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Sample records for saudi arabian y-chromosome

  1. Distinctiveness of Saudi Arabian EFL Learners

    OpenAIRE

    Manssour Habbash; Srinivasa Rao Idapalapati

    2016-01-01

    In view of the increasing concern among English language teachers dealing with students from Saudi Arabia, as it manifests in TESOL community discussions, about the uniqueness of Saudi Arabian EFL learners, this paper attempts to document the outcome of a study of their distinctiveness from the perspective of expatriate teachers working for PYPs (Preparatory Year Programs) in Saudi Arabia. This study examines the distinctiveness with regard to the learning attitudes of Saudi students that are...

  2. Distinctiveness of Saudi Arabian EFL Learners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manssour Habbash

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In view of the increasing concern among English language teachers dealing with students from Saudi Arabia, as it manifests in TESOL community discussions, about the uniqueness of Saudi Arabian EFL learners, this paper attempts to document the outcome of a study of their distinctiveness from the perspective of expatriate teachers working for PYPs (Preparatory Year Programs in Saudi Arabia. This study examines the distinctiveness with regard to the learning attitudes of Saudi students that are often cultivated by the culture and academic environment in their homeland. Employing an emic approach for collecting the required data an analysis was carried out in light of the other studies on ‘education’ in Saudi Arabia that have particular reference to the factors that can positively influence student motivation, student success and the academic environment. The findings were used in constructing the rationale behind such distinctiveness. Assuming that the outcome of the discussion on the findings of this exploration can be helpful for teachers in adapting their teaching methodology and improving their teacher efficacy in dealing with students both from the kingdom and in the kingdom, some recommendations are made. Keywords: China Distinctiveness, Saudi Arabian University context, Expatriate teachers’ perspective, Distinctiveness Theory

  3. Medication burden of Saudi Arabian women receiving antiresorptive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sadat-Ali M; Al-Shafie B; Al-Omran AS; Azam MQ

    2012-01-01

    Mir Sadat-Ali,1 Bader Al-Shafie,2 Abdallah S Al-Omran,1 Mohammed Q Azam11Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmacy, King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, Saudi ArabiaBackground and purpose: Osteoporosis is common in the Saudi Arabian population, and its successful treatment requires full compliance. Patients who require antiresorptive therapy, such as oral bisphosphonates, may suffer from other disease...

  4. Saudi Arabian ICU safety culture and nurses' attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alayed, Abdulrahman S; Lööf, Helena; Johansson, Unn-Britt

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine nurses' attitudes towards safety culture in six Saudi Arabian intensive care units (ICUs). The study is descriptive with a cross-sectional design. The Safety Attitude Questionnaire (SAQ)-ICU version was distributed and 216 completed questionnaires were returned. The findings provide a basis for further research on Saudi Arabian ICU safety culture. This study showed that the SAQ-ICU can be used to measure safety climate to identify areas for improvement according to nurse attitudes and perceptions. Findings indicate that ICU safety culture is an important issue that hospital managers should prioritise. The SAQ-ICU questionnaire, used to measure safety climate in Saudi Arabian ICUs, identifies service strengths and improvement areas according to attitudes and perceptions. To the knowledge, this is the first study to use SAQ to examine nurses' safety culture attitudes in Saudi Arabian ICUs. The present findings provide a baseline and further details about Saudi Arabian ICU safety. Study participants represented nine nationalities, indicating the nursing workforce's diversity, which is expected to continue in the future. Such a nursing cultural heterogeneity calls for further studies to examine and evaluate attitudes and values to improve ICU safety culture.

  5. Prostate carcinoma: Comparative study of Saudi Arabian and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: A recent Saudi Arabian series on prostate carcinoma directed attention to the urgent need for worldwide comparative studies and accumulation of data on this disease. This necessitated comparing of my West African data with those of that Middle Eastern population. Method: A 30-year retrospective study was carried ...

  6. Antimicrobial activities of some Saudi Arabian herbal plants | Shahat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... methanol extracts of twenty-four species of sixteen plant families used in the traditional medicine by Saudi Arabian people for the treatment of numerous ailments of the microbial and non-microbial origin against four Gram-positive, four Gram-negative bacteria and four fungi and yeast using the agar well diffusion method.

  7. Selected Lexical Patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lesa; Palmer, Jeffrey Levi; Reynolds, Wanette

    2012-01-01

    This combined paper will focus on the description of two selected lexical patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL): metaphor and metonymy in emotion-related signs (Young) and lexicalization patterns of objects and their derivational roots (Palmer and Reynolds). The over-arcing methodology used by both studies is detailed in Stephen and…

  8. Observations on Word Order in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprenger, Kristen; Mathur, Gaurav

    2012-01-01

    This article focuses on the syntactic level of the grammar of Saudi Arabian Sign Language by exploring some word orders that occur in personal narratives in the language. Word order is one of the main ways in which languages indicate the main syntactic roles of subjects, verbs, and objects; others are verbal agreement and nominal case morphology.…

  9. On Selected Phonological Patterns in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomita, Nozomi; Kozak, Viola

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on two selected phonological patterns that appear unique to Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL). For both sections of this paper, the overall methodology is the same as that discussed in Stephen and Mathur (this volume), with some additional modifications tailored to the specific studies discussed here, which will be expanded…

  10. On Selected Morphemes in Saudi Arabian Sign Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Carla; Schneider, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Following a year of study of Saudi Arabian Sign Language (SASL), we are documenting our findings to provide a grammatical sketch of the language. This paper represents one part of that endeavor and focuses on a description of selected morphemes, both manual and non-manual, that have appeared in the course of data collection. While some of the…

  11. Saudi Arabian Women Dispel Myths and Stereotypes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanley, Delinda C

    2001-01-01

    ..., "Brilliant Saudi Woman Breaks the Stereotype." It soon dawned on me, however, that it's the Western stereotype of the veiled Saudi woman hidden away from modern-day opportunities that needs to change. No one I met felt oppressed or excluded. On the contrary, every woman I interviewed personified the fact that many Saudi women have received...

  12. Collectivists' Decision-Making: Saudi Arabian Graduate Students' Study Abroad Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakaboski, Tamara; Perez-Velez, Karla; Almutairi, Yousef

    2017-01-01

    The authors in this qualitative study explored how Saudi Arabian students selected a teaching focused research institution by examining Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and U.S. national influences, institutional factors, and personal influencers. Despite the continued rise in Saudi Arabian students studying at U.S. universities, limited published research…

  13. Desulfurization of Saudi Arabian crudes by oxidation-extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Otaibi, Raja L; Liu, Dong; Hou, Xulian; Song, Linhua; Li, Qingyin; Li, Mengfei; Almigrin, Hamid O; Yan, Zifeng

    The oxidation-extraction desulfurization of Saudi Arabian crudes was conducted with hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid oxidation system. The selection of extractant, the optimization of oxidation-extraction conditions, and the exploration of desulfurization mechanism were studied. As DMF was used as the extractant, the optimal desulfurization rate of 35.11 % and oil recovery of 95 % were obtained at 70 °C with the molar ratio of peracetic acid to sulfur of 8:1, the molar ratio of acetic acid to hydrogen peroxide of 2:1 and the volume ratio of extractant to oil of 1:1. The desulfurization effect of different fractions in the treated Saudi Arabian crudes was found to obey the following order: gasoline-diesel fraction >VGO fraction >VR fraction, due to different types and structures of sulfur compounds. The oil quality was less affected and most sulfides were mainly extracted via DMF.

  14. Contraception: attitudes and experiences of Saudi Arabian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Turki, Haifa Abdulaziz

    2011-02-01

    We carried out a survey to find the contraception practices and experiences of Saudi Arabian females. A preset questionnaire was developed, and married Saudi females were asked to answer the questionnaire. Between July and December 2008, 215 women completed the questionnaire. The average age was 37.6 ± 9.1 years. One hundred and sixty one of the women said they were using contraception. Fifty-nine (36.6%) said they were using oral contraception pills (OCP) and 32 (19.9%) said they were using intra-uterine contraceptive devices (IUCDs). One hundred and twenty-seven (78.8%) of the women were satisfied with the contraception they were using. We found that a majority of Saudi women are using contraception methods but without medical advice.

  15. Vitamin D status and breast cancer in Saudi Arabian women: case-control study1234

    OpenAIRE

    Yousef, Fatimah M.; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Kang, Paul T; Hakim, Iman A; Going, Scott; Yousef, Jehad M.; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M.; Taha A. Kumosani; Thomson, Cynthia A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of vitamin D in breast cancer prevention is equivocal. Saudi Arabian women may be at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency because of a darker skin type and a greater likelihood of reduced ultraviolet B radiation exposure. Data regarding the vitamin D status of Saudi Arabian women and its relation to breast cancer risk are lacking.

  16. Consanguinity among the Saudi Arabian population.

    OpenAIRE

    el-Hazmi, M A; al-Swailem, A R; Warsy, A S; al-Swailem, A M; Sulaimani, R; al-Meshari, A A

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted on 3212 Saudi families to investigate the prevalence of consanguineous marriages. The families were interviewed and the information on the relationship between the husband and wife was obtained. The overall rate of consanguinity shows that 57.7% of the families screened were consanguineous. The most frequent were first cousin marriages (28.4%) followed by distant relative marriages (15.2%) and second cousin marriages (14.6%). The families were grouped according to the...

  17. Consanguinity among the Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Hazmi, M A; al-Swailem, A R; Warsy, A S; al-Swailem, A M; Sulaimani, R; al-Meshari, A A

    1995-01-01

    This study was conducted on 3212 Saudi families to investigate the prevalence of consanguineous marriages. The families were interviewed and the information on the relationship between the husband and wife was obtained. The overall rate of consanguinity shows that 57.7% of the families screened were consanguineous. The most frequent were first cousin marriages (28.4%) followed by distant relative marriages (15.2%) and second cousin marriages (14.6%). The families were grouped according to the province of their origin and the consanguinity rates were calculated accordingly. There were slight differences in the consanguinity rates in the five provinces, which ranged from 52.1% to 67.7%. In each province first cousin marriages were the most frequently encountered pattern, ranging from 17.9% to 40.9%. The inbreeding coefficient (F) was calculated for each province and ranged from 0.020 to 0.030. Within each province, there were several significant differences among the populations in the different areas. The highest rate of consanguinity was 80.6% in Samtah and the lowest rate was around 34% in Abha in the South Western province. These results place Saudi Arabia among the countries of the world with a high rate of consanguinity. The possible consequences of increased consanguinity are presented and discussed. PMID:7473654

  18. Indoor radon measurements in dwellings of four Saudi Arabian cities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Jarallah, M.I. E-mail: mibrahim@kfupm.edu.sa; Fazal-ur-Rehman; Abu-Jarad, F.; Al-Shukri, A

    2003-06-01

    An indoor radon survey of a total of 269 dwellings, with one dosimeter per house, distributed in four Saudi Arabian cities was carried out. The objective of this survey was to carry out indoor radon measurements of two cities in the Eastern Province, Khafji and Hafr Al-Batin and to compare this with two cities in the Western Province, Al-Madina and Taif. The survey provides additional information about indoor radon concentrations in Saudi Arabia. The results of the survey in these cities showed that the overall minimum, maximum and average radon concentration were 7,137 and 30 Bq m{sup -3}, respectively. The lowest average radon concentration (20 Bq m{sup -3}) was found in Hafr Al-Batin, while the highest average concentration was found in Khafji (40 Bq m{sup -3})

  19. Hypertension in Renal Transplantation: Saudi Arabian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souqiyyeh Muhammad

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the prevalence, etiologic factors and therapy of hypertension in actively followed up transplant population in Saudi Arabia; we retrospectively reviewed the records of the active renal transplant patients at two large transplant centers in Riyadh and Jeddah in Saudi Arabia. These subjects were transplanted between January 1979 and November 1998. The patients were grouped according to the measurement of blood pressure; group 1 (considered normo-tensive: blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg, group2: blood pressure between 140-159/90-99, group 3: blood pressure 160-179/100-109 group 4: equal to or above 180/110. There were 1115 patients′ records included in the study. The mean duration of transplantation was 66.9 ± 50.1 months. According to the level of measured blood pressure, there were 641 (57.5% patients in the normotensive group (group 1, 404 (36.3% patients in the mildly hypertensive group (group 2 64 (5.7% patients in the moderately severe hypertension group (group 3 and only six (0.5% patients in the severe hypertension group (group 4. The estimated prevalence of hypertension in this study was almost 85%. We found no significant difference in the prevalence of hypertension in terms of gender, year of transplantation, duration of transplantation, type of donor, number of previous transplants, diagnosis of renal artery stenosis, etiology of kidney disease, diagnosis of diabetes after transplantation, diagnosis of cerebrovascular accidents, or mean dose of prednisolone and cyclosporine. There was a statistically significant association between increased level of blood pressure and old age (above 50 years, original disease associated with hypertension, history of hypertension on dialysis, acute rejection (once or more, presence of protienuria (more than 0.3 mg/day, abnormality of ECG, or serum creatinine above 300 µmol/L. We conclude that hypertension is highly prevalent in the renal transplant population in Saudi Arabia. Risk

  20. Attitudes of Saudi Arabian Undergraduate Medical Students towards Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Al-Hilali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate attitudes, perceptions and perceived barriers towards health research among Saudi Arabian undergraduate medical students. Methods: This cross-sectional study took place between August and October 2014 and included 520 students from five medical schools across Saudi Arabia. An anonymous online survey with 21 close-ended questions was designed to assess students’ attitudes towards research, contribution to research-related activities, awareness of the importance of research, perception of available resources/opportunities for research, appreciation of medical students’ research contributions and perceived barriers to research. Responses were scored on a 5-point Likert scale. Results: A total of 401 students participated in the study (response rate: 77.1%. Of these, 278 (69.3% were female. A positive attitude towards research was reported by 43.9% of the students. No statistically significant differences were observed between genders with regards to attitudes towards and available resources for research (P = 0.500 and 0.200, respectively. Clinical students had a significantly more positive attitude towards research compared to preclinical students (P = 0.007. Only 26.4% of the respondents believed that they had adequate resources/opportunities for research. According to the students, perceived barriers to undertaking research included time constraints (n = 200; 49.9%, lack of research mentors (n = 95; 23.7%, lack of formal research methodology training (n = 170; 42.4% and difficulties in conducting literature searches (n = 145; 36.2%. Conclusion: Less than half of the surveyed Saudi Arabian medical students had a positive attitude towards health research. Medical education policies should aim to counteract the barriers identified in this study.

  1. Vitamin D status and breast cancer in Saudi Arabian women: case-control study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yousef, Fatimah M; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Kang, Paul T; Hakim, Iman A; Going, Scott; Yousef, Jehad M; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M; Kumosani, Taha A; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2013-01-01

    The role of vitamin D in breast cancer prevention is equivocal. Saudi Arabian women may be at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency because of a darker skin type and a greater likelihood of reduced ultraviolet B radiation exposure...

  2. Awareness among a Saudi Arabian university community of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus following an outbreak

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maha Al-Mohaissen

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to measure the level of awareness of faculty members, staff and students in a female Saudi Arabian university community towards Middle East respiratory syndrome coronvirus (MERS-CoV...

  3. Cartography of major urban settlements on Saudi Arabian Peninsula between 18th -20th centuries

    OpenAIRE

    Çetin, Murat; Al-Dosary, Adel S.; Doyduk, Senem; Çelebioğlu, Banu

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to provide a urban morphological analysis of the transformation of Saudi Arabian cities from the late 18th century onwards through a cartographical urban inventory as its basis. The paper focuses on the cartographical information about the major cities in the Saudi Arabian Peninsula associated with the period between late 18th and early 20th centuries. This study was mainly conducted as a survey through the archives that have hitherto been kept closed for research purposes in ...

  4. Perception of Nursing Care: View of Saudi Arabian Female Nurses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jette

    2008-01-01

    ‘Values are principles and standards that have meaning and worth to an individual, family, group, or community’ (Purnell & Paulanka 1998: 3). Values are central to the care provided by nurses. The provision of nursing care within the context of value clarification, has been explored from various...... perspectives, however, as values vary within cultures, there is a limited range of studies reflecting on Saudi Arabian nurses’ perspectives of nursing care. Through a Heideggerian phenomenological research design, six nurses were enrolled through purposive sampling. Semi-structured, in-depth interviews, which...... were audio tape-recorded, were chosen as the methods of data collection. A seven stage framework approach was applied to analyse and organise the research findings in three conceptual themes: values in context of Islam, the nurse-patient relationship, and identity’s influence on being in the world...

  5. Knowledge and awareness of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus among Saudi and Non-Saudi Arabian pilgrims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althobaity, Hosam M; Alharthi, Raed A S; Altowairqi, Mohammed H; Alsufyani, Ziyad A; Aloufi, Nahar S; Altowairqi, Abdulrahman E; Alqahtani, Abdulrahman S; Alzahrani, Ali K; Abdel-Moneim, Ahmed S

    2017-01-01

    The current study was intended to evaluate the knowledge and awareness toward Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) of pilgrims from Saudi Arabia and from different Arabian countries. A prospective study was conducted among pilgrims from Saudi Arabia and those from other Arab nations. A total number of 2120 participants including 736 Saudi pilgrims (436 males and 300 females) and 1384 non-Saudi Arabian pilgrims (1384; 909 males and 475 females) were included in the study. The responses of the participants were descriptively analyzed. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to screen the possible correlations among different variables. The differences in the responses between the two groups were evaluated using Mann-Whitney analysis. The responses of the Saudi pilgrims showed statistically significant results in comparison to non-Saudi pilgrims in answering all questions except those related to the presence of efficient vaccination or treatment and the source of information. It was clear that the Saudi pilgrims were more oriented about different aspects of MERS-CoV including the nature of the causative agent, the signs, the severity of the disease, the animals that can transmit the infection to humans, the risk groups, and when one need to be screened for infection. In both Saudi and non-Saudi pilgrims, the official websites of health organizations constitute the main source of their information. It was concluded that Saudi pilgrims possess good knowledge about the MERS-CoV although more orientation is still required.

  6. Understanding the Use of Twitter for Teaching Purposes in Saudi Arabian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alim, Sophia

    2017-01-01

    The increased use of Twitter in Saudi Arabia has opened new opportunities in higher education teaching. However, there exists a lack of studies which examine academics' thoughts on Twitter use for teaching purposes. For this study, a questionnaire was distributed to academics in Saudi Arabian universities in order to explore their experiences and…

  7. Genetic Influence of Candidate Osteoporosis Genes in Saudi Arabian Population: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Ali, Mir; Al-Turki, Haifa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The purpose of the present study is to find the genes and SNP that influence BMD and postmenopausal Saudi women. Material and Methods. Two-hundred ethnic Saudi Arabian women with a diagnosis of postmenopausal osteoporosis were the subjects of this study. Baseline blood hematology, biochemistry, and bone panel were done. Blood was collected, and three TaqMan-MGB probes were used to analyze SNP variants in ALOX15 (rs7220870), LRP5 (C 25752205 10), and TNFRSF11B (C 11869235 10). Results. The variant of ALOX15 17p13 showed that the BMD of the spine was lower in the AA allele (P value Saudi Arabians population is similar. We believe that the same genetic markers that influence osteoporosis in the Caucasian race could be used for further studies in the Saudi Arabian population. PMID:22545221

  8. Eurasian and African mitochondrial DNA influences in the Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; González, Ana M; Larruga, Jose M; Bosley, Thomas M; Cabrera, Vicente M

    2007-03-01

    Genetic studies of the Arabian Peninsula are scarce even though the region was the center of ancient trade routes and empires and may have been the southern corridor for the earliest human migration from Africa to Asia. A total of 120 mtDNA Saudi Arab lineages were analyzed for HVSI/II sequences and for haplogroup confirmatory coding diagnostic positions. A phylogeny of the most abundant haplogroup (preHV)1 (R0a) was constructed based on 13 whole mtDNA genomes. The Saudi Arabian group showed greatest similarity to other Arabian Peninsula populations (Bedouin from the Negev desert and Yemeni) and to Levantine populations. Nearly all the main western Asia haplogroups were detected in the Saudi sample, including the rare U9 clade. Saudi Arabs had only a minority sub-Saharan Africa component (7%), similar to the specific North-African contribution (5%). In addition, a small Indian influence (3%) was also detected. The majority of the Saudi-Arab mitochondrial DNA lineages (85%) have a western Asia provenance. Although the still large confidence intervals, the coalescence and phylogeography of (preHV)1 haplogroup (accounting for 18 % of Saudi Arabian lineages) matches a Neolithic expansion in Saudi Arabia.

  9. Eurasian and African mitochondrial DNA influences in the Saudi Arabian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosley Thomas M

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genetic studies of the Arabian Peninsula are scarce even though the region was the center of ancient trade routes and empires and may have been the southern corridor for the earliest human migration from Africa to Asia. A total of 120 mtDNA Saudi Arab lineages were analyzed for HVSI/II sequences and for haplogroup confirmatory coding diagnostic positions. A phylogeny of the most abundant haplogroup (preHV1 (R0a was constructed based on 13 whole mtDNA genomes. Results The Saudi Arabian group showed greatest similarity to other Arabian Peninsula populations (Bedouin from the Negev desert and Yemeni and to Levantine populations. Nearly all the main western Asia haplogroups were detected in the Saudi sample, including the rare U9 clade. Saudi Arabs had only a minority sub-Saharan Africa component (7%, similar to the specific North-African contribution (5%. In addition, a small Indian influence (3% was also detected. Conclusion The majority of the Saudi-Arab mitochondrial DNA lineages (85% have a western Asia provenance. Although the still large confidence intervals, the coalescence and phylogeography of (preHV1 haplogroup (accounting for 18 % of Saudi Arabian lineages matches a Neolithic expansion in Saudi Arabia.

  10. Medication burden of Saudi Arabian women receiving antiresorptive therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadat-Ali M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Mir Sadat-Ali,1 Bader Al-Shafie,2 Abdallah S Al-Omran,1 Mohammed Q Azam11Department of Orthopedic Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Dammam, Dammam, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmacy, King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, Saudi ArabiaBackground and purpose: Osteoporosis is common in the Saudi Arabian population, and its successful treatment requires full compliance. Patients who require antiresorptive therapy, such as oral bisphosphonates, may suffer from other diseases requiring medications, which increases the medication burden and ends up in drug noncompliance on the part of patients, making them vulnerable to osteoporosis-related fractures. We decided to undertake this study to analyze the concomitant medications that osteoporotic patients are receiving at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar.Methods: Osteoporotic patients receiving antiresorptive therapy (ART at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, were identified through the database of the QuadraMed Patient Care system and cross-checked with the radiology database of the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and pharmacy drug-dispensing system between January 2009 and December 2009. Concomitant medication is defined as the use of other drugs for $30 days with oral bisphosphonates, calcium, and vitamin D. Medication burdens are defined as mild (≤1 concomitant medication, moderate (≥2 and ≤4 medications, and severe (≥5 medications. The demographic data, such as age, sex, and diagnosis, were collected from the medical records. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS.Results: During the study period, 516 patients were diagnosed with osteoporosis, and 473 were on ART while the rest were using anabolic Teriperatide. Sixty-eight (14.4% of the patients, with an average age of 50.15 ± 2.4 years, were on one medication besides ART, vitamin D, and elemental calcium; 129 (27.3% of the patients, with an

  11. Medication burden of Saudi Arabian women receiving antiresorptive therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat-Ali, Mir; Al-Shafie, Bader; Al-Omran, Abdallah S; Azam, Mohammed Q

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose Osteoporosis is common in the Saudi Arabian population, and its successful treatment requires full compliance. Patients who require antiresorptive therapy, such as oral bisphosphonates, may suffer from other diseases requiring medications, which increases the medication burden and ends up in drug noncompliance on the part of patients, making them vulnerable to osteoporosis-related fractures. We decided to undertake this study to analyze the concomitant medications that osteoporotic patients are receiving at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar. Methods Osteoporotic patients receiving antiresorptive therapy (ART) at King Fahd Hospital of the University, Al Khobar, were identified through the database of the QuadraMed Patient Care system and cross-checked with the radiology database of the dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scan and pharmacy drug-dispensing system between January 2009 and December 2009. Concomitant medication is defined as the use of other drugs for ≥30 days with oral bisphosphonates, calcium, and vitamin D. Medication burdens are defined as mild (≤1 concomitant medication), moderate (≥2 and ≤4 medications), and severe (≥5 medications). The demographic data, such as age, sex, and diagnosis, were collected from the medical records. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS). Results During the study period, 516 patients were diagnosed with osteoporosis, and 473 were on ART while the rest were using anabolic Teriperatide. Sixty-eight (14.4%) of the patients, with an average age of 50.15 ± 2.4 years, were on one medication besides ART, vitamin D, and elemental calcium; 129 (27.3%) of the patients, with an average age of 51.6 ± 9.7 years, were taking 3.32 medications, and 276 (58.3%) of the patients, with a mean age of 62.1 ± 10.7 years, were on 8.02 concomitant medications. The most common concomitant medications in use were cardiac, endocrine, systemic nonsteroidal

  12. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M.S. Farag

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients.

  13. Barriers deterring patient advocacy in a Saudi Arabian critical care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortell, Manfred; Abdullah, Khatijah L; Ahmad, Chean

    2017-09-28

    To explore the perceptions of patient advocacy among Saudi Arabian intensive care unit (ICU) nurses. Despite advocacy being a crucial role for nurses, its scope is often limited in clinical practice. Although numerous studies have identified barriers to patient advocacy, their recommendations for resolution were unclear. The study employed a constructivist grounded theory methodology, with 13 Saudi Arabian registered nurses, working in critical care, in a tertiary academic teaching hospital. Semi-structured interviews, with broad open-ended questions, and reflective participant journals were used to collect data. All interviews were concurrently analysed and transcribed verbatim. Gender, culture, education, subjugation, communal patronage, organisational support and repercussions, and role-associated risks were all revealed as factors affecting their ability to act as advocates for critically ill patients. Saudi Arabian ICU nurses in the study believed that advocacy is problematic. Despite attempting to advocate for their patients, they are unable to act to an optimal level, instead choosing avoidance of the potential risks associated with the role, or confrontation, which often had undesirable outcomes. Patient advocacy from a Saudi Arabian nursing perspective is contextually complex, controversial and remains uncertain. Further research is needed to ensure patient safety is supported by nurses as effective advocates.

  14. RADIATION PROTECTION IN AN INTERVENTIONAL LABORATORY: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF AUSTRALIAN AND SAUDI ARABIAN HOSPITALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahmari, Mohammed Ali S; Sun, Zhonghua; Bartlett, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether the use of protection devices and attitudes of interventional professionals (including radiologists, cardiologists, vascular surgeons, medical imaging technicians and nurses) towards radiation protection will differ between Saudi Arabian and Australian hospitals. Hard copies of an anonymous survey were distributed to 10 and 6 clinical departments in the Eastern province of Saudi Arabia and metropolitan hospitals in Western Australia, respectively. The overall response rate was 43 % comprising 110 Australian participants and 63 % comprising 147 Saudi participants. Analysis showed that Australian respondents differed significantly from Saudi respondents with respect to their usages of leaded glasses (p radiation protection than the corresponding group in Saudi Arabia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Nd, Pb, Sr, and O isotopic characterization of Saudi Arabian Shield terranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeser, D.B.; Frost, C.D.

    2006-01-01

    New Nd, Sr and O isotopic data for granitoid rocks of the Saudi Arabian Shield are presented together with published Nd, Pb, Sr and O isotopic data and all available geologic and geochronologic information to re-evaluate the terranes defined for the Saudi Arabian part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Three groups of terranes are identified: 1) the western arc terranes, 2) the eastern arc terranes, and 3) the Khida terrane. The Khida terrane is the only terrane composed of pre-Neoproterozoic continental crust. The western arc terranes are of oceanic arc affinity, and have the least radiogenic Pb and Sr and most radiogenic Nd isotopic compositions and some of the lowest ??18O values of any rocks of the Saudi Arabian Shield. Although some previous studies have characterized the eastern arc terranes as of continental affinity, this study shows that they too are composed of Neoproterozoic oceanic arcs, although their sources have slightly elevated 208Pb/204Pb, Nd, Sri, and ??18O values compared to the western arc terranes. These data suggest that either the isotopic composition of the mantle source for the western arc terranes is more depleted than that of the eastern arc terranes or the eastern arc terranes have been mixed with a small amount of cratonic source material, or both. We further elaborate on the Hulayfah-Ad Dafinah fault zone as a major boundary within the Saudi Arabian portion of the East African Orogen. With further study, its northern extension may be shown to pass through what has been defined as the Hail terrane, and its southern extension appears to lie under cover east of the Tathlith-Malahah terrane and extend into Yemen. It may represent the collision zone between East and West Gondwana, and at the very least it is an important suture between groups of arc terranes of contrasting isotopic composition caught between two converging continents.

  16. Genetic Influence of Candidate Osteoporosis Genes in Saudi Arabian Population: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Sadat-Ali

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. The purpose of the present study is to find the genes and SNP that influence BMD and postmenopausal Saudi women. Material and Methods. Two-hundred ethnic Saudi Arabian women with a diagnosis of postmenopausal osteoporosis were the subjects of this study. Baseline blood hematology, biochemistry, and bone panel were done. Blood was collected, and three TaqMan-MGB probes were used to analyze SNP variants in ALOX15 (rs7220870, LRP5 (C 25752205 10, and TNFRSF11B (C 11869235 10. Results. The variant of ALOX15 17p13 showed that the BMD of the spine was lower in the AA allele (P value <0.002 and fractures were highest at 50% compared to CC allele. In the TNFRSF11B gene, BMD of the hip and spine was significantly higher in the GG allele and the history of fractures was significantly higher in GG group. With regard to the LRP5 (C 25752205 10 gene, there was no significant difference between allele groups. Conclusion(s. This study shows that the genetic influence of osteoporosis in the Caucasian and Saudi Arabians population is similar. We believe that the same genetic markers that influence osteoporosis in the Caucasian race could be used for further studies in the Saudi Arabian population.

  17. Vitamin D status and breast cancer in Saudi Arabian women: case-control study1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Fatimah M; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Kang, Paul T; Hakim, Iman A; Going, Scott; Yousef, Jehad M; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M; Kumosani, Taha A; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2013-01-01

    Background: The role of vitamin D in breast cancer prevention is equivocal. Saudi Arabian women may be at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency because of a darker skin type and a greater likelihood of reduced ultraviolet B radiation exposure. Data regarding the vitamin D status of Saudi Arabian women and its relation to breast cancer risk are lacking. Objective: The purpose of this research was to evaluate the association between circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and breast cancer risk in Saudi Arabian women. Design: A case-control study was conducted among 120 breast cancer cases and 120 controls. The study population was drawn from patients admitted to King Fahd Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, from June to August 2009. Participants completed questionnaires on diet and medical history, and serum samples were collected from all women to measure circulating 25(OH)D concentrations. Results: The participants had a mean age of 47.8 y and a mean body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) of 30.0. Breast cancer cases had significantly lower (mean ± SD) serum concentrations of 25(OH)D (9.4 ± 6.4 ng/mL) than did controls (15.4 ± 12.3 ng/mL; P = 0.001). In comparison with those in the highest category of vitamin D status for this population (≥20 ng/mL), the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for invasive breast cancer were 6.1 (2.4, 15.1) for women with a serum 25(OH)D concentration women with a serum concentration of ≥10 to Saudi Arabian women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01817231. PMID:23697705

  18. Vitamin D status and breast cancer in Saudi Arabian women: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Fatimah M; Jacobs, Elizabeth T; Kang, Paul T; Hakim, Iman A; Going, Scott; Yousef, Jehad M; Al-Raddadi, Rajaa M; Kumosani, Taha A; Thomson, Cynthia A

    2013-07-01

    The role of vitamin D in breast cancer prevention is equivocal. Saudi Arabian women may be at greater risk of vitamin D deficiency because of a darker skin type and a greater likelihood of reduced ultraviolet B radiation exposure. Data regarding the vitamin D status of Saudi Arabian women and its relation to breast cancer risk are lacking. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the association between circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and breast cancer risk in Saudi Arabian women. A case-control study was conducted among 120 breast cancer cases and 120 controls. The study population was drawn from patients admitted to King Fahd Hospital in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, from June to August 2009. Participants completed questionnaires on diet and medical history, and serum samples were collected from all women to measure circulating 25(OH)D concentrations. The participants had a mean age of 47.8 y and a mean body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)) of 30.0. Breast cancer cases had significantly lower (mean ± SD) serum concentrations of 25(OH)D (9.4 ± 6.4 ng/mL) than did controls (15.4 ± 12.3 ng/mL; P = 0.001). In comparison with those in the highest category of vitamin D status for this population (≥20 ng/mL), the adjusted ORs (95% CIs) for invasive breast cancer were 6.1 (2.4, 15.1) for women with a serum 25(OH)D concentration cancer risk in Saudi Arabian women. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01817231.

  19. Male Saudi Arabian Freshman Science Majors at Jazan University: Their Perceptions of Parental Educational Practices on Their Science Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrehaly, Essa D.

    2012-01-01

    Examination of Saudi Arabian educational practices is scarce, but increasingly important, especially in light of the country's pace in worldwide mathematics and science rankings. The purpose of the study is to understand and evaluate parental influence on male children's science education achievements in Saudi Arabia. Parental level of education…

  20. Genetic Influence of Candidate Osteoporosis Genes in Saudi Arabian Population: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Mir Sadat-Ali; Al-Turki, Haifa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives. The purpose of the present study is to find the genes and SNP that influence BMD and postmenopausal Saudi women. Material and Methods. Two-hundred ethnic Saudi Arabian women with a diagnosis of postmenopausal osteoporosis were the subjects of this study. Baseline blood hematology, biochemistry, and bone panel were done. Blood was collected, and three TaqMan-MGB probes were used to analyze SNP variants in ALOX15 (rs7220870), LRP5 (C 25752205 10), and TNFRSF11B (C 118...

  1. Attitude of Saudi Arabian adults towards consanguineous marriage

    OpenAIRE

    Alharbi, Omar A.; Al-Shaia, Walaa A.; Al-Hamam, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Marzoug, Hala M.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Bagha, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on the attitudes of Saudi adults towards consanguinity is scarce. The study aimed to explore the attitudes towards consanguinity and its associations with socio-demographic characteristics in a sample of Saudi adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 386 outpatient waiting-area attendees at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City-Riyadh were included. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristi...

  2. Influence of Family on Saudi Arabian Emergency Medical Services Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Leggio

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify influences on learning for Saudi male students studying Emergency Medical Services at a college in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Previous research on influences on student learning in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia focused on the historical development of education in Saudi Arabia, English language development, and intrinsic motivations of students and excluded a focus on students studying Emergency Medical Services. Methods: Exploratory sequential mixed-methods study was deployed. Results: Family support was an exceptionally strong predictor of student confidence in both skills and post-graduate EMS employment. Concepts involving application, memorization, motivation, and English language did not present as statically significant. The discovery of the strong influences that a family can have on Saudi EMS student’s confidence is noteworthy, as this was not previously discovered in the literature. Conclusion: This discovery holds practical implications for EMS education and training programs as emphasizes the importance of developing practical ways to include a student’s family as a source of support in ensuring student success and confidence.

  3. Tobacco smoking and periodontal health in a Saudi Arabian population

    OpenAIRE

    Bakur Natto, Suzan

    2005-01-01

    Background & Aim: Tobacco smoking exerts a harmful effect on the periodontal tissues manifested by periodontal pockets, attachment loss and periodontal bone loss. Current evidences on the effects of tobacco on periodontal health mainly concern cigarette smoking. In view of the increasing popularity of water pipe smoking in Arabian countries and reports confirming that water pipe smoking has health effects similar to those of cigarette smoking, there is a need for a better un...

  4. Pediatric intussusception in a Saudi Arabian tertiary hospital | Al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Because of this, we reviewed the cases and management of intussusception, seen at Aseer Central Hospital over a 7-year period. Materials and methods: Thirty four pediatric patients admitted at Aseer Central Hospital over a 7-year period (from 1993 to 2000) at Aseer Central Hospital, Southwestern region of Saudi Arabia ...

  5. Attitude of Saudi Arabian adults towards consanguineous marriage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Omar A.; Al-Shaia, Walaa A.; Al-Hamam, Abdulaziz A.; Al-Marzoug, Hala M.; Ahmed, Anwar E.; Bagha, Muhammed

    2015-01-01

    Background: Research on the attitudes of Saudi adults towards consanguinity is scarce. The study aimed to explore the attitudes towards consanguinity and its associations with socio-demographic characteristics in a sample of Saudi adults. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted using a self-administered questionnaire. A total of 386 outpatient waiting-area attendees at King Abdul-Aziz Medical City-Riyadh were included. Participants were asked about their socio-demographic characteristics, attitude towards consanguinity and the reasons behind this. Results: The positive attitude towards consanguinity among the study respondents was 48.1% with 95% confidence interval (42.91–53.33%). Social and traditional culture (59.9%) were found to be the predominant reasons for favoring consanguinity in Saudi Arabia. Evidence against a positive attitude towards consanguinity was noted in respondents who received medical information about consanguinity versus those who had not received medical information (42.3% vs. 57%, p-value = 0.008). According to the multivariate logistic model, the odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 2 times higher for males (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.147, 4.290) and 4.1 times higher in respondents in consanguineous marriages (aOR: 4.1; 95% CI: 2.350, 7.156). The odds of a positive attitude towards consanguinity were 50% less in respondents who received health information on consanguinity compared to those who had not received health information about consanguinity (aOR: 0.50; 95% CI: 0.253, 0.863). Conclusion: One in every two Saudi adults favors consanguinity however, Saudi men and women differ in their attitudes towards consanguinity. Receiving health information on consanguinity was associated with a negative attitude towards this practice. PMID:26835408

  6. Quality of gastroenterology research published in Saudi Arabian scientific journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaghrabi, Majed M; Alamoudi, Abdullah S; Radi, Suhaib A; Merdad, Anas A; Makhdoum, Ahmad M; Batwa, Faisal A

    2015-01-01

    Evidence-based medicine has established itself in the field of gastroenterology. In this study we aim to assess the types of study designs of gastroenterology-related articles published in Saudi scientific journals. An online review using PubMed was carried out to review gastroenterology-related articles published in six Saudi medical journals in the time interval from 2003 to 2012. To classify the level of evidence in these articles we employed the Oxford's levels of evidence. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare the levels of evidence between published articles. A total of 721 gastroenterology-related articles were reviewed, of which 591 articles met our inclusion criteria; 80.7% were level IV. The three most common types of studies we encountered were cross-sectional (33.9%), case reports (27.9%), and case series (18.8%). Forty-three percent of the published research was in the field of hepatobiliary and spleen. The total number of articles increased from 260 articles in the 1 st 5-year period (2003-2007) to 330 in the 2 nd period (2008-2012). However, no statistically significant difference in the level of evidence was noted. In Annals of Saudi Medicine Journal, articles with level II increased from 0 to 10% with a P value 0.02. In our review of gastroenterology-related published articles in Saudi scientific journals, we observed an increase in the quantity of articles with the quality and level of evidence remaining unchanged. Further research is recommended to explore different reasons affecting the volume and quality of gastroenterology-related research in Saudi scientific journals.

  7. Fortification with vitamin D: Comparative study in the Saudi Arabian and US markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mir Sadat-Ali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Vitamin D deficiency is common among Saudi Arabian population. To evaluate the current status of vitamin D fortification and calcium content of commonly consumed food items by the Saudi population and to compare it to US data. Setting and Design: Cross-sectional market survey at markets of Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia and State of Illinois, USA. Methods: A dietary survey was carried out for the content of calcium and vitamin D on the most commonly consumed food products by the Saudi population which are suppose to be fortified by vitamin D. The survey included different brands of fresh milk, yoghurt, powdered milk, cheese, ready-to-eat breakfast cereals and orange juice. Vitamin D content in the products studied from the Saudi marketplace was compared with the suggested vitamin D content in the same products according to US Code of Federal Regulations recommendations. Results: The overall calcium content in the processed dairy products is generally higher than the content in fresh dairy products. Vitamin D content in the fresh dairy products varied from 40 IU/L to 400 IU/L. None of the cereals or orange juice in Saudi Arabia contain vitamin D supplement. The vitamin D content in the food items from the Saudi marketplace is mostly lower than recommended by the US Code of Federal Regulations. Conclusion: Most commonly consumed food products by Saudi population which are suppose to be fortified by vitamin D either not fortified or contain an amount less than recommended by guidelines set for US marketplace.

  8. Saudi Arabian Nurses. are they prone to burnout syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Turki, Haifa A

    2010-03-01

    To find out the prevalence of Burnout syndrome (BS) in Saudi nurses. This is a cross-sectional study involving 60 female Saudi nurses in the workforce of King Fahd University Hospital, Al-Khobar, which is a tertiary care center for the eastern province. Between May and August 2009, Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) individual-based questionnaire was distributed after modification to include age, marital status, unit working and number of years in service. We used the 3 MBI factors: emotional exhaustion (EE), depersonalization (DP), and personal accomplishment (PA) for analysis of BS. Thirty-seven nurses (61.6%) completed the survey. The average age was 28.102.07 years and the average duration of work was 27.367.2 months. Seventeen (45.9%) had high EE and 35.1% (13) had moderate frequency of EE. Depersonalization was high in 18 (48.6%) and moderate in 15 (40.5%). Emotional exhaustion was significantly common in the married group with a frequency of 31.912.1 versus 22.559.67 (p=0.01). The nurses working in high activity areas were more emotionally exhausted and depersonalized when compared with the nurses taking care of patients in the wards and out patients clinics (p=0.003). The findings show that Saudi nurses had a higher frequency of EE and DP, and most of them had low PA.

  9. Incidence of two canals in extracted mandibular incisors teeth of Saudi Arabian samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid S Al-Fouzan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of this in vitro study is to provide clinical data on the presence of the second canal in mandibular incisor teeth of Saudi Arabian Samples. Materials and Methods: Eighty extracted human mandibular incisors were collected from Saudi patients. The teeth were accessed by small round bur then placed in 5.25% sodium hypochlorite for 24 hours to dissolve the organic debris. Indian ink was injected inside the root canal systems under negative pressure. The teeth were decalcified in 5% nitric acid for three days then dehydrated in different concentrations of ethyl alcohol. Following the decalcification process, the teeth were cleared in methyl salicylate and evaluated according to Vertucci′s classification. Result: Fifty six of both mandibular central and lateral incisor teeth (70% had type I canal configuration (one main canal and one main apical foramen, while the remaining 30% of the sample (24 teeth had a type III canal configuration (two separate canals and merged into one canal before exiting the tooth through single apical foramen. Conclusion : The incidence of two canals in mandibular incisor teeth is about one third of the examined Saudi Arabian samples with no difference between the centrals and laterals. The clinician should deal with these teeth as if they have two canals unless it is proved otherwise.

  10. Lean Construction Implementation in the Saudi Arabian Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Ghazi Sarhan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA has witnessed a huge increase in construction during the last two decades. However, many projects experienced time delays, cost overruns and the generation of massive amounts of waste. To address these challenges, lean construction has been introduced into the Saudi construction industry; however, it is still in its infancy. This study therefore investigates the current state of lean construction implementation in the construction industry in the KSA. The objectives are to identify: the types of construction waste, level of use of tools that support the implementation of lean construction, stages of application of lean methods, and the benefits of lean construction. To achieve these objectives, a structured questionnaire survey of 282 construction professionals was carried out. After the analysis of the collected data using mean score and Anova test, the following conclusions were made.  In the construction industry in the KSA, waiting is the most common type of waste, while Computer Aided Design (CAD is the conventional tool supporting the implementation of lean construction. Furthermore, the data suggests that lean construction is most commonly used in the construction stage of projects while customer satisfaction is the main benefit derived from lean construction practices. This study concludes that the level of implementation of lean construction in the KSA construction industry is increasing. The results will help benchmark the current state of lean construction implementation, which will enable the construction industry to identify strategies to implement lean construction in Saudi Arabia in accordance with their needs and project goals, to achieve better productivity.

  11. Emergency contraception: Awareness, attitudes and barriers of Saudi Arabian Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Syed Irfan; Irfan, Farhana; Rowais, Norah Al; Zahrani, Basma Al; Qureshi, Riaz; Qadrah, Bedoor H Al

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To assess knowledge, attitude, and barriers about emergency contraception (EC) among married women of child bearing age. Methods: A quantitative cross-sectional study was conducted over a 6-month period, commencing in March 2013 at Family Practice Clinics of King Khalid University Hospital (KKUH), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Data was collected using a structured pretested questionnaire and analyzed using SPSS version 21.0 statistical software. Result: A total of 242 women were enrolled in the study. Only 6.2% (15/242) had some knowledge of EC and of these only two had ever used it. Health care professionals were the least reported source of EC information (6.6%, n=1). Majority (73.3%) had negative attitude toward EC being available over-the-counter without a prescription. The most common barriers to using EC were concerns about possible health effects. Only two women (13.3%) considered religious belief as a major hindrance to its use. Conclusion: Awareness of emergency contraception is very low among women of Saudi Arabia. Health care professionals were the least reported source of information, which is a cause for concern. Our findings reveal an urgent need to educate women about EC, keeping in view the social norms and the Islamic values. PMID:26870124

  12. Determination of Lead in Saudi Arabian Imported Green Tea by ICP-MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Othman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lead (Pb in nine different Saudi Arabian imported green tea samples originated from China has been determined using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS. Tea infusion and microwave acid digestion procedures are used for sample pre-treatment. The concentrations range of lead (total in the analyzed green tea samples is 0.231 – 6.340 mg/kg. The total concentration of lead released 3% – 19% into tea infusions with boiling water. The calculated average daily intakes of lead in tea infusions was low and within the bounds of safety (≤0.009 mg/day.

  13. Saudi Arabian Woman's Marriage Life in Girls of Riyadh, a Novel by Rajaa Alsanea: Subordination and Struggle

    OpenAIRE

    THALIB, AMIRAH ANIS

    2013-01-01

    This article argues that implementation of Pre-Islamic tradition and culture emerges subordination toward woman in Saudi Arabia. They face subordination in many aspects of life. This phenomenon can be found in Girls of Riyadh novel. In this novel, Rajaa Alsanea, a Saudi Arabian woman writer tells how women live under male domination. In analyzing the phenomena, the writer used feminist approach by applying feminism theory which is combined with Islamic references to reveal subordination and s...

  14. Measurement of quality in Saudi Arabian service industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannadi, O.A. [King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Al-Saggaf, H. [SCECO-East (Saudi Arabia)

    2000-10-12

    Quality problems in the service organisation are the result of the mismatch between prior expectation and perceived quality of the service. Each organisation will attempt to determine the requirements of its customers and translate these requirements into product and delivery process specifications. This paper examines a particular electric company (SCECO-East), a typical service provider in Saudi Arabia, in which service quality is a distinguishing feature of primary importance. It describes a detailed survey and analysis in the light of the model put forward by Parasuraman et al. It utilises SERVQUAL for measuring customers' perceptions of service quality. The study revealed that SCECO-East scored high in tangibles dimension but low in features of responsiveness and reliability. In addition, while the performance of SCECO-East was acceptable to all customer categories, service quality was perceived differently by various types of customers, with reinforcement and commercial customers awarding SCECO-East even lower ratings than other customers did. (Author)

  15. Shared clinical decision making. A Saudi Arabian perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali I. AlHaqwi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To determine preferences of patients regarding their involvement in the clinical decision making process and the related factors in Saudi Arabia. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a major family practice center in King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between March and May 2012. Multivariate multinomial regression models were fitted to identify factors associated with patients preferences. Results: The study included 236 participants. The most preferred decision-making style was shared decision-making (57%, followed by paternalistic (28%, and informed consumerism (14%. The preference for shared clinical decision making was significantly higher among male patients and those with higher level of education, whereas paternalism was significantly higher among older patients and those with chronic health conditions, and consumerism was significantly higher in younger age groups. In multivariate multinomial regression analysis, compared with the shared group, the consumerism group were more likely to be female [adjusted odds ratio (AOR =2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.31-6.27, p=0.008] and non-dyslipidemic (AOR=2.90, 95% CI: 1.03-8.09, p=0.04, and the paternalism group were more likely to be older (AOR=1.03, 95% CI: 1.01-1.05, p=0.04, and female (AOR=2.47, 95% CI: 1.32-4.06, p=0.008. Conclusion: Preferences of patients for involvement in the clinical decision-making varied considerably. In our setting, underlying factors that influence these preferences identified in this study should be considered and tailored individually to achieve optimal treatment outcomes.

  16. Spatial variation in coral reef fish and benthic communities in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Khalil, Maha T.

    2017-06-06

    Local-scale ecological information is critical as a sound basis for spatial management and conservation and as support for ongoing research in relatively unstudied areas. We conducted visual surveys of fish and benthic communities on nine reefs (3–24 km from shore) in the Thuwal area of the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Fish biomass increased with increasing distance from shore, but was generally low compared to reefs experiencing minimal human influence around the world. All reefs had a herbivore-dominated trophic structure and few top predators, such as sharks, jacks, or large groupers. Coral cover was considerably lower on inshore reefs, likely due to a 2010 bleaching event. Community analyses showed inshore reefs to be characterized by turf algae, slower-growing corals, lower herbivore diversity, and highly abundant turf-farming damselfishes. Offshore reefs had more planktivorous fishes, a more diverse herbivore assemblage, and faster-growing corals. All reefs appear to be impacted by overfishing, and inshore reefs seem more vulnerable to thermal bleaching. The study provides a description of the spatial variation in biomass and community structure in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea and provides a basis for spatial prioritization and subsequent marine protected area design in Thuwal.

  17. Spatial variation in coral reef fish and benthic communities in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwmeester, Jessica; Berumen, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Local-scale ecological information is critical as a sound basis for spatial management and conservation and as support for ongoing research in relatively unstudied areas. We conducted visual surveys of fish and benthic communities on nine reefs (3–24 km from shore) in the Thuwal area of the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Fish biomass increased with increasing distance from shore, but was generally low compared to reefs experiencing minimal human influence around the world. All reefs had a herbivore-dominated trophic structure and few top predators, such as sharks, jacks, or large groupers. Coral cover was considerably lower on inshore reefs, likely due to a 2010 bleaching event. Community analyses showed inshore reefs to be characterized by turf algae, slower-growing corals, lower herbivore diversity, and highly abundant turf-farming damselfishes. Offshore reefs had more planktivorous fishes, a more diverse herbivore assemblage, and faster-growing corals. All reefs appear to be impacted by overfishing, and inshore reefs seem more vulnerable to thermal bleaching. The study provides a description of the spatial variation in biomass and community structure in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea and provides a basis for spatial prioritization and subsequent marine protected area design in Thuwal. PMID:28603671

  18. Spatial variation in coral reef fish and benthic communities in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha T. Khalil

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Local-scale ecological information is critical as a sound basis for spatial management and conservation and as support for ongoing research in relatively unstudied areas. We conducted visual surveys of fish and benthic communities on nine reefs (3–24 km from shore in the Thuwal area of the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea. Fish biomass increased with increasing distance from shore, but was generally low compared to reefs experiencing minimal human influence around the world. All reefs had a herbivore-dominated trophic structure and few top predators, such as sharks, jacks, or large groupers. Coral cover was considerably lower on inshore reefs, likely due to a 2010 bleaching event. Community analyses showed inshore reefs to be characterized by turf algae, slower-growing corals, lower herbivore diversity, and highly abundant turf-farming damselfishes. Offshore reefs had more planktivorous fishes, a more diverse herbivore assemblage, and faster-growing corals. All reefs appear to be impacted by overfishing, and inshore reefs seem more vulnerable to thermal bleaching. The study provides a description of the spatial variation in biomass and community structure in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea and provides a basis for spatial prioritization and subsequent marine protected area design in Thuwal.

  19. Vitamin D deficiency in Saudi Arabians: A reality or simply hype: A meta-analysis (2008-2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haneen Al-Alyani

    2018-01-01

    CONCLUSIONS: The currently available literature on the Saudi Arabian population suggests that the Vitamin D deficiency is around 60% and not 100% as indicated in some studies. The relatively small number of studies on the population and the different modes of diagnostic methodology used make the issue of correct figures of Vitamin D deficiency contentious.

  20. Development and Evaluation of the Virtual Prototype of the First Saudi Arabian-Designed Car

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustufa H. Abidi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Prototyping and evaluation are imperative phases of the present product design and development process. Although digital modeling and analysis methods are widely employed at various product development stages, still, building a physical prototype makes the present typical process expensive and time consuming. Therefore, it is necessary to implement new technologies, such as virtual prototyping, which can enable industry to have a rapid and more controlled decision making process. Virtual prototyping has come a long way in recent years, where current environments enable stereoscopic visuals, surround sound and ample interaction with the generated models. It is also important to evaluate how representative the developed virtual prototype is when compared to the real-world counterpart and the sense of presence reported by users of the virtual prototype. This paper describes the systematic procedure to develop a virtual prototype of Gazal-1 (i.e., the first car prototype designed by Saudi engineers in a semi-immersive virtual environment. The steps to develop a virtual prototype from CAD (computer-aided design models are explained in detail. Various issues involved in the different phases for the development of the virtual prototype are also discussed comprehensively. The paper further describes the results of the subjective assessment of a developed virtual prototype of a Saudi Arabian-designed automobile. User’s feedback is recorded using a presence questionnaire. Based on the user-based study, it is revealed that the virtual prototype is representative of the real Saudi Arabian car and offers a flexible environment to analyze design features when compared against its physical prototype. The capabilities of the virtual environment are validated with the application of the car prototype. Finally, vital requirements and directions for future research are also presented.

  1. Effect of drinking Arabian Qahwa on fractional exhaled nitric oxide levels in healthy nonsmoking Saudi adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Shahid Habib

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FENO is an emerging marker of inflammation in respiratory diseases. However, it is affected by a number of confounding factors. We aimed to study the effect of drinking Arabian Qahwa on FENO in non-smoking Saudi healthy adults. Methods: We recruited 12 nonsmoker healthy male adults aged 36.6 ± 2.7 (21-50 years. All subjects were free from acute respiratory infections or allergies and had normal ventilatory functions and serum IgE levels. At 8 am in the morning, their baseline values of FENO were recorded. They had not taken tea or coffee in the morning and had taken similar light breakfast. They were given three cups of Arabian Qahwa to drink and then after every 30 minutes, serial levels of FENO were recorded. Results: Average FENO levels at baseline were 28.73 ± 9.33 (mean ± SD parts per billion (ppb. The mean FENO levels started to decrease significantly after 30 minutes of drinking Arabian Qahwa (P=0.002. This decrease in FENO level was further observed till two hours after Qahwa drinking and then it started to increase in next 90 minutes but still was significantly lower than the baseline (P=0.002. The mean FENO level recorded after 4 hours was 27.22 ± 10.22 (P=0.039. Conclusions: FENO levels were significantly lowered by intake of Arabian Qahwa and this effect remains for about 4 hours. Therefore, history of recent Qahwa intake and abstinence is essential before performance of FENO and its interpretation.

  2. Association between sleeping hours and cardiometabolic risk factors for metabolic syndrome in a Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Jason; Wu, Fen; Chen, Yu; Shamy, Magdy; Alghamdi, Mansour A; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Alkhatim, Alser A; Abdou, Mamdouh H; Costa, Max

    2015-11-30

    Epidemiological and molecular studies have shown that sleep duration is associated with metabolic syndrome (MtS), a disease that is on the rise in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. We aim to investigate the association between sleep duration and selected cardiometabolic risk factors of MtS in a Saudi Arabian population. Secondary care was given to the participants. There were 2 participating centres, shopping malls in North and South Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We recruited 2686 participants over a 1-year study period. Participants were selected based on their willingness. The only criterion for exclusion was living in the area (North or South Jeddah) for less than 15 years. Participants were measured for blood sugar levels, blood pressure and body mass index. All participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire. There was a positive association between longer sleep duration and obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia. The adjusted ORs for obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia were 1.54 (95% CI 1.20 to 1.98), 1.89 (95% CI 1.45 to 2.48) and 1.59 (95% CI 1.19 to 2.13), respectively, in participants sleeping >8 h/night, as compared with those sleeping 7 h. The positive associations between longer sleep duration, defined as sleeping >7 h, and the disease status, did not differ from other risk factors such as physical activity and nutrition. This is the first epidemiological study reporting on the association between sleep duration and cardiometabolic risk factors of MtS in a Saudi Arabian population. Sleep durations of 8 h or greater were found to be associated with all 3 cardiometabolic risk factors: obesity, hypertension and hyperglycaemia, and this relationship was not confounded by quality of nutrition or physical activity levels. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  3. Homogeneity of coral reef communities across 8 degrees of latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Roberts, May B.

    2015-11-20

    Coral reef communities between 26.8°N and 18.6°N latitude in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea were surveyed to provide baseline data and an assessment of fine-scale biogeography of communities in this region. Forty reefs along 1100 km of coastline were surveyed using depth-stratified visual transects of fish and benthic communities. Fish abundance and benthic cover data were analyzed using multivariate approaches to investigate whether coral reef communities differed with latitude. A total of 215 fish species and 90 benthic categories were recorded on the surveys. There were no significant differences among locations in fish abundance, species richness, or among several diversity indices. Despite known environmental gradients within the Red Sea, the communities remained surprisingly similar. The communities do, however, exhibit subtle changes across this span of reefs that likely reflect the constrained distributions of several species of reef fish and benthic fauna.

  4. Baseline evaluation of sediment contamination in the shallow coastal areas of Saudi Arabian Red Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Compean, Pedro; Ellis, Joanne; Cúrdia, João; Payumo, Richard; Langner, Ute; Jones, Burton; Carvalho, Susana

    2017-10-15

    Despite the growing recognition of the importance of water and sediment quality there is still limited information on contamination levels in many regions globally including the Red Sea. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of three classes of contaminants (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - PAH; metals; plastics) in coastal sediments along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea mainly collected using grabs. Background concentrations are provided for metals in the region. Concentrations of metals and PAH were generally low in comparison to international guidelines. A clear relationship between the concentration of metals and anthropogenic sources was not always apparent and dust and vegetation may be relevant players in the region. Microplastic items (mainly polyethylene) were abundant (reaching up to 1gm -2 and 160piecesm -2 ) and in general associated with areas of high human activity. This study provides critical information for future monitoring and the development of national policies within the Red Sea region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Baseline evaluation of sediment contamination in the shallow coastal areas of Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Ruiz Compean, Pedro Javier

    2017-09-12

    Despite the growing recognition of the importance of water and sediment quality there is still limited information on contamination levels in many regions globally including the Red Sea. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of three classes of contaminants (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons - PAH; metals; plastics) in coastal sediments along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea mainly collected using grabs. Background concentrations are provided for metals in the region. Concentrations of metals and PAH were generally low in comparison to international guidelines. A clear relationship between the concentration of metals and anthropogenic sources was not always apparent and dust and vegetation may be relevant players in the region. Microplastic items (mainly polyethylene) were abundant (reaching up to 1gm−2 and 160piecesm−2) and in general associated with areas of high human activity. This study provides critical information for future monitoring and the development of national policies within the Red Sea region.

  6. Phytoplankton abundance in relation to the quality of the coastal water – Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Abdel Mohsen El Gammal

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton abundance in relation to some physicochemical characters of the costal water of Arabian Gulf (Saudi Arabia was studied for one year. The sampling program included 15 locations in Dammam, Saihat, Al-Qatif, Al-Awamia and Safwa. Water samples were analyzed monthly for these parameters; temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen, nitrite, nitrate, ammonia, carbon dioxide, total chloride, reactive orthophosphate and total phosphorus and alkalinity, also phytoplankton communities were identified and Chlorophyll a was estimated. The results showed that, the high phytoplankton density attaining the maximum (190.3 × 104/m3 during May and June, and the minimum (10.4 × 104/m3 during November and December. Forty Five species belonging to 5 phytoplankton groups were recorded. Bacillariophyceae was the first dominant group forming 48% of the total phytoplankton communities (23 species. The dominant species of Bacillariophyceae were Pleurosigma strigosum, Pleurosigma elongatum, Lyrella clavata, Rhizosolenia shrubsolei, Cylindrotheca closterium, Nitzschia panduriform, Nitzschia longissimia, Amphora sp and Stephanopyxis. Dinophyceae was the second dominant group and formed 31% of the total phytoplankton communities (10 species; the dominant species were Ceratium fusus, Heterosigma sp, Ceratium furca, Prorocentrum triestium, Protoperidinium sp, Gyrodinium spirale, Noctiluca scintillans and Scrippsiella trochoidea. Cyanophyceae formed 13% (5 species where Nostoc sp, Oscillatoria and Merismopedia sp were the dominant species. Chlorophyceae had 8% (6 species; Scendesmus sp., Chlorella sp., Chlamydomonas sp., Dunaliella salina and Nannochloropsis sp were the dominant species. The Euglinophyceae was rare only one species (Euglina sp. The relationship was positive between the phytoplankton, chlorophyll a and carbon dioxide while negative amongst dissolved oxygen and total nitrogen. This research indicated that the relation between water quality

  7. Assessment of natural radioactivity and (137)Cs in some coastal areas of the Saudi Arabian gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, H; Al-Muqrin, A; El-Sharkawy, A

    2016-03-15

    The levels of natural radioactivity have been investigated in some Saudi Arabian Gulf coastal areas. Sampling sites were chosen according to the presence of nearby non-nuclear industrial activities such as, the two main water desalination plants in Al Khobar and Al Jubail, and Maaden phosphate complex in Ras Al Khair, to ensure that effluents discharges into the Arabian Gulf didn't enhance radioactivity in seawater and shore sediments. Seawater samples were analyzed for radium isotopes (Ra-226 & Ra-228) and measured by gamma spectrometry using high purity germanium detector, after radiochemical separation of the isotopes by co-precipitation with MnO2. Shore sediment samples were analyzed for (226)Ra, (228)Ra ((232)Th), (4)°K and (137)Cs using gamma sepectrometry. A small variation was observed in the activity concentrations of the investigated radioisotopes, and the activity levels were comparable to those reported in literature. Quality assurance and methods validation were established through the efficiency calibration of the detectors, the estimation of uncertainties, the use of blanks, the analysis of standard reference materials and the intercomparison and proficiency tests. Radiological hazards were assessed, and the annual effective dose had an average value of 0.02 mSv. On the basis of the current results, we may conclude that any radiological hazards to the public visiting these shores are not expected. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Predicting Relationship of Smoking Behavior Among Male Saudi Arabian College Students Related to Their Religious Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Khalid M

    2016-04-01

    This study describes the relationships of smoking behavior among a sample of male college students in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) to their religious practice, parents' smoking behaviors and attitudes, peers' smoking behaviors and attitudes, and knowledge about the dangers of smoking. A 49-item questionnaire was developed and pilot tested in KSA. This questionnaire was completed during the academic year 2013 by 715 undergraduate male students at the King Saud University in Riyadh. 29.8% of the students were smokers (13.8% cigarette smokers, 7.3% sheesha smokers, and 27% cigarette and sheesha smokers). Students in the College of Education were much more likely to be smokers than the students in the College of Science. The differences between the College of Education and the College of Science was statistically significant (χ (2) = 16.864. df = 1, p = .001). Logistic regression analysis suggested that students who were more faithful in their practice of Islam were 15% less likely to smoke. Students who were more knowledgeable about the dangers of smoking were 8% less likely to smoke. The logistic analysis identified peers (friends) as the most powerful factor in predicting smoking. The four-factor model had an overall classification accuracy of 78%. The need to understand more fully the dynamics of peer relations among Saudi Arabian males as a basis for developing tobacco education/prevention programs. Prevention programs will need to include education and changes in the college level or earlier in KSA.

  9. A taxonomic survey of Saudi Arabian Red Sea octocorals (Cnidaria: Alcyonacea)

    KAUST Repository

    Haverkort-Yeh, Roxanne D.

    2013-05-04

    A preliminary survey of Saudi Arabian Alcyonacea is presented, which combines classical taxonomy, multilocus molecular barcodes, and in situ photographs. We explored 14 locations along the west coast of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia to assess the regional taxonomic diversity of non-gorgonian alcyonaceans. We collected samples from a total of 74 colonies, distributed among four families: 18 colonies of Alcyoniidae, 14 of Nephtheidae, 9 of Tubiporidae, and 33 of Xeniidae. We sequenced the octocorals using multiple nuclear [ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacers (ITS) and ATP Synthetase Subunit α (ATPSα)] and mitochondrial [MutS homolog (mtMutS) and Cytochrome C Oxidase subunit one (COI)] loci, providing molecular barcodes which will: (1) allow direct comparison of biodiversity from this location to others for which molecular data are available, and (2) facilitate future identifications of these taxa. Finally, this preliminary phylogeny of sampled taxa provides insights on the resolution of mitochondrial versus nuclear loci, and highlights octocoral taxa that require further taxonomic attention. © 2013 Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  10. Radiographic investigation of in vivo endodontically treated maxillary premolars in a Saudi Arabian sub-population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Al-Nazhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the prevalence of the number of root canals in permanent maxillary first and second premolars of a Saudi Arabian sub-population. Results will be compared to previous Asian studies. Materials and Methods: A total of 894 periapical radiographs of endodontically treated maxillary first and second premolars of 628 Saudi patients (268 males and 360 females were viewed. The teeth were segregated into maxillary first premolars (463 and maxillary second premolars (431. The diagnostic, working length, master cone and final films with different angles were mounted, projected and, with the utilization of written clinical records, evaluated. Teeth with multiple canal systems were categorized according to whether the canals exited the root by common or separate apical foramen. Data was analyzed statistically using Chi-square test and professional t-test, by comparing pairs of groups with the significant level established at 5% (P < 0.05. Results: More than 90% of first maxillary premolar and more than 50% of the second maxillary premolar was found to have two canals. There was no significant difference between male (92% and female (95% in the distribution of the two root canals of the first maxillary premolar (t-test = 1.21, P value = 0.228, however, there was significant difference between the distributions of male (69.4% and female (52.2% of the two root canals within the second maxillary premolar (t-test = 3.75, P value = 0.000. Few teeth showed three canals. Conclusion: The number of root canals of the maxillary first premolar in Saudi population shows a higher incidence of two canals (93.6% than previously reported. In addition, the figure is higher than most of the Asian countries.

  11. Case-control association between CCT-associated variants and keratoconus in a Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Helwa, Inas; Al-Muammar, Abdulrahman; Strickland, Shelby; Hauser, Michael A; Allingham, R Rand; Liu, Yutao

    2015-06-04

    Keratoconus (KC) is the most common primary ectatic disease of the cornea and a major indication for corneal transplant. To date, limited KC-associated-risk loci have been identified. Association has recently been suggested between KC and 8 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genomic regions of FNDC3B, COL4A3, MPDZ-NF1B, RXRA-COL5A1, LCN12-PTGDS, FOXO1, and BANP-ZNF469. These SNPs are associated with central corneal thickness (CCT), a known risk factor to KC. We are questioning whether these SNPs are significantly associated with KC in a Saudi Arabian population. The study included 108 unrelated KC cases and 300 controls. Patients were diagnosed with KC according to the Schimpff-flow based elevation map of the cornea. DNA genotyping was done using probe-based allelic discrimination TaqMan assays. Allele frequencies were compared between the cases and controls. All SNPs were successfully genotyped with high efficiency (>95 %). The SNPs had no significant deviation in cases or controls from Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE, p value > 0.05). None of the selected SNPs were significantly associated with KC in the Saudi Arabian population. However, we replicated the same trend of minor allele frequency (MAF) between cases and controls reported by a recent GWAS regarding the 5 SNPs rs4894535 (FNDC3B, chr3: 171995605), rs1536482 (RXRA-COL5A1, chr9: 137440528), rs7044529 (COL5A1, chr9: 137568051), rs11145951 (LCN12-PTGDS, chr9: 139860264), and rs2721051 (FOXO1, chr13: 41110884). This is the first study investigating the association of these SNPs with KC in a population from Saudi Arabia. We replicated the same trend of MAF alteration of the association between the SNPs rs4894535 (FNDC3B, chr3: 171995605), rs7044529 (COL5A1, chr9: 137568051), rs11145951 (LCN12-PTGDS, chr9: 139860264) and rs2721051 (FOXO1, chr13: 41110884) and KC-risk as reported by a recently published GWAS. Consistently replicated population-based studies are necessary to identify and/or confirm

  12. The Y Chromosome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offner, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The Y chromosome is of great interest to students and can be used to teach about many important biological concepts in addition to sex determination. This paper discusses mutation, recombination, mammalian sex determination, sex determination in general, and the evolution of sex determination in mammals. It includes a student activity that…

  13. Brief Arabic tobacco craving questionnaire: An investigation into craving and heavy smoking in Saudi Arabian males

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    Abdulaziz A Albrithen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Research in the United States has shown that craving tobacco is associated with smoking, yet no investigation has been done into the relationship between craving and the use of tobacco in Saudi Arabian smokers. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the craving of tobacco by Saudi males and its influence on daily smoking. Subjects were recruited under the auspices of the Tobacco Control Program in Jeddah City and Riyadh. Methods: The American English version of the tobacco craving questionnaire (TCQ-12 is a valid measure of four distinct aspects (factors of tobacco craving. The TCQ-12 was translated into Arabic tobacco craving questionnaire (ATCQ-12 and administered to a sample of 322 male smokers. Predictive validity was determined by examining the relationship between the factors and the number of cigarettes smoked per day (CPD. Results: In a general linear multivariate analysis of variance model, CPD increased significantly as either ATCQ-12 Factor 1 (emotionality or Factor 3 (compulsiveness increased. A significant Factor 1 by Factor 3 interaction indicated that Factor 1 was a better predictor of heavy smoking, but only when Factor 3 was low. Factor 3 was a better predictor of heavy smoking, but only when Factor 1 was low. Conclusions: The ATCQ-12 is a rapid measure of craving and valid predictor of CPD and heavy smoking. Craving in anticipation of smoking as relief from a negative mood (emotionality is an indicator of psychological withdrawal symptoms, while craving in anticipation of the inability to control tobacco use (compulsiveness is an indicator of physical dependence.

  14. Growth and Maturation of Plectropomus spp. in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    DesRosiers, Noah

    2011-05-01

    Two species of plectropomid grouper (Plectropomus areolatus and P. pessuliferus) are found in the Red Sea. In Saudi Arabia these are the most valuable fishes by weight, averaging wholesale prices around US $15 per kilogram (personal observation). Over the past two decades, the number of fishing vessels in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea has tripled. Despite this increase in fishing effort Saudi Arabia has not implemented any marine resource management for Red Sea fisheries. Little biological data are currently available to inform managers. The research presented here addresses knowledge gaps on the growth pattern, longevity and sexual ontogeny of Plectropomus spp. in the Red Sea. Collections of each species were established by purchasing landed individuals from fishermen and fish markets distributed evenly between three latitudinal regions around the country. The total length of each fish was measured to the nearest millimeter. Age was estimated by enumerating annual bands visualized in transverse sections of sagittal otoliths. Sexual stage was determined via histological examination of gonadal tissue. Plots of total length versus age were fitted with reparameterized von Bertalanffy growth functions constrained to a size-at-settlement estimate of 20 mm. P. pessuliferus achieved a larger size (maximum 960 mm) and an older age (maximum 19 years) than P. areolatus (maximum size 570 mm, maximum age 9 years). While no regional patterns were found for P. pesuliferus, likelihood ratio tests revealed regional differences in growth pattern for P. areolatus, finding an increasing mean age, increasing mean length, and decreasing growth rate with decreasing latitude. In addition, males of P. areolatus were more abundant in the Southern region. These findings contradict existing theories about the effects of latitudinal temperature gradients on life history. It is hypothesized that the broader continental shelf in the Southern region may be providing a haven for these species in the

  15. Phylogenetic Diversity of Cephalopoda (Animalia:Mollusca) Along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea Coastline

    KAUST Repository

    Byron, Gordon

    2016-12-01

    Although the Red Sea presents a unique environment with high temperature and salinity, it remains an area that is understudied. This lack of information is reflected in many areas, one which is biodiversity. Despite increasing work on biodiversity throughout the Red Sea and an increase in Cephalopoda studies, Cephalopoda in the Red Sea remain underrepresented, which is especially pronounced in molecular analyses. Members of the class Cephalopoda are considered to be major contributors to coral reef ecosystems, serving as part of the food chain and exhibiting population increases due to targeted teleost fisheries and global climate change. In order to assess the biodiversity of Cephalopoda in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, 87 specimens were collected from 25 reef locations between 17°N and 28°N latitude, as well as from the largest fish market in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Taxonomic identification of specimens was determined using morphological comparisons with previously reported species in the Red Sea and the molecular barcoding region Cytochrome Oxidase I. 84 Red Sea sequences were compared with sequences from GenBank and analyzed using a complement of Neighbor-Joining, Maximum-Likelihood, and Bayesian inference trees. Species complexes were also investigated for Sepia pharaonis and Sepioteuthis lessoniana, which had been previously reported. From 17 cuttlefish, our study yielded three species, two of which matched previously reported species in GenBank. In addition, two distinct clades of Sepia pharaonis were identified. Of 35 squid collected, four species were identified, one of which did not match any other accepted species in literature, while Sepioteuthis lessoniana in the Red Sea formed a distinct clade. From 30 different specimens a total of five genera of Octopoda were present, forming six distinct species. Five Octopoda species collected did not match previously reported species, although many specimens were paralarvae or juveniles, so morphologically we

  16. Assessment of metal contamination in coastal sediments of Al-Khobar area, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Talal; El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset

    2017-05-01

    An assessment of marine pollution due to heavy metals was made to coastal sediments collected from Al-Khobar coastline, in the Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia by analyzing of Al, V, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Hg, Mo, Sr, Se, As, Fe, Co and Ni using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The results indicated that the distribution of most metals was largely controlled by inputs of terrigenous material and most strongly associated with distribution of Al in sediments. In general Sr, Cr, Zn, Cu, V, Hg, Mo and Se show severe enrichment factors. Average values of Cu and Hg highly exceed the ERL and the Canadian ISQG values. Average Ni was higher than the ERL and the ERM values. The severe enrichment of some metals in the studied sediment could be partially attributed to anthropogenic activities, notably oil spills from exploration, transportation and from saline water desalination plants in Al-Khobar coast, and other industrial activities in the region.

  17. Biogeographic Patterns of Reef Fish Communities in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Roberts, May B.

    2014-12-01

    As a region renowned for high biodiversity, endemism and extreme temperature and salinity levels, the Red Sea is of high ecological interest. Despite this, there is relatively little literature on basic broad scale characteristics of the biodiversity or overall reef fish communities and how they change across latitude. We conducted visual transects recording the abundance of over 200 species of fish from 45 reefs spanning over 1000 km of Saudi Arabian coastline and used hierarchical cluster analysis to find that for combined depths from 0m-10m across this geographical range, the reef fish communities are relatively similar. However we find some interesting patterns both at the community level across depth and latitude as well as in endemic community distributions. We find that the communities, much like the environmental factors, shift gradually along latitude but do not show distinct clusters within the range we surveyed (from Al-Wajh in the north to the Farasan Banks in the south). Numbers of endemic species tend to be higher in the Thuwal region and further south. This type of baseline data on reef fish distribution and possible factors that may influence their ranges in the Red Sea are critical for future scientific studies as well as effective monitoring and in the face of the persistent anthropogenic influences such as coastal development, overfishing and climate change.

  18. Occurrence of acrylamide carcinogen in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea from Saudi Arabian market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Rizwan; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Naushad, Mu; Alomary, Ahmed Khodran; Alfadul, Sulaiman Mohammed; Alsohaimi, Ibrahim Hotan; Algamdi, Mohammad Saad

    2017-02-01

    The present work describes the outcomes of the assessment on acrylamide contents in a number of thermally treated foods (Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea) obtained from the Saudi Arabian markets. A total of 56 food samples of different brands and origin were studied, the amounts of acrylamide in Arabic coffee Qahwa, coffee and tea were obtained in the range of 10 to 682 μg kg-1. In comparison to coffee (152-682 μg kg-1), the Arabic coffee Qahwa (73-108 μg kg-1) and tea (10-97 μg kg-1) contain lower amounts of acrylamide. Among the analyzed samples, the green tea contained low amounts of acrylamide ranged from 10 to 18 μg kg-1, and thus the green tea could be considered as a healthier hot drink. A great variation of acrylamide formation has been observed in these food products. This divergence may be due to the initial concentration of amino acids especially asparagines and reducing sugars in food products, in addition to roasting temperature and time, pH and water activity. The obtained data can also be used in epidemiological investigation to estimate the acrylamide exposure from nutritional survey.

  19. [Y chromosome and spermatogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Human Y chromosome evolution has progressively been directed towards a role in sex determination and reproduction. Cytogenetically visible structural abnormalities have determined long arm chromosomal regions which define the AZF factor that contains genes implicated in the spermatogenic process. By using molecular tools, the AZF factor has been subdivided into three loci, AZFa, b and c, the deletion of which leads to specific spermatogenesis impairments due to the loss of particular genes. Most AZF genes are specifically expressed in testis but their functions are far to be known precisely. Partial deletions of AZF regions have been described. Some of them have allowed to define more precise genotype-phenotype relationships whereas others are considered as variants in relation to Y chromosome polymorphism.

  20. [Dicentric Y chromosome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoula, N Bouayed; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes are the most common Y structural abnormalities and their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. Here, we report the third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. We find 78 new cases for which molecular studies (PCR or FISH) have been widely applied to investigate SRY (68% of cases), GBY, ZFY, RFS4Y, GCY and different genes at AZF region. For dic(Yq), all cases (n = 20) were mosaic for 45,X and 4 of them were also mosaic for a 46,XY cell line. When breakpoints were available (15/20 cases), they were in Yp11. 50% of cases were phenotypic female and 20% phenotypic male while 20% of cases were reported with gonadal dysgenesis. Gonadal histology was defined in 8 cases but only in one case, gonadal tissu was genetically investigated because of gonadoblastoma. For dic(Yp) (n = 55), mosaicism concerned only 45,X cell line and was found in 50 cases while the remainder five cases were homogeneous. When breakpoints were available, it was at Yq11 in 50 cases and at Yq12 in two cases. 54% of cases were phenotypic female, 26% were phenotypic male and 18% were associated with genitalia ambiguous. SRY was analyzed in 33 cases, sequenced in 9 cases and was muted in only one case. Gonads were histologically explored in 34 cases and genetically investigated in 8 cases. Gonadoblastoma was found in only two cases. Through this review, it seems that phenotype-genotype correlations are still not possible and that homogeneous studies of dic(Y) in more patients using molecular tools for structural characterization of the rearranged Y chromosome and assessment of mosaicism in many organs are necessary to clarify the basis of the phenotypic heterogeneity of dicentric Y chromosomes and then to help phenotypic prediction of such chromosome rearrangement.

  1. The Effect of Corporate Governance on Capital Structure Decisions – A Case of Saudi Arabian Banking Sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasir Ali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this empirical study is to analyse the impact of Corporate Governance on Capital Structure Decisions in Saudi Arabian commercial banking sector. The components of corporate governance whose impact has been analysed on the capital structure are board size, independence of directors, ownership structure, ownership of management, board meetings. Multiple regression analysis, Correlation matrix and Descriptive Statistics is used to assess the relationship among corporate governance components and capital structure of Saudi commercial banks for the years 2010 and 2011. The results shows that ownership structure and board size are positively correlated which is coherent with most of the previous studies. Managerial ownership and board independence are negatively correlated and board meeting held in a year is also negatively correlated but is statistically insignificant. Moreover the study found that on average the Saudi banks uses 68 % debt capital. The research study is supposed to facilitate regulatory authorities like CMA for improving the implementation of rules and regulations in order to make corporate governance tools work more efficiently in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The research study evaluates the effects of corporate governance components on capital structure decisions of Saudi commercial banks.

  2. Influence of safety motivation and climate on safety behaviour and outcomes: evidence from the Saudi Arabian construction industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuwatwanich, Kriengsak; Al-Haadir, Saeed; Stewart, Rodney A

    2017-03-01

    Over the last three decades, safety literature has focused on safety climate and its role in forecasting injuries and accidents. However, research findings regarding the relationships between safety climate and other key outcome constructs are somewhat inconsistent. Recent safety climate literature suggests that examining the role of safety motivation may help provide a better explanation of such relationships. The research presented in this article aimed to empirically analyse the relationships among safety motivation, safety climate, safety behaviour and safety outcomes within the context of the Saudi Arabian construction industry. A conceptual model was developed to examine the relationships among four main constructs: safety motivation, safety climate, safety behaviour and safety outcomes. Based on the survey data collected in Saudi Arabia from site engineers and project managers (n = 295), statistical analyses were carried out, including confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis, and structural equation modelling to assess the model and test the hypotheses. The main results indicated that safety motivation could positively influence safety behaviour through safety climate, which plays a mediating role for this mechanism. The results also confirmed that safety behaviour could predict safety outcomes within the context of the Saudi Arabian construction industry.

  3. Species delimitation in the coral genus Goniopora (Scleractinia, Poritidae) from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Terraneo, Tullia Isotta

    2016-06-16

    Variable skeletal morphology, genotype induced plasticity, and homoplasy of skeletal structures have presented major challenges for scleractinian coral taxonomy and systematics since the 18th century. Although the recent integration of genetic and micromorphological data is helping to clarify the taxonomic confusion within the order, phylogenetic relationships and species delimitation within most coral genera are still far from settled. In the present study, the species boundaries in the scleractinian coral genus Goniopora were investigated using 199 colonies from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea and sequencing of four molecular markers: the mitochondrial intergenic spacer between CytB and NAD2, the nuclear ribosomal ITS region, and two single-copy nuclear genes (ATPsβ and CalM). DNA sequence data were analyzed using a variety of methods and exploratory species-delimitation tools. The results were broadly congruent in identifying five distinct molecular lineages within the sequenced Goniopora samples: G. somaliensis/G. savignyi, G. djiboutiensis/G. lobata, G. stokesi, G. albiconus/G. tenuidens, and G. minor/G. gracilis. Although the traditional macromorphological characters used to identify these nine morphospecies were not able to discriminate the obtained molecular clades, informative micromorphological and microstructural features (such as the micro-ornamentation and the arrangement of the columella) were recovered among the five lineages. Moreover, unique in vivo morphologies were associated with the genetic-delimited lineages, further supporting the molecular findings. This study represents the first attempt to identify species boundaries within Goniopora using a combined morpho-molecular approach. The obtained data establish a basis for future taxonomic revision of the genus, which should include colonies across its entire geographical distribution in the Indo-Pacific.

  4. Study on self-assessment regarding knowledge of temporomandibular disorders in children/adolescents by Swedish and Saudi Arabian dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khotani, Amal; Björnsson, Olof; Naimi-Akbar, Aron; Christidis, Nikolaos; Alstergren, Per

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the degree of self-assessed knowledge among dentists in Sweden and Saudi Arabia regarding temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in children and adolescents using a summative form of assessment and further to investigate the possible factors that may influence the self-assessed knowledge. A questionnaire survey covering four domains (Etiology; Diagnosis and classification; Chronic pain and pain behavior; Treatment and prognosis) regarding TMD knowledge was used. Out of 250 questionnaires (125 in each country) a total of 65 (52%) were returned in Sweden and 104 (83%) in Saudi Arabia. Self-assessed individual knowledge was significantly associated to the level of actual knowledge among the Swedish groups in the domains Etiology; Diagnosis and classification and Treatment and prognosis (p dentists in Sweden and Saudi Arabia. The Swedish dentists have a better ability to assess their level of knowledge compared to Saudi Arabian dentists regarding TMD in children and adolescents. This difference could be related to several factors such as motivation, positive feedback, reflection, psychomotor, and interpersonal skills, which all are more dominant in the Swedish educational tradition.

  5. Male Saudi Arabian freshman science majors at Jazan University: Their perceptions of parental educational practices on their science achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrehaly, Essa D.

    Examination of Saudi Arabian educational practices is scarce, but increasingly important, especially in light of the country's pace in worldwide mathematics and science rankings. The purpose of the study is to understand and evaluate parental influence on male children's science education achievements in Saudi Arabia. Parental level of education and participant's choice of science major were used to identify groups for the purpose of data analysis. Data were gathered using five independent variables concerning parental educational practices (attitude, involvement, autonomy support, structure and control) and the dependent variable of science scores in high school. The sample consisted of 338 participants and was arbitrarily drawn from the science-based colleges (medical, engineering, and natural science) at Jazan University in Saudi Arabia. The data were tested using Pearson's analysis, backward multiple regression, one way ANOVA and independent t-test. The findings of the study reveal significant correlations for all five of the variables. Multiple regressions revealed that all five of the parents' educational practices indicators combined together could explain 19% of the variance in science scores and parental attitude toward science and educational involvement combined accounted for more than 18% of the variance. Analysis indicates that no significant difference is attributable to parental involvement and educational level. This finding is important because it indicates that, in Saudi Arabia, results are not consistent with research in Western or other Asian contexts.

  6. Genome at juncture of early human migration: a systematic analysis of two whole genomes and thirteen exomes from Kuwaiti population subgroup of inferred Saudi Arabian tribe ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osama Alsmadi

    Full Text Available Population of the State of Kuwait is composed of three genetic subgroups of inferred Persian, Saudi Arabian tribe and Bedouin ancestry. The Saudi Arabian tribe subgroup traces its origin to the Najd region of Saudi Arabia. By sequencing two whole genomes and thirteen exomes from this subgroup at high coverage (>40X, we identify 4,950,724 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs, 515,802 indels and 39,762 structural variations. Of the identified variants, 10,098 (8.3% exomic SNPs, 139,923 (2.9% non-exomic SNPs, 5,256 (54.3% exomic indels, and 374,959 (74.08% non-exomic indels are 'novel'. Up to 8,070 (79.9% of the reported novel biallelic exomic SNPs are seen in low frequency (minor allele frequency T] from CYP4F2 gene [MIM:*604426] associated with warfarin dosage levels [MIM:#122700] required to elicit normal anticoagulant response; and a 3' UTR SNP (rs6151429 [22:g.51063477T>C] from ARSA gene [MIM:*607574] associated with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy [MIM:#250100]. Hemoglobin Riyadh variant (identified for the first time in a Saudi Arabian woman is observed in the exome data. The mitochondrial haplogroup profiles of the 15 individuals are consistent with the haplogroup diversity seen in Saudi Arabian natives, who are believed to have received substantial gene flow from Africa and eastern provenance. We present the first genome resource imperative for designing future genetic studies in Saudi Arabian tribe subgroup. The full-length genome sequences and the identified variants are available at ftp://dgr.dasmaninstitute.org and http://dgr.dasmaninstitute.org/DGR/gb.html.

  7. Genome at juncture of early human migration: a systematic analysis of two whole genomes and thirteen exomes from Kuwaiti population subgroup of inferred Saudi Arabian tribe ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsmadi, Osama; John, Sumi E; Thareja, Gaurav; Hebbar, Prashantha; Antony, Dinu; Behbehani, Kazem; Thanaraj, Thangavel Alphonse

    2014-01-01

    Population of the State of Kuwait is composed of three genetic subgroups of inferred Persian, Saudi Arabian tribe and Bedouin ancestry. The Saudi Arabian tribe subgroup traces its origin to the Najd region of Saudi Arabia. By sequencing two whole genomes and thirteen exomes from this subgroup at high coverage (>40X), we identify 4,950,724 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), 515,802 indels and 39,762 structural variations. Of the identified variants, 10,098 (8.3%) exomic SNPs, 139,923 (2.9%) non-exomic SNPs, 5,256 (54.3%) exomic indels, and 374,959 (74.08%) non-exomic indels are 'novel'. Up to 8,070 (79.9%) of the reported novel biallelic exomic SNPs are seen in low frequency (minor allele frequency high frequencies in this subgroup are: a nonsynonymous deleterious SNP (rs2108622 [19:g.15990431C>T] from CYP4F2 gene [MIM:*604426]) associated with warfarin dosage levels [MIM:#122700] required to elicit normal anticoagulant response; and a 3' UTR SNP (rs6151429 [22:g.51063477T>C]) from ARSA gene [MIM:*607574]) associated with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy [MIM:#250100]. Hemoglobin Riyadh variant (identified for the first time in a Saudi Arabian woman) is observed in the exome data. The mitochondrial haplogroup profiles of the 15 individuals are consistent with the haplogroup diversity seen in Saudi Arabian natives, who are believed to have received substantial gene flow from Africa and eastern provenance. We present the first genome resource imperative for designing future genetic studies in Saudi Arabian tribe subgroup. The full-length genome sequences and the identified variants are available at ftp://dgr.dasmaninstitute.org and http://dgr.dasmaninstitute.org/DGR/gb.html.

  8. Distribution of smile line, gingival angle and tooth shape among the Saudi Arabian subpopulation and their association with gingival biotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlQahtani, Nabeeh A; Haralur, Satheesh B; AlMaqbol, Mohammad; AlMufarrij, Ali Jubran; Al Dera, Ahmed Ali; Al-Qarni, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    To determine the occurrence of smile line and maxillary tooth shape in the Saudi Arabian subpopulation, and to estimate the association between these parameters with gingival biotype. On the fulfillment of selection criteria, total 315 patients belong to Saudi Arabian ethnic group were randomly selected. Two frontal photographs of the patients were acquired. The tooth morphology, gingival angle, and smile line classification were determined with ImageJ image analyzing software. The gingival biotype was assessed by probe transparency method. The obtained data were analyzed with SPSS 19 (IBM Corporation, New York, USA) software to determine the frequency and association between other parameters and gingival biotype. Among the clinical parameters evaluated, the tapering tooth morphology (56.8%), thick gingival biotype (53%), and average smile line (57.5%) was more prevalent. The statistically significant association was found between thick gingival biotype and the square tooth, high smile line. The high gingival angle was associated with thin gingival biotype. The study results indicate the existence of an association between tooth shape, smile line, and gingival angle with gingival biotype.

  9. "I Am Different from Other Women in the World": The Experiences of Saudi Arabian Women Studying Online in International Master Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Annamaria

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative study that investigated seven female Saudi Arabian students of the University of Liverpool's online Masters programmes. Qualitative, first-person research methods and hermeneutic phenomenology were chosen for the analysis and interpretation of transcripts (Langeveld, 1983; van Manen, 1997; Creswell,…

  10. Analysis of sounds produced by Rhynchophorus ferrugineus and Oryctes elegans larvae and adults in data palm trees and offshoots in Saudi Arabian commercial orchards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sounds produced by larval and adult palm tree pests in Saudi Arabian date palm orchards were recorded using commercially available insect acoustic detection instruments. The trees and offshoots were inspected for presence/absence of insects and other visual signs of infestation. Subsequently, the sp...

  11. Y chromosome morphology of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, W L; Upton, P C

    1979-11-01

    Metaphase chromosomes from cultured lymphocytes were prepared from 246 bulls including Bos indicus, Bos taurus. Bos (Bibos) banteng, Sanga and interspecific and intra-specific breed crosses. Morphology and karyotype position of the Y chromosome for each bull were noted. Karyotype position of the Y chromosome varied between bulls from 25th to 29th pair and the Y chromosomes of Bos indicus and breeds derived from Bos indicus bulls were acrocentric while those of Bos taurus, Sanga and breeds derived from these bulls were metacentric/submetacentric. Two forms of Y chromosome were noted in the Droughtmaster breed. C-banding patterns of the acrocentric Y chromosome were characteristic and enabled easy identification.

  12. Factors influencing Saudi Arabian optometry candidates' career choices and institution of learning. Why do Saudi students choose to study optometry?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Osuagwu, Uchechukwu L; Briggs, Stella T; Chijuka, John C; Alanazi, Saud A; Ogbuehi, Kelechi C

    2014-01-01

    Optometry is a primary health-care profession (PHCP) and this study aimed to elucidate the factors influencing the choice of optometry as a career for Saudi students, the students' perceptions of optometry and the effect of gender...

  13. Designing Local-Scale Marine Protected Area Networks in the Central Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Khalil, Maha T.

    2015-12-01

    Coral reefs around the world are at risk from overexploitation and climate change, and coral reefs of the Red Sea are no exception. Science-based designation of marine protected areas (MPAs), within which human activities are restricted, has become a popular method for conserving biodiversity, restoring degraded habitats, and replenishing depleted populations. The aim of this project was to explore adaptable methods for designing locally-manageable MPAs for various conservation goals near Thuwal in the central Saudi Arabian Red Sea while allowing human activities to continue. First, the potential for using simple spatial habitat distribution metrics to aid in designing MPAs that are well-connected with larval supply was explored. Results showed that the degree of habitat patchiness may be positively correlated with realized dispersal distances, making it possible to space MPAs further apart in patchier habitats while still maintaining larval connectivity. However, this relationship requires further study and may be informative to MPA design only in the absence of spatially-explicit empirical dispersal data. Next, biological data was collected, and the spatial variation in biomass, trophic structure, biodiversity, and community assemblages on Thuwal reefs was analyzed in order to inform the process of prioritizing reefs for inclusion in MPA networks. Inshore and offshore reef community assemblages were found to be different and indicated relatively degraded inshore habitats. These trends were used to select species and benthic categories that would be important to conserve in a local MPA. The abundances of these “conservation features” were then modeled throughout the study area, and the decision support software “Marxan” was used to design MPA networks in Thuwal that included these features to achieve quantitative objectives. While achieving objectives relevant to fisheries concerns was relatively more challenging, results showed that it is possible to

  14. Replication of GWAS Coding SNPs Implicates MMEL1 as a Potential Susceptibility Locus among Saudi Arabian Celiac Disease Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar I. Saadah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD, a gluten intolerance disorder, was implicated to have 57 genetic susceptibility loci for Europeans but not for culturally and geographically distinct ethnic populations like Saudi Arabian CD patients. Therefore, we genotyped Saudi CD patients and healthy controls for three polymorphisms, that is, Phe196Ser in IRAK1, Trp262Arg in SH2B3, and Met518Thr in MMEL1 genes. Single locus analysis identified that carriers of the 518 Thr/Thr (MMEL1 genotype conferred a 1.6-fold increased disease risk compared to the noncarriers (OR = 2.6; 95% CI: 1.22–5.54; P<0.01. This significance persisted even under allelic (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 1.05–2.28; P=0.02 and additive (OR = 0.35; 95% CI: 0.17–0.71; P=0.03 genetic models. However, frequencies for Trp262Arg (SH2B3 and Phe196Ser (IRAK1 polymorphisms were not significantly different between patients and controls. The overall best MDR model included Met518Thr and Trp262Arg polymorphisms, with a maximal testing accuracy of 64.1% and a maximal cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10 (P=0.0156. Allelic distribution of the 518 Thr/Thr polymorphism in MMEL1 primarily suggests its independent and synergistic contribution towards CD susceptibility among Saudi patients. Lack of significant association of IRAK and SH2B3 gene polymorphisms in Saudi patients but their association in European groups suggests the genetic heterogeneity of CD.

  15. Re-introduction of globally threatened Arabian Gazelles Gazella Arabica (Pallas, 1766 (Mammalia: Bovidae in fenced protected area in central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. Islam

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Arabian Gazelle is a globally threatened antelope (Vulnerable in Saudi Arabia. Small relict populations remain in limited areas, while historically Arabian Gazelles occurred in Mahazat as-Sayd protected area in central Saudi Arabia but were exterminated by anthropogenic and other pressures, including habitat loss and hunting. Important habitat has been lost to agricultural developments, fencing of pasture for livestock and the construction of human settlements and roads. The reintroduction of Arabian Gazelles was undertaken in Mahazat during 2011-2014 to bring back this locally extinct species study its ecology and biology in a fenced protected area. We released a total of 49 (12 males, 37 females animals. A year after release animals started breeding and six calves have been recorded so far with more to come. The gazelles prefer to use more rocky areas where shrubs and acacia trees occur in the reserve, and do not move long distances except for one individual that moved more than 50km. Mahazat is fenced, which prevents local people from entering the reserve to poach or otherwise disturb animals. Management lessons include the need for continued monitor-ing of reintroduced populations. Interactions between Arabian and Sand Gazelles (Gazella subgutturosa marica and Arabian Oryx (Oryx leucoryx were also studied.

  16. Using a genetic-fuzzy algorithm as a computer aided diagnosis tool on Saudi Arabian breast cancer database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Abir; Tchier, F

    2017-04-01

    The computer-aided diagnosis has become one of the major research topics in medical diagnostics. In this research paper, we focus on designing an automated computer diagnosis by combining two major methodologies, namely the fuzzy base systems and the evolutionary genetic algorithms and applying them to the Saudi Arabian breast cancer diagnosis database, to be employed for assisting physicians in the early detection of breast cancers, and hence obtaining an early-computerized diagnosis complementary to that by physicians. Our hybrid algorithm, the genetic-fuzzy algorithm, has produced optimized diagnosis systems that attain high classification performance, in fact, our best three rule system obtained a 97% accuracy, with simple and well interpretive rules, and with a good degree of confidence of 91%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A study on Saudi Arabian retail dynamics, its potential future and challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammed Naquibur Rahman

    2014-01-01

      The research report is aimed at providing opportunities to the retail business players and the government to get the best benefits from the business potential and resources available in the of Saudi Arabia...

  18. “I am Different from Other Women in the World” THE EXPERIENCES OF SAUDI ARABIAN WOMEN STUDYING ONLINE IN INTERNATIONAL MASTER PROGRAMMES

    OpenAIRE

    Szilagyi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative study that investigated seven female Saudi Arabian students of the University of Liverpool’s online Masters Programmes. Qualitative, first-person research methods and hermeneutic phenomenology were chosen for the analysis and interpretation of transcripts (Langeveld, 1983; van Manen, 1997; Creswell, 2007, Roth, 2012). The principles of cultural anthropology (Hall & du Gay, 1996; Hannerz, 1992; Lull, 2001; Coleman, 2010) were used to take...

  19. Geology of the Arabian Peninsula; shield area of western Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Glen F.; Schmidt, Dwight L.; Huffman, A. Curtis

    1989-01-01

    Western Arabia lies within the low-latitude desert of north Africa and the Middle East, the core being the Arabian segment of the African Shield. The core of complex basement rocks accounts for about 670,000 km2, or one-third of the Arabian Peninsula. Reconnaissance mapping of these crystalline rocks, together with bordering sedimentary rocks and volcanic flows, begun in 1950, resulted during the next 13 years in a series of geologic and geographic maps without extensive texts. The maps served as general guides for development of natural resources, including water supplies, ore deposits, and building materials. An intensive exploration program that began in 1963 and involved numerous geologists has vastly increased geologic information.

  20. Islamic Teachers' Perceptions of Improving Critical Thinking Skills in Saudi Arabian Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwadai, Mesfer Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The intent of this explanatory sequential mixed-method study is to examine Islamic teachers' thoughts on improving critical thinking skills in elementary schools in the Southwestern province of Saudi Arabia. This study involves the collection of quantitative data and an explanation of the quantitative results with qualitative data. In the first…

  1. Relation between ABO blood groups and obesity in a Saudi Arabian population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turki A. Alwasaidi, FRCPC

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Overall, our study did not show a significant relation between overweight and obesity and ABO blood groups. However, the elevation of the prevalence of overweight and obesity, mainly among the younger generations of the Saudi population, requires more awareness and educational programs.

  2. Critical Success Factors for eLearning in Saudi Arabian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhabeeb, Abdullah; Rowley, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to offer insights into the development of eLearning systems and the perceptions of key players in the management of eLearning systems in three large universities in Saudi Arabia. It establishes the relative importance of different factors and compares these findings with studies conducted elsewhere in the…

  3. A New Perspective on the Quest for Education: The Saudi Arabian Way to Knowledge Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan, Annalisa

    2013-01-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, thanks to the foresight and generosity of the Al Saud ruling family, has always devoted great efforts to the development of education. Investments in higher education, in particular, have increased exponentially in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to introduce some facts and figures about the new developments…

  4. Saudi Arabian Green Economy Infrastructure: Barriers, Strategies & Opportunity – An Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisreen Ismail Albanawi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Saudi Arabia is finally catching up with the rest of the developed world in terms of environmental awareness. In the past, while much of the rest of the world spent its time pondering issues such as global warming, water, air, and soil pollution, over-exploitation of resources, and a myriad of other environmental concerns, the Saudi people and government seemed to be primarily focused on expanding their capital in a globalized economy. However, in 2015, for the first time, this trend began to show legitimate change. This new emphasis on environmental concerns has caused some interest and uproar, specifically in the economic sector. The research, therefore, concentrated on the barriers, strategies, and opportunities that might impede or encourage Saudi Arabia in its quest to develop a greener and more sustainable economic infrastructure. After carefully considering the available literature, data, and reliable statistics, the report concluded that, while change will be difficult and, possibly slow, Saudi Arabia should expect to see greener projects and initiatives transpiring in their homeland over the course of the next several years.

  5. Impact of Computer-Aided Warfarin Dosing in a Saudi Arabian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    general lack of quality evaluation and monitoring in oral anticoagulation clinics. There is much evidence that better anticoagulation control (i.e., higher TTR) can protect patients from severe or even fatal adverse events [5]. Our study aims to analyze the application of computer software-aided anticoagulation dosing in Saudi ...

  6. Exploring the genetic diversity of shallow-water Agariciidae (Cnidaria: Anthozoa) from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Terraneo, Tullia Isotta

    2017-05-19

    Scleractinian corals ascribed to the family Agariciidae represent an important component of Red Sea coral reef fauna, though little genetic data are currently available for this group, and existing information shows polyphyly in the examined mesophotic taxa from the Pacific Ocean. In this work, we provide a first genetic survey of Agariciidae from the Saudi Arabian Red Sea, based on a collection of shallow-water material (<30 m) from the Gulf of Aqaba to the Farasan Islands. Two molecular markers were sequenced to infer morphospecies monophyly and relationships, the intergenic region between COI and 16S rRNA from mitochondrial DNA and the ribosomal ITS1 region from nuclear DNA. A total of 20 morphospecies were identified based on classical macromorphological characters. Six, namely Gardineroseris planulata, Pavona maldivensis, Pavona clavus, Pavona decussata, Leptoseris fragilis, and Leptoseris yabei, were resolved with both DNA loci. The molecular boundaries among the remaining 14 species remain unclear. Our results further confirm that the morphology-based taxonomy of most agariciid species is in disagreement with genetics. In order to disentangle the systematics of these taxa, the inclusion of more sampling locations, additional variable loci, and a micromophological approach are likely needed. Our genetic data represent a first step towards the comparison of biodiversity and connectivity between the Red Sea and the rest of the Indo-Pacific.

  7. Antimicrobial, antioxidant properties and chemical composition of seaweeds collected from Saudi Arabia (Red Sea and Arabian Gulf).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moubayed, Nadine M S; Al Houri, Hadeel Jawad; Al Khulaifi, Manal M; Al Farraj, Dunia A

    2017-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the antibacterial activity of selected brown and green marine algae collected from Saudi Arabia Red Sea and Arabian Gulf. The methanolic and acetone extracts were tested against gram positive, gram negative bacteria and Candida albicans in an attempt to be used as an alternative to commonly used antibiotics. Both brown seaweed species Sargassum latifolium B and Sargassum platycarpum A methanolic extracts were found to be active against gram positive than gram negative; however, S. latifolium acetone extract gave the highest inhibitory activity against Salmonella sp. On the other hand, Cladophorasocialis organic extract demonstrated higher antibacterial activity than the fresh extract but both C. socialis extracts revealed decreased activity compared to Sargassum extracts. Cladophora methanolic extract showed an obvious effect on methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The present work shows a comparable therapeutic potency of the tested seaweed members Sargassum and Cladophora extracts in treating human microbial pathogens to synthetic chemical antibiotics. A remarkable higher antioxidant DPPH free radical scavenging effect was recorded with Sargassum sp. compared to Cladophora sp. FTIR Infrared Spectrometer analysis together with the high performance liquid chromatography provided a detailed description of the possible functional constituents and the major chemical components present in marine macroalgae particularly in brown seaweeds to be mainly of phenolic nature to which the potent antimicrobial activity is being attributed.

  8. Professional use of the internet among Saudi Arabian dermatologists: a cross-sectional survey

    OpenAIRE

    AlGhamdi Khalid M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The internet is an increasingly important tool for physicians, but the extent to which it is used by dermatologists is unknown. We aimed to investigate the utilization of the internet by dermatologists in Saudi Arabia for medical purposes during their daily practice and to clarify the reasons for its use and non-use. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all 160 dermatologists attending the National Dermatology conference in 2007. Results A total of ...

  9. Explaining the intent to start a business among Saudi Arabian University Students

    OpenAIRE

    ALI, Tarek BEN

    2016-01-01

    Studying entrepreneurial intention has long been an important topic in the field of entrepreneurship. In this paper, we investigate the entrepreneurial intentions of final-year management university students in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia by applying the theory of planned behavior (TPB). The objectives of the study were to test whether the TPB can help explain the entrepreneurial intentions of university students; to determine whether students will have intentions to start a business and to t...

  10. The desire to utilize postmastectomy breast reconstruction in Saudi Arabian women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Basim A.; Samargandi, Osama A.; Alghamdi, Hattan A.; Sayegh, Anas A.; Hakeem, Yasir J.; Merdad, Leena; Merdad, Adnan A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To study factors that influence the desire to utilize breast reconstruction after mastectomy, and to investigate the barriers to reconstruction among women in Saudi Arabia. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study at 2 surgical centers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all breast cancer patients attending the surgery clinics for follow-up after mastectomy between January and March 2013. Ninety-one patients met the study inclusion criteria. The first part of the questionnaire covered the demographic and socioeconomic information regarding factors that might influence the desire to utilize breast reconstruction including possible barriers. Multivariate logistic regression was used to determine the significant predictors of the desire to undergo reconstruction. Results: Overall, 16.5% of patients underwent breast reconstruction after mastectomy. Young age and high educational attainment were significantly associated with an increased desire to undergo reconstruction. The main barriers to reconstruction were the lack of adequate information on the procedure (63%), concerns on the complications of the procedure (68%), and concerns on the reconstruction interfering with the detection of recurrence (54%). Conclusion: Age and educational level were significant predictors of the desire to utilize breast reconstruction. Furthermore, modifiable barriers included the lack of knowledge and misconceptions on the procedure. Addressing these issues may increase the rate of breast reconstruction in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25737172

  11. Analysis of Saudi Arabian middle and high school science teachers' conceptions of the nature of science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almazroa, Hiya Mohammed

    This study was conducted to explore Saudi middle and high school science teachers' conceptions of the Nature of Science (NOS). It also detected the effects of gender, science content major, and years of teaching experience on teachers' conceptions of the NOS. The study included a sample of 786 science teachers (137 male and 649 female) who were teaching in middle and high schools in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia in the 1995-1996 academic year. The study was conducted using a translated version of the Nature of Science Scale (NOSS) developed by Kimball (1967). The scale contains 29 items ranging from "agree" to "disagree", and the scoring of the items ranged from 29 to 87. The lowest score is 29 (1 x 29) and the highest score possible on the test is 87 (3 x 29 items). The data collected was statistically analyzed using descriptive statistics and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The study revealed that Saudi science teachers as a group hold numerous misconceptions about the NOS with a significant difference in understanding the NOS between the male and female teachers. The study also showed that teachers with a major in physics held more adequate views than did teachers with other majors. In addition, novice teachers were found to have more adequate conceptions of the NOS than did experienced teachers.

  12. The role of land surface fluxes in Saudi-KAU AGCM: Temperature climatology over the Arabian Peninsula for the period 1981-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashfaqur Rahman, M.; Almazroui, Mansour; Nazrul Islam, M.; O'Brien, Enda; Yousef, Ahmed Elsayed

    2018-02-01

    A new version of the Community Land Model (CLM) was introduced to the Saudi King Abdulaziz University Atmospheric Global Climate Model (Saudi-KAU AGCM) for better land surface component representation, and so to enhance climate simulation. CLM replaced the original land surface model (LSM) in Saudi-KAU AGCM, with the aim of simulating more accurate land surface fluxes globally, but especially over the Arabian Peninsula. To evaluate the performance of Saudi-KAU AGCM, simulations were completed with CLM and LSM for the period 1981-2010. In comparison with LSM, CLM generates surface air temperature values that are closer to National Centre for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) observations. The global annual averages of land surface air temperature are 9.51, 9.52, and 9.57 °C for NCEP, CLM, and LSM respectively, although the same atmospheric radiative and surface forcing from Saudi-KAU AGCM are provided to both LSM and CLM at every time step. The better temperature simulations when using CLM can be attributed to the more comprehensive plant functional type and hierarchical tile approach to the land cover type in CLM, along with better parameterization of upward land surface fluxes compared to LSM. At global scale, CLM exhibits smaller annual and seasonal mean biases of temperature with respect to NCEP data. Moreover, at regional scale, CLM demonstrates reasonable seasonal and annual mean temperature over the Arabian Peninsula as compared to the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) data. Finally, CLM generated better matches to single point-wise observations of surface air temperature and surface fluxes for some case studies.

  13. The Effects of Low Self-Control and Delinquent Peers on Alcohol, Tobacco, and Drug Use in a Sample of Saudi Arabian Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaver, Kevin M; Al-Ghamdi, Mohammed Said; Kobeisy, Ahmed Nezar; Alqurashi, Fathiyah H; Schwartz, Joseph A; Connolly, Eric J; Gajos, Jamie M

    2016-10-01

    A considerable amount of research has examined patterns of substance use and the potential explanations of it among samples from the United States and other industrialized nations. To date, however, no research has explored these issues in a sample of Saudi Arabian youth. The current study addressed this gap in the literature and examined the lifetime use of drugs, alcohol, and tobacco among Saudi Arabian youth. We also examined whether key measures from social learning theory and low self-control theory were able to account for patterns of usage. Data drawn from a sample of nearly 500 youth residing in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, were used. Analysis of the data revealed that 12.7% of youth had smoked cigarettes at least 1 time, 2.6% had consumed alcohol at least once, and 3.0% had used illegal drugs. Moreover, the results of rare-events logistic regression revealed that a measure of delinquent peers was the strongest and most consistent predictor of substance use, while a measure of low self-control was unrelated (or related in a direction opposite to that which was predicted) to the measures of substance use. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Influence of Adiposity-Related Genetic Markers in a Population of Saudi Arabians Where Other Variables Influencing Obesity May Be Reduced

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    Khalid K. Alharbi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Large scale studies in Europeans have clearly identified common polymorphism affecting BMI and obesity. We undertook a genotype study to examine the impact of variants, known to influence obesity, in a sample from the Saudi Arabian population, notable for its profound combination of low mean physical activity indices and high energy intake. Anthropometry measures and genotypes were obtained for 367 Saudis, taken from King Saud University and Biomarker Screening Project in Riyadh (Riyadh Cohort. We observed large effect sizes with obesity for rs10767664 (BDNF (OR = 1.923, P=0.00072 and rs3751812 (FTO (OR = 1.523, P=0.016 in our sample and, using weighted genetic risk scores, we found strong evidence of a cumulative effect using 11 SNPs taken predominantly from loci principally affecting appetite (OR = 2.57, P=0.00092. We used conditional analyses to discern which of our three highly correlated FTO SNPs were responsible for the observed signal, although we were unable to determine with confidence which best marked the causal site. Our analysis indicates that markers located in loci known to influence fat mass through increased appetite affect obesity in Saudi Arabians to an extent possibly greater than in Europeans. Larger scale studies will be necessary to obtain a precise comparison.

  15. Trace-element geochemistry of postorogenic granites from the northeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckless, John S.; Knight, R.J.; VanTrump, G.; Budahn, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Concentrations determined for all of the trace elements included in this study of postorogenic granites from the northeastern Arabian Shield are best described by log-normal distributions. The trace elements are divided into two groups: (1) compatible lithophile and siderophile elements (strontium, cobalt, scandium, manganese, europium, and titanium) and (2) incompatible lithophile elements (uranium, thorium, tantalum, rubidium, and rare-earth elements, except europium). The compatible elements exhibit greatest concentrations in the metaluminous postorogenic granites, and concentrations decrease with increasing degree of magma evolution. Economic potential for these elements and other geochemically similar elements is considered to be low. The concentrations of the incompatible elements increase with increasing degree of magma evolution and are greatest in the peralkaline and peraluminous granites. There is some geologic evidence that pegmatite and vein-forming processes were operative toward the end stage of postorogenic magmatism in the northeastern Arabian Shield, and therefore there is some probability for economic potential for these elements. It is suggested that such potential is greatest where highly evolved postorogenic granites intruded volatile (generally water )-rich country rocks.

  16. Serologic surveillance for selected viral agents in captive and free-ranging populations of Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frölich, Kai; Hamblin, Christopher; Jung, Sandra; Ostrowski, Stéphane; Mwanzia, Jacob; Streich, Wolf Jürgen; Anderson, John; Armstrong, Robert M; Anajariyah, Saud

    2005-01-01

    A total of 294 sera collected between 1999 and 2001 from eight captive and one free-ranging herds of Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) distributed in Saudi Arabia (SA) and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) were assayed for antibodies against 13 selected viral agents. Arabian oryx have been exposed to bluetongue virus (BTV), epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), rinderpest virus (RPV), bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV), bovine adenovirus 3 (BAV-3), cervid herpesvirus-1, foot-and-mouth disease virus, equine herpesvirus 9, and bovine viral diarrhea virus. The high seroprevalence to BTV and EHDV in the UAE and SA indicates that Arabian oryx are likely to be susceptible to infection by these viruses and therefore could act as a source of virus to vectors during the infective stage of infection. Moreover, antibodies were detected against RPV and BRSV in sera from SA and against BAV-3 in sera from the UAE. No antibodies were found against bovine herpesvirus-1, caprine herpesvirus-1, enzootic bovine leucosis virus, and peste des petits ruminants virus. On the basis of these results, caution should be applied when considering translocation of Arabian oryx, and only those proven to be free of infectious agents that might present a risk to other species should be moved.

  17. Association of mitochondrial haplogroups H and R with keratoconus in Saudi Arabian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Azad, Taif Anwar; Sultan, Tahira; Kalantan, Hatem; Kondkar, Altaf A; Al-Muammar, Abdulrahman M

    2014-05-01

    Keratoconic corneas exhibit more mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage than do normal corneas and thus mtDNA may represent a potential candidate for genetic susceptibility studies in keratoconus. To test this hypothesis we determined mitochondrial haplogroups in Saudi patients with keratoconus and healthy controls of same ethnicity. Mitochondrial haplogrouping was performed by polymerase chain reaction-based automated Sanger sequencing in 114 patients with keratoconus and 552 healthy controls. Mitochondrial haplogroups H and R were significantly overrepresented in patients with keratoconus (28.9% vs. 8.5%, P keratoconus. In addition, the results provide further evidence for a plausible role of mtDNA in keratoconus etiology.

  18. Contrasting zircon morphology and UPb systematics in peralkaline and metaluminous post-orogenic granite complexes of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikof, J.N.; Stoeser, D.B.

    1989-01-01

    Uzircon ages are reported for seven metaluminous-to-peralkaline post-orogenic granites from the Late Proterozoic Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia. Zircons from the metaluminous rocks are prismatic, with length-to-width ratios of ??? 2-4: 1 and small pyramidal terminations. In contrast, zircons from three of the four peralkaline complexes either lack well-developed prismatic faces (are pseudo-octahedral) or are anhedral. Some zircons from the peralkaline granites contain inherited radiogenic Pb and have very high common Pb contents (206Pb/204Pb Zircons in the metaluminous granites do not contain inheritance and yield well-defined concordia intercepts. The span of ages of the seven complexes (670-470 Ma) indicates that post-orogenic granitic magmatism was not a singular event in the Arabian Shield but rather occurred as multiple intrusive episodes from the Late Proterozoic to the Middle Ordovician. ?? 1989.

  19. Metal pollution in Al-Khobar seawater, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Talal; Alfaifi, Hussain; El-Sorogy, Abdelbaset

    2017-06-15

    In order to assess heavy metals pollution along the Al-Khobar coastline, 30 seawater samples and 15 sediment ones were collected for Al, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Sr, Mo, Cd, Hg and Pb analysis by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS). The analysis indicated a southward decreasing pattern in most heavy metal concentrations and the average values of Zn, Fe, Mn, Cu, As and Cr were higher than the ones reported from some worldwide seas and gulfs. Most of the highest levels were recorded within the bays and were related with in situ under sediments especially that composed of clays and very fine sands, and in localities characterized with anthropogenic activities like landfilling, desalination plants, fishing boats, oil spills and solid rubbish. The results of the present study provide useful background for further marine investigation and management in the Arabian Gulf region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Peralkaline and peraluminous granites and related mineral deposits of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, James E.

    1983-01-01

    In the Precambrian Arabian Shield, granitoid plutonic rocks are widespread and range in age from 800 to 550 Ma old; but the mineral-resource potential associated with these plutonic rocks is restricted mainly to the younger, postorogenic granites. Two granite types of current economic interest are zirconium- niobium-enriched per alkaline granites and tin-tungsten-enriched peraluminous granites. Both types are highly evolved, are enriched in lithium, rubidium, and fluorine, and have distinctive mineralogy, textures, and chemistry. The zirconium-niobium-enriched granites are related to medium- to large-sized plutons and complexes of peralkaline granite, and the tin-tungsten-enriched granites are related to medium-sized plutons of biotite or biotite-muscovite granite.

  1. Professional use of the internet among Saudi Arabian dermatologists: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Khalid M

    2009-10-16

    The internet is an increasingly important tool for physicians, but the extent to which it is used by dermatologists is unknown. We aimed to investigate the utilization of the internet by dermatologists in Saudi Arabia for medical purposes during their daily practice and to clarify the reasons for its use and non-use. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all 160 dermatologists attending the National Dermatology conference in 2007. A total of 107 questionnaires were completed. Sixty-two percent of respondents had access to the internet in the workplace. The use of the internet to update medical knowledge was reported by 91%.Only 27% had internet access in consultation rooms. The majority of information retrieval occurred outside patient consultation hours (91%).Only 13% reported using the internet during patient consultation. Possible reasons included: lack of access (54%), time pressure (37%), possible interference with the physician-patient relationship (30%), and that use of the internet was too time-consuming (10%). The mean searching time used to solve a clinical problem was 34 +/- 3 minutes. Fifty-eight percent used Pubmed; however, 77% of the dermatologists had no training at all in how to use this tool. Professional medical use of the internet is widespread among dermatologists in Saudi Arabia. Providing access to the internet in the workplace and training of dermatologists to perform effective electronic searches are badly needed to improve the professional medical use of internet, which is expected to lead to better delivery of patient care.

  2. Pyrolysis Of Saudi Arabian Date Palm Waste: A Viable Option For Converting Waste Into Wealth

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Ahmad

    2014-11-01

    Saudi Arabia has about 23 million palm trees and it is the second largest producer of dates. The biomass from the trimmed branches of palm trees amount to more than 200,000 tons/year. This biomass waste can be used to produce many commercial products. There are several relevant technologies for conversion of biomass and solid wastes into higher value products. The starting point of the project is the pretreatment of palm solid wastes. Thermogravimetric analysis has been done to understand the pyrolysis behavior of palm date wastes. A fluidized bed (FB) has been designed and to study hydrodynamics and develop optimum conditions for the pyrolysis of palm wastes. A novel fluidized bed test rig has been designed and fabricated to carry out the pyrolysis of palm wastes. The pyrolysis is used to produce activated carbon and the waste can also be readily converted to liquid phenolic products. Liquid products are particularly interesting because they have a higher energy density and can be used to produce adhesives as well as biofuels for use in power generation and transport sector. Experimental results have indicated potential opportunities of using the date biomass waste as a potential fuel in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

  3. Parasuicide in an Arab industrial community: the Arabian-American Oil Company experience, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daradkeh, T K; Al-Zayer, N

    1988-06-01

    The parasuicide phenomena was investigated for the first time in a retrospective and prospective way in an Arab industrial community in the Eastern Province of Saudi Arabia during 1985 and 1986. Though the parasuicide rate of 20.7 per 100,000 is substantially lower from the reported rates in the West, underreporting and misdiagnosing of the phenomena may explain the low rate. The results of this study confirm that the act is predominantly the activity of young females, and disordered interpersonal relationships with spouses and parents stand out as precipitating factors. Acute reaction to stress was the commonest diagnosis followed by depression. Deliberate self-poisoning by analgesics and psychotropic drugs was the commonest method used. The findings of this study refute the hypothesis that parasuicide is rare in this part of the world, and time probably has come to amend the law in order to give the opportunity for distressed people to receive help.

  4. Professional use of the internet among Saudi Arabian dermatologists: a cross-sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlGhamdi Khalid M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The internet is an increasingly important tool for physicians, but the extent to which it is used by dermatologists is unknown. We aimed to investigate the utilization of the internet by dermatologists in Saudi Arabia for medical purposes during their daily practice and to clarify the reasons for its use and non-use. Methods A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to all 160 dermatologists attending the National Dermatology conference in 2007. Results A total of 107 questionnaires were completed. Sixty-two percent of respondents had access to the internet in the workplace. The use of the internet to update medical knowledge was reported by 91%. Only 27% had internet access in consultation rooms. The majority of information retrieval occurred outside patient consultation hours (91%. Only 13% reported using the internet during patient consultation. Possible reasons included: lack of access (54%, time pressure (37%, possible interference with the physician-patient relationship (30%, and that use of the internet was too time-consuming (10%. The mean searching time used to solve a clinical problem was 34 ± 3 minutes. Fifty-eight percent used Pubmed; however, 77% of the dermatologists had no training at all in how to use this tool. Conclusion Professional medical use of the internet is widespread among dermatologists in Saudi Arabia. Providing access to the internet in the workplace and training of dermatologists to perform effective electronic searches are badly needed to improve the professional medical use of internet, which is expected to lead to better delivery of patient care.

  5. Chemical Composition of Date Palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) Seed Oil from Six Saudi Arabian Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehdi, Imeddedine Arbi; Sbihi, Hassen Mohamed; Tan, Chin Ping; Rashid, Umer; Al-Resayes, Saud Ibrahim

    2018-01-27

    This investigation aimed to evaluate the chemical composition and physicochemical properties of seed oils from 6 date palm (Phoenix. dactylifera L.) cultivars (Barhi, Khalas, Manifi, Rezeiz, Sulaj, and Sukkari) growing in Saudi Arabia and to compare them with conventional palm olein. The mean oil content of the seeds was about 7%. Oleic acid (48.67%) was the main fatty acid, followed by lauric acid (17.26%), stearic acid (10.74%), palmitic acid (9.88%), and linolenic acid (8.13%). The mean value for free fatty acids content was 0.5%. The P. dactylifera seed oil also exhibited a mean tocol content of 70.75 mg/100 g. α-Tocotrienol was the most abundant isomer (30.19%), followed by γ-tocopherol (23.61%), γ-tocotrienol (19.07%), and α-tocopherol (17.52%). The oils showed high thermal and oxidative stabilities. The findings indicate that date seed oil has the potential to be used in the food industry as an abundant alternative to palm olein. This study showed that date seed had great nutritional value due to which it can be used for food applications especially as frying or cooking oil. In addition, date oil has also potential to be used in cosmetic and pharmaceutical practices as well. The extraction of oil from Phoenix dactylifera seed on large scale can create positive socioeconomic benefits especially for rural communities and could also assist to resolve the environmental issues generated by excess date production in large scale date-producing countries such as Saudi Arabia. © 2018 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  6. Mutation survey of known LCA genes and loci in the Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yumei; Wang, Hui; Peng, Jianlan; Gibbs, Richard A; Lewis, Richard Alan; Lupski, James R; Mardon, Graeme; Chen, Rui

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to perform a comprehensive survey of all known Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) genes and loci in a collection of 37 consanguineous LCA families from Saudi Arabia. Direct PCR and sequencing were used to screen 13 known LCA genes (GUCY2D, CRX, RPE65, TULP1, AIPL1, CRB1, RPGRIP1, LRAT, RDH12, IMPDH1, CEP290, RD3, LCA5). In addition, families without mutations identified were further screened with STR markers around these 13 known LCA genes and two loci. Disease-causing mutations were identified in nine of the 37 families: five in TULP1, two in CRB1, one in RPE65, and one in GUCY2D. Mutations in known genes only accounted for 24% of the Saudi families--much less than what has been observed in the European population (65%). Phenotype-genotype analysis was carried out to investigate the LCA disease penetrance for all families whose mutations identified. All identified mutations were found to segregate perfectly with the disease phenotype. On the other hand, severity of the disease varies for different patients carrying the same mutation and even within the same family. Furthermore, based on homozygosity mapping with both STR and SNP markers, one family is likely to map to the LCA3 locus. These results underscore the importance of studying LCA disease families from different ethnic backgrounds to identify additional novel LCA disease genes. Furthermore, perfect segregation between mutation and disease indicates that LCA is fully penetrant. However, phenotypic variations among patients carrying the same mutation suggest that at least some of the variations in the clinical phenotype is due to modification from the genetic background, environment, or other factors.

  7. Readmissions and Emergency Department Visits after Bariatric Surgery at Saudi Arabian Hospital: The Rates, Reasons, and Risk Factors

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    Anwar Ahmed

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Saudi Arabian hospital readmissions and emergency department (ED visits following bariatric surgery and discharge have never been investigated. This study aimed to evaluate the rates and reasons of hospital readmissions and ED visits related to surgical weight loss interventions at the King Abdulaziz Medical City - Riyadh. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study on 301 patients who underwent bariatric surgery between January 2011 and July 2016. We reviewed patient medical records progressively to assess hospital readmission, ED visits, and complications. Results: Of the 301 patients analyzed, 67.1% were female and 93% had class II obesity. The readmission rate, ED visit rate after discharge and the rate of either of the two was 8%, 14%,and 18.3%, respectively. The most common causes of readmission were abdominal pain (37.5%, nausea/vomiting (29.2%, and site leak (25%, while the most common causes of ED visits were abdominal pain (59.5% and nausea/vomiting (16.9%. Readmission rates tended to be higher in older patients (age of patients readmitted 42 ± 12.1 years vs. age of patients not readmitted 34.3 ± 11.8 years; p = 0.002. The rate of readmission tends to increase in patients with overweight or class I obesity (odds ratio (OR = 20.15, diabetes (OR = 14.82, and obstructive sleep apnea (OR = 14.29. Dyslipidemia was positively associated with ED visits (p = 0.027, OR = 2.87. The rate of readmission or ED visits increased with age, while there were decreases in readmission and ED visits for those who had received gastric sleeve surgery. Conclusions: The study reported high rates of readmission and ED visits, thus the effectiveness of different types of weight loss surgeries should be further evaluated, particularly in individuals with complicated medical issues such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obstructive sleep apnea.

  8. Mutations in MSX1, PAX9 and MMP20 genes in Saudi Arabian patients with tooth agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Mohammad; Balto, Hanan A; Al-Hammad, Nouf; Joshi, S; Khalil, Hesham Saleh; Somily, Ali Mohammed; Sinjilawi, Nasr Abdul-Aziz; Al-Ghamdi, Sameer; Faiyaz-Ul-Haque, Muhammad; Dhillon, Varinderpal S

    2016-08-01

    Tooth agenesis in human being is the most common congenital anomaly associated with dental development. Mutations in many genes such as MSH homeobox 1 (MSX1), paired box gene 9 (PAX9), ectodysplasin A (EDA) and EDA receptor (EDAR) have been associated with familial form of this condition. However, in large majority of patients, genetic cause could not be identified. The primary aim of present study was to identify the causative mutation(s) in these genes in Saudi Arabian families diagnosed with non-syndromic form of disease. Direct sequencing of coding regions, including exon-intron boundaries of these genes was carried out. All identified nucleotide variations were also tested to exclude possibility of being rare polymorphisms. The sequence analysis of exons and exon-intronic regions of these genes revealed five new mutations that include four in MSX1, one in PAX9 and one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in majority of the patients in MMP20. One novel mutation in exon 1 of MSX1 gene (5354C > G; A40G) was found in three patients. In addition, another novel mutation was detected in two patients in exon 3 (PAX9) as g.10672A > T which changes asparagine to isoleucine at position 40. These mutations were not found in any of the control subjects. A single SNP in MMP20 genes (g.5066A > C) that changes lysine to threonine at position 18 was found in 10% controls as well. Our results for the first time demonstrates that mutations in MSX1 gene might play an important role in hypodontia cases involving pre-molars and is a risk factor for this ethnic population mainly of Arabs and is first report linking these mutations with tooth agenesis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Large scale patterns of antimicrofouling defenses in the hard coral Pocillopora verrucosa in an environmental gradient along the Saudi Arabian coast of the Red Sea.

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    Martin Wahl

    Full Text Available Large scale patterns of ecologically relevant traits may help identify drivers of their variability and conditions beneficial or adverse to the expression of these traits. Antimicrofouling defenses in scleractinian corals regulate the establishment of the associated biofilm as well as the risks of infection. The Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast features a pronounced thermal and nutritional gradient including regions and seasons with potentially stressful conditions to corals. Assessing the patterns of antimicrofouling defenses across the Red Sea may hint at the susceptibility of corals to global change. We investigated microfouling pressure as well as the relative strength of 2 alternative antimicrofouling defenses (chemical antisettlement activity, mucus release along the pronounced environmental gradient along the Saudi Arabian Red Sea coast in 2 successive years. Microfouling pressure was exceptionally low along most of the coast but sharply increased at the southernmost sites. Mucus release correlated with temperature. Chemical defense tended to anti-correlate with mucus release. As a result, the combined action of mucus release and chemical antimicrofouling defense seemed to warrant sufficient defense against microbes along the entire coast. In the future, however, we expect enhanced energetic strain on corals when warming and/or eutrophication lead to higher bacterial fouling pressure and a shift towards putatively more costly defense by mucus release.

  10. Anti-cancer agents in Saudi Arabian herbals revealed by automated high-content imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Hajjar, Dina

    2017-06-13

    Natural products have been used for medical applications since ancient times. Commonly, natural products are structurally complex chemical compounds that efficiently interact with their biological targets, making them useful drug candidates in cancer therapy. Here, we used cell-based phenotypic profiling and image-based high-content screening to study the mode of action and potential cellular targets of plants historically used in Saudi Arabia\\'s traditional medicine. We compared the cytological profiles of fractions taken from Juniperus phoenicea (Arar), Anastatica hierochuntica (Kaff Maryam), and Citrullus colocynthis (Hanzal) with a set of reference compounds with established modes of action. Cluster analyses of the cytological profiles of the tested compounds suggested that these plants contain possible topoisomerase inhibitors that could be effective in cancer treatment. Using histone H2AX phosphorylation as a marker for DNA damage, we discovered that some of the compounds induced double-strand DNA breaks. Furthermore, chemical analysis of the active fraction isolated from Juniperus phoenicea revealed possible anti-cancer compounds. Our results demonstrate the usefulness of cell-based phenotypic screening of natural products to reveal their biological activities.

  11. Developing questionnaires for students' evaluation of individual faculty's teaching skills: A Saudi Arabian pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rubaish, Abdullah M; Abdel Rahim, Sheikh Idris; Hassan, Ammar; Ali, Amein Al; Mokabel, Fatma; Hegazy, Mohammed; Wosornu, Ladé

    2010-05-01

    The National Commission for Academic Accreditation and Assessment is responsible for the academic accreditation of universities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Requirements for this include evaluation of teaching effectiveness, evidence-based conclusions, and external benchmarks. To develop a questionnaire for students' evaluation of the teaching skills of individual instructors and provide a tool for benchmarking. College of Nursing, University of Dammam [UoD], May-June 2009. The original questionnaire was "Monash Questionnaire Series on Teaching (MonQueST) - Clinical Nursing. The UoD modification retained four areas and seven responses, but reduced items from 26 to 20. Outcome measures were factor analysis and Cronbach's alpha coefficient. Seven Nursing courses were studied, viz.: Fundamentals, Medical, Surgical, Psychiatric and Mental Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Family and Community Health. Total number of students was 74; missing data ranged from 5 to 27%. The explained variance ranged from 66.9% to 78.7%. The observed Cornbach's α coefficients ranged from 0.78 to 0.93, indicating an exceptionally high reliability. The students in the study were found to be fair and frank in their evaluation.

  12. HLA class I and class II associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian population.

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    Nuha Mahmoud Hamdi

    Full Text Available Chronic renal failure (CRF leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population.A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated control. Patients and control groups were typed by SSOP lumenix techniques. The alleles positively associated to the ESRD were: HLA-B*15, B*18, B*49 - DRB1*03, negatively associated alleles were A*26, HLA-B*39, B*50. The haplotypes positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A*01-DRB1*13 and HLA-A*30-DRBI*03. The negatively associated haplotypes were: HLA-A*02-B*39, A*02-B*50, A*24-B*35, A*24-B*58, A*24-DRB1*16, A*68-DRB1*04, A*02-DQB1*03, A*29-DQB1*02, A*29-DOB1*05 and B*27-DRB1*07 and the last one is the most significant protective haplotypes.The high Relative Risk (RR observed and its statistical correlation reflect the strength of the described association between HLA antigens and ESRD.

  13. HLA Class I and Class II Associations with ESRD in Saudi Arabian Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdi, Nuha Mahmoud; Al-Hababi, Fadel Hassan; Eid, Amr Ekhlas

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic renal failure (CRF) leads in the majority of instances to end stage renal disease (ESRD) requiring renal replacement therapy. Our interest was to evaluate the possible associations of HLA class I and class II antigens with ESRD independent of other factors, in Saudi Arabia population. Methodology A retrospective study to determine the HLA class I and class II polymorphisms and their association with ESRD, was performed on 350 patients with ESRD, and 105 healthy unrelated control. Patients and control groups were typed by SSOP lumenix techniques. The alleles positively associated to the ESRD were: HLA-B*15, B*18, B*49 - DRB1*03, negatively associated alleles were A*26, HLA-B*39, B*50. The haplotypes positively associated with ESRD were: HLA-A*01-DRB1*13 and HLA-A*30-DRBI*03. The negatively associated haplotypes were: HLA-A*02-B*39, A*02-B*50, A*24-B*35, A*24-B*58, A*24-DRB1*16, A*68-DRB1*04, A*02-DQB1*03, A*29-DQB1*02, A*29-DOB1*05 and B*27-DRB1*07 and the last one is the most significant protective haplotypes. Conclusion The high Relative Risk (RR) observed and its statistical correlation reflect the strength of the described association between HLA antigens and ESRD. PMID:25380295

  14. Association between Exposure to Ambient Air Particulates and Metabolic Syndrome Components in a Saudi Arabian Population

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    Magdy Shamy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent epidemiological evidence suggests that exposure to particulates may be a factor in the etiology of metabolic syndrome (MetS. In this novel study, we investigated the relationship between particulate levels and prevalence of MetS component abnormalities (hypertension, hyperglycemia, obesity in a recruited cohort (N = 2025 in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. We observed significant associations between a 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 and increased risks for MetS (Risk Ratio (RR: 1.12; 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.06–1.19, hyperglycemia (RR: 1.08; 95% CI: 1.03–1.14, and hypertension (RR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.04–1.14. PM2.5 from soil/road dust was found to be associated with hyperglycemia (RR: 1.12; 95% CI: 1.06–1.19 and hypertension (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.05–1.18, while PM2.5 from traffic was associated with hyperglycemia (RR: 1.33; 95% CI: 1.05–1.71. We did not observe any health associations with source-specific mass exposures. Our findings suggest that exposure to specific elemental components of PM2.5, especially Ni, may contribute to the development of cardiometabolic disorders.

  15. Traditional Arabian marriages and mental health in a group of outpatient Saudis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaleby, K

    1988-02-01

    This is a prospective study of 150 consecutive outpatients who were either married or divorced. Marriage custom in Saudi Arabia is unique to the culture of that country and several different kinds of marriage are identified: arranged marriage of cousins; marriage of a couple who have not met before consummation; marriage of a couple who have met once before consummation; forced marriage; and, rarely, marriage preceded by a period of courtship. Marital discord defined by the patients as fully or partially responsible for their presenting symptoms, was correlated with the different kinds of marriage. Discord was found to be more likely when the couple had never met or when there had been a period of courtship; more likely associated with anxiety and dysthymic disorders; and to affect females more than males. Polygamy was a definite stress. The consanguinous marriage had a higher rate of marital discord than the non-consanguinous, but this was found to be not statistically significant. In 40% of discordant, consanguinous marriages the discord was directly related to the degree of consanguinity.

  16. Fish market surveys indicate unsustainable elasmobranch fisheries in the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Spät, Julia L.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Elasmobranch populations worldwide are severely threatened due to overexploited and unregulated fisheries. Despite the fact that sharks and rays are captured in fisheries operating along the Red Sea coast of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), information on any aspects of these fisheries are very limited. Here we document the structure, composition and biological characteristics of eastern Red Sea elasmobranch fisheries based on genetic identification and market survey data over an intensive two-year sampling period at the biggest Red Sea fish market in the KSA (Jeddah). Market surveys conducted two times per month between 2011 and 2013 revealed that 24 previously confirmed elasmobranch species for the Red Sea were landed by fishers and offered for sale. Genetic identification revealed two potentially undescribed guitarfish species as well as four batoid species not formerly reported from the Red Sea. Five coastal carcharhinid species dominated the landings-. Carcharhinus sorrah, C. amblyrhynchos, C. falciformis, C. limbatus, Rhizoprionodon acutus, together comprising 73% numerically of the total catch. Targeted shark fisheries reportedly exist in shark nursery areas. Most elasmobranchs outside of these areas were reportedly landed as bycatch. Most strikingly, the large majority of landed elasmobranchs were immature males or females below their reported size of sexual maturity, which suggests potential for both growth and recruitment overfishing and emphasizes the urgent need to implement region-specific management and conservation strategies to avoid the loss of these critical predators.

  17. Experimental Measurement of Diffusive Extinction Depth and Soil Moisture Gradients in Southwestern Saudi Arabian Dune Sand

    KAUST Repository

    Mughal, Iqra

    2013-05-01

    In arid lands, a major contribution to water loss is by soil water evaporation. Desert sand dunes in arid regions are devoid of runoff and have high rates of infiltration. Rainwater is commonly stored within them because of the low permeability soils in the underlying desert pavement. In such cases, moisture is confined in the sand dune below a depth, termed as the “extinction depth”, where it is protected from evaporation during long dry periods. Moreover, desert sand dunes have sparse vegetation, which results in low transpiration losses from the stored water. The water accumulated below the extinction depth of the sand dunes can be utilized for various purposes such as in irrigation to support desert agriculture. In this study, field experiments were conducted in Western Saudi Arabia to monitor the soil moisture gradients and determine the diffusive extinction depth of dune sand. The dune sand was saturated with water and was exposed to natural conditions (evaporation and precipitation). The decline of the water level in the sand column was continuously recorded using transducers and sensors installed at different depths monitored the temporal variation of temperature and moisture content within the sand. The hydrological simulator HYDRUS-1D was used to construct the vertical profiles of soil water content and temperature and the results obtained from HYDRUS-1D were compared to the gradients monitored by the sensors.

  18. Urinary metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in Saudi Arabian schoolchildren in relation to sources of exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Mansour A; Alam, Mohammed S; Stark, Christopher; Mohammed, Nuredin; Harrison, Roy M; Shamy, Magdy; Khoder, Mamdouh I; Shabbaj, Ibrahim I; Göen, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons contain a number of known carcinogenic compounds, and urinary biomarkers have been widely used as a measure of exposure but quantitative relationships with exposure variables have proved elusive. This study aimed to quantify the relationship between exposures to phenanthrene and pyrene from atmospheric and dietary sources with the excretion of 1-hydroxypyrene and hydroxyphenanthrenes in urine as biomarkers of exposure. The study population consisted of 204 male schoolchildren attending three schools in different parts of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia who provided urine samples on each of three consecutive days. Outdoor air measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons were made at the schools and the children provided information on diet, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke and incense, and various lifestyle factors through a questionnaire. Mixed models with random effects for subjects nested within site were fitted in order to examine the relationship between exposure variables and urinary PAH metabolites. A unit increase (1 ng m(-3)) in ambient pyrene (particulate plus gaseous phase) was associated with a 3.5% (95% CI: 1.01%, 5.13%) increase in urinary 1-hydroxypyrene concentration. A unit increase in ambient phenanthrene was associated with a 1.01% (95% CI: 0.03%, 2.02%) increase in total hydroxyphenanthrene concentrations. Consumption of chargrilled food increased the 1-hydroxypyrene and hydroxyphenanthrene concentrations by 24% (95% CI: 11%, 37%) and 17% (95% CI: 8%, 26%) respectively. We did not find evidence of association for environmental tobacco smoke exposure or incense burning. It is concluded that both respiratory exposure and consumption of chargrilled food are considerable sources of PAH exposure in this population as reflected by concentrations of urinary biomarkers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. The clinical pattern of axillary hidradenitis suppurativa among Saudi Arabians: Mode of presentation and treatment challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bader Hamza Shirah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic follicular occlusive disease affecting the folliculopilosebaceous unit. The clinical course is variable, ranging from mild to severe cases. Definitive evidence-based guidelines for the management are lacking. In addition, the multifaceted clinical features and the unpredictable course of the disease make a uniform approach to treatment impractical. As a result, there are multiple therapeutic approaches. Therefore, in this study, we aim to analyze the results of management of axillary hidradenitis suppurativa among the local community in Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective cohort database analysis of 1369 patients diagnosed and treated for axillary hidradenitis suppurativa between January 2004 and December 2013 was done. Seven hundred and forty-one (54.12% were females and 628 (45.87% were males. All patients with Stage I disease favored the conservative method while all patients with Stage II chose the surgical approach. Results: The mean age was 25.5 years. Nine hundred and seventy-four (71.15% patients were treated conservatively; the mean healing time was 5.5 weeks. Three hundred and ninety-five (28.85% patients were treated surgically. One hundred and fourteen (28.9% had incision and drainage, 281 (71.1% had complete excision; all wounds eventually healed without significant scarring. The recurrence rate was 12.5% (122 patients in the conservative method group and zero (0% in the surgical method group. Conclusions: Hidradenitis suppurativa remains a challenging clinical condition for patients and physicians. Further studies need to focus not only on the etiology of this disease but also on the optimal treatment regimen. Public awareness programs are necessary to avoid late presentation and complications.

  20. Seed viability of five wild Saudi Arabian species by germination and X-ray tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.A. Al-Hammad

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Our objective was to evaluate the usefulness of the germination vs. the X-ray test in determining the initial viability of seeds of five wild species (Moringa peregrina, Abrus precatorius, Arthrocnemum macrostachyum, Acacia ehrenbergiana and Acacia tortilis from Saudi Arabia. Usually several days were required to determine the viability of all five species via germination tests. However, X-ray test will give immediate results on filled/viable seeds. Seeds of all species, except Acacia ehrenbergiana and Acacia tortilis showed high viability in both germination (96–72% at 25/15 °C, 94–70% at 35/25 °C and X-ray (100–80% test. Furthermore, there was a general agreement between the germination (19%, 14% at 25/15 °C and 17% and 12% at 35/25 °C and X-ray (8%, 4% tests in which seed viability of Acacia ehrenbergiana and Acacia tortilis was very low due to insect damaged embryo as shown in X-ray analysis. Seeds of Abruspreca torius have physical dormancy, which was broken by scarification in concentrated sulfuric acid (10 min, and they exhibited high viability in both the germination (83% at 25/15 °C and 81% at 35/25 °C and X-ray (96% tests. Most of the nongerminated seeds of the five species except those of Acacia ehrenbergiana and Acacia tortilis, were alive as judged by the tetrazolium test (TZ. Thus, for the five species examined, the X-ray test was proved to be a good and rapid predictor of seed viability.

  1. The dilemma of revealing sensitive information on paternity status in Arabian social and cultural contexts: telling the truth about paternity in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlan, Abdallah A; ten Have, Henk A M J

    2012-12-01

    Telling the truth is one of the most respected virtues in medical history and one of the most emphasized in the code of medical ethics. Health care providers are frequently confronted with the dilemma as to whether or not to tell the truth. This dilemma deepens when both choices are critically vicious: The choice is no longer between "right and right" or "right and wrong," it is between "wrong and wrong." In the case presented and discussed in this paper, a research team in Saudi Arabia unintentionally uncovered information regarding misattributed paternity. In such a situation and in the context of a tribal cultural system, what should the team do with this information? This case analysis demonstrates the joint application of ethical resources originating from within and outside the Saudi Arabian context. The article analyses the case based on the moral problems involved, relevant medical application, and the impact of such information in the Saudi tribal and Islamic domains. The most pertinent relevant values and secular debates on similar matters are discussed. Finally, the article aims to provide an Islamic dimension of family, fatherhood, and adultery.

  2. Merging Approaches to Explore Connectivity in the Anemonefish, Amphiprion bicinctus, along the Saudi Arabian Coast of the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Nanninga, Gerrit B.

    2013-09-01

    The field of marine population connectivity is receiving growing attention from ecologists worldwide. The degree to which metapopulations are connected via larval dispersal has vital ramifications for demographic and evolutionary dynamics and largely determines the way we manage threatened coastal ecosystems. Here we addressed different questions relating to connectivity by integrating direct and indirect genetic approaches over different spatial and ecological scales in a coral reef fish in the Red Sea. We developed 35 novel microsatellite loci for our study organism the two-band anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus (Rüppel 1830), which served as the basis of the following approaches. First, we collected nearly one thousand samples of A. bicinctus from 19 locations across 1500 km along the Saudi Arabian coast to infer population genetic structure. Genetic variability along the northern and central coast was weak, but showed a significant break at approximately 20°N. Implementing a model of isolation by environment with chlorophyll-a concentrations and geographic distance as predictors we were able to explain over 90% of the genetic variability in the data (R2 = 0.92). For the second approach we sampled 311 (c. 99%) putative parents and 172 juveniles at an isolated reef, Quita al Girsh (QG), to estimate self-recruitment using genetic parentage analysis. Additionally we collected 176 juveniles at surrounding locations to estimate larval dispersal from QG and ran a biophysical dispersal model of the system with real5 time climatological forcing. In concordance with model predictions, we found a complete lack (c. 0.5%) of self-recruitment over two sampling periods within our study system, thus presenting the first empirical evidence for a largely open reef fish population. Lastly, to conceptualize different hypotheses regarding the underlying processes and mechanisms of self-recruitment versus long-distance dispersal in marine organisms with pelagic larval stages, I

  3. Exploring the Mismatch between Skills and Jobs for Women in Saudi Arabia in Technical and Vocational Areas: The Views of Saudi Arabian Private Sector Business Managers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, John R.; Al-Shetaiwi, A. S.

    2002-01-01

    Gives an overview of women in both general and technical-vocational education and employment in Saudi Arabia. Reports on a survey of 220 private business managers: 83% indicated that Saudi women had limited participation in technical jobs; 63% suggested that vocational-technical education did not promote women's participation. (Contains 51…

  4. [Y chromosome structural abnormalities and Turner's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravel, C; Siffroi, J-P

    2009-06-01

    Although specifically male, the human Y chromosome may be observed in female karyotypes, mostly in women with Turner syndrome stigmata. In women with isolated gonadal dysgenesis but otherwise normal stature, the testis determining factor or SRY gene may have been removed from the Y chromosome or may be mutated. In other women with Turner syndrome, the karyotype is usually abnormal and shows a frequent 45,X/46,XY mosaicism. In these cases, the phenotype depends on the ratio between Y positive and 45,X cell lines in the body. When in mosaicism, Y chromosomes are likely to carry structural abnormalities which explain mitotic instability, such as the existence of two centromeres. Dicentric Y isochromosomes for the short arm (idic[Yp]) or ring Y chromosomes (r[Y]) are the most frequent abnormal Y chromosomes found in infertile patients and in Turner syndrome in mosaic with 45,X cells. Although monocentric, deleted Y chromosomes for the long arm and those carrying microdeletions in the AZF region are also instable and are frequently associated with a 45,X cell line. Management of infertile patients carrying such abnormal Y chromosomes must take into account the risk and the consequences of a mosaicism in the offspring.

  5. Mayans: a Y chromosome perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Benedico, David; La Salvia, Joel; Zeng, Zhaoshu; Herrera, Giselle A; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph; Herrera, Rene J

    2016-01-01

    In spite of the wealth of available cultural and archeological information as well as general interest in the Mayans, little is known about their genetics. In this study, for the first time, we attempt to alleviate this lacuna of knowledge by comprehensively investigating the Y chromosome composition of contemporary Mayan populations throughout their domain. To accomplish this, five geographically targeted and ethnically distinct Mayan populations are investigated using Y-SNP and Y-STR markers. Findings: overall, the Mayan populations as a group are highly homogeneous, basically made up of only two autochthonous haplogroups, Q1a2a1a1*-M3 and Q1a2a1*-L54. Although the Y-STR data illustrates diversity, this diversity, for the most part, is uniformly distributed among geographically distant Mayan populations. Similar haplotypes among populations, abundance of singletons and absence of population partitioning within networks among Mayan populations suggest recent population expansion and substantial gene flow within the Mayan dominion, possibly due to the development of agriculture, the establishment of interacting City–State systems and commerce. PMID:26956252

  6. The Y chromosomes of the great apes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallast, Pille; Jobling, Mark A

    2017-05-01

    The great apes (orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos and humans) descended from a common ancestor around 13 million years ago, and since then their sex chromosomes have followed very different evolutionary paths. While great-ape X chromosomes are highly conserved, their Y chromosomes, reflecting the general lability and degeneration of this male-specific part of the genome since its early mammalian origin, have evolved rapidly both between and within species. Understanding great-ape Y chromosome structure, gene content and diversity would provide a valuable evolutionary context for the human Y, and would also illuminate sex-biased behaviours, and the effects of the evolutionary pressures exerted by different mating strategies on this male-specific part of the genome. High-quality Y-chromosome sequences are available for human and chimpanzee (and low-quality for gorilla). The chromosomes differ in size, sequence organisation and content, and while retaining a relatively stable set of ancestral single-copy genes, show considerable variation in content and copy number of ampliconic multi-copy genes. Studies of Y-chromosome diversity in other great apes are relatively undeveloped compared to those in humans, but have nevertheless provided insights into speciation, dispersal, and mating patterns. Future studies, including data from larger sample sizes of wild-born and geographically well-defined individuals, and full Y-chromosome sequences from bonobos, gorillas and orangutans, promise to further our understanding of population histories, male-biased behaviours, mutation processes, and the functions of Y-chromosomal genes.

  7. SPEARMAN'S HYPOTHESIS TESTED COMPARING SAUDI ARABIAN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS WITH VARIOUS OTHER GROUPS OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS ON THE ITEMS OF THE STANDARD PROGRESSIVE MATRICES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te NijenhuiS, Jan; Batterjee, Adel A; Van Den Hoek, Michael; Allik, Jüri; Sukhanovskiy, Vladimir

    2017-09-01

    Spearman's hypothesis tested at the level of items states that differences between ethnic groups on the items of an IQ test are a function of the g loadings of these items, such that there are small differences between ethnic groups on items with low g loadings and large differences between ethnic groups on items with high g loadings; this has been confirmed in a limited number of studies. In this paper, Spearman's hypothesis was tested, comparing a group of Saudi children and adolescents (N=3209) with other groups of children and adolescents from Denmark, Cyprus, Croatia, Bosnia, South Africa, Estonia, Ukraine, Ireland, Russia and Chile (total N=9333). The analyses were carried out on twelve comparisons between the Saudi Arabian children and the other children. Spearman's hypothesis was confirmed less strongly than in other large-scale studies with a mean weighted r value of 0.44. The relevance of these findings for the discussion on the causes of group differences is discussed.

  8. EFL Students’ Writing Strategies in Saudi Arabian ESP Writing Classes: Perspectives on Learning Strategies in Self-access Language Learning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mohammad Alnufaie; Michael Grenfell

    2012-01-01

    This study was part of a PhD research to explore the writing strategies of 121 second-year undergraduate Saudi student writers who are studying English as a foreign language and for specific purposes...

  9. EFL Students’ Writing Strategies in Saudi Arabian ESP Writing Classes: Perspectives on Learning Strategies in Self-access Language Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Alnufaie; Michael Grenfell

    2012-01-01

    This study was part of a PhD research to explore the writing strategies of 121 second-year undergraduate Saudi student writers who are studying English as a foreign language and for specific purposes in one of the Saudi industrial colleges: Jubail Industrial College (JIC). The writing strategies under investigation had been classified into two categories (process-oriented writing strategies and product-oriented writing strategies) based on their instructional philosophies. A strategy question...

  10. The Influence of Sweet Taste Perception on Dietary Intake in Relation to Dental Caries and BMI in Saudi Arabian Schoolchildren

    OpenAIRE

    Ashi, Heba; Campus, Guglielmo; Bert?us Forslund, Hel?ne; Hafiz, Waleed; Ahmed, Neveen; Lingstr?m, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of sweet taste perception on dietary habits in Saudi schoolchildren. In addition, the relationship between dietary habits and both caries and BMI was studied. Methods. A cross-sectional observational study comprising 225 schoolchildren aged 13–15 years from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, was conducted. The consumption frequency of certain food items was analysed from a beverage and snack questionnaire and a three-day estimated dietary reco...

  11. Change Detection Analysis of Costal Habitat Using Remote Sensing Technologies in the Western Arabian Gulf (Saudi Arabian Coast) over a Thirty-Year Period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Askary, H. M.; Idris, N.; Johnson, S. H.; Qurban, M. A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Many factors can severely affect the growth and abundance of the marine ecosystems. For example, due to anthropogenic and natural forces, benthic habitats including but not limited to mangroves, sea grass, salt marshes, macro algae, and coral reefs have been experiencing high levels of declination. Furthermore, aerosols and their propellants are suspected contributors to marine habitat degradation. Although several studies reveal that the Arabian Gulf habitats have suffered deleterious impacts after the Gulf War and the following six month off-shore oil spill, limited research exists to track the changes in benthic habitats over the past three decades using remote sensing. Document changes in costal habitats over the past thirty years were better observed with the use of multispectral remote sensors such as Landsat-5, Landsat-7, and Landsat8 (OLI). Change detection analysis was performed on the three Landsat images (Landsat-5 for the 1987 image, Landsat-7 for the 2000, and Landsat-8 for the 2013 image). The images were then modified, masked off from open water and land. An unsupervised classification was performed which cluster similar classes together. The supervised classification displayed the seven following classes: coral reefs, macro algae, sea grass, salt marshes, mangroves, water, and land. Compared to 1987 image to 2000 scene, there was a noticeable increase in the extensiveness of salt marsh and macro algae habitats. However, a significant decrease in salt marsh habitats were apparent in the 2013 scene.

  12. Mineral chemistry as a tool for understanding the petrogenesis of Cryogenian (arc-related)-Ediacaran (post-collisional) gabbros in the western Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surour, Adel A.; Ahmed, Ahmed H.; Harbi, Hesham M.

    2017-07-01

    Metagabbros and gabbros in the Ablah-Shuwas belt (western Saudi Arabia) represent part of significant mafic magmatism in the Neoproterozoic Arabian Shield. The metagabbros are Cryogenian, occasionally stratified and bear calcic amphiboles (hornblende, magnesio-hornblende and actinolite) typical of calc-alkaline complexes. These amphiboles suggest low pressure ( 1-3 kbar), high f_{{{{O}}2 }} and crystallization temperature up to 727 °C, whereas it is 247-275 °C in the case of retrograde chlorite. Rutile and titanite in metagabbros are Fe-rich and replace Mn-bearing ilmenite precursors at high f_{{{{O}}2 }}. On the other hand, younger gabbros are fresh, layered and comprised of olivine gabbro and olivine-hornblende gabbro with an uppermost layer of anorthositic gabbro. The fresh gabbros are biotite-bearing. They are characterized by secondary magnetite-orthopyroxene symplectitic intergrowth at the outer peripheries of olivine. The symplectite forms by deuteric alteration from residual pore fluids moving along olivine grain boundaries in the sub-solidus state. In fresh gabbros, ortho- and clinopyroxenes indicate crystallization at 1300-900 and 800-600 °C, respectively. Geochemically, the Cryogenian metagabbros ( 850-780 Ma) are tholeiitic to calc-alkaline in composition and interpreted as arc-related. Younger, fresh gabbros are calc-alkaline and post-collisional ( 620-590 Ma, i.e., Ediacaran), forming during the late stages of arc amalgamation in the southern Arabian Shield. The calc-alkaline metagabbros are related to a lithospheric mantle source previously modified by subduction. Younger, fresh gabbros were probably produced by partial melting of an enriched mantle source (e.g., garnet lherzolite).

  13. Catastrophic die-off of globally threatened Arabian Oryx and Sand Gazelle in the fenced protected area of the arid central Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Z. Islam

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A large number of die-off of globally threatened Arabian Oryx (Oryx leucoryx, and Arabian Sand Gazelle (Gazella subgutturosa marica were recorded from 1999 to 2008 in fenced Mahazat as-Sayd Protected Area (PA in western-central Saudi Arabia. Mortalities of animals have been recorded during summer months when the rainfall is negligible or insignificant. Deaths were due to starvation because of reduced availability, accessibility and quality of food plants in the area. In total, 560 oryx and 2815 sand gazelle deaths were recorded since the reintroduction projects began till the end of 2008. Mortalities of animals were higher in 1999-2001, 2006, 2007 and 2008. Grazing of oryx habitat depends on rainfall and animals move over great distances in response to rain. The fence around Mahazat as-Sayd PA prevents natural movements of animals, and artificially concentrates the ungulate populations into possibly unfavourable habitat. The sand gazelle is a highly gregarious and migratory species, moving long distances in search of good quality pastures. Populations of sand gazelle in Central Asia are also known to migrate over large distances, covering several hundred kilometers. It is therefore likely that by preventing natural movements of sand gazelles and oryx, fencing may have reinforced the effects of stressful conditions such as drought. To reduce the catastrophic effects, a Strategy and Action Plan was developed in August 2008 to manage oryx and gazelle within the reserve and with provision for food and water at the five camps in the reserve as emergency plan to minimize mortalities.

  14. RESEARCH ARTICLE Y chromosome polymorphisms of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-10

    Feb 10, 2017 ... individual camels. In addition, a TG repeat in the USP9Y gene was identified as the first polymorphic microsatellite in the camel Y chromosome, whereas microsatellites based on bovine sequences were not detected. The frequency of each allele varied among different populations.For the Nanjiang, Hexi ...

  15. Y chromosome haplogroups in autistic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamain, S; Quach, H; Quintana-Murci, L; Betancur, C; Philippe, A; Gillberg, C; Sponheim, E; Skjeldal, O H; Fellous, M; Leboyer, M; Bourgeron, T

    2002-01-01

    The male to female ratio in autism is 4:1 in the global autistic population, but increases to 23:1 in autistic subjects without physical or brain abnormalities.(1) Despite this well-recognised gender difference, male predisposition to autistic disorder remains unexplained and the role of sex chromosomes is still debated. Numerical and structural abnormalities of the sex chromosomes are among the most frequently reported chromosomal disorders associated with autism. However, genome scans have failed to detect linkage on the X chromosome(2,3,4) and this approach cannot study the non-recombining region of the Y chromosome. In this study, we searched for a specific Y chromosome effect in autistic subjects. Using informative Y-polymorphic markers, the Y chromosome haplotypes of 111 autistic subjects from France, Sweden and Norway were defined and compared with relevant control populations. No significant difference in Y-haplotype distribution between the affected and control groups was observed. Although this study cannot exclude the presence of a Y susceptibility gene, our results are not suggestive of a Y chromosome effect in autism.

  16. The human Y chromosome: a masculine chromosome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordam, Michiel J.; Repping, Sjoerd

    2006-01-01

    Once considered to be a genetic wasteland of no scientific interest beyond sex determination, the human Y chromosome has made a significant comeback in the past few decades and is currently implicated in multiple diseases, including spermatogenic failure - absent or very low levels of sperm

  17. Attitudes of Saudi Arabian secondary preservice teachers toward teaching practices in science: The adequacy of preparation to use teaching strategies in classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljabber, Jabber M.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes of Saudi Arabian secondary preservice science teachers (SPSTs) toward a variety of science teaching practices. An ultimate, essential goal of this study was to use generated information and findings to improve the current secondary science education programs in Saudi Arabia and to develop better science teacher practices. The selected practices were posted by the National Research Council in 1999. These indicated that students learn science best through understanding of science rather than memorization of scientific facts and concepts, building new knowledge and understanding on what is already known and believed, formulating new knowledge by modifying and refining current concepts and by adding new concepts to what is already known, taking care of their own learning, social learning environments and interactions, and application of knowledge to novel situations. The study's sample consisted of all (147) SPSTs enrolled in the spring semester of 2003 in four Teachers' Colleges: Riyadh, Makkah, Taif, and Dammam. All participants were performing student teaching in secondary schools. This study used quantitative and qualitative data collection methods. Only three SPSTs were purposefully selected from each college for seven semi-structured interview questions, lasting an hour per interview. They were asked to complete a 58-item questionnaire survey and respond to four open-ended survey questions. To assess their attitudes toward the above science teaching practices, data was analyzed using the Rasch analysis model, other parametric tests (e.g., a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and independent-samples t-test), and non-parametric tests (e.g., a chi-square of independent test). Furthermore, qualitative procedures were also used to assess SPSTs' views of some specific aspects about science teaching and the current secondary science education programs in Saudi Arabia. This was achieved through a careful

  18. La place du pétrole dans l'économie de l'Arabie Saoudite The Position of Oil in the Saudi Arabian Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berne M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available En Arabie Saoudite, la contribution du secteur pétrolier au Produit Intérieur Brut est encore aujourd'hui de la moitié environ. Mais l'importance du pétrole ne se limite pas à ce chiffre. Au-delà de la comptabilité nationale, les mécanismes budgétaires et financiers, les grands équilibres économiques reposent dans une très large mesure sur l'existence d'importants revenus pétroliers perçus par l'état. Dans son effort de développement économique, l'Arabie a choisi de créer une puissante industrie pétrochimique pour valoriser sa production d'hydrocarbures et pour amorcer le décollage d'un secteur industriel diversifié. Cette stratégie a aussi des implications sur le bilan énergétique et le développement régional du pays. Ayant mis à profit les revenus pétroliers exceptionnels de la décennie passée pour construire une infrastructure remarquable, l'Arabie peut, malgré les problèmes économiques posés par son choix de développement, envisager raisonnablement une croissance équilibrée qui réduira sa dépendance sur le pétrole. In Saudi Arabia, the oil sector still accounts for half of the gross domestic product (GDP. But the importance of oil is not limited to this figure. Over and beyond national accounting and budgetary and financial mechanisms, the major economic balances to a very large extent are based on the existence of large oil revenues received by the state. In its economic development effort, Saudi Arabia has chosen to create a powerful petrochemical industry to upgrade its hydrocarbon production and to prime the take-off of a diversified industrial sector. This strategy also has implications on the energy balance and regional development of the country. Having taken advantage of the exceptional oil revenues of the past decade to build a remarkable infrastructure, Saudi Arabian can, despite the economic problems raised by its development choice, reasonably plan on balanced growth that will reduce its

  19. Sequence conservation on the Y chromosome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, L.H.; Yang-Feng, L. [Yale Univ. School of Medicine, New Haven, CT (United States); Lau, C. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The Y chromosome is present in all mammals and is considered to be essential to sex determination. Despite intense genomic research, only a few genes have been identified and mapped to this chromosome in humans. Several of them, such as SRY and ZFY, have been demonstrated to be conserved and Y-located in other mammals. In order to address the issue of sequence conservation on the Y chromosome, we performed fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with DNA from a human Y cosmid library as a probe to study the Y chromosomes from other mammalian species. Total DNA from 3,000-4,500 cosmid pools were labeled with biotinylated-dUTP and hybridized to metaphase chromosomes. For human and primate preparations, human cot1 DNA was included in the hybridization mixture to suppress the hybridization from repeat sequences. FISH signals were detected on the Y chromosomes of human, gorilla, orangutan and baboon (Old World monkey) and were absent on those of squirrel monkey (New World monkey), Indian munjac, wood lemming, Chinese hamster, rat and mouse. Since sequence analysis suggested that specific genes, e.g. SRY and ZFY, are conserved between these two groups, the lack of detectable hybridization in the latter group implies either that conservation of the human Y sequences is limited to the Y chromosomes of the great apes and Old World monkeys, or that the size of the syntenic segment is too small to be detected under the resolution of FISH, or that homologeous sequences have undergone considerable divergence. Further studies with reduced hybridization stringency are currently being conducted. Our results provide some clues as to Y-sequence conservation across species and demonstrate the limitations of FISH across species with total DNA sequences from a particular chromosome.

  20. EFL Students’ Writing Strategies in Saudi Arabian ESP Writing Classes: Perspectives on Learning Strategies in Self-access Language Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Alnufaie

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This study was part of a PhD research to explore the writing strategies of 121 second-year undergraduate Saudi student writers who are studying English as a foreign language and for specific purposes in one of the Saudi industrial colleges: Jubail Industrial College (JIC. The writing strategies under investigation had been classified into two categories (process-oriented writing strategies and product-oriented writing strategies based on their instructional philosophies. A strategy questionnaire was designed to collect data. Although JIC writing classes were assumed to be product-oriented as reported by the majority of the participants’ description of their teachers’ writing approach, the results showed that almost all of the participants (95.9% were mixing the two kinds of strategies. More surprisingly, the top five writing strategies used by the participants were process-oriented.

  1. Ants of the Monomorium monomorium species-group (Hymenoptera: Formicidae in the Arabian Peninsula with description of a new species from southwestern Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Sharaf

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We revise the taxonomy of the myrmicine ants of the Monomorium monomorium species-group for the Arabian Peninsula. Six species are recognized: Monomorium aeyade Collingwood & Agosti, 1996, M. clavicorne André, 1881, M. exiguum Forel, 1894, M. holothir Bolton, 1987, M. mohammedi sp. n., and M. sarawatense Sharaf & Aldawood, 2013. On the basis of the worker caste, we describe Monomorium mohammedi sp. n. from the southwestern region of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. We designate a neotype for Monomorium aeyade Collingwood & Agosti and redescribe and illustrate the worker caste. Furthermore, we provide a worker-based species identification key, distribution maps for the treated species, and ecological and biological notes, if available. Monomorium holothir is recorded for the first time from the KSA. Also, we propose M. clavicorne var. punica Santschi, 1915a as a junior synonym of M. clavicorne, as well as M. dryhimi Aldawood & Sharaf, 2011 and M. montanum Collingwood & Agosti, 1996 to be treated as junior synonyms of Monomorium exiguum.

  2. An evaluation of the applicability of the telluric-electric and audio-magnetotelluric methods to mineral assessment on the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanigan, Vincent J.; Zablocki, Charles J.

    1984-01-01

    Feasibility studies of two electromagnetic methods were made in selected areas of the Jabal Hibshi (1:250,000) quadrangle, 26F, in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in March of 1983. The methods tested were the natural source-field telluricelectric and audio-magnetotelluric methods developed and extensively used in recent years by the U.S. Geological Survey in some of its domestic programs related to geothermal and mineral resource assessment. Results from limited studies in the Meshaheed district, the Jabal as Silsilah ring complex, and across a portion of the Raha fault zone clearly demonstrate the appropriateness of these sub-regional scale, reconnaissance-type studies to mineral resource assessment. The favorable results obtained are largely attributed to distinctive and large contrasts in the electrical resistivity of the major rock types encountered. It appears that the predominant controlling factor governing the rock resistivities is the amount of contained clay minerals. Accordingly, unaltered (specifically, non-argillic) igneous and metamorphic rocks have very high resistivities; metasedimentary rocks of the Murdama group that contain several percent clay minerals have intermediate values of resistivity; and highly altered rocks, containing abundant clay minerals, have very low values of resistivity. Water-filled fracture porosity may be a secondary, but important, factor in some settings. However, influences from variations in interstitial or intercrystalline, water-filled porosity are probably small because these types of porosity are generally low. It is reasonable to expect similar results in other areas within the Arabian Shield.

  3. Zircon morphology and U-Pb geochronology of seven metaluminous and peralkaline post-orogenic granite complexes of the Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John Nicholas; Stoeser, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    The U-Pb zircon method was used to determine the ages of seven metaluminous-to-peralkaline post-orogenic granites located throughout the Late Proterozoic Arabian Shield of Saudi Arabia. Zircons from the metaluminous rocks are prismatic, with length-to-width ratios of about 2-4:1 and small pyramidal terminations. In contrast, zircons from three of the four peralkaline complexes either lack well developed prismatic faces (are pseudo-octahedral) or are anhedral. Some of the zircons from the peralkaline granites contain inherited radiogenic lead. This complicates interpretation of the isotopic data and. in many cases, may make the U-Pb method unsuitable for determining the age of a peralkaline granite. Zircons in the metaluminous granites do not contain inheritance and thus, best-fit chords calculated through the data have upper concordia intercepts that indicate the age of intrusion, and lower intercepts that indicate simple episodic lead loss. The results show that these granites were emplaced during multiple intrusive episodes from 670 to 510 Ma (Late Proterozoic to Cambrian).

  4. Developing questionnaires for students′ evaluation of individual faculty′s teaching skills: A Saudi Arabian pilot study

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Rubaish, Abdullah M.; Sheikh Idris Abdel Rahim; Ammar Hassan; Amein Al Ali; Fatma Mokabel; Mohammed Hegazy; Ladé Wosornu

    2010-01-01

    Background: The National Commission for Academic Accreditation and Assessment is responsible for the academic accreditation of universities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Requirements for this include evaluation of teaching effectiveness, evidence-based conclusions, and external benchmarks. Aims: To develop a questionnaire for students’ evaluation of the teaching skills of individual instructors and provide a tool for benchmarking. Setting: College of Nursing, University of Dammam [UoD...

  5. The range of diagnoses for oral soft-tissue biopsies of geriatric patients in a Saudi Arabian teaching hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Qannam

    2016-04-01

    Conclusions: The range of lesions seen in Saudi geriatric patients were similar to those reported for other parts of the world, although the lesions were more similar to those reported from developing countries. The very high rate of oral cancer, however, is expected to take the majority of the resources allocated to geriatric oral health care, except if a strong, population-based prevention program is initiated immediately.

  6. Human occupation of the Arabian Empty Quarter during MIS 5: evidence from Mundafan Al-Buhayrah, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groucutt, Huw S.; White, Tom S.; Clark-Balzan, Laine; Parton, Ash; Crassard, Rémy; Shipton, Ceri; Jennings, Richard P.; Parker, Adrian G.; Breeze, Paul S.; Scerri, Eleanor M. L.; Alsharekh, Abdullah; Petraglia, Michael D.

    2015-07-01

    The Empty Quarter (or Rub' al Khali) of the Arabian Peninsula is the largest continuous sandy desert in the world. It has been known for several decades that Late Pleistocene and Holocene deposits, representing phases of wetter climate, are preserved there. These sequences have yielded palaeontological evidence in the form of a variety of vertebrate and invertebrate fossils and have been dated using various radiometric techniques. However, evidence for human presence during these wetter phases has until now been ephemeral. Here, we report on the first stratified and dated archaeology from the Empty Quarter, recovered from the site of Mundafan Al-Buhayrah (MDF-61). Human occupation at the site, represented by stone tools, has been dated to the later part of Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5 using multiple luminescence dating techniques (multigrain and single grain OSL, TT-OSL). The sequence consists primarily of lacustrine and palustrine sediments, from which evidence for changing local environmental conditions has been obtained through analysis of fossil assemblages (phytoliths and non-marine molluscs and ostracods). The discovery of securely-dated archaeological material at ∼100 to 80 ka in the Empty Quarter has important implications for hypotheses concerning the timing and routes of dispersal of Homo sapiens out of Africa, which have been much debated. Consequently, the data presented here fill a crucial gap in palaeoenvironmental and archaeological understanding of the southern Arabian interior. Fossils of H. sapiens in the Levant, also dated to MIS 5, together with Middle Palaeolithic archaeological sites in Arabia and India are thought to represent the earliest dispersal of our species out of Africa. We suggest that the widespread occurrence of similar lithic technologies across southern Asia, coupled with a growing body of evidence for environmental amelioration across the Saharo-Arabian belt, indicates that occupation of the Levant by H. sapiens during MIS 5

  7. Y-Chromosome short tandem repeat, typing technology, locus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Y-Chromosome short tandem repeat, typing technology, locus information and allele frequency in different population: A review. ... This review will highlight the importance of the Y- Chromosome as a tool for tracing human evolution and describes some details of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) analysis. Among ...

  8. Mineral potential of felsic plutonic rocks in the north-central Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Fourteen plutons of Late Proterozoie age potentially favorable for rare-element mineralization have been identified in a geochemical and petrographic assessment of felsic plutonic rocks in the north-central Arabian Shield (lat 23°00'-25°00' N., long 40°00'-45°00' E.). The plutons are highly fractionated, leucocratic granitoids assigned to a major magmatic pulse that spanned the later stages of the Hijaz orogeny (about 610 Ma to about 550 Ma). Most of the targeted plutons are small or not deeply eroded. Two rock types are dominant: subsolvus, muscovite-bearing monzogranite or syenogranite; and hypersolvus, mieroeline perthite granite commonly containing sodic pyriboles. Enrichment in varied suites of the granitophile elements (Sn-W-NbTa-Zr-Y-Th-U) is characteristic. The plutons occupy the central part of a broad arcuate belt of geochemically specialized plutons that conforms generally to the eastern limit of exposed Proterozoic basement.

  9. The Influence of Sweet Taste Perception on Dietary Intake in Relation to Dental Caries and BMI in Saudi Arabian Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashi, Heba; Campus, Guglielmo; Bertéus Forslund, Heléne; Hafiz, Waleed; Ahmed, Neveen; Lingström, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of sweet taste perception on dietary habits in Saudi schoolchildren. In addition, the relationship between dietary habits and both caries and BMI was studied. A cross-sectional observational study comprising 225 schoolchildren aged 13-15 years from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, was conducted. The consumption frequency of certain food items was analysed from a beverage and snack questionnaire and a three-day estimated dietary record was obtained. The sweet taste perception level was determined as sweet taste threshold (TT) and sweet taste preference (TP). Children were grouped into low, medium, and high, according to their sweet taste perception level. ICDAS and DMFS indices were used for caries registration and anthropometric measurements using BMI were collected. Sweet taste perception was found to be negatively correlated to the number of main meals and positively correlated to both snack and sweet intake occasions. Statistically significant differences were found between the TT and TP groups with regard to the number of main meals and sweet intake ( p ≤ 0.01). No significant correlation between the dietary variables and caries or BMI was found. The dietary habits and sweet intake were found to be influenced by the sweet taste perception level, while the relation between the dietary habits and the caries and BMI was found insignificant.

  10. The Influence of Sweet Taste Perception on Dietary Intake in Relation to Dental Caries and BMI in Saudi Arabian Schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heba Ashi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of sweet taste perception on dietary habits in Saudi schoolchildren. In addition, the relationship between dietary habits and both caries and BMI was studied. Methods. A cross-sectional observational study comprising 225 schoolchildren aged 13–15 years from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, was conducted. The consumption frequency of certain food items was analysed from a beverage and snack questionnaire and a three-day estimated dietary record was obtained. The sweet taste perception level was determined as sweet taste threshold (TT and sweet taste preference (TP. Children were grouped into low, medium, and high, according to their sweet taste perception level. ICDAS and DMFS indices were used for caries registration and anthropometric measurements using BMI were collected. Results. Sweet taste perception was found to be negatively correlated to the number of main meals and positively correlated to both snack and sweet intake occasions. Statistically significant differences were found between the TT and TP groups with regard to the number of main meals and sweet intake (p≤0.01. No significant correlation between the dietary variables and caries or BMI was found. Conclusions. The dietary habits and sweet intake were found to be influenced by the sweet taste perception level, while the relation between the dietary habits and the caries and BMI was found insignificant.

  11. Introducing the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program for mechanically ventilated patients in Saudi Arabian Intensive Care Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond M Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, there have been major improvements to the care of mechanically ventilated patients (MVPs. Earlier initiatives used the concept of ventilator care bundles (sets of interventions, with a primary focus on reducing ventilator-associated pneumonia. However, recent evidence has led to a more comprehensive approach: The ABCDE bundle (Awakening and Breathing trial Coordination, Delirium management and Early mobilization. The approach of the Comprehensive Unit-based Safety Program (CUSP was developed by patient safety researchers at the Johns Hopkins Hospital and is supported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality to improve local safety cultures and to learn from defects by utilizing a validated structured framework. In August 2015, 17 Intensive Care Units (ICUs (a total of 271 beds in eight hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia joined the CUSP for MVPs (CUSP 4 MVP that was conducted in 235 ICUs in 169 US hospitals and led by the Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality. The CUSP 4 MVP project will set the stage for cooperation between multiple hospitals and thus strives to create a countrywide plan for the management of all MVPs in Saudi Arabia.

  12. AB26. Y chromosome and male infertility

    OpenAIRE

    Iijima, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    In infertile couples, a male contribution to infertility is found in 45-50%. The cause of male factor infertility remains largely unexplained, but varicocele and genetic disorder are recognized as major causes leading to spermatogenesis disability. Genetic disorder leads to male infertility include chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions. Chromosomal abnormalities (numerical or structural abnormalities) can be detected routine karyotype analysis. In non-obstructed azoospemia...

  13. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in Somalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Simonsen, Bo; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose

    2005-01-01

    A total of 201 males from Somalia were typed for the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 with the PowerPlex Y kit (Promega). A total of 96 different haplotypes were observed and the haplotype diversity was 0.......9715. The number of unique haplotypes was 71 while the most common haplotype was observed 24 times....

  14. Y chromosomal STR analysis using Pyrosequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Hanna; Allen, Marie

    2009-03-01

    Analysis of Y chromosome STR markers has proven to be useful in forensic cases where the samples contain a mixture of DNA from several individuals. STR markers are commonly genotyped based on length separation of PCR products. In this study we evaluated if Pyrosequencing can be used as an alternative method for determining Y-STR variants. In total 70 unrelated Swedish males were typed for the Y chromosomal markers (DYS19, DYS389 I-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393 and DYS438) using Pyrosequencing. Using the 8 markers, 57 unique haplotypes were observed with a discrimination capacity of 0.81. At four loci, the Pyrosequencing analysis revealed sequence variants. The sequence variants were found in the DYS389 II, DYS390, DYS391, and DYS393 loci in frequencies between 1.43% and 14.3%. Pyrosequencing has here been shown to be a useful tool for typing Y chromosomal STRs and the method can provide a complement to conventional forensic Y STR analyses. Moreover, the Pyrosequencing method can be used to rapidly evaluate novel markers.

  15. Anxiety, Depression, Hostility and General Psychopathology: An Arabian Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Abdel-Sattar; Ibrahim, Radwa M.

    In Arabian cultures, the psychosocial characteristics of psychopathological trends, including depression, anxiety, and hostility remain largely unknown. Scales measuring depression, anxiety, and hostility were administered to a voluntary sample of 989 Saudi Arabian men and 1,024 Saudi women coming from different social, economical, and educational…

  16. Assessing the Groundwater Quality at a Saudi Arabian Agricultural Site and the Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens on Irrigated Food Produce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsalah, Dhafer; Al-Jassim, Nada; Timraz, Kenda; Hong, Pei-Ying

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the groundwater quality in wells situated near agricultural fields in Saudi Arabia. Fruits (e.g., tomato and green pepper) irrigated with groundwater were also assessed for the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens to determine if food safety was compromised by the groundwater. The amount of total nitrogen in most of the groundwater samples exceeded the 15 mg/L permissible limit for agricultural irrigation. Fecal coliforms in densities > 12 MPN/100 mL were detected in three of the groundwater wells that were in close proximity to a chicken farm. These findings, coupled with qPCR-based fecal source tracking, show that groundwater in wells D and E, which were nearest to the chicken farm, had compromised quality. Anthropogenic contamination resulted in a shift in the predominant bacterial phyla within the groundwater microbial communities. For example, there was an elevated presence of Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in wells D and E but a lower overall microbial richness in the groundwater perturbed by anthropogenic contamination. In the remaining wells, the genus Acinetobacter was detected at high relative abundance ranging from 1.5% to 48% of the total groundwater microbial community. However, culture-based analysis did not recover any antibiotic-resistant bacteria or opportunistic pathogens from these groundwater samples. In contrast, opportunistic pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the fruits irrigated with the groundwater from wells B and F. Although the groundwater was compromised, quantitative microbial risk assessment suggests that the annual risk incurred from accidental consumption of E. faecalis on these fruits was within the acceptable limit of 10−4. However, the annual risk arising from P. aeruginosa was 9.55 × 10−4, slightly above the acceptable limit. Our findings highlight that the groundwater quality at this agricultural site in western Saudi Arabia is not pristine and that better

  17. Assessing the Groundwater Quality at a Saudi Arabian Agricultural Site and the Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens on Irrigated Food Produce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhafer Alsalah

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the groundwater quality in wells situated near agricultural fields in Saudi Arabia. Fruits (e.g., tomato and green pepper irrigated with groundwater were also assessed for the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens to determine if food safety was compromised by the groundwater. The amount of total nitrogen in most of the groundwater samples exceeded the 15 mg/L permissible limit for agricultural irrigation. Fecal coliforms in densities > 12 MPN/100 mL were detected in three of the groundwater wells that were in close proximity to a chicken farm. These findings, coupled with qPCR-based fecal source tracking, show that groundwater in wells D and E, which were nearest to the chicken farm, had compromised quality. Anthropogenic contamination resulted in a shift in the predominant bacterial phyla within the groundwater microbial communities. For example, there was an elevated presence of Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in wells D and E but a lower overall microbial richness in the groundwater perturbed by anthropogenic contamination. In the remaining wells, the genus Acinetobacter was detected at high relative abundance ranging from 1.5% to 48% of the total groundwater microbial community. However, culture-based analysis did not recover any antibiotic-resistant bacteria or opportunistic pathogens from these groundwater samples. In contrast, opportunistic pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the fruits irrigated with the groundwater from wells B and F. Although the groundwater was compromised, quantitative microbial risk assessment suggests that the annual risk incurred from accidental consumption of E. faecalis on these fruits was within the acceptable limit of 10−4. However, the annual risk arising from P. aeruginosa was 9.55 × 10−4, slightly above the acceptable limit. Our findings highlight that the groundwater quality at this agricultural site in western Saudi Arabia is not

  18. Assessing the Groundwater Quality at a Saudi Arabian Agricultural Site and the Occurrence of Opportunistic Pathogens on Irrigated Food Produce

    KAUST Repository

    Alsalah, Dhafer

    2015-10-05

    This study examines the groundwater quality in wells situated near agricultural fields in Saudi Arabia. Fruits (e.g., tomato and green pepper) irrigated with groundwater were also assessed for the occurrence of opportunistic pathogens to determine if food safety was compromised by the groundwater. The amount of total nitrogen in most of the groundwater samples exceeded the 15 mg/L permissible limit for agricultural irrigation. Fecal coliforms in densities > 12 MPN/100 mL were detected in three of the groundwater wells that were in close proximity to a chicken farm. These findings, coupled with qPCR-based fecal source tracking, show that groundwater in wells D and E, which were nearest to the chicken farm, had compromised quality. Anthropogenic contamination resulted in a shift in the predominant bacterial phyla within the groundwater microbial communities. For example, there was an elevated presence of Proteobacteria and Cyanobacteria in wells D and E but a lower overall microbial richness in the groundwater perturbed by anthropogenic contamination. In the remaining wells, the genus Acinetobacter was detected at high relative abundance ranging from 1.5% to 48% of the total groundwater microbial community. However, culture-based analysis did not recover any antibiotic-resistant bacteria or opportunistic pathogens from these groundwater samples. In contrast, opportunistic pathogenic Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated from the fruits irrigated with the groundwater from wells B and F. Although the groundwater was compromised, quantitative microbial risk assessment suggests that the annual risk incurred from accidental consumption of E. faecalis on these fruits was within the acceptable limit of 10−4. However, the annual risk arising from P. aeruginosa was 9.55 × 10−4, slightly above the acceptable limit. Our findings highlight that the groundwater quality at this agricultural site in western Saudi Arabia is not pristine and that better

  19. Meningococcal serogroup C serum and salivary antibody responses to meningococcal quadrivalent conjugate vaccine in Saudi Arabian adolescents previously vaccinated with bivalent and quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed; Al-Mazrou, Yagob; Findlow, Helen; Chadha, Helen; Bosch Castells, Valerie; Oster, Philipp; Borrow, Ray

    2014-09-29

    Following repeated polysaccharide vaccination, reduced immune responses have been reported, but there are limited data on the mucosal response of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PSV) or meningococcal conjugate vaccination. Saudi Arabian adolescents (aged 16-19 years) who had previously been vaccinated with ≥1 dose of bivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and 1 dose of quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide (MPSV4) were enrolled in a controlled, randomised, and modified observer-blind study (collectively termed the PSV-exposed group). The PSV-exposed group was randomised to receive either quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) (PSV-exposed/MCV4 group) or MPSV4 (PSV-exposed/MPSV4 group), and a PSV-naïve group received MCV4. Serum and saliva samples were collected pre-vaccination and 28 days post-vaccination. Serum serogroup-specific A, C, W and Y IgG were quantified as were salivary serogroup-specific C IgG and IgA together with total salivary IgG and IgA. For each serogroup, the post-vaccination serum geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) were significantly higher in the PSV-naïve and the PSV-exposed/MCV4 group than in the PSV-exposed/PSV4 group. For serogroup C, serum serogroup-specific IgG for the PSV-naïve group was significantly higher than both the PSV exposed groups. Higher levels of salivary serogroup C-specific IgG were found in the PSV-naïve group than those who had received two doses of polysaccharide but no significant differences were noted with regards to serogroup-specific IgA. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. An Analysis of Activities in Saudi Arabian Middle School Science Textbooks and Workbooks for the Inclusion of Essential Features of Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldahmash, Abdulwali H.; Mansour, Nasser S.; Alshamrani, Saeed M.; Almohi, Saeed

    2016-12-01

    This study examines Saudi Arabian middle school science textbooks' coverage of the essential features of scientific inquiry. All activities in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks were analyzed by using the scientific inquiry `essential features' rubric. The results indicated that the essential features are included in about 59 % of the analyzed science activities. However, feature 2, `making learner give priority to evidence in responding to questions' and feature 3, `allowing learner to formulate explanations from evidence' appeared more frequently than the other three features (feature 1: engaging learner in scientifically oriented questions, feature 4: helping learner connect explanations to scientific knowledge, and feature 5: helping learner communicate and justify explanations to others), whether in the activities as a whole, or in the activities included in each of the four science domains (physical science, Earth science, life science and chemistry). These features are represented in almost all activities. This means that almost all activities in the middle school science textbooks and the workbooks include features 2 and 3. Meanwhile, the mean level of inclusion of the five essential features of scientific inquiry found in the middle school science textbooks and workbooks as a whole is 2.55. However, results found for features 1, 4, 5 and for in-level inclusion of the inquiry features in each of the science domains indicate that the inclusion of the essential inquiry features is teacher-centred. As a result, neither science textbooks nor workbooks provide students with the opportunity or encouragement to develop their inquiry skills. Consequently, the results suggest important directions for educational administrators and policy-makers in the preparation and use of science educational content.

  1. Systematic thematic review of e-health research in the Gulf Cooperation Council (Arabian Gulf): Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Alan S; Turjoman, Rebal; Shaheen, Yanal; Al Sayyed, Farah; Hwang, Mu Ji; Malick, Faryal

    2017-05-01

    Introduction The Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC or 'Arabian Gulf'), comprising Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and United Arab Emirates, is a political organization sharing a common history and culture. All GCC nations have made substantial investments in telecommunications and electronic health infrastructure since 2000. Methods We conducted a literature search in English and Arabic on peer-reviewed e-health research up to December 2014 originating in the GCC. The objective was to retrieve all research on e-health in the GCC and to categorize and analyse it qualitatively to reveal the current state of e-health research and development in the region. Inclusion criteria included peer-reviewed articles, books, book chapters, conference papers and graduate theses written on e-health in the GCC. Blogs, health websites and non-peer-reviewed literature were excluded. Results Three hundred and six articles were retrieved, categorized and analysed qualitatively to reveal the state of e-health research in the GCC. Both country-specific and GCC-wide major themes were identified using NVivo 10.0 qualitative software and summarized. The most common type of study was an overview (35.0%), with common study designs of case studies (26.8%) and descriptive articles (46.4%). Significant themes were: prospective national benefits from e-health, implementation and satisfaction with electronic health records, online technologies in medical education, innovative systems (case studies), and information security and personal health information. Discussion This is the first comprehensive analytical literature review of e-health in the GCC. Important research gaps were identified: few cost-benefit analyses, controlled interventional studies, or research targeting gender and religious issues were retrieved.

  2. The effectiveness of small scale Photovoltaic (PV) systems design and cost analysis simulation on Saudi Arabian Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almansour, Faris Abdullah

    The advantages of Renewable Energy Sources (RES) are much more than the disadvantages, RES such as solar, wind energy, biomass, and geothermal, which can be used for generating distributed power but cannot directly replace the existing electric energy grid technologies. The latter are far too well established to abandon, while the new RES technologies are not sufficiently developed to meet the total energy demand. Therefore, it is sensible to gradually infuse RES into existing grids and transform the system over time Saudi Arabia (SA) is a semi-developed nation with a population of over twenty nine million people. It is the largest country in western Asia with an area of 2.225MKm2. SA's largest export is oil, owning 1/5 of the world's supply, and producing twelve million barrels a day. However, SA is far behind in developing a smart grid and RES. A lot of this is to do with lack of participation by both the government and the private business sector. Currently SA spends over $13B a year on generating electricity from oil. SA is the largest consumer of petroleum in the Middle East, due to the high demand for transportation and electricity generation. According to the Saudi electrical company, the total amount of generated power in 2011 was 190.280GW. In addition, SA's electricity consumption is currently growing 8% a year. SA aims to generate 55GW of renewable energy by 2020, in order to free up fossil fuels for export. 41GW of the 55GW will be generated from solar energy. Smart grid technologies are also under consideration in SA; this will allow an efficient and reliable way to control the energy in the future. In addition, the potential for wind and geothermal energy is very high. In this thesis, there is a full exploration of RES components which are critical to manage carbon emission and the limitations of the current grid to the new RES technologies, which face barriers to full-scale deployment. A study in Dhahran, SA has been simulated on a installing a Dual

  3. Absence of genetic differentiation in the coral Pocillopora verrucosa along environmental gradients of the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Robitzch, Vanessa S.N.

    2015-02-11

    Arabian Seas.

  4. Absence of genetic differentiation in the coral Pocillopora verrucosa along environmental gradients of the Saudi Arabian Red Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa eRobitzch

    2015-02-01

    -Pacific and Arabian Seas.

  5. New native South American Y chromosome lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jota, Marilza S; Lacerda, Daniela R; Sandoval, José R; Vieira, Pedro Paulo R; Ohasi, Dominique; Santos-Júnior, José E; Acosta, Oscar; Cuellar, Cinthia; Revollo, Susana; Paz-Y-Miño, Cesar; Fujita, Ricardo; Vallejo, Gustavo A; Schurr, Theodore G; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo M; Pena, Sergio Dj; Ayub, Qasim; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Santos, Fabrício R

    2016-07-01

    Many single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the non-recombining region of the human Y chromosome have been described in the last decade. High-coverage sequencing has helped to characterize new SNPs, which has in turn increased the level of detail in paternal phylogenies. However, these paternal lineages still provide insufficient information on population history and demography, especially for Native Americans. The present study aimed to identify informative paternal sublineages derived from the main founder lineage of the Americas-haplogroup Q-L54-in a sample of 1841 native South Americans. For this purpose, we used a Y-chromosomal genotyping multiplex platform and conventional genotyping methods to validate 34 new SNPs that were identified in the present study by sequencing, together with many Y-SNPs previously described in the literature. We updated the haplogroup Q phylogeny and identified two new Q-M3 and three new Q-L54*(xM3) sublineages defined by five informative SNPs, designated SA04, SA05, SA02, SA03 and SA29. Within the Q-M3, sublineage Q-SA04 was mostly found in individuals from ethnic groups belonging to the Tukanoan linguistic family in the northwest Amazon, whereas sublineage Q-SA05 was found in Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon ethnic groups. Within Q-L54*, the derived sublineages Q-SA03 and Q-SA02 were exclusively found among Coyaima individuals (Cariban linguistic family) from Colombia, while Q-SA29 was found only in Maxacali individuals (Jean linguistic family) from southeast Brazil. Furthermore, we validated the usefulness of several published SNPs among indigenous South Americans. This new Y chromosome haplogroup Q phylogeny offers an informative paternal genealogy to investigate the pre-Columbian history of South America.Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 31 March 2016; doi:10.1038/jhg.2016.26.

  6. Developing questionnaires for students′ evaluation of individual faculty′s teaching skills: A Saudi Arabian pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M Al-Rubaish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Commission for Academic Accreditation and Assessment is responsible for the academic accreditation of universities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA. Requirements for this include evaluation of teaching effectiveness, evidence-based conclusions, and external benchmarks. Aims: To develop a questionnaire for students′ evaluation of the teaching skills of individual instructors and provide a tool for benchmarking. Setting: College of Nursing, University of Dammam [UoD], May-June 2009. Materials and Methods: The original questionnaire was "Monash Questionnaire Series on Teaching (MonQueST - Clinical Nursing. The UoD modification retained four areas and seven responses, but reduced items from 26 to 20. Outcome measures were factor analysis and Cronbach′s alpha coefficient. Results: Seven Nursing courses were studied, viz.: Fundamentals, Medical, Surgical, Psychiatric and Mental Health, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, and Family and Community Health. Total number of students was 74; missing data ranged from 5 to 27%. The explained variance ranged from 66.9% to 78.7%. The observed Cornbach′s α coefficients ranged from 0.78 to 0.93, indicating an exceptionally high reliability. The students in the study were found to be fair and frank in their evaluation.

  7. Forensic use of Y-chromosome DNA: a general overview

    OpenAIRE

    Kayser, Manfred

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe male-specific part of the human Y chromosome is widely used in forensic DNA analysis, particularly in cases where standard autosomal DNA profiling is not informative. A Y-chromosomal gene fragment is applied for inferring the biological sex of a crime scene trace donor. Haplotypes composed of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms (Y-STRs) are used to characterise paternal lineages of unknown male trace donors, especially suitable when males and females have contribut...

  8. Roles of the Y chromosome genes in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Kido

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Male and female differ genetically by their respective sex chromosome composition, that is, XY as male and XX as female. Although both X and Y chromosomes evolved from the same ancestor pair of autosomes, the Y chromosome harbors male-specific genes, which play pivotal roles in male sex determination, germ cell differentiation, and masculinization of various tissues. Deletions or translocation of the sex-determining gene, SRY, from the Y chromosome causes disorders of sex development (previously termed as an intersex condition with dysgenic gonads. Failure of gonadal development results not only in infertility, but also in increased risks of germ cell tumor (GCT, such as gonadoblastoma and various types of testicular GCT. Recent studies demonstrate that either loss of Y chromosome or ectopic expression of Y chromosome genes is closely associated with various male-biased diseases, including selected somatic cancers. These observations suggest that the Y-linked genes are involved in male health and diseases in more frequently than expected. Although only a small number of protein-coding genes are present in the male-specific region of Y chromosome, the impacts of Y chromosome genes on human diseases are still largely unknown, due to lack of in vivo models and differences between the Y chromosomes of human and rodents. In this review, we highlight the involvement of selected Y chromosome genes in cancer development in men.

  9. Signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders and oral parafunctions in urban Saudi arabian adolescents: a research report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feteih Rabab M

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of signs and symptoms of temporomandibular disorders (TMD and oral parafunction habits among Saudi adolescents in the permanent dentition stage. Methods A total of 385 (230 females and 155 males school children age 12–16, completed a questionnaire and were examined clinically. A stratified selection technique was used for schools allocation. Results The results showed that 21.3% of the subjects exhibited at least one sign of TMD and females were generally more affected than males. Joint sounds were the most prevalent sign (13.5% followed by restricted opening (4.7% and opening deviation (3.9%. The amplitude of mouth opening, overbite taken into consideration, was 46.5 mm and 50.2 mm in females and males respectively. TMJ pain and muscle tenderness were rare (0.5%. Reported symptoms were 33%, headache being the most frequent symptom 22%, followed by pain during chewing 14% and hearing TMJ noises 8.7%. Difficulty during jaw opening and jaw locking were rare. Lip/cheek biting was the most common parafunction habit (41% with females significantly more than males, followed by nail biting (29%. Bruxism and thumb sucking were only 7.4% and 7.8% respectively. Conclusion The prevalence of TMD signs were 21.3% with joint sounds being the most prevalent sign. While TMD symptoms were found to be 33% as, with headache being the most prevalent. Among the oral parafunctions, lip/cheek biting was the most prevalent 41% followed by nail biting 29%.

  10. Agency, Expression, and the Virtual Sphere: Social Media in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Hayman, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    This paper seeks to address the question of why so many Saudi Arabians use social media. Prior literature investigating social media usage in the Saudi Arabia is either too broad or too narrow. This necessitates academic inquiry that addresses the “middle ground”. Saudi Arabians' markedly high rates of social media usage appear incongruous with the traditional, highly restrictive nature of Saudi Arabian society. Given social media's status as a relatively new phenomenon, and its recognized ab...

  11. Bored boys, graffiti, and YouTube - tracing recent groundwater level changes in a Saudi Arabian cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Nils; Dirks, Heiko; Schulz, Stephan; Kempe, Stephan; Schüth, Christoph

    2015-04-01

    The Dahl Hith cave is located approximately 30 km southeast of Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia. In the past decades, the groundwater table exposed inside the cave became subject to appreciable changes. After a decline due to agricultural water abstraction for irrigation purposes, the water table exhibited a rapid rise in the last few years. Considering that most of the aquifers of the country show a depletion of the largely fossil groundwater, the mentioned rise is quite unusual. The area does not host an observation well, i.e., reliable data on the piezometric changes is hitherto not available. Hence, two uncommon data sources were used to reconstruct the water level changes: (1) YouTube videos and (2) graffiti inscriptions. (1) The cave is frequently visited by locals and expats from Riyadh and many visitors are willing to share their cave adventures on YouTube. Identifying certain reference points in the uploaded videos (e.g. specific boulders, cave graffiti) and estimating their position relative to the water table allows for an approximate reconstruction of the recent groundwater rise. Information on the observation time is derived from the uploading date. Occasionally, also the exact date of the visit is provided as part of the footage description. (2) Some people documented their visit by graffiti inscriptions. These do not only serve as a marker in the videos, but also contain genuine data on historic water levels: if written on parts of the cave wall, which are only accessible from the water, they indicate the water level at the time of their creation. Fortunately, some graffiti also feature the date of the visit. In order to improve the reliability of the water level estimations, measurements conducted in the course of own site visits in the past few years were considered for the evaluation. Also photographs taken during these surveys helped to improve the quality of the water level reconstruction. The described "Youtube Approach" could be interpreted

  12. Birth outcome measures and maternal exposure to heavy metals (lead, cadmium and mercury) in Saudi Arabian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Saleh, Iman; Shinwari, Neptune; Mashhour, Abdullah; Rabah, Abdullah

    2014-03-01

    This cross-sectional study was conducted to assess the association between exposure to heavy metals (lead, cadmium and mercury) during pregnancy and birth outcomes in 1578 women aged 16-50 years who delivered in Al-Kharj hospital, Saudi Arabia, in 2005 and 2006. The levels of lead, cadmium and mercury were measured in umbilical cord blood, maternal blood and the placenta. Outcome variables were anthropometric measures taken at birth, along with the risk of being small-for-gestational age (SGA). We selected the 10th percentile as the cutoff for dichotomizing measures of birth outcome. Cadmium, despite its partial passage through the placenta had the most prominent effect on several measures of birth outcome. After adjustment for potential confounders, logistic regression models revealed that crown-heel length (p=0.034), the Apgar 5-minute score (p=0.004), birth weight (p=0.015) and SGA (p=0.049) were influenced by cadmium in the umbilical cord blood. Significant decreases in crown-heel length (p=0.007) and placental thickness (p=0.022) were seen with higher levels of cadmium in maternal blood. As placental cadmium increased, cord length increased (p=0.012) and placental thickness decreased (p=0.032). Only lead levels in maternal blood influenced placental thickness (p=0.011). Mercury in both umbilical cord and maternal blood was marginally associated with placental thickness and placental weight, respectively. Conversely, placental mercury levels significantly influenced head circumference (p=0.017), the Apgar 5-minute score (p=0.01) and cord length (p=0.026). The predictions of these models were further assessed with the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating curves (ROCs), which were modest (larger than 0.5 and smaller than 0.7). The independence of gestational age or preterm births on the observed effect of metals on some measures of birth outcome, suggested detrimental effects of exposure on fetal development. The magnitude of the estimated effects

  13. User acceptance of a picture archiving and communication system (PACS) in a Saudi Arabian hospital radiology department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Compared with the increasingly widespread use of picture archiving and communication systems (PACSs), knowledge concerning users’ acceptance of such systems is limited. Knowledge of acceptance is needed given the large (and growing) financial investment associated with the implementation of PACSs, and because the level of user acceptance influences the degree to which the benefits of the systems for healthcare can be realized. Methods A Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was used to assess the level of acceptance of the host PACS by staff in the radiology department at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire survey of 89 PACS users was employed to obtain data regarding user characteristics, perceived usefulness (PU) (6 items), perceived ease of use (PEU) (4 items), a change construct (4 items), and a behavior (acceptance) construct (9 items). Respondents graded each item in each construct using five-point likert scales. Results Surveyed users reported high levels of PU (4.33/5), PEU (4.15/5), change (4.26/5), and acceptance (3.86/5). The three constructs of PU, PEU, and change explained 41 % of the variation in PACS user acceptance. PU was the most important predictor, explaining 38 % of the variation on its own. The most important single item in the explanatory constructs was that users found PACS to have improved the quality of their work in providing better patient care. Technologists had lower acceptance ratings than did clinicians/radiologists, but no influence on acceptance level was found due to gender, age, or length of experience using the PACS. Although not directly measured, there appeared to be no cultural influence on either the level of acceptance or its determinants. Conclusions User acceptance must be considered when an organization implements a PACS, in order to enhance its successful adoption. Health organizations should adopt a PACS that offers all required functions and which is likely to

  14. User acceptance of a picture archiving and communication system (PACS in a Saudi Arabian hospital radiology department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldosari Bakheet

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Compared with the increasingly widespread use of picture archiving and communication systems (PACSs, knowledge concerning users’ acceptance of such systems is limited. Knowledge of acceptance is needed given the large (and growing financial investment associated with the implementation of PACSs, and because the level of user acceptance influences the degree to which the benefits of the systems for healthcare can be realized. Methods A Technology Acceptance Model (TAM was used to assess the level of acceptance of the host PACS by staff in the radiology department at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. A questionnaire survey of 89 PACS users was employed to obtain data regarding user characteristics, perceived usefulness (PU (6 items, perceived ease of use (PEU (4 items, a change construct (4 items, and a behavior (acceptance construct (9 items. Respondents graded each item in each construct using five-point likert scales. Results Surveyed users reported high levels of PU (4.33/5, PEU (4.15/5, change (4.26/5, and acceptance (3.86/5. The three constructs of PU, PEU, and change explained 41 % of the variation in PACS user acceptance. PU was the most important predictor, explaining 38 % of the variation on its own. The most important single item in the explanatory constructs was that users found PACS to have improved the quality of their work in providing better patient care. Technologists had lower acceptance ratings than did clinicians/radiologists, but no influence on acceptance level was found due to gender, age, or length of experience using the PACS. Although not directly measured, there appeared to be no cultural influence on either the level of acceptance or its determinants. Conclusions User acceptance must be considered when an organization implements a PACS, in order to enhance its successful adoption. Health organizations should adopt a PACS that offers all required functions and which is

  15. Technical feasibility of a seabed gallery seawater intake at Ras Abu Ali Island, Arabian Gulf, Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Rachman, Rinaldi

    2014-07-23

    Open-ocean intake systems require extensive and advanced pretreatment unit operation to produce feed water with low membrane fouling potential in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) facilities. Alternatively, subsurface intake systems tend to produce high quality raw seawater even before pretreatment. Subsurface intakes extract seawater indirectly through the geological structure of shoreline or nearshore sediments. Water percolation through geological units provides physical and biological treatment, so that the raw seawater is microbiologically stable with relatively low particulate and organics content. Overall, utilization of subsurface intakes will reduce the intensity of pretreatment, which reduces operating cost, lowers chemical and energy consumption, and reduces environmental impacts. An important aspect in the feasibility of a subsurface intake is the compatibility of the local geological environment. In this study, a field investigation was conducted at Ras Abu Ali Island in the Arabian Gulf. This location currently contains an of existing oil company facilities and a proposed governmental marine fish hatchery facility. Recreational, commercial, and domestic potable water uses require the need to use the SWRO process to meet demands. Characterization of the shoreline and marine offshore bottom were performed as well as observation of tidal fluctuations and wave heights. A specific grid area was chosen where 35 sediment samples were collected from the seabed floor for laboratory analysis of grain size distribution, sediment porosity, and hydraulic conductivity. Onsite observation showed that the marine bottom has a low slope creating a wide intertidal area. The lowest tidal zone is more than 150 m from the shoreline defining a far seaward boundary for the intake construction point. A relatively thin layer of mixed-type sediment (carbonate and siliciclastic) covers the marine hardground bottom. The unlithified bottom sediment contains a low mud percentage

  16. Forensic use of Y-chromosome DNA: a general overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe male-specific part of the human Y chromosome is widely used in forensic DNA analysis, particularly in cases where standard autosomal DNA profiling is not informative. A Y-chromosomal gene fragment is applied for inferring the biological sex of a crime scene trace donor. Haplotypes

  17. Typing of Y chromosome SNPs with multiplex PCR methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Børsting, Claus; Morling, Niels

    2005-01-01

    We describe a method for the simultaneous typing of Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers by means of multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) strategies that allow the detection of 35 Y chromosome SNPs on 25 amplicons from 100 to 200 pg of chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid...

  18. Y-chromosome STR haplotypes in Danes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Nielsen, Karsten; Simonsen, Bo Thisted

    2005-01-01

    A total of 185 unrelated Danish males were typed for the Y-chromosome STRs DYS19, DYS385a/b, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439 using the kits PowerPlex Y (Promega), ReliaGene Y-Plex 6 and ReliaGene Y-Plex 5 (Reliagene Technologies). A total of 163 diff...... different haplotypes were observed and among these, 144 haplotypes were unique. The gene diversity was 0.9985. In DYS392, a variant allele migrating as a 10.2 allele was observed. Sequencing of the allele showed a deletion upstream the repeated area....

  19. Afghanistan from a Y-chromosome perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacau, Harlette; Gayden, Tenzin; Regueiro, Maria; Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Bukhari, Areej; Underhill, Peter A; Garcia-Bertrand, Ralph L; Herrera, Rene J

    2012-10-01

    Central Asia has served as a corridor for human migrations providing trading routes since ancient times. It has functioned as a conduit connecting Europe and the Middle East with South Asia and far Eastern civilizations. Therefore, the study of populations in this region is essential for a comprehensive understanding of early human dispersal on the Eurasian continent. Although Y- chromosome distributions in Central Asia have been widely surveyed, present-day Afghanistan remains poorly characterized genetically. The present study addresses this lacuna by analyzing 190 Pathan males from Afghanistan using high-resolution Y-chromosome binary markers. In addition, haplotype diversity for its most common lineages (haplogroups R1a1a*-M198 and L3-M357) was estimated using a set of 15 Y-specific STR loci. The observed haplogroup distribution suggests some degree of genetic isolation of the northern population, likely due to the Hindu Kush mountain range separating it from the southern Afghans who have had greater contact with neighboring Pathans from Pakistan and migrations from the Indian subcontinent. Our study demonstrates genetic similarities between Pathans from Afghanistan and Pakistan, both of which are characterized by the predominance of haplogroup R1a1a*-M198 (>50%) and the sharing of the same modal haplotype. Furthermore, the high frequencies of R1a1a-M198 and the presence of G2c-M377 chromosomes in Pathans might represent phylogenetic signals from Khazars, a common link between Pathans and Ashkenazi groups, whereas the absence of E1b1b1a2-V13 lineage does not support their professed Greek ancestry.

  20. The study of human Y chromosome variation through ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kivisild, Toomas

    2017-05-01

    High throughput sequencing methods have completely transformed the study of human Y chromosome variation by offering a genome-scale view on genetic variation retrieved from ancient human remains in context of a growing number of high coverage whole Y chromosome sequence data from living populations from across the world. The ancient Y chromosome sequences are providing us the first exciting glimpses into the past variation of male-specific compartment of the genome and the opportunity to evaluate models based on previously made inferences from patterns of genetic variation in living populations. Analyses of the ancient Y chromosome sequences are challenging not only because of issues generally related to ancient DNA work, such as DNA damage-induced mutations and low content of endogenous DNA in most human remains, but also because of specific properties of the Y chromosome, such as its highly repetitive nature and high homology with the X chromosome. Shotgun sequencing of uniquely mapping regions of the Y chromosomes to sufficiently high coverage is still challenging and costly in poorly preserved samples. To increase the coverage of specific target SNPs capture-based methods have been developed and used in recent years to generate Y chromosome sequence data from hundreds of prehistoric skeletal remains. Besides the prospects of testing directly as how much genetic change in a given time period has accompanied changes in material culture the sequencing of ancient Y chromosomes allows us also to better understand the rate at which mutations accumulate and get fixed over time. This review considers genome-scale evidence on ancient Y chromosome diversity that has recently started to accumulate in geographic areas favourable to DNA preservation. More specifically the review focuses on examples of regional continuity and change of the Y chromosome haplogroups in North Eurasia and in the New World.

  1. The Human Y-Chromosome - Introduction into Genetics and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, M

    2003-07-01

    Human Y-chromosomal DNA analysis is becoming well established in forensic sciences. That is because human Y-chromosomal DNA polymorphisms are the only genetic markers that are able to specifically characterize and identify male culprit DNA in material from sexual assault or forcible rape cases where offenders are almost always males. Appropriate Y-chromosomal DNA markers evaluated for forensic applications with standardized nomenclature, typing and statistic methodology, and haplotype frequency databases are currently available to the forensic DNA community. As with any other kind of DNA evidence, the Y-chromosomal DNA analysis in forensic science requires not only a high standard of quality assurance but also appropriate scientific background knowledge to ensure correct interpretation of DNA profiles. The following overview article will provide an introduction to the molecular genetics of the human Y-chromosome and will discuss the advantages that Y-chromosomal DNA polymorphisms can offer to forensic applications, as well as the limitations to the types of information provided by the human Y-chromosome. Copyright © 2003 Central Police University.

  2. Genetic differentiation between upland and lowland populations shapes the Y-chromosomal landscape of West Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balanovsky, O; Chukhryaeva, M; Zaporozhchenko, V; Urasin, V; Zhabagin, M; Hovhannisyan, A; Agdzhoyan, A; Dibirova, K; Kuznetsova, M; Koshel, S; Pocheshkhova, E; Alborova, I; Skhalyakho, R; Utevska, O; Mustafin, Kh; Yepiskoposyan, L; Tyler-Smith, C; Balanovska, E

    2017-04-01

    Y-chromosomal variation in West Asian populations has so far been studied in less detail than in the neighboring Europe. Here, we analyzed 598 Y-chromosomes from two West Asian subregions-Transcaucasia and the Armenian plateau-using 40 Y-SNPs and 17 Y-STRs and combined them with previously published data from the region. The West Asian populations fell into two clusters: upland populations from the Anatolian, Armenian and Iranian plateaus, and lowland populations from the Levant, Mesopotamia and the Arabian Peninsula. This geographic subdivision corresponds with the linguistic difference between Indo-European and Turkic speakers, on the one hand, and Semitic speakers, on the other. This subdivision could be traced back to the Neolithic epoch, when upland populations from the Anatolian and Iranian plateaus carried similar haplogroup spectra but did not overlap with lowland populations from the Levant. We also found that the initial gene pool of the Armenian motherland population has been well preserved in most groups of the Armenian Diaspora. In view of the contribution of West Asians to the autosomal gene pool of the steppe Yamnaya archaeological culture, we sequenced a large portion of the Y-chromosome in haplogroup R1b samples from present-day East European steppe populations. The ancient Yamnaya samples are located on the "eastern" R-GG400 branch of haplogroup R1b-L23, showing that the paternal descendants of the Yamnaya still live in the Pontic steppe and that the ancient Yamnaya population was not an important source of paternal lineages in present-day West Europeans.

  3. Y chromosome structural and functional changes in human malignant diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Néstor O

    2009-01-01

    The main Y chromosome abnormalities found in testicular cancer and other malignant diseases are microdeletions, entire chromosome loss and transcription deregulation of several genes mapping in the non-recombinant part of the Y chromosome. Yet, the role of these changes in the origin or evolution of malignancies is uncertain. The Y chromosome has experienced a long and intricate evolutionary history of deleterious, compensatory, and advantageous mutations. It is proposed that the compensatory mechanisms preventing Y decay in cancer cells are no longer working, and that deletions and gene down-expression reflect a very fast process of Y attrition. From this perspective, Y chromosome aberrations, mutations and unbalanced gene expression very likely play no role in the etiology of cell transformation, although in some forms of cancer, Y abnormalities may influence tumor progression.

  4. Forensic use of Y-chromosome DNA: a general overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Manfred

    2017-05-01

    The male-specific part of the human Y chromosome is widely used in forensic DNA analysis, particularly in cases where standard autosomal DNA profiling is not informative. A Y-chromosomal gene fragment is applied for inferring the biological sex of a crime scene trace donor. Haplotypes composed of Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat polymorphisms (Y-STRs) are used to characterise paternal lineages of unknown male trace donors, especially suitable when males and females have contributed to the same trace, such as in sexual assault cases. Y-STR haplotyping applied in crime scene investigation can (i) exclude male suspects from involvement in crime, (ii) identify the paternal lineage of male perpetrators, (iii) highlight multiple male contributors to a trace, and (iv) provide investigative leads for finding unknown male perpetrators. Y-STR haplotype analysis is employed in paternity disputes of male offspring and other types of paternal kinship testing, including historical cases, as well as in special cases of missing person and disaster victim identification involving men. Y-chromosome polymorphisms are applied for inferring the paternal bio-geographic ancestry of unknown trace donors or missing persons, in cases where autosomal DNA profiling is uninformative. In this overview, all different forensic applications of Y-chromosome DNA are described. To illustrate the necessity of forensic Y-chromosome analysis, the investigation of a prominent murder case is described, which initiated two changes in national forensic DNA legislation both covering Y-chromosome use, and was finally solved via an innovative Y-STR dragnet involving thousands of volunteers after 14 years. Finally, expectations for the future of forensic Y-chromosome DNA analysis are discussed.

  5. The prevalence of Y chromosome microdeletions in Pakistani infertile men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubina Tabassum Siddiqui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Microdeletions of the azoospermia factor locus of the long arm of Y chromosome are an etiological factor of severe oligozoospermia or azoospermia. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Y-chromosome microdeletions in AZF region and their role in infertility in Pakistani population. Materials and Methods: The type of deletions in AZF locus were detected in infertile men (n=113 and the association of Y chromosome microdeletions with male infertility was assessed by including men (50 with normal karyotype and having children. Y chromosome microdeletions were detected by multiplex PCR using 10 sequence tagged sites namely sY81, sY130, sY141, sY142, sY155, sY157, sY160, sY182, sY231, and sY202 that covered all three regions of AZF. Results: Individuals with severe oligozoospermia showed 2.86% deletion frequency in AZFc region as compared to azoospermic males (5.5%. Conclusion: The results of our study showed that deletions in Y chromosome are not playing major part in male infertility. Moreover, multiplex-PCR strategy might preferably be employed for the detection of Y chromosome microdeletions allied to male infertility.

  6. [Dicentric Y chromosomes. First part: cytogenetic and molecular aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouayed Abdelmoula, N; Amouri, A

    2005-01-01

    Dicentric Y chromosomes have been reviewed twice in 1994 by Hsu et al. and in 1995 by Tuck-Muller et al. who showed that dic(Y) are the most common Y structural abnormalities and that their influence on gonadal and somatic development is extremely variable. The prediction of their phenotypic consequences is often difficult because of the variety of genomic sequences concerned by duplications and deletions, because of the variable degrees of mosaicism (cell line 45,X in particular) and at the end, because of identification and analysis technical difficulties of the structure of the rearranged Y chromosome. The clinical specter of this cytogenetic abnormality is rather wide going from almost-normal or infertile males, to females with or without stigmas of Turner syndrome. Middle phenotypes consist of various degrees of genital ambiguities. However, clinical expression seems to be related to the genomic capital of the Y chromosome, mainly the Y genes involved in the control of the process of the determination of gonads (Yp) and spermatogenesis (Yq) as well as control of the growth and the skeletal development (Yp). Here, we report a third comprehensive review of the literature concerning dicentric Y chromosomes reported since 1994. In the light of previous reviews as well as the recent data of the genetic cartography of the Y chromosome, we try, in this first part, to determine characteristics of reported dicentric Y chromosomes as well as their chromosomal mechanics, their mitotic stability and finally their cytogenetic and molecular investigations.

  7. Extensive geographical and social structure in the paternal lineages of Saudi Arabia revealed by analysis of 27 Y-STRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khubrani, Yahya M; Wetton, Jon H; Jobling, Mark A

    2018-03-01

    Saudi Arabia's indigenous population is organized into patrilineal descent groups, but to date, little has been done to characterize its population structure, in particular with respect to the male-specific region of the Y chromosome. We have used the 27-STR Yfiler ® Plus kit to generate haplotypes in 597 unrelated Saudi males, classified into five geographical regions (North, South, Central, East and West). Overall, Yfiler ® Plus provides a good discrimination capacity of 95.3%, but this is greatly reduced (74.7%) when considering the reduced Yfiler ® set of 17 Y-STRs, justifying the use of the expanded set of markers in this population. Comparison of the five geographical divisions reveals striking differences, with low diversity and similar haplotype spectra in the Central and Northern regions, and high diversity and similar haplotype spectra in the East and West. These patterns likely reflect the geographical isolation of the desert heartland of the peninsula, and the proximity to the sea of the Eastern and Western areas, and consequent historical immigration. We predicted haplogroups from Y-STR haplotypes, testing the performance of prediction by using a large independent set of Saudi Arabian Y-STR + Y-SNP data. Prediction indicated predominance (71%) of haplogroup J1, which was significantly more common in Central, Northern and Southern groups than in East and West, and formed a star-like expansion cluster in a median-joining network with an estimated age of ∼2800 years. Most of our 597 participants were sampled within Saudi Arabia itself, but ∼16% were sampled in the UK. Despite matching these two groups by home sub-region, we observed significant differences in haplotype and predicted haplogroup constitutions overall, and for most sub-regions individually. This suggests social structure influencing the probability of leaving Saudi Arabia, correlated with different Y-chromosome compositions. The UK-recruited sample is an inappropriate proxy for

  8. Cross-cultural comparison of the patient-centeredness of the hidden curriculum between a Saudi Arabian and 9 US medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Bawardy, Rasha; Blatt, Benjamin; Al-Shohaib, Saad; Simmens, Samuel J

    2009-12-18

    The implicit "hidden curriculum" strongly influences medical students' perceptions of the importance of patient-centeredness. A new instrument, the Communication, Curriculum, and Culture Survey (C3), already used to assess this hard-to- access part of the curriculum in the US, has potential for use in cross-cultural comparisons. To use the C3 to perform a pilot cross-cultural comparison of the patient-centeredness of the hidden curriculum between a Saudi medical school and 9 U.S. medical schools. Senior Saudi medical students completed the C3 and a second instrument, the Patient-Provider Orientation Scale (PPOS), which measured their attitudes toward patient-centered behavior. Senior Saudi medical students. 139/256 (54%) Saudis completed the C3; 122/256(48%) completed the PPOS. Means for 2 out of 3 of the C3's domains (0-100 scale) were lower for the Saudis than those for the Americans (95% confidence intervals in parentheses): 47 (45, 50) vs. 55 (53, 58); 54 (50, 58) vs. 68 (67, 70); they overlapped in the third: 60 (57, 63) vs. 62 (60, 63). The mean Saudi PPOS score was 4.0 (3.9, 4.1); for the American medical schools, 4.8 (4.8-4.8) (1-6, least to most patient-centered). In this preliminary study the data suggest that the patient-centeredness of the hidden curriculum differs in Saudi and US medical schools in 2 out of 3 domains. Cross-cultural use of instruments such as the C3 can highlight such important differences and help educators evaluate their curriculum from an international, as well as a local perspective. Use of instruments across borders is a growing trend and an indicator of the increasing globalization of medical education.

  9. Y-chromosomal diversity in Lebanon is structured by recent historical events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalloua, Pierre A; Xue, Yali; Khalife, Jade; Makhoul, Nadine; Debiane, Labib; Platt, Daniel E; Royyuru, Ajay K; Herrera, Rene J; Hernanz, David F Soria; Blue-Smith, Jason; Wells, R Spencer; Comas, David; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2008-04-01

    Lebanon is an eastern Mediterranean country inhabited by approximately four million people with a wide variety of ethnicities and religions, including Muslim, Christian, and Druze. In the present study, 926 Lebanese men were typed with Y-chromosomal SNP and STR markers, and unusually, male genetic variation within Lebanon was found to be more strongly structured by religious affiliation than by geography. We therefore tested the hypothesis that migrations within historical times could have contributed to this situation. Y-haplogroup J*(xJ2) was more frequent in the putative Muslim source region (the Arabian Peninsula) than in Lebanon, and it was also more frequent in Lebanese Muslims than in Lebanese non-Muslims. Conversely, haplogroup R1b was more frequent in the putative Christian source region (western Europe) than in Lebanon and was also more frequent in Lebanese Christians than in Lebanese non-Christians. The most common R1b STR-haplotype in Lebanese Christians was otherwise highly specific for western Europe and was unlikely to have reached its current frequency in Lebanese Christians without admixture. We therefore suggest that the Islamic expansion from the Arabian Peninsula beginning in the seventh century CE introduced lineages typical of this area into those who subsequently became Lebanese Muslims, whereas the Crusader activity in the 11(th)-13(th) centuries CE introduced western European lineages into Lebanese Christians.

  10. First dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin P Kear

    Full Text Available Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (~ 75 Ma deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titanosaur caudal vertebrae, and some isolated theropod marginal teeth that share unique character states and metric parameters (analyzed using multivariate statistical methods with derived abelisaurids - this is the first justifiable example of a non-avian carnivorous dinosaur clade from Arabia. The recognition of titanosaurians and abelisaurids from Saudi Arabia extends the palaeogeographical range of these groups along the entire northern Gondwanan margin during the latest Cretaceous. Moreover, given the extreme paucity of coeval occurrences elsewhere, the Saudi Arabian fossils provide a tantalizing glimpse into dinosaurian assemblage diversity within the region.

  11. First dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kear, Benjamin P; Rich, Thomas H; Vickers-Rich, Patricia; Ali, Mohammed A; Al-Mufarreh, Yahya A; Matari, Adel H; Al-Massari, Abdu M; Nasser, Abdulaziz H; Attia, Yousry; Halawani, Mohammed A

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (~ 75 Ma) deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titanosaur caudal vertebrae, and some isolated theropod marginal teeth that share unique character states and metric parameters (analyzed using multivariate statistical methods) with derived abelisaurids - this is the first justifiable example of a non-avian carnivorous dinosaur clade from Arabia. The recognition of titanosaurians and abelisaurids from Saudi Arabia extends the palaeogeographical range of these groups along the entire northern Gondwanan margin during the latest Cretaceous. Moreover, given the extreme paucity of coeval occurrences elsewhere, the Saudi Arabian fossils provide a tantalizing glimpse into dinosaurian assemblage diversity within the region.

  12. Veiled Delusions: Gender, Education, and Employment in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Patricia; Caram, Chris A.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the oppression endured by Saudi Arabian women, and discusses the state of education, higher education, and employment for them. States that it will be difficult for Saudi women to achieve their aspirations brought about by higher education due to the growing number of unemployed Saudi males and the heavy rule of the monarchist…

  13. Y chromosome evidence for a founder effect in Ashkenazi Jews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebel, Almut; Filon, Dvora; Faerman, Marina; Soodyall, Himla; Oppenheim, Ariella

    2005-03-01

    Recent genetic studies, based on Y chromosome polymorphic markers, showed that Ashkenazi Jews are more closely related to other Jewish and Middle Eastern groups than to their host populations in Europe. However, Ashkenazim have an elevated frequency of R-M17, the dominant Y chromosome haplogroup in Eastern Europeans, suggesting possible gene flow. In the present study of 495 Y chromosomes of Ashkenazim, 57 (11.5%) were found to belong to R-M17. Detailed analyses of haplotype structure, diversity and geographic distribution suggest a founder effect for this haplogroup, introduced at an early stage into the evolving Ashkenazi community in Europe. R-M17 chromosomes in Ashkenazim may represent vestiges of the mysterious Khazars.

  14. In-hospital mortality among patients injured in motor vehicle crashes in a Saudi Arabian hospital relative to large U.S. trauma centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghnam, Suliman; Palta, Mari; Hamedani, Azita; Remington, Patrick L; Alkelya, Mohamed; Albedah, Khalid; Durkin, Maureen S

    Traffic-related fatalities are a leading cause of premature death worldwide. According to the 2012 report the Global Burden of Disease 2010, traffic injuries ranked 8th as a cause of death in 2010, compared to 10th in 1990. Saudi Arabia is estimated to have an overall traffic fatality rate more than double that of the U.S., but it is unknown whether mortality differences also exist for injured patients seeking medical care. We aim to compare in-hospital mortality between Saudi Arabia and the United States, adjusting for severity and demographic variables. The analysis included 485,611 patients from the U.S. National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) and 5,290 patients from a trauma registry at King Abdulaziz Medical City (KAMC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. For comparability, we restricted our sample to NTDB data from level-I public trauma centers (≥400 beds) in the U.S. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the effect of setting (KAMC vs. NTDB) on in-hospital mortality after adjusting for age, sex, Triage-Revised Scale (T-RTS), Injury Severity Score (ISS), mechanism of injury, hypotension, surgery and head injuries. Interactions between setting and ISS, and predictors were also evaluated. Injured patients in the Saudi registry were more likely to be males, and younger than those from the NTDB. Patients at the Saudi hospital were at higher risk of in-hospital death than their U.S. counterparts. In the highest severity group (ISSs, 25-75), the odds ratio of in-hospital death in KAMC versus NTDB was 5.0 (95% CI 4.3-5.8). There were no differences in mortality between KAMC and NTDB among patients from lower ISS groups (ISSs, 1-8, 9-15, and 16-24). Patients who are severely injured following traffic crash injuries in Saudi Arabia are significantly more likely to die in the hospital than comparable patients admitted to large U.S. trauma centers. Further research is needed to identify reasons for this disparity and strategies for improving the care of

  15. First Dinosaurs from Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin P Kear; Rich, Thomas H; Patricia Vickers-Rich; Mohammed A. Ali; Yahya A Al-Mufarreh; Matari, Adel H.; Al-Massari, Abdu M.; Abdulaziz H Nasser; Yousry Attia; Mohammed A Halawani

    2013-01-01

    Dinosaur remains from the Arabian subcontinent are exceedingly rare, and those that have been documented manifest indeterminate affinities. Consequently the discovery of a small, but diagnostic, accumulation of elements from Campanian-Maastrichtian (similar to 75 Ma) deposits in northwestern Saudi Arabia is significant because it constitutes the first taxonomically identifiable dinosaur material described from the Arabian Peninsula. The fossils include a series of possible lithostrotian titan...

  16. Y chromosome in Turner syndrome: review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Mary Rocco de Oliveira

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome (TS is one of the most common types of aneuploidy among humans, and is present in 1:2000 newborns with female phenotype. Cytogenetically, the syndrome is characterized by sex chromosome monosomy (45,X, which is present in 50-60% of the cases. The other cases present mosaicism, with a 45,X cell line accompanied by one or more other cell lines with a complete or structurally abnormal X or Y chromosome. The presence of Y-chromosome material in patients with dysgenetic gonads increases the risk of gonadal tumors, especially gonadoblastoma. The greatest concern is the high risk of developing gonadoblastoma or other tumors and virilization during puberty if chromosome Y-specific sequences are present. The role of the Y chromosome in human oncogenesis is still controversial. Even though gonadoblastoma is a benign tumor, it can undergo transformation into invasive dysgerminoma in 60% of the cases, and also into other, malignant forms of germ cell tumors. Although some authors have questioned the high incidence of gonadoblastoma (around 30%, the risk of developing any kind of gonadal lesion, whether tumoral or not, justifies investigation of Y-chromosome sequences by means of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR, a highly sensitive, low-cost and easy-to-perform technique. In conclusion, mosaicism of both the X and the Y chromosome is a common finding in TS, and detection of Y-chromosome-specific sequences in patients, regardless of their karyotype, is necessary in order to prevent the development of gonadal lesions.

  17. The Divergence of Neandertal and Modern Human Y Chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Fernando L; Poznik, G David; Castellano, Sergi; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-04-07

    Sequencing the genomes of extinct hominids has reshaped our understanding of modern human origins. Here, we analyze ∼120 kb of exome-captured Y-chromosome DNA from a Neandertal individual from El Sidrón, Spain. We investigate its divergence from orthologous chimpanzee and modern human sequences and find strong support for a model that places the Neandertal lineage as an outgroup to modern human Y chromosomes-including A00, the highly divergent basal haplogroup. We estimate that the time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA) of Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes is ∼588 thousand years ago (kya) (95% confidence interval [CI]: 447-806 kya). This is ∼2.1 (95% CI: 1.7-2.9) times longer than the TMRCA of A00 and other extant modern human Y-chromosome lineages. This estimate suggests that the Y-chromosome divergence mirrors the population divergence of Neandertals and modern human ancestors, and it refutes alternative scenarios of a relatively recent or super-archaic origin of Neandertal Y chromosomes. The fact that the Neandertal Y we describe has never been observed in modern humans suggests that the lineage is most likely extinct. We identify protein-coding differences between Neandertal and modern human Y chromosomes, including potentially damaging changes to PCDH11Y, TMSB4Y, USP9Y, and KDM5D. Three of these changes are missense mutations in genes that produce male-specific minor histocompatibility (H-Y) antigens. Antigens derived from KDM5D, for example, are thought to elicit a maternal immune response during gestation. It is possible that incompatibilities at one or more of these genes played a role in the reproductive isolation of the two groups. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Pericentric inversion of the Y chromosome of infertile male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomomasa, H; Adachi, Y; Iwabuchi, M; Oshio, S; Umeda, T; Iino, Y; Takano, T; Nakahori, Y

    2000-01-01

    The authors report a case with pericentric inversion of the Y chromosome associated with asthenonecrozoospermia. The conventional karyotype was 46, X, inv (Y) (p11q11). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis revealed the deletion of DYZ3, DYS139, and RBM1. Three-color fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of the sperm chromosomes showed normal ratio between X- and Y-bearing sperm. In this case, the frequencies of aneuploidy of the sperm are not significantly higher compared with those from the normal volunteers. Cytogenetic analysis is recommended when the patients with pericentric inversion of the Y chromosome are attending an infertility clinic.

  19. Dog Y chromosomal DNA sequence: identification, sequencing and SNP discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkness Ewen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Population genetic studies of dogs have so far mainly been based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA, describing only the history of female dogs. To get a picture of the male history, as well as a second independent marker, there is a need for studies of biallelic Y-chromosome polymorphisms. However, there are no biallelic polymorphisms reported, and only 3200 bp of non-repetitive dog Y-chromosome sequence deposited in GenBank, necessitating the identification of dog Y chromosome sequence and the search for polymorphisms therein. The genome has been only partially sequenced for one male dog, disallowing mapping of the sequence into specific chromosomes. However, by comparing the male genome sequence to the complete female dog genome sequence, candidate Y-chromosome sequence may be identified by exclusion. Results The male dog genome sequence was analysed by Blast search against the human genome to identify sequences with a best match to the human Y chromosome and to the female dog genome to identify those absent in the female genome. Candidate sequences were then tested for male specificity by PCR of five male and five female dogs. 32 sequences from the male genome, with a total length of 24 kbp, were identified as male specific, based on a match to the human Y chromosome, absence in the female dog genome and male specific PCR results. 14437 bp were then sequenced for 10 male dogs originating from Europe, Southwest Asia, Siberia, East Asia, Africa and America. Nine haplotypes were found, which were defined by 14 substitutions. The genetic distance between the haplotypes indicates that they originate from at least five wolf haplotypes. There was no obvious trend in the geographic distribution of the haplotypes. Conclusion We have identified 24159 bp of dog Y-chromosome sequence to be used for population genetic studies. We sequenced 14437 bp in a worldwide collection of dogs, identifying 14 SNPs for future SNP analyses, and

  20. Dog Y chromosomal DNA sequence: identification, sequencing and SNP discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Natanaelsson, Christian; Oskarsson, Mattias CR; Angleby, Helen; Lundeberg, Joakim; Kirkness, Ewen; Savolainen, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Population genetic studies of dogs have so far mainly been based on analysis of mitochondrial DNA, describing only the history of female dogs. To get a picture of the male history, as well as a second independent marker, there is a need for studies of biallelic Y-chromosome polymorphisms. However, there are no biallelic polymorphisms reported, and only 3200 bp of non-repetitive dog Y-chromosome sequence deposited in GenBank, necessitating the identification of dog Y chromo...

  1. Saudi Arabia and CERN sign protocol

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On 9 May 2008, Mohammed I. Al Suwaiyel, President of the King Abdulaziz City of Science and Technology, representing the Government of Saudi Arabia, and CERN Director-General, Robert Aymar, signed a protocol to the 2006 cooperation agreement between CERN and Saudi Arabia. Members of the Saudi Arabian Government visit ATLAS.The purpose of the protocol is to define the operational framework needed to carry out various specific tasks provided for in the cooperation agreement in order to promote the development of a high energy particle physics community in Saudi Arabia and its ultimate visible participation as a member of the global CERN community. Signing the protocol, Mohammed I. Al-Suwaiyel said: "The Saudi Arabian Government has taken a number of initiatives to promote R&D in the interests of our country’s development and the advancement of science. Thanks to this protocol, Saudi scientists will be able to work towards this go...

  2. Comparison of recommended sanctions for lapses in professionalism of undergraduate medical students in a Saudi Arabian and a Scottish medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattar, Kamran; Roff, Sue

    2016-12-01

    Medical Professionalism is recognized as a cultural construct. We explore perceptions of the severity of lapses in professionalism of undergraduate medical students at two medical schools with different cultural contexts. Respondents from two medical schools (Saudi Arabia & UK) recommended sanctions for the first time, unmitigated lapses in academic professionalism, using the Dundee Polyprofessionalism Inventory 1: Academic Integrity. While more than two-thirds of the recommended sanctions for the 30 items of poor professionalism were fully or nearly congruent among the 1125 respondents, there were substantial differences in recommended response for one-third of the items, with a strong tendency for the Saudi students to recommend more lenient sanctions than the Scottish students. The strategy of using recommended sanctions as a proxy for the perception of the severity of different lapses in professionalism may be a useful tool in learning and teaching academic professionalism among medical students in different cultural contexts.

  3. Upper mantle structure under western Saudi Arabia from Rayleigh wave tomography and the origin of Cenozoic uplift and volcanism on the Arabian Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Y; Nyblade, A; Rodgers, A; Al-Amri, A

    2007-11-09

    The shear velocity structure of the shallow upper mantle beneath the Arabian Shield has been modeled by inverting new Rayleigh wave phase velocity measurements between 45 and 140 s together with previously published Rayleigh wave group velocity measurement between 10 and 45 s. For measuring phase velocities, we applied a modified array method that minimizes the distortion of raypaths by lateral heterogeneity. The new shear velocity model shows a broad low velocity region in the lithospheric mantle across the Shield and a low velocity region at depths {ge} 150 km localized along the Red Sea coast and Makkah-Madinah-Nafud (MMN) volcanic line. The velocity reduction in the upper mantle corresponds to a temperature anomaly of {approx}250-330 K. These finding, in particular the region of continuous low velocities along the Red Sea and MMN volcanic line, do not support interpretations for the origin of the Cenozoic plateau uplift and volcanism on the Shield invoking two separate plumes. When combined with images of the 410 and 660 km discontinuities beneath the southern part of the Arabian Shield, body wave tomographic models, a S-wave polarization analysis, and SKS splitting results, our new model supports an interpretation invoking a thermal upwelling of warm mantle rock originating in the lower mantle under Africa that crosses through the transition zone beneath Ethiopia and moves to the north and northwest under the eastern margin of the Red Sea and the Arabian Shield. In this interpretation, the difference in mean elevation between the Platform and Shield can be attributed to isostatic uplift caused by heating of the lithospheric mantle under the Shield, with significantly higher region along the Red Sea possibly resulting from a combination of lithosphere thinning and dynamic uplift.

  4. A discussion on the tectonic implications of Ediacaran late- to post-orogenic A-type granite in the northeastern Arabian Shield, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, F. A.; Bonin, B.; Pease, V.; Anderson, J. L.

    2017-03-01

    The transition from late-orogenic to post-orogenic magmatism following major orogenic episodes such as the Neoproterozoic to Cambrian East African Orogen (EAO) is an important, yet not well-understood geological event marking the cessation of subduction-controlled magmatism between buoyant lithospheric fragments. Forming the northern part of the EAO in the Arabian-Nubian Shield are three granitic suites that successively intruded the same northeastern area and post-date the 640 Ma major orogenic episode: (1) 620-600 Ma alkali feldspar (hypersolvous) granite with alkaline/ferroan/A-type geochemistry, (2) 599 Ma granite cumulates (some garnet-bearing) with calc-alkaline/magnesian affinities, and (3) 584-566 Ma alkali feldspar (hypersolvous) granite (aegirine-bearing) with a distinctive peralkaline/ferroan/A-type signature. Combining whole-rock geochemistry from the southern and northern Arabian Shield, suites 1 and 2 are suggested to be products of late-orogenic slab tear/rollback inducing asthenospheric mantle injection and lower crustal melting/fractionation toward A-type/ferroan geochemistry. Suite 3, however, is suggested to be produced by post-orogenic lithospheric delamination, which replaced the older mantle with new asthenospheric (rare earth element-enriched) mantle that ultimately becomes the thermal boundary layer of the new lithosphere. Major shear zones, such as the 620-540 Ma Najd Fault System (NFS), are some of the last tectonic events recorded across the Arabian Shield. Data presented here suggest that the NFS is directly related to the late-orogenic (620-600 Ma) slab tear/rollback in the northeastern Shield as it met with opposing subduction polarity in the southern Shield. Furthermore, this study infers that east and west Gondwana amalgamation interacted with opposing convergence reflected by the NFS.

  5. Preliminary assessment of the geochemistry and mineral favorability of the postorogenic granites of the southeastern Arabian Shield, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckless, John S.; VanTrump, G.; Christiansen, E.H.; Bush, C.A.; Bunker, C.M.; Bartel, A.J.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical analyses of samples for 19 postorogenic plutons from the southeastern Arabian Shield show that these rocks have average potassium/rubidium ratios (162) and average rubidium/strontium ratios (11.8) characteristic of highly evolved granites. Most of the analyzed samples are peraluminous. Three plutons are physically similar in terms of shape and megascopic textural zonation to peralkaline complexes in the northeastern part of the Shield, but none of the samples from these plutons is peralkaline. However, these plutons do contain the least-evolved samples.

  6. Mutational landscape of the human Y chromosome-linked genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013), repeated abortion. (Pathak et al. 2006; Yan et al. 2011) and other categories of disorders related to male infertility (Bashamboo et al. 2005;. Tian et al. 2014; Yadav et al. 2014). Despite the advances made on Y chromosome genetics, our understanding on the affected genes and loci in males with clinical condition of ...

  7. Semen quality in men with Y chromosome aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, A; Marcucci, L; Elli, R; Tanzi, N; Paoli, D; Radicioni, A; Lombardo, F; Lenzi, A; Gandini, L

    2011-10-01

    Infertile males sometimes bear structurally balanced chromosome aberrations, such as translocations and inversions, which involve both autosomes and sex chromosomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate genotype-phenotype correlations in a sample of infertile men with various types of Y chromosome abnormalities. In particular, we examined the effect of (i) balanced structural aberrations such as translocations between sex chromosomes and autosomes; (ii) unbalanced structural aberrations such as deletions or isodicentrics, both [idic(Yp)] and [idic(Yq)]. We studied 13 subjects bearing Y chromosome aberrations. Each patient underwent seminal fluid examination, andrological inspection, hormone study, testicular ultrasound, conventional and molecular cytogenetic analysis and study of Y chromosome microdeletions. Comparison of genotype and sperm phenotype in infertile patients with various Y chromosome aberrations revealed the key role of meiotic pairing defects in arresting spermatogenesis, both in the presence and in the absence of azoospermic factor microdeletions and cell mosaicism. The failure of meiosis and, in consequence, spermatogenesis may be a result of the failure to inactivate the X chromosome in the meiotic prophase, which is necessary for normal male spermatogenesis to take place. © 2010 The Authors. International Journal of Andrology © 2011 European Academy of Andrology.

  8. Y-Chromosome short tandem repeat, typing technology, locus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-07-08

    Jul 8, 2015 ... Chromosome Y microsatellites seem to be ideal markers to delineate differences between human populations. They are transmitted in uniparental and they are very sensitive for genetic drift. This review will highlight the importance of the Y- Chromosome as a tool for tracing human evolution and describes.

  9. Lemba origins revisited: Tracing the ancestry of Y chromosomes in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Previous historical, anthropological and genetic data provided overwhelming support for the Semitic origins of the Lemba, a Bantu-speaking people in southern Africa. Objective. To revisit the question concerning genetic affinities between the Lemba and Jews. Methods. Y-chromosome variation was examined ...

  10. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The female spinach genome was taken as blocker and cDNA library specifically expressed in Y chromosome was constructed. Moreover, expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences in cDNA library were cloned, sequenced and bioinformatics was analysed. There were 63 valid EST sequences obtained in this study.

  11. Rapid cloning and bioinformatic analysis of spinach Y chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jun Gao and Long-Dou Lu. J. Genet. 94, 705–713. Table 1. List of part of spinach Y chromosome-specific ESTs clones by dot blot and their size and homology to the sequences available at the GenBank database by BLASTx software.

  12. Existence of global attractor for the Trojan Y Chromosome model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Zhao

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the long time behavior of solution for the equation derived by the Trojan Y Chromosome (TYC model with spatial spread. Based on the regularity estimates for the semigroups and the classical existence theorem of global attractors, we prove that this equations possesses a global attractor in $H^k(\\Omega^4$ $(k\\geq 0$ space.

  13. Mutational landscape of the human Y chromosome-linked genes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mutational landscape of the human Y chromosome-linked genes and loci in patients with hypogonadism. Deepali Pathak, Sandeep Kumar Yadav, Leena Rawal and Sher Ali. J. Genet. 94, 677–687. Table 1. Details showing age, sex, karyotype, clinical features and diagnosis results of the patients with H. Hormone profile.

  14. Y chromosomes of prehistoric people along the Yangtze River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Huang, Ying; Mustavich, Laura F; Zhang, Fan; Tan, Jing-Ze; Wang, Ling-E; Qian, Ji; Gao, Meng-He; Jin, Li

    2007-11-01

    The ability to extract mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from ancient remains has enabled the study of ancient DNA, a legitimate field for over 20 years now. Recently, Y chromosome genotyping has begun to be applied to ancient DNA. The Y chromosome haplogroup in East Asia has since caught the attention of molecular anthropologists, as it is one of the most ethnic-related genetic markers of the region. In this paper, the Y chromosome haplogroup of DNA from ancient East Asians was examined, in order to genetically link them to modern populations. Fifty-six human remains were sampled from five archaeological sites, primarily along the Yangtze River. Strict criteria were followed to eliminate potential contamination. Five SNPs from the Y chromosome were successfully amplified from most of the samples, with at least 62.5% of the samples belonging to the O haplogroup, similar to the frequency for modern East Asian populations. A high frequency of O1 was found in Liangzhu Culture sites around the mouth of the Yangtze River, linking this culture to modern Austronesian and Daic populations. A rare haplogroup, O3d, was found at the Daxi site in the middle reaches of the Yangtze River, indicating that the Daxi people might be the ancestors of modern Hmong-Mien populations, which show only small traces of O3d today. Noticeable genetic segregation was observed among the prehistoric cultures, demonstrating the genetic foundation of the multiple origins of the Chinese Civilization.

  15. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... [Traut W. 2010 New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia. J. Genet. 89, ..... Schultheis C., Böhne A., Schartl M., Volff J. and Galiana-Arnoux D. 2009 Sex determination diversity and sex chromosome evolution in poeciliid fish. Sex. Dev. 3, 68–77 ...

  16. Distribution of Y chromosomes among Native North Americans: A study of Athapaskan population history

    OpenAIRE

    Malhi, Ripan Singh; Gonzalez-Oliver, Angelica; Schroeder, Kari Britt; Kemp, Brian M; Greenberg, Jonathan A.; Dobrowski, Solomon Z.; Smith, David Glenn; Resendez, Andres; Karafet, Tatiana; Hammer, Michael; Zegura, Stephen; Brovko, Tatiana

    2008-01-01

    In this study 231 Y chromosomes from 12 populations were typed for four diagnostic SNPs to determine haplogroup membership and 43 Y chromosomes from three of these populations were typed for eight Simple Tandem Repeats (STRs) to determine haplotypes. These data were combined with previously published data, amounting to 724 Y chromosomes from 26 populations in North America, and analyzed to investigate the geographic distribution of Y chromosomes among Native North Americans and to test the So...

  17. The pig X and Y Chromosomes: structure, sequence, and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Benjamin M; Sargent, Carole A; Churcher, Carol; Hunt, Toby; Herrero, Javier; Loveland, Jane E; Dunn, Matt; Louzada, Sandra; Fu, Beiyuan; Chow, William; Gilbert, James; Austin-Guest, Siobhan; Beal, Kathryn; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Cheng, William; Gordon, Daria; Grafham, Darren; Hardy, Matt; Harley, Jo; Hauser, Heidi; Howden, Philip; Howe, Kerstin; Lachani, Kim; Ellis, Peter J I; Kelly, Daniel; Kerry, Giselle; Kerwin, James; Ng, Bee Ling; Threadgold, Glen; Wileman, Thomas; Wood, Jonathan M D; Yang, Fengtang; Harrow, Jen; Affara, Nabeel A; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2016-01-01

    We have generated an improved assembly and gene annotation of the pig X Chromosome, and a first draft assembly of the pig Y Chromosome, by sequencing BAC and fosmid clones from Duroc animals and incorporating information from optical mapping and fiber-FISH. The X Chromosome carries 1033 annotated genes, 690 of which are protein coding. Gene order closely matches that found in primates (including humans) and carnivores (including cats and dogs), which is inferred to be ancestral. Nevertheless, several protein-coding genes present on the human X Chromosome were absent from the pig, and 38 pig-specific X-chromosomal genes were annotated, 22 of which were olfactory receptors. The pig Y-specific Chromosome sequence generated here comprises 30 megabases (Mb). A 15-Mb subset of this sequence was assembled, revealing two clusters of male-specific low copy number genes, separated by an ampliconic region including the HSFY gene family, which together make up most of the short arm. Both clusters contain palindromes with high sequence identity, presumably maintained by gene conversion. Many of the ancestral X-related genes previously reported in at least one mammalian Y Chromosome are represented either as active genes or partial sequences. This sequencing project has allowed us to identify genes--both single copy and amplified--on the pig Y Chromosome, to compare the pig X and Y Chromosomes for homologous sequences, and thereby to reveal mechanisms underlying pig X and Y Chromosome evolution. © 2016 Skinner et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Risk of Gonadoblastoma Development in Patients with Turner Syndrome with Cryptic Y Chromosome Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Ahreum; Hyun, Sei Eun; Jung, Mo Kyung; Chae, Hyun Wook; Lee, Woo Jung; Kim, Tae Hyuk; Kim, Duk Hee; Kim, Ho-Seong

    2017-06-01

    Current guidelines recommend that testing for Y chromosome material should be performed only in patients with Turner syndrome harboring a marker chromosome and exhibiting virilization in order to detect individuals who are at high risk of gonadoblastoma. However, cryptic Y chromosome material is suggested to be a risk factor for gonadoblastoma in patients with Turner syndrome. Here, we aimed to estimate the frequency of cryptic Y chromosome material in patients with Turner syndrome and determine whether Y chromosome material increased the risk for development of gonadoblastoma. A total of 124 patients who were diagnosed with Turner syndrome by conventional cytogenetic techniques underwent additional molecular analysis to detect cryptic Y chromosome material. In addition, patients with Turner syndrome harboring Y chromosome cell lines had their ovaries removed prophylactically. Finally, we assessed the occurrence of gonadoblastoma in patients with Turner syndrome. Molecular analysis demonstrated that 10 patients had Y chromosome material among 118 patients without overt Y chromosome (8.5%). Six patients with overt Y chromosome and four patients with cryptic Y chromosome material underwent oophorectomy. Histopathological analysis revealed that the occurrence of gonadoblastoma in the total group was 2.4%, and gonadoblastoma occurred in one of six patients with an overt Y chromosome (16.7%) and 2 of 10 patients with cryptic Y chromosome material (20.0%). The risk of developing gonadoblastoma in patients with cryptic Y chromosome material was similar to that in patients with overt Y chromosome. Therefore, molecular screening for Y chromosome material should be recommended for all patients with Turner syndrome to detect individuals at a high risk of gonadoblastoma and to facilitate proper management of the disease.

  19. Antibodies against human platelet alloantigens and human leucocyte antigen class 1 in Saudi Arabian multiparous women and multi-transfused patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ouda, Sarah K.; Al-Banyan, Abdulmajeed A.; Al-Gahtani, Farjah H.; Abdel-Gader, Abdel-Galil M.; Al-Dakhil, Lateefa O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the frequency of alloimmunization against human platelet antigens (HPAs) and human leucocyte antigen class 1 (HLA1) in multiparous women and multi-transfused patients. Methods: This prospective study was conducted between January and August 2013, on 50 multiparous women with no history of previous blood transfusion recruited from the Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic, and 50 patients, who received multiple platelet transfusions, recruited from the Hematology/Oncology Ward, King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: The frequency of alloimmunization among multiparous pregnant women was 76%, as follows: 16% against HLA1 only, 8% against HPAs only, 52% against both HPAs and HLA1 antigens. In multi-transfused patients, the rate of alloimmunization was 42% as follows: 2% against HLA1 only, 22% against HPAs only, 18% against both HPAs and HLA1 antigens. The frequency of alloimmunization increases with the number of pregnancies, but not with the number of platelet transfusions. Conclusion: Alloimmunization against HPAs and HLA1 is very common among Saudi multiparous women and multi-transfused patients, which encourages the search for the extent of the possible complications in the fetus and newborn and in multitransfused patients and how to prevent their occurrence. PMID:25987107

  20. Perceived barriers to physician-scientist careers among female undergraduate medical students at the College of Medicine - Alfaisal University: a Saudi Arabian perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Zaid, Ahmed; Altinawi, Basmah

    2014-04-01

    At present, only a negligible number of matriculating and graduating female medical students express interest in physician-scientist careers. The aim of this study is to explore the perceived barriers towards pursuing physician-scientist careers by female undergraduate medical students at College of Medicine - Alfaisal University, Saudi Arabia. An online, anonymous, self-rating survey was administered. The survey assessed students' perceived barriers towards potential physician-scientist careers by responding to typical 5-point Likert scale statements. One hundred sixteen students (116/171) participated in the survey with a 67.8% response rate. The top three barriers to such physician-scientist careers were greater preference towards patient care than research (75%), lack of conviction as regards merging a fruitful research profession with satisfying motherhood life (52.6%) and paucity of recognizing successful and well-known female physician-scientist role models in the country (48.3%). Our results showed that the perceived barriers to physician-scientist careers by College of Medicine - Alfaisal University's female undergraduate medical students were largely identical to the Western literature with few differences and more influence of cultural reasons. It is crucial for medical educators in Saudi Arabia to work on mechanisms that stimulate female students' interest in research and resolve all barriers that stand in the face of students towards considering physician-scientist careers.

  1. Twenty novel mutations in BCKDHA, BCKDHB and DBT genes in a cohort of 52 Saudi Arabian patients with maple syrup urine disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiqa Imtiaz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, an autosomal recessive inborn error of metabolism due to defects in the branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD complex, is commonly observed among other inherited metabolic disorders in the kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This report presents the results of mutation analysis of three of the four genes encoding the BCKD complex in 52 biochemically diagnosed MSUD patients originating from Saudi Arabia. The 25 mutations (20 novel detected spanned across the entire coding regions of the BCKHDA, BCKDHB and DBT genes. There were no mutations found in the DLD gene in this cohort of patients. Prediction effects, conservation and modelling of novel mutations demonstrated that all were predicted to be disease-causing. All mutations presented in a homozygous form and we did not detect the presence of a “founder” mutation in any of three genes. In addition, prenatal molecular genetic testing was successfully carried out on chorionic villus samples or amniocenteses in 10 expectant mothers with affected children with MSUD, molecularly characterized by this study.

  2. Y-Chromosome Markers for the Red Fox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rando, Halie M; Stutchman, Jeremy T; Bastounes, Estelle R; Johnson, Jennifer L; Driscoll, Carlos A; Barr, Christina S; Trut, Lyudmila N; Sacks, Benjamin N; Kukekova, Anna V

    2017-09-01

    The de novo assembly of the red fox (Vulpes vulpes) genome has facilitated the development of genomic tools for the species. Efforts to identify the population history of red foxes in North America have previously been limited by a lack of information about the red fox Y-chromosome sequence. However, a megabase of red fox Y-chromosome sequence was recently identified over 2 scaffolds in the reference genome. Here, these scaffolds were scanned for repeated motifs, revealing 194 likely microsatellites. Twenty-three of these loci were selected for primer development and, after testing, produced a panel of 11 novel markers that were analyzed alongside 2 markers previously developed for the red fox from dog Y-chromosome sequence. The markers were genotyped in 76 male red foxes from 4 populations: 7 foxes from Newfoundland (eastern Canada), 12 from Maryland (eastern United States), and 9 from the island of Great Britain, as well as 48 foxes of known North American origin maintained on an experimental farm in Novosibirsk, Russia. The full marker panel revealed 22 haplotypes among these red foxes, whereas the 2 previously known markers alone would have identified only 10 haplotypes. The haplotypes from the 4 populations clustered primarily by continent, but unidirectional gene flow from Great Britain and farm populations may influence haplotype diversity in the Maryland population. The development of new markers has increased the resolution at which red fox Y-chromosome diversity can be analyzed and provides insight into the contribution of males to red fox population diversity and patterns of phylogeography. © The American Genetic Association 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Heterogeneity of pericentric inversions of the human y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knebel, S; Pasantes, J J; Thi, D A D; Schaller, F; Schempp, W

    2011-01-01

    Pericentric inversions of the human Y chromosome (inv(Y)) are the result of breakpoints in Yp and Yq. Whether these breakpoints occur recurrently on specific hotspots or appear at different locations along the repeat structure of the human Y chromosome is an open question. Employing FISH for a better definition and refinement of the inversion breakpoints in 9 cases of inv(Y) chromosomes, with seemingly unvarying metacentric appearance after banding analysis, unequivocally resulted in heterogeneity of the pericentric inversions of the human Y chromosome. While in all 9 inv(Y) cases the inversion breakpoints in the short arm fall in a gene-poor region of X-transposed sequences proximal to PAR1 and SRY in Yp11.2, there are clearly 3 different inversion breakpoints in the long arm. Inv(Y)-types I and II are familial cases showing inversion breakpoints that map in Yq11.23 or in Yq11.223, outside the ampliconic fertility gene cluster of DAZ and CDY in AZFc. Inv(Y)-type III shows an inversion breakpoint in Yq11.223 that splits the DAZ and CDY fertility gene-cluster in AZFc. This inversion type is representative of both familial cases and cases with spermatogenetic impairment. In a further familial case of inv(Y), with almost acrocentric morphology, the breakpoints are within the TSPY and RBMY repeat in Yp and within the heterochromatin in Yq. Therefore, the presence of specific inversion breakpoints leading to impaired fertility in certain inv(Y) cases remains an open question. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Y chromosome loss in male patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lleo, Ana; Oertelt-Prigione, Sabine; Bianchi, Ilaria; Caliari, Lisa; Finelli, Palma; Miozzo, Monica; Lazzari, Roberta; Floreani, Annarosa; Donato, Francesca; Colombo, Massimo; Gershwin, M Eric; Podda, Mauro; Invernizzi, Pietro

    2013-03-01

    Sex chromosome abnormalities have been advocated to be involved in the striking female prevalence of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and women with PBC manifest an increased X chromosome loss in peripheral blood mononuclear cells compared to age-matched healthy women. Our knowledge of the etiopathogenesis of autoimmunity in male patients remains, however, limited. Next to the possible role of androgens and their imbalances, the Y chromosome appears as a potential candidate for influence of the immune function in men. Herein we analyzed a population of male patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (n = 26) and healthy controls (n = 88) to define a potential association of disease and the loss of the Y chromosome. We demonstrate that Y chromosome loss indeed is higher in PBC males compared to healthy controls, and this phenomenon increases with aging. We were, thus, able to confirm the existence of an analogous mechanism in the male population to previously identified X haploinsufficiency in female patients with organ-specific autoimmune disease. We propose that this commonality might represent a relevant feature in the etiopathogenesis of autoimmune diseases that should be further investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Y-chromosomal genes affecting male fertility: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasdeep Kaur Dhanoa

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The mammalian sex-chromosomes (X and Y have evolved from autosomes and are involved in sex determination and reproductive traits. The Y-chromosome is the smallest chromosome that consists of 2-3% of the haploid genome and may contain between 70 and 200 genes. The Y-chromosome plays major role in male fertility and is suitable to study the evolutionary relics, speciation, and male infertility and/or subfertility due to its unique features such as long non-recombining region, abundance of repetitive sequences, and holandric inheritance pattern. During evolution, many holandric genes were deleted. The current review discusses the mammalian holandric genes and their functions. The commonly encountered infertility and/or subfertility problems due to point or gross mutation (deletion of the Y-chromosomal genes have also been discussed. For example, loss or microdeletion of sex-determining region, Y-linked gene results in XY males that exhibit female characteristics, deletion of RNA binding motif, Y-encoded in azoospermic factor b region results in the arrest of spermatogenesis at meiosis. The holandric genes have been covered for associating the mutations with male factor infertility.

  6. Immunogenicity and safety of a meningococcal quadrivalent conjugate vaccine in Saudi Arabian adolescents previously vaccinated with one dose of bivalent and quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccines: a phase III, controlled, randomized, and modified blind-observer study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mazrou, Yagob; Khalil, Mohamed; Findlow, Helen; Chadha, Helen; Bosch Castells, Valerie; Johnson, David R; Borrow, Ray

    2012-07-01

    Reduced immune responses to repeated polysaccharide vaccination have been previously reported, but there are limited immunogenicity data on the use of meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine (PSV) followed by meningococcal conjugate vaccine. Saudi Arabian adolescents (aged 16 to 19 years) who had previously been vaccinated with ≥1 dose of bivalent meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine and 1 dose of quadrivalent meningococcal polysaccharide (MPSV4) were enrolled in a controlled, randomized, and modified observer-blind study (collectively termed the PSV-exposed group). The PSV-exposed group was randomized to receive either quadrivalent meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4) (n = 145 PSV-exposed/MCV4 group) or MPSV4 (n = 142 PSV-exposed/MPSV4 group), and a PSV-naïve group received MCV4 (n = 163). Serum samples collected prevaccination and 28 days postvaccination were measured by baby rabbit serum bactericidal antibody (rSBA) assay, and vaccine tolerability and safety were also evaluated. For each serogroup, the postvaccination geometric mean titers (GMTs) were significantly higher in the PSV-naïve group than in either group comprised of the PSV-exposed participants. The postvaccination serogroup C rSBA GMT was significantly higher in the PSV-MCV4 group than in the PSV-MPSV4 group after adjusting for prevaccination GMTs. Although not statistically significant, similar differences were observed for serogroups A, Y, and W-135. No worrisome safety signals were detected. This study demonstrated MCV4 to be safe and immunogenic in those who had previously received polysaccharide vaccination, and it suggests that conjugate vaccine can partially compensate for the hyporesponsiveness seen with repeated doses of polysaccharide vaccine.

  7. Evaluation of groundwater chemistry and its impact on drinking and irrigation water quality in the eastern part of the Central Arabian graben and trough system, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Faisal K.; Mogren, Saad; Mukhopadhyay, Manoj; Ibrahim, Elkhedr

    2016-08-01

    The present study deals with the assessment of groundwater with respect to the main hydrological processes controlling its chemistry and its subsequent impact on groundwater quality for drinking and irrigation purposes in the eastern part of the Central Arabian graben and trough system. Groundwater samples were collected from 73 bore wells tapping the Cretaceous Biyadh and Wasia sandstone aquifers. The main groundwater facies in the area belong to the mixed Casbnd Mgsbnd SO4/Cl type and the SO4sbnd Cl type. Prolonged rock water interaction has resulted in high TDS (average of 2131 mg/l) and high EC (average of 2725 μS/cm) of the groundwater. The average nitrate (56.38 mg/l) value in the area is higher than the WHO prescribed limits of 50 mg/l in drinking water and is attributed to agricultural activities. The Drinking Water Quality Index (DWQI) shows that 33% of the water samples fall within the excellent to good category whereas the remaining samples fall in the poor to unsuitable for drinking category. In terms of Sodium Adsorption Ratio (SAR), Sodium percentage (Na %) and Residual Sodium Carbonate (RSC) the groundwater is suitable for irrigation however the high salinity values can adversely affect the plant physiology.

  8. Aberrations in pseudoautosomal regions (PARs) found in infertile men with Y-chromosome microdeletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgez, Carolina J; Weedin, John W; Sahin, Aysegul; Tannour-Louet, Mounia; Han, Shuo; Bournat, Juan C; Mielnik, Anna; Cheung, Sau Wai; Nangia, Ajay K; Schlegel, Peter N; Lipshultz, Larry I; Lamb, Dolores J

    2011-04-01

    The pseudoautosomal regions (PARs) of the Y-chromosome undergo meiotic recombination with the X-chromosome. PAR mutations are associated with infertility and mental and stature disorders. The aim of the study was to determine whether men with Y-chromosome microdeletions have structural defects in PARs. Eighty-seven infertile men with Y-chromosome microdeletions and 35 controls were evaluated for chromosomal rearrangements using commercial or custom (X- and Y-chromosome) array comparative genomic hybridization or by quantitative PCR of selected PAR genes. Multisoftware-defined chromosomal gains or losses were validated by quantitative PCR and FISH. Array comparative genomic hybridization confirmed the AZF deletions identified by multiplex PCR. All men with Y-chromosome microdeletions and an abnormal karyotype displayed PAR abnormalities, as did 10% of men with Y-chromosome microdeletions and a normal karyotype. None of the control subjects or infertile men without Y-chromosome microdeletions had PAR duplications or deletions. SHOX aberrations occurred in 14 men (nine gains and five losses); four were short in stature (95th percentile). In contrast, the height of 23 men with Y-chromosome microdeletions and normal PARs was average at 176.8 cm (50th percentile). Y-chromosome microdeletions can include PAR defects causing genomic disorders such as SHOX, which may be transmitted to offspring. Previously unrecognized PAR gains and losses in men with Y-chromosome microdeletions may have consequences for offspring.

  9. Modeling Future Land Cover Changes and Their Effects on the Land Surface Temperatures in the Saudi Arabian Eastern Coastal City of Dammam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Tauhidur Rahman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several decades, Saudi cities have experienced rapid urban developments and land use and land cover (LULC changes. These developments will have numerous short- and long-term consequences including increasing the land surface temperature (LST of these cities. This study investigated the effects of LULC changes on the LST for the eastern coastal city of Dammam. Using Landsat imagery, the study first detected the LULC using the maximum likelihood classification method and derived the LSTs for the years 1990, 2002, and 2014. Using the classified results, it then modeled the future LULC for 2026 using the Cellular Automata Markov (CAM model. Finally, using three thematic indices and linear regression analysis, it then modeled the LST for 2026 as well. The built-up area in Dammam increased by 28.9% between 1990 and 2014. During this period, the average LSTs for the LULC classes increased as well, with bare soil and built-up area having the highest LST. By 2026, the urban area is expected to encompass 55% of the city and 98% of the land cover is envisioned to have average LSTs over 41 °C. Such high temperatures will make it difficult for the residents to live in the area.

  10. A GPS Network Densification in Saudi Arabia in Support of Geophysical Investigations in the Region

    OpenAIRE

    Almuslmani, Bandar; Al-Motari, Eid; Bingley, Richard M.; Teferle, Felix Norman; Moore, Terry

    2006-01-01

    Current investigations of the motions of the Arabian and its neighboring plates are primarily based on GPS measurements obtained in the surrounding areas of the Arabian plate, with few stations actually located on the Arabian plate itself in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. In order to advance the knowledge of the dynamics of the Arabian plate and its intra-plate deformations, the General Directorate of Military Survey (GDMS), through a collaboration with the Institute of Engineering Surveying an...

  11. [Screening for Y chromosome sequences in patients with Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrão, Lénia; Lopes, Maria Lurdes; Limbert, Catarina; Marques, Bárbara; Boieiro, Filomena; Silva, Marisa; Marques, Ramira; Lavinha, João; Mota, Amilcar; Gonçalves, João

    2002-01-01

    The Turner syndrome (TS) has been described in association with different sex chromosome aberrations. Although most TS patients show no evidence of Y chromosome sequences, according to different authors some TS patients may have Y chromosome material present in a few cells that are not detected by standard cytogenetic analysis. The importance of identification of this low level Y mosaicism is of clinical relevance due to the patient's increased risk of developing gonadoblastoma. In the present study, standard chromosome analysis performed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from 22 TS patients showed 12 patients with 45,X karyotype, 7 patients were mosaics with or without structural abnormalities in one X chromosome and, the remaining three patients had the following karyotypes: 46,X,i(X)(q10); 46,X,+mar/47,X,idic(Y),+mar and 45,X/46,X,+r. Molecular studies were performed on genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes and mouth epithelial cells, which derive from two different embryonic germ layers, mesoderm and ectoderm, respectively. The screening for low level Y mosaicism was carried out by simplex PCR and by nested PCR of the following Y specific loci: SRY (sex determining region Y), TSPY (testis specific protein Y encoded), DYZ3 (centromeric locus) and DAZ1 (deleted in azoospermia). In two TS patients a set of STSs of the Y long and short arms were used to characterize the idic(Y) and the ring chromosomes. The high sensitivity of the nested PCR (1 male cell/125,000 female cells) allowed for exclusion of the presence of low level Y mosaicism in 20 out of 22 TS patients. In the patient with the idic(Y), PCR analysis was positive for all Y loci tested excluding the heterochromatic region. This result identified the breakpoint between sY158 and sY159 on the long arm and, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) it was confirmed that the euchromatic part of the long arm, centromere and short arm of the Y chromosome were duplicated. The characterization

  12. Learning and Teaching Vocabulary Acquisition: Analysing One Unit of a Textbook in the Saudi Arabia Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashrah, Hind Talal

    2013-01-01

    Saudi Arabian Ministry of Education is seeking for the best English language textbook to be taught in schools in order to develop the Saudi education in the future. To choose the most beneficial one, frameworks or tools were designed to analyze and to evaluate a unit of a textbook in Saudi Arabia based on standard criteria. These standard criteria…

  13. Evolutionary breakpoint analysis on Y chromosomes of higher primates provides insight into human Y evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, R; Kirsch, S; Rappold, G A; Schempp, W

    2005-01-01

    Comparative FISH mapping of PAC clones covering almost 3 Mb of the human AZFa region in Yq11.21 to metaphases of human and great apes unravels breakpoints that were involved in species-specific Y chromosome evolution. An astonishing clustering of evolutionary breakpoints was detected in the very proximal region on the long arm of the human Y chromosome in Yq11.21. These breakpoints were involved in deletions, one specific for the human and another for the orang-utan Y chromosome, in a duplicative translocation/transposition specific for bonobo and chimpanzee Y chromosomes and in a pericentric inversion specific for the gorilla Y chromosome. In addition, our comparative results allow the deduction of a model for the human Y chromosome evolution. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. PREVALENCE OF Y CHROMOSOME MICRODELETIONS IN IRANIAN INFERTILE MEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Akbari Asbagh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed to determine the frequency of Y chromosome AZF (Azoospermia Factor subregions, microdeletions in patients with idiopathic nonobstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia. Subjects included 40 men who had been referred to infertility clinics for assisted reproduction, 37 were azoospermic and 3 had severe oligospermia. Medical history and physical exam revealed no evidence of infection, obstruction of seminal tract, endocrine failure or chromosomal anomalies. Hormonal study was performed for all patients. Twenty six men had biopsies of the testes including 11 patients with hypospermatogenesis, 9 patients with maturation arrest, 4 patients with sertoli cell only syndrome and 2 patients with tubular sclerosis. In 14 men who did not have a testicular biopsy multiple, epididymal and testicular sperm aspirations under anesthesia failed and testicular sperm extraction was subsequently performed for ICSI. DNA was isolated from blood samples. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification of 11 loci spanning the AZFa, AZFb and AZFc subregions of the Y chromosome using sY81, sY83, sY127, sY130, sY131, sY147, sY149, sY157, sY158, sY254 and sY276 was performed. Microdeletions of the Y chromosome were found in two of the patients (5%, who had azoospermia. Deletions were restricted to DAZ (deleted in azoospermia locus in AZFc subregion. One of the patients had a history of cryptorchidism and the second had undergone a left side varicocelectomy. Testicular pathology showed sertoli cell only syndrome in both of them. Our experience adds to the current logic that men with azoospermia or severe oligospermia should be evaluated for Yq11 microdeletions before deciding to operate varicoceles or else scheduling them for assisted reproductive techniques.

  15. Exploring the Y Chromosomal Ancestry of Modern Panamanians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugni, Viola; Battaglia, Vincenza; Perego, Ugo Alessandro; Raveane, Alessandro; Lancioni, Hovirag; Olivieri, Anna; Ferretti, Luca; Woodward, Scott R; Pascale, Juan Miguel; Cooke, Richard; Myres, Natalie; Motta, Jorge; Torroni, Antonio; Achilli, Alessandro; Semino, Ornella

    2015-01-01

    Geologically, Panama belongs to the Central American land-bridge between North and South America crossed by Homo sapiens >14 ka ago. Archaeologically, it belongs to a wider Isthmo-Colombian Area. Today, seven indigenous ethnic groups account for 12.3% of Panama's population. Five speak Chibchan languages and are characterized by low genetic diversity and a high level of differentiation. In addition, no evidence of differential structuring between maternally and paternally inherited genes has been reported in isthmian Chibchan cultural groups. Recent data have shown that 83% of the Panamanian general population harbour mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) of Native American ancestry. Considering differential male/female mortality at European contact and multiple degrees of geographical and genetic isolation over the subsequent five centuries, the Y-chromosome Native American component is expected to vary across different geographic regions and communities in Panama. To address this issue, we investigated Y-chromosome variation in 408 modern males from the nine provinces of Panama and one indigenous territory (the comarca of Kuna Yala). In contrast to mtDNA data, the Y-chromosome Native American component (haplogroup Q) exceeds 50% only in three populations facing the Caribbean Sea: the comarca of Kuna Yala and Bocas del Toro province where Chibchan languages are spoken by the majority, and the province of Colón where many Kuna and people of mixed indigenous-African-and-European descent live. Elsewhere the Old World component is dominant and mostly represented by western Eurasian haplogroups, which signal the strong male genetic impact of invaders. Sub-Saharan African input accounts for 5.9% of male haplotypes. This reflects the consequences of the colonial Atlantic slave trade and more recent influxes of West Indians of African heritage. Overall, our findings reveal a local evolution of the male Native American ancestral gene pool, and a strong but geographically

  16. Coexistence of inverted Y, chromosome 15p+ and abnormal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, H; Cora, T; Erkul, I

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we report conventional and molecular cytogenetic studies in a patient with multiple anomalies who is a carrier of a pericentric inversion on chromosome Y and a chromosome 15p+. His parents were phenotypically normal. The father is a carrier of a pericentric inversion of chromosome Y, and the mother carries a large chromosome 15p+ variant. The inverted Y chromosome was demonstrated by GTG- and CBG-banding, and DAPI-staining. The presence of extra chromosomal material on the chromosome 15p, that was C-band and DAPI positive, was demonstrated by trypsin G-banding. This suggests that the extra chromosomal material contained repetitive DNA sequences. NOR-staining indicated the presence a nuclear organizer region at the junction of the chromosome 15p+ material. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), with chromosome X and Y painting probes, alpha- and classic-satellite probes specific for chromosome Y, alpha- and beta-satellite III probes for chromosome 15 were used to elucidate the nature of both the inverted Y chromosome and chromosome 15p+. The result with chromosome X and Y painting probes, alpha-satellite, classic-satellite, and DYS59 probes specific for chromosome Y revealed the rearrangement of the Y chromosome was an inv(Y)(p11.2q11.22 or q11.23). FISH with alpha-satellite and beta-satellite III probes for chromosome 15 demonstrated that the extra chromosomal material on the chromosome 15 probably represents beta-satellite III sequences. The possible roles of the simultaneous occurrence of an inverted Y and the amplified DNA sequence on chromosome 15p in the abnormal phenotype of the proband are discussed.

  17. Exploring the Y Chromosomal Ancestry of Modern Panamanians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola Grugni

    Full Text Available Geologically, Panama belongs to the Central American land-bridge between North and South America crossed by Homo sapiens >14 ka ago. Archaeologically, it belongs to a wider Isthmo-Colombian Area. Today, seven indigenous ethnic groups account for 12.3% of Panama's population. Five speak Chibchan languages and are characterized by low genetic diversity and a high level of differentiation. In addition, no evidence of differential structuring between maternally and paternally inherited genes has been reported in isthmian Chibchan cultural groups. Recent data have shown that 83% of the Panamanian general population harbour mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs of Native American ancestry. Considering differential male/female mortality at European contact and multiple degrees of geographical and genetic isolation over the subsequent five centuries, the Y-chromosome Native American component is expected to vary across different geographic regions and communities in Panama. To address this issue, we investigated Y-chromosome variation in 408 modern males from the nine provinces of Panama and one indigenous territory (the comarca of Kuna Yala. In contrast to mtDNA data, the Y-chromosome Native American component (haplogroup Q exceeds 50% only in three populations facing the Caribbean Sea: the comarca of Kuna Yala and Bocas del Toro province where Chibchan languages are spoken by the majority, and the province of Colón where many Kuna and people of mixed indigenous-African-and-European descent live. Elsewhere the Old World component is dominant and mostly represented by western Eurasian haplogroups, which signal the strong male genetic impact of invaders. Sub-Saharan African input accounts for 5.9% of male haplotypes. This reflects the consequences of the colonial Atlantic slave trade and more recent influxes of West Indians of African heritage. Overall, our findings reveal a local evolution of the male Native American ancestral gene pool, and a strong but

  18. A pericentric inversion in the cattle Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iannuzzi, L; Di Meo, G P; Perucatti, A; Eggen, A; Incarnato, D; Sarubbi, F; Cribiu, E

    2001-01-01

    Sixteen male Podolian cattle, two sires and their 14 male offspring, were investigated cytogenetically on the basis of a female-like phenotype found in one of them. Eleven male offspring, including the one with female traits, and one of the two sires were found to carry an abnormal Y chromosome which originated from a pericentric inversion of the proximal half of the Yq arm (Yq11-->q12.2), as demonstrated by both banding and FISH mapping techniques with Y-specific molecular markers. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  19. How convincing is a matching Y-chromosome profile?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Balding, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of forensic autosomal DNA profiles was controversial, but the problems were successfully addressed, and DNA profiling has gone on to revolutionise forensic science. Y-chromosome profiles are valuable when there is a mixture of male-source and female-source DNA, and interest centres...... of the number of males with a matching Y profile. We show that this distribution is robust to different values for the variance in reproductive success and the population growth rate. We also use importance sampling reweighting to derive the distribution of the number of matching males conditional on a database...

  20. Comparison of the X and Y chromosome organization in Silene latifolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zluvova, Jitka; Janousek, Bohuslav; Negrutiu, Ioan; Vyskot, Boris

    2005-07-01

    Here we compare gene orders on the Silene latifolia sex chromosomes. On the basis of the deletion mapping results (11 markers and 23 independent Y chromosome deletion lines used), we conclude that a part of the Y chromosome (covering a region corresponding to at least 23.9 cM on the X chromosome) has been inverted. The gradient in silent-site divergence suggests that this inversion took place after the recombination arrest in this region. Because recombination arrest events followed by Y chromosome rearrangements also have been found in the human Y chromosome, this process seems to be a general evolutionary pathway.

  1. The mouse A/HeJ Y chromosome: another good Y gone bad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia A; Jackson, Jodi M; Horan, Sonia; Lawson, Crystal A; Grindell, Laura; Washburn, Linda L; Eicher, Eva M

    2008-01-01

    In both humans and mice there are numerous reports of Y chromosome abnormalities that interfere with sex determination. Recent studies in the mouse of one such mutation have identified Y chromosome nondisjunction during preimplantation development as the cause of abnormal testis determination that results in a high frequency of true hermaphroditism. We report here that the mouse Y chromosome from the A/HeJ inbred strain induces similar aberrations in sex determination. Our analyses provide evidence, however, that the mechanism underlying these aberrations is not Y chromosome nondisjunction. On the basis of our findings, we postulate that a mutation at or near the centromere affects both the segregation and sex-determining properties of the A/HeJ Y chromosome. This Y chromosome adds to the growing list of Y chromosome aberrations in humans and mice. In both species, the centromere of the Y is structurally and morphologically distinct from the centromeres of all other chromosomes. We conclude that these centromeric features make the human and mouse Y chromosomes extremely sensitive to minor structural alterations, and that our studies provide yet another example of a good Y chromosome gone 'bad.'

  2. A calibrated human Y-chromosomal phylogeny based on resequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Ayub, Qasim; Chen, Yuan; McCarthy, Shane; Hou, Yiping; Carbone, Ignazio; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2013-01-01

    We have identified variants present in high-coverage complete sequences of 36 diverse human Y chromosomes from Africa, Europe, South Asia, East Asia, and the Americas, representing eight major haplogroups. After restricting our analysis to 8.97 Mb of the unique male-specific Y sequence, we identified 6662 high-confidence variants, including single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), multi-nucleotide polymorphisms (MNPs), and indels. We constructed phylogenetic trees using these variants, or subsets of them, and recapitulated the known structure of the tree. Assuming a male mutation rate of 1 × 10−9 per base pair per year, the time depth of the tree (haplogroups A3-R) was ∼101,000–115,000 yr, and the lineages found outside Africa dated to 57,000–74,000 yr, both as expected. In addition, we dated a striking Paleolithic male lineage expansion to 41,000–52,000 yr ago and the node representing the major European Y lineage, R1b, to 4000–13,000 yr ago, supporting a Neolithic origin for these modern European Y chromosomes. In all, we provide a nearly 10-fold increase in the number of Y markers with phylogenetic information, and novel historical insights derived from placing them on a calibrated phylogenetic tree. PMID:23038768

  3. Structure and evolution of the Y-chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA of cattle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkaar, Edward Louis Christian

    2003-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on the structure and evolution of the bovine Y-chromosome and the use of paternal markers in molecular diagnostics. The Y-chromosome has emerged together with the X-chromosome early during the evolution of the mammals by differentiation of a pair of

  4. An efficient multiplex genotyping approach for detecting the major worldwide human Y-chromosome haplogroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Oven (Mannis); M.H. Kayser (Manfred); A. Ralf (Arwin)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract The Y chromosome is paternally inherited and therefore serves as an evolutionary marker of patrilineal descent. Worldwide DNA variation within the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome can be represented as a monophyletic phylogenetic tree in which the branches

  5. The sex-determining region of the Megaselia scalaris (Diptera) Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoeft, U; Traut, W

    1995-01-01

    In Megaselia scalaris (Loew) the presence or absence of a male-determining factor, M, is responsible for sex determination. In two wild-type strains, M is located on the homomorphic chromosome pair 2. In the laboratory line Except42 a new Y chromosome was created by recombination between the original Y and the original X chromosome. The Except42 Y chromosome has conserved the sex-determining function and four molecular markers of the original Y chromosome, while 13 original Y markers have been lost. The new Y chromosome, therefore, consists of roughly one-quarter of the original Y chromosome and three-quarters of the original X chromosome. To define the sex-determining region, cosmid clones, one from the original X and one from the original Y chromosome region of the Except42 Y chromosome, were isolated and used as probes for chromosomal in situ suppression (CISS) hybridization. The CISS hybridization signals map the conserved Y segment, including the male-determining factor, to the distal segment of the short arm of the Y chromosome.

  6. New binary polymorphisms reshape and increase resolution of the human Y chromosomal haplogroup tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafet, Tatiana M; Mendez, Fernando L; Meilerman, Monica B; Underhill, Peter A; Zegura, Stephen L; Hammer, Michael F

    2008-05-01

    Markers on the non-recombining portion of the human Y chromosome continue to have applications in many fields including evolutionary biology, forensics, medical genetics, and genealogical reconstruction. In 2002, the Y Chromosome Consortium published a single parsimony tree showing the relationships among 153 haplogroups based on 243 binary markers and devised a standardized nomenclature system to name lineages nested within this tree. Here we present an extensively revised Y chromosome tree containing 311 distinct haplogroups, including two new major haplogroups (S and T), and incorporating approximately 600 binary markers. We describe major changes in the topology of the parsimony tree and provide names for new and rearranged lineages within the tree following the rules presented by the Y Chromosome Consortium in 2002. Several changes in the tree topology have important implications for studies of human ancestry. We also present demography-independent age estimates for 11 of the major clades in the new Y chromosome tree.

  7. Human male infertility, the Y chromosome, and dinosaur extinction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman J. Silber

    2011-06-01

    Our studies of the Y chromosome and male infertility suggest that the default mechanism for determining the sex of offspring is the temperature of egg incubation, and that genetic sex determination (based on sex chromosomes like X and Y has evolved many times over and over again in different ways, in different genera, as a more foolproof method than temperature variation of assuring a balanced sex ratio in offspring. The absence of such a genetic sex determining mechanism in dinosaurs may have led to a skewed sex ratio when global temperature dramatically changed 65,000,000 years ago, resulting in a preponderance of males, and consequentially a rapid decline in population.

  8. Y chromosome markers and Trans-Bering Strait dispersals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karafet, T; Zegura, S L; Vuturo-Brady, J; Posukh, O; Osipova, L; Wiebe, V; Romero, F; Long, J C; Harihara, S; Jin, F; Dashnyam, B; Gerelsaikhan, T; Omoto, K; Hammer, M F

    1997-03-01

    Five polymorphisms involving two paternally inherited loci were surveyed in 38 world populations (n = 1,631) to investigate the origins of Native Americans. One of the six Y chromosome combination haplotypes (1T) was found at relatively high frequencies (17.8-75.0%) in nine Native American populations (n = 206) representing the three major linguistic divisions in the New World. Overall, these data do not support the Greenberg et al. (1986) tripartite model for the early peopling of the Americas. The 1T haplotype was also discovered at a low frequency in Siberian Eskimos (3/22), Chukchi (1/6), and Evens (1/65) but was absent from 17 other Asian populations (n = 987). The perplexing presence of the 1T haplotype in northeastern Siberia may be due to back-migration from the New World to Asia.

  9. Paternal lineages in Libya inferred from Y-chromosome haplogroups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triki-Fendri, Soumaya; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Rey-González, Danel; Ayadi, Imen; Carracedo, Ángel; Rebai, Ahmed

    2015-06-01

    Many studies based on genetic diversity of North African populations have contributed to elucidate the modelling of the genetic landscape in this region. North Africa is considered as a distinct spatial-temporal entity on geographic, archaeological, and historical grounds, which has undergone the influence of different human migrations along its shaping. For instance, Libya, a North African country, was first inhabited by Berbers and then colonized by a variety of ethnic groups like Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Arabs and, in recent times, Italians. In this study, we contribute to clarify the genetic variation of Libya and consequently, of North African modern populations, by the study of Libyan male lineages. A total of 22 Y-chromosome-specific SNPs were genotyped in a sample of 175 Libyan males, allowing the characterization of 18 Y-chromosomal haplogroups. The obtained data revealed a predominant Northwest African component represented by haplogroup E-M81 (33.7%) followed by J(xJ1a,J2)-M304 (27.4%), which is postulated to have a Middle Eastern origin. The comparative study with other populations (∼5,400 individuals from North Africa, Middle East, Sub-Saharan Africa, and Europe) revealed a general genetic homogeneity among North African populations (FST = 5.3 %; P-value Libya and in North Africa is characterized by two genetic components. The first signature is typical of Berber-speaking people (E-M81), the autochthonous inhabitants, whereas the second is (J(xJ1a,J2)-M304), originating from Arabic populations. This is in agreement with the hypothesis of an Arabic expansion from the Middle East, shaping the North African genetic landscape. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Kenya's fifth record of Arabian Bustard Ardeotis arabs in Sibiloi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in the Arabian Desert in Saudi Arabia and Yemen. According to BirdLife (2016), this species is currently listed as Near Threatened on the ... Laboratory and Museum of Evolutionary Ecology, Department of Ecology, Faculty of Humanities and Natural Sciences, University of Prešov, 17. novembra 1, 081 16 Prešov, Slovakia.

  11. Molecular and clinical characteristics of 26 cases with structural Y chromosome aberrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Park, S-Y; Ryu, H-M; Lee, D-E; Lee, B-Y; Kim, S-Y; Park, Y-S; Lee, H-S; Seo, J-T

    2012-01-01

    Structural abnormalities include various types of translocations, inversions, deletions, duplications and isochromosomes. Structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome are estimated to affect less than 1% of the newborn male population and are particularly hazardous for male reproductive function. The objective of this study was to characterize a group of patients with structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome. All patients who visited our laboratory between 2007 and 2010 underwent cytogenetic investigations. Among these, we detected 26 patients with structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome. To confirm the structural Y chromosome alterations, we used special bandings, FISH and multiplex PCR to detect Y chromosome microdeletions. Of the 26 patients presented here, 11 had an isodicentric Y chromosome, 7 had an inversion, 3 had a translocation, 2 had a derivative, 2 had a Yqs and 1 had a deletion. Sixteen were diagnosed with azoospermia, 8 as normal fertile males and 1 as a man who was unable to donate semen due to mental retardation. One of the patients having 45,X/46,X,idic(Y) was reported to be phenotypically female with primary amenorrhea and without uterus. Deletions of the AZFbc region were correlated with the sperm concentration (p Y chromosome aberrations may be clinically important for genetic counseling and assisted reproductive technology treatment. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. The origin of the isolated population of the Faroe Islands investigated using Y chromosomal markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Tove H; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Wang, August G

    2004-01-01

    to analyse genetic diversity in the Faroese population and to compare this with the distribution of genotypes in the putative ancestral populations. Using a combination of genetic distance measures, assignment and phylogenetic analyses, we find a high degree of similarity between the Faroese Y chromosomes...... and the Norwegian, Swedish and Icelandic Y chromosomes but also some similarity with the Scottish and Irish Y chromosomes. Diversity measures and estimates of effective population sizes also suggest that the original gene pool of the settlers have been influenced by random genetic drift, thus complicating direct...

  13. Threats To The Saudi Arabian Monarchy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Manning, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    ... all contribute to mounting tensions and opposition to the Monarchy. Today, some question the need for a Monarchy in a country where there is increased friction between modernists and Islamic fundamentalists...

  14. Nuptiality and fertility in Saudi Arabia: An appraisal of census data

    OpenAIRE

    Salam, Asharaf Abdul

    2013-01-01

    Saudi Arabia constitutes bulk of the Arabian Peninsula. Higher birth and lower death rate with higher levels of expectation of life characterizes Saudi Arabian demography. This attempt at appraising nuptiality and fertility is based on censuses. Marriage patterns are changing with higher age at marriage; increasing ever marriage and reducing adolescent marriage, divorces and polygamy. Fertility, was captured from children ever born, parity, and births during 12 months prior to 2004 census and...

  15. Mutability of Y-chromosomal microsatellites: Rates, characteristics, molecular bases, and rorensic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ballantyne (Kaye); M.A. Goedbloed (Miriam); R.N. Fang (Rixun); O. Schaap (Onno); O. Lao Grueso (Oscar); A. Wollstein (Andreas); Y. Choi (Ying); K. van Duijn (Kate); M. Vermeulen (Mark); S. Brauer (Silke); R. Decorte (Ronny); M. Poetsch (Micaela); N. von Wurmb-Schwark (Nicole); P. de Knijff (Peter); D. Labuda (Damian); H. Vézina (Hélne); H. Knoblauch (Hans); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); L. Roewer (Lutz); R. Ploski (Rafal); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); J. Henke (Jürgen); M.R. Furtado (Manohar); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractNonrecombining Y-chromosomal microsatellites (Y-STRs) are widely used to infer population histories, discover genealogical relationships, and identify males for criminal justice purposes. Although a key requirement for their application is reliable mutability knowledge, empirical data

  16. Two Y genes can replace the entire Y chromosome for assisted reproduction in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Riel, Jonathan M; Stoytcheva, Zoia; Ward, Monika A

    2014-01-03

    The Y chromosome is thought to be important for male reproduction. We have previously shown that, with the use of assisted reproduction, live offspring can be obtained from mice lacking the entire Y chromosome long arm. Here, we demonstrate that live mouse progeny can also be generated by using germ cells from males with the Y chromosome contribution limited to only two genes, the testis determinant factor Sry and the spermatogonial proliferation factor Eif2s3y. Sry is believed to function primarily in sex determination during fetal life. Eif2s3y may be the only Y chromosome gene required to drive mouse spermatogenesis, allowing formation of haploid germ cells that are functional in assisted reproduction. Our findings are relevant, but not directly translatable, to human male infertility cases.

  17. Neural Correlates of the Y Chromosome in Autism: XYY Syndrome as a Genetic Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0355 TITLE: Neural Correlates of the Y Chromosome in Autism: XYY Syndrome as a Genetic Model PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...by ANSI Std. Z39.18 Neural Correlates of the Y Chromosome in Autism: XYY Syndrome as a Genetic Model Table of Contents Page 1. Introduction...heterogeneous with regard to etiological/risk factors, pathogenesis, and clinical presentations. Heritability studies have shown that genetic

  18. The Consistencies of Y-Chromosomal and Autosomal Continental Ancestry Varying among Haplogroups

    OpenAIRE

    Chuan-Chao Wang; Lei Shang; Hui-Yuan Yeh; Lan-Hai Wei

    2016-01-01

    The Y-chromosome has been widely used in ancestry inference based on its region-specific haplogroup distributions. However, there is always a debate on how informative such a single marker is for inferring an individual's genetic ancestry. Here, we compared genetic ancestry inferences at continental level made by Y-chromosomal haplogroups to those made by autosomal single-nucleotide polymorphisms in 1230 samples of Affymetrix Human Origins dataset. The highest ancestry proportions of a majori...

  19. Mitochondrial DNA structure in the Arabian Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabrera Vicente M

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two potential migratory routes followed by modern humans to colonize Eurasia from Africa have been proposed. These are the two natural passageways that connect both continents: the northern route through the Sinai Peninsula and the southern route across the Bab al Mandab strait. Recent archaeological and genetic evidence have favored a unique southern coastal route. Under this scenario, the study of the population genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula, the first step out of Africa, to search for primary genetic links between Africa and Eurasia, is crucial. The haploid and maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA molecule has been the most used genetic marker to identify and to relate lineages with clear geographic origins, as the African Ls and the Eurasian M and N that have a common root with the Africans L3. Results To assess the role of the Arabian Peninsula in the southern route, we genetically analyzed 553 Saudi Arabs using partial (546 and complete mtDNA (7 sequencing, and compared the lineages obtained with those present in Africa, the Near East, central, east and southeast Asia and Australasia. The results showed that the Arabian Peninsula has received substantial gene flow from Africa (20%, detected by the presence of L, M1 and U6 lineages; that an 18% of the Arabian Peninsula lineages have a clear eastern provenance, mainly represented by U lineages; but also by Indian M lineages and rare M links with Central Asia, Indonesia and even Australia. However, the bulk (62% of the Arabian lineages has a Northern source. Conclusion Although there is evidence of Neolithic and more recent expansions in the Arabian Peninsula, mainly detected by (preHV1 and J1b lineages, the lack of primitive autochthonous M and N sequences, suggests that this area has been more a receptor of human migrations, including historic ones, from Africa, India, Indonesia and even Australia, than a demographic expansion center along the

  20. Mitochondrial DNA structure in the Arabian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Amero, Khaled K; Larruga, José M; Cabrera, Vicente M; González, Ana M

    2008-02-12

    Two potential migratory routes followed by modern humans to colonize Eurasia from Africa have been proposed. These are the two natural passageways that connect both continents: the northern route through the Sinai Peninsula and the southern route across the Bab al Mandab strait. Recent archaeological and genetic evidence have favored a unique southern coastal route. Under this scenario, the study of the population genetic structure of the Arabian Peninsula, the first step out of Africa, to search for primary genetic links between Africa and Eurasia, is crucial. The haploid and maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) molecule has been the most used genetic marker to identify and to relate lineages with clear geographic origins, as the African Ls and the Eurasian M and N that have a common root with the Africans L3. To assess the role of the Arabian Peninsula in the southern route, we genetically analyzed 553 Saudi Arabs using partial (546) and complete mtDNA (7) sequencing, and compared the lineages obtained with those present in Africa, the Near East, central, east and southeast Asia and Australasia. The results showed that the Arabian Peninsula has received substantial gene flow from Africa (20%), detected by the presence of L, M1 and U6 lineages; that an 18% of the Arabian Peninsula lineages have a clear eastern provenance, mainly represented by U lineages; but also by Indian M lineages and rare M links with Central Asia, Indonesia and even Australia. However, the bulk (62%) of the Arabian lineages has a Northern source. Although there is evidence of Neolithic and more recent expansions in the Arabian Peninsula, mainly detected by (preHV)1 and J1b lineages, the lack of primitive autochthonous M and N sequences, suggests that this area has been more a receptor of human migrations, including historic ones, from Africa, India, Indonesia and even Australia, than a demographic expansion center along the proposed southern coastal route.

  1. Evidence for contribution of the y chromosome in atherosclerotic plaque occurrence in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskarides, Konstantinos; Hadjipanagi, Despina; Papazachariou, Louiza; Griffin, Maura; Panayiotou, Andrie G

    2014-08-01

    Diseases such as atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease demonstrate disparate population prevalence or present with variable severity in men and women. While the usual explanation points to hormonal status, the role of the Y chromosome has been implicated, but not sufficiently studied. We genotyped six markers of the male-specific region of the Y chromosome, representing the major haplogroups (YAP, G, I, J, K, and R) in 373 male participants of the "Cyprus Study" with ultrasonic data on subclinical atherosclerosis. Of the five major haplogroups identified, two (J and K) accounted for roughly 67% of the Y-chromosome variance among these Greek Cypriot men. Carriers of haplogroup K had a 2.5-fold higher age-adjusted risk for having an atherosclerotic plaque present in any of the four bifurcations scanned, compared to men with other Y-chromosome lineages (OR=2.51; 95% CI=1.18 to 5.33; p=0.017). Carriers of the YAP haplogroup had about 50% less risk for having a plaque in the femoral bifurcation versus the rest (OR=0.46; 95% CI=0.27 to 0.77; p<0.001). We show a possible contribution of the Y chromosome in atherosclerotic phenotypes in men adding to the previous findings for coronary artery disease. Additional studies are warranted as evidence suggests that the Y chromosome could serve as a biomarker for the health status of men.

  2. Site-specific genetic engineering of the Anopheles gambiae Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, Federica; Galizi, Roberto; Menichelli, Miriam; Papathanos, Philippos-Aris; Dritsou, Vicky; Marois, Eric; Crisanti, Andrea; Windbichler, Nikolai

    2014-05-27

    Despite its function in sex determination and its role in driving genome evolution, the Y chromosome remains poorly understood in most species. Y chromosomes are gene-poor, repeat-rich and largely heterochromatic and therefore represent a difficult target for genetic engineering. The Y chromosome of the human malaria vector Anopheles gambiae appears to be involved in sex determination although very little is known about both its structure and function. Here, we characterize a transgenic strain of this mosquito species, obtained by transposon-mediated integration of a transgene construct onto the Y chromosome. Using meganuclease-induced homologous repair we introduce a site-specific recombination signal onto the Y chromosome and show that the resulting docking line can be used for secondary integration. To demonstrate its utility, we study the activity of a germ-line-specific promoter when located on the Y chromosome. We also show that Y-linked fluorescent transgenes allow automated sex separation of this important vector species, providing the means to generate large single-sex populations. Our findings will aid studies of sex chromosome function and enable the development of male-exclusive genetic traits for vector control.

  3. Y chromosome lineages in men of west African descent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jada Benn Torres

    Full Text Available The early African experience in the Americas is marked by the transatlantic slave trade from ∼1619 to 1850 and the rise of the plantation system. The origins of enslaved Africans were largely dependent on European preferences as well as the availability of potential laborers within Africa. Rice production was a key industry of many colonial South Carolina low country plantations. Accordingly, rice plantations owners within South Carolina often requested enslaved Africans from the so-called "Grain Coast" of western Africa (Senegal to Sierra Leone. Studies on the African origins of the enslaved within other regions of the Americas have been limited. To address the issue of origins of people of African descent within the Americas and understand more about the genetic heterogeneity present within Africa and the African Diaspora, we typed Y chromosome specific markers in 1,319 men consisting of 508 west and central Africans (from 12 populations, 188 Caribbeans (from 2 islands, 532 African Americans (AAs from Washington, DC and Columbia, SC, and 91 European Americans. Principal component and admixture analyses provide support for significant Grain Coast ancestry among African American men in South Carolina. AA men from DC and the Caribbean showed a closer affinity to populations from the Bight of Biafra. Furthermore, 30-40% of the paternal lineages in African descent populations in the Americas are of European ancestry. Diverse west African ancestries and sex-biased gene flow from EAs has contributed greatly to the genetic heterogeneity of African populations throughout the Americas and has significant implications for gene mapping efforts in these populations.

  4. Y chromosome lineages in men of west African descent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Jada Benn; Doura, Menahem B; Keita, Shomarka O Y; Kittles, Rick A

    2012-01-01

    The early African experience in the Americas is marked by the transatlantic slave trade from ∼1619 to 1850 and the rise of the plantation system. The origins of enslaved Africans were largely dependent on European preferences as well as the availability of potential laborers within Africa. Rice production was a key industry of many colonial South Carolina low country plantations. Accordingly, rice plantations owners within South Carolina often requested enslaved Africans from the so-called "Grain Coast" of western Africa (Senegal to Sierra Leone). Studies on the African origins of the enslaved within other regions of the Americas have been limited. To address the issue of origins of people of African descent within the Americas and understand more about the genetic heterogeneity present within Africa and the African Diaspora, we typed Y chromosome specific markers in 1,319 men consisting of 508 west and central Africans (from 12 populations), 188 Caribbeans (from 2 islands), 532 African Americans (AAs from Washington, DC and Columbia, SC), and 91 European Americans. Principal component and admixture analyses provide support for significant Grain Coast ancestry among African American men in South Carolina. AA men from DC and the Caribbean showed a closer affinity to populations from the Bight of Biafra. Furthermore, 30-40% of the paternal lineages in African descent populations in the Americas are of European ancestry. Diverse west African ancestries and sex-biased gene flow from EAs has contributed greatly to the genetic heterogeneity of African populations throughout the Americas and has significant implications for gene mapping efforts in these populations.

  5. Digging deeper into East African human Y chromosome lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Verónica; Sánchez-Diz, Paula; Amorim, António; Carracedo, Angel; Gusmão, Leonor

    2010-03-01

    The most significant and widely studied remodeling of the African genetic landscape is the Bantu expansion, which led to an almost total replacement of the previous populations from the sub-Saharan region. However, a poor knowledge exists about other population movements, namely, the Nilotic migration, which is a pastoralist dispersal that, contrary to the Bantu expansion, impacted only East African populations. Here, samples from a Ugandan Nilotic-speaking population were studied for 37 Y chromosome-specific SNPs, and the obtained data were compared with those already available for other sub-Saharan population groups. Although Uganda lies on the fringe of both Bantu and Nilotic expansions, a low admixture with Bantu populations was detected, with haplogroups carrying M13, M182 and M75 mutations prevailing in Nilotes together with a low frequency of the main Bantu haplogroups from clade E1b1a-M2. The results of a comparative analysis with data from other population groups allowed a deeper characterization of some lineages in our sample, clarifying some doubts about the origin of some particular Y-SNPs in different ethnic groups, such as M150, M112 and M75. Moreover, it was also possible to identify a new Y-SNP apparently specific to Nilotic groups, as well as the presence of particular haplogroups that characterize Nilotic populations. The detection of a new haplogroup B2a1b defined by G1, could be, therefore, important to differentiate Nilotes from other groups, helping to trace migration and admixture events that occurred in eastern Africa.

  6. Investigation of extended Y chromosome STR haplotypes in Sardinia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacerenza, D; Aneli, S; Di Gaetano, C; Critelli, R; Piazza, A; Matullo, G; Culigioni, C; Robledo, R; Robino, C; Calò, C

    2017-03-01

    Y-chromosomal variation of selected single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 32 short tandem repeat (STR) loci was evaluated in Sardinia in three open population groups (Northern Sardinia, n=40; Central Sardinia, n=56; Southern Sardinia, n=91) and three isolates (Desulo, n=34; Benetutti, n=45, Carloforte, n=42). The tested Y-STRs consisted of Yfiler® Plus markers and the seven rapidly mutating (RM) loci not included in the YFiler® Plus kit (DYF399S1, DYF403S1ab, DYF404S1, DYS526ab, DYS547, DYS612, and DYS626). As expected, inclusion of additional Y-STR loci increased haplotype diversity (h), though complete differentiation of male lineages was impossible even by means of RM Y-STRs (h=0.99997). Analysis of molecular variance indicated that the three open populations were fairly homogeneous, whereas signs of genetic heterogeneity could be detected when the three isolates were also included in the analysis. Multidimensional scaling analysis showed that, even for extended haplotypes including RM Y-STR markers, Sardinians were clearly differentiated from populations of the Italian peninsula and Sicily. The only exception was represented by the Carloforte sample that, in accordance with its peculiar population history, clustered with Northern/Central Italian populations. The introduction of extended forensic Y-STR panels, including highly variable RM Y-STR markers, is expected to reduce the impact of population structure on haplotype frequency estimations. However, our results show that the availability of geographically detailed reference databases is still important for the assessment of the evidential value of a Y-haplotype match. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Autosomal mutations affecting Y chromosome loops in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrucci Romano

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster harbors several genes required for male fertility. The genes for these fertility factors are very large in size and contain conspicuous amounts of repetitive DNA and transposons. Three of these loci (ks-1, kl-3 and kl-5 have the ability to develop giant lampbrush-like loops in primary spermatocytes, a cytological manifestation of their active state in these cells. Y-loops bind a number of non-Y encoded proteins, but the mechanisms regulating their development and their specific functions are still to be elucidated. Results Here we report the results of a screen of 726 male sterile lines to identify novel autosomal genes controlling Y-loop function. We analyzed mutant testis preparations both in vivo and by immunofluorescence using antibodies directed against Y-loop-associated proteins. This screen enabled us to isolate 17 mutations at 15 loci whose wild-type function is required for proper Y-loop morphogenesis. Six of these loci are likely to specifically control loop development, while the others display pleiotropic effects on both loops and meiotic processes such as spermiogenesis, sperm development and maturation. We also determined the map position of the mutations affecting exclusively Y-loop morphology. Conclusion Our cytological screening permitted us to identify novel genetic functions required for male spermatogenesis, some of which show pleiotropic effects. Analysis of these mutations also shows that loop development can be uncoupled from meiosis progression. These data represent a useful framework for the characterization of Y-loop development at a molecular level and for the study of the genetic control of heterochromatin.

  8. Phenotypic variation within European carriers of the Y-chromosomal gr/gr deletion is independent of Y-chromosomal background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krausz, C; Giachini, C; Xue, Y

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have compared sperm phenotypes between men with partial deletions within the AZFc region of the Y chromosome and non-carriers, with variable results. In this study, a separate question was investigated, the basis of the variation in sperm phenotype within gr/gr deleti...

  9. Stroke in Saudi Arabia: a review of the recent literature | Asirvatham ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) is the largest country in the Middle East occupying approximately four-fifths of the Arabian Peninsula supporting a population of more than 28 million. Stroke is becoming a rapidly increasing problem and an important cause of illness and deaths in Saudi Arabia. However, compared with ...

  10. Psychological Challenges of Saudi Female International Students in Virginia: Single Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Joyce G.

    2016-01-01

    Saudi Arabian female international students enrolled in a public university in Northern Virginia used either problem-focused coping or emotion-focused coping strategies to overcome psychological and social challenges. Sixteen Saudi females participated in this qualitative case study. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to obtain the opinions…

  11. The prevalence of specific dental anomalies in a group of Saudi cleft lip and palate patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghada H. Al-Kharboush

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Dental anomalies were common in Saudi subjects with CLP type. This will complicate the health care required for the CL/P subjects. This study was conducted to epidemiologically explore the prevalence of dental anomalies among Saudi Arabian subjects with CLP.

  12. Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Intermediate Variant Alleles DYS392.2, DYS449.2, and DYS385.2 Delineate New Phylogenetic Substructure in Human Y-chromosome Haplogroup Tree

    OpenAIRE

    Myres, Natalie M.; Ritchie, Kathleen H.; Lin, Alice A.; Hughes, Robert H.; Woodward, Scott R.; Underhill, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Aim To determine the human Y-chromosome haplogroup backgrounds of intermediate-sized variant alleles displayed by short tandem repeat (STR) loci DYS392, DYS449, and DYS385, and to valuate the potential of each intermediate variant to elucidate new phylogenetic substructure within the human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree. Methods Molecular characterization of lineages was achieved using a combination of Y-chromosome haplogroup defining binary polymorphisms and up to 37 ...

  13. Spontaneously hypertensive rat Y chromosome increases indexes of sympathetic nervous system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ely, D; Caplea, A; Dunphy, G; Daneshvar, H; Turner, M; Milsted, A; Takiyyudin, M

    1997-02-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory have demonstrated that the Y chromosome from the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) is responsible for a significant portion of the elevated blood pressure and also produces an earlier pubertal rise in plasma testosterone. We performed the following studies to determine whether the SHR Y chromosome raises blood pressure by sympathetic nervous system responses as measured by adrenal chromogranin A and plasma and tissue catecholamines. Male SHR from the University of Akron colony were studied from 5 to 20 weeks of age. Blood pressure was measured by tail-cuff, tail artery cannulation, and aortic telemetry (Data Sciences); acute (air stress) and chronic (territorial colony) social stressors were compared; blood was collected for determination of plasma catecholamines; and adrenal glands were analyzed at 15 weeks for catecholamines. Rats with the SHR Y chromosome had higher blood pressure and plasma norepinephrine than those with the normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) Y chromosome. However, the SHR Y chromosome did not significantly change responsiveness to acute or chronic stressors. Phentolamine and clonidine prevented the stress responses. Adrenal chromogranin A levels were elevated 37% and 40% and adrenal norepinephrine content 29% and 100% at 4 and 10 weeks of age, respectively, in rats with an SHR Y chromosome compared with WKY. Chemical sympathectomy normalized blood pressure in all strains and significantly reduced norepinephrine (36% to 41%) in all strains except in WKY, which already had a normal blood pressure. In conclusion, the SHR Y chromosome appears to increase the chronic sympathetic nervous system. A potential mechanism could be a Y locus that influences chronic sympathetic nervous system activity, which may reinforce neurohumoral factors and structural components of the vessel wall, accelerating the development of hypertension.

  14. Evolution of the DAZ gene and the AZFc region on primate Y chromosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Jane-Fang

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Azoospermia Factor c (AZFc region of the human Y chromosome is a unique product of segmental duplication. It consists almost entirely of very long amplicons, represented by different colors, and is frequently deleted in subfertile men. Most of the AZFc amplicons have high sequence similarity with autosomal segments, indicating recent duplication and transposition to the Y chromosome. The Deleted in Azoospermia (DAZ gene within the red-amplicon arose from an ancestral autosomal DAZ-like (DAZL gene. It varies significantly between different men regarding to its copy number and the numbers of RNA recognition motif and DAZ repeat it encodes. We used Southern analyses to study the evolution of DAZ and AZFc amplicons on the Y chromosomes of primates. Results The Old World monkey rhesus macaque has only one DAZ gene. In contrast, the great apes have multiple copies of DAZ, ranging from 2 copies in bonobos and gorillas to at least 6 copies in orangutans, and these DAZ genes have polymorphic structures similar to those of their human counterparts. Sequences homologous to the various AZFc amplicons are present on the Y chromosomes of some but not all primates, indicating that they arrived on the Y chromosome at different times during primate evolution. Conclusion The duplication and transposition of AZFc amplicons to the human Y chromosome occurred in three waves, i.e., after the branching of the New World monkey, the gorilla, and the chimpanzee/bonobo lineages, respectively. The red-amplicon, one of the first to arrive on the Y chromosome, amplified by inverted duplication followed by direct duplication after the separation of the Old World monkey and the great ape lineages. Subsequent duplication/deletion in the various lineages gave rise to a spectrum of DAZ gene structure and copy number found in today's great apes.

  15. Free-Living Marine Interstitial Hypotrichid Ciliates from Jubail Marine Wildlife Sanctuary in the Arabian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.A.S. AL-Rasheid

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Sediment samples were collected at low tide from various localities of the Jubail Marine Wildlife Sanctuary in the Arabian Gulf on several occasions during l996-l997 for the study of the marine interstitial ciliate fauna of the Sanctuary. Twenty three species belonging to the order Hypotrichida were identified after protargol impregnation, 20 of which represent new records of the fauna of Saudi Arabia, and of the Arabian Gulf at large. The distribution of each species is compared to those in similar habitats worldwide. The present study increases the total known number of hypotrichid ciliates species in Saudi Arabia to 40 species.

  16. Elucidation of structural abnormalities of the X chromosome using fluorescence in situ hybridisation with a Y chromosome painting probe.

    OpenAIRE

    Howell, R T; Millener, R; Thorne, S; O'Loughlin, J; Brassey, J; McDermott, A

    1994-01-01

    Particular regions of the X and Y chromosomes share DNA sequence homology to the extent that cross hybridisation occurs. Thus, chromosome painting with a whole Y chromosome probe consistently results in fluorescence on specific regions of the X chromosome as well as the complete Y chromosome. This phenomenon has been exploited to elucidate the structure of unusual X chromosome rearrangements, without Y involvement, in two females.

  17. Analysis of VanA vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium isolates from Saudi Arabian hospitals reveals the presence of clonal cluster 17 and two new Tn 1546 lineage types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Khan (Mushtaq); M. van der Wal (Martin); D.J. Farrell (David); L. Cossins (Luke); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); A. Alaidan (Alwaleed); J.P. Hays (John)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractObjectives; The aim of this study was to characterize 34 vancomycin-resistant VanA Enterococcus faecium isolates obtained from two hospitals in Saudi Arabia and to assess Tn 1546 variation within these isolates. Methods: PFGE and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) genotypes, antibiotic

  18. Y chromosomal variation tracks the evolution of mating systems in chimpanzee and bonobo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Schaller

    Full Text Available The male-specific regions of the Y chromosome (MSY of the human and the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes are fully sequenced. The most striking difference is the dramatic rearrangement of large parts of their respective MSYs. These non-recombining regions include ampliconic gene families that are known to be important for male reproduction,and are consequently under significant selective pressure. However, whether the published Y-chromosomal pattern of ampliconic fertility genes is invariable within P. troglodytes is an open but fundamental question pertinent to discussions of the evolutionary fate of the Y chromosome in different primate mating systems. To solve this question we applied fluorescence in situ hybridisation (FISH of testis-specific expressed ampliconic fertility genes to metaphase Y chromosomes of 17 chimpanzees derived from 11 wild-born males and 16 bonobos representing seven wild-born males. We show that of eleven P. troglodytes Y-chromosomal lines, ten Y-chromosomal variants were detected based on the number and arrangement of the ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia and CDY (chromodomain protein Y-a so-far never-described variation of a species' Y chromosome. In marked contrast, no variation was evident among seven Y-chromosomal lines of the bonobo, P. paniscus, the chimpanzee's closest living relative. Although, loss of variation of the Y chromosome in the bonobo by a founder effect or genetic drift cannot be excluded, these contrasting patterns might be explained in the context of the species' markedly different social and mating behaviour. In chimpanzees, multiple males copulate with a receptive female during a short period of visible anogenital swelling, and this may place significant selection on fertility genes. In bonobos, however, female mate choice may make sperm competition redundant (leading to monomorphism of fertility genes, since ovulation in this species is concealed by the prolonged anogenital

  19. Perlindungan Pemerintah Arab Saudi Terhadap Imigran (Tenaga Kerja) Indonesia 2010-2012

    OpenAIRE

    Nismi, Yusnarida Eka; Putri, Octariandry Shavita

    2014-01-01

    This research describes about The protection of Saudi Arabian€™s government towards the immigrants of (labor) Indonesia 2010-2012. The Shipment of Indonesian labor was carried out by the government of Hindia Belanda to Suriname, South America. Difficultly for getting a job in this country to be one of the many factors that Indonesian society decided to work in another country, the country became one of the main options is Saudi Arabia. Initially, Indonesian Labor who worked in Saudi Arabian t...

  20. Peopling of the North Circumpolar Region – Insights from Y Chromosome STR and SNP Typing of Greenlanders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Jill Katharina; Pereira, Vania; Børsting, Claus

    2015-01-01

    The human population in Greenland is characterized by migration events of Paleo- and Neo-Eskimos, as well as admixture with Europeans. In this study, the Y-chromosomal variation in male Greenlanders was investigated in detail by typing 73 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) and......The human population in Greenland is characterized by migration events of Paleo- and Neo-Eskimos, as well as admixture with Europeans. In this study, the Y-chromosomal variation in male Greenlanders was investigated in detail by typing 73 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y...

  1. PCR Based Detection of Genetically Modified Soy in Processed Foods Commercially Available in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Abdullah Alaraidh

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In this research, PCR (polymerase chain reaction technique was applied to detect the presence of GMO sold in the Saudi Arabian market. This method was applied to detect genetically modified soy (GM-soy in particular the roundup ready soy (RRS. To confirm the presence of soy, samples were first tested for the existence of the soy specific lectin gene.  A total of eighty samples were tested out of which two samples tested positive as GM-soy. Not surprisingly, the findings showed the existence of GM-soy in food products in Saudi. This supports the necessity of developing precise quantitative and qualitative ways for routine analyses and detection of GMO products in the Saudi Arabian market. With the discovery of GM products in the Saudi Arabian market it would be of no surprise that other Middle Eastern nations also knowingly or unknowingly import GM crops.

  2. A recent bottleneck of Y chromosome diversity coincides with a global change in culture

    KAUST Repository

    Karmin, Monika

    2015-04-30

    It is commonly thought that human genetic diversity in non-African populations was shaped primarily by an out-of-Africa dispersal 50–100 thousand yr ago (kya). Here, we present a study of 456 geographically diverse high-coverage Y chromosome sequences, including 299 newly reported samples. Applying ancient DNA calibration, we date the Y-chromosomal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in Africa at 254 (95% CI 192–307) kya and detect a cluster of major non-African founder haplogroups in a narrow time interval at 47–52 kya, consistent with a rapid initial colonization model of Eurasia and Oceania after the out-of-Africa bottleneck. In contrast to demographic reconstructions based on mtDNA, we infer a second strong bottleneck in Y-chromosome lineages dating to the last 10 ky. We hypothesize that this bottleneck is caused by cultural changes affecting variance of reproductive success among males.

  3. [Molecular analysis of the Y chromosome in XX sex-reversed patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernykh, V B; Chukhrova, A L; Vasserman, N N; Il'ina, E V; Karmanov, M E; Fedotov, V P; Poliakov, A V

    2008-02-01

    Molecular genetic analysis was performed for 26 phenotypically male patients lacking the Y chromosome in the karyotype. The sex-determining region Y (SRY) gene was found in 77% of the patients. PCR analysis of Y-specific loci in the 17 SRY-positive patients revealed Yp fragments varying in size in 16 cases and cryptic mosaicism (or chimerism) for the Y chromosome in one case. The frequencies of class I, II, and III (Yp+)XX sex reversals were 18.75, 25.25, and 56%, respectively. All of the class III (Yp+)XX sex-reversed patients had a 3.5-Mb paracentric inversion flanked by inverted repeats 3 (IR3) on the short arm of the Y chromosome.

  4. New Y chromosomes and early stages of sex chromosome differentiation: sex determination in Megaselia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traut, Walther

    2010-09-01

    The phorid fly Megaselia scalaris is a laboratory model for the turnover and early differentiation of sex chromosomes. Isolates from the field have an XY sex-determining mechanism with chromosome pair 2 acting as X and Y chromosomes. The sex chromosomes are homomorphic but display early signs of sex chromosome differentiation: a low level of molecular differences between X and Y. The male-determining function (M), maps to the distal part of the Y chromosome's short arm. In laboratory cultures, new Y chromosomes with no signs of a molecular differentiation arise at a low rate, probably by transposition of M to these chromosomes. Downstream of the primary signal, the homologue of the Drosophila doublesex (dsx) is part of the sex-determining pathway while Sex-lethal (Sxl), though structurally conserved, is not.

  5. Comparison of the X and Y Chromosome Organization in Silene latifolia

    OpenAIRE

    Zluvova, Jitka; Janousek, Bohuslav; Negrutiu, Ioan; Vyskot, Boris

    2005-01-01

    Here we compare gene orders on the Silene latifolia sex chromosomes. On the basis of the deletion mapping results (11 markers and 23 independent Y chromosome deletion lines used), we conclude that a part of the Y chromosome (covering a region corresponding to at least 23.9 cM on the X chromosome) has been inverted. The gradient in silent-site divergence suggests that this inversion took place after the recombination arrest in this region. Because recombination arrest events followed by Y chro...

  6. A recent bottleneck of Y chromosome diversity coincides with a global change in culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karmin, Monika; Saag, Lauri; Vicente, Mário

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly thought that human genetic diversity in non-African populations was shaped primarily by an out-of-Africa dispersal 50-100 thousand yr ago (kya). Here, we present a study of 456 geographically diverse high-coverage Y chromosome sequences, including 299 newly reported samples. Applying...... ancient DNA calibration, we date the Y-chromosomal most recent common ancestor (MRCA) in Africa at 254 (95% CI 192-307) kya and detect a cluster of major non-African founder haplogroups in a narrow time interval at 47-52 kya, consistent with a rapid initial colonization model of Eurasia and Oceania after...

  7. Trends in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity in the Arabian Gulf States: systematic review and meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Alharbi, NS; Almutari, R; Jones, S.; Al-Daghr, N; Khunti, K; de Lusignan, S.

    2014-01-01

    We report trends in type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity in adults residing in the Arabian Gulf States. Among the Saudi population, the prevalence of diabetes increased from 10.6% in 1989 to 32.1% in 2009. Prevalence of the disease increased faster among Saudi men than women, with growth rates of 0.8% and 0.6% per year, respectively.

  8. Wind resource characterization in the Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Yip, Chak Man Andrew

    2015-12-28

    Wind energy is expected to contribute to alleviating the rise in energy demand in the Middle East that is driven by population growth and industrial development. However, variability and intermittency in the wind resource present significant challenges to grid integration of wind energy systems. These issues are rarely addressed in the literature of wind resource assessment in the Middle East due to sparse meteorological observations with varying record lengths. In this study, the wind field with consistent space–time resolution for over three decades at three hub heights (50m, 80m, 140m) over the whole Arabian Peninsula is constructed using the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) dataset. The wind resource is assessed at a higher spatial resolution with metrics of temporal variations in the wind than in prior studies. Previously unrecognized locations of interest with high wind abundance and low variability and intermittency have been identified in this study and confirmed by recent on-site observations. In particular, the western mountains of Saudi Arabia experience more abundant wind resource than most Red Sea coastal areas. The wind resource is more variable in coastal areas along the Arabian Gulf than their Red Sea counterparts at a similar latitude. Persistent wind is found along the coast of the Arabian Gulf.

  9. Further records of pseudoscorpions (Arachnida, Pseudoscorpiones) from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahnert, Volker; Sharaf, Mostafa; Aldawood, Abdulrahman S

    2014-02-11

    Five species of pseudoscorpions are recorded from the southwestern mountains of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Pseudochthonius arabicus Mahnert n. sp. is described as new to science; this genus was previously known only from sub-Saharan Africa and tropical South America and represents the first record of the family Chthoniidae from the Arabian Peninsula. Paratemnoides ellingseni (Beier, 1932), a widespread species in tropical Africa, and Withius piger (Simon, 1878) are added to the faunal list of Saudi Arabia. Minniza monticola Mahnert, 1991 and Rhacochelifer sonyae Mahnert, 1991 are apparently endemic to the southwestern mountains of Saudi Arabia.

  10. Effect of Menses on Clearance of Y-Chromosome in Vaginal Fluid: Implications for a Biomarker of Recent Sexual Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Rebecca M.; Melendez, Johan H.; Smith, Tukisa D.; Galai, Noya; Zenilman, Jonathan M.

    2012-01-01

    Self-reported sexual behaviors are subject to bias. We previously developed a polymerase chain reaction for the detection of Y-chromosome sequences in vaginal fluid as a potential biomarker for recent sexual activity. In this study, we found menses results in lower Y-chromosome concentrations but with similar decay patterns as non-menstrual samples. PMID:20118672

  11. High level of male-biased Scandinavian admixture in Greenlandic Inuit shown by Y-chromosomal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Elena; Calafell, Francesc; Rosser, Zoë H

    2003-01-01

    that precedes the split between European and Native American populations, it is possible to assign chromosomes in an admixed population to either continental source. On this basis, 58+/-6% of these Y chromosomes have been assigned to a European origin. The high proportion of European Y chromosomes contrasts...

  12. Genetic variation within the Y chromosome is not associated with histological characteristics of the atherosclerotic carotid artery or aneurysmal wall

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haitjema, Saskia; van Setten, Jessica|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/345493990; Eales, James; van der Laan, Sander W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314003045; Gandin, Ilaria; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; de Borst, Gert J|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/237108151; Pasterkamp, Gerard|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/138488304; Asselbergs, Folkert W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/270752137; Charchar, Fadi J; Wilson, James F; de Jager, Saskia C A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314952799; Tomaszewski, Maciej; den Ruijter, Hester M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304123846

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Haplogroup I, a common European paternal lineage of the Y chromosome, is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease in British men. It is unclear whether this haplogroup or any other haplogroup on the Y chromosome is associated with histological characteristics of

  13. Evaluating the relationship between spermatogenic silencing of the X chromosome and evolution of the Y chromosome in chimpanzee and human

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.M. Achame; W.M. Baarends (Willy); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); J.A. Grootegoed (Anton)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractChimpanzees and humans are genetically very similar, with the striking exception of their Y chromosomes, which have diverged tremendously. The male-specific region (MSY), representing the greater part of the Y chromosome, is inherited from father to son in a clonal fashion, with natural

  14. Loss of Y-chromosome does not correlate with age at onset of head and neck carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veiga, L C Silva; Bérgamo, N A; Reis, P P

    2012-01-01

    Loss of Y-chromosome has been correlated with older age in males. Furthermore, current evidence indicates that Y-chromosome loss also occurs in several human tumors, including head and neck carcinomas. However, the association between Y nullisomy and the occurrence of neoplasias in elderly men ha...

  15. SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 4. Saudi Engineering Solar Energy Applications System Design Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Literature summarizing a study on the Saudi Arabian solar controlled environment agriculture system is presented. Specifications and performance requirements for the system components are revealed. Detailed performance and cost analyses are used to determine the optimum design. A preliminary design of an engineering field test is included. Some weather data are provided for Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

  16. Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome-specific polymorphisms in the Seminole Tribe of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huoponen, K; Torroni, A; Wickman, P R; Sellitto, D; Gurley, D S; Scozzari, R; Wallace, D C

    1997-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequence variation was examined in 37 Seminoles from Florida by polymerase chain reaction amplification and high resolution restriction endonuclease analysis. The Y chromosome TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphisms detected by the probes 49a, 49f, and 12f2 were examined in the 26 males of this group. Analysis of the mtDNA revealed that all four Native American haplogroups (A, B, C and D) were present in the Seminoles encompassing about 95% of the Seminole mtDNAs. No European mtDNAs were found among the Seminoles, but two mtDNAs (about 5%) were members of the African-specific haplogroup L1, thus indicating that a limited number of African women were incorporated in the Seminole tribe. Analysis of Y chromosome haplotypes supports the hypothesis that haplotypes 18 and 63 are the most likely founding Native American Y chromosome haplotypes from Asia. However, 11% of the Seminole Y chromosomes represented haplotypes generally attributed to Europeans, though none harbored standard African haplotypes. These findings support historical evidence that the Seminole tribe has integrated individuals of European and African ancestry, but suggests that the sex ratio of nonnatives from different continents may have varied.

  17. Surname and Y chromosome in Southern Europe: a case study with Colom/Colombo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-González, Luis Javier; Martínez-Espín, Esther; Álvarez, Juan Carlos; Albardaner, Francesc; Rickards, Olga; Martínez-Labarga, Cristina; Calafell, Francesc; Lorente, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    According to most historians, Christopher Columbus was born in Genoa, Italy. However, based on some key facts in the discoverer's biography, as well as in the linguistic analysis of his texts, some historians and linguists believe that Columbus could have been of Catalan origin. A Ligurian Columbus would have carried the Colombo surname, whereas he would have been called Colom if he were Catalan. In order to test whether it would be possible to discriminate between a Ligurian or a Catalan origin were Columbus' Y-chromosome haplotype to be retrieved, we genotyped 17 Y-chromosome STRs in 238 Spanish (from Catalonia, Valencia, and the Balearic Islands) and French Colom men, and 114 North Italian Colombo (from Liguria, Lombardy, and Piedmont). The Italian samples and, in particular, the Lombard Colombos were genetically as diverse as the general population, and we found little evidence of clusters of haplotypes that could indicate descent from a single founder. Colombo is actually the most frequent surname in Lombardy, where foundlings and orphans used to be given the surname Colombo. By contrast, Y-chromosome diversity was reduced in the Iberian Colom, where most of the men had Y chromosomes belonging to a few lineages. This implies that a positive identification would be more likely if Columbus were of Catalan descent. In this study, we have shown the diverse dynamics of two surnames linked by their etymology, in what is, to the best of our knowledge, the first genetic analysis of a surname in Southern Europe. PMID:21847141

  18. No evidence for a Y chromosomal effect on alternative behavioral strategies in mice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sluyter, F; Lynch, CB; Meeter, F; vanOortmerssen, GA; Bult, Abel

    This study takes the first step toward testing a Y chromosomal effect on both aggression and thermoregulatory nest-building behavior in mouse lines either bidirectionally selected for short (SAL) and long (LAL) attack latency or high (HIGH) and low (LOW) nest-building behavior. Using reciprocal

  19. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DY...

  20. Impact of repetitive elements on the Y chromosome formation in plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hobza, Roman; Čegan, R.; Jesionek, W.; Kejnovský, E.; Vyskot, B.; Kubát, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 302. ISSN 2073-4425 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-08698S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Satellites * Sex chromosomes * Transposable elements * Y chromosome Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.600, year: 2016

  1. Y-chromosome haplogroups and susceptibility to azoospermia factor c microdeletion in an Italian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arredi, Barbara; Ferlin, Alberto; Speltra, Elena; Bedin, Chiara; Zuccarello, Daniela; Ganz, Francesco; Marchina, Eleonora; Stuppia, Liborio; Krausz, Csilla; Foresta, Carlo

    2007-03-01

    A limited number of studies aimed at investigating the possible association of Y-chromosome haplogroups with microdeletions of the azoospermia factors (AZFs) or with particular infertile phenotypes, but definitive conclusions have not been attained. The main confounding elements in these association studies are the small sample sizes and the lack of homogeneity in the geographical origin of studied populations, affecting, respectively, the statistical power and the haplogroup distribution. To assess whether some Y-chromosome haplogroups are predisposing to, or protecting against, azoospermia factor c (AZFc; b2/b4) deletions, 31 north Italian patients carrying the AZFc b2/b4 microdeletion were characterised for 8 Y-chromosome haplogroups, and compared with the haplogroup frequency shown by a north Italian population without the microdeletion (n = 93). A significant difference was observed between the two populations, patients with microdeletions showing a higher frequency of the E haplogroup (29.3% vs 9.7%, ppopulation, controlled at microgeographical level, allows the possibility that the geographical structure of the Y genetic variability has affected our results to be excluded. Thus, it is concluded that in the north Italian population Y-chromosome background affects the occurrence of AZFc b2/b4 deletions.

  2. Y chromosome gr/gr deletions are a risk factor for low semen quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L.; Westerveld, G. H.; Korver, C. M.; van Daalen, S. K. M.; Hovingh, S. E.; Rozen, S.; van der Veen, F.; Repping, S.

    2009-01-01

    Subfertility affects one in eight couples. In up to 50% of cases, the male partner has low semen quality. Four Y chromosome deletions, i.e. Azoospermia factor a (AZFa), P5/proximal-P1 (AZFb), P5/distal-P1 and AZFc deletions, are established causes of low semen quality. Whether a recently identified

  3. The Y chromosome as the most popular marker in genetic genealogy benefits interdisciplinary research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calafell, Francesc; Larmuseau, Maarten H D

    2017-05-01

    The Y chromosome is currently by far the most popular marker in genetic genealogy that combines genetic data and family history. This popularity is based on its haploid character and its close association with the patrilineage and paternal inherited surname. Other markers have not been found (yet) to overrule this status due to the low sensitivity and precision of autosomal DNA for genetic genealogical applications, given the vagaries of recombination, and the lower capacities of mitochondrial DNA combined with an in general much lower interest in maternal lineages. The current knowledge about the Y chromosome and the availability of markers with divergent mutation rates make it possible to answer questions on relatedness levels which differ in time depth; from the individual and familial level to the surnames, clan and population level. The use of the Y chromosome in genetic genealogy has led to applications in several well-established research disciplines; namely in, e.g., family history, demography, anthropology, forensic sciences, population genetics and sex chromosome evolution. The information obtained from analysing this chromosome is not only interesting for academic scientists but also for the huge and lively community of amateur genealogists and citizen-scientists, fascinated in analysing their own genealogy or surname. This popularity, however, has also some drawbacks, mainly for privacy reasons related to the DNA donor, his close family and far-related namesakes. In this review paper we argue why Y-chromosomal analysis and its genetic genealogical applications will still perform an important role in future interdisciplinary research.

  4. The origin of the isolated population of the Faroe Islands investigated using Y chromosomal markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, Tove H; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Wang, August G

    2004-01-01

    to analyse genetic diversity in the Faroese population and to compare this with the distribution of genotypes in the putative ancestral populations. Using a combination of genetic distance measures, assignment and phylogenetic analyses, we find a high degree of similarity between the Faroese Y chromosomes...

  5. Toward Male Individualization with Rapidly Mutating Y-Chromosomal Short Tandem Repeats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Ballantyne (Kaye); A. Ralf (Arwin); R. Aboukhalid (Rachid); N.M. Achakzai (Niaz); T. Anjos (Tania); Q. Ayub (Qasim); J. Balažic (Jože); J. Ballantyne (Jack); D.J. Ballard (David); B. Berger (Burkhard); C. Bobillo (Cecilia); M. Bouabdellah (Mehdi); H. Burri (Helen); T. Capal (Tomas); S. Caratti (Stefano); J. Cárdenas (Jorge); F. Cartault (François); E.F. Carvalho (Elizeu); M. de Carvalho (Margarete); B. Cheng (Baowen); M.D. Coble (Michael); D. Comas (David); D. Corach (Daniel); M. D'Amato (Mauro); S. Davison (Sean); P. de Knijff (Peter); M.C.A. de Ungria (Maria Corazon); R. Decorte (Ronny); T. Dobosz (Tadeusz); B.M. Dupuy (Berit); S. Elmrghni (Samir); M. Gliwiński (Mateusz); S.C. Gomes (Sara); L. Grol (Laurens); C. Haas (Cordula); E. Hanson (Erin); J. Henke (Jürgen); L. Henke (Lotte); F. Herrera-Rodríguez (Fabiola); C.R. Hill (Carolyn); G. Holmlund (Gunilla); K. Honda (Katsuya); U.-D. Immel (Uta-Dorothee); S. Inokuchi (Shota); R. Jobling; M. Kaddura (Mahmoud); J.S. Kim (Jong); S.H. Kim (Soon); W. Kim (Wook); T.E. King (Turi); E. Klausriegler (Eva); D. Kling (Daniel); L. Kovačević (Lejla); L. Kovatsi (Leda); P. Krajewski (Paweł); S. Kravchenko (Sergey); M.H.D. Larmuseau (Maarten); E.Y. Lee (Eun Young); R. Lessig (Rüdiger); L.A. Livshits (Ludmila); D. Marjanović (Damir); M. Minarik (Marek); N. Mizuno (Natsuko); H. Moreira (Helena); N. Morling (Niels); M. Mukherjee (Meeta); P. Munier (Patrick); J. Nagaraju (Javaregowda); F. Neuhuber (Franz); S. Nie (Shengjie); P. Nilasitsataporn (Premlaphat); T. Nishi (Takeki); H.H. Oh (Hye); S. Olofsson (Sylvia); V. Onofri (Valerio); J. Palo (Jukka); H. Pamjav (Horolma); W. Parson (Walther); M. Petlach (Michal); C. Phillips (Christopher); R. Ploski (Rafal); S.P.R. Prasad (Samayamantri P.); D. Primorac (Dragan); G.A. Purnomo (Gludhug); J. Purps (Josephine); H. Rangel-Villalobos (Hector); K. Reogonekbała (Krzysztof); B. Rerkamnuaychoke (Budsaba); D.R. Gonzalez (Danel Rey); C. Robino (Carlo); L. Roewer (Lutz); A. de Rosa (Anna); A. Sajantila (Antti); A. Sala (Andrea); J.M. Salvador (Jazelyn); P. Sanz (Paula); C. Schmitt (Christian); A.K. Sharma (Anisha K.); D.A. Silva (Dayse); K.-J. Shin (Kyoung-Jin); T. Sijen (Titia); M. Sirker (Miriam); D. Siváková (Daniela); V. Škaro (Vedrana); C. Solano-Matamoros (Carlos); L. Souto (L.); V. Stenzl (Vlastimil); H. Sudoyo (Herawati); D. Syndercombe-Court (Denise); A. Tagliabracci (Adriano); D. Taylor (Duncan); A. Tillmar (Andreas); I.S. Tsybovsky (Iosif); C. Tyler-Smith (Chris); K. van der Gaag (Kristiaan); D. Vanek (Daniel); A. Völgyi (Antónia); D. Ward (Denise); P. Willemse (Patricia); E.P.H. Yap (Eric); Z-Y. Yong (Ze-Yie); I.Z. Pajnič (Irena Zupanič); M.H. Kayser (Manfred)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractRelevant for various areas of human genetics, Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) are commonly used for testing close paternal relationships among individuals and populations, and for male lineage identification. However, even the widely used 17-loci Yfiler set cannot resolve

  6. Decreased Rate of Evolution in Y Chromosome STR Loci of Increased Size of the Repeat Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järve, Mari; Zhivotovsky, Lev A.; Rootsi, Siiri; Help, Hela; Rogaev, Evgeny I.; Khusnutdinova, Elza K.; Kivisild, Toomas; Sanchez, Juan J.

    2009-01-01

    Background Polymorphic Y chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) have been widely used in population genetic and evolutionary studies. Compared to di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats, STRs with longer repeat units occur more rarely and are far less commonly used. Principal Findings In order to study the evolutionary dynamics of STRs according to repeat unit size, we analysed variation at 24 Y chromosome repeat loci: 1 tri-, 14 tetra-, 7 penta-, and 2 hexanucleotide loci. According to our results, penta- and hexanucleotide repeats have approximately two times lower repeat variance and diversity than tri- and tetranucleotide repeats, indicating that their mutation rate is about half of that of tri- and tetranucleotide repeats. Thus, STR markers with longer repeat units are more robust in distinguishing Y chromosome haplogroups and, in some cases, phylogenetic splits within established haplogroups. Conclusions Our findings suggest that Y chromosome STRs of increased repeat unit size have a lower rate of evolution, which has significant relevance in population genetic and evolutionary studies. PMID:19789645

  7. Autosomal control of the Y-chromosome kl-3 loop of Drosophila melanogaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piergentili, R.; Bonaccorsi, S.; Raffa, G.D.; Pisano, C.; Hackstein, J.H.P.; Mencarelli, C.

    2004-01-01

    The Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster carries a limited number of loci necessary for male fertility that possess a series of unconventional features that still hinder a definition of their biological role: they have extremely large sizes; accommodate huge amounts of repetitive DNA; and develop

  8. High Y-chromosomal differentiation among ethnic groups of Dir and Swat districts, Pakistan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullah, Inam; Olofsson, Jill K.; Margaryan, Ashot

    2017-01-01

    , these five ethnic groups fall mostly outside the previously characterized Y-chromosomal gene pools of the Indo-Pakistani subcontinent. Male founder effects, coupled with culturally and topographically based constraints upon marriage and movement, are likely responsible for the high degree of genetic...

  9. Isodicentric Y Chromosomes and Sex Disorders as Byproducts of Homologous Recombination that Maintains Palindromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Julian; Skaletsky, Helen; van Daalen, Saskia K. M.; Embry, Stephanie L.; Korver, Cindy M.; Brown, Laura G.; Oates, Robert D.; Silber, Sherman; Repping, Sjoerd; Page, David C.

    2009-01-01

    Massive palindromes in the human Y chromosome harbor mirror-image gene pairs essential for spermatogenesis. During evolution, these gene pairs have been maintained by intrapalindrome, arm-to-arm recombination. The mechanism of intrapalindrome recombination and risk of harmful effects are unknown. We

  10. Y chromosome haplotyping in Scandinavian wolves (Canis lupus) based on microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundqvist, A K; Ellegren, H; Olivier, M; Vilà, C

    2001-08-01

    The analysis of mitochondrial DNA sequences has for a long time been the most extensively used genetic tool for phylogenetic, phylogeographic and population genetic studies. Since this approach only considers female lineages, it tends to give a biased picture of the population history. The use of protein polymorphisms and microsatellites has helped to obtain a more unbiased view, but complementing population genetic studies with Y chromosome markers could clarify the role of each sex in natural processes. In this study we analysed genetic variability at four microsatellite loci on the canid Y chromosome. With these four microsatellites we constructed haplotypes and used them to study the genetic status of the Scandinavian wolf population, a population that now contains 60-70 animals but was thought to have been extinct in the 1970s. In a sample of 100 male wolves from northern Europe we found 17 different Y chromosome haplotypes. Only two of these were found in the current Scandinavian population. This indicates that there should have been at least two males involved in the founding of the Scandinavian wolf population after the bottleneck in the 1970s. The two Scandinavian Y chromosome haplotypes were not found elsewhere in northern Europe, which indicates low male gene flow between Scandinavia and the neighbouring countries.

  11. The contribution of the Y chromosome to hybrid male sterility in house mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Polly; Good, Jeffrey M; Dean, Matthew D; Tucker, Priscilla K; Nachman, Michael W

    2012-08-01

    Hybrid sterility in the heterogametic sex is a common feature of speciation in animals. In house mice, the contribution of the Mus musculus musculus X chromosome to hybrid male sterility is large. It is not known, however, whether F1 male sterility is caused by X-Y or X-autosome incompatibilities or a combination of both. We investigated the contribution of the M. musculus domesticus Y chromosome to hybrid male sterility in a cross between wild-derived strains in which males with a M. m. musculus X chromosome and M. m. domesticus Y chromosome are partially sterile, while males from the reciprocal cross are reproductively normal. We used eight X introgression lines to combine different X chromosome genotypes with different Y chromosomes on an F1 autosomal background, and we measured a suite of male reproductive traits. Reproductive deficits were observed in most F1 males, regardless of Y chromosome genotype. Nonetheless, we found evidence for a negative interaction between the M. m. domesticus Y and an interval on the M. m. musculus X that resulted in abnormal sperm morphology. Therefore, although F1 male sterility appears to be caused mainly by X-autosome incompatibilities, X-Y incompatibilities contribute to some aspects of sterility.

  12. Genetic sub-structure in western Mediterranean populations revealed by 12 Y-chromosome STR loci

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez, V; Tomas Mas, Carmen; Sánchez, J J

    2008-01-01

    Haplotype and allele frequencies of 12 Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385 a/b, DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439) included in the Powerplex(R) Y System were determined in seven western Mediterranean populations from Valencia...

  13. Evaluation of 12 Y-chromosome STR loci in Western Mediterranean populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, V.; Tomas, Carmen; Sanchez, Juan J.

    2008-01-01

    With the aim to establish a Y-STR haplotype database, a total of 554 males from seven Western Mediterranean populations were genotyped for the 12 Y-chromosome STR loci (minimal haplotype extended by loci DYS437, DYS438 and DYS439) included in the Powerplex Y System (Promega). Among the 554 males...

  14. A comparative analysis of Y chromosome and mtDNA phylogenies of the Hylobates gibbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Yi-Chiao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evolutionary relationships of closely related species have long been of interest to biologists since these species experienced different evolutionary processes in a relatively short period of time. Comparison of phylogenies inferred from DNA sequences with differing inheritance patterns, such as mitochondrial, autosomal, and X and Y chromosomal loci, can provide more comprehensive inferences of the evolutionary histories of species. Gibbons, especially the genus Hylobates, are particularly intriguing as they consist of multiple closely related species which emerged rapidly and live in close geographic proximity. Our current understanding of relationships among Hylobates species is largely based on data from the maternally-inherited mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs. Results To infer the paternal histories of gibbon taxa, we sequenced multiple Y chromosomal loci from 26 gibbons representing 10 species. As expected, we find levels of sequence variation some five times lower than observed for the mitochondrial genome (mtgenome. Although our Y chromosome phylogenetic tree shows relatively low resolution compared to the mtgenome tree, our results are consistent with the monophyly of gibbon genera suggested by the mtgenome tree. In a comparison of the molecular dating of divergences and on the branching patterns of phylogeny trees between mtgenome and Y chromosome data, we found: 1 the inferred divergence estimates were more recent for the Y chromosome than for the mtgenome, 2 the species H. lar and H. pileatus are monophyletic in the mtgenome phylogeny, respectively, but a H. pileatus individual falls into the H. lar Y chromosome clade. Conclusions Based on the ~6.4 kb of Y chromosomal DNA sequence data generated for each of the 26 individuals in this study, we provide molecular inferences on gibbon and particularly on Hylobates evolution complementary to those from mtDNA data. Overall, our results illustrate the utility of

  15. Analysis of Sry duplications on the Rattus norvegicus Y-chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jeremy W; Underwood, Adam C; Turner, Monte E; Miller, Nic; Pietrzak, Dawn; Scott, Sarah; Smith, Chris; Milsted, Amy

    2013-11-14

    Gene copy number variation plays a large role in the evolution of genomes. In Rattus norvegicus and other rodent species, the Y-chromosome has accumulated multiple copies of Sry loci. These copy number variations have been previously linked with changes in phenotype of animal models such as the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR). This study characterizes the Y-chromosome in the Sry region of Rattus norvegicus, while addressing functional variations seen in the Sry protein products. Eleven Sry loci have been identified in the SHR with one (nonHMG Sry) containing a frame shift mutation. The nonHMGSry is found and conserved in the related WKY and SD rat strains. Three new, previously unidentified, Sry loci were identified in this study (Sry3BII, Sry4 and Sry4A) in both SHR and WKY. Repetitive element analysis revealed numerous LINE-L1 elements at regions where conservation is lost among the Sry copies. In addition we have identified a retrotransposed copy of Med14 originating from spliced mRNA, two autosomal genes (Ccdc110 and HMGB1) and a normal mammalian Y-chromosome gene (Zfy) in the Sry region of the rat Y-chromosome. Translation of the sequences of each Sry gene reveals eight proteins with amino acid differences leading to changes in nuclear localization and promoter activation of a Sry-responsive gene. Sry-β (coded by the Sry2 locus) has an increased cytoplasmic fraction due to alterations at amino acid 21. Sry-γ has altered gene regulation of the Sry1 promoter due to changes at amino acid 76. The duplication of Sry on the Rattus norvegicus Y-chromosome has led to proteins with altered functional ability that may have been selected for functions in addition to testis determination. Additionally, several other genes not normally found on the Y-chromosome have duplicated new copies into the region around the Sry genes. These suggest a role of active transposable elements in the evolution of the mammalian Y-chromosome in species such as Rattus norvegicus.

  16. Analysis of ESP Syllabus: Analysing the Book Basic English for Computing as a Sample and Testing its Suitability for ESP Learners in Public and Private Yemeni and Saudi Arabian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Mohammed S. Alduais

    2012-01-01

    Any syllabus could be evaluated and analysed in terms of design and format and achieving the goals of the designed syllabus in reality; in this paper the first type of analysis is conducted in addition to integrating the researcher’s experience of teaching ESP in Yemen and Saudi Arabia. Reviewing previous and related literature along with collected data from the text book, the researcher used different types of methodologies to come up with detailed analysis of the above named ESP book. The b...

  17. New initiatives for managment of red palm weevil threats to historical Arabian date palms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The date palm is an important part of the religious, cultural, and economic heritage of the Arabian Peninsula. This heritage is threatened by the recent invasion of the red palm weevil(RPW) from Southeast Asia. In Saudi Arabia, a national campaign for control of RPW by containment/destruction of inf...

  18. Brown and polar bear Y chromosomes reveal extensive male-biased gene flow within brother lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidon, Tobias; Janke, Axel; Fain, Steven R; Eiken, Hans Geir; Hagen, Snorre B; Saarma, Urmas; Hallström, Björn M; Lecomte, Nicolas; Hailer, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Brown and polar bears have become prominent examples in phylogeography, but previous phylogeographic studies relied largely on maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or were geographically restricted. The male-specific Y chromosome, a natural counterpart to mtDNA, has remained underexplored. Although this paternally inherited chromosome is indispensable for comprehensive analyses of phylogeographic patterns, technical difficulties and low variability have hampered its application in most mammals. We developed 13 novel Y-chromosomal sequence and microsatellite markers from the polar bear genome and screened these in a broad geographic sample of 130 brown and polar bears. We also analyzed a 390-kb-long Y-chromosomal scaffold using sequencing data from published male ursine genomes. Y chromosome evidence support the emerging understanding that brown and polar bears started to diverge no later than the Middle Pleistocene. Contrary to mtDNA patterns, we found 1) brown and polar bears to be reciprocally monophyletic sister (or rather brother) lineages, without signals of introgression, 2) male-biased gene flow across continents and on phylogeographic time scales, and 3) male dispersal that links the Alaskan ABC islands population to mainland brown bears. Due to female philopatry, mtDNA provides a highly structured estimate of population differentiation, while male-biased gene flow is a homogenizing force for nuclear genetic variation. Our findings highlight the importance of analyzing both maternally and paternally inherited loci for a comprehensive view of phylogeographic history, and that mtDNA-based phylogeographic studies of many mammals should be reevaluated. Recent advances in sequencing technology render the analysis of Y-chromosomal variation feasible, even in nonmodel organisms. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  19. Hill-Robertson Interference Reduces Genetic Diversity on a Young Plant Y-Chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, Josh; Wang, Wei; Barrett, Spencer C H; Wright, Stephen I

    2017-10-01

    X and Y chromosomes differ in effective population size ( N e ), rates of recombination, and exposure to natural selection, all of which can affect patterns of genetic diversity. On Y chromosomes with suppressed recombination, natural selection is expected to eliminate linked neutral variation, and lower the N e of Y compared to X chromosomes or autosomes. However, female-biased sex ratios and high variance in male reproductive success can also reduce Y-linked N e , making it difficult to infer the causes of low Y-diversity. Here, we investigate the factors affecting levels of polymorphism during sex chromosome evolution in the dioecious plant Rumex hastatulus (Polygonaceae). Strikingly, we find that neutral diversity for genes on the Y chromosome is, on average, 2.1% of the value for their X-linked homologs, corresponding to a chromosome-wide reduction of 93% compared to the standard neutral expectation. We demonstrate that the magnitude of this diversity loss is inconsistent with reduced male N e caused by neutral processes. Instead, using forward simulations and estimates of the distribution of deleterious fitness effects, we show that Y chromosome diversity loss can be explained by purifying selection acting in aggregate over a large number of genetically linked sites. Simulations also suggest that our observed level of Y-diversity is consistent with the joint action of purifying and positive selection, but only for models in which there were fewer constrained sites than we empirically estimated. Given the relatively recent origin of R. hastatulus sex chromosomes, our results imply that Y-chromosome degeneration in the early stages may be largely driven by selective interference rather than by neutral genetic drift of silenced Y-linked genes. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Cytogenetic abnormalities and Y-chromosome microdeletions in infertile Syrian males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Achkar, Walid; Wafa, Abdulsamad; Moassass, Faten

    2013-03-01

    Infertility is an important health issue affecting numerous couples. Approximately 30-50% of the cases of male infertility is due to unknown reasons. The main genetic factors involved in male infertility are chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions within the Yq11 region. The genes controlling spermatogenesis located in the Yq11 region are termed azoospermia factor genes (AZF). Klinefelter syndrome (KS) is the most common of the chromosomal anomalies in the infertile male. AZF microdeletions on the Y chromosome are the most frequent genetic cause of male infertility. Screening for microdeletions in the AZFa, b and c regions of the Y chromosome showed a marked variation among different studies. The present study aimed to investigate the prevalence of such deletions in Syrian men. A total of 162 infertile males (97 azoospermic, 49 oligospermic and 16 severely oligospermic) were screened for chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions using 28 markers in the AZF region. Twenty (12.34%) patients had chromosomal rearrangements, 17 of them showed sex chromosome abnormalities (11 of 17 patients within the azoospermic group had a KS of 64.7%), 2 patients had apparently balanced autosomal rearrangements, while 1 patient had an inversion. Of the 162 infertile men, 46 patients (28.4%) had Y chromosome microdeletions within the AZF-regions. Most frequently hit were the AZFc (34.8%), followed by the AZFbc, AZFa, AZFac, AZFbc, AZFb, AZFd, AZFab, AZFad, AZFbd, AZFabc and the AZFbcd. Combined AZF deletions involving three regions with chromosomal abnormalities were observed in one case. The higher frequency of AZF deletions in our study was comparable with frequencies in other countries and regions of the world, possibly due to the elevated number of the sequence-tagged site (STS) markers used for this screening.

  1. Unique signatures of natural background radiation on human Y chromosomes from Kerala, India.

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    Sanjay Premi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The most frequently observed major consequences of ionizing radiation are chromosomal lesions and cancers, although the entire genome may be affected. Owing to its haploid status and absence of recombination, the human Y chromosome is an ideal candidate to be assessed for possible genetic alterations induced by ionizing radiation. We studied the human Y chromosome in 390 males from the South Indian state of Kerala, where the level of natural background radiation (NBR is ten-fold higher than the worldwide average, and that from 790 unexposed males as control. RESULTS: We observed random microdeletions in the Azoospermia factor (AZF a, b and c regions in >90%, and tandem duplication and copy number polymorphism (CNP of 11 different Y-linked genes in about 80% of males exposed to NBR. The autosomal homologues of Y-linked CDY genes largely remained unaffected. Multiple polymorphic copies of the Y-linked genes showing single Y-specific signals suggested their tandem duplication. Some exposed males showed unilocus duplication of DAZ genes resulting in six copies. Notably, in the AZFa region, approximately 25% of exposed males showed deletion of the DBY gene, whereas flanking genes USP9Y and UTY remained unaffected. All these alterations were detected in blood samples but not in the germline (sperm samples. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to high levels of NBR correlated with several interstitial polymorphisms of the human Y chromosome. CNPs and enhanced transcription of the SRY gene after duplication are envisaged to compensate for the loss of Y chromosome in some cells. The aforesaid changes, confined to peripheral blood lymphocytes, suggest a possible innate mechanism protecting the germline DNA from the NBR. Genome analysis of a larger population focusing on greater numbers of genes may provide new insights into the mechanisms and risks of the resultant genetic damages. The present work demonstrates unique signatures of NBR on human Y chromosomes

  2. Y-Chromosome variation in hominids: intraspecific variation is limited to the polygamous chimpanzee.

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    Gabriele Greve

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia and CDY (chromodomain protein Y varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes. In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus, the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus, and examine the resulting patterns in the light of the species' markedly different social and mating behaviors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH of DAZ and CDY in 12 Y-chromosomal lineages of western lowland gorilla (G. gorilla gorilla and a single lineage of the eastern lowland gorilla (G. beringei graueri showed no variation among lineages. Similar findings were noted for the 10 Y-chromosomal lineages examined in the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus, and 11 Y-chromosomal lineages of the Sumatran orangutan (P. abelii. We validated the contrasting DAZ and CDY patterns using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR in chimpanzee and bonobo. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High intraspecific variation in copy number and position of the DAZ and CDY genes is seen only in the chimpanzee. We hypothesize that this is best explained by sperm competition that results in the variant DAZ and CDY haplotypes detected in this species. In contrast, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans-species that are not subject to sperm competition-showed no intraspecific variation in DAZ and CDY suggesting that monoandry in gorillas, and preferential female mate choice in bonobos and orangutans, probably permitted the fixation of a single Y variant in each taxon. These data support the notion that the evolutionary history of a primate Y chromosome is not simply encrypted in its DNA

  3. Y-Chromosome Variation in Hominids: Intraspecific Variation Is Limited to the Polygamous Chimpanzee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Gabriele; Alechine, Evguenia; Pasantes, Juan J.; Hodler, Christine; Rietschel, Wolfram; Robinson, Terence J.; Schempp, Werner

    2011-01-01

    Background We have previously demonstrated that the Y-specific ampliconic fertility genes DAZ (deleted in azoospermia) and CDY (chromodomain protein Y) varied with respect to copy number and position among chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). In comparison, seven Y-chromosomal lineages of the bonobo (Pan paniscus), the chimpanzee's closest living relative, showed no variation. We extend our earlier comparative investigation to include an analysis of the intraspecific variation of these genes in gorillas (Gorilla gorilla) and orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus), and examine the resulting patterns in the light of the species' markedly different social and mating behaviors. Methodology/Principal Findings Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis (FISH) of DAZ and CDY in 12 Y-chromosomal lineages of western lowland gorilla (G. gorilla gorilla) and a single lineage of the eastern lowland gorilla (G. beringei graueri) showed no variation among lineages. Similar findings were noted for the 10 Y-chromosomal lineages examined in the Bornean orangutan (Pongo pygmaeus), and 11 Y-chromosomal lineages of the Sumatran orangutan (P. abelii). We validated the contrasting DAZ and CDY patterns using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in chimpanzee and bonobo. Conclusion/Significance High intraspecific variation in copy number and position of the DAZ and CDY genes is seen only in the chimpanzee. We hypothesize that this is best explained by sperm competition that results in the variant DAZ and CDY haplotypes detected in this species. In contrast, bonobos, gorillas and orangutans—species that are not subject to sperm competition—showed no intraspecific variation in DAZ and CDY suggesting that monoandry in gorillas, and preferential female mate choice in bonobos and orangutans, probably permitted the fixation of a single Y variant in each taxon. These data support the notion that the evolutionary history of a primate Y chromosome is not simply encrypted in its DNA

  4. Frequency data for 17 Y-chromosomal STRs and 19 Y-chromosomal SNPs in the Tyrolean district of Reutte, Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Daniel; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Gassner, Christoph; Schennach, Harald; Parson, Walther

    2012-11-01

    We established a data set of 17 Y-STRs of 261 males from the Tyrolean district of Reutte. In total we observed 228 different haplotypes, 203 of which were unique and 25 occurred between two and four times. The haplotype diversity was 0.9987 and the discrimination capacity was 0.8736. Further, samples were typed with a selection of 19 Y-SNPs to establish the haplogroup background. Data are available in the Y chromosome haplotype reference database under accession number YA003715.

  5. DYZ1 copy number variation, Y chromosome polymorphism and early recurrent spontaneous abortion/early embryo growth arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Junhao; Fan, Lingling; Zhao, Yueran; You, Li; Wang, Laicheng; Zhao, Han; Li, Yuan; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2011-12-01

    To find the association between recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA)/early embryo growth arrest and Y chromosome polymorphism. Peripheral blood samples of the male patients of big Y chromosome, small Y chromosome and other male patients whose partners suffered from unexplained RSA/early embryo growth arrest were collected. PCR and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR were used to test the deletion and the copy number variation of DYZ1 region in Y chromosome of the patients. A total of 79 big Y chromosome patients (48 of whose partners suffered from RSA or early embryo growth arrest), 7 small Y chromosome patients, 106 other male patients whose partners had suffered from unexplained RSA or early embryo growth arrest, and 100 normal male controls were enrolled. There was no fraction deletion of DYZ1 detected both in big Y patients and in normal men. Of RSA patients, 1 case showed deletion of 266bp from the gene locus 25-290bp, and 2 cases showed deletion of 773bp from 1347 to 2119bp. Of only 7 small Y chromosome patients, 2 cases showed deletion of 266bp from 25 to 290bp, and 4 cases showed deletion of 773bp from 1347 to 2119bp and 275bp from 3128 to 3420bp. The mean of DYZ1 copies was 3900 in normal control men; the mean in big Y patients was 5571, in RSA patients was 2655, and in small Y patients was 1059. All of the others were significantly different (PRSA patients and small Y patients. The integrity and copy number variation of DYZ1 are closely related to the Y chromosome length under microscope. The cause of RSA/early embryo growth arrest in some couples may be the increase (big Y patients) or decrease of DYZ1 copy number in the husbands' Y chromosome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Y-chromosome phylogeny in the evolutionary net of chamois (genus Rupicapra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domínguez Ana

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chamois, distributed over most of the medium to high altitude mountain ranges of southern Eurasia, provides an excellent model for exploring the effects of historical and evolutionary events on diversification. Populations have been grouped into two species, Rupicapra pyrenaica from southwestern Europe and R. rupicapra from eastern Europe. The study of matrilineal mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA and biparentally inherited microsatellites showed that the two species are paraphyletic and indicated alternate events of population contraction and dispersal-hybridization in the diversification of chamois. Here we investigate the pattern of variation of the Y-chromosome to obtain information on the patrilineal phylogenetic position of the genus Rupicapra and on the male-specific dispersal of chamois across Europe. Results We analyzed the Y-chromosome of 87 males covering the distribution range of the Rupicapra genus. We sequenced a fragment of the SRY gene promoter and characterized the male specific microsatellites UMN2303 and SRYM18. The SRY promoter sequences of two samples of Barbary sheep (Ammotragus lervia were also determined and compared with the sequences of Bovidae available in the GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis of the alignment showed the clustering of Rupicapra with Capra and the Ammotragus sequence obtained in this study, different from the previously reported sequence of Ammotragus which groups with Ovis. Within Rupicapra, the combined data define 10 Y-chromosome haplotypes forming two haplogroups, which concur with taxonomic classification, instead of the three clades formed for mtDNA and nuclear microsatellites. The variation shows a west-to-east geographical cline of ancestral to derived alleles. Conclusions The phylogeny of the SRY-promoter shows an association between Rupicapra and Capra. The position of Ammotragus needs a reinvestigation. The study of ancestral and derived characters in the Y-chromosome suggests

  7. Nuptiality and fertility in Saudi Arabia: An appraisal of census data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asharaf Abdul Salam

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Saudi Arabia constitutes bulk of the Arabian Peninsula. Higher birth and lower death rate with higher levels of expectation of life characterizes Saudi Arabian demography. This attempt at appraising nuptiality and fertility is based on censuses. Marriage patterns are changing with higher age at marriage; increasing ever marriage and reducing adolescent marriage, divorces and polygamy. Fertility, was captured from children ever born, parity, and births during 12 months prior to 2004 census and sterility. The children ever born to Saudi Arabian ever married women were 3.8. Women of higher age had higher number of children ever born. Fertility levels remained higher but with a larger proportion of woman at zero parity even among those above 45 years – indication of sterility. Fertility transition was under way as a result of improved female education, value of children, higher age at marriage and reduced infant and child mortality rate.

  8. New, male-specific microsatellite markers from the human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P S; Tatum, O L; Deaven, L L; Longmire, J L

    1999-05-01

    Seven novel microsatellite markers have been developed from a new cosmid library constructed from flow-sorted human Y chromosomes. These microsatellites are tetranucleotide GATA repeats and are polymorphic among unrelated individuals. Five of the seven markers are male-specific, with no PCR product being generated from female DNA. One marker produces male-specific, polymorphic PCR products but occasionally produces a much larger, invariant product from female DNA. The remaining marker is polymorphic in both males and females with many shared alleles between the sexes. This report of six new, male-specific markers doubles the number of tetranucleotide markers that are currently available for the human Y chromosome. These new markers will be valuable where nonrecombining, gender-specific DNA markers are desired, including forensic investigations as well as studies of populations and their evolutionary histories. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Molecular cytogenetic evidence of rearrangements on the Y chromosome of the threespine stickleback fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Joseph A; Peichel, Catherine L

    2008-08-01

    To identify the processes shaping vertebrate sex chromosomes during the early stages of their evolution, it is necessary to study systems in which genetic sex determination was recently acquired. Previous cytogenetic studies suggested that threespine stickleback fish (Gasterosteus aculeatus) do not have a heteromorphic sex chromosome pair, although recent genetic studies found evidence of an XY genetic sex-determination system. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we report that the threespine stickleback Y chromosome is heteromorphic and has suffered both inversions and deletion. Using the FISH data, we reconstruct the rearrangements that have led to the current physical state of the threespine stickleback Y chromosome. These data demonstrate that the threespine Y is more degenerate than previously thought, suggesting that the process of sex chromosome evolution can occur rapidly following acquisition of a sex-determining region.

  10. Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes in Inuit and Danish population samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Elena; Rosser, Zoë H; Nørby, Søren

    2003-01-01

    Nineteen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), DYS19, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385, DYS388, DYS434, DYS435, DYS436, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS460, DYS461 and DYS462 were typed in Inuit (n=70) and Danish (n=62) population samples.......Nineteen Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), DYS19, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385, DYS388, DYS434, DYS435, DYS436, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS460, DYS461 and DYS462 were typed in Inuit (n=70) and Danish (n=62) population samples....

  11. Avian W and mammalian Y chromosomes convergently retained dosage-sensitive regulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellott, Daniel W.; Skaletsky, Helen; Cho, Ting-Jan; Brown, Laura; Locke, Devin; Chen, Nancy; Galkina, Svetlana; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Koutseva, Natalia; Graves, Tina; Kremitzki, Colin; Warren, Wesley C.; Clark, Andrew G.; Gaginskaya, Elena; Wilson, Richard K.; Page, David C.

    2017-01-01

    After birds diverged from mammals, different ancestral autosomes evolved into sex chromosomes in each lineage. In birds, females are ZW and males ZZ, but in mammals females are XX and males XY. We sequenced the chicken W chromosome, compared its gene content with our reconstruction of the ancestral autosomes, and followed the evolutionary trajectory of ancestral W-linked genes across birds. Avian W chromosomes evolved in parallel with mammalian Y chromosomes, preserving ancestral genes through selection to maintain the dosage of broadly-expressed regulators of key cellular processes. We propose that, like the human Y chromosome, the chicken W chromosome is essential for embryonic viability of the heterogametic sex. Unlike other sequenced sex chromosomes, the chicken W did not acquire and amplify genes specifically expressed in reproductive tissues. We speculate that the pressures that drive the acquisition of reproduction related genes on sex chromosomes may be specific to the male germ line. PMID:28135246

  12. Y-Chromosome Structural Diversity in the Bonobo and Chimpanzee Lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetjens, Matthew T; Shen, Feichen; Emery, Sarah B; Zou, Zhengting; Kidd, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-03

    The male-specific regions of primate Y-chromosomes (MSY) are enriched for multi-copy genes highly expressed in the testis. These genes are located in large repetitive sequences arranged as palindromes, inverted-, and tandem repeats termed amplicons. In humans, these genes have critical roles in male fertility and are essential for the production of sperm. The structure of human and chimpanzee amplicon sequences show remarkable difference relative to the remainder of the genome, a difference that may be the result of intense selective pressure on male fertility. Four subspecies of common chimpanzees have undergone extended periods of isolation and appear to be in the early process of subspeciation. A recent study found amplicons enriched for testis-expressed genes on the primate X-chromosome the target of hard selective sweeps, and male-fertility genes on the Y-chromosome may also be the targets of selection. However, little is understood about Y-chromosome amplicon diversity within and across chimpanzee populations. Here, we analyze nine common chimpanzee (representing three subspecies: Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii, Pan troglodytes ellioti, and Pan troglodytes verus) and two bonobo (Pan paniscus) male whole-genome sequences to assess Y ampliconic copy-number diversity across the Pan genus. We observe that the copy number of Y chromosome amplicons is variable among chimpanzees and bonobos, and identify several lineage-specific patterns, including variable copy number of azoospermia candidates RBMY and DAZ We detect recurrent switchpoints of copy-number change along the ampliconic tracts across chimpanzee populations, which may be the result of localized genome instability or selective forces. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  13. Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Lebanon Is Structured by Recent Historical Events

    OpenAIRE

    Zalloua, Pierre A.; Xue, Yali; Khalife, Jade; Makhoul, Nadine; Debiane, Labib; Platt, Daniel E.; Royyuru, Ajay K.; Herrera, Rene J.; Hernanz, David F. Soria; Blue-Smith, Jason; Wells, R. Spencer; Comas, David; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2008-01-01

    Lebanon is an eastern Mediterranean country inhabited by approximately four million people with a wide variety of ethnicities and religions, including Muslim, Christian, and Druze. In the present study, 926 Lebanese men were typed with Y-chromosomal SNP and STR markers, and unusually, male genetic variation within Lebanon was found to be more strongly structured by religious affiliation than by geography. We therefore tested the hypothesis that migrations within historical times could have co...

  14. Y-chromosomal diversity in the population of Guinea-Bissau: a multiethnic perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Alexandra; Ornelas, Carolina; Jobling, Mark A; Brehm, António; Villems, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The geographic and ethnolinguistic differentiation of many African Y-chromosomal lineages provides an opportunity to evaluate human migration episodes and admixture processes, in a pan-continental context. The analysis of the paternal genetic structure of Equatorial West Africans carried out to date leaves their origins and relationships unclear, and raises questions about the existence of major demographic phenomena analogous to the large-scale Bantu expansions. To addres...

  15. Inferring paternal history of rural African-derived Brazilian populations from Y chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Lilian; Nunes, Kelly; Macedo-Souza, Lúcia Inês; Rocha, Jorge; Meyer, Diogo; Mingroni-Netto, Regina Célia

    2017-03-01

    Quilombo remnants are relics of communities founded by runaway or abandoned African slaves, but often with subsequent extensive and complex admixture patterns with European and Native Americans. We combine a genetic study of Y-chromosome markers with anthropological surveys in order to obtain a portrait of quilombo structure and history in the region that has the largest number of quilombo remnants in the state of São Paulo. Samples from 289 individuals from quilombo remnants were genotyped using a set of 17 microsatellites on the Y chromosome (AmpFlSTR-Yfiler). A subset of 82 samples was also genotyped using SNPs array (Axiom Human Origins-Affymetrix). We estimated haplotype and haplogroup frequencies, haplotype diversity and sharing, and pairwise genetic distances through F ST and R ST indexes. We identified 95 Y chromosome haplotypes, classified into 15 haplogroups. About 63% are European, 32% are African, and 6% Native American. The most common were: R1b (European, 34.2%), E1b1a (African, 32.3%), J1 (European, 6.9%), and Q (Native American, 6.2%). Genetic differentiation among communities was low (F ST  = 0.0171; R ST  = 0.0161), and haplotype sharing was extensive. Genetic, genealogical and oral surveys allowed us to detect five main founder haplotypes, which explained a total of 27.7% of the Y chromosome lineages. Our results showed a high European patrilineal genetic contribution among the founders of quilombos, high amounts of gene flow, and a recent common origin of these populations. Common haplotypes and genealogical data indicate the origin of quilombos from a few male individuals. Our study reinforces the importance of a dual approach, involving the analysis of both anthropological and genetic data. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Exchange of genetic information between therian X and Y chromosome gametologs in old evolutionary strata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peneder, Peter; Wallner, Barbara; Vogl, Claus

    2017-10-01

    Therian X and Y sex chromosomes arose from a pair of autosomes. Y chromosomes consist of a pseudoautosomal region that crosses over with the X chromosome and a male-specific Y-chromosomal region that does not. The X chromosome can be structured into "evolutionary strata". Divergence of X-chromosomal genes from their gametologs is similar within a stratum, but differs among strata, likely caused by a different onset of suppression of crossing over between gametologs. After stratum formation, exchange of information between gametologs has long been believed absent; however, recent studies have shown limited exchange, likely through gene conversion. Herein we investigate exchange of genetic information between gametologs in old strata that formed before the split of Laurasiatheria (cattle) from Euarchontoglires (primates and rodents) with a new phylogenetic approach. A prerequisite for our test is an overall preradiative topology, that is, all X-chromosomal gametologs are more similar among themselves than to Y-chromosomal sequences. Screening multiple sequence alignments of the coding sequences of genes from cattle, mice, and humans identified four genes, DDX3X/Y,RBMX/Y,USP9X/Y, and UTX/Y, exhibiting a preradiation topology. Applying our test, we detected exchange of genetic information between all four X and Y gametologs after stratum formation.

  17. Y-chromosome variability in four Native American populations from Panama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascunce, Marina S; González-Oliver, Angelica; Mulligan, Connie J

    2008-06-01

    The allele and haplotype frequencies for 13 Y-chromosome short tandem repeats (STRs) [nine STR loci of the minimal Y-chromosome haplotype (DYS19 - DYS385a - DYS385b - DYS389I - DYS389II - DYS390 - DYS391- DYS392 - DYS393) plus four additional loci (DYS388, DYS426, DYS439, DXYS156)] were determined in 99 males from 4 Panamanian native American populations, including the Chibcha-speaking Ngöbé and Kuna and the Chocó-speaking Emberá and Wounan. Fifty haplotypes were identified, of which 48 (96%) were specific to a single population and 29 (63%) were found in only a single individual. Gene diversity per locus per population ranged from 0 to 0.814, with the highest gene diversity present at the DYS389II locus in the Emberá. The haplotypic discrimination capacity was low, ranging from 42.3% in the Kuna to 63.1% in the Wounan. The four tribes showed a high degree of differentiation both at the Y chromosome and in the mitochondrial genome, highlighting the importance of genetic structure even in geographically proximate and linguistically related populations.

  18. Intrachromosomal homologous recombination between inverted amplicons on opposing Y-chromosome arms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Julian; Noordam, Michiel J; van Daalen, Saskia K M; Skaletsky, Helen; Clark, Brian A; Macville, Merryn V; Page, David C; Repping, Sjoerd

    2013-10-01

    Amplicons--large, nearly identical repeats in direct or inverted orientation--are abundant in the male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) and provide targets for intrachromosomal non-allelic homologous recombination (NAHR). Thus far, NAHR events resulting in deletions, duplications, inversions, or isodicentric chromosomes have been reported only for amplicon pairs located exclusively on the short arm (Yp) or the long arm (Yq). Here we report our finding of four men with Y chromosomes that evidently formed by intrachromosomal NAHR between inverted repeat pairs comprising one amplicon on Yp and one amplicon on Yq. In two men with spermatogenic failure, sister-chromatid crossing-over resulted in pseudoisoYp chromosome formation and loss of distal Yq. In two men with normal spermatogenesis, intrachromatid crossing-over generated pericentric inversions. These findings highlight the recombinogenic nature of the MSY, as intrachromosomal NAHR occurs for nearly all Y-chromosome amplicon pairs, even those located on opposing chromosome arms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Correlation of intercentromeric distance, mosaicism, and sexual phenotype: molecular localization of breakpoints in isodicentric Y chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu Bergeron, Mélanie; Brochu, Pierre; Lemyre, Emmanuelle; Lemieux, Nicole

    2011-11-01

    Isodicentric chromosomes are among the structural abnormalities of the Y chromosome that are commonly identified in patients. The simultaneous 45,X cell line that is generated in cell division due to instability of the isodicentric Y chromosome [idic(Y)] has long been hypothesized to explain the variable sexual development of these patients, although gonads have been studied in only a subset of cases. We report here on the molecular localization of breakpoints in ten patients with an idic(Y). Breakpoints were mapped by FISH using BACs; gonads and fibroblasts were also analyzed when possible to evaluate the level of mosaicism. First, we demonstrate great tissue variability in the distribution of idic(Y). Second, palindromes and direct repeats were near the breakpoint of several idic(Y), suggesting that these sequences play a role in the formation of idic(Y). Finally, our data suggest that intercentromeric distance has a negative influence on the stability of idic(Y), as a greater proportion of cells with breakage or loss of the idic(Y) were found in idic(Y) with a greater intercentromeric distance. Females had a significantly greater intercentromeric distance on their idic(Y) than did males. In conclusion, our study indicates that the Y chromosome contains sequences that are more prone to formation of isodicentric chromosomes. We also demonstrate that patients with an intercentromeric distance greater than 20 Mb on their idic(Y) are at increased risk of having a female sexual phenotype. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Birth of a new gene on the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Antonio Bernardo; Vicoso, Beatriz; Russo, Claudia A M; Swenor, Bonnielin; Clark, Andrew G

    2015-10-06

    Contrary to the pattern seen in mammalian sex chromosomes, where most Y-linked genes have X-linked homologs, the Drosophila X and Y chromosomes appear to be unrelated. Most of the Y-linked genes have autosomal paralogs, so autosome-to-Y transposition must be the main source of Drosophila Y-linked genes. Here we show how these genes were acquired. We found a previously unidentified gene (flagrante delicto Y, FDY) that originated from a recent duplication of the autosomal gene vig2 to the Y chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. Four contiguous genes were duplicated along with vig2, but they became pseudogenes through the accumulation of deletions and transposable element insertions, whereas FDY remained functional, acquired testis-specific expression, and now accounts for ∼20% of the vig2-like mRNA in testis. FDY is absent in the closest relatives of D. melanogaster, and DNA sequence divergence indicates that the duplication to the Y chromosome occurred ∼2 million years ago. Thus, FDY provides a snapshot of the early stages of the establishment of a Y-linked gene and demonstrates how the Drosophila Y has been accumulating autosomal genes.

  1. Surnames and Y-Chromosomal Markers Reveal Low Relationships in Southern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón, Rosario; Hernández, Candela L.; Cuesta, Pedro; Dugoujon, Jean Michel

    2015-01-01

    A sample of 416 males from western and eastern Andalusia has been jointly analyzed for surnames and Y-chromosome haplogroups and haplotypes. The observed number of different surnames was 222 (353 when the second surname of the Spanish system of naming is considered). The great majority of recorded surnames have a Castilian-Leonese origin, while Catalan or Basque surnames have not been found. A few Arab-related surnames appear but none discernible of Sephardic-Jewish descent. Low correlation among surnames with different population frequencies and Y-chromosome markers, at different levels of genetic resolution, has been observed in Andalusia. This finding could be explained mainly by the very low rate of monophyletic surnames because of the historical process of surname ascription and the resulting high frequencies of the most common Spanish surnames. The introduction of surnames in Spain during the Middle Ages coincided with Reconquest of the territories under Islamic rule, and Muslims and Jews progressively adopted the present male line surname system. Sampled surnames and Y-chromosome lineages fit well a power-law distribution and observed isonymy is very close to that of the general population. Besides, our data and results show that the reliability of the isonymy method should be questioned because of the high rate of polyphyletic surnames, even in small geographic regions and autochthonous populations. Random isonymy would be consistently dependent of the most common surname frequencies in the population. PMID:25860017

  2. A distinct type of heterochromatin at the telomeric region of the Drosophila melanogaster Y chromosome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney H Wang

    Full Text Available Heterochromatin assembly and its associated phenotype, position effect variegation (PEV, provide an informative system to study chromatin structure and genome packaging. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, the Y chromosome is entirely heterochromatic in all cell types except the male germline; as such, Y chromosome dosage is a potent modifier of PEV. However, neither Y heterochromatin composition, nor its assembly, has been carefully studied. Here, we report the mapping and characterization of eight reporter lines that show male-specific PEV. In all eight cases, the reporter insertion sites lie in the telomeric transposon array (HeT-A and TART-B2 homologous repeats of the Y chromosome short arm (Ys. Investigations of the impact on the PEV phenotype of mutations in known heterochromatin proteins (i.e., modifiers of PEV show that this Ys telomeric region is a unique heterochromatin domain: it displays sensitivity to mutations in HP1a, EGG and SU(VAR3-9, but no sensitivity to Su(z2 mutations. It appears that the endo-siRNA pathway plays a major targeting role for this domain. Interestingly, an ectopic copy of 1360 is sufficient to induce a piRNA targeting mechanism to further enhance silencing of a reporter cytologically localized to the Ys telomere. These results demonstrate the diversity of heterochromatin domains, and the corresponding variation in potential targeting mechanisms.

  3. The phylogenetic and geographic structure of Y-chromosome haplogroup R1a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underhill, Peter A; Poznik, G David; Rootsi, Siiri; Järve, Mari; Lin, Alice A; Wang, Jianbin; Passarelli, Ben; Kanbar, Jad; Myres, Natalie M; King, Roy J; Di Cristofaro, Julie; Sahakyan, Hovhannes; Behar, Doron M; Kushniarevich, Alena; Sarac, Jelena; Saric, Tena; Rudan, Pavao; Pathak, Ajai Kumar; Chaubey, Gyaneshwer; Grugni, Viola; Semino, Ornella; Yepiskoposyan, Levon; Bahmanimehr, Ardeshir; Farjadian, Shirin; Balanovsky, Oleg; Khusnutdinova, Elza K; Herrera, Rene J; Chiaroni, Jacques; Bustamante, Carlos D; Quake, Stephen R; Kivisild, Toomas; Villems, Richard

    2015-01-01

    R1a-M420 is one of the most widely spread Y-chromosome haplogroups; however, its substructure within Europe and Asia has remained poorly characterized. Using a panel of 16 244 male subjects from 126 populations sampled across Eurasia, we identified 2923 R1a-M420 Y-chromosomes and analyzed them to a highly granular phylogeographic resolution. Whole Y-chromosome sequence analysis of eight R1a and five R1b individuals suggests a divergence time of ∼25,000 (95% CI: 21,300-29,000) years ago and a coalescence time within R1a-M417 of ∼5800 (95% CI: 4800-6800) years. The spatial frequency distributions of R1a sub-haplogroups conclusively indicate two major groups, one found primarily in Europe and the other confined to Central and South Asia. Beyond the major European versus Asian dichotomy, we describe several younger sub-haplogroups. Based on spatial distributions and diversity patterns within the R1a-M420 clade, particularly rare basal branches detected primarily within Iran and eastern Turkey, we conclude that the initial episodes of haplogroup R1a diversification likely occurred in the vicinity of present-day Iran.

  4. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome diversity in the English-speaking Caribbean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn Torres, J; Kittles, R A; Stone, A C

    2007-11-01

    The transatlantic slave trade lasted over three centuries and represents one of the largest forced migrations in human history. The biological repercussions are not well understood especially in African-Caribbean populations. This paper explores the effects of the forced migration, isolation, and admixture on genetic diversity using mitochondrial and Y chromosome markers for 501 individuals from Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, St. Kitts, St. Lucia, St. Thomas, St. Vincent, and Trinidad. Genetic diversity and population genetic structure analyses of mitochondrial data and Y chromosome data indicate that there was no post-migration loss in genetic diversity in the African derived lineages. Genetic structure was observed between the islands for both genetic systems. This may be due to isolation, differences in the number and source of Africans imported, depopulation of indigenous populations, and/or differences in colonization history. Nearly 10% of the individuals belonged to a non-African mitochondrial haplogroup. In contrast, Y chromosome admixture estimates showed that there was nearly 30% European contribution to these Caribbean populations. This study sheds light on the history of Africans in the Americas as well as contributing to our understanding of the nature and extent of diversity within the African Diaspora.

  5. Chromosome evolution and improved cytogenetic maps of the Y chromosome in cattle, zebu, river buffalo, sheep and goat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Meo, G P; Perucatti, A; Floriot, S; Incarnato, D; Rullo, R; Caputi Jambrenghi, A; Ferretti, L; Vonghia, G; Cribiu, E; Eggen, A; Iannuzzi, L

    2005-01-01

    Comparative FISH-mapping among Y chromosomes of cattle (Bos taurus, 2n = 60, BTA, submetacentric Y chromosome), zebu (Bos indicus, 2n = 60, BIN, acrocentric Y chromosome but with visible small p-arms), river buffalo (Bubalus bubalis, 2n = 50, BBU, acrocentric Y chromosome), sheep (Ovis aries, 2n = 54, OAR, small metacentric Y chromosome) and goat (Capra hircus, 2n = 60, CHI, Y-chromosome as in sheep) was performed to extend the existing cytogenetic maps and improve the understanding of karyotype evolution of these small chromosomes in bovids. C- and R-banding comparison were also performed and both bovine and caprine BAC clones containing the SRY, ZFY, UMN0504, UMN0301, UMN0304 and DYZ10 loci in cattle and DXYS3 and SLC25A6 in goat were hybridized on R-banded chromosomes by FISH. The main results were the following: (a) Y-chromosomes of all species show a typical distal positive C-band which seems to be located at the same region of the typical distal R-band positive; (b) the PAR is located at the telomeres but close to both R-band positive and ZFY in all species; (c) ZFY is located opposite SRYand on different arms of BTA, BIN, OAR/CHI Y chromosomes and distal (but centromeric to ZFY) in BBU-Y; (d) BTA-Y and BIN-Y differ as a result of a centromere transposition or pericentric inversion since they retain the same gene order along their distal chromosome regions and have chromosome arms of different size; (e) BTA-Y and BBU-Y differ in a pericentric inversion with a concomitant loss or gain of heterochromatin; (f) OAR/CHI-Y differs from BBU-Y for a pericentric inversion with a major loss of heterochromatin and from BTA and BIN for a centromere transposition followed by the loss of heterochromatin.

  6. Interchromosomal duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y chromosome imply a distinct evolutionary origin of the sex chromosomes compared to Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Gabrieli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data

  7. Interchromosomal Duplications on the Bactrocera oleae Y Chromosome Imply a Distinct Evolutionary Origin of the Sex Chromosomes Compared to Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrieli, Paolo; Gomulski, Ludvik M.; Bonomi, Angelica; Siciliano, Paolo; Scolari, Francesca; Franz, Gerald; Jessup, Andrew; Malacrida, Anna R.; Gasperi, Giuliano

    2011-01-01

    Background Diptera have an extraordinary variety of sex determination mechanisms, and Drosophila melanogaster is the paradigm for this group. However, the Drosophila sex determination pathway is only partially conserved and the family Tephritidae affords an interesting example. The tephritid Y chromosome is postulated to be necessary to determine male development. Characterization of Y sequences, apart from elucidating the nature of the male determining factor, is also important to understand the evolutionary history of sex chromosomes within the Tephritidae. We studied the Y sequences from the olive fly, Bactrocera oleae. Its Y chromosome is minute and highly heterochromatic, and displays high heteromorphism with the X chromosome. Methodology/Principal Findings A combined Representational Difference Analysis (RDA) and fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) approach was used to investigate the Y chromosome to derive information on its sequence content. The Y chromosome is strewn with repetitive DNA sequences, the majority of which are also interdispersed in the pericentromeric regions of the autosomes. The Y chromosome appears to have accumulated small and large repetitive interchromosomal duplications. The large interchromosomal duplications harbour an importin-4-like gene fragment. Apart from these importin-4-like sequences, the other Y repetitive sequences are not shared with the X chromosome, suggesting molecular differentiation of these two chromosomes. Moreover, as the identified Y sequences were not detected on the Y chromosomes of closely related tephritids, we can infer divergence in the repetitive nature of their sequence contents. Conclusions/Significance The identification of Y-linked sequences may tell us much about the repetitive nature, the origin and the evolution of Y chromosomes. We hypothesize how these repetitive sequences accumulated and were maintained on the Y chromosome during its evolutionary history. Our data reinforce the idea that the

  8. Genetic variation within the Y chromosome is not associated with histological characteristics of the atherosclerotic carotid artery or aneurysmal wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haitjema, Saskia; van Setten, Jessica; Eales, James; van der Laan, Sander W; Gandin, Ilaria; de Vries, Jean-Paul P M; de Borst, Gert J; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Charchar, Fadi J; Wilson, James F; de Jager, Saskia C A; Tomaszewski, Maciej; den Ruijter, Hester M

    2017-04-01

    Haplogroup I, a common European paternal lineage of the Y chromosome, is associated with increased risk of coronary artery disease in British men. It is unclear whether this haplogroup or any other haplogroup on the Y chromosome is associated with histological characteristics of the diseased vessel wall in other vascular manifestations of cardiovascular diseases showing a male preponderance. We examined Dutch men undergoing either carotid endarterectomy from the Athero-Express biobank (AE, n = 1217) or open aneurysm repair from the Aneurysm-Express biobank (AAA, n = 393). Upon resolving the Y chromosome phylogeny, each man was assigned to one of the paternal lineages based on combinations of single nucleotide polymorphisms of the male-specific region of the Y chromosome. We examined the associations between the Y chromosome and the histological characteristics of the carotid plaque and aneurysm wall, including lipid content, leukocyte infiltration and intraplaque haemorrhage, in all men. A majority of men were carriers of either haplogroup I (AE: 28% AAA: 24%) or haplogroup R (AE: 59% AAA: 61%). We found no association between Y chromosomal haplogroups and histological characteristics of plaque collected from carotid arteries or tissue specimens of aneurysms. Moreover, the distribution of frequency for all Y chromosomal haplogroups in both cohorts was similar to that of a general population of Dutch men. Our data show that genetic variation on the Y chromosome is not associated with histological characteristics of the plaques from carotid arteries or specimens of aneurysms in men of Dutch origin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prediction of the Y-Chromosome Haplogroups within a recently settled Turkish Population in Sarajevo, Bosnia & Herzegovina

    OpenAIRE

    Doğan, Serkan; Doğan, Gülşen; Ašić, Adna; Bešić, Larisa; Klimenta, Biljana; Hukić, Mirsada; Turan, Yusuf; Primorac, Dragan; Marjanović, Damir

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of Y-chromosome haplogroup distribution is widely used when investigating geographical clustering of different populations, which is why it plays an important role in population genetics, human migration patterns and even in forensic investigations. Individual determination of these haplogroups is mostly based on the analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers located in the non-recombining part of Y-chromosome (NRY). On the other hand, the number of forensic and anthrop...

  10. Genomic and expression analysis of multiple Sry loci from a single Rattus norvegicus Y chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farkas Joel

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sry is a gene known to be essential for testis determination but is also transcribed in adult male tissues. The laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus, has multiple Y chromosome copies of Sry while most mammals have only a single copy. DNA sequence comparisons with other rodents with multiple Sry copies are inconsistent in divergence patterns and functionality of the multiple copies. To address hypotheses of divergence, gene conversion and functional constraints, we sequenced Sry loci from a single R. norvegicus Y chromosome from the Spontaneously Hypertensive Rat strain (SHR and analyzed DNA sequences for homology among copies. Next, to determine whether all copies of Sry are expressed, we developed a modification of the fluorescent marked capillary electrophoresis method to generate three different sized amplification products to identify Sry copies. We applied this fragment analysis method to both genomic DNA and cDNA prepared from mRNA from testis and adrenal gland of adult male rats. Results Y chromosome fragments were amplified and sequenced using primers that included the entire Sry coding region and flanking sequences. The analysis of these sequences identified six Sry loci on the Y chromosome. These are paralogous copies consistent with a single phylogeny and the divergence between any two copies is less than 2%. All copies have a conserved reading frame and amino acid sequence consistent with function. Fragment analysis of genomic DNA showed close approximations of experimental with predicted values, validating the use of this method to identify proportions of each copy. Using the fragment analysis procedure with cDNA samples showed the Sry copies expressed were significantly different from the genomic distribution (testis p Sry transcript expression, analyzed by real-time PCR, showed significantly higher levels of Sry in testis than adrenal gland (p, 0.001. Conclusion The SHR Y chromosome contains at least 6 full length

  11. Gender-segregated Education in Saudi Arabia: Its Impact on Social Norms the Saudi Labor Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roula Baki

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia's gender-segregated higher education system and how it is used to transmit the Kingdom's traditional societal expectations to the employment sector. With Saudi Arabia's current need for economic change, the education system is retarding instead of accelerating reform. A background consisting of Saudi Arabian history, governing laws, religious beliefs and women's roles is examined. I then discuss the education system's preservation goal by considering segregation, women's mobility, videoconferencing courses, and the roles of professors. I attempt to explain how the current education system fails to prepare its students for the global economy: by limiting women's access to the labor market, and by not preparing men for the realities of the global market and therefore creating the need for migrant workers. In conclusion, conserving culture is significant, but for economic change to occur, the extent of cultural conservatism and its effect on the education system need to be re-evaluated.

  12. Preparative mass-spectrometry profiling of bioactive metabolites in Saudi-Arabian propolis fractionated by high-speed countercurrent chromatography and off-line atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometry injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerz, Gerold; Elnakady, Yasser A; Braun, André; Jäckel, Kristin; Sasse, Florenz; Al Ghamdi, Ahmad A; Omar, Mohamed O M; Winterhalter, Peter

    2014-06-20

    Propolis is a glue material collected by honeybees which is used to seal cracks in beehives and to protect the bee population from infections. Propolis resins have a long history in medicinal use as a natural remedy. The multiple biological properties are related to variations in their chemical compositions. Geographical settings and availability of plant sources are important factors for the occurrence of specific natural products in propolis. A propolis ethylacetate extract (800mg) from Saudi Arabia (Al-Baha region) was separated by preparative scale high-speed countercurrent chromatography (HSCCC) using a non-aqueous solvent system n-hexane-ACN (1:1, v/v). For multiple metabolite detection, the resulting HSCCC-fractions were sequentially injected off-line into an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass-spectrometry (APCI-MS/MS) device, and a reconstituted mass spectrometry profile of the preparative run was visualized by selected ion traces. Best ion-intensities for detected compounds were obtained in the negative APCI mode and monitored occurring co-elution effects. HSCCC and successive purification steps resulted in the isolation and characterization of various bioactive natural products such as (12E)- and (12Z)-communic acid, sandaracopimaric acid, (+)-ferruginol, (+)-totarol, and 3β-acetoxy-19(29)-taraxasten-20a-ol using EI-, APCI-MS and 1D/2D-NMR. Cycloartenol-derivatives and triterpene acetates were isolated in mixtures and elucidated by EI-MS and 1D-NMR. Free fatty acids, and two labdane fatty acid esters were identified by APCI-MS/MS. In total 19 metabolites have been identified. The novel combination of HSCCC fractionation, and APCI-MS-target-guided molecular mass profiling improve efficiency of lead-structure identification. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Method for the fast determination of bromate, nitrate and nitrite by ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and their monitoring in Saudi Arabian drinking water with chemometric data treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Rizwan; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Alothman, Zeid Abdullah; Busquets, Rosa; Naushad, Mu

    2016-05-15

    A rapid, sensitive and precise method for the determination of bromate (BrO3(-)), nitrate (NO3(-)) and nitrite (NO2(-)) in drinking water was developed with Ultra performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (UPLC-ESI/MS). The elution of BrO3(-), NO3(-) and NO2(-) was attained in less than two minutes in a reverse phase column. Quality parameters of the method were established; run-to-run and day-to-day precisions were <3% when analysing standards at 10 µg L(-1). The limit of detection was 0.04 µg NO2(-) L(-1) and 0.03 µg L(-1) for both NO3(-)and BrO3(-). The developed UPLC-ESI/MS method was used to quantify these anions in metropolitan water from Saudi Arabia (Jeddah, Dammam and Riyadh areas) and commercial bottled water (from well or unknown source) after mere filtration steps. The quantified levels of NO3(-) were not found to pose a risk. In contrast, BrO3(-) was found above the maximum contaminant level established by the US Environmental Protection Agency in 25% and 33% of the bottled and metropolitan waters, respectively. NO2(-) was found at higher concentrations than the aforementioned limits in 70% and 92% of the bottled and metropolitan water samples, respectively. Therefore, remediation measures or improvements in the disinfection treatments are required. The concentrations of BrO3(-), NO3(-) and NO2(-) were mapped with Principal Component analysis (PCA), which differentiated metropolitan water from bottled water through the concentrations of BrO3(-) and NO3(-) mainly. Furthermore, it was possible to discriminate between well water; blend of well water and desalinated water; and desalinated water. The point or source (region) was found to not be distinctive. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. From barriers to bridges: An investigation on Saudi student mobility (2006-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denman, Brian D.; Hilal, Kholoud T.

    2011-08-01

    Globalisation is often thought to advocate for a single set of beliefs and customs and for a rejection of the need to protect regional cultures and traditions. In the aftermath of 9/11, the rift between Western and Arab cultures has deepened, and there is a patent need for cultural bridges to be built. The government of Saudi Arabia has, by increasing funding for higher education through grants and scholarships, enabled Saudi students to study at overseas universities. A number of non-Saudi students are also enrolled at Saudi Arabian universities. After a brief introduction to the cultural and educational history of the Arab region and Saudi identity, this article turns to contemporary higher education in Saudi Arabia. It introduces the King Abdullah Scholarship Programme and then goes on to present detailed enrolment data for 2006-2009, demonstrating trends and policy changes and identifying patterns in student mobility.

  15. Rayleigh-Wave Group-Velocity Tomography of Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng; Mai, P. Martin; Chang, Sung-Joon; Zahran, Hani

    2017-04-01

    We use surface-wave tomography to investigate the lithospheric structure of the Arabian plate, which is traditionally divided into the Arabian shield in the west and the Arabian platform in the east. The Arabian shield is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks. The Arabian platform is primarily covered by very thick Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sediments. We develop high-resolution tomographic images from fundamental-mode Rayleigh-wave group-velocities across Saudi Arabia, utilizing the teleseismic data recorded by the permanent Saudi National Seismic Network (SNSN). Our study extends previous efforts on surface wave work by increasing ray path density and improving spatial resolution. Good quality dispersion measurements for roughly 3000 Rayleigh-wave paths have been obtained and utilized for the group-velocity tomography. We have applied the Fast Marching Surface Tomography (FMST) scheme of Rawlinson (2005) to obtain Rayleigh-wave group-velocity images for periods from 8 s to 40 s on a 0.8° 0.8° grid and at resolutions approaching 2.5° based on the checkerboard tests. Our results indicate that short-period group-velocity maps (8-15 s) correlate well with surface geology, with slow velocities delineating the main sedimentary features including the Arabian platform, the Persian Gulf and Mesopotamia. For longer periods (20-40 s), the velocity contrast is due to the differences in crustal thickness and subduction/collision zones. The lower velocities are sensitive to the thicker continental crust beneath the eastern Arabia and the subduction/collision zones between the Arabian and Eurasian plate, while the higher velocities in the west infer mantle velocity.

  16. Imprinting of the Y chromosome influences dosage compensation in roX1 roX2 Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Debashish U; Meller, Victoria H

    2009-11-01

    Drosophila melanogaster males have a well-characterized regulatory system that increases X-linked gene expression. This essential process restores the balance between X-linked and autosomal gene products in males. A complex composed of the male-specific lethal (MSL) proteins and RNA is recruited to the body of transcribed X-linked genes where it modifies chromatin to increase expression. The RNA components of this complex, roX1 and roX2 (RNA on the X1, RNA on the X2), are functionally redundant. Males mutated for both roX genes have dramatically reduced survival. We show that reversal of sex chromosome inheritance suppresses lethality in roX1 roX2 males. Genetic tests indicate that the effect on male survival depends upon the presence and source of the Y chromosome, revealing a germ line imprint that influences dosage compensation. Conventional paternal transmission of the Y chromosome enhances roX1 roX2 lethality, while maternal transmission of the Y chromosome suppresses lethality. roX1 roX2 males with both maternal and paternal Y chromosomes have very low survival, indicating dominance of the paternal imprint. In an otherwise wild-type male, the Y chromosome does not appreciably affect dosage compensation. The influence of the Y chromosome, clearly apparent in roX1 roX2 mutants, thus requires a sensitized genetic background. We believe that the Y chromosome is likely to act through modulation of a process that is defective in roX1 roX2 mutants: X chromosome recognition or chromatin modification by the MSL complex.

  17. Analysis of Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations as genetic markers of infertility in Serbian men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinić Jelena

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Impaired fertility of a male partner is the main cause of infertility in up to one half of all infertile couples. At the genetic level, male infertility can be caused by chromosome aberrations or gene mutations. The presence and types of Y chromosome microdeletions and cystic fybrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene mutations as genetic cause of male infertility was tested in Serbian men. The aim of this study was to analyze CFTR gene mutations and Y chromosome microdelations as potential causes of male infertility in Serbian patients, as well as to test the hypothesis that CFTR mutations in infertile men are predominantly located in the several last exons of the gene. Methods. This study has encompassed 33 men with oligo- or azoospermia. The screening for Y chromosome microdeletions in the azoospermia factor (AZF region was performed by multiplex PCR analysis. The screening of the CFTR gene was performed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE method. Results. Deletions on Y chromosome were detected in four patients, predominantly in AZFc region (four of total six deletions. Mutations in the CFTR gene were detected on eight out of 66 analyzed chromosomes of infertile men. The most common mutation was F508del (six of total eight mutations. Conclusion. This study confirmed that both Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations played important role in etiology of male infertility in Serbian infertile men. Genetic testing for Y chromosome microdeletions and CFTR gene mutations has been introduced in routine diagnostics and offered to couples undergoing assisted reproduction techniques. Considering that both the type of Y chromosome microdeletion and the type of CFTR mutation have a prognostic value, it is recommended that AZF and CFTR genotyping should not only be performed in patients with reduced sperm quality before undergoing assisted reproduction, but also for the purpose of preimplantation and

  18. Identification of genetic variation on the horse y chromosome and the tracing of male founder lineages in modern breeds.

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    Barbara Wallner

    Full Text Available The paternally inherited Y chromosome displays the population genetic history of males. While modern domestic horses (Equus caballus exhibit abundant diversity within maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA, no significant Y-chromosomal sequence diversity has been detected. We used high throughput sequencing technology to identify the first polymorphic Y-chromosomal markers useful for tracing paternal lines. The nucleotide variability of the modern horse Y chromosome is extremely low, resulting in six haplotypes (HT, all clearly distinct from the Przewalski horse (E. przewalskii. The most widespread HT1 is ancestral and the other five haplotypes apparently arose on the background of HT1 by mutation or gene conversion after domestication. Two haplotypes (HT2 and HT3 are widely distributed at high frequencies among modern European horse breeds. Using pedigree information, we trace the distribution of Y-haplotype diversity to particular founders. The mutation leading to HT3 occurred in the germline of the famous English Thoroughbred stallion "Eclipse" or his son or grandson and its prevalence demonstrates the influence of this popular paternal line on modern sport horse breeds. The pervasive introgression of Thoroughbred stallions during the last 200 years to refine autochthonous breeds has strongly affected the distribution of Y-chromosomal variation in modern horse breeds and has led to the replacement of autochthonous Y chromosomes. Only a few northern European breeds bear unique variants at high frequencies or fixed within but not shared among breeds. Our Y-chromosomal data complement the well established mtDNA lineages and document the male side of the genetic history of modern horse breeds and breeding practices.

  19. Saudi Arabia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. Objective: To compare the pregnancy outcome in women with singleton breech presentation at term delivered by caesarean section (CS) and vaginal breech delivery. Design: A retrospective study. Setting: Abha Maternity hospital, Saudi Arabia. Material and Methods: 573 women with singleton breech.

  20. The first peopling of South America: new evidence from Y-chromosome haplogroup Q.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenza Battaglia

    Full Text Available Recent progress in the phylogenetic resolution of the Y-chromosome phylogeny permits the male demographic dynamics and migratory events that occurred in Central and Southern America after the initial human spread into the Americas to be investigated at the regional level. To delve further into this issue, we examined more than 400 Native American Y chromosomes (collected in the region ranging from Mexico to South America belonging to haplogroup Q - virtually the only branch of the Y phylogeny observed in modern-day Amerindians of Central and South America - together with 27 from Mongolia and Kamchatka. Two main founding lineages, Q1a3a1a-M3 and Q1a3a1-L54(xM3, were detected along with novel sub-clades of younger age and more restricted geographic distributions. The first was also observed in Far East Asia while no Q1a3a1-L54(xM3 Y chromosome was found in Asia except the southern Siberian-specific sub-clade Q1a3a1c-L330. Our data not only confirm a southern Siberian origin of ancestral populations that gave rise to Paleo-Indians and the differentiation of both Native American Q founding lineages in Beringia, but support their concomitant arrival in Mesoamerica, where Mexico acted as recipient for the first wave of migration, followed by a rapid southward migration, along the Pacific coast, into the Andean region. Although Q1a3a1a-M3 and Q1a3a1-L54(xM3 display overlapping general distributions, they show different patterns of evolution in the Mexican plateau and the Andean area, which can be explained by local differentiations due to demographic events triggered by the introduction of agriculture and associated with the flourishing of the Great Empires.

  1. Genetic variation in South Indian castes: evidence from Y-chromosome, mitochondrial, and autosomal polymorphisms

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    Tirupati S

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major population movements, social structure, and caste endogamy have influenced the genetic structure of Indian populations. An understanding of these influences is increasingly important as gene mapping and case-control studies are initiated in South Indian populations. Results We report new data on 155 individuals from four Tamil caste populations of South India and perform comparative analyses with caste populations from the neighboring state of Andhra Pradesh. Genetic differentiation among Tamil castes is low (RST = 0.96% for 45 autosomal short tandem repeat (STR markers, reflecting a largely common origin. Nonetheless, caste- and continent-specific patterns are evident. For 32 lineage-defining Y-chromosome SNPs, Tamil castes show higher affinity to Europeans than to eastern Asians, and genetic distance estimates to the Europeans are ordered by caste rank. For 32 lineage-defining mitochondrial SNPs and hypervariable sequence (HVS 1, Tamil castes have higher affinity to eastern Asians than to Europeans. For 45 autosomal STRs, upper and middle rank castes show higher affinity to Europeans than do lower rank castes from either Tamil Nadu or Andhra Pradesh. Local between-caste variation (Tamil Nadu RST = 0.96%, Andhra Pradesh RST = 0.77% exceeds the estimate of variation between these geographically separated groups (RST = 0.12%. Low, but statistically significant, correlations between caste rank distance and genetic distance are demonstrated for Tamil castes using Y-chromosome, mtDNA, and autosomal data. Conclusion Genetic data from Y-chromosome, mtDNA, and autosomal STRs are in accord with historical accounts of northwest to southeast population movements in India. The influence of ancient and historical population movements and caste social structure can be detected and replicated in South Indian caste populations from two different geographic regions.

  2. Y chromosome haplotype diversity of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in northern Eurasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Peng, Wei-Feng; Yang, Guang-Li; Lv, Feng-Hua; Liu, Ming-Jun; Li, Wen-Rong; Liu, Yong-Gang; Li, Jin-Quan; Wang, Feng; Shen, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, Sheng-Guo; Hehua, Eer; Marzanov, Nurbiy; Murawski, Maziek; Kantanen, Juha; Li, Meng-Hua

    2014-12-01

    Variation in two SNPs and one microsatellite on the Y chromosome was analyzed in a total of 663 rams representing 59 breeds from a large geographic range in northern Eurasia. SNPA-oY1 showed the highest allele frequency (91.55%) across the breeds, whereas SNPG-oY1 was present in only 56 samples. Combined genotypes established seven haplotypes (H4, H5, H6, H7, H8, H12 and H19). H6 dominated in northern Eurasia, and H8 showed the second-highest frequency. H4, which had been earlier reported to be absent in European breeds, was detected in one European breed (Swiniarka), whereas H7, which had been previously identified to be unique to European breeds, was present in two Chinese breeds (Ninglang Black and Large-tailed Han), one Buryatian (Transbaikal Finewool) and two Russian breeds (North Caucasus Mutton-Wool and Kuibyshev). H12, which had been detected only in Turkish breeds, was also found in Chinese breeds in this work. An overall low level of haplotype diversity (median h = 0.1288) was observed across the breeds with relatively higher median values in breeds from the regions neighboring the Near Eastern domestication center of sheep. H6 is the dominant haplotype in northwestern and eastern China, in which the haplotype distribution could be explained by the historical translocations of the H4 and H8 Y chromosomes to China via the Mongol invasions followed by expansions to northwestern and eastern China. Our findings extend previous results of sheep Y chromosomal genetic variability and indicate probably recent paternal gene flows between sheep breeds from distinct major geographic regions. © 2014 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  3. Phylogenetic distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dog Y chromosomes illuminates dog origins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K Brown

    Full Text Available Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1 assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus and 2 compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog.

  4. Phylogenetic distinctiveness of Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dog Y chromosomes illuminates dog origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Sarah K; Pedersen, Niels C; Jafarishorijeh, Sardar; Bannasch, Danika L; Ahrens, Kristen D; Wu, Jui-Te; Okon, Michaella; Sacks, Benjamin N

    2011-01-01

    Modern genetic samples are commonly used to trace dog origins, which entails untested assumptions that village dogs reflect indigenous ancestry or that breed origins can be reliably traced to particular regions. We used high-resolution Y chromosome markers (SNP and STR) and mitochondrial DNA to analyze 495 village dogs/dingoes from the Middle East and Southeast Asia, along with 138 dogs from >35 modern breeds to 1) assess genetic divergence between Middle Eastern and Southeast Asian village dogs and their phylogenetic affinities to Australian dingoes and gray wolves (Canis lupus) and 2) compare the genetic affinities of modern breeds to regional indigenous village dog populations. The Y chromosome markers indicated that village dogs in the two regions corresponded to reciprocally monophyletic clades, reflecting several to many thousand years divergence, predating the Neolithic ages, and indicating long-indigenous roots to those regions. As expected, breeds of the Middle East and East Asia clustered within the respective regional village dog clade. Australian dingoes also clustered in the Southeast Asian clade. However, the European and American breeds clustered almost entirely within the Southeast Asian clade, even sharing many haplotypes, suggesting a substantial and recent influence of East Asian dogs in the creation of European breeds. Comparison to 818 published breed dog Y STR haplotypes confirmed this conclusion and indicated that some African breeds reflect another distinct patrilineal origin. The lower-resolution mtDNA marker consistently supported Y-chromosome results. Both marker types confirmed previous findings of higher genetic diversity in dogs from Southeast Asia than the Middle East. Our findings demonstrate the importance of village dogs as windows into the past and provide a reference against which ancient DNA can be used to further elucidate origins and spread of the domestic dog.

  5. Haplotype data for 23 Y-chromosome markers in four U.S. population groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, Michael D; Hill, Carolyn R; Butler, John M

    2013-05-01

    The PowerPlex Y23 kit contains 23 Y-chromosomal loci including all 17 of the markers in the Yfiler Y-STR kit plus six additional markers: DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643. We have typed 1032 unrelated population samples from four self-declared US groups: African Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and Western European Caucasians. An analysis of the population genetic parameters and the improvement of adding additional Y-STR markers to the dataset are described. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Multiple Roles of the Y Chromosome in the Biology of Drosophila melanogaster

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    Roberto Piergentili

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The X and Y chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster were the first examples of chromosomes associated with genetic information. Thanks to the serendipitous discovery of a male with white eyes in 1910, T.H. Morgan was able to associate the X chromosome of the fruit fly with a phenotypic character (the eye color for the first time. A few years later, his student, C.B. Bridges, demonstrated that X0 males, although phenotypically normal, are completely sterile. This means that the X chromosome, like the autosomes, harbors genes that control several phenotypic traits, while the Y chromosome is important for male fertility only. Notwithstanding its long history – almost 100 years in terms of genetic studies – most of the features of the Y chromosome are still a mystery. This is due to the intrinsic nature of this genetic element, namely, (1 its molecular composition (mainly transposable elements and satellite DNA, (2 its genetic inertia (lack of recombination due to its heterochromatic nature, (3 the absence of homology with the X (with the only exception of the nucleolar organizer, (4 the lack of visible phenotypes when it is missing (indeed, except for their sterility, X0 flies are normal males, and (5 its low density as for protein-coding sequences (to date, only 13 genes out of approximately 14,000 have been mapped on this chromosome in D. melanogaster, i.e., ~0.1% of the total. Nonetheless, a more accurate analysis reveals that this chromosome can influence several complex phenotypes: (1 it has a role in the fertility of both sexes and viability of males when over-represented; (2 it can unbalance the intracellular nucleotide pool; (3 it can interfere with the gene expression either by recruiting proteins involved in chromatin remodeling (PEV or, to a higher extent, by influencing the expression of up to 1,000 different genes, probably by changing the availability of transcription factors; (4 it plays a major role (up to 50% in the resistance

  7. What's in a name? Y chromosomes, surnames and the genetic genealogy revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Turi E; Jobling, Mark A

    2009-08-01

    Heritable surnames are highly diverse cultural markers of coancestry in human populations. A patrilineal surname is inherited in the same way as the non-recombining region of the Y chromosome and there should, therefore, be a correlation between the two. Studies of Y haplotypes within surnames, mostly of the British Isles, reveal high levels of coancestry among surname cohorts and the influence of confounding factors, including multiple founders for names, non-paternities and genetic drift. Combining molecular genetics and surname analysis illuminates population structure and history, has potential applications in forensic studies and, in the form of 'genetic genealogy', is an area of rapidly growing interest for the public.

  8. Separation of Y-chromosomal haplotypes from male DNA mixtures via multiplex haplotype-specific extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, Jessica; Nagy, Marion

    2015-11-01

    In forensic analysis, the interpretation of DNA mixtures is the subject of ongoing debate and requires expertise knowledge. Haplotype-specific extraction (HSE) is an alternative method that enables the separation of large chromosome fragments or haplotypes by using magnetic beads in conjunction with allele-specific probes. HSE thus allows physical separation of the components of a DNA mixture. Here, we present the first multiplex HSE separation of a Y-chromosomal haplotype consisting of six Yfiler short tandem repeat markers from a mixture of male DNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Y-chromosomal diversity in the population of Guinea-Bissau: a multiethnic perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Alexandra; Ornelas, Carolina; Jobling, Mark A; Brehm, António; Villems, Richard

    2007-07-27

    The geographic and ethnolinguistic differentiation of many African Y-chromosomal lineages provides an opportunity to evaluate human migration episodes and admixture processes, in a pan-continental context. The analysis of the paternal genetic structure of Equatorial West Africans carried out to date leaves their origins and relationships unclear, and raises questions about the existence of major demographic phenomena analogous to the large-scale Bantu expansions. To address this, we have analysed the variation of 31 binary and 11 microsatellite markers on the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome in Guinea-Bissau samples of diverse ethnic affiliations, some not studied before. The Guinea-Bissau Y chromosome pool is characterized by low haplogroup diversity (D = 0.470, sd 0.033), with the predominant haplogroup E3a*-M2 shared among the ethnic clusters and reaching a maximum of 82.2% in the Mandenka people. The Felupe-Djola and Papel groups exhibit the highest diversity of lineages and harbor the deep-rooting haplogroups A-M91, E2-M75 and E3*-PN2, typical of Sahel's more central and eastern areas. Their genetic distinction from other groups is statistically significant (P = 0.01) though not attributable to linguistic, geographic or religious criteria. Non sub-Saharan influences were associated with the presence of haplogroup R1b-P25 and particular lineages of E3b1-M78. The predominance and high diversity of haplogroup E3a*-M2 suggests a demographic expansion in the equatorial western fringe, possibly supported by a local agricultural center. The paternal pool of the Mandenka and Balanta displays evidence of a particularly marked population growth among the Guineans, possibly reflecting the demographic effects of the agriculturalist lifestyle and their putative relationship to the people that introduced early cultivation practices into West Africa. The paternal background of the Felupe-Djola and Papel ethnic groups suggests a better conserved ancestral pool

  10. Y-chromosomal diversity in the population of Guinea-Bissau: a multiethnic perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jobling Mark A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographic and ethnolinguistic differentiation of many African Y-chromosomal lineages provides an opportunity to evaluate human migration episodes and admixture processes, in a pan-continental context. The analysis of the paternal genetic structure of Equatorial West Africans carried out to date leaves their origins and relationships unclear, and raises questions about the existence of major demographic phenomena analogous to the large-scale Bantu expansions. To address this, we have analysed the variation of 31 binary and 11 microsatellite markers on the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome in Guinea-Bissau samples of diverse ethnic affiliations, some not studied before. Results The Guinea-Bissau Y chromosome pool is characterized by low haplogroup diversity (D = 0.470, sd 0.033, with the predominant haplogroup E3a*-M2 shared among the ethnic clusters and reaching a maximum of 82.2% in the Mandenka people. The Felupe-Djola and Papel groups exhibit the highest diversity of lineages and harbor the deep-rooting haplogroups A-M91, E2-M75 and E3*-PN2, typical of Sahel's more central and eastern areas. Their genetic distinction from other groups is statistically significant (P = 0.01 though not attributable to linguistic, geographic or religious criteria. Non sub-Saharan influences were associated with the presence of haplogroup R1b-P25 and particular lineages of E3b1-M78. Conclusion The predominance and high diversity of haplogroup E3a*-M2 suggests a demographic expansion in the equatorial western fringe, possibly supported by a local agricultural center. The paternal pool of the Mandenka and Balanta displays evidence of a particularly marked population growth among the Guineans, possibly reflecting the demographic effects of the agriculturalist lifestyle and their putative relationship to the people that introduced early cultivation practices into West Africa. The paternal background of the Felupe-Djola and Papel

  11. Mitochondrial and Y-chromosome diversity of the Tharus (Nepal): a reservoir of genetic variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornarino, Simona; Pala, Maria; Battaglia, Vincenza; Maranta, Ramona; Achilli, Alessandro; Modiano, Guido; Torroni, Antonio; Semino, Ornella; Santachiara-Benerecetti, Silvana A

    2009-01-01

    Background Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent represent an area considered as a source and a reservoir for human genetic diversity, with many markers taking root here, most of which are the ancestral state of eastern and western haplogroups, while others are local. Between these two regions, Terai (Nepal) is a pivotal passageway allowing, in different times, multiple population interactions, although because of its highly malarial environment, it was scarcely inhabited until a few decades ago, when malaria was eradicated. One of the oldest and the largest indigenous people of Terai is represented by the malaria resistant Tharus, whose gene pool could still retain traces of ancient complex interactions. Until now, however, investigations on their genetic structure have been scarce mainly identifying East Asian signatures. Results High-resolution analyses of mitochondrial-DNA (including 34 complete sequences) and Y-chromosome (67 SNPs and 12 STRs) variations carried out in 173 Tharus (two groups from Central and one from Eastern Terai), and 104 Indians (Hindus from Terai and New Delhi and tribals from Andhra Pradesh) allowed the identification of three principal components: East Asian, West Eurasian and Indian, the last including both local and inter-regional sub-components, at least for the Y chromosome. Conclusion Although remarkable quantitative and qualitative differences appear among the various population groups and also between sexes within the same group, many mitochondrial-DNA and Y-chromosome lineages are shared or derived from ancient Indian haplogroups, thus revealing a deep shared ancestry between Tharus and Indians. Interestingly, the local Y-chromosome Indian component observed in the Andhra-Pradesh tribals is present in all Tharu groups, whereas the inter-regional component strongly prevails in the two Hindu samples and other Nepalese populations. The complete sequencing of mtDNAs from unresolved haplogroups also provided informative markers

  12. Mitochondrial and Y-chromosome diversity of the Tharus (Nepal: a reservoir of genetic variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Modiano Guido

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Central Asia and the Indian subcontinent represent an area considered as a source and a reservoir for human genetic diversity, with many markers taking root here, most of which are the ancestral state of eastern and western haplogroups, while others are local. Between these two regions, Terai (Nepal is a pivotal passageway allowing, in different times, multiple population interactions, although because of its highly malarial environment, it was scarcely inhabited until a few decades ago, when malaria was eradicated. One of the oldest and the largest indigenous people of Terai is represented by the malaria resistant Tharus, whose gene pool could still retain traces of ancient complex interactions. Until now, however, investigations on their genetic structure have been scarce mainly identifying East Asian signatures. Results High-resolution analyses of mitochondrial-DNA (including 34 complete sequences and Y-chromosome (67 SNPs and 12 STRs variations carried out in 173 Tharus (two groups from Central and one from Eastern Terai, and 104 Indians (Hindus from Terai and New Delhi and tribals from Andhra Pradesh allowed the identification of three principal components: East Asian, West Eurasian and Indian, the last including both local and inter-regional sub-components, at least for the Y chromosome. Conclusion Although remarkable quantitative and qualitative differences appear among the various population groups and also between sexes within the same group, many mitochondrial-DNA and Y-chromosome lineages are shared or derived from ancient Indian haplogroups, thus revealing a deep shared ancestry between Tharus and Indians. Interestingly, the local Y-chromosome Indian component observed in the Andhra-Pradesh tribals is present in all Tharu groups, whereas the inter-regional component strongly prevails in the two Hindu samples and other Nepalese populations. The complete sequencing of mtDNAs from unresolved haplogroups also provided

  13. Patients' satisfaction of service quality in Saudi hospitals: a SERVQUAL analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Borie, Hussein M; Damanhouri, Amal M Sheikh

    2013-01-01

    Saudi Arabian hospital performance, vis-á-vis patient satisfaction with service provision, has emerged as a key policy and planning concern. Keeping in view public and private hospital service quality, this article seeks to provide guidelines to the on-going Saudi Arabian health service reorganization, which emphasizes decentralization, bed-capacity expansion, research-based policymaking and initiatives in the health insurance sector. The article outlines an empirical study that compares patient satisfaction with service quality in Saudi Arabian public and private sector hospitals. The authors employ a stratified random sample (1,000 inpatients) from five Saudi Arabian public and five private hospitals. Data were collected through questionnaire using the SERVQUAL scale. For reducing the language bias the questionnaire was translated into Arabic. The response rate was 74.9 percent. Data were analyzed using SPSS and appropriate descriptive and inferential statistical techniques. Cronbach's alpha for five service-quality dimensions (tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, safety and empathy) were high and the SERVQUAL instrument proved to be reliable, valid and appropriate. The results showed that sex, education, income and occupation were statistically significant in influencing inpatients' satisfaction, and all the null hypotheses were rejected. Only inpatient age was not significant. The study highlights service quality influence in the design of broader healthcare strategies for Saudi Arabian public and private hospitals. It demands that management researchers and analysts must identify regional service quality consistencies and related inpatient demographic indicators. The study offers some insights into, and guidance for, hospital quality assurance in Saudi Arabia in general and the urban hospital setting in the Middle-East in particular.

  14. The origin and differentiation process of X and Y chromosomes of the black marsh turtle (Siebenrockiella crassicollis, Geoemydidae, Testudines).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagoshi, Taiki; Nishida, Chizuko; Matsuda, Yoichi

    2012-01-01

    The black marsh turtle (Siebenrockiella crassicollis) has morphologically differentiated X and Y sex chromosomes. To elucidate the origin and evolutionary process of S. crassicollis X and Y chromosomes, we performed cross-species chromosome painting with chromosome-specific DNA from Chinese soft-shelled turtle (Pelodiscus sinensis) and chromosome mapping of the sex-linked genes of S. crassicollis using FISH. The X and Y chromosomes of S. crassicollis were hybridized with DNA probe of P. sinensis chromosome 5, which is homologous to chicken chromosome 5. S. crassicollis homologues of 14 chicken chromosome 5-linked genes were all localized to the X long arm, whereas two genes were mapped to the Y short arm and the other 12 genes were localized to the Y long arm in the same order as the X chromosome. This result suggests that extensive linkage homology has been retained between chicken chromosome 5 and S. crassicollis X and Y chromosomes and that S. crassicollis X and Y chromosomes are at an early stage of sex chromosome differentiation. Comparison of the locations of two site-specific repetitive DNA sequences on the X and Y chromosomes demonstrated that the centromere shift was the result of centromere repositioning, not of pericentric inversion.

  15. Cytogenetic and molecular studies of a familial paracentric inversion of Y chromosome present in a patient with ambiguous genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J D; Ma, Y Y; Gibson, L H; Su, H; Charest, N; Lau, Y F; Yang-Feng, T L

    1997-05-16

    Here we describe the first reported case of a patient with a familial paracentric inversion in the long arm of the Y chromosome and ambiguous genitalia. FISH analyses with Y chromosome YACs demonstrated that the inversion breakpoints of the patients and the father's Ys appear to be the same and lie within interval 5B of the Y chromosome. PCR and sequence analysis indicated that our patient carries a normal SRY gene. For an additional comparison of the patient's inv(Y) with the father, two other Y chromosome sequences were examined. Molecular studies of this familial inverted Y chromosome showed no differences in the ZFY and TSPY genes between the father and the patient suggesting that the short arm of our patient's inv(Y) is identical to that of the patient's father. Southern analysis using a probe of the DAX-1 gene indicated that a single copy of DSS (dosage sensitive sex reversal) locus was present in the patient. Our results suggest that the abnormal sexual development in our patient is likely attributable to (an)other mechanism(s) than mutation in the SRY gene and dosage alteration of the DAX-1 gene.

  16. Y-chromosome short tandem repeat intermediate variant alleles DYS392.2, DYS449.2, and DYS385.2 delineate new phylogenetic substructure in human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myres, Natalie M; Ritchie, Kathleen H; Lin, Alice A; Hughes, Robert H; Woodward, Scott R; Underhill, Peter A

    2009-06-01

    To determine the human Y-chromosome haplogroup backgrounds of intermediate-sized variant alleles displayed by short tandem repeat (STR) loci DYS392, DYS449, and DYS385, and to evaluate the potential of each intermediate variant to elucidate new phylogenetic substructure within the human Y-chromosome haplogroup tree. Molecular characterization of lineages was achieved using a combination of Y-chromosome haplogroup defining binary polymorphisms and up to 37 short tandem repeat loci. DNA sequencing and median-joining network analyses were used to evaluate Y-chromosome lineages displaying intermediate variant alleles. We show that DYS392.2 occurs on a single haplogroup background, specifically I1*-M253, and likely represents a new phylogenetic subdivision in this European haplogroup. Intermediate variants DYS449.2 and DYS385.2 both occur on multiple haplogroup backgrounds, and when evaluated within specific haplogroup contexts, delineate new phylogenetic substructure, with DYS449.2 being informative within haplogroup A-P97 and DYS385.2 in haplogroups D-M145, E1b1a-M2, and R1b*-M343. Sequence analysis of variant alleles observed within the various haplogroup backgrounds showed that the nature of the intermediate variant differed, confirming the mutations arose independently. Y-chromosome short tandem repeat intermediate variant alleles, while relatively rare, typically occur on multiple haplogroup backgrounds. This distribution indicates that such mutations arise at a rate generally intermediate to those of binary markers and STR loci. As a result, intermediate-sized Y-STR variants can reveal phylogenetic substructure within the Y-chromosome phylogeny not currently detected by either binary or Y-STR markers alone, but only when such variants are evaluated within a haplogroup context.

  17. Senior-Loken Syndrome in a Saudi Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AlFadhel Majid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Senior-Loken syndrome is a rare syndrome of retinopathy and nephrono-phthisis. The clinical features of this syndrome include renal involvement, ocular involve-ment, retinitis pigmentosa and other systemic involvement. We describe an 11-year-old Saudi girl who was diagnosed to have this syndrome. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of this syndrome from the Arabian Peninsula.

  18. Dental age assessment of Western Saudi children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Amin M. Alshihri; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the London Atlas of Human Tooth Development and Eruption for age estimation in Saudi Arabian children and adolescents (aged 2–20 years), for forensic odontology application. Materials and methods: This cross-sectional survey analyzed orthopantomograms (OPGs) of the complete dentition (including root development) to estimate the deviation from chronological age. Each OPG was de-identified and analyzed individually and classified into age...

  19. Black Carbon Measurement and Modeling in the Arabian Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawad, Faisal Al; Khoder, Mamdouh; Almazroui, Mansour; Alghamdi, Mansour; Lihavainen, Heikki; Hyvarinen, Antti; Henriksson, Svante

    2017-04-01

    Black carbon is an important atmospheric aerosol as an effective factor in public health, changing the global and regional climate, and reducing visibility. Black carbon absorbs light, warms the atmosphere, and modifies cloud droplets and the amount of precipitation. In spite of this significance, knowledge of black carbon over the Arabian Peninsula is hard to find in literature until recently. The total mass of black carbon and wind direction and speeds were measured continuously at Hada Al-Sham, Saudi Arabia for the year 2013. In addition, a state of the art global aerosol - climate model (ECHAM5-HAM) was used to determine black carbon climatology over the Arabian Peninsula. Simulation of the model was carried out for the years eight years (2004 - 2011). The daily mean values of the concentrations of black carbon had a minimum of 15.0 ng/m3 and a maximum of 6372 ng/m3 with a mean of at 1899 ng/m3. The diurnal pattern of black carbon showed higher values overnight, and steady low values during daytimes caused by sea and land breezes. Seasons of black carbon vary over the Arabian Peninsula, and the longest is in the Northern Region where it lasts from July to October. High concentrations of black carbon at Hada Al-Sham was observed with a mean of 1.9 µm/m3, and seasons of black carbon vary widely across the Arabian Peninsula. Assessment of the effects of black carbon over the Arabian Peninsula on the global radiation balance. Initiating a black carbon monitoring network is highly recommended to assess its impacts on health, environment, and climate.

  20. The Karyotype of Microsternarchus aff. bilineatus: A First Case of Y Chromosome Degeneration in Gymnotiformes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Jéssica Almeida; Cardoso, Adauto Lima; Milhomem-Paixão, Susana Suely Rodrigues; Ready, Jonathan Stuart; Pieczarka, Julio Cesar; Nagamachi, Cleusa Yoshiko

    2017-06-01

    Various species and lineages that until recently were identified as Microsternarchus bilineatus (Hypopomidae, Gymnotiformes) have a widespread distribution in the Amazon and Orinoco River basins and across the Guiana shield. Recent molecular studies show five distinct lineages for Microsternarchus from different localities. These results suggest that this previously monotypic genus actually consists of more than one species. Here, we describe the karyotype of M. aff. bilineatus from the Cururutuia River (Bragança, Pará, Brazil). The diploid number of 48 chromosomes (14 meta-submetacentric/34 subtelo-acrocentric) is found for males and females, with an XX/XY sex chromosome system. The nucleolar organizer region is found in the short arm of pair 9. Constitutive heterochromatin occurs in the pericentromeric region of all chromosomes, in the distal region of 3p, 5p, 7p, 8q, 9q, 16q, and Xq, in the interstitial region in 2p, 10q, 11q, and 12q and all along 4p, and in a large block of the Y chromosome. These results indicate extensive karyotype divergence between this population and samples from Igarapé Tarumã Grande (Negro River, Amazonas, Brazil) studied by other researchers. Moreover, despite the diversity of sex chromosome systems found in Gymnotiformes, the XX/XY sex chromosome system of M. aff. bilineatus is the first case of Y chromosome degeneration in this order. The present data are valuable to help understand karyotype evolution in Hypopomidae.

  1. Microdissection and painting of the Y chromosome in spinach (Spinacia oleracea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chuan-Liang; Qin, Rui-Yun; Cao, Ying; Gao, Jun; Li, Shu-Fen; Gao, Wu-Jun; Lu, Long-Dou

    2013-07-01

    Spinach has long been used as a model for genetic and physiological studies of sex determination and expression. Although trisomic analysis from a cross between diploid and triploid plants identified the XY chromosome as the largest chromosome, no direct evidence has been provided to support this at the molecular level. In this study, the largest chromosomes of spinach from mitotic metaphase spreads were microdissected using glass needles. Degenerate oligonucleotide primed polymerase chain reaction was used to amplify the dissected chromosomes. The amplified products from the Y chromosome were identified using the male-specific marker T11A. For the first time, the largest spinach chromosome was confirmed to be a sex chromosome at the molecular level. PCR products from the isolated chromosomes were used in an in situ probe mixture for painting the Y chromosome. The fluorescence signals were mainly distributed on all chromosomes and four pair of weaker punctate fluorescence signal sites were observed on the terminal region of two pair of autosomes. These findings provide a foundation for the study of sex chromosome evolution in spinach.

  2. Breakpoint of a Y chromosome pericentric inversion in the DAZ gene area. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causio, F; Canale, D; Schonauer, L M; Fischetto, R; Leonetti, T; Archidiacono, N

    2000-07-01

    The presence of a spermatogenesis locus (gene or gene complex) in the euchromatic region of the long arm of the Y chromosome (Yq11), defined as azoospermia factor on the basis of gross structural rearrangement, was detected. The gene family responsible for different spermatogenetic defects is "deleted in azoospermia" (DAZ). A 34-year-old man had oligozoospermia, and a cytogenetic analysis carried out on peripheral lymphocytes with G banding revealed a 46,X, inv(Y)(p11q11)karyotype. The relation between the chromosomal breakpoint and the DAZ gene was more precisely defined by a fluorescent in situ hybridization technique. We revealed two signals for the DAZ gene, weaker than normal, one on the short arm and the other on the long arm of the Y chromosome, indicating that the breakpoint was located at the DAZ gene level. This is the first report documenting a chromosomal pericentric inversion with disruption in the DAZ gene area. We hope to obtain information on whether the disruption affects a functional zone of the gene and correlates with oligospermia at the chromosomal level.

  3. Homomorphic sex chromosomes and the intriguing Y chromosome of Ctenomys rodent species (Rodentia, Ctenomyidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Villota, Elkin Y; Pansonato-Alves, José C; Foresti, Fausto; Gallardo, Milton H

    2014-01-01

    Unlike the X chromosome, the mammalian Y chromosome undergoes evolutionary decay resulting in small size. This sex chromosomal heteromorphism, observed in most species of the fossorial rodent Ctenomys, contrasts with the medium-sized, homomorphic acrocentric sex chromosomes of closely related C. maulinus and C. sp. To characterize the sequence composition of these chromosomes, fluorescent banding, self-genomic in situ hybridization, and fluorescent in situ hybridization with an X painting probe were performed on mitotic and meiotic plates. High molecular homology between the sex chromosomes was detected on mitotic material as well as on meiotic plates immunodetected with anti-SYCP3 and anti-γH2AX. The Y chromosome is euchromatic, poor in repetitive sequences and differs from the X by the loss of a block of pericentromeric chromatin. Inferred from the G-banding pattern, an inversion and the concomitant prevention of recombination in a large asynaptic region seems to be crucial for meiotic X chromosome inactivation. These peculiar findings together with the homomorphism of Ctenomys sex chromosomes are discussed in the light of the regular purge that counteracts Muller's ratchet and the probable mechanisms accounting for their origin and molecular homology. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. Y chromosome azoospermia factor region microdeletions and transmission characteristics in azoospermic and severe oligozoospermic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Wei; Wei, Zhen-Tong; Jiang, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Song-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is an essential reproductive process that is regulated by many Y chromosome specific genes. Most of these genes are located in a specific region known as the azoospermia factor region (AZF) in the long arm of the human Y chromosome. AZF microdeletions are recognized as the most frequent structural chromosomal abnormalities and are the major cause of male infertility. Assisted reproductive techniques (ART) such as intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and testicular sperm extraction (TESE) can overcome natural fertilization barriers and help a proportion of infertile couples produce children; however, these techniques increase the transmission risk of genetic defects. AZF microdeletions and their associated phenotypes in infertile males have been extensively studied, and different AZF microdeletion types have been identified by sequence-tagged site polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR), suspension array technology (SAT) and array-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH); however, each of these approaches has limitations that need to be overcome. Even though the transmission of AZF microdeletions has been reported worldwide, arguments correlating ART and the incidence of AZF microdeletions and explaining the occurrence of de novo deletions and expansion have not been resolved. Using the newest findings in the field, this review presents a systematic update concerning progress in understanding the functions of AZF regions and their associated genes, AZF microdeletions and their phenotypes and novel approaches for screening AZF microdeletions. Moreover, the transmission characteristics of AZF microdeletions and the future direction of research in the field will be specifically discussed.

  5. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Walton, Jay R; Parshad, Rana D; Storey, Katie; Boggess, May

    2014-06-01

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species.

  6. Identification of the Sex-Determining Region of the Ceratitis Capitata Y Chromosome by Deletion Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhoeft, U.; Franz, G.

    1996-01-01

    In the medfly Ceratitis capitata, the Y chromosome is responsible for determining the male sex. We have mapped the region containing the relevant factor through the analysis of Y-autosome translocations using fluorescence in situ hybridization with two different probes. One probe, the clone pY114, contains repetitive, Y-specific DNA sequences from C. capitata, while the second clone, pDh2-H8, consists of ribosomal DNA sequences from Drosophila hydei. Clone pY114 labeled most of the long arm and pDh2-H8 hybridizes to the short arm and the centromeric region of the long arm. In 12 of the analyzed 19 Y-autosome translocation strains, adjacent-1 segregation products survive to the late pupal or even adult stage and can, therefore, be sexed. This was correlated with the length of the Y fragment still present in these aberrant individuals and allowed us to map the male-determining factor to a region of the long arm representing ~15% of the entire Y chromosome. No additional factors, affecting for example fertility, were detected outside the male-determining region. PMID:8889534

  7. Analysis of the Trojan Y-Chromosome eradication strategy for an invasive species

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Xueying

    2013-05-24

    The Trojan Y-Chromosome (TYC) strategy, an autocidal genetic biocontrol method, has been proposed to eliminate invasive alien species. In this work, we analyze the dynamical system model of the TYC strategy, with the aim of studying the viability of the TYC eradication and control strategy of an invasive species. In particular, because the constant introduction of sex-reversed trojan females for all time is not possible in practice, there arises the question: What happens if this injection is stopped after some time? Can the invasive species recover? To answer that question, we perform a rigorous bifurcation analysis and study the basin of attraction of the recovery state and the extinction state in both the full model and a certain reduced model. In particular, we find a theoretical condition for the eradication strategy to work. Additionally, the consideration of an Allee effect and the possibility of a Turing instability are also studied in this work. Our results show that: (1) with the inclusion of an Allee effect, the number of the invasive females is not required to be very low when the introduction of the sex-reversed trojan females is stopped, and the remaining Trojan Y-Chromosome population is sufficient to induce extinction of the invasive females; (2) incorporating diffusive spatial spread does not produce a Turing instability, which would have suggested that the TYC eradication strategy might be only partially effective, leaving a patchy distribution of the invasive species. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  8. Characterization of the OmyY1 Region on the Rainbow Trout Y Chromosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth B. Phillips

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We characterized the male-specific region on the Y chromosome of rainbow trout, which contains both sdY (the sex-determining gene and the male-specific genetic marker, OmyY1. Several clones containing the OmyY1 marker were screened from a BAC library from a YY clonal line and found to be part of an 800 kb BAC contig. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, these clones were localized to the end of the short arm of the Y chromosome in rainbow trout, with an additional signal on the end of the X chromosome in many cells. We sequenced a minimum tiling path of these clones using Illumina and 454 pyrosequencing. The region is rich in transposons and rDNA, but also appears to contain several single-copy protein-coding genes. Most of these genes are also found on the X chromosome; and in several cases sex-specific SNPs in these genes were identified between the male (YY and female (XX homozygous clonal lines. Additional genes were identified by hybridization of the BACs to the cGRASP salmonid 4x44K oligo microarray. By BLASTn evaluations using hypothetical transcripts of OmyY1-linked candidate genes as query against several EST databases, we conclude at least 12 of these candidate genes are likely functional, and expressed.

  9. Gene conversion violates the stepwise mutation model for microsatellites in y-chromosomal palindromic repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaresque, Patricia; King, Turi E; Parkin, Emma J; Heyer, Evelyne; Carvalho-Silva, Denise; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; de Knijff, Peter; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A

    2014-05-01

    The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome (MSY) contains eight large inverted repeats (palindromes), in which high-sequence similarity between repeat arms is maintained by gene conversion. These palindromes also harbor microsatellites, considered to evolve via a stepwise mutation model (SMM). Here, we ask whether gene conversion between palindrome microsatellites contributes to their mutational dynamics. First, we study the duplicated tetranucleotide microsatellite DYS385a,b lying in palindrome P4. We show, by comparing observed data with simulated data under a SMM within haplogroups, that observed heteroallelic combinations in which the modal repeat number difference between copies was large, can give rise to homoallelic combinations with zero-repeats difference, equivalent to many single-step mutations. These are unlikely to be generated under a strict SMM, suggesting the action of gene conversion. Second, we show that the intercopy repeat number difference for a large set of duplicated microsatellites in all palindromes in the MSY reference sequence is significantly reduced compared with that for nonpalindrome-duplicated microsatellites, suggesting that the former are characterized by unusual evolutionary dynamics. These observations indicate that gene conversion violates the SMM for microsatellites in palindromes, homogenizing copies within individual Y chromosomes, but increasing overall haplotype diversity among chromosomes within related groups. © 2014 The Authors. *Human Mutation published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Cluster analysis of European Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes using the discrete Laplace method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mikkel Meyer; Eriksen, Poul Svante; Morling, Niels

    2014-01-01

    The European Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype distribution has previously been analysed in various ways. Here, we introduce a new way of analysing population substructure using a new method based on clustering within the discrete Laplace exponential family that models the probabi......The European Y-chromosomal short tandem repeat (STR) haplotype distribution has previously been analysed in various ways. Here, we introduce a new way of analysing population substructure using a new method based on clustering within the discrete Laplace exponential family that models...... the probability distribution of the Y-STR haplotypes. Creating a consistent statistical model of the haplotypes enables us to perform a wide range of analyses. Previously, haplotype frequency estimation using the discrete Laplace method has been validated. In this paper we investigate how the discrete Laplace...... method can be used for cluster analysis to further validate the discrete Laplace method. A very important practical fact is that the calculations can be performed on a normal computer. We identified two sub-clusters of the Eastern and Western European Y-STR haplotypes similar to results of previous...

  11. Y chromosomal haplotype characteristics of domestic sheep (Ovis aries) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yutao; Xu, Lei; Yan, Wei; Li, Shaobin; Wang, Jiqing; Liu, Xiu; Hu, Jiang; Luo, Yuzhu

    2015-07-10

    Investigations on the variation present at the male-specific Y chromosome region provide strong information to understand the origin and evolution of domestic sheep. One SNP OY1 (g.88A>G) in the upstream region of SRY gene, and the microsatellite SRYM18 locus within ovine Y chromosome were analyzed in one hundred and forty five samples collected from eleven breeds in China. SNP OY1 was analyzed using PCR-SSCP method and sequencing. Two different PCR-SSCP patterns represented two specific sequences with sequence analysis revealing SNP-OY1 (g.88A>G) were observed, while SNP A-OY1 showed the most common frequency (82.8%). Sequencing of the SRYM18 region revealed one novel size fragment (A2) with different repetitive units. Seven haplotypes (H4, H5, H6, H7, H8, H9 and H12) and two novel haplotypes (Ha and Hb) were established using combined genotype analysis. H6 showed the highest frequency (43.4%) across all breeds, and H8 showed the second frequency (24.1%). Ha was only found in one breed (Tan), while Hb was present in three breeds (Gansu alpine, White Suffolk and Duolang). Our findings reveal one novel allele in SRYM18 region and two novel male haplotypes of domestic sheep in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene expression, nucleotide composition and codon usage bias of genes associated with human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Monisha Nath; Uddin, Arif; Chakraborty, Supriyo

    2017-06-01

    Analysis of codon usage pattern is important to understand the genetic and evolutionary characteristics of genomes. We have used bioinformatic approaches to analyze the codon usage bias (CUB) of the genes located in human Y chromosome. Codon bias index (CBI) indicated that the overall extent of codon usage bias was low. The relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) analysis suggested that approximately half of the codons out of 59 synonymous codons were most frequently used, and possessed a T or G at the third codon position. The codon usage pattern was different in different genes as revealed from correspondence analysis (COA). A significant correlation between effective number of codons (ENC) and various GC contents suggests that both mutation pressure and natural selection affect the codon usage pattern of genes located in human Y chromosome. In addition, Y-linked genes have significant difference in GC contents at the second and third codon positions, expression level, and codon usage pattern of some codons like the SPANX genes in X chromosome.

  13. Two newly recognized species of Hemidactylus (Squamata, Gekkonidae from the Arabian Peninsula and Sinai, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Smid

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available A recent molecular phylogeny of the Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus revealed that the recently described H. saba and two unnamed Hemidactylus species from Sinai, Saudi Arabia and Yemen form a well-supported monophyletic group within the Arabian radiation of the genus. The name ‘Hemidactylus saba species group’ is suggested for this clade. According to the results of morphological comparisons and the molecular analyses using two mitochondrial (12S and cytb and four nuclear (cmos, mc1r, rag1, rag2 genes, the name Hemidactylus granosus Heyden, 1827 is resurrected from the synonymy of H. turcicus for the Sinai and Saudi Arabian species. The third species of this group from Yemen is described formally as a new species H. ulii sp. n. The phylogenetic relationships of the members of ‘Hemidactylus saba species group’ are evaluated and the distribution and ecology of individual species are discussed.

  14. Y-chromosome polymorphisms and ethnic group - a combined STR and SNP approach in a population sample from northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortellini, Venusia; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cerri, Nicoletta; Marino, Alberto; De Ferrari, Francescoi

    2013-06-01

    To find an association between Y chromosome polymorphisms and some ethnic groups. Short tandem repeats (STR) and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) on the Y chromosome were typed in 311 unrelated men from four different ethnic groups - Italians from northern Italy, Albanians, Africans from the Maghreb region, and Indo-Pakistanis, using the AmpFlSTR® Yfiler PCR Amplification Kit and the SNaPshot Multiplex Kit. STRs analysis found 299 different haplotypes and SNPs analysis 11 different haplogroups. Haplotypes and haplogroups were analyzed and compared between different ethnic groups. Significant differences were found among all the population groups, except between Italians and Indo-Pakistanis and between Albanians and Indo-Pakistanis. Typing both STRs and SNPs on the Y chromosome could become useful in determining ethnic origin of a potential suspect.

  15. Analysis of 62 hybrid assembled human Y chromosomes exposes rapid structural changes and high rates of gene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Skov, Laurits; Maretty, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    and the potentially large role of gene conversion. Here we perform an evolutionary analysis of 62 Y-chromosomes of Danish descent sequenced using a wide range of library insert sizes and high coverage, thus allowing large regions of these chromosomes to be well assembled. These include 17 father-son pairs, which we...... with the chimpanzee Y chromosome. We analyzed 2.7 Mb of large inverted repeats (palindromes) for variation patterns among the two palindrome arms and identified 603 mutation and 416 gene conversions events. We find clear evidence for GC-biased gene conversion in the palindromes (and a balancing AT mutation bias...... that such events can consist of complex combinations of simultaneous insertions and deletions of long stretches of the Y chromosome....

  16. Gender Representation in EFL Textbooks in Saudi Arabia: A Fair Deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaimani, Amjjad

    2017-01-01

    This study explores gender representation in an international English as a Foreign Language (EFL) textbook that has been specifically adapted for the Saudi Arabian context. It aims to investigate gender frequencies in conversations in three dimensions: gender relations, subject positions, and contents. The quantitative data were analysed using…

  17. Technological Leadership Behavior of High School Headteachers in Asir Region, Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkrdem, Mofareh

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the technological leadership behaviors of Saudi Arabian high school regarding the supply and use of educational technologies based on the educational technology standards developed and approved for school headteachers in many countries. The study was carried out with 135 high school headteachers. In the…

  18. Exploring Common Misconceptions and Errors about Fractions among College Students in Saudi Arabia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghazo, Yazan M.; Alghazo, Runna

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate what common errors and misconceptions about fractions exist among Saudi Arabian college students. Moreover, the study aimed at investigating the possible explanations for the existence of such misconceptions among students. A researcher developed mathematical test aimed at identifying common errors…

  19. Y-Chromosome Haplogroups in the Bosnian-Herzegovinian Population Based on 23 Y-STR Loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Serkan; Ašić, Adna; Doğan, Gulsen; Besic, Larisa; Marjanovic, Damir

    2016-07-01

    In a study of the Bosnian-Herzegovinian (B&H) population, Y-chromosome marker frequencies for 100 individuals, generated using the PowerPlex Y23 kit, were used to perform Y-chromosome haplogroup assignment via Whit Athey's Haplogroup Predictor. This algorithm determines Y-chromosome haplogroups from Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (Y-STR) data using a Bayesian probability-based approach. The most frequent haplogroup appeared to be I2a, with a prevalence of 49%, followed by R1a and E1b1b, each accounting for 17% of all haplogroups within the population. Remaining haplogroups were J2a (5%), I1 (4%), R1b (4%), J2b (2%), G2a (1%), and N (1%). These results confirm previously published preliminary B&H population data published over 10 years ago, especially the prediction about the B&H population being a part of the Western Balkan area, which served as the Last Glacial Maximum refuge for the Paleolithic human European population. Furthermore, the results corroborate the hypothesis that this area was a significant stopping point on the "Middle East-Europe highway" during the Neolithic farmer migrations. Finally, since these results are almost completely in accordance with previously published data on B&H and neighboring populations generated by Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphism analysis, it can be concluded that in silico analysis of Y-STRs is a reliable method for approximation of the Y-chromosome haplogroup diversity of an examined population.

  20. Interspecific Y chromosome variation is sufficient to rescue hybrid male sterility and is influenced by the grandparental origin of the chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araripe, L O; Tao, Y; Lemos, B

    2016-06-01

    Y chromosomes display population variation within and between species. Co-evolution within populations is expected to produce adaptive interactions between Y chromosomes and the rest of the genome. One consequence is that Y chromosomes from disparate populations could disrupt harmonious interactions between co-evolved genetic elements and result in reduced male fertility, sterility or inviability. Here we address the contribution of 'heterospecific Y chromosomes' to fertility in hybrid males carrying a homozygous region of Drosophila mauritiana introgressed in the Drosophila simulans background. In order to detect Y chromosome-autosome interactions, which may go unnoticed in a single-species background of autosomes, we constructed hybrid genotypes involving three sister species: Drosophila simulans, D. mauritiana, and D. sechellia. These engineered strains varied due to: (i) species origin of the Y chromosome (D. simulans or D. sechellia); (ii) location of the introgressed D. mauritiana segment on the D. simulans third chromosome, and (iii) grandparental genomic background (three genotypes of D. simulans). We find complex interactions between the species origin of the Y chromosome, the identity of the D. mauritiana segment and the grandparental genetic background donating the chromosomes. Unexpectedly, the interaction of the Y chromosome and one segment of D. mauritiana drastically reduced fertility in the presence of Ysim, whereas the fertility is partially rescued by the Y chromosome of D. sechellia when it descends from a specific grandparental genotype. The restoration of fertility occurs in spite of an autosomal and X-linked genome that is mostly of D. simulans origin. These results illustrate the multifactorial basis of genetic interactions involving the Y chromosome. Our study supports the hypothesis that the Y chromosome can contribute significantly to the evolution of reproductive isolation and highlights the conditional manifestation of infertility in

  1. The indigenous honey bees of Saudi Arabia (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Apis mellifera jemenitica Ruttner): Their natural history and role in beekeeping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqarni, Abdulaziz S; Hannan, Mohammed A; Owayss, Ayman A; Engel, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Apis mellifera jemenitica Ruttner (= yemenitica auctorum: videEngel 1999) has been used in apiculture throughout the Arabian Peninsula since at least 2000 BC. Existing literature demonstrates that these populations are well adapted for the harsh extremes of the region. Populations of Apis mellifera jemenitica native to Saudi Arabia are far more heat tolerant than the standard races often imported from Europe. Central Saudi Arabia has the highest summer temperatures for the Arabian Peninsula, and it is in this region where only Apis mellifera jemenitica survives, while other subspecies fail to persist. The indigenous race of Saudi Arabia differs from other subspecies in the region in some morphological, biological, and behavioral characteristics. Further taxonomic investigation, as well as molecular studies, is needed in order to confirm whether the Saudi indigenous bee populations represent a race distinct from Apis mellifera jemenitica, or merely an ecotype of this subspecies.

  2. The indigenous honey bees of Saudi Arabia (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Apis mellifera jemenitica Ruttner: Their natural history and role in beekeeping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulaziz Alqarni

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Apis mellifera jemenitica Ruttner (= yemenitica auctorum: vide Engel 1999 has been used in apiculture throughout the Arabian Peninsula since at least 2000 BC. Existing literature demonstrates that these populations are well adapted for the harsh extremes of the region. Populations of A. m. jemenitica native to Saudi Arabia are far more heat tolerant than the standard races often imported from Europe. Central Saudi Arabia has the highest summer temperatures for the Arabian Peninsula, and it is in this region where only A. m. jemenitica survives, while other subspecies fail to persist. The indigenous race of Saudi Arabia differs from other subspecies in the region in some morphological, biological, and behavioral characteristics. Further taxonomic investigation, as well as molecular studies, is needed in order to confirm whether the Saudi indigenous bee populations represent a race distinct from A. m. jemenitica, or merely an ecotype of this subspecies.

  3. The lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia: Young volcanism in an old shield

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Zheng

    2016-05-11

    We investigate the lithospheric shear-wave velocity structure of Saudi Arabia by conducting H-κ stacking analysis and jointly inverting teleseismic P-receiver functions and fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave group velocities at 56 broadband stations deployed by the Saudi Geological Survey (SGS). The study region, the Arabian plate, is traditionally divided into the western Arabian shield and the eastern Arabian platform: The Arabian shield itself is a complicated mélange of crustal material, composed of several Proterozoic terrains separated by ophiolite-bearing suture zones and dotted by outcropping Cenozoic volcanic rocks (locally known as harrats). The Arabian platform is primarily covered by 8 to 10 km of Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary rocks. Our results reveal high Vp/Vs ratios in the region of Harrat Lunayyir, which are interpreted as solidified magma intrusions from old magmatic episodes in the shield. Our results also indicate slow velocities and large upper mantle lid temperatures below the southern and northern tips of the Arabian shield, when compared with the values obtained for the central shield. We argue that our inferred patterns of lid velocity and temperature are due to heating by thermal conduction from the Afar plume (and, possibly, the Jordan plume), and that volcanism in western Arabia may result from small-scale adiabatic ascent of magma diapirs.

  4. Implications of inconsistencies between imposed international law and Sharia law in Saudi Arabia, with special reference to copyright law

    OpenAIRE

    Al Nasser, Turki Abdullah M.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis aims to examine the complex relationship between Sharia law and the Saudi Arabian copyright law. It focuses on the implications of the inconsistencies between the law governing intellectual property rights imposed by the TRIPs agreement and Sharia law in Saudi Arabia, specifically as regards copyright law. Original sources from the different schools within Sharia law are analysed in depth to assess their perspectives on conceptions of property, ownership, selling, punishment, grie...

  5. Documentation of ethical conduct of human subject research published in Saudi medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gaai, E A; Hammami, M M; Al Eidan, M

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the documentation of ethical conduct (obtaining institutional review board approval and consent and following ethical guidelines) of human subject research studies published in Saudi Arabian medical journals between 1979 and 2007. Studies were classified as retrospective, prospective noninterventional, interventional or survey/interview. Of 1838 studies published in 286 journal issues of 11 Saudi Arabian medical journals, only 0.9% documented the ethical guidelines followed, with a significantly higher rate for studies published after year 2000 (1.7%). Of 821 studies requiring institutional review board approval, 8.6% documented obtaining the approval and informed consent, with a significantly higher rate for interventional studies (19.4%), post-year 2000 studies (19.7%) and studies performed outside Saudi Arabia (15.9%). The low documentation rate suggests editor's lack of rigor and/or investigators' ignorance of guidelines. The higher documentation rate after year 2000 suggests an ongoing improvement.

  6. An overview of wetlands of Saudi Arabia: Values, threats, and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaid, Sami; Samraoui, Boudjéma; Thomas, Jacob; El-Serehy, Hamed A; Alfarhan, Ahmed H; Schneider, Wolfgang; O'Connell, Mark

    2017-02-01

    The wetlands of Saudi Arabia are located in a water-stressed region that is highly vulnerable to climate and other global changes. Sebkhas, mudflats, mangroves, and wadis are the dominant wetlands in the arid regions of North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. These unique wetlands are recognized as a sanctuary for biodiversity and for their economic services generated from mineral extraction, agriculture, and grazing. Despite their ecological values and societal services, the long-term permanence of Saudi Arabia's wetlands faces strong challenges resulting from human activities associated with sustained population growth, habitat degradation, and coastal development. This paper consolidates a literature review of Saudi Arabia's wetlands from local to global importance, highlights their biodiversity, and identifies threats and evolution of these vulnerable ecosystems in the arid Arabian Peninsula by focusing on the status of key freshwater taxa (Odonata, freshwater fishes, amphibians, and waterbirds) and documenting changes affecting important wetlands.

  7. A Call for More Research from the Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlMarri, Fatemah; Al Sabah, Salman; Al Haddad, Eliana; Vaz, Jonathan D

    2017-08-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic in the Arabian Gulf, with the prevalence of obesity according to the latest report from the World Health Organization (WHO) showing the gulf region to be countries with the highest incidence of obesity in the 30% plus group. This study aims to examine publications on bariatric surgery and compare them with the other countries with a high incidence of obesity in the world. A literature review on bariatric surgery published from the earliest detected year of publication up until March 2016 using SCOPUS, PubMed, Ovid, and Google Scholar was conducted. Individual papers were assessed for types of surgery, preoperative measures, names of journals, authors, and outcomes. The data was analyzed using Endnote library and SPSS. Key words used in the search included "Bariatric Surgery," "Arabian Gulf," "Kuwait," "Qatar," "Saudi Arabia," "United Arab Emirates," "Oman," "USA," "Australia," "weight loss surgery," "sleeve gastrectomy," "gastric bypass," "gastric band," "mini-gastric bypass," "biliropancreatic diversion," "duodenal switch," and "intragastric balloon." Original papers, systematic reviews and case reports were included. From our review, the gastric sleeve proved to be the most popular published on procedure in the Arabian Gulf, whereas the USA had the highest percentage of gastric bypass surgeries and Australia had equivalent numbers when it came to gastric bypass and band. The numbers of studies from Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, UAE, Bahrain, Qatar, and Oman were 70, 44, 20, 7, 6, and 0, respectively. The mean impact factor of the published articles was 2.53 +/- 1.76 SD. Most of the publications were published in Obesity Surgery (29%), Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases (5%), and Surgical Endoscopy (5%). The Arabian Gulf has both the highest percentage of bariatric procedures performed as well as the highest prevalence of obesity. However, they have the lowest number of publications and research when compared to their western

  8. Taiwan Y-chromosomal DNA variation and its relationship with Island Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Much of the data resolution of the haploid non-recombining Y chromosome (NRY) haplogroup O in East Asia are still rudimentary and could be an explanatory factor for current debates on the settlement history of Island Southeast Asia (ISEA). Here, 81 slowly evolving markers (mostly SNPs) and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats were used to achieve higher level molecular resolution. Our aim is to investigate if the distribution of NRY DNA variation in Taiwan and ISEA is consistent with a single pre-Neolithic expansion scenario from Southeast China to all ISEA, or if it better fits an expansion model from Taiwan (the OOT model), or whether a more complex history of settlement and dispersals throughout ISEA should be envisioned. Results We examined DNA samples from 1658 individuals from Vietnam, Thailand, Fujian, Taiwan (Han, plain tribes and 14 indigenous groups), the Philippines and Indonesia. While haplogroups O1a*-M119, O1a1*-P203, O1a2-M50 and O3a2-P201 follow a decreasing cline from Taiwan towards Western Indonesia, O2a1-M95/M88, O3a*-M324, O3a1c-IMS-JST002611 and O3a2c1a-M133 decline northward from Western Indonesia towards Taiwan. Compared to the Taiwan plain tribe minority groups the Taiwanese Austronesian speaking groups show little genetic paternal contribution from Han. They are also characterized by low Y-chromosome diversity, thus testifying for fast drift in these populations. However, in contrast to data provided from other regions of the genome, Y-chromosome gene diversity in Taiwan mountain tribes significantly increases from North to South. Conclusion The geographic distribution and the diversity accumulated in the O1a*-M119, O1a1*-P203, O1a2-M50 and O3a2-P201 haplogroups on one hand, and in the O2a1-M95/M88, O3a*-M324, O3a1c-IMS-JST002611 and O3a2c1a-M133 haplogroups on the other, support a pincer model of dispersals and gene flow from the mainland to the islands which likely started during the late upper Paleolithic, 18,000 to 15

  9. Saudi Arabia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidt, Martin

    2017-01-01

    . Private sector focus, privatization of state owned entities and salary cuts in the public sector were proposed. But the item that drew most attention was the plan to sell a 5 per cent stake in the oil company Saudi Aramco, the national pride of the Kingdom, which was seen by many as selling the family...... silver. Later in 2016 the Vision 2030 plan was followed by the National Transformation Plan 2020 which is a far more detailed plan or operational plan, posting specific benchmarks and targets for the economy in order to fulfill the aims of the Vision 2030....

  10. Rabies in Saudi Arabia: a need for epidemiological data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziad A. Memish

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rabies is endemic in animals in the Arabian Peninsula. Although Saudi Arabia is the largest country in the Peninsula, little has been published about the rabies situation in the country. A total of 11 069 animal bites to humans were reported during 2007–2009, and 40 animals suspected of rabies were examined for rabies infection from 2005 through 2010. Results suggest that animal-related injuries in Saudi Arabia remain a public health problem, with feral dogs accounting for the majority of bites to humans and for the majority of animals found to be rabid. Over the last 10 years, no confirmed human rabies case has been reported. More detailed information about the epidemiology of animal bites and that of animal rabies in Saudi Arabia would be of great interest, notably to provide a basis on which vaccination recommendations could be made for the numerous international travellers visiting the country.

  11. An ultra-high discrimination Y chromosome short tandem repeat multiplex DNA typing system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K Hanson

    Full Text Available In forensic casework, Y chromosome short tandem repeat markers (Y-STRs are often used to identify a male donor DNA profile in the presence of excess quantities of female DNA, such as is found in many sexual assault investigations. Commercially available Y-STR multiplexes incorporating 12-17 loci are currently used in forensic casework (Promega's PowerPlex Y and Applied Biosystems' AmpFlSTR Yfiler. Despite the robustness of these commercial multiplex Y-STR systems and the ability to discriminate two male individuals in most cases, the coincidence match probabilities between unrelated males are modest compared with the standard set of autosomal STR markers. Hence there is still a need to develop new multiplex systems to supplement these for those cases where additional discriminatory power is desired or where there is a coincidental Y-STR match between potential male participants. Over 400 Y-STR loci have been identified on the Y chromosome. While these have the potential to increase the discrimination potential afforded by the commercially available kits, many have not been well characterized. In the present work, 91 loci were tested for their relative ability to increase the discrimination potential of the commonly used 'core' Y-STR loci. The result of this extensive evaluation was the development of an ultra high discrimination (UHD multiplex DNA typing system that allows for the robust co-amplification of 14 non-core Y-STR loci. Population studies with a mixed African American and American Caucasian sample set (n = 572 indicated that the overall discriminatory potential of the UHD multiplex was superior to all commercial kits tested. The combined use of the UHD multiplex and the Applied Biosystems' AmpFlSTR Yfiler kit resulted in 100% discrimination of all individuals within the sample set, which presages its potential to maximally augment currently available forensic casework markers. It could also find applications in human evolutionary

  12. Validation of a reaction volume reduction protocol for analysis of Y chromosome haplotypes targeting DNA databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, C A; Oliveira, T C; Crovella, S; Santos, S M; Rabêlo, K C N; Soriano, E P; Carvalho, M V D; Junior, A F Caldas; Porto, G G; Campello, R I C; Antunes, A A; Queiroz, R A; Souza, S M

    2017-04-28

    The use of Y chromosome haplotypes, important for the detection of sexual crimes in forensics, has gained prominence with the use of databases that incorporate these genetic profiles in their system. Here, we optimized and validated an amplification protocol for Y chromosome profile retrieval in reference samples using lesser materials than those in commercial kits. FTA(®) cards (Flinders Technology Associates) were used to support the oral cells of male individuals, which were amplified directly using the SwabSolution reagent (Promega). First, we optimized and validated the process to define the volume and cycling conditions. Three reference samples and nineteen 1.2 mm-diameter perforated discs were used per sample. Amplification of one or two discs (samples) with the PowerPlex(®) Y23 kit (Promega) was performed using 25, 26, and 27 thermal cycles. Twenty percent, 32%, and 100% reagent volumes, one disc, and 26 cycles were used for the control per sample. Thereafter, all samples (N = 270) were amplified using 27 cycles, one disc, and 32% reagents (optimized conditions). Data was analyzed using a study of equilibrium values between fluorophore colors. In the samples analyzed with 20% volume, an imbalance was observed in peak heights, both inside and in-between each dye. In samples amplified with 32% reagents, the values obtained for the intra-color and inter-color standard balance calculations for verification of the quality of the analyzed peaks were similar to those of samples amplified with 100% of the recommended volume. The quality of the profiles obtained with 32% reagents was suitable for insertion into databases.

  13. Y-chromosome evidence supports asymmetric dog introgression into eastern coyotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeldon, Tyler J; Rutledge, Linda Y; Patterson, Brent R; White, Bradley N; Wilson, Paul J

    2013-09-01

    Hybridization has played an important role in the evolutionary history of Canis species in eastern North America. Genetic evidence of coyote-dog hybridization based on mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is lacking compared to that based on autosomal markers. This discordance suggests dog introgression into coyotes has potentially been male biased, but this hypothesis has not been formally tested. Therefore, we investigated biparentally, maternally, and paternally inherited genetic markers in a sample of coyotes and dogs from southeastern Ontario to assess potential asymmetric dog introgression into coyotes. Analysis of autosomal microsatellite genotypes revealed minimal historical and contemporary admixture between coyotes and dogs. We observed only mutually exclusive mtDNA haplotypes in coyotes and dogs, but we observed Y-chromosome haplotypes (Y-haplotypes) in both historical and contemporary coyotes that were also common in dogs. Species-specific Zfy intron sequences of Y-haplotypes shared between coyotes and dogs confirmed their homology and indicated a putative origin from dogs. We compared Y-haplotypes observed in coyotes, wolves, and dogs profiled in multiple studies, and observed that the Y-haplotypes shared between coyotes and dogs were either absent or rare in North American wolves, present in eastern coyotes, but absent in western coyotes. We suggest the eastern coyote has experienced asymmetric genetic introgression from dogs, resulting from predominantly historical hybridization with male dogs and subsequent backcrossing of hybrid offspring with coyotes. We discuss the temporal and spatial dynamics of coyote-dog hybridization and the conditions that may have facilitated the introgression of dog Y-chromosomes into coyotes. Our findings clarify the evolutionary history of the eastern coyote.

  14. Isodicentric Y chromosomes in Egyptian patients with disorders of sex development (DSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekkawy, Mona; Kamel, Alaa; El-Ruby, Mona; Mohamed, Amal; Essawi, Mona; Soliman, Hala; Dessouky, Nabil; Shehab, Marwa; Mazen, Inas

    2012-07-01

    Isodicentric chromosome formation is the most common structural abnormality of the Y chromosome. As dicentrics are mitotically unstable, they are subsequently lost during cell division resulting in mosaicism with a 45,X cell line. We report on six patients with variable signs of disorders of sex development (DSD) including ambiguous genitalia, short stature, primary amenorrhea, and male infertility with azoospermia. Cytogenetic studies showed the presence of a sex chromosome marker in all patients; associated with a 45,X cell line in five of them. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique was used to determine the structure and the breakage sites of the markers that all proved to be isodicentric Y chromosomes. Three patients, were found to have similar breakpoints: idic Y(qter→ p11.32:: p11.32→ qter), two of them presented with ambiguous genitalia and were found to have ovotesticular DSD, while the third presented with short stature and hypomelanosis of Ito. One female patient presenting with primary amenorrhea, Turner manifestations and ambiguous genitalia revealed the breakpoint: idic Y (pter→q11.1::q11.1→pter). The same breakpoint was detected in a male with azoospermia but in non-mosaic form. An infant with ambiguous genitalia and mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD) had the breakpoint at Yq11.2: idic Y(pter→q11.2::q11.2→pter). SRY signals were detected in all patients. Sequencing of the SRY gene was carried out for three patients with normal results. This study emphasizes the importance of FISH analysis in the diagnosis of patients with DSD as well as the establishment of the relationship between phenotype and karyotype. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Unexpected island effects at an extreme: reduced Y chromosome and mitochondrial DNA diversity in Nias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oven, Mannis; Hämmerle, Johannes M; van Schoor, Marja; Kushnick, Geoff; Pennekamp, Petra; Zega, Idaman; Lao, Oscar; Brown, Lea; Kennerknecht, Ingo; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-04-01

    The amount of genetic diversity in a population is determined by demographic and selection events in its history. Human populations which exhibit greatly reduced overall genetic diversity, presumably resulting from severe bottlenecks or founder events, are particularly interesting, not least because of their potential to serve as valuable resources for health studies. Here, we present an unexpected case, the human population of Nias Island in Indonesia, that exhibits severely reduced Y chromosome (non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome [NRY]) and to a lesser extent also reduced mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diversity as compared with most other populations from the Asia/Oceania region. Our genetic data, collected from more than 400 individuals from across the island, suggest a strong previously undetected bottleneck or founder event in the human population history of Nias, more pronounced for males than for females, followed by subsequent genetic isolation. Our findings are unexpected given the island's geographic proximity to the genetically highly diverse Southeast Asian world, as well as our previous knowledge about the human history of Nias. Furthermore, all NRY and virtually all mtDNA haplogroups observed in Nias can be attributed to the Austronesian expansion, in line with linguistic data, and in contrast with archaeological evidence for a pre-Austronesian occupation of Nias that, as we show here, left no significant genetic footprints in the contemporary population. Our work underlines the importance of human genetic diversity studies not only for a better understanding of human population history but also because of the potential relevance for genetic disease-mapping studies.

  16. Indigenous and foreign Y-chromosomes characterize the Lingayat and Vokkaliga populations of Southwest India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chennakrishnaiah, Shilpa; Perez, David; Gayden, Tenzin; Rivera, Luis; Regueiro, Maria; Herrera, Rene J

    2013-09-10

    Previous studies have shown that India's vast coastal rim played an important role in the dispersal of modern humans out of Africa but the Karnataka state, which is located on the southwest coast of India, remains poorly characterized genetically. In the present study, two Dravidian populations, namely Lingayat (N=101) and Vokkaliga (N=102), who represent the two major communities of the Karnataka state, were examined using high-resolution analyses of Y-chromosome single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs) and seventeen short tandem repeat (Y-STR) loci. Our results revealed that the majority of the Lingayat and Vokkaliga paternal gene pools are composed of four Y-chromosomal haplogroups (H, L, F* and R2) that are frequent in the Indian subcontinent. The high level of L1-M76 chromosomes in the Vokkaligas suggests an agricultural expansion in the region, while the predominance of R1a1a1b2-Z93 and J2a-M410 lineages in the Lingayat indicates gene flow from neighboring south Indian populations and West Asia, respectively. Lingayat (0.9981) also exhibits a relatively high haplotype diversity compared to Vokkaliga (0.9901), supporting the historical record that the Lingayat originated from multiple source populations. In addition, we detected ancient lineages such as F*-M213, H*-M69 and C*-M216 that may be indicative of genetic signatures of the earliest settlers who reached India after their migration out of Africa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Copy number variation arising from gene conversion on the human Y chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wentao; Massaia, Andrea; Louzada, Sandra; Banerjee, Ruby; Hallast, Pille; Chen, Yuan; Bergström, Anders; Gu, Yong; Leonard, Steven; Quail, Michael A; Ayub, Qasim; Yang, Fengtang; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Xue, Yali

    2018-01-01

    We describe the variation in copy number of a ~ 10 kb region overlapping the long intergenic noncoding RNA (lincRNA) gene, TTTY22, within the IR3 inverted repeat on the short arm of the human Y chromosome, leading to individuals with 0-3 copies of this region in the general population. Variation of this CNV is common, with 266 individuals having 0 copies, 943 (including the reference sequence) having 1, 23 having 2 copies, and two having 3 copies, and was validated by breakpoint PCR, fibre-FISH, and 10× Genomics Chromium linked-read sequencing in subsets of 1234 individuals from the 1000 Genomes Project. Mapping the changes in copy number to the phylogeny of these Y chromosomes previously established by the Project identified at least 20 mutational events, and investigation of flanking paralogous sequence variants showed that the mutations involved flanking sequences in 18 of these, and could extend over > 30 kb of DNA. While either gene conversion or double crossover between misaligned sister chromatids could formally explain the 0-2 copy events, gene conversion is the more likely mechanism, and these events include the longest non-allelic gene conversion reported thus far. Chromosomes with three copies of this CNV have arisen just once in our data set via another mechanism: duplication of 420 kb that places the third copy 230 kb proximal to the existing proximal copy. Our results establish gene conversion as a previously under-appreciated mechanism of generating copy number changes in humans and reveal the exceptionally large size of the conversion events that can occur.

  18. Presence of three different paternal lineages among North Indians: a study of 560 Y chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongming; Khan, Faisal; Borkar, Minal; Herrera, Rene; Agrawal, Suraksha

    2009-01-01

    The genetic structure, affinities, and diversity of the 1 billion Indians hold important keys to numerous unanswered questions regarding the evolution of human populations and the forces shaping contemporary patterns of genetic variation. Although there have been several recent studies of South Indian caste groups, North Indian caste groups, and South Indian Muslims using Y-chromosomal markers, overall, the Indian population has still not been well studied compared to other geographical populations. In particular, no genetic study has been conducted on Shias and Sunnis from North India. This study aims to investigate genetic variation and the gene pool in North Indians. A total of 32 Y-chromosomal markers in 560 North Indian males collected from three higher caste groups (Brahmins, Chaturvedis and Bhargavas) and two Muslims groups (Shia and Sunni) were genotyped. Three distinct lineages were revealed based upon 13 haplogroups. The first was a Central Asian lineage harbouring haplogroups R1 and R2. The second lineage was of Middle-Eastern origin represented by haplogroups J2*, Shia-specific E1b1b1, and to some extent G* and L*. The third was the indigenous Indian Y-lineage represented by haplogroups H1*, F*, C* and O*. Haplogroup E1b1b1 was observed in Shias only. The results revealed that a substantial part of today's North Indian paternal gene pool was contributed by Central Asian lineages who are Indo-European speakers, suggesting that extant Indian caste groups are primarily the descendants of Indo-European migrants. The presence of haplogroup E in Shias, first reported in this study, suggests a genetic distinction between the two Indo Muslim sects. The findings of the present study provide insights into prehistoric and early historic patterns of migration into India and the evolution of Indian populations in recent history.

  19. Y chromosome haplogroup distribution in Indo-European speaking tribes of Gujarat, western India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, Priyanka; Aggarwal, Aastha; Mitra, Siuli; Italia, Yazdi M; Saraswathy, Kallur N; Chandrasekar, Adimoolam; Kshatriya, Gautam K

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out in the Indo-European speaking tribal population groups of Southern Gujarat, India to investigate and reconstruct their paternal population structure and population histories. The role of language, ethnicity and geography in determining the observed pattern of Y haplogroup clustering in the study populations was also examined. A set of 48 bi-allelic markers on the non-recombining region of Y chromosome (NRY) were analysed in 284 males; representing nine Indo-European speaking tribal populations. The genetic structure of the populations revealed that none of these groups was overtly admixed or completely isolated. However, elevated haplogroup diversity and FST value point towards greater diversity and differentiation which suggests the possibility of early demographic expansion of the study groups. The phylogenetic analysis revealed 13 paternal lineages, of which six haplogroups: C5, H1a*, H2, J2, R1a1* and R2 accounted for a major portion of the Y chromosome diversity. The higher frequency of the six haplogroups and the pattern of clustering in the populations indicated overlapping of haplogroups with West and Central Asian populations. Other analyses undertaken on the population affiliations revealed that the Indo-European speaking populations along with the Dravidian speaking groups of southern India have an influence on the tribal groups of Gujarat. The vital role of geography in determining the distribution of Y lineages was also noticed. This implies that although language plays a vital role in determining the distribution of Y lineages, the present day linguistic affiliation of any population in India for reconstructing the demographic history of the country should be considered with caution.

  20. Y-chromosome diversity in modern Bulgarians: new clues about their ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sena Karachanak

    Full Text Available To better define the structure and origin of the Bulgarian paternal gene pool, we have examined the Y-chromosome variation in 808 Bulgarian males. The analysis was performed by high-resolution genotyping of biallelic markers and by analyzing the STR variation within the most informative haplogroups. We found that the Y-chromosome gene pool in modern Bulgarians is primarily represented by Western Eurasian haplogroups with ∼ 40% belonging to haplogroups E-V13 and I-M423, and 20% to R-M17. Haplogroups common in the Middle East (J and G and in South Western Asia (R-L23* occur at frequencies of 19% and 5%, respectively. Haplogroups C, N and Q, distinctive for Altaic and Central Asian Turkic-speaking populations, occur at the negligible frequency of only 1.5%. Principal Component analyses group Bulgarians with European populations, apart from Central Asian Turkic-speaking groups and South Western Asia populations. Within the country, the genetic variation is structured in Western, Central and Eastern Bulgaria indicating that the Balkan Mountains have been permeable to human movements. The lineage analysis provided the following interesting results: (i R-L23* is present in Eastern Bulgaria since the post glacial period; (ii haplogroup E-V13 has a Mesolithic age in Bulgaria from where it expanded after the arrival of farming; (iii haplogroup J-M241 probably reflects the Neolithic westward expansion of farmers from the earliest sites along the Black Sea. On the whole, in light of the most recent historical studies, which indicate a substantial proto-Bulgarian input to the contemporary Bulgarian people, our data suggest that a common paternal ancestry between the proto-Bulgarians and the Altaic and Central Asian Turkic-speaking populations either did not exist or was negligible.

  1. Analysis of 62 hybrid assembled human Y chromosomes exposes rapid structural changes and high rates of gene conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Izarzugaza, Jose Maria; Skov, Laurits; Maretty, Lasse

    2017-01-01

    The human Y-chromosome does not recombine across its male-specific part and is therefore an excellent marker of human migrations. It also plays an important role in male fertility. However, its evolution is difficult to fully understand because of repetitive sequences, inverted repeats...

  2. Finding the founder of Stockholm - A kinship study based on Y-chromosomal, autosomal and mitochondrial DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malmström, Helena; Vretemark, Maria; Tillmar, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    , massive clonal data, the c-statistics, and real-time quantitative data. We show that the males carry the same Y-chromosomal haplogroup and thus we cannot reject a father-son type of relation. Further, as shown by the mtDNA analyses, none of the individuals are maternally related. We conclude...

  3. Loss of the Y-chromosome in the primary metastasis of a male sex cord stromal tumor : Pathogenetic implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaff, WE; van Echten, J; van der Veen, AY; Sleijfer, DT; Timmer, A; de Jong, B; Schraffordt Koops, H.

    1999-01-01

    The first published chromosomal pattern of the retroperitoneal lymph node metastasis of a malignant gonadal stroma cell tumor of the adult testis is presented. Karyotyping showed structural chromosomal abnormalities and loss of the Y-chromosome. This loss was confirmed in primary tumor and

  4. Analysis of Turner syndrome patients within the Jordanian population, with a focus on four patients with Y chromosome abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daggag, H; Srour, W; El-Khateeb, M; Ajlouni, K

    2013-01-01

    This study presents findings in Turner syndrome (TS) patients from the Jordanian population, with focus on 4 patients with Y chromosomal abnormalities. From 1989 to 2011, 504 patients with TS stigmata were referred to our institute for karyotyping, resulting in 142 positive TS cases. Of these, 62 (43.7%) had the typical 45,X karyotype and the remaining individuals (56.3%) were found to be mosaics. Fifteen TS patients (10.5%) carried a structural abnormality of the Y chromosome and presented with the mosaic 45,X/46,XY karyotype. From these, 4 TS cases were investigated further. Karyotyping revealed that 1 patient carried a small supernumerary marker chromosome, whereas cytogenetic and molecular analyses showed that 3 patients carried 2 copies of the SRY gene. Further analysis by SRY sequencing revealed no mutations within the gene. The analyzed patients were found to be phenotypically either females or males, depending on the predominance of the cell line carrying the Y chromosome. This study demonstrates the importance of detailed cytogenetic analysis (such as FISH) in TS patients, and it also emphasizes the need for molecular analysis (such as PCR and sequencing) when fragments of the Y chromosome are present. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Dual Origins of Dairy Cattle Farming – Evidence from a Comprehensive Survey of European Y-Chromosomal Variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, Ceiridwen J; Genja, Catarina; Kantanen, Juha

    2011-01-01

    Background: Diversity patterns of livestock species are informative to the history of agriculture and indicate uniqueness of breeds as relevant for conservation. So far, most studies on cattle have focused on mitochondrial and autosomal DNA variation. Previous studies of Y-chromosomal variation, ...

  6. The male-specific region of the human Y chromosome is a mosaic of discrete sequence classes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Skaletsky, Helen; Kuroda-Kawaguchi, Tomoko; Minx, Patrick J.; Cordum, Holland S.; Hillier, LaDeana; Brown, Laura G.; Repping, Sjoerd; Pyntikova, Tatyana; Ali, Johar; Bieri, Tamberlyn; Chinwalla, Asif; Delehaunty, Andrew; Delehaunty, Kim; Du, Hui; Fewell, Ginger; Fulton, Lucinda; Fulton, Robert; Graves, Tina; Hou, Shun-Fang; Latrielle, Philip; Leonard, Shawn; Mardis, Elaine; Maupin, Rachel; McPherson, John; Miner, Tracie; Nash, William; Nguyen, Christine; Ozersky, Philip; Pepin, Kymberlie; Rock, Susan; Rohlfing, Tracy; Scott, Kelsi; Schultz, Brian; Strong, Cindy; Tin-Wollam, Aye; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Waterston, Robert H.; Wilson, Richard K.; Rozen, Steve; Page, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The male-specific region of the Y chromosome, the MSY, differentiates the sexes and comprises 95% of the chromosome's length. Here, we report that the MSY is a mosaic of heterochromatic sequences and three classes of euchromatic sequences: X-transposed, X-degenerate and ampliconic. These classes

  7. Y-chromosome lineages from Portugal, Madeira and Açores record elements of Sephardim and Berber ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Rita; Freitas, Ana; Branco, Marta; Rosa, Alexandra; Fernandes, Ana T; Zhivotovsky, Lev A; Underhill, Peter A; Kivisild, Toomas; Brehm, António

    2005-07-01

    A total of 553 Y-chromosomes were analyzed from mainland Portugal and the North Atlantic Archipelagos of Açores and Madeira, in order to characterize the genetic composition of their male gene pool. A large majority (78-83% of each population) of the male lineages could be classified as belonging to three basic Y chromosomal haplogroups, R1b, J, and E3b. While R1b, accounting for more than half of the lineages in any of the Portuguese sub-populations, is a characteristic marker of many different West European populations, haplogroups J and E3b consist of lineages that are typical of the circum-Mediterranean region or even East Africa. The highly diverse haplogroup E3b in Portuguese likely combines sub-clades of distinct origins. The present composition of the Y chromosomes in Portugal in this haplogroup likely reflects a pre-Arab component shared with North African populations or testifies, at least in part, to the influence of Sephardic Jews. In contrast to the marginally low sub-Saharan African Y chromosome component in Portuguese, such lineages have been detected at a moderately high frequency in our previous survey of mtDNA from the same samples, indicating the presence of sex-related gene flow, most likely mediated by the Atlantic slave trade.

  8. Microarray Analysis of Copy Number Variants on the Human Y Chromosome Reveals Novel and Frequent Duplications Overrepresented in Specific Haplogroups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin M Johansson

    Full Text Available The human Y chromosome is almost always excluded from genome-wide investigations of copy number variants (CNVs due to its highly repetitive structure. This chromosome should not be forgotten, not only for its well-known relevance in male fertility, but also for its involvement in clinical phenotypes such as cancers, heart failure and sex specific effects on brain and behaviour.We analysed Y chromosome data from Affymetrix 6.0 SNP arrays and found that the signal intensities for most of 8179 SNP/CN probes in the male specific region (MSY discriminated between a male, background signals in a female and an isodicentric male containing a large deletion of the q-arm and a duplication of the p-arm of the Y chromosome. Therefore, this SNP/CN platform is suitable for identification of gain and loss of Y chromosome sequences. In a set of 1718 males, we found 25 different CNV patterns, many of which are novel. We confirmed some of these variants by PCR or qPCR. The total frequency of individuals with CNVs was 14.7%, including 9.5% with duplications, 4.5% with deletions and 0.7% exhibiting both. Hence, a novel observation is that the frequency of duplications was more than twice the frequency of deletions. Another striking result was that 10 of the 25 detected variants were significantly overrepresented in one or more haplogroups, demonstrating the importance to control for haplogroups in genome-wide investigations to avoid stratification. NO-M214(xM175 individuals presented the highest percentage (95% of CNVs. If they were not counted, 12.4% of the rest included CNVs, and the difference between duplications (8.9% and deletions (2.8% was even larger.Our results demonstrate that currently available genome-wide SNP platforms can be used to identify duplications and deletions in the human Y chromosome. Future association studies of the full spectrum of Y chromosome variants will demonstrate the potential involvement of gain or loss of Y chromosome sequence in

  9. Semen says: assessing the accuracy of adolescents' self-reported sexual abstinence using a semen Y-chromosome biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Janet E; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Rose, Eve; Wingood, Gina M; DiClemente, Ralph J

    2017-03-01

    Researchers often assess condom use only among participants who report recent sexual behaviour, excluding participants who report no recent vaginal sex or who did not answer questions about their sexual behaviour, but self-reported sexual behaviour may be inaccurate. This study uses a semen Y-chromosome biomarker to assess semen exposure among participants who reported sexual abstinence or did not report their sexual behaviour. This prospective cohort study uses data from 715 sexually active African-American female adolescents in Atlanta, surveyed at baseline, 6 months and 12 months. Participants completed a 40 min interview and were tested for semen Y-chromosome with PCR from a self-administered vaginal swab. We predicted Y-chromosome test results from self-reported sexual behaviour using within-subject panel regression. Among the participants who reported abstinence from vaginal sex in the past 14 days, 9.4% tested positive for semen Y-chromosome. Among item non-respondents, 6.3% tested positive for semen Y-chromosome. Women who reported abstinence and engaged in item non-response regarding their sexual behaviour had respectively 62% and 78% lower odds of testing positive for Y-chromosome (OR 0.38 (0.21 to 0.67), OR 0.22 (0.12 to 0.40)), controlling for smoking, survey wave and non-coital sexual behaviours reported during abstinence. Adolescents who report sexual abstinence under-report semen exposure. Research should validate self-reported sexual behaviour with biomarkers. Adolescents who engage in item non-response regarding vaginal sex test positive for semen Y-chromosome at similar rates, which supports the practice of grouping non-respondents with adolescents reporting abstinence in statistical analysis. NCT00633906. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Genome-Wide Search Identifies 1.9 Mb from the Polar Bear Y Chromosome for Evolutionary Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidon, Tobias; Schreck, Nancy; Hailer, Frank; Nilsson, Maria A; Janke, Axel

    2015-05-27

    The male-inherited Y chromosome is the major haploid fraction of the mammalian genome, rendering Y-linked sequences an indispensable resource for evolutionary research. However, despite recent large-scale genome sequencing approaches, only a handful of Y chromosome sequences have been characterized to date, mainly in model organisms. Using polar bear (Ursus maritimus) genomes, we compare two different in silico approaches to identify Y-linked sequences: 1) Similarity to known Y-linked genes and 2) difference in the average read depth of autosomal versus sex chromosomal scaffolds. Specifically, we mapped available genomic sequencing short reads from a male and a female polar bear against the reference genome and identify 112 Y-chromosomal scaffolds with a combined length of 1.9 Mb. We verified the in silico findings for the longer polar bear scaffolds by male-specific in vitro amplification, demonstrating the reliability of the average read depth approach. The obtained Y chromosome sequences contain protein-coding sequences, single nucleotide polymorphisms, microsatellites, and transposable elements that are useful for evolutionary studies. A high-resolution phylogeny of the polar bear patriline shows two highly divergent Y chromosome lineages, obtained from analysis of the identified Y scaffolds in 12 previously published male polar bear genomes. Moreover, we find evidence of gene conversion among ZFX and ZFY sequences in the giant panda lineage and in the ancestor of ursine and tremarctine bears. Thus, the identification of Y-linked scaffold sequences from unordered genome sequences yields valuable data to infer phylogenomic and population-genomic patterns in bears. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  11. Genetic aspects of human male infertility: the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in severe male factor infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicdan, Arzu; Vicdan, Kubilay; Günalp, Serdar; Kence, Aykut; Akarsu, Cem; Işik, Ahmet Zeki; Sözen, Eran

    2004-11-10

    The main purpose of this study is to detect the frequency and type of both chromosomal abnormalities and Y chromosome microdeletions in patients with severe male factor infertility and fertile control subjects. The association between the genetic abnormality and clinical parameters was also evaluated. This study was carried out in 208 infertile and 20 fertile men. Results of 208 patients, 119 had non-obstructive azoospermia and 89 had severe oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT). Seventeen out of 119 (14.3%) azoospermic patients and two out of 89 (2.2%) patients with OAT had Y chromosome microdeletions. In total, 19 cases with deletions were detected in 208 infertile men, with a frequency of 9.1%. The AZFc locus, mainly DAZ gene cluster was the most frequently deleted region. Five other cases with azoospermia (4.2%) and two cases with OAT (2.2%) had a chromosomal abnormality, with a total number of seven (3.4%). Including Y chromosome deletions and structural chromosome abnormalities, the rate of genetic abnormalities was 12.5% (26/208) in our patients. On the other hand, 20 men with proven fertility and fathers of five cases with microdeletions were genetically normal. Y chromosome deletions and chromosomal abnormalities were associated with various histological alterations in testis. Sertoli cell-only (SCO) syndrome and maturation arrest predominated in these cases, whereas hypospermatogenesis occurred more frequently in genetically normal patients. Various chromosomal abnormalities and deletions of Y chromosome can cause spermatogenic breakdown resulting in chromosomally derived infertility. All these findings strongly support the recommendation of genetic screening of infertile patients.

  12. Y-chromosome DNA is present in the blood of female dogs suggesting the presence of fetal microchimerism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra M Axiak-Bechtel

    Full Text Available Fetal microchimerism has been suggested to play contradictory roles in women's health, with factors including age of the recipient, time elapsed since microchimerism occurred, and microchimeric cell type modulating disease. Both beneficial and harmful effects have been identified in wound healing and tissue regeneration, immune mediated disease, and cancer. This area of research is relatively new, and hindered by the time course from occurrence of fetal microchimerism to the multi-factorial development of disease. Dogs represent an excellent model for study of fetal microchimerism, as they share our environment, have a naturally condensed lifespan, and spontaneously develop immune-mediated diseases and cancers similar to their human counterparts. However, fetal microchimerism has not been described in dogs. These experiments sought preliminary evidence that dogs develop fetal microchimerism following pregnancy. We hypothesized that Y chromosomal DNA would be detected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of female dogs collected within two months of parturition. We further hypothesized that Y chromosomal DNA would be detected in banked whole blood DNA samples from parous female Golden Retrievers with at least one male puppy in a prior litter. Amplification of DNA extracted from five female Golden Retrievers that had whelped within the two months prior to collection revealed strong positive bands for the Y chromosome. Of banked, parous samples, 36% yielded positive bands for the Y chromosome. This is the first report of persistent Y chromosomal DNA in post-partum female dogs and these results suggest that fetal microchimerism occurs in the canine species. Evaluation of the contributions of fetal microchimeric cells to disease processes in dogs as a model for human disease is warranted.

  13. Desalination impacts on the coastal environment: Ash Shuqayq, Saudi Arabia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alharbi, O.A., E-mail: omar.alharbi@smu.ac.uk [Faculty of Applied Design and Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea Metropolitan University, Swansea, Wales SA1 6ED (United Kingdom); Phillips, M.R., E-mail: m.phillips@smu.ac.uk [Faculty of Applied Design and Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea Metropolitan University, Swansea, Wales SA1 6ED (United Kingdom); Williams, A.T., E-mail: allan.williams@smu.ac.uk [Faculty of Applied Design and Engineering, University of Wales, Swansea Metropolitan University, Swansea, Wales SA1 6ED (United Kingdom); Gheith, A.M., E-mail: amingheith@mans.edu.eg [Geology Department, Faculty of Science, Mansoura University, Mansoura (Egypt); Bantan, R.A., E-mail: rbantan@kau.edu.sa [Marine Geology Department, Faculty of Marine Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Rasul, N.M., E-mail: rasul.nm@sgs.org.sa [Saudi Geological Survey, Centre for Marine Geology, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-04-01

    Ash Shuqayq (Saudi Red Sea coast) is approximately 28 km long and characterised by narrow rocky headlands with intermittent pocket beaches. Fifty-two sediment samples from six different environments (beach, dune, sabkha, tidal/lagoon, offshore and wadi) were analysed. Testing showed that beach and dune sands are mainly medium to fine grained, with some very coarse sand (MZ = - 0.59o). Both beach and dune sands are moderately well to moderately sorted, although some are poorly sorted due to an influx of wadi sediments. Sediment source together with littoral reworking contributed to grain size variation. Carbonate content varied between 1.5% and 23%, whilst the organic content varied between 1.1% and 13%. Spatial analysis showed increasing southward carbonate and organic content, with both correlated (r = 0.57). Sabkha sediments had significantly higher carbonate percentages (t = 2.898; df = 18; p < 0.01) and results suggested origins are similar for both UAE Arabian Sea and Saudi Arabian Red Sea coasts. X-ray diffractions show beach and dune sediments are mainly composed of detrital quartz and plagioclase feldspar with uncommon amounts of chlorites. Analysis of sediment characteristics, composition and shoreline distribution alongside coastal processes, indicate that high chlorite levels are probably caused by desalination processes. Due to human and ecosystem health consequences and the likely increased demand for desalination plants, similar analyses should be undertaken elsewhere, e.g. the Mediterranean. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New and previously unpublished Red Sea sediment information. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sediment chemical and spatial variations established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sabkha origins are similar for both UAE Arabian Sea and Saudi Arabian Red Sea coasts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Desalination plant shown as cause of increased marine sediment chlorite levels.

  14. Understanding cultural competence in a multicultural nursing workforce: registered nurses' experience in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almutairi, Adel F; McCarthy, Alexandra; Gardner, Glenn E

    2015-01-01

    In Saudi Arabia, the health system is mainly staffed by expatriate nurses from different cultural and linguistic backgrounds. Given the potential risks this situation poses for patient care, it is important to understand how cultural diversity can be effectively managed in this multicultural environment. The purpose of this study was to explore notions of cultural competence with non-Saudi Arabian nurses working in a major hospital in Saudi Arabia. Face-to-face, audio-recorded, semistructured interviews were conducted with 24 non-Saudi Arabian nurses. Deductive data collection and analysis were undertaken drawing on Campinha-Bacote's cultural competence model. The data that could not be explained by this model were coded and analyzed inductively. Nurses within this culturally diverse environment struggled with the notion of cultural competence in terms of each other's cultural expectations and those of the dominant Saudi culture. The study also addressed the limitations of Campinha-Bacote's model, which did not account for all of the nurses' experiences. Subsequent inductive analysis yielded important themes that more fully explained the nurses' experiences in this environment. The findings can inform policy, professional education, and practice in the multicultural Saudi setting. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Shyness, Vocabulary and Children's Reticence in Saudi Arabian Preschools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, W. Ray; Badawood, Asma

    2009-01-01

    The aims of the present study are to examine whether preschool children's scores on a standardized test of vocabulary mediate or moderate the relation between shyness and reticence and to test whether any influence of vocabulary would be found for both teacher and parent assessments of shyness. Participants were 108 children (50 males), mean age,…

  16. Pediatric intussusception in a Saudi Arabian tertiary hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion of polyhydramnios in this study (31.6%) might be due to lack of health awareness among pregnant mothers. The de- lay in diagnosis leads to preoperative feeding, aspiration and increased incidence of pneumonia. Those who died were sig- nificantly older at presentation than those who survived. The study showed ...

  17. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) and a key to Saudi Arabian species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-24

    Oct 24, 2011 ... the type species Chelonus dentatus Panzer. Tobias. (1972 ... The types of new species are deposited in Department of Zoology, King Khalid. University, Abha, KSA pending transfer to Natural History Museum,. London. .... Tobias VI (1972) Contribución al conocimiento del subgénero Chelonus s. str. en la ...

  18. Hepatitis C virus infection in Saudi Arabian recipients of renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conclusions in regard to the clinical impact of hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection. ... HCV infection and assessed its effect on patient and graft survival and occurrence of chronic hepatitis in renal transplant ... at the time of censorship was compared with the rates in 99 hemodialyzed patients, 400 healthy volunteers and 113

  19. Arabian Sea oceanography and fisheries

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Madhupratap, M.; Nair, K.N.V.; Venugopal, P.; Gauns, M.; Haridas, P.; Gopalakrishnan, T.C.; Nair, K.K.C.

    The physical and chemical forcing which drive the Arabian production is now fairly well understood. The main attributes, which contribute to the productivity are (1) the boundary processes which manifest as upwelling during summer monsoon and (2...

  20. Denitrification in the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naqvi, S.W.A.; Noronha, R.J.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Estimates of the amount of denitrification in the Arabian Sea are inconsistent, and so two methods of calculations of 'original' nitrate concentrations used in earlier studies have been reviewed. Nitrite at intermediate depths was not restricted...

  1. (Actinomyces pyogenes) from Arabian gazelles

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-04

    Dec 4, 2011 ... African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 10(80), pp. ... pyogenes in the infected Arabian gazelles kept at King Khalid Wildlife Research Center at Thumamah, .... Research Center, Faculty of Science, King Saud University as.

  2. Peopling of the North Circumpolar Region--insights from Y chromosome STR and SNP typing of Greenlanders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill Katharina Olofsson

    Full Text Available The human population in Greenland is characterized by migration events of Paleo- and Neo-Eskimos, as well as admixture with Europeans. In this study, the Y-chromosomal variation in male Greenlanders was investigated in detail by typing 73 Y-chromosomal single nucleotide polymorphisms (Y-SNPs and 17 Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs. Approximately 40% of the analyzed Greenlandic Y chromosomes were of European origin (I-M170, R1a-M513 and R1b-M343. Y chromosomes of European origin were mainly found in individuals from the west and south coasts of Greenland, which is in agreement with the historic records of the geographic placements of European settlements in Greenland. Two Inuit Y-chromosomal lineages, Q-M3 (xM19, M194, L663, SA01 and L766 and Q-NWT01 (xM265 were found in 23% and 31% of the male Greenlanders, respectively. The time to the most recent common ancestor (TMRCA of the Q-M3 lineage of the Greenlanders was estimated to be between 4,400 and 10,900 years ago (y. a. using two different methods. This is in agreement with the theory that the North Circumpolar Region was populated via a second expansion of humans in the North American continent. The TMRCA of the Q-NWT01 (xM265 lineage in Greenland was estimated to be between 7,000 and 14,300 y. a. using two different methods, which is older than the previously reported TMRCA of this lineage in other Inuit populations. Our results indicate that Inuit individuals carrying the Q-NWT01 (xM265 lineage may have their origin in the northeastern parts of North America and could be descendants of the Dorset culture. This in turn points to the possibility that the current Inuit population in Greenland is comprised of individuals of both Thule and Dorset descent.

  3. Prediction of the Y-Chromosome Haplogroups Within a Recently Settled Turkish Population in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Serkan; Doğan, Gŭlşen; Ašić, Adna; Besić, Larisa; Klimenta, Biljana; Hukić, Mirsada; Turan, Yusuf; Primorac, Dragan; Marjanović, Damir

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of Y-chromosome haplogroup distribution is widely used when investigating geographical clustering of different populations, which is why it plays an important role in population genetics, human migration patterns and even in forensic investigations. Individual determination of these haplogroups is mostly based on the analysis of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers located in the non-recombining part of Y-chromosome (NRY). On the other hand, the number of forensic and anthropology studies investigating short tandem repeats on the Y-chromosome (Y-STRs) increases rapidly every year. During the last few years, these markers have been successfully used as haplogroup prediction methods, which is why they have been used in this study. Previously obtained Y-STR haplotypes (23 loci) from 100 unrelated Turkish males recently settled in Sarajevo were used for the determination of haplogroups via 'Whit Athey's Haplogroup Predictor' software. The Bayesian probability of 90 of the studied haplotypes is greater than 92.2% and ranges from 51.4% to 84.3% for the remaining 10 haplotypes. A distribution of 17 different haplogroups was found, with the Y- haplogroup J2a being most prevalent, having been found in 26% of all the samples, whereas R1b, G2a and R1a were less prevalent, covering a range of 10% to 15% of all the samples. Together, these four haplogroups account for 63% of all Y-chromosomes. Eleven haplogroups (E1b1b, G1, I1, I2a, I2b, J1, J2b, L, Q, R2, and T) range from 2% to 5%, while E1b1a and N are found in 1% of all samples. Obtained results indicate that a large majority of the Turkish paternal line belongs to West Asia, Europe Caucasus, Western Europe, Northeast Europe, Middle East, Russia, Anatolia, and Black Sea Y-chromosome lineages. As the distribution of Y-chromosome haplogroups is consistent with the previously published data for the Turkish population residing in Turkey, it was concluded that the analyzed population could also be recognized as

  4. Genetic integrity of the human Y chromosome exposed to groundwater arsenic

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    Ali Sher

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is a known human carcinogen reported to cause chromosomal deletions and genetic anomalies in cultured cells. The vast human population inhabiting the Ganges delta in West Bengal, India and Bangladesh is exposed to critical levels of arsenic present in the groundwater. The genetic and physiological mechanism of arsenic toxicity in the human body is yet to be fully established. In addition, lack of animal models has made work on this line even more challenging. Methods Human male blood samples were collected with their informed consent from 5 districts in West Bengal having groundwater arsenic level more than 50 μg/L. Isolation of genomic DNA and preparation of metaphase chromosomes was done using standard protocols. End point PCR was performed for established sequence tagged sites to ascertain the status of recombination events. Single nucleotide variants of candidate genes and amplicons were carried out using appropriate restriction enzymes. The copy number of DYZ1 array per haploid genome was calculated using real time PCR and its chromosomal localization was done by fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH. Results We studied effects of arsenic exposure on the human Y chromosome in males from different areas of West Bengal focusing on known recombination events (P5-P1 proximal; P5-P1 distal; gr/gr; TSPY-TSPY, b1/b3 and b2/b3, single nucleotide variants (SNVs of a few candidate Y-linked genes (DAZ, TTY4, BPY2, GOLGA2LY and the amplicons of AZFc region. Also, possible chromosomal reorganization of DYZ1 repeat arrays was analyzed. Barring a few microdeletions, no major changes were detected in blood DNA samples. SNV analysis showed a difference in some alleles. Similarly, DYZ1 arrays signals detected by FISH were found to be affected in some males. Conclusions Our Y chromosome analysis suggests that the same is protected from the effects of arsenic by some unknown mechanisms maintaining its structural and functional

  5. Association of ATRX with pericentric heterochromatin and the Y chromosome of neonatal mouse spermatogonia

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    De La Fuente Rabindranath

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishment of chromosomal cytosine methylation and histone methylation patterns are critical epigenetic modifications required for heterochromatin formation in the mammalian genome. However, the nature of the primary signal(s targeting DNA methylation at specific genomic regions is not clear. Notably, whether histone methylation and/or chromatin remodeling proteins play a role in the establishment of DNA methylation during gametogenesis is not known. The chromosomes of mouse neonatal spermatogonia display a unique pattern of 5-methyl cytosine staining whereby centromeric heterochromatin is hypo-methylated whereas chromatids are strongly methylated. Thus, in order to gain some insight into the relationship between global DNA and histone methylation in the germ line we have used neonatal spermatogonia as a model to determine whether these unique chromosomal DNA methylation patterns are also reflected by concomitant changes in histone methylation. Results Our results demonstrate that histone H3 tri-methylated at lysine 9 (H3K9me3, a hallmark of constitutive heterochromatin, as well as the chromatin remodeling protein ATRX remained associated with pericentric heterochromatin regions in spite of their extensive hypo-methylation. This suggests that in neonatal spermatogonia, chromosomal 5-methyl cytosine patterns are regulated independently of changes in histone methylation, potentially reflecting a crucial mechanism to maintain pericentric heterochromatin silencing. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation and fluorescence in situ hybridization, revealed that ATRX as well as H3K9me3 associate with Y chromosome-specific DNA sequences and decorate both arms of the Y chromosome, suggesting a possible role in heterochromatinization and the predominant transcriptional quiescence of this chromosome during spermatogenesis. Conclusion These results are consistent with a role for histone modifications and chromatin remodeling proteins

  6. Early non-invasive detection of fetal Y chromosome sequences in maternal plasma using multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolialexi, Aggeliki; Tounta, Georgia; Apostolou, Paraskevi; Vrettou, Christina; Papantoniou, Nikos; Kanavakis, Emmanuel; Antsaklis, Aris; Mavrou, Ariadni

    2012-03-01

    Clinical indications for fetal sex determination include risk of X-linked disorders, a family history of conditions associated with ambiguous development of the external genitalia, and some fetal ultrasound findings. It is usually performed in the first trimester from fetal material obtained through CVS and is associated with an approximately 1% risk of miscarriage. Ultrasound fetal sex determination is often performed after 11 weeks of gestation. This study aims to validate a reliable method for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of fetal gender using maternal plasma cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) for fetal sex assessment in the first trimester of pregnancy and test its clinical utility in the diagnosis of potentially affected pregnancies in carriers of X-linked disorders. In the validation study, blood samples from 100 pregnant women at 6-11 weeks of gestation were analysed. In the clinical study, 17 pregnancies at risk of having an affected fetus were tested. 7 ml of maternal blood in EDTA were obtained and cffDNA was extracted using a commercially available kit. DNA was enzymatically digested using a methylation sensitive endonuclease (AciI) to remove maternal unmethylated sequences of the RASSF1A gene. A multiplex PCR was performed for the simultaneous amplification of target sequences of SRY and DYS14 from chromosome Y, along with RASSF1A and ACTB sequences. Amplification of these loci indicates fetal gender, confirms the presence of cffDNA and allows assessment of digestion efficiency. After establishing the appropriate experimental conditions, validation studies were successful in all 100 cases tested with no false negative or false positive results. Y chromosome-specific sequences were detected in 68 samples, and 32 cases were diagnosed as female based on the amplification of RASFF1A sequences only, in the absence of ACTB. In the clinical studies, fetal sex was correctly diagnosed in 16 pregnancies, and one case was reported as inconclusive. Fetal sex

  7. The Impact of Length of Study Abroad on Collocational Knowledge: The Case of Saudi Students in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqarni, Ibrahim R.

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the impact that study in Australia has on the lexical knowledge of Saudi Arabian students. It focuses on: 1) the effects that the length of study in Australia has on the acquisition of lexical collocations, as reflected by lexical knowledge tests, and 2) whether there is a significant gender difference in the acquisition of…

  8. A re-examination of the Salicornias (Amaranthaceae of Saudi Arabia and their polymorphs

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    Turki Ali Al-Turki

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available During the period from 1964 to 1999 Saudi Arabian species of Salicornia were wrongly treated under the European species, S. europaea L. Recent explorations proved that there are two separate allopatric species of Salicornia in Saudi Arabia, one inhabiting the inland salt-marshes of the Najd (highlands and the other inhabiting the Arabian Gulf Coast (lowlands. Morphological, ecological and exploratory studies confirm that they are two distinct species. The two species differ in features of bark, axillary spikes, basal vegetative segment(s of spike, fertile segments, colour of senescent plants, and flowering, fruiting and germination phenology. As both the species have been described earlier from Iran, they are now new records for Saudi Arabia. The species are, S. persica ssp. iranica (Akhani Kadereit & Piirainen and S. sinus-persica Akhani. S. sinus-persica, of which the status was thought doubtful has been confirmed. Both the species have been described and illustrated. Each species comprises a number of polymorphs. As leaves and flowers are rudimentary, confusing species circumscriptions, a proliferation of binomials has resulted in the taxonomy of Salicornia. To mitigate such confusion, the full range of variability of the Saudi Arabian species has been documented.

  9. Y-chromosomal STR analysis in the Pashtun population of Southern Afghanistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achakzai, Niaz M; Rahman, Z; Shahzad, M S; Daud, S; Zar, M S; Israr, M; Husnain, T; Willuweit, Sascha; Roewer, Lutz

    2012-07-01

    Afghanistan is a landlocked country in the heart of Asia and since the dawn of humankind Afghanistan has faced centuries of turmoil, strife, conflict, warfare, distress, social unrest, difficult climate, harsh terrain and due to its unique geostrategic position in Eurasia which has historically attracted commerce and conflict. It is an important stop along the Silk Road, connecting the far eastern civilizations to the western world. A 5000-year history of constant invasion. Afghanistan has been repeatedly invaded and conquered by rulers and super powers, neighboring interference in this conflict-tattered land for centuries yet rarely leading to the conquest of this rugged and challenging terrain nation. Afghans are not only shepherds, farmers and nomads but also intense fighters and fierce warriors. Currently very limited genetic studies have been performed in Afghan populations. 17 Y chromosomal short tandem repeats (Y-STRs) were analyzed in 125 unrelated Pashtun (in hindi: Pathan) males residing in the Kandahar region of Southern Afghanistan. A total of 92 unique haplotypes were observed. The predominant haplotype reached a frequency of 9.6%. The haplotype diversity was 0.987 and the discrimination capacity 73.6%. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) reveals a considerable regional stratification within the country as well as between different Pashtun (Pathan) groups from Afghanistan, Pakistan and India. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing

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    David H. Warshauer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel sequencing (MPS technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics. The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles.

  11. Human Y chromosome copy number variation in the next generation sequencing era and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaia, Andrea; Xue, Yali

    2017-05-01

    The human Y chromosome provides a fertile ground for structural rearrangements owing to its haploidy and high content of repeated sequences. The methodologies used for copy number variation (CNV) studies have developed over the years. Low-throughput techniques based on direct observation of rearrangements were developed early on, and are still used, often to complement array-based or sequencing approaches which have limited power in regions with high repeat content and specifically in the presence of long, identical repeats, such as those found in human sex chromosomes. Some specific rearrangements have been investigated for decades; because of their effects on fertility, or their outstanding evolutionary features, the interest in these has not diminished. However, following the flourishing of large-scale genomics, several studies have investigated CNVs across the whole chromosome. These studies sometimes employ data generated within large genomic projects such as the DDD study or the 1000 Genomes Project, and often survey large samples of healthy individuals without any prior selection. Novel technologies based on sequencing long molecules and combinations of technologies, promise to stimulate the study of Y-CNVs in the immediate future.

  12. Detection of two biological markers of intercourse: prostate-specific antigen and Y-chromosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Roxanne; Penman-Aguilar, Ana; Wiener, Jeffrey; Gallo, Maria F; Zenilman, Jonathan M; Melendez, J H; Snead, Margaret; Black, Carolyn M; Jamieson, Denise J; Macaluso, Maurizio

    2013-12-01

    Although biological markers of women's exposure to semen from vaginal intercourse have been developed as surrogates for risk of infection or probability of pregnancy, data on their persistence time and clearance are limited. During 2006-2008, 52 couples were enrolled for three 14-day cycles of abstinence from vaginal sex during which women were exposed in the clinic to a specific quantity (10, 100 or 1000 μL) of their partner's semen. Vaginal swabs were collected before and at 1, 6, 12, 24, 48, 72 and 144 h after exposure for testing for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and Y-chromosome DNA (Yc DNA). Immediately after exposure to 1000 μL of semen, the predicted sensitivity of being PSA positive was 0.96; this decreased to 0.65, 0.44, 0.21 and 0.07 at 6, 12, 24 and 48 h, respectively. Corresponding predicted sensitivity of being Yc DNA positive was 0.72 immediately postexposure; this increased to 0.76 at 1 h postexposure and then decreased to 0.60 (at 6 h), 0.63 (at 12 h), 0.49 (at 24 h), 0.21 (at 48 h), 0.17 (at 72 h) and 0.12 (at 144 h). Overall findings suggest that PSA may be more consistent as a marker of very recent exposure and that Yc DNA is more likely to be detected in the vagina after 12 h postexposure compared to PSA. © 2013.

  13. Study of Y Chromosome Microdeletion in AZF Region in Infertile Males of Isfahan Population

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    M Motovali-Bashi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: One of the main genetic factors of infertility is the deletions in the chromosome Y. Accordingly this study was conducted to determine the frequency of microdeletion of AZF region in infertile men of Isfahan, Iran. Methods: In this case-control study, 100 infertile men referred to the Infertility Center of Isfahan and 100 fertile men as controls were randomly selected. Genomic DNA was extracted from their blood and amplified by sequence tagged sites-polymerase chain reaction (STS-PCR method. The presence of microdeletion in AZF locus was diagnosed. Results: No AZFa, AZFb or AZFc deletions were found in the control group. Microdeletions were observed in one patient in AZFb region, eight patients in AZFc region and two patients in AZFa region. Conclusion: The incidence of Yq microdeletions in Iranian population is similar to the international frequency. Our data agree with other studies regarding microdeletions of AZFc, but for microdeletions of AZFa (2% our results show smaller frequency and differ significantly with many studies. Key words: Infertility, Y chromosome, Microdeletion

  14. Design and validation of a highly discriminatory 10-locus Y-chromosome STR multiplex system

    KAUST Repository

    D'Amato, María Eugenia

    2011-03-01

    The Y-chromosome STRs (short tandem repeat) markers are routinely utilized in the resolution of forensic casework related to sexual assault. For this, the forensic community has adopted a set of eleven (core) Y-STR that is incorporated in all commercial diagnostic systems. Our previous studies of Y-STR polymorphisms in the South African population identified low levels of diversity and discrimination capacity for many commercial marker sets, determining a limited applicability of these systems to the local population groups. To overcome this shortcoming, we designed a Y-STR 10-plex system that shows higher discriminatory capacity (DC) than available commercial systems. The markers were selected from a population group of 283 individuals with African, European and Asian ancestry genotyped at 45 Y-STRs, applying an optimization based selection procedure to achieve the highest possible DC with the minimal number of markers. The 10-plex was satisfactorily subjected to developmental validation tests following the SWGDAM guidelines and shows potential for its application to genealogical and evolutionary studies. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  15. A global analysis of Y-chromosomal haplotype diversity for 23 STR loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purps, Josephine; Siegert, Sabine; Willuweit, Sascha; Nagy, Marion; Alves, Cíntia; Salazar, Renato; Angustia, Sheila M.T.; Santos, Lorna H.; Anslinger, Katja; Bayer, Birgit; Ayub, Qasim; Wei, Wei; Xue, Yali; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Bafalluy, Miriam Baeta; Martínez-Jarreta, Begoña; Egyed, Balazs; Balitzki, Beate; Tschumi, Sibylle; Ballard, David; Court, Denise Syndercombe; Barrantes, Xinia; Bäßler, Gerhard; Wiest, Tina; Berger, Burkhard; Niederstätter, Harald; Parson, Walther; Davis, Carey; Budowle, Bruce; Burri, Helen; Borer, Urs; Koller, Christoph; Carvalho, Elizeu F.; Domingues, Patricia M.; Chamoun, Wafaa Takash; Coble, Michael D.; Hill, Carolyn R.; Corach, Daniel; Caputo, Mariela; D’Amato, Maria E.; Davison, Sean; Decorte, Ronny; Larmuseau, Maarten H.D.; Ottoni, Claudio; Rickards, Olga; Lu, Di; Jiang, Chengtao; Dobosz, Tadeusz; Jonkisz, Anna; Frank, William E.; Furac, Ivana; Gehrig, Christian; Castella, Vincent; Grskovic, Branka; Haas, Cordula; Wobst, Jana; Hadzic, Gavrilo; Drobnic, Katja; Honda, Katsuya; Hou, Yiping; Zhou, Di; Li, Yan; Hu, Shengping; Chen, Shenglan; Immel, Uta-Dorothee; Lessig, Rüdiger; Jakovski, Zlatko; Ilievska, Tanja; Klann, Anja E.; García, Cristina Cano; de Knijff, Peter; Kraaijenbrink, Thirsa; Kondili, Aikaterini; Miniati, Penelope; Vouropoulou, Maria; Kovacevic, Lejla; Marjanovic, Damir; Lindner, Iris; Mansour, Issam; Al-Azem, Mouayyad; Andari, Ansar El; Marino, Miguel; Furfuro, Sandra; Locarno, Laura; Martín, Pablo; Luque, Gracia M.; Alonso, Antonio; Miranda, Luís Souto; Moreira, Helena; Mizuno, Natsuko; Iwashima, Yasuki; Neto, Rodrigo S. Moura; Nogueira, Tatiana L.S.; Silva, Rosane; Nastainczyk-Wulf, Marina; Edelmann, Jeanett; Kohl, Michael; Nie, Shengjie; Wang, Xianping; Cheng, Baowen; Núñez, Carolina; Pancorbo, Marian Martínez de; Olofsson, Jill K.; Morling, Niels; Onofri, Valerio; Tagliabracci, Adriano; Pamjav, Horolma; Volgyi, Antonia; Barany, Gusztav; Pawlowski, Ryszard; Maciejewska, Agnieszka; Pelotti, Susi; Pepinski, Witold; Abreu-Glowacka, Monica; Phillips, Christopher; Cárdenas, Jorge; Rey-Gonzalez, Danel; Salas, Antonio; Brisighelli, Francesca; Capelli, Cristian; Toscanini, Ulises; Piccinini, Andrea; Piglionica, Marilidia; Baldassarra, Stefania L.; Ploski, Rafal; Konarzewska, Magdalena; Jastrzebska, Emila; Robino, Carlo; Sajantila, Antti; Palo, Jukka U.; Guevara, Evelyn; Salvador, Jazelyn; Ungria, Maria Corazon De; Rodriguez, Jae Joseph Russell; Schmidt, Ulrike; Schlauderer, Nicola; Saukko, Pekka; Schneider, Peter M.; Sirker, Miriam; Shin, Kyoung-Jin; Oh, Yu Na; Skitsa, Iulia; Ampati, Alexandra; Smith, Tobi-Gail; Calvit, Lina Solis de; Stenzl, Vlastimil; Capal, Thomas; Tillmar, Andreas; Nilsson, Helena; Turrina, Stefania; De Leo, Domenico; Verzeletti, Andrea; Cortellini, Venusia; Wetton, Jon H.; Gwynne, Gareth M.; Jobling, Mark A.; Whittle, Martin R.; Sumita, Denilce R.; Wolańska-Nowak, Paulina; Yong, Rita Y.Y.; Krawczak, Michael; Nothnagel, Michael; Roewer, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In a worldwide collaborative effort, 19,630 Y-chromosomes were sampled from 129 different populations in 51 countries. These chromosomes were typed for 23 short-tandem repeat (STR) loci (DYS19, DYS389I, DYS389II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393, DYS385ab, DYS437, DYS438, DYS439, DYS448, DYS456, DYS458, DYS635, GATAH4, DYS481, DYS533, DYS549, DYS570, DYS576, and DYS643) and using the PowerPlex Y23 System (PPY23, Promega Corporation, Madison, WI). Locus-specific allelic spectra of these markers were determined and a consistently high level of allelic diversity was observed. A considerable number of null, duplicate and off-ladder alleles were revealed. Standard single-locus and haplotype-based parameters were calculated and compared between subsets of Y-STR markers established for forensic casework. The PPY23 marker set provides substantially stronger discriminatory power than other available kits but at the same time reveals the same general patterns of population structure as other marker sets. A strong correlation was observed between the number of Y-STRs included in a marker set and some of the forensic parameters under study. Interestingly a weak but consistent trend toward smaller genetic distances resulting from larger numbers of markers became apparent. PMID:24854874

  16. Genetic admixture history of Eastern Indonesia as revealed by Y-chromosome and mitochondrial DNA analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Stefano; Grunz, Katharina E; Brauer, Silke; Pakendorf, Brigitte; Castrì, Loredana; Sudoyo, Herawati; Marzuki, Sangkot; Barnes, Robert H; Schmidtke, Jörg; Stoneking, Mark; Kayser, Manfred

    2009-08-01

    Eastern Indonesia possesses more linguistic diversity than any other region in Southeast Asia, with both Austronesian (AN) languages that are of East Asian origin, as well as non-Austronesian (NAN) languages of likely Melanesian origin. Here, we investigated the genetic history of human populations from seven eastern Indonesian islands, including AN and NAN speakers, as well as the relationship between languages and genes, by means of nonrecombining Y-chromosomal (NRY) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) analysis. We found that the eastern Indonesian gene pool consists of East Asian as well as Melanesian components, as might be expected based on linguistic evidence, but also harbors putative indigenous eastern Indonesian signatures that perhaps reflect the initial occupation of the Wallacea by aboriginal hunter-gatherers already in Palaeolithic times. Furthermore, both NRY and mtDNA data showed a complete lack of correlation between linguistic and genetic relationships, most likely reflecting genetic admixture and/or language shift. In addition, we noted a small fraction of the NRY and mtDNA data shared between eastern Indonesians and Australian Aborigines likely reflecting an ancient link between Asia and Australia. Our data thus provide insights into the complex genetic ancestry history of eastern Indonesian islanders characterized by several admixture episodes and demonstrate a clear example of the lack of the often-assumed correlation between the genes and languages of human populations.

  17. Spontaneous pregnancies in a Turner syndrome woman with Y-chromosome mosaicism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landin-Wilhelmsen, Kerstin; Bryman, Inger; Hanson, Charles; Hanson, Lars

    2004-06-01

    To present a case involving pregnancies in a Turner woman with Y-chromosome mosaicism. A descriptive case report of a single patient. A 39-year-old woman was admitted to the endocrine clinic due to fatigue and premature menopause. She had tried in-vitro fertilization and oocyte donation twice without pregnancies but became spontaneously pregnant at age 36 and 37 and delivered two girls. During the seventh month of the second pregnancy, a dissecting aortic aneurysm, a coarctation, and subsequently a pheochromocytoma were detected and repaired. Hypothyroidism developed. Turner syndrome was diagnosed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis of lymphocytes revealed 31% XY cells and 4% XYY cells, while 66% of buccal cells had an XY constitution. Oophorectomy revealed no malignancy. FISH revealed 54% XY cells in the left gonad and 38% XY cells in the right. Turner syndrome should be suspected in women with aortic dissection, in general, but especially in those with additional features such as horseshoe kidney, coarctation, and infertility.

  18. Afghanistan's ethnic groups share a Y-chromosomal heritage structured by historical events.

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    Marc Haber

    Full Text Available Afghanistan has held a strategic position throughout history. It has been inhabited since the Paleolithic and later became a crossroad for expanding civilizations and empires. Afghanistan's location, history, and diverse ethnic groups present a unique opportunity to explore how nations and ethnic groups emerged, and how major cultural evolutions and technological developments in human history have influenced modern population structures. In this study we have analyzed, for the first time, the four major ethnic groups in present-day Afghanistan: Hazara, Pashtun, Tajik, and Uzbek, using 52 binary markers and 19 short tandem repeats on the non-recombinant segment of the Y-chromosome. A total of 204 Afghan samples were investigated along with more than 8,500 samples from surrounding populations important to Afghanistan's history through migrations and conquests, including Iranians, Greeks, Indians, Middle Easterners, East Europeans, and East Asians. Our results suggest that all current Afghans largely share a heritage derived from a common unstructured ancestral population that could have emerged during the Neolithic revolution and the formation of the first farming communities. Our results also indicate that inter-Afghan differentiation started during the Bronze Age, probably driven by the formation of the first civilizations in the region. Later migrations and invasions into the region have been assimilated differentially among the ethnic groups, increasing inter-population genetic differences, and giving the Afghans a unique genetic diversity in Central Asia.

  19. X and Y chromosome complement influence adiposity and metabolism in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuqi; McClusky, Rebecca; Itoh, Yuichiro; Reue, Karen; Arnold, Arthur P

    2013-03-01

    Three different models of MF1 strain mice were studied to measure the effects of gonadal secretions and sex chromosome type and number on body weight and composition, and on related metabolic variables such as glucose homeostasis, feeding, and activity. The 3 genetic models varied sex chromosome complement in different ways, as follows: 1) "four core genotypes" mice, comprising XX and XY gonadal males, and XX and XY gonadal females; 2) the XY* model comprising groups similar to XO, XX, XY, and XXY; and 3) a novel model comprising 6 groups having XO, XX, and XY chromosomes with either testes or ovaries. In gonadally intact mice, gonadal males were heavier than gonadal females, but sex chromosome complement also influenced weight. The male/female difference was abolished by adult gonadectomy, after which mice with 2 sex chromosomes (XX or XY) had greater body weight and percentage of body fat than mice with 1 X chromosome. A second sex chromosome of either type, X or Y, had similar effects, indicating that the 2 sex chromosomes each possess factors that influence body weight and composition in the MF1 genetic background. Sex chromosome complement also influenced metabolic variables such as food intake and glucose tolerance. The results reveal a role for the Y chromosome in metabolism independent of testes and gonadal hormones and point to a small number of X-Y gene pairs with similar coding sequences as candidates for causing these effects.

  20. The inverted Y-chromosome polymorphism in the Gujarati Muslim Indian population of South Africa has a single origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spurdle, A; Jenkins, T

    1992-01-01

    Y-specific polymorphisms were studied in Gujarati Muslim Indians possessing a Y-chromosome pericentric inversion [inv(Y)] in an attempt to prove a common genetic origin for the inversion. The p49a/TaqI and p49a/PvuII haplotypes were determined for 9 normal and 8 inv(Y) Gujarati Muslim men. Men with the inversion possessed identical TaqI and PvuII profiles, as opposed to 7 different TaqI and 8 different PvuII haplotypes observed in the 9 normal men. These results provide conclusive evidence for a common genetic origin of the inverted Y chromosome observed in this Gujarati Muslim community.

  1. Y chromosome peculiarities and chromosomal G- and C-staining in Crocidura shantungensis Miller, 1901 (Soricomorpha: Soricidae

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    Irina Kartavtseva

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytogenetical examinations of Crocidura shantungensis Miller, 1901 from small Young Island of South Korea and the mainland of Russian Far East (Vladivostok were carried out and literature data concerning Tsushima Island of Japan and Cheju Island of Korea were considered. The chromosome sets of all investigated specimens are characterized by 2n = 40 and NFa = 46. Four pairs of biarmed autosomes, 15 pairs of acrocentrics and two sex chromosomes were identified applying G- and C-banding. The X chromosome is a large metacentric whereas the Y chromosome is a middle sized acrocentric element. A variation in the Y chromosome size in samples from the three islands is noticeable. Comparative analysis of G-banded chromosomes of C. shantungensis (our material and C. suaveolens (Pallas, 1811 (literature data shows a similarity between karyotypes of these two species.

  2. Two newly recognized species of Hemidactylus (Squamata, Gekkonidae) from the Arabian Peninsula and Sinai, Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smíd, Jiří; Moravec, Jiří; Kratochvíl, Lukáš; Gvoždík, Václav; Nasher, Abdul Karim; Busais, Salem M; Wilms, Thomas; Shobrak, Mohammed Y; Carranza, Salvador

    2013-01-01

    A recent molecular phylogeny of the Arid clade of the genus Hemidactylus revealed that the recently described H. saba and two unnamed Hemidactylus species from Sinai, Saudi Arabia and Yemen form a well-supported monophyletic group within the Arabian radiation of the genus. The name 'Hemidactylus saba species group' is suggested for this clade. According to the results of morphological comparisons and the molecular analyses using two mitochondrial (12S and cytb) and four nuclear (cmos, mc1r, rag1, rag2) genes, the name Hemidactylus granosus Heyden, 1827 is resurrected from the synonymy of H. turcicus for the Sinai and Saudi Arabian species. The third species of this group from Yemen is described formally as a new species H. ulii sp. n. The phylogenetic relationships of the members of 'Hemidactylus saba species group' are evaluated and the distribution and ecology of individual species are discussed.

  3. Origin and evolution of the transcribed repeated sequences of the Y chromosome lampbrush loops of Drosophila hydei

    OpenAIRE

    Hareven, Dana; Zuckerman, Mathi; Lifschytz, Eliezer

    1986-01-01

    The molecular evolution and patterns of conservation of clones from four Y chromosome lampbrush loops of Drosophila hydei were investigated. Each loop contains a discrete family of transcribed repeats that are only slightly conserved even in the hydei subgroup species. Sequencing of clones from the four D. hydei loops indicates that all transcribed repeats evolved from A+T-rich elements of the genome. Evidence is presented that suggests a Y-specific family evolved as a result of the transposi...

  4. Y-chromosome and mtDNA variation confirms independent domestications and directional hybridization in South American camelids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, J C; Romero, K; Rivera, R; Johnson, W E; González, B A

    2017-10-01

    Investigations of genetic diversity and domestication in South American camelids (SAC) have relied on autosomal microsatellite and maternally-inherited mitochondrial data. We present the first integrated analysis of domestic and wild SAC combining male and female sex-specific markers (male specific Y-chromosome and female-specific mtDNA sequence variation) to assess: (i) hypotheses about the origin of domestic camelids, (ii) directionality of introgression among domestic and/or wild taxa as evidence of hybridization and (iii) currently recognized subspecies patterns. Three male-specific Y-chromosome markers and control region sequences of mitochondrial DNA are studied here. Although no sequence variation was found in SRY and ZFY, there were seven variable sites in DBY generating five haplotypes on the Y-chromosome. The haplotype network showed clear separation between haplogroups of guanaco-llama and vicuña-alpaca, indicating two genetically distinct patrilineages with near absence of shared haplotypes between guanacos and vicuñas. Although we document some examples of directional hybridization, the patterns strongly support the hypothesis that llama (Lama glama) is derived from guanaco (Lama guanicoe) and the alpaca (Vicugna pacos) from vicuña (Vicugna vicugna). Within male guanacos we identified a haplogroup formed by three haplotypes with different geographical distributions, the northernmost of which (Peru and northern Chile) was also observed in llamas, supporting the commonly held hypothesis that llamas were domesticated from the northernmost populations of guanacos (L. g. cacilensis). Southern guanacos shared the other two haplotypes. A second haplogroup, consisting of two haplotypes, was mostly present in vicuñas and alpacas. However, Y-chromosome variation did not distinguish the two subspecies of vicuñas. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  5. Achilles, a New Family of Transcriptionally Active Retrotransposons from the Olive Fruit Fly, with Y Chromosome Preferential Distribution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina T Tsoumani

    Full Text Available Sex chromosomes have many unusual features relative to autosomes. The in depth exploration of their structure will improve our understanding of their origin and divergence (degeneration as well as the evolution of genetic sex determination pathways which, most often are attributed to them. In Tephritids, the structure of Y chromosome, where the male-determining factor M is localized, is largely unexplored and limited data concerning its sequence content and evolution are available. In order to get insight into the structure and organization of the Y chromosome of the major olive insect pest, the olive fly Bactrocera oleae, we characterized sequences from a Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE-isolated Y chromosome. Here, we report the discovery of the first olive fly LTR retrotransposon with increased presence on the Y chromosome. The element belongs to the BEL-Pao superfamily, however, its sequence comparison with the other members of the superfamily suggests that it constitutes a new family that we termed Achilles. Its ~7.5 kb sequence consists of the 5'LTR, the 5'non-coding sequence and the open reading frame (ORF, which encodes the polyprotein Gag-Pol. In situ hybridization to the B. oleae polytene chromosomes showed that Achilles is distributed in discrete bands dispersed on all five autosomes, in all centromeric regions and in the granular heterochromatic network corresponding to the mitotic sex chromosomes. The between sexes comparison revealed a variation in Achilles copy number, with male flies possessing 5-10 copies more than female (CI range: 18-38 and 12-33 copies respectively per genome. The examination of its transcriptional activity demonstrated the presence of at least one intact active copy in the genome, showing a differential level of expression between sexes as well as during embryonic development. The higher expression was detected in male germline tissues (testes. Moreover, the presence of Achilles-like elements in

  6. Temporal differentiation across a West-European Y-chromosomal cline: genealogy as a tool in human population genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Larmuseau, Maarten HD; Ottoni, Claudio; Raeymaekers, Joost AM; Vanderheyden, Nancy; Larmuseau, Hendrik FM; Decorte, Ronny

    2011-01-01

    The pattern of population genetic variation and allele frequencies within a species are unstable and are changing over time according to different evolutionary factors. For humans, it is possible to combine detailed patrilineal genealogical records with deep Y-chromosome (Y-chr) genotyping to disentangle signals of historical population genetic structures because of the exponential increase in genetic genealogical data. To test this approach, we studied the temporal pattern of the ‘autochthon...

  7. Biogeochemistry of iron in the Arabian sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Moffett, J.W.; Vedamati, J.; Goepfert, T.J.; Pratihary, A.K.; Gauns, M.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    The Arabian Sea is a productive basin where seasonal upwelling and convective mixing result in high surface nutrient concentrations and widespread algal blooms. The factors controlling primary productivity in the Arabian Sea are of interest because...

  8. The contribution of p53 and Y chromosome long arm genes to regulation of apoptosis in mouse testis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Tomasz; Styrna, Józefa; Kotarska, Katarzyna

    2017-08-02

    Apoptosis of excessive or defective germ cells is a natural process occurring in mammalian testes. Tumour suppressor protein p53 is involved in this process both in developing and adult male gonads. Its contribution to testicular physiology is known to be modified by genetic background. The aim of this study was to evaluate the combined influence of the p53 and Y chromosome long arm genes on male germ cell apoptosis. Knockout of the transformation related protein 53 (Trp53) gene was introduced into congenic strains: B10.BR (intact Y chromosome) and B10.BR-Ydel (Y chromosome with a deletion in the long arm). The level of apoptosis in the testes of 19-day-old and 3-month-old male mice was determined using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate in situ nick-end labelling (TUNEL) method. The study revealed that although p53 is involved in germ cell apoptosis in peripubertal testes, this process can also be mediated by p53-independent mechanisms. However, activation of p53-independent apoptotic pathways in the absence of the p53 protein requires engagement of the multicopy Yq genes and was not observed in gonads of B10.BR-Ydel-p53-/- males. The role of Yq genes in the regulation of testicular apoptosis seems to be restricted to the initial wave of spermatogenesis and is not evident in adult gonads. The study confirmed, instead, that p53 does participate in spontaneous apoptosis in mature testes.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome structure at the Mediterranean and Atlantic façades of the Iberian Peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Cristina; Fregel, Rosa; Cabrera, Vicente M; Alvarez, Luis; Larruga, Jose M; Ramos, Amanda; López, Miguel A; Pilar Aluja, María; González, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome lineages in a range of Atlantic and Mediterranean populations of the Iberian Peninsula in search of genetic differences between both façades and to uncover the most probable geographic origin and coalescence ages of lineages. The control region of mitochondrial DNA and haplogroup diagnostic positions were analyzed in 575 subjects and Y-chromosome markers were typed in 260 unrelated males. Moreover, previously published data were compiled and used in the analyses. The level of genetic structure deduced from uniparental markers for the Iberian Peninsula was weak, with stronger Atlantic versus Mediterranean than North to South differentiation and larger diversities in the South. In general, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups had mainly Paleolithic and Mesolithic coalescences in Europe, although some of them, ruling out drift effects, seem to have younger implantation in Central Europe and the Atlantic areas than in the Mediterranean (I, J, J2a, T1, and W) while others as N1 and X could have reached the Iberian Peninsula at the Neolithic transition. On the other hand, younger coalescence ages are being proposed for the arriving or spread of the bulk of Y-chromosome lineages in Europe. The major haplotypic affinities found for all the Iberian Peninsula regions were always with North Africa and the Atlantic Islands. These results draw an Atlantic network that clearly resembles those of the Megalithic Copper and Bronze cultures at this part of Europe. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Human Y chromosome base-substitution mutation rate measured by direct sequencing in a deep-rooting pedigree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Yali; Wang, Qiuju; Long, Quan; Ng, Bee Ling; Swerdlow, Harold; Burton, John; Skuce, Carl; Taylor, Ruth; Abdellah, Zahra; Zhao, Yali; MacArthur, Daniel G; Quail, Michael A; Carter, Nigel P; Yang, Huanming; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2009-09-15

    Understanding the key process of human mutation is important for many aspects of medical genetics and human evolution. In the past, estimates of mutation rates have generally been inferred from phenotypic observations or comparisons of homologous sequences among closely related species. Here, we apply new sequencing technology to measure directly one mutation rate, that of base substitutions on the human Y chromosome. The Y chromosomes of two individuals separated by 13 generations were flow sorted and sequenced by Illumina (Solexa) paired-end sequencing to an average depth of 11x or 20x, respectively. Candidate mutations were further examined by capillary sequencing in cell-line and blood DNA from the donors and additional family members. Twelve mutations were confirmed in approximately 10.15 Mb; eight of these had occurred in vitro and four in vivo. The latter could be placed in different positions on the pedigree and led to a mutation-rate measurement of 3.0 x 10(-8) mutations/nucleotide/generation (95% CI: 8.9 x 10(-9)-7.0 x 10(-8)), consistent with estimates of 2.3 x 10(-8)-6.3 x 10(-8) mutations/nucleotide/generation for the same Y-chromosomal region from published human-chimpanzee comparisons depending on the generation and split times assumed.

  11. An immunological approach of sperm sexing and different methods for identification of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv Kumar Yadav

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm has been practiced for selection of desired sex of offspring to increase the profit in livestock industries. At present, fluorescence-activated cell sorter is the only successful method for separation of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm. This technology is based on the differences in DNA content between these two types of sperm and has been commercialized for bovine sperm. However, this technology still has problems in terms of high economic cost, sperm damage, and lower pregnancy rates compared to unsorted semen. Therefore, an inexpensive, convenient, and non-invasive approach for sperm sexing would be of benefit to agricultural sector. Within this perspective, immunological sperm sexing method is one of the attractive choices to separate X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm. This article reviews the current knowledge about immunological approaches, viz., H-Y antigen, sex-specific antigens, and differentially expressed proteins for sperm sexing. Moreover, this review also highlighted the different methods for identification of X- and Y-sperm.

  12. Kinship and Y-chromosome analysis of 7th century human remains: novel DNA extraction and typing procedure for ancient material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanek, Daniel; Saskova, Lenka; Koch, Hubert

    2009-06-01

    To develop novel DNA extraction and typing procedure for DNA identification of the 7th century human remains, determine the familiar relationship between the individuals, estimate the Y-chromosome haplogroup, and compare the Y-chromosome haplotype with the contemporary populations. DNA from preserved femur samples was extracted using the modified silica-based extraction technique. Polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using human identification kits MiniFiler, Identifiler, and Y-filer and also laboratory-developed and validated Y-chromosome short tandem repeat (STR) pentaplexes with short amplicons. For 244A, 244B, 244C samples, full autosomal DNA profiles (15 STR markers and Amelogenin) and for 244D, 244E, 244F samples, MiniFiler profiles were produced. Y-chromosome haplotypes consisting of up to 24 STR markers were determined and used to predict the Y-chromosome haplogroups and compare the resulting haplotypes with the current population. Samples 244A, 244B, 244C, and 244D belong to Y-chromosome haplogroup R1b and the samples 244E and 244F to haplogroup G2a. Comparison of ancient haplotypes with the current population yielded numerous close matches with genetic distance below 2. Application of forensic genetics in archaeology enables retrieving new types of information and helps in data interpretation. The number of successfully typed autosomal and Y-STR loci from ancient specimens in this study is one of the largest published so far for aged samples.

  13. Temporal fluctuation in North East Baltic Sea region cattle population revealed by mitochondrial and Y-chromosomal DNA analyses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Niemi

    Full Text Available Ancient DNA analysis offers a way to detect changes in populations over time. To date, most studies of ancient cattle have focused on their domestication in prehistory, while only a limited number of studies have analysed later periods. Conversely, the genetic structure of modern cattle populations is well known given the undertaking of several molecular and population genetic studies.Bones and teeth from ancient cattle populations from the North-East Baltic Sea region dated to the Prehistoric (Late Bronze and Iron Age, 5 samples, Medieval (14, and Post-Medieval (26 periods were investigated by sequencing 667 base pairs (bp from the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA and 155 bp of intron 19 in the Y-chromosomal UTY gene. Comparison of maternal (mtDNA haplotypes genetic diversity in ancient cattle (45 samples with modern cattle populations in Europe and Asia (2094 samples revealed 30 ancient mtDNA haplotypes, 24 of which were shared with modern breeds, while 6 were unique to the ancient samples. Of seven Y-chromosomal sequences determined from ancient samples, six were Y2 and one Y1 haplotype. Combined data including Swedish samples from the same periods (64 samples was compared with the occurrence of Y-chromosomal haplotypes in modern cattle (1614 samples.The diversity of haplogroups was highest in the Prehistoric samples, where many haplotypes were unique. The Medieval and Post-Medieval samples also show a high diversity with new haplotypes. Some of these haplotypes have become frequent in modern breeds in the Nordic Countries and North-Western Russia while other haplotypes have remained in only a few local breeds or seem to have been lost. A temporal shift in Y-chromosomal haplotypes from Y2 to Y1 was detected that corresponds with the appearance of new mtDNA haplotypes in the Medieval and Post-Medieval period. This suggests a replacement of the Prehistoric mtDNA and Y chromosomal haplotypes by new types of cattle.

  14. Cytogenetic and molecular analysis of male infertility: Y chromosome deletion during nonobstructive azoospermia and severe oligozoospermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Rima; Gupta, N P; Kucheria, K

    2006-01-01

    Reduced male fertility and subfertility can be caused by genetic factors that affect both germ cell development, differentiation, and function; in particular, chromosome abnormalities and Yq microdeletions are a possible cause of spermatogenetic impairment in males as shown by their higher frequency in infertile men than in the general male population. Microdeletion of the long arm of the Y chromosome (Yq) are associated with spermatogenic failure and have been used to define three regions on Yq (AZFa, AZFb, and AZFc) that are critical for germ cell development. With the advent of assisted reproductive technology and intracytoplasmic sperm injection, knowledge about the various factors leading to spermatogenic impairment is one of the most important aspects of scientific research. Therefore, this study was designed to identify the frequency of cytogenetic and submicroscopic interstitial deletions in azoospermia factor loci in infertile Indian males. One hundred and eighty males with nonobstructive oligozoospermia and azoospermia were included in this study. Semen analysis was done in each case to determine the spermatogenic status. Individuals were subjected to detailed clinical examination, family history, and endocrinological and cytogenetic study after consent from the patient. Peripheral blood cultures were set up according to standard protocols and 30 G-banded metaphases were analyzed in each case. Numerical and structural chromosomal abnormalities were detected in 40 infertile cases. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis was done in some cases to identify the percentage of mosaic cell lines and any cryptic or low-level mosaicism. Polymerase chain reaction microdeletion analysis was done in 140 cytogenetically normal cases. Of the 140 cases, 8 showed deletion of at least one of the sequence-tagged site markers. Review of literature has shown that the overall frequency of microdeletions varies from 1 to 55%. In the present study, the frequency of

  15. Mitochondrial and Y chromosome haplotype motifs as diagnostic markers of Jewish ancestry: a reconsideration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eTofanelli

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Several authors have proposed haplotype motifs based on site variants at the mitochondrial genome (mtDNA and the non-recombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY to trace the genealogies of Jewish people. Here, we analyzed their main approaches and test the feasibility of adopting motifs as ancestry markers through construction of a large database of mtDNA and NRY haplotypes from public genetic genealogical repositories. We verified the reliability of Jewish ancestry prediction based on the Cohen and Levite Modal Haplotypes in their classical 6 STR marker format or in the extended 12 STR format, as well as four founder mtDNA lineages (HVS-I segments accounting for about 40% of the current population of Ashkenazi Jews. For this purpose we compared haplotype composition in individuals of self-reported Jewish ancestry with the rest of European, African or Middle Eastern samples, to test for non-random association of ethno-geographic groups and haplotypes. Overall, NRY and mtDNA based motifs, previously reported to differentiate between groups, were found to be more represented in Jewish compared to non-Jewish groups. However, this seems to stem from common ancestors of Jewish lineages being rather recent respect to ancestors of non-Jewish lineages with the same haplotype signatures. Moreover, the polyphyly of haplotypes which contain the proposed motifs and the misuse of constant mutation rates heavily affected previous attempts to correctly dating the origin of common ancestries. Accordingly, our results stress the limitations of using the above haplotype motifs as reliable Jewish ancestry predictors and show its inadequacy for forensic or genealogical purposes.

  16. A genetic basis for a postmeiotic X versus Y chromosome intragenomic conflict in the mouse.

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    Julie Cocquet

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Intragenomic conflicts arise when a genetic element favours its own transmission to the detriment of others. Conflicts over sex chromosome transmission are expected to have influenced genome structure, gene regulation, and speciation. In the mouse, the existence of an intragenomic conflict between X- and Y-linked multicopy genes has long been suggested but never demonstrated. The Y-encoded multicopy gene Sly has been shown to have a predominant role in the epigenetic repression of post meiotic sex chromatin (PMSC and, as such, represses X and Y genes, among which are its X-linked homologs Slx and Slxl1. Here, we produced mice that are deficient for both Sly and Slx/Slxl1 and observed that Slx/Slxl1 has an opposite role to that of Sly, in that it stimulates XY gene expression in spermatids. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency rescues the sperm differentiation defects and near sterility caused by Sly deficiency and vice versa. Slx/Slxl1 deficiency also causes a sex ratio distortion towards the production of male offspring that is corrected by Sly deficiency. All in all, our data show that Slx/Slxl1 and Sly have antagonistic effects during sperm differentiation and are involved in a postmeiotic intragenomic conflict that causes segregation distortion and male sterility. This is undoubtedly what drove the massive gene amplification on the mouse X and Y chromosomes. It may also be at the basis of cases of F1 male hybrid sterility where the balance between Slx/Slxl1 and Sly copy number, and therefore expression, is disrupted. To the best of our knowledge, our work is the first demonstration of a competition occurring between X and Y related genes in mammals. It also provides a biological basis for the concept that intragenomic conflict is an important evolutionary force which impacts on gene expression, genome structure, and speciation.

  17. Analysis of Bos taurus and Sus scrofa X and Y chromosome transcriptome highlights reproductive driver genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faheem Ahmed; Liu, Hui; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Kai; Qamar, Muhammad Tahir Ul; Pandupuspitasari, Nuruliarizki Shinta; Shujun, Zhang

    2017-08-15

    The biology of sperm, its capability of fertilizing an egg and its role in sex ratio are the major biological questions in reproductive biology. To answer these question we integrated X and Y chromosome transcriptome across different species: Bos taurus and Sus scrofa and identified reproductive driver genes based on Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis (WGCNA) algorithm. Our strategy resulted in 11007 and 10445 unique genes consisting of 9 and 11 reproductive modules in Bos taurus and Sus scrofa, respectively. The consensus module calculation yields an overall 167 overlapped genes which were mapped to 846 DEGs in Bos taurus to finally get a list of 67 dual feature genes. We develop gene co-expression network of selected 67 genes that consists of 58 nodes (27 down-regulated and 31 up-regulated genes) enriched to 66 GO biological process (BP) including 6 GO annotations related to reproduction and two KEGG pathways. Moreover, we searched significantly related TF (ISRE, AP1FJ, RP58, CREL) and miRNAs (bta-miR-181a, bta-miR-17-5p, bta-miR-146b, bta-miR-146a) which targeted the genes in co-expression network. In addition we performed genetic analysis including phylogenetic, functional domain identification, epigenetic modifications, mutation analysis of the most important reproductive driver genes PRM1, PPP2R2B and PAFAH1B1 and finally performed a protein docking analysis to visualize their therapeutic and gene expression regulation ability.

  18. Information Assurance in Saudi Organizations - An Empirical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabi, Syed Irfan; Mirza, Abdulrahman A.; Alghathbar, Khaled

    This paper presents selective results of a survey conducted to find out the much needed insight into the status of information security in Saudi Arabian organizations. The purpose of this research is to give the state of information assurance in the Kingdom and to better understand the prevalent ground realities. The survey covered technical aspects of information security, risk management and information assurance management. The results provide deep insights in to the existing level of information assurance in various sectors that can be helpful in better understanding the intricate details of the prevalent information security in the Kingdom. Also, the results can be very useful for information assurance policy makers in the government as well as private sector organizations. There are few empirical studies on information assurance governance available in literature, especially about the Middle East and Saudi Arabia, therefore, the results are invaluable for information security researchers in improving the understanding of information assurance in this region and the Kingdom.

  19. Customer Satisfaction and Brand Switching Intention: A Study of Mobile Services in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud ABDEL HAMID SALEH; Abdulrahman ALTHONAYAN; Ayman ALHABIB; Essa ALRASHEEDI; Ghafar ALQAHTANI

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to investigate first, the relationship between the customer satisfaction and brand switching intention into the Saudi Arabian mobile-service market, and second, the association of service quality, customer service, service pricing, and value-added services with the customer satisfaction. Because of the difficulty of having a frame for the mobile-service customers from their providers, a convenience sample of 350 online respondents with the proper surveying techniqu...

  20. Estimation of Stature from Hand Measurements and Handprints in a Sample of Saudi Population

    OpenAIRE

    Maryna Kornieieva; Azza H. Elelemi

    2016-01-01

    Stature estimation is a commonly used method in forensic identification analysis. The tracks and remnants available at crime scene or catastrophes can give extensive information concerning the biological profiles of unknown persons. However, the investigator should take into account the constitutional peculiarities of the population where the evidence was found due to the high specificity of such data. The present work aimed at studying the ethnic peculiarities of the Saudi Arabian population...