in 42% of the women, of whom 77.8% wore a veil. Another 33% considered having a procedure. The motives for seeking a cosmetic procedure were to improve self-esteem in 83.7%, attract a husband in 63.3%, or prevent a husband from seeking another wife in 36.2%. The decision to seek a procedure was affected by the media, with high peer influence. Motivation for elective cosmetic procedures in Saudi women is influenced by a combination of emotional and cultural factors, level of education, marital status, and religious beliefs. The veil is not an impediment for seeking such procedures. The limitation of the study was missing data analysis as some items in the questionnaire were completed inaccurately or left unanswered.

  11. Transforming the nursing profession in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Mohammed G; Urden, Linda D

    2016-01-01

    To discuss the impact of health-care policies and regulations on hospitals' journey towards the Magnet designation in Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia, like many other countries, faces several challenges in achieving 'the Gold Standard' in nursing practice. Centralised management, the absence of a regulatory professional body, lack of a national benchmarking database and a nursing shortage are all major challenges in advancing nursing practice. The presence of two Magnet-designated hospitals in Saudi Arabia (not affiliated with the Ministry of Health) is an opportunity to explore how this has been achieved within the organisational and professional context. The nursing leaders in the Ministry of Health could be accountable to address the barriers in advancing nursing practice and to raise nursing awareness regarding the adoption of a new culture of excellence. Nursing managers in the Ministry of Health hospitals are encouraged to assess the hospitals' readiness to apply for Magnet status. Their readiness must include having a high level of nursing satisfaction and low turnover rate, which goes along with assessing cultural and organisational climates to understand the gaps in work environment and driving evidence of readiness toward achieving Magnet status. Health-care policies and regulations, both nationally and globally, can result in several challenges to achieving 'the Gold Standard' in nursing practice. These challenges may not be possible to resolve within an organisational level. Collaborative effort and transformational changes are needed to drive the nursing profession toward the best outcomes for our patients and nurses. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Motivational issues of faculty in Saudi Arabia

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    Akram AbdulCader

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the factors that affect motivation of faculty in Saudi Arabia. It included two surveys and open-ended queries to a focus group of five academic managers and 25 faculty members of varying nationalities, rank, and institutes in Saudi Arabia. The research showed that the faculties in Saudi Arabia’s higher education industry feel disconnected from the program development. The faculty members did not feel motivated to participate in the development and improvement of the academic program due to: (a lack of monetary and non-monetary incentives, (b management not involving faculty in decision-making, and (c lack of recognition and moral support. However, the faculties were intrinsically motivated to perform their best within the confines of the classroom. The results of the study indicated that there was a greater interest in intrinsic motivation as a personal measure for success inside the classroom, but extrinsic motivation was a factor that needed greater improvement from the management of the universities for faculty to partake in development of the program. DOI:  10.18870/hlrc.v4i4.211

  13. The New Saudi Educational Renaissance: In between the "Capacity to Aspire" and the "Capacity to Remember"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Annalisa

    2014-01-01

    In the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia investments in higher education have increased exponentially in recent years, and the New Saudi Educational Renaissance is attracting the attention of international academia. The purpose of this study is to draw on Saudi sources, with the aim of allowing Saudi voices to introduce their strategies for the design of a…

  14. Saudi English-Major Undergraduates' Academic Writing Problems: A Taif University Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khairy, Mohamed Ali

    2013-01-01

    This study attempted to investigate Saudi English-major undergraduates studying at Taif University to identify a) the types of academic writing Saudi English-major undergraduates carry out at English departments, b) Saudi English-major undergraduates' writing problems, c) the reasons behind Saudi English-major undergraduates' writing problems and…

  15. Perceptions of gender equality, work environment, support and social issues for women doctors at a university hospital in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baqi, Shehla; Albalbeesi, Amal; Iftikhar, Sundus; Baig-Ansari, Naila; Alanazi, Mohammad; Alanazi, Awadh

    2017-01-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is an Islamic monarchy and was established in 1932. Saudi women first entered the medical field in 1975 and the country has since seen a steady increase in women pursuing medicine. However, there is limited data on gender related issues for women doctors practicing in Saudi Arabia. Therefore, our study objective was to assess the perception amongst peers regarding gender equality and social issues faced by women doctors in Saudi Arabia. An online anonymous cross-sectional survey was administered in English to doctors at King Khalid Hospital, affiliated to King Saud University, in Riyadh, between April and May of 2016. Of 1015 doctors, 304 (30%) participated, of which 129 (42.4%) were females and 231 (76%) were Saudi nationals. The average age was 32.4 years (±SD: 8.7). The majority opined that there was no gender discrimination in salaries (73.7% p-value = 0.4), hospital benefits (62.2% p-value = 0.06) or entry into any field of Medicine/Pediatrics (68.4% p-value = 0.207). However, only a minority believed that there was no gender discrimination for entry into surgery (37.3% p-value = .091). A higher proportion of male doctors agreed that promotion opportunities are equal (66.3% vs 45.7%, p-value = 0.002). However, of 54 consultants, only 18 (33.3%) were women. Over half of the women (52.3%) reported that they never wear the face veil. Only a minority of male and female doctors (12.2%) believed women doctors should wear the veil since they examine male patients. Fewer respondents believed that female doctors face harassment from male doctors (14.5%) whereas 30.7% believed female doctors face harassment from male patients. More females, than males, agreed with the statement that female doctors are as committed to their careers as are males (92.2% vs 67.4%, p-valueequal proportions between males and females (68% vs 70.5%, p-value = 0.79). In conclusion, our survey of male and female doctors at a government university hospital in

  16. Prevalence of dental fluorosis in school going children of Dammam, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Soban Qadir Khan; Imran Alam Moheet; Imran Farooq; Faraz Ahmed Farooqi; Aws Saleh ArRejaie; Mohammad Hassan Abdullah Al Abbad; Abdul Khabeer

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Purpose of the study was to determine the prevalence of dental fluorosis and its pattern in primary and permanent teeth among 6-12-year-old Pakistani school going children living in Dammam, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed between June and September 2014. A total number of screened children were 496 among them 259 were males and 237 were females. World Health Organization′s scale was used to examine children for dental fluorosis. Results...

  17. Willingness to Communicate in English among Saudi Female University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turjoman, Mona Obaid Alrahman Ashik

    2016-01-01

    Since the English Language teaching system differs from public schools to private ones, it is presumed that this would have a great impact of students' willingness to communicate in English in Saudi Arabia. The purpose of the current study is to investigate the effect of private and public school education on WTC in English among Saudi Female…

  18. Kas Saudi Araabia naftatulu leiab tee Rootsi pangandusturule? / Romet Enok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Enok, Romet

    2008-01-01

    Autor vaatleb, kes võiks enim olla huvitatud Põhjala pangandusturu ümberkorraldamisest ja kellel oleks selleks kõige rohkem vahendeid. Autori hinnangul on võimalik, et Investori ja SEB juhtide kohtumisel Saudi Araabia printsi Alwaleed bin Saudiga oli kõne all Saudi printsi kaasamine strateegilise investorina SEB kõrvale Nordeat ostma

  19. Ecological study on Uyun Layla in Saudi Arabia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    Ecological study on Uyun Layla in Saudi Arabia. Wafaa Mohammed Al-Ghanem. Department of .... decrease in S- is expected in the deserts as found by Al-. Moneyeri et al. (1986). The phosphorous content .... wetlands in Saudi Arabia: The NCWCD system plan for protected areas. In Wetland and Waterfowl Conservation in ...

  20. Special Education in Saudi Arabia: Challenges, Perspectives, Future Possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquraini, Turki

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a brief background of the education system in Saudi Arabia and current special education services and programs for students with disabilities. Additionally, this paper presents the findings of some studies that examined teachers' perspectives regarding the inclusion of students with disabilities. As Saudi Arabia continues its…

  1. Is consanguinity prevalence decreasing in Saudis?: A study in two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Saudi population is unique in that there is a strong preference for cousin marriages in the general population. We studied the prevalence of consanguinity in educated Saudi females and compared the results with the results obtained in their parents, to access if a generation difference in which extensive ...

  2. Genetic diversity in Egyptian and Saudi goat breeds using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity in Egyptian and Saudi goat breeds using microsatellite markers. KF Mahrous, SYM Alakilli, LM Salem, SHA El-Aziem, AA El-Hanafy. Abstract. Objective: The genetic polymorphism within and among three indigenous goat breeds found in Egypt (Barki and Zaraibi) and in Saudi Arabia (Ardi) was detected by ...

  3. Video Games Promote Saudi Children's English Vocabulary Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShaiji, Ohoud Abdullatif

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of Video Games and their role on promoting Saudi Kids' English vocabulary retention. The study attempted to answer whether there was a statistically significant difference (a = 0.05) between the Saudi children's subjects' mean score on the English vocabulary test due to using Video Games…

  4. Learning English: Experiences and Needs of Saudi Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unruh, Susan; Obeidat, Fayiz

    2015-01-01

    In this qualitative study, Saudi engineering students talk openly of their experiences learning English in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) and as university students in the United States (US). These students reported that they learned only the basics of vocabulary and grammar in KSA. Consequently, they came to the US with few English skills. In…

  5. Burnout syndrome among multinational nurses working in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Burnout syndrome among multinational nurses working in Saudi Arabia. ... This study was conducted to assess the prevalence of BS among a multinational nursing workforce in Saudi Arabia. Materials ... We believe that working conditions have to be improved to develop strategies to cope and alleviate stressful situations.

  6. Blended Learning in Saudi Universities: Challenges and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebaikan, Reem; Troudi, Salah

    2010-01-01

    This study is an attempt to investigate the nature of obstacles and challenges encountered at Saudi universities while implementing a blended learning approach. A literature review of blended learning rationale and designs, and the status of web-based education in Saudi higher education are demonstrated. Three main challenges of applying blended…

  7. Exploring the Unknown: The Autonomy of Saudi EFL Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrabai, Fakieh

    2017-01-01

    This study addresses a new area of research in Saudi Arabia. Using a sample of 630 Saudi students, it investigates learners' level of autonomy and its relationship to academic achievement in English as a foreign language (EFL). Learners' level of autonomy was measured by a survey, whereas their achievement was evaluated using standardized…

  8. Foreign Language Planning in Saudi Arabia: Beyond English

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Mark; Almansour, Maram

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents findings from an exploratory study of foreign language planning in Saudi Arabia. In terms of official policy, the sole foreign language taught in Saudi public schools is English. Therefore, researching foreign languages there is often limited to researching the area of English as a Foreign Language. However, evidence shows that…

  9. Common Diseases and Some Demographic Characteristics among Saudi Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haramlah, Ahmed Abdulrahman; Al-Bakr, Fawziah; Merza, Haniah

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to detect the common diseases among Saudi women and their relationship with the level of physical activity and some variables. This study was applied to 1233 Saudi woman in different regions of the Kingdom, and adopted to explore the common diseases: obesity, hypertension, diabetes, cholesterol and asthma. The study results showed…

  10. Biostatistics of leishmaniasis in Saudi Arabia | Al Aboud | Sudanese ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... health planning and management. Both cutaneous and visceral types of leishmaniasis exist in Saudi Arabia with the predominance of the first type. This statistics commentary is written to review in numbers the cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis in Saudi Arabia from 1983-2004. Sudanese Journal of Dermatology Vol.

  11. Gender differences in leisure-time versus non-leisure-time physical activity among Saudi adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sobayel, Hana; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M; Abahussain, Nanda A; Qahwaji, Dina M; Musaiger, Abdulrahman O

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the gender differences and predictors of leisure versus non-leisure time physical activities among Saudi adolescents aged 14-19 years. The multistage stratified cluster random sampling technique was used. A sample of 1,388 males and 1,500 females enrolled in secondary schools in three major cities in Saudi Arabia was included. Anthropometric measurements were performed and Body Mass Index was calculated. Physical activity, sedentary behaviours and dietary habits were measured using a self-reported validated questionnaire. The total time spent in leisure and non-leisure physical activity per week was 90 and 77 minutes, respectively. The males spent more time per week in leisure-time physical activities than females. Females in private schools spent more time during the week in leisure-time physical activities, compared to females in Stateschools. There was a significant difference between genders by obesity status interaction in leisure-time physical activity. Gender, and other factors, predicted total duration spent in leisure-time and non-leisure-time physical activity. The study showed that female adolescents are much less active than males, especially in leisure-time physical activities. Programmes to promote physical activity among adolescents are urgently needed, with consideration of gender differences.

  12. Perception of self-medication among university students in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa S Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to assess self-medication practice among university students in the Al-Qassim Province of Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional community-based survey was conducted by distributing a self-administered 18-item questionnaire among university students in the Al-Qassim Province of Saudi Arabia in the period between October and December 2012. The participants were selected using a convenience sampling technique. Data were collected from the questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 19. A total of 354 male students with an average age of 21.95 (SD ± 3.43 participated in this study. Our study showed that self-medication among male students was high (86.6% compared to results shown in other studies in the same region. Headache (59.9%, cough/cold (41% and fever (24.6% were the most common symptoms associated with self-medication. Congruent with the medical conditions reported, the most widely used medications without prescriptions were paracetamol (34.7%, followed by antibiotics (31.4% and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (28.7%. Our study shows that antibiotics were sometimes irrationally used for self-treatment of cough and fever. Self-medication was highly frequent among the students. Influence of TV advertisements, high accessibility of pharmacies and convenience stores, as well as good buying power were found to be leading factors for self-medication among male university students.

  13. Improving Students' English Speaking Proficiency in Saudi Public Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Awadh Alharbi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In English as a foreign language (EFL contexts, the absence of authentic language learning situations outside the classroom presents a significant challenge to improving students' English communication skills. Specific obstacles in the learning environment can also result in students’ limited use of English inside the classroom. These issues ultimately affect students’ English speaking capacity. Focusing on the Saudi EFL context, this paper attempted to identify the causes of Saudi students’ low proficiency in English communication and provide some recommendations to address these issues. The most significant findings of the paper were: (1 reforming specific Ministry of Education and Higher Education policies in Saudi Arabia is crucial; (2 the Saudi education system should reinforce the use of contemporary approaches to teaching that emphasise problem solving and critical thinking skills and put students in charge of their own learning; and (3 the ministry should consider converting some Saudi public schools into bilingual schools.

  14. The Effects of Age Factor on Learning English: A Case Study of Learning English in Saudi Schools, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawi, Elsadig Mohamed Khalifa

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of age on learning English in Saudi Arabia. It aims at encouraging the learning of English as a foreign language at an early age in KSA. The populations of the study are English language teachers and Saudi students in elementary schools compared with intermediate school students in Dawadmi…

  15. The characteristics and distribution of dentist workforce in Saudi Arabia: A descriptive cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz A. AlBaker

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Most of the dental care in Saudi Arabia is provided by non-Saudi dentists in both private and public health sectors. With the rising unemployment rate among Saudi dentists, the governmental bodies that are responsible of dental labor market regulations such as the ministries of health, economy and planning, and labor should come up with a policy to gradually but carefully replace the non-Saudi dentists in both public and private sectors with Saudi dentists.

  16. Saudi nurses' perceptions of nursing as an occupational choice: a qualitative interview study

    OpenAIRE

    Gazzaz, Lamya Asaad

    2009-01-01

    Background: Saudi Arabia has always been dependent on non-Saudi nurses. However, the recruitment of these nurses has been challenged by the consequences of the first Gulf War of 1991 and the political unrest in the Middle East ever since. Moreover, the annual supply of Saudi nursing graduates has been insufficient in meeting the demands of the expanding healthcare services. Indeed, Saudi nurses make less than 30% of the total nursing workforce Kingdom wide. The Saudi literature links the shor...

  17. Energy drinks consumption pattern, perceived benefits and associated adverse effects amongst students of University of Dammam, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsunni, Ahmed A; Badar, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    There are safety concerns about energy drinks alongside marketing claims of physiological and behavioural benefits. There is no scientific data about usage of energy drinks in Saudi Arabia. This study determined consumption patterns of energy drinks as well as perceived benefits and side effects amongst students at a Saudi university. This study was carried out in students of University of Dammam from October to December 2010. A questionnaire about energy drink use, reasons for use, benefits and side effects experienced was distributed amongst the university students. Frequencies of responses and differences between male and female students were analysed. A total of 412 students (282 males and 130 females) responded, out of whom 54.60% males and 26.15% female students were energy drink users. Mean age at first use was significantly (pstudents. Inspirations for first time use were friends (both genders) and curiosity (males mainly). Most students did not have a fixed frequency of use. The commonest reasons for use were company of friends, to keep awake, for more energy and for better performance in driving, sports or exams. Amongst many the commonest (pstudents reported a number of adverse effects. Increased urination and insomnia were the commonest in males and females respectively. Only 36.70% males and 14.28% females never experienced an adverse effect. A significant proportion of students at university of Dammam use energy drinks, they have reported a number of effects (perceived as benefits) along with a variety of adverse effects.

  18. Prevalence and genotyping ofToxoplasma gondii among Saudi pregnant women in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Jawahir; Elamin, Maha Hussein; Alhabib, Samia

    2016-11-01

    Introduction: Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is an intracellular protozoan that can infect all mammals, who serve as intermediate host. It causes congenital, neurological, eyes complications and mild or asymptomatic infections in humans. Purpose of this study: To investigate not only the prevalence of T. gondii, but also to find out its genotyping using multiple sequential molecular methods to predict exactly the precise genotyping of T. gondii among Saudi pregnant women. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using multi-stage methods. Initial stage involved enrolment of 250 Saudi pregnant women from multi-centre healthcare and community based settings in the capital of Saudi Arabia Riyadh. The second stage was embracement of the laboratory investigation that included Enzyme immunoassay (ELISA), DNA extraction, PCR, nested-PCR assay, and genotyping of the seropositive cases. Results: 203 women agreed to take part in our study with a response rate of 81.2% (203/250). Using ELISA, we found that the prevalence of Toxoplasma gondii IgG and IgM antibodies was 32.5% and 6.4%, respectively. We found that 29 samples (80.6%) were of genotype II; however 7 samples (19.4%) were of genotype III. Conclusion: Defining the population structure of T. gondii from Saudi Arabia has important implications for transmission, immunogenicity, pathogenesis, and in planning preventive strategies. Relationship between such variation in structure and disease manifestation in pregnant women is still difficult to assess due to the role of host immune status and genetic background on the control of infection, and of other parasitic features such as the infecting dose or parasite stage. Our finding of the genotyping of T. gondii might facilitate and inform future studies on comparative genomics and identification of genes that control important biological phenotypes including pathogenesis and transmission among Saudi women.

  19. The Spectrum of Glomerulonephritis in Saudi Arabia: The Results of the Saudi Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huraib S

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Only few studies regarding glomerulonephritis, with relatively small numbers of patients, have so far been published from different centers in Saudi Arabia, and have reported conflicting results regarding the patterns, even in the same city. The possible reasons for these differences include the small number of patients in the different studies, differences in the indications for renal biopsies, referral bias, geographical differences, and, sometimes, the non-availability of the necessary diagnostic facilities in the reporting centers. In order to overcome these problems, a registry for glomerulonephropathy was attempted in Saudi Arabia. Six large referral hospitals from different regions of Saudi Arabia participated in this registry. Biopsy reports and clinical information of 1294 renal biopsies were obtained. There were 782 renal biopsies due to glomerulonephritis (GN accounting for 77.2% of the total biopsies. Five hundred eighty seven (72.6% were primary glomerulonephritidis. Focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS (21.3% and membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN (20.7% were the most common types found in the primary glomerulonephritidis. Membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN was present in only 10.6% of the cases. IgA nephropathy was found in 6.5% of the cases. Of the secondary glomerulo-nephritides, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE was the most common indication for biopsy (57.0% and amyloidosis was found in only 3.2% of the biopsies. In conclusion, FSGS and MPGN were the most common forms of primary glomerulonephritis in adult patients in Saudi Arabia. MGN was not as common as in the western world. SLE was the commonest cause of secondary GN. Amyloidosis was not as common as in other Arab countries. There is a need for more centers from Saudi Arabia to join this national GN registry. Similar registries can be established in different Arab countries, which all would, hopefully, lead to a Pan-Arab GN registry.

  20. Condoms - male

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prophylactics; Rubbers; Male condoms; Contraceptive - condom; Contraception - condom; Barrier method - condom ... The male condom is a thin cover that fits over a man's erect penis . Condoms are made of: Animal ...

  1. Male Hypogonadism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male hypogonadism Overview Male hypogonadism is a condition in which the body doesn't produce enough testosterone — the hormone that plays a key ... sperm or both. You may be born with male hypogonadism, or it can develop later in life, ...

  2. Examining the relationship between child maltreatment and school performance in public schools in Saudi Arabia: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamimi, Dana; Almuneef, Maha; Albuhairan, Fadia; Saleheen, Hassan

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between child maltreatment (CM) and school performance among adolescents in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, in 2014. The enrolment criteria included both male and female Saudi students ( n=674; 52.7% male) aged 12-19 years ( M age =15.6±1.6 years), attending intermediate and secondary schools belonging to the Ministry of National Guard. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information on different forms of abuse that had occurred in the past or were currently occurring. Poor school performance was more likely in students who lived among substance-use family members or guardians compared with those who did not (33.3% vs. 11.4%; pperformance in school, and included living among substance-use family members or guardians (odds ratio=4.0; 95% confidence interval=1.7-9.5) and living with imprisoned family member (odds ratio=3.1, 95% confidence interval=1.5-6.3). CM, along with family structure and dynamics, has an adverse relationship with students' school performance. These findings highlight the importance of increasing awareness of the impact of CM on school performance among families, schools and the community.

  3. Prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and the role of the A- variant in a Saudi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Khalid Khalaf; Khan, Imran Ali

    2014-10-01

    To estimate the prevalence of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency among Saudi men, and to establish the frequency of the two mutations/polymorphisms associated with the G6PD A- mutation--G to A at nucleotide 202 (G202A) and A to G at nucleotide 376 (A376G)--in those found to have G6PD deficiency. Blood samples were obtained from healthy male Saudi donors and screened for G6PD deficiency using a fluorescent spot test. Samples from subjects shown to be G6PD deficient and controls were then analysed for the presence of the G202A and A376G mutations on exons 4 and 5, respectively, of the G6PD gene using polymerase chain reaction followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism. A total of 2100 male subjects were screened; of these, 100 (4.76%) were shown to be G6PD deficient. The G6PD A- mutation (presence of both G202A and A376G) was observed in two (2%) of the 100 subjects with G6PD deficiency. There was no significant difference in the frequency of this mutation between those with G6PD deficiency and controls. The G6PD A- mutation (G202A and A376G) does not appear to have a role in G6PD deficiency in a Saudi population. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  4. Evaluation of the Role of Palatal Rugae Application as a Tool for Sex Identification in the Saudi Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MM Fawzi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Human identification has always been a major challenge for forensic experts, especially when dealing with decomposed and severely mutilated corpses. Palatal rugae are usually preserved in such conditions and thus can be used as a rapid, simple technique where other methods fail to apply. This study aimed to evaluate the role of palatal rugae application as a tool for sex identification in the Saudi population. Three hundred randomly chosen Saudis of both genders were included in the study. Maxillary arch impression casts were prepared and digitally photographed. The palatal rugae count, patterns, length, prominence and median raphe extension were the studied parameters. The rugae count showed higher incidence in males, 63.3%. The rugae patterns study showed that the sinuous was the highest incidence in males, 31.5%, while the curve was the highest in females, 34%. Primary and prominent rugae showed statistical significance while median raphe extension was non-significant. The study revealed the possible application of palatal rugae as a tool for sex identification in the Saudi population. This finding can be helpful in the identification process and is recommended for other populations. Digital archiving of palatoprints by legal authorities may act as reference for criminal and civil cases.

  5. Gender-dependent associations between socioeconomic status and metabolic syndrome: a cross-sectional study in the adult Saudi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Al-Attas, Omar S; Khan, Nasiruddin; Alfawaz, Hanan A; Alghanim, Saad A; Al-Yousef, Mansour A; Al-Ajlan, Abdulrahman S M; Alokail, Majed S

    2014-04-14

    To determine the gender-dependent association of socio-economic status variables with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) in the adult Saudi population. A total of 9164 adult Saudis (aged 18-70 years) were included in this cross-sectional study. Marital status, income, education, and occupation were used as socio-economic indicators while behavioral factor like physical exercise was also taken into account. MetS was defined using the criteria based from the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III). In males, the odds ratio (OR) of harboring MetS was higher in married [OR1.6 (Confidence Interval (CI) 1.1, 2.4); p high income class [OR 2.3(CI 1.5, 3.5); p high income [OR 0.70 (CI 0.46, 1.1); p education level [OR 0.38 (CI 0.26, 0.56); p high among retired, married and high-earning Saudi males while in females, high earners and high education seem to confer a protective effect against MetS.

  6. Economic costs of diabetes in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulkarim K Alhowaish

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes imposes a large economic burden on the individual, national healthcare systems, and countries. Objective: To determine the economic impact of diabetes mellitus on Saudi healthcare system, both now and in the future. Materials and Methods: This research study uses a prevalence-based approach that combines the demographics of the population (classified by nationality, sex and age group with and without diagnosed diabetes in 1992 and 2010. The economic impact of diabetes is estimated in this study, using secondary sources of information provided by Ministry of Health, Ministry of Finance and Central Department of Statistics and Information databases. Results: People diagnosed with diabetes, on average, have medical healthcare expenditures that are ten times higher ($3,686 vs. $380 than what expenditures would be in the absence of diabetes. Over 96% of all medical healthcare expenditures attributed to diabetes are incurred by persons of Saudi nationality, with the remaining 4% incurred by persons of non-Saudi nationality. The population age 45-60 incurs 45% of diabetes-attributed costs, with the remaining population under age 15 incurs 3.8%, age 15-44 incurs 27.5%, and age 60 and above incurs 23.8%. Conclusion: The actual national healthcare burden because of diabetes is likely to exceed the $0.87 billion estimated in this study, because it omits the indirect costs associated with diabetes, such as absenteeism, lost productivity from disease-related absenteeism, unemployment from disease-related disability, lost productivity due to early mortality by disease. The social cost of intangibles such as pain and suffering and care provided by non-paid caregivers as well as healthcare system administrative costs, cost of medications, clinician training programs, and research and infrastructure development is also omitted from this research study. Further studies are needed to confirm the present findings and to improve our

  7. Tobacco Use among Health Care Workers in Southwestern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Mahfouz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study targeted health care workers (HCWs in Governmental Hospitals and Primary Health Care Centers in Abha City, southwestern Saudi Arabia. An anonymous self-report questionnaire was used to assess tobacco use and the reasons for smoking. The present study included 736 HCWs. The overall prevalence of tobacco use amounted to 26.3% (14.8% current and 11.5% former users. In a binary logistic regression analysis, males were found significantly more prone to smoke compared to females (aOR = 3.081, 95% CI: 2.004–4.739. Similarly, parental history of tobacco use was found to be a significant risk factor (aOR = 1.540, 95% CI: 1.040–2.278. Among current users, 89.9% were interested in quitting and 66.1% tried before to quit. The prevalence of smoking among HCWs in the present study, besides being a public health problem, represents a potential barrier in involving this group as a first line for tobacco control. There is a need for a national intervention programme in the country in a tailored manner for HCWs to control tobacco use parallel to the running national program for public. These interventions should begin early in basic medical education and to be applied continually during one’s medical career.

  8. Odontogenic tumors: analysis of 188 cases from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSheddi, Manal Abdulaziz; AlSenani, May Ahmad; AlDosari, Amani Wassam

    2015-01-01

    Odontogenic tumors (OTs) represent an uncommon group of lesions that arise from the tooth-forming apparatus. They pose a significant diagnostic and management challenge. There is a lack of data among the Saudi population. The aim of the study was to establish the relative frequency of the various histological types of OTs. A retrospective study of 188 cases of OTs using the histopathology archives of the College of Dentistry, King Saud University. The histopathology archives of the College of Dentistry, King Saud University were reviewed from January 1984 to December 2010 for OTs. The age and gender of the patients, tumor site, and histopathologic typing were analyzed. A total of 188 (4.3%) patients met the criteria for being classified as an OT. Odontogenic keratocystic tumor (36.7%) was the most commonly diagnosed, followed by ameloblastoma (25.0%), odontoma (14.9%), and odontogenic myxoma (6.4%). Two cases of malignant OTs (1.1%) are found. The male-to-female ratio was 1.4:1. The most frequently affected area was the posterior mandible (48.9%), followed by the anterior maxilla (22.9%). This is a relatively large series of OTs revealing aspects of similarities and differences with those of previous studies of populations in Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The findings of the present study may be useful as a guide for clinicians who need to make clinical judgments prior to biopsy about the most probable diagnosis.

  9. Risk factors of bronchial asthma in bahrah, saudi arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mazam, A; Mohamed, A G

    2001-01-01

    Asthma is a common health problem whose prevalence in Saudi Arabia has risen over the last few decades. Brick factories in the city of Bahrah have exacerbated the problem, and increasing numbers of asthma cases are attending local primary health care centers. Determine the risk factors of asthma in Bahrah. The study was comprised of 110 cases of bronchial asthma resident in Bahrah who were diagnosed by the treating physicians and 110 healthy controls matched in age and sex. A questionnaire was completed from cases and controls, consisting of data regarding personal, familial, indoor and outdoor environmental factors that may be potential risk factors to asthma. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were done to assess risk factors. The mean ages of cases and controls were 22.4 (± 16.7) and 22.8 (± 16.1) years, respectively. Each group consisted of 64 males (58%) and 46 (42%) females. There was a significant association between distance from houses to brick factories and bronchial asthma (Chi square for linear trend = 26.6, pfactories, family history and history of rhinitis, skin atopy, or recurrent respiratory tract infections are risk factors of bronchial asthma. An in-depth study to asses air pollution in Bahrah is recom-mended. People are advised not to live near brick factories.

  10. Dental age assessment of Western Saudi children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshihri, Amin M; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the London Atlas of Human Tooth Development and Eruption for age estimation in Saudi Arabian children and adolescents (aged 2-20 years), for forensic odontology application. This cross-sectional survey analyzed orthopantomograms (OPGs) of the complete dentition (including root development) to estimate the deviation from chronological age. Each OPG was de-identified and analyzed individually and classified into age-groups by the lead author, using the methods of the Atlas of Tooth Development. OPGs from a total of 252 patients [110 (44%) males, 142 (56%) females] aged 2-20 years (24-240 months) were examined in this study. The average estimated and chronological ages of subjects differed significantly p 12 months. This study, conducted in a sub-population of different origin than the UK sample used for the development of the London Atlas, identified variation in age estimates that may have significant impacts on results. The establishment of a composite international repository of atlas-based data for diverse ethnic sub-populations would be of great value to clinicians across the globe.

  11. Extensive geographical and social structure in the paternal lineages of Saudi Arabia revealed by analysis of 27 Y-STRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubrani, Yahya M; Wetton, Jon H; Jobling, Mark A

    2018-03-01

    Saudi Arabia's indigenous population is organized into patrilineal descent groups, but to date, little has been done to characterize its population structure, in particular with respect to the male-specific region of the Y chromosome. We have used the 27-STR Yfiler ® Plus kit to generate haplotypes in 597 unrelated Saudi males, classified into five geographical regions (North, South, Central, East and West). Overall, Yfiler ® Plus provides a good discrimination capacity of 95.3%, but this is greatly reduced (74.7%) when considering the reduced Yfiler ® set of 17 Y-STRs, justifying the use of the expanded set of markers in this population. Comparison of the five geographical divisions reveals striking differences, with low diversity and similar haplotype spectra in the Central and Northern regions, and high diversity and similar haplotype spectra in the East and West. These patterns likely reflect the geographical isolation of the desert heartland of the peninsula, and the proximity to the sea of the Eastern and Western areas, and consequent historical immigration. We predicted haplogroups from Y-STR haplotypes, testing the performance of prediction by using a large independent set of Saudi Arabian Y-STR + Y-SNP data. Prediction indicated predominance (71%) of haplogroup J1, which was significantly more common in Central, Northern and Southern groups than in East and West, and formed a star-like expansion cluster in a median-joining network with an estimated age of ∼2800 years. Most of our 597 participants were sampled within Saudi Arabia itself, but ∼16% were sampled in the UK. Despite matching these two groups by home sub-region, we observed significant differences in haplotype and predicted haplogroup constitutions overall, and for most sub-regions individually. This suggests social structure influencing the probability of leaving Saudi Arabia, correlated with different Y-chromosome compositions. The UK-recruited sample is an inappropriate proxy for

  12. Non-verbal communication barriers when dealing with Saudi sellers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosra Missaoui

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Communication has a major impact on how customers perceive sellers and their organizations. Especially, the non-verbal communication such as body language, appearance, facial expressions, gestures, proximity, posture, eye contact that can influence positively or negatively the first impression of customers and their experiences in stores. Salespeople in many countries, especially the developing ones, are just telling about their companies’ products because they are unaware of the real role of sellers and the importance of non-verbal communication. In Saudi Arabia, the seller profession has been exclusively for foreign labor until 2006. It is very recently that Saudi workforce enters to the retailing sector as sellers. The non-verbal communication of those sellers has never been evaluated from consumer’s point of view. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to explore the non-verbal communication barriers that customers are facing when dealing with Saudi sellers. After discussing the non-verbal communication skills that sellers must have in the light of the previous academic research and the depth interviews with seven focus groups of Saudi customers, this study found that the Saudi customers were not totally satisfied with the current non-verbal communication skills of Saudi sellers. Therefore, it is strongly recommended to develop the non-verbal communication skills of Saudi sellers by intensive trainings, to distinguish more the appearance of their sellers, especially the female ones, to focus on the time of intervention as well as the proximity to customers.

  13. Assessing Volcanic Risk in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, Jan Marie; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2014-08-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia has numerous large monogenetic volcanic fields, known locally as "harrats." The largest of these, Harrat Rahat (Figure 1), produced a basaltic fissure eruption in 1256 C.E. with lava flows traveling within 20 kilometers of the city Al-Madinah, which currently has a population of 1.5 million plus an additional 3 million pilgrims annually. With more than 950 visible vents and periodic seismic swarms, an understanding of the risk of future eruptions in this volcanic field is vital.

  14. The large carpenter bees of central Saudi Arabia, with notes on the biology of Xylocopa sulcatipes Maa (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Xylocopinae

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    Mohammed Hannan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The large carpenter bees (Xylocopinae, Xylocopa Latreille occurring in central Saudi Arabia are reviewed. Two species are recognized in the fauna, Xylocopa (Koptortosoma aestuans (Linnaeus and X. (Ctenoxylocopa sulcatipes Maa. Diagnoses for and keys to the species of these prominent components of the central Saudi Arabian bee fauna are provided to aid their identification by pollination researchers active in the region. Females and males of both species are figured and biological notes provided for X. sulcatipes. Notes on the nesting biology and ecology of X. sulcatipes are appended. As in studies for this species from elsewhere, nests were found in dried stems of Calotropis procera (Aiton (Asclepiadaceae and Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae.

  15. The large carpenter bees of central Saudi Arabia, with notes on the biology of Xylocopa sulcatipes Maa (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Xylocopinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mohammed A.; Alqarni, Abdulaziz S.; Owayss, Ayman A.; Engel, Michael S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The large carpenter bees (Xylocopinae, Xylocopa Latreille) occurring in central Saudi Arabia are reviewed. Two species are recognized in the fauna, Xylocopa (Koptortosoma) aestuans (Linnaeus) and Xylocopa (Ctenoxylocopa) sulcatipes Maa. Diagnoses for and keys to the species of these prominent components of the central Saudi Arabian bee fauna are provided to aid their identification by pollination researchers active in the region. Females and males of both species are figured and biological notes provided for Xylocopa sulcatipes. Notes on the nesting biology and ecology of Xylocopa sulcatipes are appended. As in studies for this species from elsewhere, nests were found in dried stems of Calotropis procera (Aiton) (Asclepiadaceae) and Phoenix dactylifera L. (Arecaceae). PMID:22768000

  16. Epidemiology and clinical complication patterns of influenza A (H1N1 virus in northern Saudi Arabia

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    Kheder Mohamed Altayep

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to describe epidemiologic and clinical presentation, clinical complications and outcomes of patients diagnosed with influenza A infection (H1N1 during a one-year period. We retrospectively investigated 300 patients with influenza-like clinical presentation during the period January 2015 − January 2016 in King Khalid Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Fifty-four patients out of 300 (18% were diagnosed with H1N1 virus infection; their age ranged from 7 months to 85 years, with a mean age of 25 years. Among them, 34 (63% were males and 20 (37% were females, with a M:F ratio of 1.70. The findings of this study show the great spread of influenza A outside the main holy cities of Saudi Arabia, and underline the absolute need for strict prevention strategies including vaccinations, public awareness and hygiene measures.

  17. Epidemiology and Clinical Complication Patterns of Influenza A (H1N1 Virus) in Northern Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altayep, Kheder Mohamed; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelakrim; A Tallaa, Amjad Tallaa; Alzayed, Ahmad Soud; Alshammari, Aqeel Jazzaa; Ali Talla, Ayman Talla

    2017-05-31

    The aim of the present study is to describe epidemiologic and clinical presentation, clinical complications and outcomes of patients diagnosed with influenza A infection (H1N1) during a one-year period. We retrospectively investigated 300 patients with influenza-like clinical presentation during the period January 2015 - January 2016 in King Khalid Hospital, Saudi Arabia. Fifty-four patients out of 300 (18%) were diagnosed with H1N1 virus infection; their age ranged from 7 months to 85 years, with a mean age of 25 years. Among them, 34 (63%) were males and 20 (37%) were females, with a M:F ratio of 1.70. The findings of this study show the great spread of influenza A outside the main holy cities of Saudi Arabia, and underline the absolute need for strict prevention strategies including vaccinations, public awareness and hygiene measures.

  18. Why do women not prefer much older men? a hypothesis based on alterations in male reproductive physiology related to increased age Por que mulheres não preferem homens muito mais velhos que elas? uma hipótese baseada em alterações da fisiologia reprodutiva masculina relacionadas ao aumento da idade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa Helena Pinheiro Spinelli

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary Psychology studies suggest that women prefer slightly older or similarly aged partners, although to date few hypotheses have been put forth to explain this pattern of choice. Several recent studies have shown changes in male reproductive parameters as a result of increased age. In the current review of medical literature, we found evidence that much older men are more likely to be infertile, women with much older partners are more likely to experience problems during pregnancy, and children of much older men are more likely to have genetic abnormalities. Based on these findings, we suggest that reproducing with much older men does not represent the best reproductive option for women, which would explain the female preference for only slightly older or similarly-aged mates.Estudos de Psicologia Evolucionista sugerem que as mulheres preferem parceiros um pouco mais velhos ou de idade semelhante, embora apresentem, até agora, poucas hipóteses para explicar esse padrão de preferência. Recentemente, vários estudos têm demonstrado alterações nos parâmetros reprodutivos masculinos como resultado do aumento da idade. Em revisão da literatura médica atual, encontramos evidências de que homens muito mais velhos são mais susceptíveis de serem inférteis, mulheres com parceiros muito mais velhos são mais propensas a sofrer com problemas durante a gravidez e filhos de homens muito mais velhos são mais propensos a ter anomalias genéticas. Com base nestes resultados, sugerimos que reproduzir com homens muito mais velhos não representa a melhor opção reprodutiva para as mulheres, o que explicaria a preferência feminina por parceiros apenas um pouco mais velhos ou de mesma faixa etária.

  19. Effectiveness of a preparatory aid in facilitating oral assessment in a group of Saudi children with autism spectrum disorders in Central Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshid, Ebtissam Z.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of a specially-designed dental book (preparatory aid) on the behavior of a group of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) Saudi children during their first dental visit to the College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional double-blinded pre-and post clinical study consisting of 2 parts; a survey targeting the parents, and a clinical oral examination of their ASD children was conducted between January and June of 2016. Results: A total of 40 children (75% males and 25% females) with an average age of 6.1 years were included. Approximately 47.5% children acted positively during the dental procedure. The dental book had a positive effect on the behavior of 37.5% children according to their parents’ evaluation and highly effective in enhancing the parents’ dental knowledge (67.5%). Conclusion: Parents expressed positive opinions regarding the use of preparatory aids in the dental environment. Approximately half of the ASD children benefit from the preparatory aid used according to the parents’ opinion, and the follow up survey showed improvement in the parent’s dental knowledge and oral hygiene practices. PMID:28439605

  20. Efficacy of pneumatic dilatation in Saudi achalasia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M; Samarkandi, Sara; Al-Harbi, Tahani; Al-Radhi, Haifa; Almadi, Majid A

    2014-01-01

    Pneumatic dilatation (PD) is one of the effective treatments of achalasia. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of pneumatic dilation and patient satisfaction in Saudi achalasia patients. We have retrospectively recruited patients with confirmed achalasia, who underwent at least one dilatation session from January 1990 to January 2010 at a single tertiary center. Symptoms, including weight loss, dysphagia, retrosternal pain, and regurgitation, were assessed with the use of the Eckardt score (which ranges from 0 to 12, with higher scores indicating more pronounced symptoms). All patients were called and asked about their Eckardt score in addition to their satisfaction score post the dilatation procedure. The primary outcome was therapeutic success (Eckardt score≤3) and patient satisfaction at the time of their calls. The secondary outcomes included the need for retreatment and the rate of complications. A total of 29 patients were included, with a mean age of 40.30 (95% CI: 36.1-44.6) and 55.2% of them were males. The mean of the pre-dilatation Eckardt score was 8.3 (95% CI: 7.2-9.4), which dropped to 2.59 (95% CI: 1.7-3.5) after PD (Pdilatation and a total failure in two patients (7%) after the third dilatation. The mean number of dilatations was 1.3 (95% CI: 1.1-1.5) where 50.7% required one dilatation, 19.2% required two dilatations, and 30.1% required three dilatations. The mean of the symptoms-free period was 53.4 months (SD 52.7, range 1-180) with symptoms recurring in 35% of patients within 2 years. The mean of post-PD patient satisfaction was 7.45 (95% CI: 6.2-8.7). Perforation, which was treated conservatively, occurred in one patient (3.5%), whereas bleeding occurred in two patients (7%). Age or gender was not found to be a predictor of Eckardt score improvement on multivariate linear regression analysis. PD is an efficacious procedure in Saudi achalasia patients with a very good overall patient satisfaction with 53.4 months of symptoms

  1. How natural are 'natural herbal remedies'? A Saudi perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Maciej J; al Tufail, Mohammed; Hassan, Huda

    2002-01-01

    There is a rapidly growing trend in the consumption of herbal remedies in industrialised and developing countries. Users of herbal remedies are at risk of toxicity and adverse interactions of herbal preparations due to their frequent contamination with metals and adulteration with synthetic drugs. The purpose of this study was to assess the quality of herbal remedies present on the market in Saudi Arabia in recent years. 247 herbal remedies and related preparations were examined from 2000-2001 at the Toxicology Laboratory, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Herbal powder samples were the most common sample type examined (n = 80), followed by complete, packed preparations (n = 59), single undescribed capsules or pills (n = 46), loose plant leaves or seeds (n = 28), creams (n = 18) and liquid or jelly samples (n = 16). All samples were subjected to toxicological screening for organic substances using gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric analysis, screening for heavy metals (arsenic, mercury, and lead) using inductive coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and microbiological examination. The preparations analysed were used to treat the following indications: leukaemia and other forms of cancer (n = 22); obesity (n = 18); diabetes mellitus (n = 14); rheumatic disorders (n = 14); skin pigmentation problems (n = 11); or to enhance male sexual activity (n = 9). In 123 cases, the indication of use was not known. 39 samples contained high concentrations of heavy metals. This was particularly striking in remedies used to treat leukaemia (arsenic content of 522-161,600 ppm) and in creams for whitening skin (mercury content of 5,700-126,000 ppm). Eight preparations contained synthetic drugs (e.g. benzodiazepines and tricyclic antidepressants in sedative preparations, cyproheptadine in a remedy to gain bodyweight, ibuprofen and dipyrone in herbal capsules used to treat rheumatism). 18 samples were contaminated with micro-organisms. 14

  2. Career Motivations, Perceptions of the Future of Dentistry and Preferred Dental Specialties Among Saudi Dental Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halawany, Hassan S

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to determine the career motivations, perceptions of the future of dentistry and preferred postgraduate specialties of Saudi dental students. Methods: A pretested, self-administered, 16-item questionnaire was distributed to first- through fifth-year dental students at King Saud University in Saudi Arabia. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and the level of significance was set at 5%. Results: Of the 530 potential participants, 329 students (198 male and 131 female respondents) completed the questionnaire. High professional status (71.4%), a secure career (67.8%), a high income (78.1%), flexible working hours (54.4%), a wide range of career options after graduation (59.3%), opportunities for self-employment (69.3%) and good job opportunities abroad (65.3%) were endorsed to a great/considerable extent by the respondents. “It takes time to establish a practice” (62.3%), “Postgraduate education is a necessity” (72.4%) and “The increasing number of dental institutions is a threat to the profession” (59.3%) were endorsed to a great or considerable extent by the respondents. The most popular specialty among the male students was oral maxillofacial surgery (20.1%) and among female students was operative dentistry (23.4%). Conclusion: The career motivations of this group of dental students seemed to relate to socioeconomic aspects of dentistry and perceptions of the future of dentistry seemed to relate to the need for postgraduate education. PMID:25246989

  3. Evaluation of hospital-learning environment for pediatric residency in eastern region of Saudi Arabia

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    Waleed H. BuAli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: No study had been conducted to assess the hospitals’ environment for learning purposes in multicenter sites in Saudi Arabia. It aims to evaluate the environment of hospitals for learning purposes of pediatric residents. Methods: We applied Postgraduate Hospital Educational Environment Measure (PHEEM to measure the learning environment at six teaching hospitals in the Eastern Region of Saudi Arabia from September to December 2013. Results: The number of respondents was 104 (86.7% out of 120 residents and 37 females and 67 male residents have responded. The residents’ response scored 100 out of 160 maximum score in rating of PHEEM that showed overall learning environment is favorable for training. There were some items in the social support domain suggesting improvements. There was no significant difference between male and female residents. There was a difference among the participant teaching hospitals (p<0.05. Conclusion: The result pointed an overall positive rating. Individual item scores suggested that their social life during residency could be uninspiring. They have the low satisfactory level and they feel racism, and sexual discrimination. Therefore, there is still a room for improvement.

  4. Correlation of psychomotor skills and didactic performance among dental students in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afify AR

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed R Afify,1 Khalid H Zawawi,1 Hisham I Othman,2 Ayman A Al-Dharrab31Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, 2Department of Basic Oral and Clinical Sciences, 3Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Rehabilitation, Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaObjectives: The objective of this study is to investigate the correlation between the psychomotor skills and the academic performance of dental students.Methods: Didactic and preclinical scores were collected for students who graduated from the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, in 2011. Three courses (Dental Anatomy, Removable Prosthodontic Denture, and Orthodontics were selected. Correlations comparing didactic and practical scores were done for the total samples, then for the males and females separately.Results: There was no significant correlation between the practical and didactic scores for the three courses for the total sample. There was a significant correlation between all three subjects in the didactic scores. For females, the results showed that there was only a significant correlation between the practical and didactic scores for Dental Anatomy. For males, no correlation was observed between the practical and didactic scores for all subjects.Conclusion: In the present sample, didactic performance did not correlate well with the students' psychomotor performance.Keywords: psychomotor performance, didactic performance, dental students, correlation study, dental education, practical performance

  5. Preconception care in Saudi women with diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Madanat, Amal Y.; Sheshah, Eman A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: The rate of preexisting diabetes mellitus (DM) in Saudi Arabia is one of the highest in the world. The role of preconception care (PCC) is well-established as a means of improving pregnancy outcomes in DM. Objectives: To assess the rate of preconception counseling, the level of PCC knowledge, and the rate of unplanned pregnancies in Saudi women with DM. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 355 Saudi women aged 18–49 years with self-reported DM. The st...

  6. Further records of pseudoscorpions (Arachnida, Pseudoscorpiones) from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnert, Volker; Sharaf, Mostafa; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2014-02-11

    Five species of pseudoscorpions are recorded from the southwestern mountains of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Pseudochthonius arabicus Mahnert n. sp. is described as new to science; this genus was previously known only from sub-Saharan Africa and tropical South America and represents the first record of the family Chthoniidae from the Arabian Peninsula. Paratemnoides ellingseni (Beier, 1932), a widespread species in tropical Africa, and Withius piger (Simon, 1878) are added to the faunal list of Saudi Arabia. Minniza monticola Mahnert, 1991 and Rhacochelifer sonyae Mahnert, 1991 are apparently endemic to the southwestern mountains of Saudi Arabia.

  7. A Panel Study of Nonmetropolitan Older Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, E. A.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    In this 10-year study of older male workers in nonmetropolitan areas, employment status, income, health, life outlook, and social ties were investigated. In most cases, adverse conditions were related to occupational class rather than age or other factors. (SK)

  8. Consanguinity among the Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Hazmi, M A; al-Swailem, A R; Warsy, A S; al-Swailem, A M; Sulaimani, R; al-Meshari, A A

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted on 3212 Saudi families to investigate the prevalence of consanguineous marriages. The families were interviewed and the information on the relationship between the husband and wife was obtained. The overall rate of consanguinity shows that 57.7% of the families screened were consanguineous. The most frequent were first cousin marriages (28.4%) followed by distant relative marriages (15.2%) and second cousin marriages (14.6%). The families were grouped according to the province of their origin and the consanguinity rates were calculated accordingly. There were slight differences in the consanguinity rates in the five provinces, which ranged from 52.1% to 67.7%. In each province first cousin marriages were the most frequently encountered pattern, ranging from 17.9% to 40.9%. The inbreeding coefficient (F) was calculated for each province and ranged from 0.020 to 0.030. Within each province, there were several significant differences among the populations in the different areas. The highest rate of consanguinity was 80.6% in Samtah and the lowest rate was around 34% in Abha in the South Western province. These results place Saudi Arabia among the countries of the world with a high rate of consanguinity. The possible consequences of increased consanguinity are presented and discussed. PMID:7473654

  9. Contemporary empyema thoracis necessitans in an adult male caused by Staphylococcus aureus: decortication is superior to traditional under water seal intercostal tube in chronic empyema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Liaqat Ali; Mousa, Ahmed A Ba; Zamzami, Marwan; Robert, Asirvatham Alwin

    2015-01-01

    Empyema thoracis necessitans is a rare clinical finding nowadays. We report 55 years old Saudi male with past history of road traffic accident, poly trauma, chest surgery and paraplegia admitted for rehabilitation in Sultan Bin Abduaziz Humanitarian City (SBAHC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia and diagnosed with empyema thoracis necessitans due to Staphylococcus aureus, treated initially with traditional thoracostomy under water seal intercostal intubation and antibiotics but subsequently required decortication. PMID:26090063

  10. Knowledge, attitudes, and quality of life of type 2 diabetes patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Suliman Al-Aboudi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between knowledge and attitude with health-related quality of life (HRQoL among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was undertaken with a cohort of 75 patients attending the University Diabetic Center at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The EuroQoL-five-dimensional (EQ-5D scale was used to assess HRQoL. EQ-5D was scored using values derived from the UK general population survey. The brief diabetic knowledge test in questionnaire format developed by the University of Michigan Diabetes Research and Training Center and the attitude toward self-care questionnaire based on the diabetic care profile were used. Results: Fifty-eight (77.35% respondents were male with a mean 12.6 ± 8.4 years of a history of diabetes. Thirty-four (45.3% were in the age group of 45–55 years with a mean age of 54 ± 9.2 years. A moderate level of HRQoL (0.71 ± 0.22 was recorded in the study cohort. The mean EQ-5D score was lower in females compared to male patients (0.58 ± 0.23 vs. 0.74 ± 0.20. The mean score of Michigan Diabetic Knowledge Test was 8.96 ± 2.1 and the median score was 9.00. Of 75 diabetic patients, 14.7% had poor knowledge; 72% had moderate knowledge, and only 13.3% had good knowledge. The average attitude score of all respondents was 6.38 ± 2.11. There was a significant positive association between attitude and EQ-5D score. Conclusion: HRQoL and knowledge scores were moderate in type 2 diabetic patients in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Patient attitude toward the disease was positive, and this was positively associated with HRQoL; most respondents believed they are responsible for their care. It is likely that a high quality of diabetes self-management education program will provide benefits and affect significantly on type 2 diabetes patients in Saudi Arabia.

  11. Level of Sedentary Behavior and Its Associated Factors among Saudi Women Working in Office-Based Jobs in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Nada M. Albawardi; Hoda Jradi; Abdulla A. Almalki; Hazzaa M. Al-Hazzaa

    2017-01-01

    Research in Saudi Arabia has revealed a shocking level of insufficiently physically active adults, particularly women. The risk of sedentary behavior will likely increase as the number of women with office-based jobs increases. The aim of this study is to determine the level of sedentary behavior, and its associated factors, among Saudi women working office-based jobs in the city of Riyadh. A cross-sectional study of 420 Saudi female employees at 8 office-based worksites were measured to dete...

  12. Male contraception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Mathew

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Contraception is an accepted route for the control of population explosion in the world. Traditionally hormonal contraceptive methods have focused on women. Male contraception by means of hormonal and non hormonal methods is an attractive alternative. Hormonal methods of contraception using testosterone have shown good results. Non hormonal reversible methods of male contraception like reversible inhibition of sperm under guidanceare very promising. In this article we have reviewed the current available options for male contraception.

  13. Association between oral health knowledge and practices of Saudi pregnant women in Dammam, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffar, B O; El Tantawi, M; Al-Ansari, A; AlAgl, A S

    2016-09-25

    This study assessed the association between oral health knowledge and practices of pregnant Saudi women selected from visitors to a government hospital in Dammam, Saudi Arabia in 2014. Women answered questions on oral health knowledge during pregnancy and knowledge of infant oral health. Most women (> 70%) knew that dental caries in children can be prevented, that pregnancy affects oral health and that dental treatment during pregnancy can negatively affect infants. Most women (> 80%) performed oral hygiene procedures but only 18% regularly visited the dentist. In a regression analysis, oral health knowledge was not significantly associated with reported oral hygiene practices. Women who visited the dentist regularly were more likely to know how to prevent caries in children, and that dental treatment during pregnancy and infant health were associated.

  14. Male age mediates reproductive investment and response to paternity assurance

    OpenAIRE

    Benowitz, Kyle M.; Head, Megan L.; Williams, Camellia A.; Moore, Allen J; Royle, Nick J

    2013-01-01

    Theory predicts that male response to reduced paternity will depend on male state and interactions between the sexes. If there is little chance of reproducing again, then males should invest heavily in current offspring, regardless of their share in paternity. We tested this by manipulating male age and paternity assurance in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We found older males invested more in both mating effort and parental effort than younger males. Furthermore, male age, a co...

  15. Correlation of psychomotor skills and didactic performance among dental students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afify, Ahmed R; Zawawi, Khalid H; Othman, Hisham I; Al-Dharrab, Ayman A

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the correlation between the psychomotor skills and the academic performance of dental students. Didactic and preclinical scores were collected for students who graduated from the Faculty of Dentistry, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, in 2011. Three courses (Dental Anatomy, Removable Prosthodontic Denture, and Orthodontics) were selected. Correlations comparing didactic and practical scores were done for the total samples, then for the males and females separately. There was no significant correlation between the practical and didactic scores for the three courses for the total sample. There was a significant correlation between all three subjects in the didactic scores. For females, the results showed that there was only a significant correlation between the practical and didactic scores for Dental Anatomy. For males, no correlation was observed between the practical and didactic scores for all subjects. In the present sample, didactic performance did not correlate well with the students' psychomotor performance.

  16. Potential antibacterial activity of some Saudi Arabia honey

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    Ahmed G. Hegazi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate the potential antibacterial activity of some Saudi Arabia honey against selected bacterial strains of medical importance. Materials and Methods: A total of 10 Saudi Arabia honey used to evaluate their antimicrobial activity against some antibiotic-resistant pathogenic bacterial strains. The bacterial strains were Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Results: The antibacterial activity of Saudi honey against five bacterial strains showed different levels of inhibition according to the type of honey. The overall results showed that the potential activity was differing according to the pathogen and honey type. Conclusion: It could be concluded that the Saudi honey inhibit the growth of bacterial strains and that honey can be used as complementary antimicrobial agent against selected pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Gender Clash: Why Is Saudi Arabia So Angry at Sweden?

    OpenAIRE

    Behravesh, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Far from being essentially a dispute over democratic governance or even human rights, the current Saudi-Swedish row basically represents a clash of state genders, pitting a “masculine” religious autocracy against a “feminine” social democracy.

  18. Evaluation of medication package inserts in Saudi Arabia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Al-Aqeel, Sinaa A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine if package inserts (PIs) supplied with prescribed and over-the-counter medications in Saudi Arabia contain information relevant for the safe and appropriate use of these medications...

  19. Role of Corporate Social Responsibility Practices in Saudi Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandar Khalaf Alharthey

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, many researchers focus on the relocation of the government in the transformation of The purpose of this study is to examine the role of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR practices in higher education of Saudi Arabia. The growing importance of CSR has made it necessary for every university to use international benchmarks as standard to devise their CSR practices accordingly. This realization has shifted focus of CSR practices of Saudi universities towards every dimension of CSR. The study collected secondary data through 120 advertisements published from 2012 to 2015 and found out that CSR practices of universities of Saudi Arabia remain focused on social dimension of CSR because Saudi culture and religion had profound impact on business laws and eventually on CSR practices.

  20. prevalence of methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus in saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    . SAUDI ARABIA: SYSTEMIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS. Sulaiman A. AL Yousef*, Sabry Y. Mahmoud, Eihab, M. Taha. *Correspondence: Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Science, University of.

  1. Saudis trust and confidence in information sources about chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJL

    Rehaili, 2002). There is an increase in the formation of "Photochemical smog" in major cities of Saudi Arabia (Nasrallah and Seroji, 2007). Endocrine disrupting substances which comprise a wide variety of environmental contaminants including ...

  2. English for Medical Purposes for Saudi Medical and Health Professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fahad Alqurashi

    2016-01-01

    This study explored the English language needs of 156 Saudi fellowship doctors and students of medical majors who are enrolled at medical and training programs in Australian hospitals and universities...

  3. Bronchiolitis in Abha, Southwest Saudi Arabia: Viral etiology and

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    for hospital admission of children with bronchiolitis in Abha city, southwest Saudi Arabia. Methods ... the time of hospital admission. Results: Prematurity, chronic lung diseases, atopic dermatitis, pure formula feeding, passive smoking and age.

  4. Physical inactivity among Egyptian and Saudi medical students

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel-Hady El-Gilany; Ragaa El-Masry

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Medical students, the future doctors, were presumed to be knowledgeable about physical activity and would have future influence on their patients. This study aims to describe the pattern of physical activity, predictors of physical inactivity and perceived barriers to and benefits of physical activity among a sample of Egyptian and Saudi medical students. Methods: A cross-sectional comparative study was carried out on 319 Egyptian and 297 Saudi medical students. The long form of t...

  5. Population Pressure and the Future of Saudi State Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    overpopulation stressors.26 No matter what population estimates the Kingdom may provide now or in the future, the general consensus is that Saudi...Quicksand of Poverty ,” Los Angeles Times, May 16, 2003, Section A-1 print edition, http://articles.latimes.com/2003/may/16/news/war-poverty16 (accessed...revolutionmuslim.com/uploads/Revolution_Past_and_Present.pdf (accessed June 4, 2008). Murphy, Kim. “Saudis Quicksand of Poverty .” Los Angeles Times

  6. Attitude of Saudi Arabian adults towards consanguineous marriage

    OpenAIRE

    Alharbi, Omar A.; Al-Shaia, Walaa A.; Al-Hamam, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Marzoug, Hala M.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Bagha, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on the attitudes of Saudi adults towards consanguinity is scarce. The study aimed to explore the attitudes towards consanguinity and its associations with socio-demographic characteristics in a sample of Saudi adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 386 outpatient waiting-area attendees at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City-Riyadh were included. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristi...

  7. Cutaneous myiasis due to Dermatobia hominis in Saudis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, J; Qadri, S M; Imam, A M

    2000-07-01

    Cutaneous myiasis infestations are normally found in South and Central America but increasing travel has resulted in their spread to non-indigenous countries with increasing frequency. We report two cases of cutaneous infestation by Dermatobia hominis in Taif, Saudi Arabia. There was no history of travel outside Saudi Arabia. The source of infection appears to be domestic cattle indicating that these infestations may be endemic in this region.

  8. Comparison between hybrid renewable energy systems in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham El Khashab

    2015-05-01

    This paper investigates RE sources applications at Yanbu, Saudi Arabia, besides a simulation using HOMER software to three proposed systems newly erected in Yanbu Industrial College Renewable Energy (RE lab. The lab represents a hybrid system, composed of PV, wind turbine, and Fuel cell systems. The cost of energy is compared in the three systems to have an actual estimation for RE in developing countries. The climatic variations at Yanbu that is located on the west coast of Saudi Arabia are considered.

  9. Smartphone addiction among university students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alosaimi, Fahad D; Alyahya, Haifa; Alshahwan, Hatem; Mahyijari, Nawal Al; Shaik, Shaffi A

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the prevalence and correlates of smartphone addiction among university students in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between September 2014 and March 2015. An electronic self administered questionnaire and the problematic use of mobile phones (PUMP) Scale were used. Results: Out of 2367 study subjects, 27.2% stated that they spent more than 8 hours per day using their smartphones....

  10. Mental health system in Saudi Arabia: an overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qureshi NA

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Naseem Akhtar Qureshi,1 Abdulhameed Abdullah Al-Habeeb,2 Harold G Koenig3 1General Administration for Research and Studies, 2Mental Health and Social Services, Ministry of Health, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Background: There is evidence that mapping mental health systems (MHSs helps in planning and developing mental health care services for users, families, and other caregivers. The General Administration of Mental Health and Social Services of the Ministry of Health over the past 4 years has sought to streamline the delivery of mental health care services to health consumers in Saudi Arabia. Objective: We overview here the outcome of a survey that assessed the Saudi MHS and suggest strategic steps for its further improvement. Method: The World Health Organization Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems was used systematically to collect information on the Saudi MHS in 2009–2010, 4 years after a baseline assessment. Results: Several mental health care milestones, especially provision of inpatient mental health services supported by a ratified Mental Health Act, were achieved during this period. However, community mental health care services are needed to match international trends evident in developed countries. Similarly, a larger well-trained mental health workforce is needed at all levels to meet the ever-increasing demand of Saudi society. Conclusion: This updated MHS information, discussed in light of international data, will help guide further development of the MHS in Saudi Arabia in the future, and other countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region may also benefit from Saudi experience. Keywords: Saudi Arabia, mental health system, organization, legal issues, research, training

  11. Optic neuritis: Observation and experience at a tertiary care hospital in Qassim region, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamgir, Mohammad Jawad; Ali, Syed Abrar; Hamdy, Nermin Aly; Khan, Moin Zafar; Mohammad, Elgamri E

    2017-01-01

    Optic neuritis (ON) can occur in isolation or association with multiple sclerosis (MS) or neuromyelitis optica. ON, is seen more commonly in Caucasians and interaction is found to exist between ethnic origin and the latitude at which the patient grows up. At present limited information is available about the profile of ON in Saudi patients. We aimed to analyze the records of ON patients, in regard to their presentation, natural history, treatment outcome, and risk and association with MS. Whether, ON in Saudi patients behaves differently from the Western and Asian patients? In this retrospective observational study; we retrieved the data from the medical records of the patients with ON, who attended the ophthalmology and neurology services of King Fahad Specialist Hospital Buraidah, Al Qassim, Saudi Arabia, from period 2006 to 2012. We recorded data of 60 patients of ON; 38 females (63.3%) and 22 males (36.7%). Color vision was affected in 66.7% of cases. Vision in the affected eye was 20/200 or worse in 74.97 % of our cases. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain revealed multiple lesions in 55% of cases; most of them developed MS on follow-up. Only 48.3% of patients had received systemic steroids. Vision improved in 85% of our cases. Most of our patients had idiopathic ON, and almost 85% had good visual recovery, in this regard our study is comparable with such studies done in other Asian countries. On the other hand, 55% of our patients had multiple MRI brain lesions, a high risk and association of MS, almost similar to the Western Europe and North American ON patients.

  12. Prevalence and risk factors of clopidogrel non-response among Saudi patients undergoing coronary angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitham I. Sakr

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of clopidogrel non-response and identify its risk factors among Saudi patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Prince Sultan Cardiac Center, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January and June 2013, to assess the degree of platelet inhibition using the VerifyNow assay (Accumetrics, San Diego, CA, USA after receiving clopidogrel standard loading dose. Clopidogrel resistance was defined as ≤15% platelet inhibition or greater than 213 P2Y12 reaction units (PRU. Results: Three hundred and four patients were included in the study. The mean age was 60.3 ± 11.4 years, and 73% were males. Clopidogrel doses were 300 mg (57%, 600 mg (27%, and 75 mg (16%. All patients used aspirin (81 mg in 94%. Approximately 66% (200/304 showed in vitro clopidogrel non-response, 54% had low platelet inhibitions, and 61% had high post-loading PRU. Using multivariate regression analysis that included all significant characteristics; only diabetes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-4.27, p=0.005 and higher preloading PRU (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.40-4.11, p=0.002 remained significantly associated with higher clopidogrel non-response while myocardial infarction (OR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.15-0.81, p=0.014 remained significantly associated with lower clopidogrel non-response. The associations of morbid obesity and diuretics use with higher clopidogrel non-response were slightly attenuated. Conclusion: Our findings indicate a high rate of clopidogrel in-vitro non-response among Saudi patients undergoing coronary angiography.

  13. Learning style and teaching method preferences of Saudi students of physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Maghraby, Mohamed A; Alshami, Ali M

    2013-09-01

    To the researchers' knowledge, there are no published studies that have investigated the learning styles and preferred teaching methods of physical therapy students in Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted to determine the learning styles and preferred teaching methods of Saudi physical therapy students. A cross-sectional study design. Fifty-three Saudis studying physical therapy (21 males and 32 females) participated in the study. The principal researcher gave an introductory lecture to explain the different learning styles and common teaching methods. Upon completion of the lecture, questionnaires were distributed, and were collected on completion. Percentages were calculated for the learning styles and teaching methods. Pearson's correlations were performed to investigate the relationship between them. More than 45 (85%) of the students rated hands-on training as the most preferred teaching method. Approximately 30 (57%) students rated the following teaching methods as the most preferred methods: "Advanced organizers," "demonstrations," and "multimedia activities." Although 31 (59%) students rated the concrete-sequential learning style the most preferred, these students demonstrated mixed styles on the other style dimensions: Abstract-sequential, abstract-random, and concrete-random. The predominant concrete-sequential learning style is consistent with the most preferred teaching method (hands-on training). The high percentage of physical therapy students whose responses were indicative of mixed learning styles suggests that they can accommodate multiple teaching methods. It is recommended that educators consider the diverse learning styles of the students and utilize a variety of teaching methods in order to promote an optimal learning environment for the students.

  14. Some epidemiological and serological studies on schistosomiasis in Najran area, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Shahawy I. S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and has been estimated to infect over 200 million people. Diagnosis of schistosomiasis by detection of specific antibodies is likely to be more sensitive than the traditional method of diagnosis by detection of eggs in stool or urine. Therefore the present study was the first attempt to highlight the seroepidemiology of schistosomiasis among the general population of Najran City, southern of Saudi Arabia, as well as to achieve the performance of the diagnostic tests used. A total of 180 participants attending King Khaled hospital in Najran Province, Saudi Arabia, over a one year period, from September 2013 to September 2014 were screened for the presence of Schistosoma antibody in their blood serum using an indirect hemagglutination assay (IHA. Specific immunoglobulin (Ig G antibody was evaluated using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Out of the 180 samples of sera tested using IHA, 32 (20 % were found to be positive with a titer ranging from 1:160 to 1:1280, while 42(23.2 % revealed Schistosoma IgG. A positive relationship was found between the seroprevalence of schistosomiasis and age of tested participants, especially in the age group of 20-40 years old. Additionally, prevalence of infection was more in males (36 % than females (7.5 %, and showed statistical significance (P < 0.001. Similarly, there was significant association between the presence of Schistosoma antibodies and the nationality of residence, and education of participants (P < 0.05. The current investigation reveals an alarmingly high prevalence of schistosomiasis among participants in Najran, southern region of Saudi Arabia and this supports an urgent need to re-evaluate the current control measures and implement an integrated, targeted and effective schistosomiasis control measures.

  15. Characteristics of pediatric ulcerative colitis in Saudi Arabia: a multicenter national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSaleem, Khalid; El Mouzan, Mohammad Issa; Saadah, Omar I; AlSaleem, Bader; Al-Hussaini, Abdulrahman; Hassosa, Mohammed; Ali, Al-Mehaidib; Banemai, Mohammed Othman; Halaby, Hana; El Edreesi, Mohammed

    2015-01-01

    Despite the extensive reporting of pediatric ulcerative colitis (UC) from industrialized developed countries, reports from developing countries are limited to small-case series from single centers. The objective of our large multicenter study was to determine the clinical, laboratory, endoscopic characteristics of UC in children from a developing country, Saudi Arabia. A retrospective study of children diagnosed with UC under the age of 18 years during the period from 2003 to 2012. Patients enrolled from 15 medical centers from different regions in Saudi Arabia. A unified database collection form specifically designed for this study was completed by all participating centers. A total of 188 children were diagnosed with UC during the study period (97 males [51.6%] and 91 females [48.4%]). The mean age at diagnosis was 9.1 years, and the mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 8.7 months. Consanguinity was present in 57 cases (32.6%), and the family history of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) was noted in 16 cases (9%). The most common clinical presentation was blood in stool (90%), followed by diarrhea (86%) and abdominal pain (62%). Laboratory investigations revealed elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (82%), anemia (75%), thrombocytosis (72%), and hypoalbuminemia (33%). The extent of the disease was pan colonic in 46.1%, and confined to left side of colon and rectum in 23% and 9.6% of the cases, respectively. This demographically pediatric IBD retrospective study revealed age-related variation in the distribution of IBD. Clinical presentation, with a high prevalence of positive consanguinity and positive family history, was noted in young patients with UC. The data from this study indicate that UC is increasingly recognized in Saudi Arabia and show many similarities to data from North America and Europe.

  16. Leisure time physical activity in Saudi Arabia: prevalence, pattern and determining factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Tarek Tawfik; Al Khoudair, Ali Salah; Al Harbi, Mohammad Abdulwahab; Al Ali, Ahmed Radi

    2012-01-01

    Identification of reliable predictors of leisure time physical activity (LTPA) will enable healthcare providers to intervene and change the patterns of LTPA in the population to improve community health. The objectives of this study were to determine prevalence and pattern of LTPA among adult Saudis aged 18-65 years, and to define the socio-demographic determinants that correlate with LTPA in Al-Hassa, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study of 2176 adult Saudis attending urban and rural primary health care centers were selected using a multistage proportionate sampling method. Participants were personally interviewed to gather information regarding socio-demographics, physical activity pattern using the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). Physical activity (PA) in each domain was expressed in metabolic equivalents (METs). The median total METs minutes/week for LTPA for both genders was 256, higher for men (636 METs minutes/week) compared to women (249 METs minutes/week). Overall, only 19.8% of the total PA was derived from LTPA. Of the sampled population 50.0% reported doing no leisure activity. Using the cut off of 600 METs-minutes/day or 150 minutes of moderate intensity over 5 or more days/week, only 21.0% of the included sample were considered as being sufficiently active and 10.4% were in the high active category with beneficial health effects. Multivariate regression analysis showed that male, younger age (<35 years), absence of chronic disease conditions and moderate level of total PA were significant predictors for being active in the LTPA domain. The prevalence and intensity of LTPA among the included sample demonstrated low levels. Nearly 80% of the included sample population did not achieve the recommended LTPA level with beneficial health effects. Female gender, urban residence and associated chronic diseases correlated with a low LTPA.

  17. Prevalence and risk factors of clopidogrel non-response among Saudi patients undergoing coronary angiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakr, Haitham I.; Alamri, Hussein S.; Almoghairi, Abdulrahman M.; Alkhudair, Ashraf A.; AlMasood, Ali S.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To estimate the prevalence of clopidogrel non-response and identify its risk factors among Saudi patients. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Prince Sultan Cardiac Center, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia between January and June 2013, to assess the degree of platelet inhibition using the VerifyNow assay (Accumetrics, San Diego, CA, USA) after receiving clopidogrel standard loading dose. Clopidogrel resistance was defined as ≤15% platelet inhibition or >213 P2Y12 reaction units (PRU). Results: Three hundred and four patients were included in the study. The mean age was 60.3 ± 11.4 years, and 73% were males. Clopidogrel doses were 300 mg (57%), 600 mg (27%), and 75 mg (16%). All patients used aspirin (81 mg in 94%). Approximately 66% (200/304) showed in vitro clopidogrel non-response, 54% had low platelet inhibitions, and 61% had high post-loading PRU. Using multivariate regression analysis that included all significant characteristics; only diabetes (odds ratio [OR]: 2.36, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30-4.27, p=0.005) and higher preloading PRU (OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.40-4.11, p=0.002) remained significantly associated with higher clopidogrel non-response while myocardial infarction (OR: 0.34, 95% CI: 0.15-0.81, p=0.014) remained significantly associated with lower clopidogrel non-response. The associations of morbid obesity and diuretics use with higher clopidogrel non-response were slightly attenuated. Conclusion: Our findings indicate a high rate of clopidogrel in-vitro non-response among Saudi patients undergoing coronary angiography. PMID:26837400

  18. Blended learning in Saudi universities: challenges and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Alebaikan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is an attempt to investigate the nature of obstacles and challenges encountered at Saudi universities while implementing a blended learning approach. A literature review of blended learning rationale and designs, and the status of web-based education in Saudi higher education are demonstrated. Three main challenges of applying blended learning in Saudi higher education are addressed. One major challenge to be considered in the implementation of blended learning in Saudi universities is the adaptation of this element in the traditional university culture. Finding the right design of blended learning is another challenge that is discussed in detail. Furthermore, the time issue is considered a crucial challenge facing blended learning faculty. Practical recommendations that would facilitate transition to a blended learning university environment are presented. It is hoped that this study will help to provide insight for the faculties and the decision-makers throughout higher education in Saudi Arabia. Although this investigation is specifically related to the implementation of blended learning in the universities of Saudi Arabia, we are confident that the assumptions and recommendations contained herein will be of great value to other populations facing similar challenges.

  19. Mental health system in Saudi Arabia: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Naseem Akhtar; Al-Habeeb, Abdulhameed Abdullah; Koenig, Harold G

    2013-01-01

    Background There is evidence that mapping mental health systems (MHSs) helps in planning and developing mental health care services for users, families, and other caregivers. The General Administration of Mental Health and Social Services of the Ministry of Health over the past 4 years has sought to streamline the delivery of mental health care services to health consumers in Saudi Arabia. Objective We overview here the outcome of a survey that assessed the Saudi MHS and suggest strategic steps for its further improvement. Method The World Health Organization Assessment Instrument for Mental Health Systems was used systematically to collect information on the Saudi MHS in 2009–2010, 4 years after a baseline assessment. Results Several mental health care milestones, especially provision of inpatient mental health services supported by a ratified Mental Health Act, were achieved during this period. However, community mental health care services are needed to match international trends evident in developed countries. Similarly, a larger well-trained mental health workforce is needed at all levels to meet the ever-increasing demand of Saudi society. Conclusion This updated MHS information, discussed in light of international data, will help guide further development of the MHS in Saudi Arabia in the future, and other countries in the Eastern Mediterranean region may also benefit from Saudi experience. PMID:23966783

  20. Factors influencing Saudi Arabian optometry candidates' career choices and institution of learning. Why do Saudi students choose to study optometry?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L; Briggs, Stella T; Chijuka, John C; Alanazi, Saud A; Ogbuehi, Kelechi C

    2014-01-01

    Optometry is a primary health-care profession (PHCP) and this study aimed to elucidate the factors influencing the choice of optometry as a career for Saudi students, the students' perceptions of optometry and the effect of gender...

  1. Air quality in Yanbu, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, M A K; Butenhoff, Christopher L; Porter, William C; Almazroui, Mansour; Alkhalaf, Abdulrahman; Al-Sahafi, Mohammed Saleh

    2016-04-01

    Yanbu, on the Red Sea, is an affluent Saudi Arabian industrial city of modest size. Substantial effort has been spent to balance environmental quality, especially air pollution, and industrial development. We have analyzed six years of observations of criteria pollutants O3, SO2, particles (PM2.5 and PM10) and the known ozone precursors-volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). The results suggest frequent VOC-limited conditions in which ozone concentrations increase with decreasing NOx and with increasing VOCs when NOx is plentiful. For the remaining circumstances ozone has a complex non-linear relationship with the VOCs. The interactions between these factors at Yanbu cause measurable impacts on air pollution including the weekend effect in which ozone concentrations stay the same or even increase despite significantly lower emissions of the precursors on the weekends. Air pollution was lower during the Eids (al-Fitr and al-Adha), Ramadan and the Hajj periods. During Ramadan, there were substantial night time emissions as the cycle everyday living is almost reversed between night and day. The exceedances of air pollution standards were evaluated using criteria from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), World Health Organization (WHO), the Saudi Presidency of Meteorology and Environment (PME) and the Royal Commission Environmental Regulations (RCER). The latter are stricter standards set just for Yanbu and Jubail. For the fine particles (PM2.5), an analysis of the winds showed a major impact from desert dust. This effect had to be taken into account but still left many occasions when standards were exceeded. Fewer exceedances were found for SO2, and fewer still for ozone. The paper presents a comprehensive view of air quality at this isolated desert urban environment. Frequent VOC-limited conditions are found at Yanbu in Saudi Arabia that increase ozone pollution if NOx is are reduced. In this desert environment, increased nightlife

  2. Hypertension in Renal Transplantation: Saudi Arabian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souqiyyeh Muhammad

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the prevalence, etiologic factors and therapy of hypertension in actively followed up transplant population in Saudi Arabia; we retrospectively reviewed the records of the active renal transplant patients at two large transplant centers in Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. These subjects were transplanted between January 1979 and November 1998. The patients were grouped according to the measurement of blood pressure; group 1 (considered normo-tensive: blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg, group2: blood pressure between 140-159/90-99, group 3: blood pressure 160-179/100-109 group 4: equal to or above 180/110. There were 1115 patients′ records included in the study. The mean duration of transplantation was 66.9 ± 50.1 months. According to the level of measured blood pressure, there were 641 (57.5% patients in the normotensive group (group 1, 404 (36.3% patients in the mildly hypertensive group (group 2 64 (5.7% patients in the moderately severe hypertension group (group 3 and only six (0.5% patients in the severe hypertension group (group 4. The estimated prevalence of hypertension in this study was almost 85%. We found no significant difference in the prevalence of hypertension in terms of gender, year of transplantation, duration of transplantation, type of donor, number of previous transplants, diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, etiology of kidney disease, diagnosis of diabetes after transplantation, diagnosis of cerebrovascular accidents, or mean dose of prednisolone and cyclosporine. There was a statistically significant association between increased level of blood pressure and old age (above 50 years, original disease associated with hypertension, history of hypertension on dialysis, acute rejection (once or more, presence of protienuria (more than 0.3 mg/day, abnormality of ECG, or serum creatinine above 300 µmol/L. We conclude that hypertension is highly prevalent in the renal transplant population in Saudi Arabia. Risk

  3. Climate change and animals in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joseph B; Shobrak, Mohammed; Wilms, Thomas M; Arif, Ibrahim A; Khan, Haseeb A

    2012-04-01

    Global warming is occurring at an alarming rate and predictions are that air temperature (T a) will continue to increase during this century. Increases in T a as a result of unabated production of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere pose a threat to the distribution and abundance of wildlife populations worldwide. Although all the animals worldwide will likely be affected by global warming, diurnal animals in the deserts will be particularly threatened in the future because T as are already high, and animals have limited access to water. It is expected that Saudi Arabia will experience a 3-5 °C in T a over the next century. For predicting the consequences of global warming for animals, it is important to understand how individual species will respond to higher air temperatures. We think that populations will not have sufficient time to make evolutionary adjustments to higher T a, and therefore they will be forced to alter their distribution patterns, or make phenotypic adjustments in their ability to cope with high T a. This report examines how increases in T a might affect body temperature (T b) in the animals of arid regions. We chose three taxonomic groups, mammals, birds, and reptiles (Arabian oryx, Arabian spiny-tailed lizard, vultures, and hoopoe larks) from Saudi Arabia, an area in which T a often reaches 45 °C during midday in summer. When T a exceeds T b, animals must resort to behavioral and physiological methods to control their T b; failure to do so results in death. The observations of this study show that in many cases T b is already close to the upper lethal limit of around 47° C in these species and therefore allowing their T b to increase as T a increases are not an option. We conclude that global warming will have a detrimental impact on a wide range of desert animals, but in reality we know little about the ability of most animals to cope with change in T a. The data presented should serve as base-line information on T b of animals in the

  4. Prevalence and prognosis of congestive heart failure in Saudi patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome (from SPACE registry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albackr, Hanan B; Alhabib, Khalid F; Ullah, Anhar; Alfaleh, Hussam; Hersi, Ahmad; Alshaer, Fayez; Alnemer, Khalid; Al Saif, Shukri; Taraben, Amir; Kashour, Tarek

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence, clinical features, and in-hospital outcomes of heart failure in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The Saudi Project for Assessment of Coronary Events recruited patients admitted with ACS from 17 hospitals in Saudi Arabia from 2005 to 2007. The outcomes of ACS patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) compared with those without CHF were analyzed. A total of 4523 patients with ACS were identified, of whom 905 (20%) had CHF. Compared with no CHF, patients with CHF were older (62±13.1 vs. 57±12.9 years; P=0.001), less likely to be men (70 vs. 79%; P=0.001), likely to present with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (48 vs. 36%; P=0.001), likely to have diabetes (71 vs. 54%; P=0.001), hypertension (64 vs. 54%; P=0.001) and previous history of coronary artery disease (53 vs. 43%; P=0.001), and likely to have significant left ventricular systolic dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction coronary intervention (19 vs. 50%; P=0.001). Adjusted in-hospital mortality and cardiogenic shock were higher in the CHF group (odds ratio 4.43, 95% confidence interval 2.52-7.78; and odds ratio 3.51, 95% confidence interval 2.23-5.52), respectively. ACS patients with CHF in the Saudi Project for Assessment of Coronary Events were older, more likely to have more cardiac risk factors, and less likely to be treated with optimum medical treatment on admission. These findings were associated with higher incidence of their in-hospital adverse outcomes. More aggressive treatment is warranted to improve prognosis.

  5. Prevalence and causes of visual impairment among Saudi adults attending primary health care centers in northern Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Shaaln, Farhan Fayez; Bakrman, Marwan Abdurrahman; Ibrahim, Adel Mohammad; Aljoudi, Abdullah Srour

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Few studies have been conducted in Saudi Arabia to estimate the prevalence of visual impairment and its causes. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of visual impairment, and identify its causes and associated factors among the adult population attending primary health care (PHC) centers in Aljouf province, in northern Saudi Arabia. DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional study during the year 2005 in PHC centers in Aljouf province in northern Sa...

  6. Attitudes of Saudi Nursing Students on AIDS and Predictors of Willingness to Provide Care for Patients in Central Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfotouh, Mostafa A.; Samar A. Al Saleh; Mahfouz, Aisha A.; Sherif M. Abolfotouh; Haya M. Al Fozan

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to assess acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related knowledge, attitudes, and risk perception among Saudi nursing students, and to identify predictors of their willingness to provide care for patients with AIDS. A cross-sectional study of 260 baccalaureate nursing students at King Saud bin-Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, was done using a previously validated ins...

  7. Coaching Older

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacey Masters

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundFrail older people who are considering movement into residential aged care or returning home following a hospital admission often face complex and difficult decisions. Despite research interest in this area, a recent Cochrane review was unable to identify any studies of interventions to support decision-making in this group that met the experimental or quasi-experimental study design criteria. AimsThis study tests the impact of a multi-component coaching intervention on the quality of preparation for care transitions, targeted to older adults and informal carers. In addition, the study assesses the impact of investing specialist geriatric resources into consultations with families in an intermediate care setting where decisions about future care needs are being made. Method This study was a randomised controlled trial of 230 older adults admitted to intermediate care in Australia. Masked assessment at 3 and 12 months examined physical functioning, health-related quality of life and utilisation of health and aged care resources. A geriatrician and specialist nurse delivered a coaching intervention to both the older person and their carer/family. Components of the intervention included provision of a Question Prompt List prior to meeting with a geriatrician (to clarify medical conditions and treatments, medications, ‘red flags’, end of life decisions and options for future health care and a follow-up meeting with a nurse who remained in telephone contact. Participants received a printed summary and an audio recording of the meeting with the geriatrician.ConclusionThe costs and outcomes of the intervention are compared with usual care. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry.

  8. Male Infertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or swelling in the testicle area Have a history of testicle, prostate or sexual problems Have had groin, testicle, penis or scrotum surgery Request an Appointment at Mayo Clinic Causes Male fertility is a complex process. To ...

  9. Measuring stages of change, perceived barriers and self efficacy for physical activity in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Otaibi, Hala Hazam

    2013-01-01

    The benefits of physical activity are well established and recognized to prevent adults from many chronic diseases and particularly some forms of cancers. The present study was conducted to investigate the present status of physical activity among Saudi adults in Al-Ahsa, and to examine the association between the stages of change for physical activity and perceived barriers, and self efficacy. A cross- sectional study of 242 subjects (118 males and 124 females) attending health centers aged between 20-56 years, were personally interviewed for demographic data, anthropometric measurement, physical activity level, stages of change for physical activity, self efficacy and perceived barriers. Forty eight percent of the females were overweight and 16.9% of the males were obese with no significant difference between the genders for BMI categories. More than half of the females were inactive and 39% of the males were physically active with a significant difference (P=0.007). Twenty percent of the males were in maintenance stage, while similar percentage of the females were in contemplation stage. However the majority of the subjects were in pre-contemplation stage with a significant difference across the stages. Males had a higher mean score of self efficacy and less external barriers of physical activity. The major barrier among the females was lack of time (7.2±1.4) and in the males, lack of motivation (7.7±1.4). The females had less internal (21.2±3.8) barriers comparable to the males (23.08±4.7). Both genders had a significant relationship between stages of changes of physical activity and perceived barriers (internal and external), but in the females no significant difference across the stages was observed for self efficacy unlike the males who had a significant difference for self efficacy and self efficacy categories. The present study provided useful data on stages of change for physical activity and some psychosocial factors (self efficacy and perceived

  10. Male contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Vivek Mathew; Ganapathi Bantwal

    2012-01-01

    Contraception is an accepted route for the control of population explosion in the world. Traditionally hormonal contraceptive methods have focused on women. Male contraception by means of hormonal and non hormonal methods is an attractive alternative. Hormonal methods of contraception using testosterone have shown good results. Non hormonal reversible methods of male contraception like reversible inhibition of sperm under guidanceare very promising. In this article we have reviewed the curren...

  11. Male Contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Amory, John K.

    2016-01-01

    Although female contraceptives are very effective at preventing unintended pregnancy, some women cannot use them due to health conditions or side effects, leaving some couples without effective contraceptive options. In addition, many men wish to take active responsibility for family planning. Thus, there is a great need for male contraceptives to prevent unintended pregnancy, of which 80–90 million occur annually. At present, effective male contraceptive options are condoms and vasectomy, wh...

  12. Agency, Expression, and the Virtual Sphere: Social Media in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Hayman, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    This paper seeks to address the question of why so many Saudi Arabians use social media. Prior literature investigating social media usage in the Saudi Arabia is either too broad or too narrow. This necessitates academic inquiry that addresses the “middle ground”. Saudi Arabians' markedly high rates of social media usage appear incongruous with the traditional, highly restrictive nature of Saudi Arabian society. Given social media's status as a relatively new phenomenon, and its recognized ab...

  13. Pattern of glomerular disease in the Saudi population: A single-center, five-year retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z Nawaz

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Glomerular diseases continue to be the leading cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD globally. Hence, it is important to recognize the pattern of glomerular diseases in different geographical areas in order to understand the patho-biology, incidence and progression of the disorder. Published studies from different centers in Saudi Arabia have reported contradicting results. In this retrospective study, we report our experience at the Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 348 native renal biopsies performed at our center on patients with proteinuria >1 g, hematuria and/or renal impairment during a period of 5 years (between January 2005 and December 2009 were studied by a histopathologist using light microscopy, immunofluorescence and electron microscopy, and were categorized. Results showed that primary glomerular disease accounted for 55.1% of all renal biopsies. The most common histological lesion was focal and segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS (27.6%, followed by minimal change disease (MCD (17.7% and membrano-proliferative glomerulonephritis (MPGN (13.0%. Secondary glomerular disease accounted for 37.9% of the glomerular diseases, with lupus nephritis (LN being the most common lesion (54.5%, followed by hypertensive nephrosclerosis (22%, post-infectious glomerulonephritis (7.5%, diabetic nephropathy (DN (6.8% and vasculitides (4.5%. Four percent of all biopsies turned out to be ESRD while biopsy was inadequate in 2.8% of the cases. In conclusion, our study showed that FSGS was the most common primary GN encountered, while LN was the most common secondary GN. We encountered 14 cases of crescentic glomerulonephritis. Also, the prevalence of MPGN, MCD, IgA nephropathy and membranous GN was many folds higher in males when compared with the Western data. We believe that it is mandatory to maintain a Saudi Arabian Renal Biopsy Registry to understand better the pattern of glomerular disease in the Saudi population and to follow

  14. Knowledge, attitudes and practices of the general public toward sun exposure and protection: A national survey in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlGhamdi, Khalid M; AlAklabi, Aeed S; AlQahtani, Abdulla Z

    2016-11-01

    Background: Many international studies have been conducted to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP) of the public toward sun exposure and sun-protection measures. However, there are scarce data on these factors from the Middle East. Objectives: This study aimed to explore the KAP of the public toward sun exposure and sun-protection measures among Saudis. Methods: A cross-sectional survey using a specially designed questionnaire was conducted on a stratified random sample of the general population in the five geographical regions of Saudi Arabia (central, eastern, northern, southern, and western). Data were collected between October 2010 and March 2011. Multiple logistic regressions were applied to relate the use of sunscreen and skin cancer awareness with various socio-demographic variables. Results: The questionnaire was distributed to 2900 Saudis. A total of 2622 questionnaires were completed, returned, and included in the data analysis, corresponding to a response rate of 90.4%. The mean (SD) age of respondents was 27.8 ± 9.7 years. Fifty percent (1301/1601) of the respondents were males. Fifty-five percent (1406/2544) were aware of the association between sun exposure and skin cancer. Female, young and student respondents were more likely to be aware of the connection between sun exposure and skin cancer (p < 0.001). Likewise, respondents from the middle social class and those with higher education levels were more likely to be informed (p < 0.02). The prevalence of regular sunscreen use among study participants was only 23.7%, and female and employed respondents were more likely to use sunscreen (p < 0.001). Protective clothes were the most commonly used sun protection measure as reported by more than 90% of our participants. Conclusion: This study has shown that sun awareness and protection are generally inadequate in the Saudi population and suggests the need for health education programs.

  15. Speech Act of Greeting for American Native Speakers of English and Saudi Native Speakers of Arabic: A Comparative Study

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    Rehan Almegren

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on comparing the speech acts of native Arabic speakers of Saudi region and English speakers of America, which help depict the impact of the variables involved, namely status, setting, social distance and situation formality. This paper makes a significant contribution for future researchers, as it is of help to researchers in the speech act area specifically in terms of Saudi Arabic and American English. It will be also of help to those learning Arabic or English and those who teach it in these two countries. Thus, the outcome of this research will contribute to depict the differences and the similarities in the use of greeting strategies between two different groups of respondents from diverse linguistic and cultural domains. Data was collected using the discourse completion test (DCT, developed by Cohen, Olshtain & Rosenstien (1985. Fifty female respondents within the age group of 20-25 years were selected from each group to participate in research procedures. Although the inclusion of male respondents would have made the process complex, it would have provided with comparatively more accurate outcomes if managed properly. The findings showed that linguistic and cultural differences, variables of social distance, social status, settings and situation formality greatly influenced the decision-making of Saudi Native Speakers of Arabic and American Native Speakers of English, pertaining to their usage of greeting strategies as part of their speech acts. For example, differences can be observed between these two speakers in terms of their greeting strategies; American English speakers attach less significance to social and physical distance and hierarchy compared to Saudi Arabic speakers. Similarly, both the groups attach almost equal importance to their initiation words when greeting others. These differences and similarities help determine social status and the relationship between speakers.

  16. Pattern of traditional medicine use by adult Saudi patients with neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Yousef; Al-Ahmari, Ahmed; Al-Dashash, Fahad; Al-Hussain, Fawaz; Al-Masnour, Firas; Masoud, Abdullah; Jradi, Hoda

    2015-04-01

    Traditional medicine (TM) has been established as a two-edged sword. On one edge numerous forms of TM have been proven safe and effective, while on the other edge various modes of TM have been shown to be futile and potentially dangerous. Resorting to TM, especially for chronic diseases, is common world-wide and includes Saudi Arabia. Most neurological diseases are chronic. No data is available on the utilization of TM among patients with neurological disorders. We conducted this study to assess for the prevalence, pattern, perception and triggers for TM use by the adult Saudi patients with neurological disorders. A survey written in Arabic and comprised of 15 questions was used to collect data on the practice of TM among the neurology patients of King Saud University Ambulatory Clinic. The questions in the survey pertain mainly to the frequency of TM practice, its form and the patient's opinion of this practice. The data was collected through a face to face interview by three medical students who were instructed on the survey questions prior to the launch of the study. 292 patients completed the survey (35.9% males and 64.0% females). 67% (n = 196) of the sample used TM. Cupping or what is commonly known as "hojamah" was the most prevalent method (45.4%) followed by herbs, skin cauterization and the Reciting of the Holy Quran (42.3%, 33.7% and 20.4% respectively). The prevalence of TM use did not differ across gender (chi-sq = 2.02; p-value = 0.15), level of education (chi-sq = 4.02; p-value = 0.40), health status (chi-sq = 2.29; p-value = 0.68), age groups (chi-sq = 5.12; p-value = 0.16), or perception toward TM (chi-sq = 2.67; p-value = 0.26) in this population. The practice of TM is common among the neurology patients of Saudi Arabia. Cupping, herbs, and skin cauterization, which can be harmful when wrongly employed, are frequently utilized in this patient population. Measures and policies to endorse the appropriate use of TM by Saudi society must be

  17. Use of complementary and alternative medicine by patients with cancer in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazieh, Abdul Rahman; Al Sudairy, Reem; Abulkhair, Omalkhair; Alaskar, Ahmed; Al Safi, Faisal; Sheblaq, Nagham; Young, Susan; Issa, Maher; Tamim, Hani

    2012-11-01

    The use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is common among patients with cancer. However, the issue is not well-studied among the Saudi patient population. Our study aimed at determining the patterns of CAM use among patients with cancer in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional study using interview-administered questionnaire was conducted in patients with cancer in the Oncology Department of King Abdulaziz Medical City for National Guards, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Patients were asked about CAM use including dietary supplement (DS) and non-DS remedies. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted to identify predicting factors for CAM use. A total of 453 adult patients were enrolled in the study, with a median age of 53.5 years (14.7-94.6), and the ratio of females to males was 271/182 (59.8%/40.2%). Of those, 410 patients (90.5%) used some type of CAM remedy. Non-DS remedies were used by 399 patients (88%) and were mainly of a religious nature including reciting the Quran (74.8%), prayer (16%), supplication (13%), and others (3.7%). However, 386 patients (85.2%) used DS including: Zamzam water (59.8%), honey (54.3%), black seed (35.1%), water with the Quran recited over it (29.8%), and other remedies. The majority of patients (90%) used CAM as a cancer treatment and the rest used it for various reasons, such as symptom control or supportive treatment. Only 18% of the patients discussed CAM use with their physicians, compared to 68% discussing it with religious clergypeople (Sheikhs).The univariate analysis revealed that only female gender is a predictor of CAM use, which remained significant in a multivariate analysis, in addition to current employment. The use of complementary therapies among Saudi patients with cancer is highly prevalent, with a predominance of interventions of religious background, indicating the strong influence of religion on peoples' lives, especially when people are faced with life-threatening illnesses.

  18. Photon fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients calculated from a Saudi population-based phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, A. K.; Altaher, K.; Hussein, M. A.; Amer, M.; Farid, K. Y.; Alghamdi, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    In this work we will present a new set of photon fluence-to-effective dose conversion coefficients using the Saudi population-based voxel phantom developed recently by our group. The phantom corresponds to an average Saudi male of 173 cm tall weighing 77 kg. There are over 125 million voxels in the phantom each of which is 1.37×1.37×1.00 mm3. Of the 27 organs and tissues of radiological interest specified in the recommendations of ICRP Publication 103, all but the oral mucosa, extrathoracic tissue and the lymph nodes were identified in the current version of the phantom. The bone surface (endosteum) is too thin to be identifiable; it is about 10 μm thick. The dose to the endosteum was therefore approximated by the dose to the bones. Irradiation geometries included anterior-posterior (AP), left (LLAT) and rotational (ROT). The simulations were carried out with the MCNPX code version 2.5.0. The fluence in free air and the energy depositions in each organ were calculated for monoenergetic photon beams from 10 keV to 10 MeV to obtain the conversion coefficients. The radiation and tissue weighting factors were taken from ICRP Publication 60 and 103. The results from this study will also be compared with the conversion coefficients in ICRP Publication 116.

  19. Self-perception of personal oral health in Saudi population: a social media approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlShahrani, I; Tikare, S; Togoo, R A; AlAsere, Y H; AlAsmari, A A

    2015-08-27

    Subjective perceptions and perceived needs for dental care in a population can provide important information for policy-makers. This study aimed to assess self-perceived personal oral health status among the Saudi Arabia population who could be accessed through social media. A pre-tested questionnaire for completion online was designed to assess self-perceived oral health via 13 items in 4 domains with weighted scores from 1-3. The questionnaire was uploaded to the Internet and the link to it was made available through popular social networking sites in Saudi Arabia. With respondents recruited by snowball methods a total of 4618 people (57.2% males, 42.8% females) completed the questionnaire. The total mean score for the participants was 23.0 (SD 5.0) (scale range 13-39). Self-perceived oral health was rated as poor by 24.2% of respondents, average by 50.6% and good by 25.2%. Educational level, age and region but not sex were significantly associated with self-perceived oral health.

  20. Khat Dependency and Psychophysical Symptoms among Chewers in Jazan Region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maged El-Setouhy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Khat chewing is highly prevalent in Africa, Yemen and Jazan region, southwest of Saudi Arabia. Most of Jazani Khat chewers consider khat session as a social activity and do not consider khat dependency. The aim of this study was to explore khat dependency and its relationship with the psychophysical symptoms among chewers. Methods. Cross-sectional study on seventy Saudi male khat chewers living in Jazan area. Psychological dependence to khat chewing was evaluated using the Severity of Dependency Scale (SDS. The participants filled in a self-administrated assisted structured questionnaire designed to collect data about their medical history, neurological symptoms, and their chewing behavior. Results. Half (52.2% of khat chewers showed psychological dependency. Those having longer khat sessions (≥6 hours were more liable for dependency. Physical and psychological symptoms were more prevalent among khat dependent chewers. Conclusions. khat has a psychological dependence effect that can be measured by the SDS, even in low doses and with irregular use. SDS scale is a useful tool to expect the burden of either physical or psychological symptoms on khat chewers.

  1. Severity and causality of maxillofacial trauma in the Southern region of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almasri, Mazen

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to examine the causality and severity of maxillofacial trauma (MFT) among patients referred to a tertiary heath care center in the Southern Aseer region of Saudi Arabia. Materials and methods The charts of all MFT patients referred to the tertiary care center from September 2010 to November 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Pertinent data, including patient age, gender, and cause of injury, were obtained from 101 selected charts. Results Male patients comprised 91% of the 101 selected cases. The highest percentage of MFT cases (88.7%) were caused by road traffic accidents (RTAs) while physical altercations and sports injuries accounted for approximately 6% and 2.8% of MFT cases, respectively. A high fracture: patient ratio of 2.4:1 was observed, which was likely due to vehicular speeding (high energy trauma) involved in RTAs in the mountain regions. Conclusion RTAs are a major cause of MFT in the southern region of Saudi. These accidents cause a heavy burden on the health care sector. PMID:24179319

  2. Association of mobile phone radiation with fatigue, headache, dizziness, tension and sleep disturbance in Saudi population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khlaiwi, Thamir; Meo, Sultan A

    2004-06-01

    The widespread use of mobile phones has been increased over the past decade; they are now an essential part of business, commerce and society. The use of mobile phones can cause health problems. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to investigate the association of using mobile phones with fatigue, headache, dizziness, tension and sleep disturbance in the Saudi population and provide health and social awareness in using these devices. This study was conducted in the Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during the year 2002 to 2003. In the present study, a total of 437 subjects (55.1% male and 39.9% female) were invited, they have and had been using mobile phones. A questionnaire was distributed regarding detailed history and association of mobile phones with health hazards. The results of the present study showed an association between the use of mobile phones and health hazards. The overall mean percentage for these clinical findings in all groups were headache (21.6%), sleep disturbance (4.%), tension (3.9%), fatigue (3%) and dizziness (2.4%). Based on the results of the present study, we conclude that the use of mobile phones is a risk factor for health hazards and suggest that long term or excessive use of mobile phones should be avoided by health promotion activities such as group discussions, public presentations and through electronic and print media sources.

  3. The Obstacles Facing Young Saudi Men and Women Getting jobs in Small Businesses Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayef Saleh Al-Ghamri

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Small businesses are considered the backbone of the national economy due to their role in creating job opportunities for young men and women who seek private sector employment. However, a series of obstacles face young Saudi male and female citizens in getting jobs in small businesses sector. The present research focuses on studies which discuss the definitions of small businesses and how they are related to the creation of employment opportunities for young men and women, their effect on improving young adults’ economic and social levels by boosting their morale and kindling their entrepreneurial spirit. The research also sets out the proposed mechanisms for the removal of obstacles faced by young small business would-be entrepreneurs. Furthermore, it endeavors to develop solutions, based on hypotheses and primary assumptions, which may contribute to a better understanding of the employment issue of Saudi young men and women. Solutions are set within a comprehensive strategy framework based on the integration and encouragement of young people to initiate small businesses, raise their standard of living, reduce the unemployment phenomenon and its consequences and repercussions which can result in domestic discord and moral degeneration– which may sometimes lead to misanthropy and suicide, as is the case in some societies such as Japan.

  4. An arabic translation, reliability, and validation of Patient Health Questionnaire in a Saudi sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlHadi, Ahmad N; AlAteeq, Deemah A; Al-Sharif, Eman; Bawazeer, Hamdah M; Alanazi, Hasan; AlShomrani, Abdulaziz T; Shuqdar, Raafat M; AlOwaybil, Reem

    2017-01-01

    Psychological disorders including depression and anxiety are not rare in primary care clinics. The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) is a clinical diagnostic tool that is widely utilized by primary health care physicians worldwide because it provides a practical in-clinic tool to screen for psychological disorders. This study evaluated the validity of the Arabic version of the PHQ in all six modules including depression, anxiety, somatic, panic, eating, and alcohol abuse disorders. This is a quantitative observational cross-sectional study that was conducted by administrating the translated Arabic version of PHQ to a sample of King Saud University students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The sample was 731 university students who participated in this study including 376 (51.6%) females and 354 (48.4%) males with a mean age of 21.30 years. Eight mental health experts carried out the face validation process of the PHQ Arabic version. The internal consistency reliability was measured using Cronbach's alpha for the PHQ9, GAD7, PHQ15, and panic disorder modules. The results were 0.857, 0.763, 0.826, and 0.696, respectively. In comparison, the eating disorders and alcohol abuse modules demonstrated poor internal consistency due to small number of participants in these modules. This study demonstrates that the Arabic version of the PHQ is a valid and reliable tool to screen for depression, anxiety, somatic, and panic disorders in a Saudi sample.

  5. Prevalence of musculoskeletal pain of the neck, upper extremities and lower back among dental practitioners working in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mohrej, Omar A; AlShaalan, Nouf S; Al-Bani, Waad M; Masuadi, Emad M; Almodaimegh, Hind S

    2016-06-20

    Studies have shown that dentists have a higher incidence of work-related musculoskeletal (MSK) pain than those in other occupations. The risk factors contributing to MSK pain among Saudi dentists has not been fully studied so this study aims to estimate the prevalence of MSK pain and investigate its associated risk factors among dentists in Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in the capital city Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, using random cluster sampling. 224 surveys were distributed among dentists with a 91.1% response rate (101 women and 103 men). The prevalence of MSK pain and its associated risk factors were investigated. 184 (90.2%) respondents reported having MSK pain. Lower back pain was the most commonly reported MSK pain (68.1%). Gender and age were reported to be predictors for at least one type of MSK pain. Older age was associated with lower back pain (OR 1.23; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.50) and women had double the risk of shoulder pain (OR 2.52; 95% CI 1.12 to 5.68). In addition, lower back pain was related to the time the dentist spent with patients (OR 0.28; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.54), while shoulder pain (OR 1.03; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.06) and lower back pain (OR 1.06; 95% CI 1.03 to 1.10) were significantly related to years of experience. MSK pain is common among older and female Saudi dentists. Research on the impact of exercise and the ergonomics of the workplace on the intensity of MSK pain and the timing of its onset is required. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Pain coping behaviors of saudi patients suffering from advanced cancer: a revisited experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babgi, Amani A

    2010-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major health problems throughout the world. The number of cancer patients is increasing, out of the estimated nine million new cancer cases every year, more than half are in developing countries. The majority of these patients are incurable by the time their disease is diagnosed. Therefore, cancer mortality is expected to continue to rise in those regions of the world (WHO, 2002). In Saudi Arabia, the latest report from the Saudi Cancer Registry SCR for 2004 registered 9,381 new cases, of these cases 7,138 were Saudis. The crude incidence rate CIR of all cancers among Saudis was 41.9/100,000. The total number of adult cancer incidence cases reported was 8595, and for children were 713 cases (NCR, 2004). The most common feared symptom encountered in advanced cancer is pain. Through their perpetual encounter with pain, advanced cancer patients usually maintain different coping behaviors. Internationally speaking, there are limited researches and investigations that deal with cancer pain, and the importance of using adaptive coping behaviors to control it. In Saudi Arabia, specifically, pain coping behaviors has never been assessed or discussed before, so is the impact of cancer pain on the quality of life. The presence of any maladaptive coping behaviors with cancer pain will interfere with the patient's life style and their quality of life, and will affect the nurse's role in caring, planning, and implementing effective nursing interventions to reduce and control cancer patient's pain. A descriptive design was used for this study to assess the pain coping behavior Among Saudi patients suffering from advanced cancer. The study was conducted at the two tumor centers which deal with cancer patients in Jeddah City. A convenient sample of 132 patients with advanced cancer who were returning to the clinics, radiation therapy and medical oncology departments of the aforementioned tumor centers were included in the study. Data were collected by an

  7. Burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia among hospitalized patients in Lebanon and Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Althaqafi AO

    2017-02-01

    -level data were collected for 93 patients with MRSA pneumonia, 50 in Saudi Arabia and 43 in Lebanon. The average age of the patients was 56 years, and 60% were male. The most common comorbidities were diabetes (39%, congestive heart failure (30%, coronary artery disease (29%, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (28%. Patients most frequently had positive cultures from pulmonary (87% and blood (27% samples. All isolates were sensitive to vancomycin, teicoplanin, and linezolid, and only one-third of the isolates tested were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Beta-lactams (inactive therapy for MRSA were prescribed 21% of the time across all lines of therapy, with 42% of patients receiving first-line beta-lactams. Fifteen percent of patients did not receive any antibiotics that were considered to be MRSA active. The mean hospital length of stay was 32 days, and in-hospital mortality was 30%. Conclusion: The treatment for MRSA pneumonia in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon may be suboptimal with inactive therapy prescribed a substantial proportion of the time. The information gathered from this Middle East sample provides important perspectives on the current treatment patterns. Keywords: MRSA, resource use, mortality, length of stay, antibiotics, Middle East

  8. Learning and Teaching Vocabulary Acquisition: Analysing One Unit of a Textbook in the Saudi Arabia Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashrah, Hind Talal

    2013-01-01

    Saudi Arabian Ministry of Education is seeking for the best English language textbook to be taught in schools in order to develop the Saudi education in the future. To choose the most beneficial one, frameworks or tools were designed to analyze and to evaluate a unit of a textbook in Saudi Arabia based on standard criteria. These standard criteria…

  9. How are health equity aspects articulated in the public health policy documents in Saudi Arabia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eklund Karlsson, Leena; Saleh, Faten; Azam, Shadi

    of health, economy and planning, labour, and higher education (The long-term strategy for the Saudi economy, 9th development plan 2010–14, Youth strategy, Saudi strategic plan, Saudi employment strategy, Vision statement of the Ministry of Health, and the E-health strategy). The term equity...

  10. Child maltreatment between knowledge, attitude and beliefs among Saudi pediatricians, pediatric residency trainees and medical students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yossef Alnasser, MBBS

    2017-04-01

    Conclusion: Saudi medical students, pediatrics trainees and pediatricians have good basic knowledge, positive attitude and willingness to learn more to provide a safe environment for children in Saudi Arabia. However, knowledge in regards to reporting child maltreatment is a major observed defect. Still, further education and training are needed to combat CAN in Saudi Arabia.

  11. Collectivists' Decision-Making: Saudi Arabian Graduate Students' Study Abroad Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakaboski, Tamara; Perez-Velez, Karla; Almutairi, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    The authors in this qualitative study explored how Saudi Arabian students selected a teaching focused research institution by examining Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and U.S. national influences, institutional factors, and personal influencers. Despite the continued rise in Saudi Arabian students studying at U.S. universities, limited published research…

  12. Impacts of Groundwater Constraints on Saudi Arabia’s Low-Carbon Electricity Supply Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Parkinson, S.; Djilali, N.; Krey, V.; Fricko, O.; Johnson, N.; Khan, Z.; Sedraoui, K.; Almasoud, A.H.

    2016-01-01

    Balancing groundwater depletion, socioeconomic development and food security in Saudi Arabia will require policy that promotes expansion of unconventional freshwater supply options, such as wastewater recycling and desalination. As these processes consume more electricity than conventional freshwater supply technologies, Saudi Arabia's electricity system is vulnerable to groundwater conservation policy. This paper examines strategies for adapting to long-term groundwater constraints in Saudi ...

  13. Lifestyle of health sciences students at Majmaah University, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad Alfhaid

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background We all want to live a long, happy and healthy life with an abundance of energy and vitality to perform well both mentally and physically. A healthy lifestyle is a valuable resource for reducing the incidence and impact of health problems, enabling you better to cope with life stressors, as well as improving your quality of life. Aims The study was aimed to assess the lifestyle (eating habits and physical activity of health sciences students studying at Majmaah University. Methods This cross-sectional institutional based study was conducted from 25th November 2014-3rd May 2015. A total of 450 students (370 males and 80 females aged between 18–28 years were randomly chosen. Self-reported questionnaire was used for data collection from the College of Medicine, College of Applied Medical Sciences and College of Dentistry. Results Majority of the students, 62.4 per cent, were physically inactive. Students from the College of Medicine, 40.4 per cent, were the most physically active. The most common reason that restrained the students from being active was time limitation. In addition to that, many of the participants, 29.6 per cent, have never had breakfast at home. Also, most of the participants, 42.7 per cent, were not satisfied with their eating habits. Almost one quarter of students were consuming soft drinks more than four times a day. Conclusion There is a high prevalence of sedentary lifestyle, physical inactivity and unhealthy dietary habits among health sciences students studying at Majmaah University. There is an urgent need for arranging health education programs for promoting healthy and active living among health sciences students of Majmaah University in Saudi Arabia.

  14. Knowledge, attitude and practice of tobacco smoking by medical students in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

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    Al-Haqwi Ali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tobacco consumption is associated with considerable negative impact on health. Health professionals, including future doctors, should have a leading role in combating smoking in the community. Objectives: The aims of the study were to assess the prevalence of smoking among medical students of newly established medical colleges in Riyadh city, the capital of Saudi Arabia, as well as to assess students′ attitude, practice and their knowledge on the risk factors of tobacco consumption. Methods: A cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study of students from two medical colleges in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia was carried out. The questionnaire used was anonymous, self-administered and developed mainly from Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS. Results: A total of 215 students participated in this study. Forty students (19% indicated that they smoke tobacco at the time of the study. All of them were males, which raise the prevalence among male students to 24%. Tobacco smoking was practiced by males more than females (P value < 0.0001 and by senior more than junior students (< 0.0001. About 94% of the study sample indicated that smoking could cause serious illnesses. About 90% of the students indicated that they would advice their patients to quit smoking in the future and 88% thought that smoking should be banned in public areas. Forty-four students (20% thought that smoking has some beneficial effects, mainly as a coping strategy for stress alleviation. Conclusion: Despite good knowledge about the hazards of tobacco consumption, about 25% of the medical students in this study continue to smoke. The main reported reasons should be addressed urgently by policy-makers. Special efforts should be taken to educate medical students on the effective strategies in managing stress during their study as they thought that tobacco smoking could be used as a coping strategy to face such a stress.

  15. Religious Correlates of Male Sexual Behavior and Contraceptive Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Michael

    1985-01-01

    This study sought to determine whether religious beliefs could distinguish between older adolescent males of differing sexual experience and to determine whether such beliefs could distinguish between older adolescent males differing in frequency of contraceptive use. Results are discussed and implications for health educators are set forth. (MT)

  16. Assessment of learning style in a sample of saudi medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buali, Waleed Hamad Al; Balaha, Magdy Hassan; Muhaidab, Nouria Saab Al

    2013-01-01

    NONE DECLARED. By knowing the different students' learning styles, teachers can plan their instruction carefully in ways that are capitalized on student preferences. The current research is done to determine specific learning styles of students. This cross sectional study was conducted in Al Ahsa College of Medicine from 2011 to 2012. A sample of 518 students completed a questionnaire based on Kolb inventory (LSI 2) to determine their learning style. A spreadsheet was prepared to compute all the information to get the cumulative scores of learning abilities and identify the learning styles. The mean values of the learning abilities; active experimentation (AE), reflective observation (RO), abstract conceptualizing (AC) or concrete experience (CE) for male students were 35, 28, 30 and 26 respectively while they were 31, 30, 31 and 29 respectively for female students. There were significant difference between male and female students regarding the mean values of AE-RO (6.7 vs 1.5) and AC-CE (4.1 vs 2.1). This indicated that the style of male students were more convergent and accommodating than those of female students. The female had more assimilating and divergent styles. Learning style in Saudi medical students showed difference between males and females in the early college years. Most male students had convergent and accommodating learning styles, while the female dominant learning styles were divergent and assimilating. Planning and implementation of instruction need to consider these findings.

  17. Portal Hypertensive Biliopathy Presents with Massive Bleeding during ERCP after Balloon Sphincteroplasty in a Noncirrhotic Saudi Sickler Patient.

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    Al-Akwaa, Ahmad M; Elsadig, Mohammed; Al-Fayaa, Ahmed E; Al-Shehri, Mohja D

    2017-01-01

    Portal hypertensive biliopathy (PHB) is described as abnormalities of the walls of the biliary tree secondary to portal hypertension. Gastrointestinal bleeding caused by PHB is rare. PHB as a cause of serious bleeding after sphincteroplasty during ERCP is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of PHB in a young Saudi male with cell sickle anemia who developed massive hemorrhage during ERCP after balloon dilation of the ampulla of Vater. We further discussed the diagnosis and management. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported.

  18. Portal Hypertensive Biliopathy Presents with Massive Bleeding during ERCP after Balloon Sphincteroplasty in a Noncirrhotic Saudi Sickler Patient

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    Ahmad M. Al-Akwaa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Portal hypertensive biliopathy (PHB is described as abnormalities of the walls of the biliary tree secondary to portal hypertension. Gastrointestinal bleeding caused by PHB is rare. PHB as a cause of serious bleeding after sphincteroplasty during ERCP is extremely rare. Here, we report a case of PHB in a young Saudi male with cell sickle anemia who developed massive hemorrhage during ERCP after balloon dilation of the ampulla of Vater. We further discussed the diagnosis and management. To the best of our knowledge, no such case has been reported.

  19. Male baldness.

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    Clarke, Philip

    2016-04-01

    Male baldness is very common. Its effect on individuals is extremely variable, and in some people it will have a significant adverse effect on their quality of life. The objectives of this article are to help general practitioners (GPs) be aware of potential health problems related to male baldness, to have an approach to assessing hair loss and to be aware of treatment options. Male baldness is, most often, a normal occurrence, but it may have significant effects on a man's health. It may also be a pointer to other potential health issues. The GP is in the ideal position to conduct an initial evaluation, consider other health issues and advise on treatment options.

  20. Social Determinants of Domestic Violence Among Saudi Married Women in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

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    Alquaiz, ALJohara M; Almuneef, Maha; Kazi, Ambreen; Almeneessier, Aljohara

    2017-12-01

    Intimate partner violence is a worldwide public health problem. The objectives of this study were to measure the prevalence and types of domestic violence, and to explore the association between social determinants (sociodemographic factors, husband-related factors, and social support) and violence against women by their intimate partner (husband). We conducted a cross-sectional survey in 18 randomly selected primary health care centers and 13 private institutions (teaching institutes, government offices, social welfare organizations) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Female data collectors took interview from 1,883 married Saudi females aged 30 to 75 years. Interviews included sociodemographic information, reproductive health variables, and social support questionnaire. Violence was measured using modified Intimate Partner Violence Against Women questionnaire developed by the World Health Organization. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was conducted. The lifetime prevalence for any type of violence was 43.0% ( n = 810). The most frequent type was controlling behavior (36.8%), followed by emotional violence (22%), sexual violence (12.7%), and physical violence (9.0%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that the following were associated with greater odds of reporting domestic violence: younger age 30 to 40 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI] = [1.3, 3.0]), 41 to 50 years (aOR = 1.6, 95% CI = [1.1, 2.5]); lack of emotional support (aOR = 1.7, 95% CI = [1.2, 2.5]); lack of tangible support (aOR = 1.4, 95% CI = [1.1, 1.9]); and perceived poor self-health (aOR = 1.7, 95% CI = [1.0, 3.0]), husbands' poor health (aOR = 1.9, 95% CI = [1.2, 2.0]), and polygamy (aOR = 1.6, 95% CI = [1.5, 2.6]). Domestic violence occurs frequently in Saudi Arabia. Both social conditions and social relations are significantly associated with domestic violence against Saudi women. Furthermore, improvement in implementation of the local policies

  1. Prevalence of respiratory diseases in hospitalized patients in Saudi Arabia: A 5 years study 1996-2000

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    Alamoudi Omer

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: 1 To determine the prevalence of respiratory diseases and the length of stay among hospitalized patients with respiratory disorders 2 To detect the medical disorders commonly associated with respiratory diseases. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review was done for 810 patients hospitalized with respiratory diseases in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, over 5 years (January 1996 to December 2000. A special form was used to collect information from patient medical records including demographic data (such as age, sex and nationality, discharge diagnosis with other associated diseases and length of stay during hospitalization. RESULTS: Fifty-five percent of patients were males and 56.3% were Saudis. The mostly affected age group was 46-65 years (41.8%. Asthma (38.6%, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (17.2%, pneumonia (11.5%, lung cancer (8.4% and tuberculosis (TB (7.2% had the highest prevalence among hospitalized patients. Asthma was higher among females (63.3% than males (36.7%. In contrast, lung cancer, COPD and TB were higher among males (88.2, 66.9 and 74.1% than females (11.8, 33.1 and 25.9% respectively ( P P CONCLUSION: Asthma, COPD and pneumonia were the leading causes of hospitalization among patients with respiratory disorders, while diabetes and hypertension were the most commonly associated diseases.

  2. Perception of the faculty regarding problem-based learning as an educational approach in Northwestern Saudi Arabia.

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    Aboonq, Moutasem

    2015-11-01

    To assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of medical teachers regarding problem-based learning (PBL) in Northwestern Saudi Arabia. This is a cross-sectional study conducted in the College of Medicine, Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, at the beginning of the academic year 2014/2015 where the PBL method had recently been introduced. Medical academic staff (n=110) were invited to participate in the study. Data about staff sociodemographic characteristics, PBL knowledge, attitudes, and practice were collected via a pre-designed structured questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods. The overall response rate was 77.3% (85 out of 110). The proportion of staff having good PBL knowledge was 76.5% (95% CI= 68.5%-84.5%), with the higher proportion being observed among the male staff (79.1%), professors (86%), and associate professors (88%). Significantly higher positive perceptions were found among male and clinical sciences staff. The PBL practice of the studied staff was 35%, with a statistically significant difference observed between male and female staff. Problem-based learning practice was also higher among clinical staff (42%), associate professors (40%), and professors (38%). A considerably high proportion of the studied medical staff was found to have good knowledge and favorable attitudes towards PBL. Training courses by the college should be considered for the staffs who have not previously engaged in such learning methods, as well for the junior and new staff.

  3. Perception of the faculty regarding problem-based learning as an educational approach in Northwestern Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboonq, Moutasem

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practice of medical teachers regarding problem-based learning (PBL) in Northwestern Saudi Arabia. Methods: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in the College of Medicine, Taibah University, Al Madinah Al Munawarah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, at the beginning of the academic year 2014/2015 where the PBL method had recently been introduced. Medical academic staff (n=110) were invited to participate in the study. Data about staff sociodemographic characteristics, PBL knowledge, attitudes, and practice were collected via a pre-designed structured questionnaire. The collected data were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods. Results: The overall response rate was 77.3% (85 out of 110). The proportion of staff having good PBL knowledge was 76.5% (95% CI= 68.5%-84.5%), with the higher proportion being observed among the male staff (79.1%), professors (86%), and associate professors (88%). Significantly higher positive perceptions were found among male and clinical sciences staff. The PBL practice of the studied staff was 35%, with a statistically significant difference observed between male and female staff. Problem-based learning practice was also higher among clinical staff (42%), associate professors (40%), and professors (38%). Conclusion: A considerably high proportion of the studied medical staff was found to have good knowledge and favorable attitudes towards PBL. Training courses by the college should be considered for the staffs who have not previously engaged in such learning methods, as well for the junior and new staff. PMID:26593167

  4. The obstacles facing scientific and medical publishing in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsanea, Nasser; Al-Ghammas, Amal; Pangan-Menor, Jeruly; Tejano, Reina Vidad; Al-Bassam, Nada; Duero-Ebora, Jennifer; Vales, Janelle A

    2014-01-01

    Medical and scientific publishing in Saudi Arabia has flourished in the last ten years. Such a form of publishing faces its own obstacles and the experience of the Annals of Saudi Medicine if analyzed can delineate such obstacles. The aim of this study is to identify the workflow obstacles facing the Annals of Saudi Medicine. Root-cause analysis of the workflow process and output from submission till publication for the period January 2012-December 2013. Key performance indicators were developed and analyzed after being extracted from the online submission system. For the period of the study, 1058 manuscripts were received annually. These manuscripts originated in descending order from: Saudi Arabia 34%, Turkey 16%, India 12%, China 8% and Western Countries 3%. Categories of the submissions were: original articles 53%, case reports 31% and others 16%. Only 103 of the submissions were accepted annually for publication. Out of 7,709 requests to review a manuscript, only 1,579 (20%) resulted in a review. Out of a sample of 744 rated reviews, only 10% were poor in quality. The average turnaround time for review was 79 days. The main reason for the delay was the low response of the reviewers. The Annals of Saudi Medicine is a regional or continental journal with substantial submissions as case reports. This affected its Impact Factor and Hirsch Index. Moreover, the review process is delayed due to the poor response of the reviewers.

  5. Health literacy among Saudi population: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Latif, Mohamed M M; Saad, Sherif Y

    2017-09-12

    Health literacy is a major problem worldwide and adversely affects an individual's health. The aim of the present study was to assess health literacy level among Saudi population. A cross-sectional study was conducted among a randomly selected population (n = 500) in Saudi Arabia. The questionnaire comprised of questions pertaining to demographic characteristics, health literacy and health information. Health literacy was measured by REALM-R test. Internal reliability was determined using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The majority of the respondents had intermediate (43.8%) and basic (34.4%) health literacy levels. A higher percentage among men had intermediate (59.8%) and basic (70.93%) health literacy levels compared with women. About 30% of respondents had difficulty in understanding health screening tests and disease treatment. More than half of participants (52.4%) had difficulty in finding health information. The REALM-R test revealed that about 42.6% of individuals with score of >6 had adequate health literacy compared with 57.4% with score of ≤6 had inadequate health literacy. The present study demonstrated that a majority of Saudi individuals had inadequate health literacy that associated with poor knowledge of health information. Our findings highlighted the importance of understanding the status of health literacy among Saudis and the need for educational programs to raise the health literacy awareness among Saudi population. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Novel mutations underlying argininosuccinic aciduria in Saudi Arabia

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    Rashed Mohamed S

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Argininosuccinic aciduria (ASAuria is an autosomal recessive disorder of the urea cycle relatively common in Saudi Arabia as a consequence of extensive consanguinity. It is the most common urea cycle disorder identified in the Saudi population, which therefore prioritizes the need to delineate the underlying molecular defects leading to disease. Findings We utilized Whole Genome Amplification (WGA, PCR and direct sequencing to identify mutations underlying ASAuria cases diagnosed by our institution. A missense mutation that accounts for 50% of Saudi ASAuria patients was recently reported by our laboratory. In this study we report a further six novel mutations (and one previously reported found in Saudi patients with ASAuria. The novel four missense, one nonsense and one splice-site mutation were confirmed by their absence in >300 chromosomes from the normal population. Pathogenicity of the novel splice-site mutation was also confirmed using reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis. Cross species amino acid conservation at the substituted residues described were observed in some but not all instances. Conclusions Together, the eight mutations described by our laboratory, encompass >90% of ASAuria patients in Saudi Arabia and add to about 45 other ASAuria mutations reported worldwide.

  7. Saudi Science Teachers' Views and Teaching Strategies of Socioscientific Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alamri, Aziz S.

    Scientific developments such as cloning and nuclear energy have generated many controversial issues pertain to many political, social, environmental, ethical and cultural values in different societies around the globe. These controversies delimited and encircled the potential of including and teaching some important aspects of science in schools and therefore caused less consideration to the influence of these issues on enhancing the scientific literacy of people in general. The purpose of this study was to investigate how Saudi science teachers in the city of Tabuk in Saudi Arabia view and teach SSI in Saudi Arabia. This study employed semi-structured interviews with Saudi science teachers. Methodologically, this study used a constructivist grounded theory as a method for analysis to generate in-depth descriptive data about Saudi science teachers' views and teaching strategies of socio-scientific issues. Some direct and indirect benefits pertain to teaching science, understanding the relationship between science, religion, and society and some other topics are discussed in this study.

  8. Saudi Arabian ICU safety culture and nurses' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Abdulrahman S; Lööf, Helena; Johansson, Unn-Britt

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine nurses' attitudes towards safety culture in six Saudi Arabian intensive care units (ICUs). The study is descriptive with a cross-sectional design. The Safety Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ)-ICU version was distributed and 216 completed questionnaires were returned. The findings provide a basis for further research on Saudi Arabian ICU safety culture. This study showed that the SAQ-ICU can be used to measure safety climate to identify areas for improvement according to nurse attitudes and perceptions. Findings indicate that ICU safety culture is an important issue that hospital managers should prioritise. The SAQ-ICU questionnaire, used to measure safety climate in Saudi Arabian ICUs, identifies service strengths and improvement areas according to attitudes and perceptions. To the knowledge, this is the first study to use SAQ to examine nurses' safety culture attitudes in Saudi Arabian ICUs. The present findings provide a baseline and further details about Saudi Arabian ICU safety. Study participants represented nine nationalities, indicating the nursing workforce's diversity, which is expected to continue in the future. Such a nursing cultural heterogeneity calls for further studies to examine and evaluate attitudes and values to improve ICU safety culture.

  9. Sustainability Assessment of Higher Education Institutions in Saudi Arabia

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    Habib M. Alshuwaikhat

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Universities are paramount change drivers in bringing about a culture of sustainability in society by setting themselves up as models and nurseries for sustainable development. Thus, assessment of sustainability integration within universities is key to their impact on sustainable development. This study conducted an assessment of different public sector universities of Saudi Arabia based on five components: (i Teaching and Curriculum; (ii Research and Scholarship; (iii Campus Operations; (iv Management and Community; and (v Financial Management. The sustainability assessment questionnaire (SAQ was utilized as a tool to discern the component-wise sustainability assessment for Saudi universities. The outcomes of the survey reveal that, in stark contrast with the universities of the developed world, offerings of sustainability relevant academic courses in Saudi Arabia are still lacking. Most Saudi universities still need to integrate research and scholarship in the area of sustainability; sustainable-campus operations in the current scenario are not sufficient. The results also reveal that sustainability-related projects are not prioritized within universities and sustainable financial management practices are not significant. This article concludes by proposing some recommendations emphasizing the importance of adopting sustainability practices in Saudi universities.

  10. Neurology Research in Saudi Arabia: Urgent call for action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algahtani, Hussein; Shirah, Bader; Boker, Faisal; Algamdi, Albaraa; Alkahtani, Abdulah

    2017-08-01

    Research activities in Saudi Arabia are promoted at the governmental and institutional levels. However, the output and quality of research conducted in the field of neurology has not yet been measured quantitatively. This study therefore aimed to analyse neurology-related publications from Saudi Arabia. This study was conducted in January 2016. A systematic search using the PubMed(®) search engine (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland, USA) was conducted to identify all neurology-related articles published from Saudi Arabia between January 1996 and December 2015. A total of 1,292 neurology-related publications were identified. Neurology research increased linearly with time, with most publications originating from Riyadh (67%) and the university sector (≈47%). However, most neurology-related articles were published in journals which had an impact factor of Neurology research in Saudi Arabia has increased substantially over the last 20 years. However, as most articles were published in low-impact journals, the quality of research remains inadequate and should be improved. It is important that an official research culture be established in both governmental and private universities as well as colleges and health institutions in Saudi Arabia. The formation of clinical academic departments staffed by research experts is recommended to ensure the quality of neurology research output.

  11. Neurology Research in Saudi Arabia : Urgent call for action

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    Hussein Algahtani

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Research activities in Saudi Arabia are promoted at the governmental and institutional levels. However, the output and quality of research conducted in the field of neurology has not yet been measured quantitatively. This study therefore aimed to analyse neurology-related publications from Saudi Arabia. Methods: This study was conducted in January 2016. A systematic search using the PubMed® search engine (National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, Maryland, USA was conducted to identify all neurology-related articles published from Saudi Arabia between January 1996 and December 2015. Results: A total of 1,292 neurologyrelated publications were identified. Neurology research increased linearly with time, with most publications originating from Riyadh (67% and the university sector (≈47%. However, most neurology-related articles were published in journals which had an impact factor of <1 (55%. Conclusion: Neurology research in Saudi Arabia has increased substantially over the last 20 years. However, as most articles were published in low-impact journals, the quality of research remains inadequate and should be improved. It is important that an official research culture be established in both governmental and private universities as well as colleges and health institutions in Saudi Arabia. The formation of clinical academic departments staffed by research experts is recommended to ensure the quality of neurology research output.

  12. Patterns of psychotropic medication use in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia

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    Alosaimi FD

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fahad D Alosaimi,1 Abdulhadi Alhabbad,2 Mohammed F Abalhassan,3 Ebtihaj O Fallata,4 Nasser M Alzain,5 Mohammad Zayed Alassiry,6 Bander Abdullah Haddad71Department of Psychiatry, King Saud University, Riyadh, 2Department of Psychiatry, Prince Mohammed Medical City, Aljouf, 3Department of Medicine, Prince Sattam Bin Abdulaziz University, Al-Kharj, 4Department of Psychiatry, Mental Health Hospital, Jeddah, 5Department of Psychiatry, Al-Amal Complex for Mental Health, Dammam, 6Medical Services Department, Abha Psychiatric Hospital, Abha, 7Department of Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Ministry of National Guard, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjective: To study the pattern of psychotropic medication use and compare this pattern between inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings in Saudi Arabia.Method: This cross-sectional observational study was conducted between July 2012 and June 2014 on patients seeking psychiatric advice at major hospitals in five main regions of Saudi Arabia. Male (n=651 and female (n=594 patients who signed the informed consent form and were currently or had been previously using psychotropic medications, irrespective of the patient’s type of psychiatric diagnosis and duration of the disease, were included. A total of 1,246 patients were found to be suitable in the inclusion criteria of whom 464 were inpatients while 782 were outpatients.Results: Several studied demographic factors have shown that compared with outpatients, inpatients were more likely to be male (P=0.004, unmarried (P<0.001, have less number of children (1–3; P=0.002, unemployed (P=0.001, have a lower family income (<3,000 SR; P<0.001, live in rural communities (P<0.001, have a lower body mass index (P=0.001, and are smokers (P<0.001; however, there were no differences with regard to age or educational levels. The current frequency of use of psychotropic medications in overall patients was antipsychotics (76.6%, antidepressants (41.4%, mood stabilizers

  13. Circumcision (Male)

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    ... Pediatrics; 2009:828. Provencio-Vasquez E. Circumcision revisited. Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing. 2009;14:295. Brown-Trask B, et al. Circumcision care. RN. 2009;72:22. Circumcision policy statement. American ... BJU International. 2008;101:65. Task Force on Circumcision. Male ...

  14. Common Eye Diseases in Children in Saudi Arabia (Jazan

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    Abdulrahman Darraj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The rise in childhood eye diseases has become a matter of concern in Saudi Arabia, and hence a study has been conducted on the residents of Jazan. The aim of the research was to find out the root cause of such issues and provide a solution to prevent such circumstances for it may affect the vision of children. In this study, therefore, we aimed to determine the types of childhood eye diseases in Jazan and to discuss the best ways to prevent them or prevent their effect on the vision of our children. Our institutions are working toward the longevity and welfare of the residents, and healthcare is one of the important aspects in such a field. Methods This is a retrospective review of all patients less than 18 years of age who presented to the pediatric ophthalmology clinic of Prince Mohammed Bin Nasser Hospital, Jazan, between October 2014 and October 2015. The data, collected on 385 cases, included the age at first presentation, sex, clinical diagnosis, refractive error (RE if present, and whether the child had amblyopia. If the child did not undergo complete ophthalmic examination with cycloplegic refraction, he/she was excluded. All data were collected and analyzed using the software SPSS. A P -value < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results We reviewed the files of 385 children, with a male/female ratio of 1.1:1.0. The group aged 0–6 years made up the largest group ( P = 0.01, and the ratio is an expression to define the credibility of the study using a chi-squared test. Strabismus (36.9%, RE (26.5%, ocular trauma (7.5%, infection of cornea and conjunctiva (7.3%, and keratoconus (6.2% were the most common conditions. There was no significant difference in presentation by age group and sex among children with REs and squint. Trauma was seen more commonly among males and in the group aged 12–18 years. Conclusion In this retrospective study, the focus was on the common childhood eye diseases that were considerably

  15. Prevalence and correlates of anaemia in adolescents in Riyadh city, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquaiz, Al-Johara M; Khoja, Tawfik Am; Alsharif, Abdullah; Kazi, Ambreen; Mohamed, Ashry Gad; Al Mane, Hamad; Aldiris, Abdullah; Shaikh, Shaffi Ahamed

    2015-12-01

    To determine the prevalence and correlates of anaemia in male and female adolescents in Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional community-based study. Five primary health-care centres in Riyadh. We invited 203 male and 292 female adolescents aged 13-18 years for interview, anthropometric measurements and complete blood count. Blood Hb was measured with a Coulter Cellular Analysis System using the light scattering method. Using the WHO cut-off of Hbanaemia. Mean Hb in males and females was 13·5 (sd 1·4) and 12·3 (sd 1·2) g/dl, respectively. Values for mean cell volume, mean cell Hb, mean corpuscular Hb concentration and red cell distribution width in male and female adolescents were 77·8 (sd 6·2) v. 76·4 (sd 10·3) μm(3), 26·1 (sd 2·7) v. 25·5 (sd 2·6) pg, 32·7 (sd 2·4) v. 32·2 (sd 2·6) g/dl and 13·9 (sd 1·4) v. 13·6 (sd 1·3) %, respectively. Multivariate logistic regression revealed that a positive family history of Fe-deficiency anaemia (OR=4·7; 95 % CI 1·7, 12·2), infrequent intake (OR=3·7; 95 % CI 1·3, 10·0) and never intake of fresh juices (OR=3·5; 95 % CI 1·4, 9·5) and being 13-14 years of age (OR=3·1; 95 % CI 1·2, 9·3) were significantly associated with anaemia in male adolescents; whereas in females, family history of Fe-deficiency anaemia (OR=3·4; 95 % CI 1·5, 7·6), being overweight (OR=3·0; 95 % CI 1·4, 6·1), no intake of fresh juices (OR=2·6; 95 % CI 1·4, 5·1), living in an apartment (OR=2·0; 95 % CI 1·1, 3·8) and living in a small house (OR=2·5; 95 % CI 1·2, 5·3) were significantly associated with anaemia. Anaemia is more prevalent among Saudi female adolescents as compared with males. Important factors like positive family history of Fe-deficiency anaemia, overweight, lack of fresh juice intake and low socio-economic status are significantly associated with anaemia in adolescents.

  16. Aquagenic Wrinkling of the Palms, two new cases from Saudi Arabia

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    Mohammed G. Turkmani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aquagenic Wrinkling of the Palms (AWP is a rare dermatologic disease. It was first described four decades ago as a potential test for Cystic Fibrosis (CF by detecting “skin wrinkling” in response to water immersion. We are reporting two cases of AWP diagnosed at Derma Clinic, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The first case was a 9-year old girl and the second case was a 17-year adolescent male. The second case was associated with palmer hyperhidrosis. Both patients denied any medication use. Additionally, signs and symptoms suggesting CF were lacking. Local dermatologists should be aware of rare conditions such as AWP and lack of previous reports from the region may indicate under-reporting rather than lack of cases.

  17. In-hospital mortality among patients injured in motor vehicle crashes in a Saudi Arabian hospital relative to large U.S. trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghnam, Suliman; Palta, Mari; Hamedani, Azita; Remington, Patrick L; Alkelya, Mohamed; Albedah, Khalid; Durkin, Maureen S

    Traffic-related fatalities are a leading cause of premature death worldwide. According to the 2012 report the Global Burden of Disease 2010, traffic injuries ranked 8th as a cause of death in 2010, compared to 10th in 1990. Saudi Arabia is estimated to have an overall traffic fatality rate more than double that of the U.S., but it is unknown whether mortality differences also exist for injured patients seeking medical care. We aim to compare in-hospital mortality between Saudi Arabia and the United States, adjusting for severity and demographic variables. The analysis included 485,611 patients from the U.S. National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) and 5,290 patients from a trauma registry at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. For comparability, we restricted our sample to NTDB data from level-I public trauma centers (≥400 beds) in the U.S. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of setting (KAMC vs. NTDB) on in-hospital mortality after adjusting for age, sex, Triage-Revised Scale (T-RTS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), mechanism of injury, hypotension, surgery and head injuries. Interactions between setting and ISS, and predictors were also evaluated. Injured patients in the Saudi registry were more likely to be males, and younger than those from the NTDB. Patients at the Saudi hospital were at higher risk of in-hospital death than their U.S. counterparts. In the highest severity group (ISSs, 25-75), the odds ratio of in-hospital death in KAMC versus NTDB was 5.0 (95% CI 4.3-5.8). There were no differences in mortality between KAMC and NTDB among patients from lower ISS groups (ISSs, 1-8, 9-15, and 16-24). Patients who are severely injured following traffic crash injuries in Saudi Arabia are significantly more likely to die in the hospital than comparable patients admitted to large U.S. trauma centers. Further research is needed to identify reasons for this disparity and strategies for improving the care of

  18. Male age mediates reproductive investment and response to paternity assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, Kyle M; Head, Megan L; Williams, Camellia A; Moore, Allen J; Royle, Nick J

    2013-08-07

    Theory predicts that male response to reduced paternity will depend on male state and interactions between the sexes. If there is little chance of reproducing again, then males should invest heavily in current offspring, regardless of their share in paternity. We tested this by manipulating male age and paternity assurance in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We found older males invested more in both mating effort and parental effort than younger males. Furthermore, male age, a component of male state, mediated male response to perceived paternity. Older males provided more prenatal care, whereas younger males provided less prenatal care, when perceived paternity was low. Adjustments in male care, however, did not influence selection acting indirectly on parents, through offspring performance. This is because females adjusted their care in response to the age of their partner, providing less care when paired with older males than younger males. As a result offspring, performance did not differ between treatments. Our study shows, for the first time, that a male state variable is an important modifier of paternity-parental care trade-offs and highlights the importance of social interactions between males and females during care in determining male response to perceived paternity.

  19. Histopathologic Patterns of Breast Lesions in Northern Saudi Arabia

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    Hussain Gadelkarim Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to find out the prevalence rates of common types of breast cancer in Northern Saudi Arabia. Methodology: A retrospective cohort study was carried out over a five-year period in two referral hospitals. In this study 257 files were retrieved from departments of Surgery from different hospitals in Hail region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Results: Of the 257 samples diagnosed using Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC, histopathological diagnosis was confirmed for 158 patients. Of the 158 diagnosed samples, 46/158 (23.2% were ductal carcinoma, 7/158 (4.4% were lobular carcinoma, 3/158 (1.9% were mixed tumours, and 102/158 (64.6 were fibroadenoma. Conclusion: Fibroadenoma and ductal carcinoma are the prevalent breast lesions in Hail Region of Saudi Arabia.

  20. Contraception: attitudes and experiences of Saudi Arabian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Turki, Haifa Abdulaziz

    2011-02-01

    We carried out a survey to find the contraception practices and experiences of Saudi Arabian females. A preset questionnaire was developed, and married Saudi females were asked to answer the questionnaire. Between July and December 2008, 215 women completed the questionnaire. The average age was 37.6 ± 9.1 years. One hundred and sixty one of the women said they were using contraception. Fifty-nine (36.6%) said they were using oral contraception pills (OCP) and 32 (19.9%) said they were using intra-uterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs). One hundred and twenty-seven (78.8%) of the women were satisfied with the contraception they were using. We found that a majority of Saudi women are using contraception methods but without medical advice.

  1. Poststroke Anxiety and Depression: Findings from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim Saleh; Alamri, Yassar

    2016-07-01

    Anxiety and depression are the two most frequent neuropsychiatric manifestations of stroke. In Saudi Arabia, there is a general lack of research into anxiety and depression in stroke patients when compared with physical complications. We assessed the prevalence of anxiety and depression in 76 stroke patients from Saudi Arabia using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). In this study, 18.4% and 23.7% of the patients met the HADS criteria for moderate or severe anxiety and depression, respectively. Female gender was the only significant predictive factor associated with both anxiety (P = .03) and depression (P = .04), where longer duration since stroke was only associated with anxiety (P = .02) but not depression (P = .25). These results suggest that anxiety and depression are commonplace in Saudi patients with stroke, a finding that has implications for clinical practice and future research. Copyright © 2016 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient’s medicinal knowledge in Saudi Arabia:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thamir M. Alshammari

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Patient education is one of the main factors of patient therapeutic plan and without it, the patient may not benefit from his/her medications. Several studies showed the effectiveness of educating patients about their disease(s and their medication(s which ultimately enhance their quality of life especially in chronic diseases such as diabetes mellitus and hypertension. Concept of patient education is well known and understood in the Western countries while in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia it is not well established despite some efforts made by few big hospitals. In Saudi Arabia, different stakeholders such as hospitals, pharmaceutical companies, healthcare professionals, health societies and association and governmental agencies do not do their job as patient education. Aim of this paper was to throw some light about the current situation in Saudi Arabia.

  3. Rabies in Saudi Arabia: a need for epidemiological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad A. Memish

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is endemic in animals in the Arabian Peninsula. Although Saudi Arabia is the largest country in the Peninsula, little has been published about the rabies situation in the country. A total of 11 069 animal bites to humans were reported during 2007–2009, and 40 animals suspected of rabies were examined for rabies infection from 2005 through 2010. Results suggest that animal-related injuries in Saudi Arabia remain a public health problem, with feral dogs accounting for the majority of bites to humans and for the majority of animals found to be rabid. Over the last 10 years, no confirmed human rabies case has been reported. More detailed information about the epidemiology of animal bites and that of animal rabies in Saudi Arabia would be of great interest, notably to provide a basis on which vaccination recommendations could be made for the numerous international travellers visiting the country.

  4. Factors Influencing Consumer Behavior Towards Online Shopping in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hani A

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to identify factors that may affect consumer behavior in Saudi Arabia while shopping online. Although Saudi Arabia has the largest and fastest growing ICT in the Middle East and the online shopping activities in Saudi are increasing rapidly, it is still lagging behind the global development. The four factors–website design quality, perceived trust, perceived convenience and advertisements & promotions were selected from the available literature. A survey was conducted and questionnaire that includes 25 questions was distributed randomly to a sample of 107 participants in Dammam city (in the Eastern Province of the kingdom. The collected data was analyzed by using SPSS software. The result indicates one hypothesis has been accepted. The findings of the study are analyzed and discussed further at the end of this paper.

  5. Lifestyle and Dietary Behaviors among Saudi Preschool Children Attending Primary Health Care Centers, Eastern Saudi Arabia

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    Magdy A. Darwish

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To study life styles and dietary behaviors among Saudi preschool children (1–5 years attending primary health care centers (PHCCs in Dammam and Qatif areas, eastern province, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods. Cross-sectional study. Data were collected using structured, interviewer-filled questionnaire. Children and their mothers were encountered during their well-baby clinic visits. A total number of 300 preschool children and their mothers were interviewed during study period. Results. Unsatisfactory areas include smoking fathers (32%, smoking in front of children (11.3%, overweight and obesity among mothers (60.3%, noncompliance using seat belts for both parents (56.3% and children (68%, children watching television (T.V more than 2 hours (50%, adherence to exclusive breast feeding (only 20.7%, and late solid food introduction (65.3%. Frequent intake of unhealthy food items was 26%, 25%, and 24% for pizza, burger, and soft drinks. Unfortunately frequent intake of the following unhealthy food items was high: biscuits, deserts/chocolates, and chips which was 78%, 67%, and 72%, respectively. Conclusion. This study provides benchmark about the current situation. It provides health care workers and decision makers with important information that may help to improve health services.

  6. Puberty development among children and adolescents with chronic disease in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlBuhairan, Fadia; Tamimi, Waleed; Tamim, Hani; Al Mutair, Angham; Felimban, Naila; Altwaijri, Yasmin; Shoukri, Mohamed; Al Alwan, Ibrahim

    2012-01-01

    Increasing numbers of children with chronic health conditions are now surviving into adolescence and adulthood because of advancing health care. These chronic health conditions are generally known to impact a child's growth and development, including pubertal development. In Saudi Arabia, chronic diseases are prevalent, yet no reports of pubertal onset and its relation to chronic illness are available. The aim of this study was to explore pubertal development among Saudi children and adolescents with a chronic illness. Cross-sectional study conducted at schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in 2006. Those students whose parents reported that their son/daughter had a chronic illness and/or was taking a long-term medication underwent a physical examination to determine sexual maturity rating and growth parameters. Of 1371 students who participated in the study, 155 (11.3%) had a chronic illness. Of those, 79 (51%) were male, and the mean SD age of all the students was 11.4 (2.4) years. Ninety (58%) students were taking medication for their health condition. Bronchial asthma was reported to be the most common chronic condition (n=66; 42.6%), followed by blood disorders (n=41; 26.5%). Fifty-three (34%) students were overweight or obese. For male gonadal (G) development, the mean age of boys with G stage 2 was 11.7 years; stage 3: 13.5 years; stage 4: 14.1 years; and stage 5: 14.6 years. For female breast (B) development, the mean age of girls with B stage 2 was 10.7 years; stage 3: 11.3 years; stage 4: 12.4 years; and stage 5: 14.1 years. The pubic hair development for both boys and girls was similar to the corresponding gonadal or breast development, respectively. The age of onset of pubertal development for both boys and girls with a chronic illness are within normal limits. The high prevalence of overweight and obesity may contribute to this phenomenon, yet further studies should consider the effects of disease severity and chronicity and medication use as possible

  7. Oral lesions in Saudi renal transplant patients

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    Al-Mohaya Maha

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal transplantation has evolved as the best treatment option for patients with end-stage renal disease. Different oral problems arise in these patients, either as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or pharmacokinetics. To determine the prevalence of intra-oral lesions in a group of medically stable Saudi renal transplant patients (RTP and to identify possible risk factors, in comparison with age and sex-matched healthy control subjects (HCS, we studied 58 RTP and 52 HCS. All subjects had a thorough oral examination and oral lesions were diagnosed according to the clinically accepted criteria. Gingival overgrowth (GO, erythematous candidiasis (EC and hairy leukoplakia (HL were diagnosed in RTP with prevalence of 74.1%, 15.5%, and 8.6%, respectively. The severity of the gingival overgrowth significantly correlated with the use of cyclosporine and nifedipine combination therapy, serum cyclosporine, and serum creatinine level. In conclusions, the finding of our study strongly propose that RTP should undergo routine and regular comprehensive oral examination, and any suspicious lesion must be investigate and treated.

  8. Nursing work environment in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboshaiqah, Ahmad E

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the work environment as perceived by nurses in a large tertiary hospital in Saudi Arabia. The quality of patient care services has been associated with the quality of work environment of nurses. It is therefore important to assess the work environment in order to acquire baseline data and enable the institution to benchmark their status from established quality standards. This study used a descriptive survey with 1007 staff nurses across service units of a 1000-bed government-operated hospital. The American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Healthy Work Environment Assessment Questionnaire was used for data collection. Scores were aggregated and interpreted. Effective decision making, authentic leadership, appropriate staffing, true collaboration, skilled communication and meaningful recognition were rated as good (mean range 3.53-3.76). Healthy work environments mutually benefit patients, nurses, nurse managers, health care providers, the health team, administration, the institution and the community at large. Valuable baseline data on the status of the work environment in this setting were generated. This should allow administrators and staff to work together in improving weaknesses and strengthening further whatever gains that are attained to ensure consistent provision of safe and quality patient care. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Patterns of tobacco consumption in food facilities in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandil, Ahmed; Yamani, Mohammad; BinSaeed, Abdulaziz; Ahmad, Shaffi; Younis, Afnan; Al-Mutlaq, Ahmad; Al-Baqmy, Omar; Al-Rajhi, Abdulaziz

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed at assessing prevailing patterns and risk factors of tobacco consumption among clients, food handlers and employers of food facilities, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A cross-sectional approach to a representative sample of food facilities in Riyadh was used. A sample of 3000 participants included clients (75%); food handlers/hospitality workers (20 %) and employers (5 %). Participants were reached at restaurants, food courts or cafes. A modified version of the WHO-CDC-Global Youth Tobacco Survey questionnaire was used for data collection. The prevalence of tobacco use at food facilities was found to be 40.3 %, of which 74% were customers, 18.8% were food handlers and 7.2% were managers. The consumption of tobacco was higher at restaurants (39.9%), but lowest at food courts of shopping malls. Water pipe (55.3%) was the main consumption type, followed by cigarettes (42.6%) and chewing tobacco (2.1%). Multivariate analysis showed that gender (male), marital status (single), and type of food facility (Estaraha and café/coffee shop) were independent risk factors associated with tobacco use at food facilities. Tobacco use is very common in food facilities in Riyadh as reflected by results of our study, especially among single males Saudis. We should build on success encountered in banning smoking in airports, airplanes, shopping malls, market places, educational institutions and healthcare facilities, extending the ban to include food facilities as well. This is important for the health of non-smokers as well as smokers themselves.

  10. Patterns of tobacco consumption in food facilities in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mandil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed at assessing prevailing patterns and risk factors of tobacco consumption among clients, food handlers and employers of food facilities, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods: A cross-sectional approach to a representative sample of food facilities in Riyadh was used. A sample of 3000 participants included clients (75%; food handlers/hospitality workers (20 % and employers (5 %. Participants were reached at restaurants, food courts or cafes. A modified version of the WHO-CDC-Global Youth Tobacco Survey questionnaire was used for data collection. Results: The prevalence of tobacco use at food facilities was found to be 40.3 %, of which 74% were customers, 18.8% were food handlers and 7.2% were managers. The consumption of tobacco was higher at restaurants (39.9%, but lowest at food courts of shopping malls. Water pipe (55.3% was the main consumption type, followed by cigarettes (42.6% and chewing tobacco (2.1%. Multivariate analysis showed that gender (male, marital status (single, and type of food facility (Estaraha and café/coffee shop were independent risk factors associated with tobacco use at food facilities. Conclusion: Tobacco use is very common in food facilities in Riyadh as reflected by results of our study, especially among single males Saudis. We should build on success encountered in banning smoking in airports, airplanes, shopping malls, market places, educational institutions and healthcare facilities, extending the ban to include food facilities as well. This is important for the health of non-smokers as well as smokers themselves.

  11. Patterns of tobacco consumption in food facilities in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandil, Ahmed; Yamani, Mohammad; BinSaeed, Abdulaziz; Ahmad, Shaffi; Younis, Afnan; Al-Mutlaq, Ahmad; Al-Baqmy, Omar; Al-Rajhi, Abdulaziz

    2014-01-01

    AIM: This study aimed at assessing prevailing patterns and risk factors of tobacco consumption among clients, food handlers and employers of food facilities, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A cross-sectional approach to a representative sample of food facilities in Riyadh was used. A sample of 3000 participants included clients (75%); food handlers/hospitality workers (20 %) and employers (5 %). Participants were reached at restaurants, food courts or cafes. A modified version of the WHO-CDC-Global Youth Tobacco Survey questionnaire was used for data collection. RESULTS: The prevalence of tobacco use at food facilities was found to be 40.3 %, of which 74% were customers, 18.8% were food handlers and 7.2% were managers. The consumption of tobacco was higher at restaurants (39.9%), but lowest at food courts of shopping malls. Water pipe (55.3%) was the main consumption type, followed by cigarettes (42.6%) and chewing tobacco (2.1%). Multivariate analysis showed that gender (male), marital status (single), and type of food facility (Estaraha and café/coffee shop) were independent risk factors associated with tobacco use at food facilities. CONCLUSION: Tobacco use is very common in food facilities in Riyadh as reflected by results of our study, especially among single males Saudis. We should build on success encountered in banning smoking in airports, airplanes, shopping malls, market places, educational institutions and healthcare facilities, extending the ban to include food facilities as well. This is important for the health of non-smokers as well as smokers themselves. PMID:24987478

  12. The Influence of Older Siblings on the Sex-Typed Toy Play of Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Alison; Fraleigh, Kimberly

    To examine the influence of older siblings on the sex-typed toy play of younger siblings, a study was undertaken of 60 children, 2 to 5 years old, with equal numbers of boys and girls with older brothers, older sisters, and no older siblings. Children's toy collections were inventoried and classified into conventionally male toys, or toys of the…

  13. Causes of irreversible unilateral or bilateral blindness in the Al Baha region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Huda Farhan

    2016-01-01

    To determine the causes of irreversible unilateral and bilateral blindness that cannot be rehabilitated medically, optically nor surgically in Al Baha province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. There were a retrospective chart review and examination of patients presenting to King Fahad Hospital Al Baha, Saudi Arabia, with unilateral or bilateral blindness from June 2011 to September 2011. Blindness was defined as best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of less than 0.05 (Snellen, 20/400) or a visual field no greater than 10° around central fixation. Data were collected on patient demographics, ocular disease either primary or secondary to systemic diseases and laterality if unilateral involvement. One hundred consecutive patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age of the study sample was 58 ± 2.28 years (range, 1-90 years). The male to female ratio was 3:2. The most common cause of blindness in one or both eyes per person was diabetes (30% of patients) followed by glaucoma (23%). Reclassification of the causes of the blindness according on World Health Organization (definition of blindness which included both eyes) did not change the causes of blindness. There were 76% patients with unilateral blindness. The most common causes of unilateral blindness were diabetes mellitus (DM) (19 patients; 27%), glaucoma (17 patients; 23%) and retinal diseases (other than that caused by DM) (17 patients; 23%). In the entire study sample, the male-to-female ratio for patients with blindness from DM was 2:1. Diabetic macular edema caused 87% of the cases of blindness in patients with DM mostly in the left eye. Diabetes mellitus and then glaucoma are the major causes of irreversible blindness in the Al Baha region in Saudi Arabia. Public health plans should be developed to encourage proper patient health education in the region. Additionally, effective screening should be performed at the primary health care centers for diabetes.

  14. Male contraception

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T.; Anderson, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the nonho...

  15. MALE OSTEOPOROSIS

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Lindomar Guimarães; Guimarães, Mara Lucia Rassi

    2010-01-01

    As a result of population ageing worldwide, osteoporotic fractures are becoming a serious problem in the western world. Osteoporotic fractures are associated with a significant burden in terms of morbidity, mortality, and economic costs. Although less frequent than in women, male osteoporosis is also a relatively common problem. Since bone loss and fragility fractures in men have been recognized as a serious medical condition, over the last two decades several studies have investigated a numb...

  16. Public awareness of blood donation in Central Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfotouh MA; Al-Assiri MH; Al-Omani M; Al Johar A; Al Hakbani A; Alaskar AS

    2014-01-01

    Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1,2 Mohammed H Al-Assiri,1 Manar Al-Omani,2 Alwaleed Al Johar,3 Abdulaziz Al Hakbani,3 Ahmed S Alaskar1,2 1King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, 2King Saud bin-Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, 3College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Introduction: In Saudi Arabia, voluntary donors are the only source of blood donation. The aim of this study was to assess the level of public knowledge and attitude toward blood donation in Sa...

  17. Assessment of the effects of glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies and trace elements on cognitive performance in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alghadir AH

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad H Alghadir,1 Sami A Gabr,1,2 Einas Al-Eisa11Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, EgyptBackground: Homeostatic imbalance of trace elements such as iron (Fe, copper (Cu, and zinc (Zn demonstrated adverse effects on brain function among older adults.Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the effects of trace elements and the presence of anti-glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADAs in human cognitive abilities among healthy older adults.Methods: A total of 100 healthy subjects (65 males, 35 females; age range; 64–96 years were recruited for this study. Based on Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment (LOTCA score, the participants were classified according to cognitive performance into normal (n=45, moderate (n=30, and severe (n=25. Cognitive functioning, leisure-time physical activity (LTPA, serum trace elements – Fe, Cu, Zn, Zn/Cu, and GADAs were assessed using LOTCA battery, pre-validated physical activity (PA questionnaire, atomic absorption, and immunoassay techniques, respectively.Results: Approximately 45% of the study population (n=45 had normal distribution of cognitive function and 55% of the study population (n=55 had abnormal cognitive function; they were classified into moderate (score 62–92 and severe (score 31–62. There was a significant reduction in the level of Zn and Zn/Cu ratio along with an increase in the level of Fe, Cu, and anti-GADAs in subjects of severe (P=0.01 and moderate (P=0.01 cognitive performance. LOTCA-cognitive scores correlated positively with sex, HbA1c, Fe, Cu, Zn, and Zn/Cu ratio, and negatively with age, PA, body mass index, and anti-GADAs. Significant inter-correlation was reported between serum trace element concentrations and anti-GADAs which suggest producing a cognitive decline via oxidative and neural

  18. Depression in Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... here Home » Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression In Older Adults: More Facts Depression affects more ... combination of both. [8] Older Adult Attitudes Toward Depression: According to a Mental Health America survey [9] ...

  19. Outcome of corneal transplantation in a private institution in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar N

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nazri Omar,1,2 Charbel T Bou Chacra,1 Khalid F Tabbara1,3,4 1The Eye Center and The Eye Foundation for Research in Ophthalmology, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Malaysia; 3Department of Ophthalmology, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4The Wilmer Ophthalmological Institute of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Background: The aim of this work was to describe the indications, complications, and outcomes of penetrating keratoplasty (PKP in Saudi Arabia. Methods: In a retrospective, noncomparative interventional case series, the medical records of patients who underwent PKP from January 2000 to December 2008 and had a minimum follow-up of 6 months were reviewed. All corneas were obtained from eye banks in the US. Indications, complications, and outcomes of surgery were recorded. This study was approved by the institutional review board. Results: Eighty-five consecutive eyes were included in this study. There were 52 (61.2% males and 33 (38.8% females. The median age was 35.0 years (range 3–85 years, and the median follow-up period was 24 months (range 6–108 months. The indications for PKP were keratoconus, bullous keratopathy, corneal scars, corneal dystrophy, and corneal regraft. The overall graft survival time was 88.9 months ± 4.9 months (mean ± standard error of mean, 95% confidence interval [CI] 79.4 months -98.4 months while the 3-year and 5-year cumulative survival rates were 90.7% and 84.3%, respectively. Surgical indication (P = 0.038, immune rejection (P < 0.001, preoperative corneal vascularization (P = 0.022, and perioperative high intraocular pressure (P = 0.032 were associated significantly with corneal graft failure in univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis reduced these significant associations to rejection (P < 0.001 and vascularization (P = 0.009. Relative risk for failure in rejected cornea was 16.22 (95% CI 4.99–52.69 and

  20. Frequency distribution of sickle cell anemia, sickle cell trait and sickle/beta-thalassemia among anemic patients in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsayid, Mohieldin; Al-Shehri, Mohammed Jahman; Alkulaibi, Yasser Abdullah; Alanazi, Abdullah; Qureshi, Shoeb

    2015-08-01

    Notwithstanding, the growing incidence of sickle cell hemoglobinopathies (SCH) such as sickle cell anemia (SCA) or sickle cell disease, sickle/beta-thalassemia; the exact prevalence remains obscure in Saudi Arabia. Hence, this study is an attempt to determine the frequency of SCA and sickle cell trait (SCT) among all anemic patients with SCH treated at the King Abdul-Aziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Furthermore, the hemoglobin (Hb) S and other Hb patterns (Hb AS and Hb F) were also estimated in SCA and SCT patients. Results of Hb capillary electrophoresis performed on all patients with SCH from January 2011 to December 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. Of a total of 3332 patient data analyzed, 307 were anemic patients (58% males and 42% females) with SCH. The sickling test showed all the patients to be positive. Hb electrophoresis revealed the incidence of 96.7%, 3.3%, and 0% of the patients suffered from SCA, SCT and sickle/beta-thalassemia, respectively. Patients with SCA had a higher level of Hb F and showed no crisis when compared with other SCA patients who had lower or no Hb F levels. SCA is relatively frequent among males (56.4%) than females out of all patients with SCH. The SCA incidence was more common (48.5%) among children, frequency of SCT among adult age group was 1.6%, while sickle/beta-thalassemia was 0%.

  1. Developing a Career Resource for College Students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkin, Laurence; Atiyeh, Naim

    With the development of Career Oasis, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM ) has pioneered the use of computer-based career guidance in Saudi Arabia. KFUPM contracted with Verbal Media, LLC, an American consulting company, to create a resource that would be available in both Arabic and English, in both online and paper-and-pencil…

  2. Do Saudi EFL Teachers Promote Creativity in Their Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qahtani, Abdulaziz Ali

    2016-01-01

    Despite the efforts made by the Ministry of Education in Saudi Arabia, there is still much to be done in order to nourish creativity in schools. According to a number of studies, there is an urgent need to reconsider the role of creativity in the current educational programmes because there is an increasing gap between the reality of the…

  3. Exploring Pedagogical Leadership in Early Years Education in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alameen, Lubna; Male, Trevor; Palaiologou, Ioanna

    2015-01-01

    The empirical research for this paper was undertaken with leaders of early years setting in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The investigation sought to establish to what extent it was possible to behave in line with the concept of pedagogical leadership in the twenty-first century in an Arab Muslim monarchy, dominated by Islam, where directive…

  4. Developing Saudi EEF Students' Oral Skills: An Integrative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljumah, Fahad Hamad

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the problems of EFL/ESL university students' unwillingness to speak and take part in class discussions. Saudi students find it inappropriate to speak in class because of their fear to be seen as verbally challenging their teachers' views openly and publicly. Even when they do, they speak a little. This leads to frustration…

  5. Estimation of genetic diversity between three Saudi sheep breeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-14

    Oct 14, 2015 ... 1Faculty of Art and Science Raniah Branch, University of Taif, Raniah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. 2Comission for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, ... The cluster analysis shows that Najdi breed is genetically different from both Harri and Awassi and that some Harri individuals showed genetic ...

  6. Genetics similarity among four breeds of goat in Saudi Arabia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phylogeny analysis using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers was performed for studying genetic variation in four Saudi Arabia goat breeds, namely: Harri, Ardi, Habsi and Masri. Six goats from Harri breed, four each from both Ardi and Habsi breeds and five from Masri breed were used for the experiment.

  7. Higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KRAS mutation is widely accepted as a key factor in colorectal tumorigenesis. Although KRAS mutation is widely studied in CRC limited data are available about mutation rates and spectrum in CRC from developing countries like Saudi Arabia where epidemiological features of the disease are different. We studied ...

  8. The contribution of the Saudi woman in economic development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haga Elimam

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the study is to analyze the contribution of Saudi woman in economic development of the country. This report develops an understanding of women contributions towards economic development. The method used to analyze the data was Pearson correlation. Through correlation we can determine the relationship between the variables. The study was a quantitative study. The data for five years was taken. Hypotheses development proceeded by focusing on labor work force participation, literacy rate of adult females and GDP rate within Saudi Arabia. Analysis was done on the results and the findings confirmed that there is a significant relationship between the variables. This study was of exploratory nature, it is recommended that this research be expanded to a statistically valid base within Saudi Arabia and then expand the study to additional countries. The findings showed that there was a high significant relationship between women labor work force participation and GDP. Whereas, there was moderate significant relationship between labor work force and literacy rate. Hence, there is a positive relationship between women contribution and economic development. The research is conducted within the context of Saudi Arabia and has certain limitation with further directions of conducting research in related field to get more accurate results.

  9. Willingness of Saudi dental professionals to treat Hepatitis B virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 10.2% of the Saudi dentists were willing to treat HB infected patients. The other dentists (89.8%) were unwilling to provide dental care for HB infected patients. Although 94.5% of the surveyed dentists were vaccinated against HBV, the main reason behind the refusal to treat HB infected patients (92.3%) was the risk of ...

  10. Teaching English for Specific Purposes: Attitudes among Saudi Engineering Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqahtani, Majed Ali

    2015-01-01

    Attitude is considered as one of the most crucial factors for learning a second or foreign language for a specific purpose. It plays a major role in arousing student's interest and motivation towards learning. The main purpose for conducting this research is to identify the attitude among engineering students in Saudi Arabia towards learning…

  11. Prostate carcinoma: Comparative study of Saudi Arabian and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: A recent Saudi Arabian series on prostate carcinoma directed attention to the urgent need for worldwide comparative studies and accumulation of data on this disease. This necessitated comparing of my West African data with those of that Middle Eastern population. Method: A 30-year retrospective study was carried ...

  12. Professional Values Among Female Nursing Students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allari, Rabia S; Ismaile, Samantha; Househ, Mowafa

    2017-01-01

    Professional values are essential to nursing practice because they guide standards for working, provide a structure for evaluating behavior, and influence decisions making. The purpose of this study is to explore the perception of Saudi female nursing students on professional values and to assess the correlation between their perception of professional values in relation to their year of academic studies. We used a cross-sectional descriptive study where a survey was administered to 150 Saudi female nurses living in Riyadh. Results show that Saudi female nurses have a high perception of professional values relating to confidentiality, privacy, moral and legal rights, health and safety, and the work environment. Whereas Saudi nursing students have a low perception for participating in professional nursing activities, utilizing research in practice, peer review, public policy, and engaging in on-going self-evaluation. There was positive correlation between different professional values and academic years. The highest correlations were for the items related to caring and trust more than activism because nursing students at higher academic levels viewed the relationship with patients as more important than advancing health care systems through public policy, research, and professional organizations. In conclusion, nursing program administrators should put emphasis on improving the development of professional values through a role modeling approach to promote activism and professional values through the arrangement of meetings, exchange forums, and conferences with other nurses, managers, policy makers, innovators, and researchers within the nursing field.

  13. Saudi Continuous Professional Development and Leadership Skills Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsughayyer, Arwa

    2016-01-01

    Higher education in Saudi Arabia has undergone major reforms over the past decade. Investment in leadership development has received particular focus by policymakers. Little is known about leaders and their participations in professional development (PD) programs and effective leadership skills. Therefore, this study examined, using a quantitative…

  14. Principals' Perceptions of the School Counsellor Role in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Nawal G.; Riddick, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Many factors in Saudi society have led to a need for counselling services in educational institutions. However, concerns remain that the role of school counsellors in that setting is unclear. An aim of this study was to determine the perceptions of principals concerning the actual and ideal role of intermediate girls school counsellors in Saudi…

  15. Emirati, Omani and Saudi Students' Academic Literacy Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Murshidi, Ghadah

    2014-01-01

    The study investigated the academic literacy socialization of students at U.S. universities from the Gulf Region--Oman, Saudi Arabia, and United Arab Emirates (UAE). International students were contacted and asked if they would participate in the project. Fifty three students responded to the survey and interview, 77% of the respondents were male…

  16. Saudi Arabia: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-22

    protector of Sunni Arab interests in Syria while pursuing Saudi national interests in Syria relative to Iran and fellow Sunni states such as Turkey and...aggressive commitment to alternative energy sources, especially solar and nuclear power, and increasing the Kingdom’s share of global oil production.” 101

  17. Geomatics Education in Saudi Arabia: Status, Challenges and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aina, Yusuf Adedoyin

    2009-01-01

    Geospatial technology has been identified as one of the three most important emerging fields along with nanotechnology and biotechnology. The application of the technology is expected to grow and become more diversified in the coming years. In Saudi Arabia, the utilization of geotechnology is growing but still limited compared to the Western…

  18. Identifying Twitter influencer profiles for health promotion in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalawi, Yousef; Sixsmith, Jane

    2017-06-01

    New media platforms, such as Twitter, provide the ideal opportunity to positively influence the health of large audiences. Saudi Arabia has one of the highest number of Twitter users of any country, some of whom are very influential in setting agendas and contributing to the dissemination of ideas. Those opinion leaders, both individuals and organizations, influential in the new media environment have the potential to raise awareness of health issues, advocate for health and potentially instigate change at a social level. To realize the potential of the new media platforms for public health, the function of opinion leaders is key. This study aims to identify and profile the most influential Twitter accounts in Saudi Arabia. Multiple measures, including: number of followers and four influence scores, were used to evaluate Twitter accounts. The data were then filtered and analysed using ratio and percentage calculations to identify the most influential users. In total, 99 Saudi Twitter accounts were classified, resulting in the identification of 25 religious men/women, 16 traditional media, 14 sports related, 10 new media, 6 political, 6 company and 4 health accounts. The methods used to identify the key influential Saudi accounts can be applied to inform profile development of Twitter users in other countries. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Pediatric intussusception in a Saudi Arabian tertiary hospital | Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of this, we reviewed the cases and management of intussusception, seen at Aseer Central Hospital over a 7-year period. Materials and methods: Thirty four pediatric patients admitted at Aseer Central Hospital over a 7-year period (from 1993 to 2000) at Aseer Central Hospital, Southwestern region of Saudi Arabia ...

  20. Faculty Perceptions of Transition Personnel Preparation in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhossan, Bandar A.; Trainor, Audrey A.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated to what extent faculty members include and value transition curricula in special education preparation programs in Saudi Arabia. A web-based survey was conducted and sent to special education professors across 20 universities. Descriptive statistics and a t-test analysis generated three main findings: (a) Institutions…

  1. Transition to knowledge-based economy in Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nour, S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the progress in transition to knowledge-based economy in Saudi Arabia. As for the methodology, this paper uses updated secondary data obtained from different sources. It uses both descriptive and comparative approaches and uses the OECD definition of knowledge-based economy and

  2. Antimicrobial activities of some Saudi Arabian herbal plants | Shahat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... methanol extracts of twenty-four species of sixteen plant families used in the traditional medicine by Saudi Arabian people for the treatment of numerous ailments of the microbial and non-microbial origin against four Gram-positive, four Gram-negative bacteria and four fungi and yeast using the agar well diffusion method.

  3. Bone turnover biomarkers in obese postmenopausal Saudi women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There is a high prevalence of diabetes mellitus type-2 (T2DM) and osteoporosis are problems worldwide. In this study, we evaluated the correlation between T2DM and bone turnover in diabetic obese postmenopausal Saudi women. Subjects and Methods: The present study included total of 65 T2-DM obese ...

  4. Saudi Aramco experience towards establishing Pipelines Integrity Management Systems (PIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AlAhmari, Saad A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-12-19

    Saudi Aramco pipelines network transports hydrocarbons to export terminals, processing plants and domestic users. This network faced several safety and operational-related challenges that require having a more effective Pipelines Integrity Management System (PIMS). Therefore Saudi Aramco decided to develop its PIMS on the basis of geographical information system (GIS) support through different phases, i.e., establishing the integrity management framework, risk calculation approach, conducting a gap analysis toward the envisioned PIMS, establishing the required scope of work, screening the PIMS applications market, and selecting suitable tools that satisfy expected deliverables, and implement PIMS applications. Saudi Aramco expects great benefits from implementing PIMS, e.g., enhancing safety, enhancing pipeline network robustness, optimizing inspection and maintenance expenditures, and facilitating pipeline management and the decision-making process. Saudi Aramco's new experience in adopting PIMS includes many challenges and lessons-learned associated with all of the PIMS development phases. These challenges include performing the gap analysis, conducting QA/QC sensitivity analysis for the acquired data, establishing the scope of work, selecting the appropriate applications and implementing PIMS. (author)

  5. Saudi Aramco experience towards establishing Pipelines Integrity Management System (PIMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Ahmari, Saad A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-07-01

    Saudi Aramco pipelines network transports hydrocarbons to export terminals, processing plants and domestic users. This network faced several safety and operational-related challenges that require having a more effective Pipelines Integrity Management System (PIMS). Therefore Saudi Aramco decided to develop its PIMS on the basis of geographical information system (GIS) support through different phases, i.e., establishing the integrity management framework, risk calculation approach, conducting a gap analysis toward the envisioned PIMS, establishing the required scope of work, screening the PIMS applications market, and selecting suitable tools that satisfy expected deliverables, and implement PIMS applications. Saudi Aramco expects great benefits from implementing PIMS, e.g., enhancing safety, enhancing pipeline network robustness, optimizing inspection and maintenance expenditures, and facilitating pipeline management and the decision-making process. Saudi Aramco's new experience in adopting PIMS includes many challenges and lessons-learned associated with all of the PIMS development phases. These challenges include performing the gap analysis, conducting QA/QC sensitivity analysis for the acquired data, establishing the scope of work, selecting the appropriate applications and implementing PIMS. (author)

  6. toed lizard( Acanthodactylus schmidti) in Al- Qassim , Saudi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    mrt

    2012-10-10

    Oct 10, 2012 ... determine the site of infection and describe the mode of endogenous development of the parasite, which we tried to achieve in this present work. MATERIALS AND METHODS. A total number of 41 sandy fringed-toed lizards (A. schmidti) were captured from Al-Qassim area, Saudi Arabia, during 2008, and.

  7. Selected Lexical Patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lesa; Palmer, Jeffrey Levi; Reynolds, Wanette

    2012-01-01

    This combined paper will focus on the description of two selected lexical patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL): metaphor and metonymy in emotion-related signs (Young) and lexicalization patterns of objects and their derivational roots (Palmer and Reynolds). The over-arcing methodology used by both studies is detailed in Stephen and…

  8. Observations on Word Order in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Kristen; Mathur, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the syntactic level of the grammar of Saudi Arabian Sign Language by exploring some word orders that occur in personal narratives in the language. Word order is one of the main ways in which languages indicate the main syntactic roles of subjects, verbs, and objects; others are verbal agreement and nominal case morphology.…

  9. On Selected Phonological Patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Nozomi; Kozak, Viola

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on two selected phonological patterns that appear unique to Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL). For both sections of this paper, the overall methodology is the same as that discussed in Stephen and Mathur (this volume), with some additional modifications tailored to the specific studies discussed here, which will be expanded…

  10. On Selected Morphemes in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carla; Schneider, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Following a year of study of Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL), we are documenting our findings to provide a grammatical sketch of the language. This paper represents one part of that endeavor and focuses on a description of selected morphemes, both manual and non-manual, that have appeared in the course of data collection. While some of the…

  11. Genetic diversity of some Saudi barley ( Hordeum Vulgare L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessment of the genetic variability within barley landraces is fundamental for barley breeding. In this study, 16 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers were used to characterize selected six barley landraces from different cultivated regions in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) (Gizan, Bahah, Taif, Asser, Qassem and Hail) ...

  12. Saudi Arabia: Background and U.S. Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-20

    were elevated to the line of succession at the expense of senior members of their fathers ’ generation. Crown Prince Mohammed bin Nayef has retained...princes, and four daughters . Analysts of past Saudi succession dynamics often referred to King Fahd and his younger full brothers as the “Sudayri Seven...

  13. Estimation of genetic diversity between three Saudi sheep breeds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The genetic variation of Najdi, Harri and Awassi breeds of Saudi sheep prevailing in Raniah province of Makka district were assessed and compared to Sudanese Desert sheep using random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase cahin reaction (RAPD-PCR) technique. Five primers successfully amplified distinguishable ...

  14. Higher prevalence of KRAS mutations in colorectal cancer in Saudi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Talha Bader

    2014-02-07

    Feb 7, 2014 ... trum in CRC from developing countries like Saudi Arabia where epidemiological features of the disease are different. ..... effective staging. Conflict of interest. The authors declare no conflicts of interest. Funding was nei- ther sought nor received for this study from any source. Authors' contributions.

  15. Bronchiolitis in Abha, Southwest Saudi Arabia: viral etiology and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the viral etiology and predictors for hospital admission of children with bronchiolitis in Abha city, southwest Saudi Arabia. Methods ... Results: Prematurity, chronic lung diseases, atopic dermatitis, pure formula feeding, passive smoking and age = one year were significant predictors of admission.

  16. Saudis trust and confidence in information sources about chemical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Public health officials recognize a direct link between health problems and exposure to these chemicals. To communicate information on chemical pollution health risks effectively, policy makers must know population source of information and the confidence level in this information. This study investigated the Saudis ratings ...

  17. Counter-terrorism strategies in Indonesia, Algeria and Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, R.; Hasan, Noorhaidi; Hendriks, B.; Janssen, F.

    2012-01-01

    This report is the result of a year-long study, conducted from March 2010 to March 2011, of the counter-terrorist strategies of three countries: Indonesia, Algeria and Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to acquire insight into the counter-terrorist strategies of these countries, to analyse

  18. Nursing in Saudi Arabia: Reflections on the experiences of South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the study was to describe and reflect on the lived experiences of the South African nurses residing and working in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual design with a phenomenological approach was adopted. Data were collected by means of individual ...

  19. Challenges to Saudi medical education in the third millennium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad A Al-Muhanna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Medical education began in Saudi Arabia in 1969 when King Saud University, the first medical school was established. Since then globalization has brought numerous challenges. In this paper, we review the status of medical education and its expected future projects.

  20. [Male sexual and reproductive health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa-Marin, Sandra C; Vásquez-Salazar, Edwin A

    2012-01-01

    Analysing scientific publications about male sexual and reproductive health in Colombia during the last two decades and determining the main findings about knowledge regarding the topic in Colombia. A systematic review was made of scientific publications in international databases concerned with male sexual and reproductive health in Colombia. Inclusion criteria concerned research concerning heterosexual males or men and women from 1990 to 2010 in both English and Spanish. Sexual health has mainly been approached quantitatively and, more recently, qualitatively. Only 4 (12.5 %) of the 32 articles analysed dealt with an adult population; most were orientated towards a younger population (i.e. school and university students) who were questioned about their knowledge and perception of risk behaviour and conduct regarding sexual and reproductive health; no articles were found which inquired about older males' sexual health, only 1 article explored aspects related to erectile dysfunction and none emphasised cultural aspects related to a particular region. Few studies were found concerning male sexual health; health policy and services were centred on female needs, thereby limiting male participation and/or identifying their needs in this area. Including cultural diversity and gender, especially from a male perspective, represents a challenge for the integral design of sexual and reproductive health programmes and services in Colombia.

  1. Overview of Human Brucellosis in Aseer region, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Paul

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Brucellosis is a common zoonotic disease of the Middle Eastern countries. Acute cases of brucellosis are often treated as cases of Pyrexia of unknown origin. Aims The main aim of this study is to compare the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory findings of the 42 culture positive cases of Brucella. Methods Forty two culture positive cases of Brucella were obtained from both in -patients and outpatients with a history of pyrexia over a period of two years (Nov 2014-Nov 2016. The patients' files were examined retrospectively for the history, clinical features, and lab findings. Results The prevalence of brucellosis was calculated to be 11.1 per cent as 42 cases were positive for brucellosis out of 377 of PUO cases Of the 42 cultures positive patients the percentage of males (57.1 per cent were almost equal to the females(42.8 per cent. The mean±S.D age was 28.5±13.65. 28.5 per cent had a history of livestock associations (Chi-square 3.8889, a p-value of 0.048607 which was statistically significant. 26.2 per cent had a history of raw milk and dairy produce intake (Chi-Square 2.6276, p-value of 0.105023 this was not statistically significant. 9.5 per cent had a family history of brucellosis; this association was not statistically significant as well (chi-square statistic 1.8651, p-value of 0.172034. 61.9 per cent presented as acute cases, 30.9 per cent of sub-acute cases and 7.1 per cent as chronic cases respectively. The pre- dominant clinical symptom was Fever (100 per cent with the commonest clinical signs being the osteoarticular signs (30.9 per cent. Raised ESR and CRP positives were seen in 34 cases (80.9 per cent and 23 cases (55 per cent respectively followed by Anaemia in 22 cases (52.3 per cent. Forty two cases were blood culture positive. All the cases were sensitive to the recommended regimen of Doxycycline and streptomycin. Conclusion Brucellosis is still a major health problem in the Middle Eastern countries especially

  2. Gender differences in learning styles and academic performance of medical students in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzhat, Ayesha; Salem, Raneem Osama; Al Hamdan, Nasser; Ashour, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Teachers at medical school are often faced with challenges of improving student satisfaction with the learning environment. On the other hand, education in the medical field is very competitive and medical students are exposed to diverse methods of teaching. Students adapt specific learning styles to keep pace with the information delivered to them in their institutions. The aim of this study is to know the differences in learning styles between male and female students, and the effect it has on academic performance. The VARK Questionnaire version 7.0 (Visual, Aural, Read/Write and Kinesthetic) was administered to the fourth year and fifth year medical students at King Saud Bin Abdul Aziz University for Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine at King Fahad Medical City, Saudi Arabia for determining the preferred learning methods of students participating in this study. The learning styles were then compared to cumulative grade point average (GPA) obtained by the students. The dominant learning style preference of students was multimodal. Among students who preferred unimodal preference, aural and kinesthetic preference was predominant for males and females. Moreover, Females had more diverse preferences than male students. Multimodal learners have higher cumulative GPAs when compared with the unimodal learners. This study revealed variation in learning style preferences among genders, and its implications on academic performance of medical students.

  3. Saudi Intermediate School EFL Teachers' Views in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia of the Multiple Intelligences Theory as an Inclusive Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kentab, Mohammad Yousef

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the researcher attempted to shed light on Saudi intermediate school EFL teachers' views of the multiple intelligences theory as an inclusive pedagogy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of multiple intelligences on Saudi intermediate students' learning of EFL. The study also tried to illustrate the main…

  4. Exploring the Mismatch between Skills and Jobs for Women in Saudi Arabia in Technical and Vocational Areas: The Views of Saudi Arabian Private Sector Business Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, John R.; Al-Shetaiwi, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Gives an overview of women in both general and technical-vocational education and employment in Saudi Arabia. Reports on a survey of 220 private business managers: 83% indicated that Saudi women had limited participation in technical jobs; 63% suggested that vocational-technical education did not promote women's participation. (Contains 51…

  5. Male contraception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jing; Page, Stephanie T; Anderson, Richard A

    2014-08-01

    Clear evidence shows that many men and women would welcome new male methods of contraception, but none have become available. The hormonal approach is based on suppression of gonadotropins and thus of testicular function and spermatogenesis, and has been investigated for several decades. This approach can achieve sufficient suppression of spermatogenesis for effective contraception in most men, but not all; the basis for these men responding insufficiently is unclear. Alternatively, the non-hormonal approach is based on identifying specific processes in sperm development, maturation and function. A range of targets has been identified in animal models, and targeted effectively. This approach, however, remains in the pre-clinical domain at present. There are, therefore, grounds for considering that safe, effective and reversible methods of contraception for men can be developed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Quality of gastroenterology research published in Saudi Arabian scientific journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaghrabi, Majed M; Alamoudi, Abdullah S; Radi, Suhaib A; Merdad, Anas A; Makhdoum, Ahmad M; Batwa, Faisal A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine has established itself in the field of gastroenterology. In this study we aim to assess the types of study designs of gastroenterology-related articles published in Saudi scientific journals. An online review using PubMed was carried out to review gastroenterology-related articles published in six Saudi medical journals in the time interval from 2003 to 2012. To classify the level of evidence in these articles we employed the Oxford's levels of evidence. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare the levels of evidence between published articles. A total of 721 gastroenterology-related articles were reviewed, of which 591 articles met our inclusion criteria; 80.7% were level IV. The three most common types of studies we encountered were cross-sectional (33.9%), case reports (27.9%), and case series (18.8%). Forty-three percent of the published research was in the field of hepatobiliary and spleen. The total number of articles increased from 260 articles in the 1 st 5-year period (2003-2007) to 330 in the 2 nd period (2008-2012). However, no statistically significant difference in the level of evidence was noted. In Annals of Saudi Medicine Journal, articles with level II increased from 0 to 10% with a P value 0.02. In our review of gastroenterology-related published articles in Saudi scientific journals, we observed an increase in the quantity of articles with the quality and level of evidence remaining unchanged. Further research is recommended to explore different reasons affecting the volume and quality of gastroenterology-related research in Saudi scientific journals.

  7. Four viruses infecting figs in Western Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Y. ALDHEBIANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many diseases are compromising fig production in Saudi Arabia and in particular those caused by viruses. RT-PCR assays were conducted on 80 samples collected from four fig-growing provinces in the West Mecca region of Saudi Arabia, including the Fatima, Khulais, Rabigh and Alshifa valleys. Samples consisted of leaf tissues taken from caprifig and common fig trees. The presence of Fig mosaic virus (FMV, Fig leaf mottle-associated virus 1 (FLMaV-1, Fig leaf mottle-associated virus 2 (FLMaV-2 and Fig mild mottle-associated virus (FMMaV was assessed from the samples. RT-PCR results showed that all four viruses were present in the surveyed areas with different proportions of infection. Incidence was 69% of samples, with a peak of 80%, from the Alshifa and Fatima valleys, 60% from Rabigh and 55% from Khulais valley. FLMaV-1 was the prevailing virus (55% of samples, followed by FMV (34%, whereas FLMaV-2 (11% of samples and FMMaV (6% were less common. Most of the mosaic symptoms observed in surveyed fig orchards occurred with the presence of FMV. However, many other symptoms remained unexplained because of the arduous task of determining the involvement of other fig-infecting viruses with mosaic disease. This is the first report of FMMaV and FLMaV-2 in Saudi Arabia, and of FMV and FLMaV-1 in western Saudi Arabia. The virus status of this crop is probably compromised and a sanitation programme is required to produce healthy plant material in Saudi Arabia.

  8. Survey of awareness of diabetes mellitus among the Arar population, Northern Border Region of Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanazi, Aseel Menwer; Abo El-Fetoh, Nagah Mohamed; Alotaibi, Hanan Khalid; Alanazi, Khalid Ayed; Alotaibi, Banan Khalid; Alshammari, Sultan Majed; Alanazi, Saud Rteamy; Alhazmi, Meshari Dalaf; Alshammari, Yousef Talal; Alshammari, Zaid Qati

    2017-09-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is one of the most widely prevalent diseases in Saudi Arabia. Health education is considered an essential component to improve knowledge and change behavior. People affected by diabetes often have inadequate knowledge about the nature of diabetes, its risk factors and associated complication. The aim of this study was to assess the awareness of the Arar population with various aspects of diabetes mellitus. A cross-sectional study was carried out in Arar city, the capital of the Northern Province of Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The study was carried out on Saudi nationals from different age groups that were selected by systematic random sampling. Data was collected by means of personal interview with the participants using a pre-designed questionnaire which was administered by the medical students for each diabetic patient. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 15, using descriptive statistics and Chi-square test. A total of 702 participants were interviewed, among them 201 (28.6%) males and 501 (71.4%) females, and most of them (77.8%) had high educational level, 10.4% were diabetics, 78.9% did not have regular checkup visits to the doctor and 58.5% did not perform any regular exercises, including walking, 60% thought that DM was due to partial or total decrease in insulin secretion and 12.4% thought that it was due to excess sweet eating. Additionally, 48.7% of the respondents thought that lack of exercise and obesity were the major risk factors of DM, 33.2% thought that it was a genetic disease. The majority (86.3) of the participants believed that the treatment of DM was a combination of healthy diet, exercise and medication and more than half (63.1%) said that weight loss and modification of life style were the most important preventive measures of DM. Regarding participants' knowledge about DM complications, 24.5% knew about retinopathy and loss of vision, 8.3% knew about retinopathy, loss of vision, low sensation and numbness in

  9. 56. Endoscopic vein graft harvest for coronary artery bypass surgery: Single center experience in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Algadheeb

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Open saphenous vein technique is the standard of care in patients undergoing coronary artery surgery (CABG worldwide and in Saudi Arabia. Endoscopic vein harvest (EVH is an innovative technique that have been recommended by the international society of minimally invasive surgery. Our aim in the current study is to review our preliminary data about endoscopic vein harvest. Would endoscopic vein harvest decrease the incidence of leg wound infections? This is a retrospective study of a single tertiary care center of 94 consecutive patients who underwent CABG with EVH. Preoperative associated risk factors were assessed. Postoperative follow up includes leg wound infection and patient satisfaction with EVH by using a telephone and/or a paper questionnaire. We had 94 consecutive patients who underwent CABG with EVH between October 2014 and October 2015, mean age was 56.7 (33–77 years, 91.5% were male, mean euro score II was 2.47%. The most common presentation was NSTEMI (39.4% followed by STEMI (26.6%, unstable angina (11.7% and stable angina (5.3%. Our cohort had the following characteristics: 85.1% were diabetic, 84% were hypertensive, 46.8% had dyslipidemia, 2.1% had CVA, 7.4% had Carotid artery disease, 2.1% had Congestive heart failure, 4.3% had any renal disease and 4.3% had previous PCI. Most of our patients received 3 grafts (44.7% followed by 4 grafts (42.6% of which only one leg was used for EVH (94.1%. Leg wound infection occurred in one patient only and in this case EVH was converted to open technique. A written and/or telephone questionnaire resulted in a high patient-satisfaction with the cosmetic outcome of EVH as well as very low grade of leg wound pain. EVH is a very promising innovative technique in patient undergoing CABG. Our patients were highly satisfied with their leg wound cosmetic outcome. In this single center experience, in Saudi Arabia, EVH is a promising innovative technique for saphenous vein harvest. It is highly

  10. Prevalence and pattern of lipid disorders in Saudi patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Shehri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was to assess the prevalence and patterns of dyslipidemia in Saudi patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease (CAD. Materials and Methods: This is a cross-sectional, hospital-based study, which was conducted on all Saudi patients who underwent coronary angiography under the author′s personal care and were found to have > 50% coronary stenosis. Fasting lipid profile was measured in all patients during the admission for the coronary angiography. Results: Two hundred and ninety-five patients were included in the study. The mean age (±Standard deviation was 55.1 ± 11, ranging from 17 to 86 years. The majority of patients were males: 229 (77.6%. Mean total cholesterol was 175.6 ± 47.6 mg/dl, mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C was 111.3 ± 40.3 mg/dl, mean high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C was 38.27 ± 9.5 mg/dl and mean triglyceride level was 141.8 ± 74.8 mg/dl. 21 (7.1% patients had normal coronary arteries, 107 (36.3% had one vessel disease, 78 (26.4% had two vessel disease and 89 (30.2% had three vessel disease. There was a significant correlation between the extent of CAD and age (P = 0.003, sex (P = 0.0002, total cholesterol (P = 0.02 and low HDL-C (P < 0.001. 21 (7.1% patients were asymptomatic, 110 (37.3% had stable angina, 127 (43.1% had none ST elevation acute coronary syndrome, 20 (6.8% had ST elevation myocardial infarction and 17 (5.7% had heart failure. There was also a significant correlation between age (P = 0.03, sex (P < 0.001, LDL-C (P = 0.005 and low HDL-C (P < 0.001 and the severity of CAD. Conclusion: Dyslipidemia is a very prevalent risk factor in Saudi patients with CAD. Low HDL-C was the most frequent lipid abnormality, which significantly impacts on the extent of the CAD.

  11. Level of Sedentary Behavior and Its Associated Factors among Saudi Women Working in Office-Based Jobs in Saudi Arabia.

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    Albawardi, Nada M; Jradi, Hoda; Almalki, Abdulla A; Al-Hazzaa, Hazzaa M

    2017-06-19

    Research in Saudi Arabia has revealed a shocking level of insufficiently physically active adults, particularly women. The risk of sedentary behavior will likely increase as the number of women with office-based jobs increases. The aim of this study is to determine the level of sedentary behavior, and its associated factors, among Saudi women working office-based jobs in the city of Riyadh. A cross-sectional study of 420 Saudi female employees at 8 office-based worksites were measured to determine body mass index and were given a self-administered survey to evaluate their level of physical activity and sedentary behavior. Median sitting time on work days was 690 min per day (interquartile range, IQR 541-870), with nearly half accumulated during work hours, and 575 min per day (IQR 360-780) on non-work days. Predictors of work day sitting time were level of education, number of children, and working in the private sector. Number of children, whether they were single, and whether they lived in a small home were found to predict non-work day sitting time. This study identifies Saudi women in office-based jobs as a high-risk group for sedentary behavior. There is a need to promote physical activity at worksites and reduce prolonged sitting.

  12. Foreign Language Anxiety in Saudi Classroom: A Case Study of Saudi Tertiary Female Students in Prince Sattam University

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    Balla, Asjad Ahmed Saeed

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the level of anxiety due to learning English as a foreign language. It tries to answer these questions: (1) Is anxiety a factor in hindering English proficiency? (2) Does anxiety lead to fear of communication? (3) Which type of anxiety is high among tertiary level female Saudi students? The Foreign Language Anxiety…

  13. Quality of life in patients with skin diseases in central Saudi Arabia

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    Abolfotouh MA

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa A Abolfotouh,1 Mohammad S Al-Khowailed,1 Wijdan E Suliman,1 Deema A Al-Turaif,1 Eman Al-Bluwi,2 Hassan S Al-Kahtani21King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, King Saud Bin-Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, 2Dermatology Department, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: Previous national and international studies of quality of life (QoL in patients with skin diseases have revealed different levels of QoL impairment. The aims of this study were to assess QoL in patients with skin diseases in central Saudi Arabia using the newly validated Skindex-16 instrument and to determine the association between QoL in patients with skin disease, sociodemographic data, and disease characteristics.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in 283 adult patients who visited the outpatient dermatology clinics of King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, over 3 months. The patients were interviewed using a pretested Arabic version of the Skindex-16 to measure the effect of skin disorders on their QoL during the previous 7 days. Patient characteristics, medical history, and clinical findings were collected. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to relate the demographic and clinical characteristics to the percentage mean QoL score, and P # 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant.Results: QoL was good in 69% of the respondents, with a total percent mean score of 31.80 ± 20.16. The emotional domain was the most affected (mean percentage score 44.27 ± 27.06, followed by symptoms (31.45 ± 28.40 and functioning (14.61 ± 22.75. After adjustment for potential confounders, poorer QoL was significantly associated with female gender (P = 0.03, older age (P = 0.003, rural origin (P = 0.03, positive family history of the same lesion(s (P = 0.01, shorter duration of ≤ 6 months (P = 0.02, generalized spread (P ≤ 0.02, and lack of isotretinoin treatment (P = 0.02.Conclusion: The

  14. From barriers to bridges: An investigation on Saudi student mobility (2006-2009)

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    Denman, Brian D.; Hilal, Kholoud T.

    2011-08-01

    Globalisation is often thought to advocate for a single set of beliefs and customs and for a rejection of the need to protect regional cultures and traditions. In the aftermath of 9/11, the rift between Western and Arab cultures has deepened, and there is a patent need for cultural bridges to be built. The government of Saudi Arabia has, by increasing funding for higher education through grants and scholarships, enabled Saudi students to study at overseas universities. A number of non-Saudi students are also enrolled at Saudi Arabian universities. After a brief introduction to the cultural and educational history of the Arab region and Saudi identity, this article turns to contemporary higher education in Saudi Arabia. It introduces the King Abdullah Scholarship Programme and then goes on to present detailed enrolment data for 2006-2009, demonstrating trends and policy changes and identifying patterns in student mobility.

  15. COUNTRY-LEVEL SOCIOECONOMIC INDICATORS ASSOCIATED WITH SURVIVAL PROBABILITY OF BECOMING A CENTENARIAN AMONG OLDER EUROPEAN ADULTS: GENDER INEQUALITY, MALE LABOUR FORCE PARTICIPATION AND PROPORTIONS OF WOMEN IN PARLIAMENTS.

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    Kim, Jong In; Kim, Gukbin

    2017-03-01

    This study confirms an association between survival probability of becoming a centenarian (SPBC) for those aged 65 to 69 and country-level socioeconomic indicators in Europe: the gender inequality index (GII), male labour force participation (MLP) rates and proportions of seats held by women in national parliaments (PWP). The analysis was based on SPBC data from 34 countries obtained from the United Nations (UN). Country-level socioeconomic indicator data were obtained from the UN and World Bank databases. The associations between socioeconomic indicators and SPBC were assessed using correlation coefficients and multivariate regression models. The findings show significant correlations between the SPBC for women and men aged 65 to 69 and country-level socioeconomic indicators: GII (r=-0.674, p=0.001), MLP (r=0.514, p=0.002) and PWP (r=0.498, p=0.003). The SPBC predictors for women and men were lower GIIs and higher MLP and PWP (R 2=0.508, p=0.001). Country-level socioeconomic indicators appear to have an important effect on the probability of becoming a centenarian in European adults aged 65 to 69. Country-level gender equality policies in European counties may decrease the risk of unhealthy old age and increase longevity in elders through greater national gender equality; disparities in GII and other country-level socioeconomic indicators impact longevity probability. National longevity strategies should target country-level gender inequality.

  16. Ocular manifestations of xeroderma pigmentosum at a tertiary eye care center in Saudi Arabia.

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    Alfawaz, Abdullah M; Al-Hussain, Hailah M

    2011-01-01

    To study the clinical profile of Saudi cases of xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). This is a single-center, retrospective, consecutive case series of all cases of XP seen at King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital from January 1, 1986, to December 31, 2006. The main outcome measures were clinical features, visual outcome, and histopathologic findings. Of 33 patients initially included in this study, 6 were excluded from the final analysis because of either unconfirmed diagnosis of XP or insufficient follow up. The final analysis included 27 patients (14 female patients, 13 male patients). A history of consanguinity was present in the parents of one third of our patients. The age at onset of ocular complications ranged from 5 to 67 years (median age, 19 years). The number of patients with no light perception (NLP) increased from 1 patient (3.7%) at the initial visit to 5 patients (18.5%) at the last visit. In 13 of 27 patients (48.1%), conjunctival tumors were observed; 10 tumors were confirmed histopathologically to be squamous cell carcinomas. Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) was the most common histopathologic diagnosis of eyelid tumors and was noted in 4 patients (14.8%). Furthermore, 10 patients (37.0%) had a history of skin malignancy, and 5 patients (18.1%) had neurologic abnormalities. Patients with XP who presented to a tertiary eye care center in Saudi Arabia had a high percentage of consanguinity in parents and late onset of ocular complications. Additionally, XP behaved aggressively in both malignancy profile and visual outcome.

  17. Quality of sleep and well-being of health workers in Najran, Saudi Arabia.

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    Olawale, O Ogunsemi; Taiwo, O Afe; Hesham, Almohandes

    2017-01-01

    Health care involves taking care of other peoples' lives. Professionals in the field of health care are expected to be at their best all the time because mistakes or errors could be costly and sometimes irreversible. This study assessed the quality of sleep and well-being of health workers in Najran city, Saudi Arabia. It was a cross-sectional study done among health workers from different hospitals within the kingdom of Najran, Saudi Arabia. The subjects were administered questionnaire that contained sections on demographic and clinical characteristics, sleep quality, and section relating to well-being. One hundred and twenty-three health workers comprising 29 (23.6%) males and 94 (76.4%) females participated in this study. The majority of the workers 74 (60.2%) were nurses; a quarter were doctors while the remaining 13.6% accounted for other categories of health workers such as the pharmacist and laboratory technicians. Fifty-two (42.3%) of the workers were poor sleepers. Significantly (χ2 = 23.98, P = 0.000), majority of the subjects that were poor sleepers (84.6%) compared with the 42.3% of the good sleepers rated the last 12 months of their profession as a bit stressful or quite a bit stressful. Similarly, 46.2% of the workers that were poor sleepers significantly (χ2 = 24.69, P = 0.000) rated their ability to handle unexpected and difficult problems in their life as fair or poor compared with 14.1% of the good sleepers. Health workers expressed some level of stress in their professional life, and a good proportion of the subjects were poor sleepers. There is, therefore, the need to establish a program within the health-care organization to address social, physical, and psychological well-being at work.

  18. The Pattern of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in a Single Tertiary Center in Saudi Arabia

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    Mohammad H. Al-Hemairi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA is the most common chronic arthritis in children. Our aim is to describe demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics and treatment of JIA patients followed up in Pediatric Rheumatology clinic in a tertiary center in Saudi Arabia. Methods. Medical records of all patients who are followed up between January 2007 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected about demographic, clinical, and laboratory features and treatment. Results. Total patients were 82, males were 31 (37.8%, and mean age of JIA onset was 7.1 ± 3.6 yr. Mean follow-up duration was 2.67±1.6 yr. Systemic onset JIA (SoJIA was the commonest (36.5%, followed by polyarticular in 29.2% and oligoarticular in 28%. Large and small joints are involved in 76 (92% and 30 (36.6%, respectively. Main extra-articular feature was fever in 34 (41.4%. Uveitis was diagnosed in 7 (8.5% and in 5 (21.7% of oligoarticular JIA. Anemia was found in 49 (59.7%, high ESR in 45 (54.8%, and leukocytosis and thrombocytosis in 33 (40.2%. Positive ANA was found in 30 (36.5% mainly in oligoarticular subtype as 12 (52% patients (out of 23 had this positive test. 9 patients (10.9% required NSAIDs only, 6 patients (7.3% required NSAIDs and intra-articular steroids only, and 19 (23% required NSAIDs, methotrexate, steroids, and biologics. Conclusion. SoJIA is the most common JIA subtype in our study. A population based rather than a single center study will give more details about JIA characteristics in Saudi Arabia

  19. Thiamine and its phosphate esters in relation to cardiometabolic risk factors in Saudi Arabs.

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    Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Al-Attas, Omar S; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Alokail, Majed S; Abd-Alrahman, Sherif H; Sabico, Shaun

    2013-09-23

    Thiamine deficiency has suggested to be linked to several insulin-resistance complications. In this study, we aim to associate circulating thiamine levels among cardiometabolic parameters in an Arab cohort using a simple, sensitive, rapid and selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method that has recently been developed. A total of 236 randomly selected, consenting Saudi adult participants (166 males and 70 females) were recruited and screened for the presence of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) using the modified National Cholesterol Education Program-Adult Treatment Panel III definition. Blood thiamine and its derivatives were quantified using HPLC. A total of 140 participants (53.9%) had MetS. The levels of thiamine and its derivatives of those with MetS were not significantly different from those without. However, hypertensive subjects had significantly higher urinary thiamine (P = 0.03) as well as significantly lower levels of thiamine diphosphate (TDP) (P = 0.01) and total thiamine (P = 0.02) than the normotensive subjects, even after adjusting for age and body mass index (BMI). Furthermore, age- and BMI-matched participants with elevated blood glucose levels had significantly lower levels of thiamine monophosphate (P = 0.020), TDP (P < 0.001) and total thiamine (P < 0.001) and significantly elevated levels of urinary thiamine (P = 0.005) compared to normoglycemic participants. Low thiamine levels are associated with elevated blood glucose and hypertension in Saudi adults. Determination of thiamine status may be considered and corrected among patients with, or at high risk for, MetS, but the question whether thiamine deficiency correction translates to improved cardiometabolic status needs further longitudinal investigation.

  20. Childhood blindness at a school for the blind in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

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    Kotb, Amgad A; Hammouda, Ehab F; Tabbara, Khalid F

    2006-02-01

    To determine the major causes of eye diseases leading to visual loss and blindness among children attending a school for the blind in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A total of 217 school children with visual disabilities attending a school for the blind in Riyadh were included. All children were brought to The Eye Center, Riyadh, and had complete ophthalmologic examinations including visual acuity testing, biomicroscopy, ophthalmoscopy, tonometry and laboratory investigations. In addition, some patients were subjected to electroretinography (ERG), electrooculography (EOG), measurement of visual evoked potentials (VEP), and laboratory work-up for congenital disorders. There were 117 male students with an age range of 6-19 years and a mean age of 16 years. In addition, there were 100 females with an age range of 6-18 years and a mean age of 12 years. Of the 217 children, 194 (89%) were blind from genetically determined diseases or congenital disorders and 23 (11%) were blind from acquired diseases. The major causes of bilateral blindness in children were retinal degeneration, congenital glaucoma, and optic atrophy. The most common acquired causes of childhood blindness were infections and trauma. The etiological pattern of childhood blindness in Saudi Arabia has changed from microbial keratitis to genetically determined diseases of the retina and optic nerve. Currently, the most common causes of childhood blindness are genetically determined causes. Consanguineous marriages may account for the autosomal recessive disorders. Public education programs should include information for the prevention of trauma and genetic counseling. Eye examinations for preschool and school children are mandatory for the prevention and cure of blinding disorders.