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Sample records for saturated equilibrium conditions

  1. Uniqueness of Specific Interfacial Area–Capillary Pressure–Saturation Relationship Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions in Two-Phase Porous Media Flow

    KAUST Repository

    Joekar-Niasar, Vahid

    2012-02-23

    The capillary pressure-saturation (P c-S w) relationship is one of the central constitutive relationships used in two-phase flow simulations. There are two major concerns regarding this relation. These concerns are partially studied in a hypothetical porous medium using a dynamic pore-network model called DYPOSIT, which has been employed and extended for this study: (a) P c-S w relationship is measured empirically under equilibrium conditions. It is then used in Darcy-based simulations for all dynamic conditions. This is only valid if there is a guarantee that this relationship is unique for a given flow process (drainage or imbibition) independent of dynamic conditions; (b) It is also known that P c-S w relationship is flow process dependent. Depending on drainage and imbibition, different curves can be achieved, which are referred to as "hysteresis". A thermodynamically derived theory (Hassanizadeh and Gray, Water Resour Res 29: 3389-3904, 1993a) suggests that, by introducing a new state variable, called the specific interfacial area (a nw, defined as the ratio of fluid-fluid interfacial area to the total volume of the domain), it is possible to define a unique relation between capillary pressure, saturation, and interfacial area. This study investigates these two aspects of capillary pressure-saturation relationship using a dynamic pore-network model. The simulation results imply that P c-S w relation not only depends on flow process (drainage and imbibition) but also on dynamic conditions for a given flow process. Moreover, this study attempts to obtain the first preliminary insights into the global functionality of capillary pressure-saturation-interfacial area relationship under equilibrium and non-equilibrium conditions and the uniqueness of P c-S w-a nw relationship. © 2012 The Author(s).

  2. Nonmonotone Saturation Profiles for Hydrostatic Equilibrium in Homogeneous Porous Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilfer, R.; Doster, F.; Zegeling, P.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073634433

    2012-01-01

    Nonmonotonic saturation profiles (saturation overshoot) occur as travelling waves in gravity driven fingering. They seem important for preferential flow mechanisms and have found much attention recently. Here, we predict them even for hydrostatic equilibrium when all velocities vanish. We suggest

  3. Evaluating the reliability of equilibrium dissolution assumption from residual gasoline in contact with water saturated sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekmine, Greg; Sookhak Lari, Kaveh; Johnston, Colin D.; Bastow, Trevor P.; Rayner, John L.; Davis, Greg B.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding dissolution dynamics of hazardous compounds from complex gasoline mixtures is a key to long-term predictions of groundwater risks. The aim of this study was to investigate if the local equilibrium assumption for BTEX and TMBs (trimethylbenzenes) dissolution was valid under variable saturation in two dimensional flow conditions and evaluate the impact of local heterogeneities when equilibrium is verified at the scale of investigation. An initial residual gasoline saturation was established over the upper two-thirds of a water saturated sand pack. A constant horizontal pore velocity was maintained and water samples were recovered across 38 sampling ports over 141 days. Inside the residual NAPL zone, BTEX and TMBs dissolution curves were in agreement with the TMVOC model based on the local equilibrium assumption. Results compared to previous numerical studies suggest the presence of small scale dissolution fingering created perpendicular to the horizontal dissolution front, mainly triggered by heterogeneities in the medium structure and the local NAPL residual saturation. In the transition zone, TMVOC was able to represent a range of behaviours exhibited by the data, confirming equilibrium or near-equilibrium dissolution at the scale of investigation. The model locally showed discrepancies with the most soluble compounds, i.e. benzene and toluene, due to local heterogeneities exhibiting that at lower scale flow bypassing and channelling may have occurred. In these conditions mass transfer rates were still high enough to fall under the equilibrium assumption in TMVOC at the scale of investigation. Comparisons with other models involving upscaled mass transfer rates demonstrated that such approximations with TMVOC could lead to overestimate BTEX dissolution rates and underestimate the total remediation time.

  4. Evaluating the reliability of equilibrium dissolution assumption from residual gasoline in contact with water saturated sands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekmine, Greg; Sookhak Lari, Kaveh; Johnston, Colin D; Bastow, Trevor P; Rayner, John L; Davis, Greg B

    2017-01-01

    Understanding dissolution dynamics of hazardous compounds from complex gasoline mixtures is a key to long-term predictions of groundwater risks. The aim of this study was to investigate if the local equilibrium assumption for BTEX and TMBs (trimethylbenzenes) dissolution was valid under variable saturation in two dimensional flow conditions and evaluate the impact of local heterogeneities when equilibrium is verified at the scale of investigation. An initial residual gasoline saturation was established over the upper two-thirds of a water saturated sand pack. A constant horizontal pore velocity was maintained and water samples were recovered across 38 sampling ports over 141days. Inside the residual NAPL zone, BTEX and TMBs dissolution curves were in agreement with the TMVOC model based on the local equilibrium assumption. Results compared to previous numerical studies suggest the presence of small scale dissolution fingering created perpendicular to the horizontal dissolution front, mainly triggered by heterogeneities in the medium structure and the local NAPL residual saturation. In the transition zone, TMVOC was able to represent a range of behaviours exhibited by the data, confirming equilibrium or near-equilibrium dissolution at the scale of investigation. The model locally showed discrepancies with the most soluble compounds, i.e. benzene and toluene, due to local heterogeneities exhibiting that at lower scale flow bypassing and channelling may have occurred. In these conditions mass transfer rates were still high enough to fall under the equilibrium assumption in TMVOC at the scale of investigation. Comparisons with other models involving upscaled mass transfer rates demonstrated that such approximations with TMVOC could lead to overestimate BTEX dissolution rates and underestimate the total remediation time. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Effects of soil water saturation on sampling equilibrium and kinetics of selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pil-Gon; Roh, Ji-Yeon; Hong, Yongseok; Kwon, Jung-Hwan

    2017-10-01

    Passive sampling can be applied for measuring the freely dissolved concentration of hydrophobic organic chemicals (HOCs) in soil pore water. When using passive samplers under field conditions, however, there are factors that might affect passive sampling equilibrium and kinetics, such as soil water saturation. To determine the effects of soil water saturation on passive sampling, the equilibrium and kinetics of passive sampling were evaluated by observing changes in the distribution coefficient between sampler and soil (Ksampler/soil) and the uptake rate constant (ku) at various soil water saturations. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) passive samplers were deployed into artificial soils spiked with seven selected polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In dry soil (0% water saturation), both Ksampler/soil and ku values were much lower than those in wet soils likely due to the contribution of adsorption of PAHs onto soil mineral surfaces and the conformational changes in soil organic matter. For high molecular weight PAHs (chrysene, benzo[a]pyrene, and dibenzo[a,h]anthracene), both Ksampler/soil and ku values increased with increasing soil water saturation, whereas they decreased with increasing soil water saturation for low molecular weight PAHs (phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, and pyrene). Changes in the sorption capacity of soil organic matter with soil water content would be the main cause of the changes in passive sampling equilibrium. Henry's law constant could explain the different behaviors in uptake kinetics of the selected PAHs. The results of this study would be helpful when passive samplers are deployed under various soil water saturations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 46 CFR 42.20-12 - Conditions of equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conditions of equilibrium. 42.20-12 Section 42.20-12... BY SEA Freeboards § 42.20-12 Conditions of equilibrium. The following conditions of equilibrium are... stability. Through an angle of 20 degrees beyond its position of equilibrium, the vessel must meet the...

  7. Dissolution of K-feldspar at CO2-saturated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenqvist, Jörgen; Kilpatrick, Andrew D.; Yardley, Bruce W. D.; Rochelle, Christopher A.

    2014-05-01

    Underground storage of carbon dioxide on a very large scale is widely considered to be an essential part of any strategy to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere. Aquifers in deep sedimentary basins have been identified as suitable targets for geological carbon dioxide storage, especially aquifers located in sandstone host rock. This has led to renewed interest in studying the interaction between sandstone minerals and aqueous fluids, as there is a paucity of data for CO2-containing systems at relevant conditions. In an attempt to improve data coverage for important silicate minerals, we have measured the dissolution kinetics of K-feldspar in CO2-saturated fluids over a range of temperatures. K-feldspar fragments were hand-picked from a larger sample, crushed to a narrow size range and cleaned. The grains were reacted with water in batch-type reactors at temperatures from 20°C to 200°C and pressures up to 200 bar, and the dissolution was followed by periodic withdrawal of aliquots of solution. The mineral grains were allowed to react with pure water for a number of weeks before injection of CO2 into the system. Excess CO2 was provided to ensure CO2 saturation in the experimental systems. While the reaction time before injection was not long enough to attain complete equilibrium, it did considerably lower the degree of undersaturation with respect to K-feldspar and helped highlight the effect of CO2 injection into a rock-equilibrated aqueous fluid. At all temperatures studied, injection of CO2 resulted in a rapid increase in the soluble concentrations of K and Si (and also Na from a plagioclase component). The dissolution then reached apparent steady state conditions after a few days, with observed dissolution rates in the range of 1E-9 to 1E-12 mol/m2/s over the temperature range studied. The CO2-saturated solutions maintained mildly acidic conditions throughout the experiments and the observed rates therefore fall roughly between rates measured in

  8. Conditions for equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Daniela J; de Folter, Julius W J; Luigjes, Bob; Castillo, Sonja I R; Sacanna, Stefano; Philipse, Albert P; Kegel, Willem K

    2010-08-19

    Particular types of solid-stabilized emulsions can be thermodynamically stable as evidenced by their spontaneous formation and monodisperse droplet size, which only depends on system parameters. Here, we investigate the generality of these equilibrium solid-stabilized emulsions with respect to the basic constituents: aqueous phase with ions, oil, and stabilizing particles. From systematic variations of these constituents, we identify general conditions for the spontaneous formation of monodisperse solid-stabilized emulsions droplets. We conclude that emulsion stability is achieved by a combination of solid particles as well as amphiphilic ions adsorbed at the droplet surface, and low interfacial tensions of the bare oil-water interface of order 10 mN/m or below. Furthermore, preferential wetting of the colloidal particles by the oil phase is necessary for thermodynamic stability. We demonstrate the sufficiency of these basic requirements by extending the observed thermodynamic stability to emulsions of different compositions. Our findings point to a new class of colloid-stabilized meso-emulsions with a potentially high impact on industrial emulsification processes due to the associated large energy savings.

  9. Crater density differences: Exploring regional resurfacing, secondary crater populations, and crater saturation equilibrium on the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povilaitis, R Z; Robinson, M S; van der Bogert, C H; Hiesinger, Harald; Meyer, H M; Ostrach, Lillian

    2017-01-01

    The global population of lunar craters >20 km in diameter was analyzed by Head et al., (2010) to correlate crater distribution with resurfacing events and multiple impactor populations. The work presented here extends the global crater distribution analysis to smaller craters (5–20 km diameters, n = 22,746). Smaller craters form at a higher rate than larger craters and thus add granularity to age estimates of larger units and can reveal smaller and younger areas of resurfacing. An areal density difference map generated by comparing the new dataset with that of Head et al., (2010) shows local deficiencies of 5–20 km diameter craters, which we interpret to be caused by a combination of resurfacing by the Orientale basin, infilling of intercrater plains within the nearside highlands, and partial mare flooding of the Australe region. Chains of 5–30 km diameter secondaries northwest of Orientale and possible 8–22 km diameter basin secondaries within the farside highlands are also distinguishable. Analysis of the new database indicates that craters 57–160 km in diameter across much of the lunar highlands are at or exceed relative crater densities of R = 0.3 or 10% geometric saturation, but nonetheless appear to fit the lunar production function. Combined with the observation that small craters on old surfaces can reach saturation equilibrium at 1% geometric saturation (Xiao and Werner, 2015), this suggests that saturation equilibrium is a size-dependent process, where large craters persist because of their resistance to destruction, degradation, and resurfacing.

  10. Strong Duality and Optimality Conditions for Generalized Equilibrium Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. H. Fang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a generalized equilibrium problem involving DC functions. By using the properties of the epigraph of the conjugate functions, some sufficient and/or necessary conditions for the weak and strong duality results and optimality conditions for generalized equilibrium problems are provided.

  11. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and mixed BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic/equilibrium reactions in saturated-unsaturated media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.T.; Salvage, K.M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Gwo, J.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Zachara, J.M.; Szecsody, J.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1998-07-01

    The computer program HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is a coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and BIOGEOCHEMical kinetic and/or equilibrium reactions in saturated/unsaturated media. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM iteratively solves the two-dimensional transport equations and the ordinary differential and algebraic equations of mixed biogeochemical reactions. The transport equations are solved for all aqueous chemical components and kinetically controlled aqueous species. HYDROBIOGEOCHEM is designed for generic application to reactive transport problems affected by both microbiological and geochemical reactions in subsurface media. Input to the program includes the geometry of the system, the spatial distribution of finite elements and nodes, the properties of the media, the potential chemical and microbial reactions, and the initial and boundary conditions. Output includes the spatial distribution of chemical and microbial concentrations as a function of time and space, and the chemical speciation at user-specified nodes.

  12. Do conditional benefits reduce equilibrium unemployment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ploeg, F.

    2006-01-01

    Although unconditional unemployment benefits destroy jobs in competitive and noncompetitive labor markets, conditional benefits can spur job growth in noncompetitive labor markets. Unconditional benefits reduce the penalty of shirking and misconduct, while conditional benefits increase this penalty.

  13. The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer with non-equilibrium model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixin Yang

    Full Text Available The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer is studied when the fluid and solid phase are not in local thermal equilibrium. The modified Darcy model is used for the momentum equation and a two-field model is used for energy equation each representing the fluid and solid phases separately. The effect of thermal non-equilibrium on the onset of double diffusive convection is discussed. The critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding wave number for the exchange of stability and over-stability are obtained, and the onset criterion for stationary and oscillatory convection is derived analytically and discussed numerically.

  14. The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer with non-equilibrium model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhixin; Wang, Shaowei; Zhao, Moli; Li, Shucai; Zhang, Qiangyong

    2013-01-01

    The onset of double diffusive convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous layer is studied when the fluid and solid phase are not in local thermal equilibrium. The modified Darcy model is used for the momentum equation and a two-field model is used for energy equation each representing the fluid and solid phases separately. The effect of thermal non-equilibrium on the onset of double diffusive convection is discussed. The critical Rayleigh number and the corresponding wave number for the exchange of stability and over-stability are obtained, and the onset criterion for stationary and oscillatory convection is derived analytically and discussed numerically.

  15. Effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) condition on emission and hydrodynamics of typical inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas are studied. The average degree of ionization at high temperatures is seen to be much lower compared to the values obtained from Thomas–Fermi scaling or Saha ...

  16. Behavior of the Enthalpy of Adsorption in Nanoporous Materials Close to Saturation Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Knoop, Ariana; Poursaeidesfahani, Ali; Vlugt, Thijs J H; Dubbeldam, David

    2017-07-11

    Many important industrial separation processes based on adsorption operate close to saturation. In this regime, the underlying adsorption processes are mostly driven by entropic forces. At equilibrium, the entropy of adsorption is closely related to the enthalpy of adsorption. Thus, studying the behavior of the enthalpy of adsorption as a function of loading is fundamental to understanding separation processes. Unfortunately, close to saturation, the enthalpy of adsorption is hard to measure experimentally and hard to compute in simulations. In simulations, the enthalpy of adsorption is usually obtained from energy/particle fluctuations in the grand-canonical ensemble, but this methodology is hampered by vanishing insertions/deletions at high loading. To investigate the fundamental behavior of the enthalpy and entropy of adsorption at high loading, we develop a simplistic model of adsorption in a channel and show that at saturation the enthalpy of adsorption diverges to large positive values due to repulsive intermolecular interactions. However, there are many systems that can avoid repulsive intermolecular interactions and hence do not show this drastic increase in enthalpy of adsorption close to saturation. We find that the conventional grand-canonical Monte Carlo method is incapable of determining the enthalpy of adsorption from energy/particle fluctuations at high loading. Here, we show that by using the continuous fractional component Monte Carlo, the enthalpy of adsorption close to saturation conditions can be reliably obtained from the energy/particle fluctuations in the grand-canonical ensemble. The best method to study properties at saturation is the NVT energy (local-) slope methodology.

  17. Soil aquifer treatment of artificial wastewater under saturated conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Essandoh, H. M K

    2011-05-01

    A 2000 mm long saturated laboratory soil column was used to simulate soil aquifer treatment under saturated conditions to assess the removal of chemical and biochemical oxygen demand (COD and BOD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrogen and phosphate, using high strength artificial wastewater. The removal rates were determined under a combination of constant hydraulic loading rates (HLR) and variable COD concentrations as well as variable HLR under a constant COD. Within the range of COD concentrations considered (42 mg L-1-135 mg L-1) it was found that at fixed hydraulic loading rate, a decrease in the influent concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), total nitrogen and phosphate improved their removal efficiencies. At the high COD concentrations applied residence times influenced the redox conditions in the soil column. Long residence times were detrimental to the removal process for COD, BOD and DOC as anoxic processes and sulphate reduction played an important role as electron acceptors. It was found that total COD mass loading within the range of 911 mg d-1-1780 mg d-1 applied as low COD wastewater infiltrated coupled with short residence times would provide better effluent quality than the same mass applied as a COD with higher concentration at long residence times. The opposite was true for organic nitrogen where relatively high concentrations coupled with long residence time gave better removal efficiency. © 2011.

  18. Inferring patterns of migration from gene frequencies under equilibrium conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufto, J; Engen, S; Hindar, K

    1996-12-01

    A new maximum likelihood method to simultaneously estimate the parameters of any migration pattern from gene frequencies in stochastic equilibrium is developed, based on a model of multivariate genetic drift in a subdivided population. Motivated by simulations of this process in the simplified case of two subpopulations, problems related to the nuisance parameter q, the equilibrium gene frequency, are eliminated by conditioning on the observed mean gene frequency. The covariance matrix of this conditional distribution is calculated by constructing an abstract process that mimics the behavior of the original process in the subspace of interest. The approximation holds as long as there is limited differentiation between subpopulations. The bias and variance of estimates of long-range and short-range migration in a finite stepping stone model are evaluated by fitting the model to simulated data with known values of the parameters. Possible ecological extensions of the model are discussed.

  19. Equilibrium Condition during Locomotion and Gait in Broiler Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MCF Alves

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The experiment was carried out with the objective of evaluating a methodology to estimate the angulation and equilibrium condition, relating them to gait score and the main diseases of the locomotion system in males and females of commercial broiler strains. A completely randomized experimental design in a factorial arrangement (2x2 was applied, consisting of two sexes and two genetic strains, with five replicates of 53 chickens each. The following characteristics related to broiler locomotion were studied: gait score (GS; incidence of Valgus (VAL and Varus (VAR deformities and of pododermatitis (POD; body angle relative the ground (ANG; equilibrium condition (EC; body weight (BW and breast weight (BrW; and incidence of femoral degeneration (FD, tibial dyschondroplasia (TD and spondylolisthesis (SPO. GS, and VAL and VAR were assessed inside a broiler house. Birds were then photographed to estimate ANG and EC. Birds were sacrificed at 42 days of age and analyzed for FD, TD, and SPO. Breast percentage was not influenced by sex or strain. Males showed better ANG than females, regardless of strain. Overall, the strains studied showed prostrated EC. The correlation between GS and the evaluated traits was low. There was a moderate to high association between EC and ANG both in males and females. GS showed low correlation with locomotion problems, and therefore, it is a poor indicator of skeletal diseases. On the other hand, the moderate to high correlations of ANG and EC with locomotion problems make them better indicators of bone diseases than gait score, which is possibly more related to EC and body posture than to bone pathologies.

  20. Reflection of processes of non-equilibrium two-phase filtration in oil-saturated hierarchical medium in data of active wave geophysical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachay, Olga; Khachay, Andrey; Khachay, Oleg

    2016-04-01

    The processes of oil extraction from deposit are linked with the movement of multi-phase multi-component media, which are characterized by non-equilibrium and non-linear rheological features. The real behavior of layered systems is defined by the complexity of the rheology of moving fluids and the morphology structure of the porous medium, and also by the great variety of interactions between the fluid and the porous medium [Hasanov and Bulgakova, 2003]. It is necessary to take into account these features in order to informatively describe the filtration processes due to the non-linearity, non-equilibrium and heterogeneity that are features of real systems. In this way, new synergetic events can be revealed (namely, a loss of stability when oscillations occur, and the formation of ordered structures). This allows us to suggest new methods for the control and management of complicated natural systems that are constructed on account of these phenomena. Thus the layered system, from which it is necessary to extract the oil, is a complicated dynamical hierarchical system. A comparison is provided of non-equilibrium effects of the influence of independent hydrodynamic and electromagnetic induction on an oil layer and the medium which it surrounds. It is known that by drainage and steeping the hysteresis effect on curves of the relative phase permeability in dependence on the porous medium's water saturation in some cycles of influence (drainage-steep-drainage) is observed. Using the earlier developed 3D method of induction electromagnetic frequency geometric monitoring, we showed the possibility of defining the physical and structural features of a hierarchical oil layer structure and estimating the water saturation from crack inclusions. This effect allows managing the process of drainage and steeping the oil out of the layer by water displacement. An algorithm was constructed for 2D modeling of sound diffraction on a porous fluid-saturated intrusion of a hierarchical

  1. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and...

  2. Dynamical Detailed Balance and Local Kms Condition for Non-Equilibrium States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accardi, Luigi; Imafuku, Kentaro

    The principle of detailed balance is at the basis of equilibrium physics and is equivalent to the Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) condition (under quite general assumptions). In the present paper we prove that a large class of non-equilibrium quantum systems satisfies a dynamical generalization of the detailed balance condition (dynamical detailed balance) expressing the fact that all the micro-currents, associated to the Bohr frequencies are constant. The usual (equilibrium) detailed balance condition is characterized by the property that this constant is identically zero. From this we deduce a simple and experimentally measurable relation expressing the microcurrent associated to a transition between two levels ɛm→ɛn as a linear combination of the occupation probabilities of the two levels, with coefficients given by the generalized susceptivities (transport coefficients). We then give a second characterization of the dynamical detailed balance condition using a master equation rather than the microcurrents. Finally we show that these two conditions are equivalent to a "local" generalization of the usual KMS condition. Summing up: rather than postulating some ansatz on the basis of phenomenological models or of numerical simulations, we deduce, directly in the quantum domain and from fundamental principles, some natural and simple non equilibrium generalizations of the three main characterizations of equilibrium states. Then we prove that these three, apparently very far, conditions are equivalent. These facts support our convinction that these three equivalent conditions capture a universal aspect of non equilibrium phenomena.

  3. Condition of Mechanical Equilibrium at the Phase Interface with Arbitrary Geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkov, V. V.; Zubkova, A. V.

    2017-09-01

    The authors produced an expression for the mechanical equilibrium condition at the phase interface within the force definition of surface tension. This equilibrium condition is the most general one from the mathematical standpoint and takes into account the three-dimensional aspect of surface tension. Furthermore, the formula produced allows describing equilibrium on the fractal surface of the interface. The authors used the fractional integral model of fractal distribution and took the fractional order integrals over Euclidean space instead of integrating over the fractal set.

  4. Ozone chemical equilibrium in the extended mesopause under the nighttime conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belikovich, M. V.; Kulikov, M. Yu.; Grygalashvyly, M.; Sonnemann, G. R.; Ermakova, T. S.; Nechaev, A. A.; Feigin, A. M.

    2018-01-01

    For retrieval of atomic oxygen and atomic hydrogen via ozone observations in the extended mesopause region (∼70-100 km) under nighttime conditions, an assumption on photochemical equilibrium of ozone is often used in research. In this work, an assumption on chemical equilibrium of ozone near mesopause region during nighttime is proofed. We examine 3D chemistry-transport model (CTM) annual calculations and determine the ratio between the correct (modeled) distributions of the O3 density and its equilibrium values depending on the altitude, latitude, and season. The results show that the retrieval of atomic oxygen and atomic hydrogen distributions using an assumption on ozone chemical equilibrium may lead to large errors below ∼81-87 km. We give simple and clear semi-empirical criterion for practical utilization of the lower boundary of the area with ozone's chemical equilibrium near mesopause.

  5. Effects of non-local thermodynamic equilibrium conditions on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section we study the effects of radiation transport on hydrodynamic parameters of typical ICF plasmas. We study the differences in one group and multigroup predictions. We also study the effects of non-LTE plasma conditions. For these studies, we consider the planer foils driven by a 200 ps (FWHM) Gaussian Nd ...

  6. Creep response in shear of clayey geo-materials under saturated and unsaturated conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Nazer Nor Shahidah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Translational slides in clays are often characterized by long-lasting intermittent movements associated with the fluctuations of pore-water pressure. Physically-based models designed to support hazard analysis of landslide movements and early warning systems require the integration of time-dependent (viscous constitutive models for the shear displacements because landslide movements are typically controlled by the viscous behaviour of the clay geo-material. This paper presents an investigation of the viscous response of a clay geo-material under saturated and unsaturated conditions. Creep and relaxation tests have been first carried out on saturated clay samples by means of direct shear box. To gain a conceptual understanding of the viscous response of the clay in shear, mechanical analogues were considered based on combinations of springs and dashpots. Preliminary tests on unsaturated samples were finally carried out to gain a first insight into the viscous response of the clay under unsaturated conditions.

  7. Velocity Regulation in Switched Reluctance Motors under Magnetic Flux Saturation Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Guzmán, Victor M.; Orrante-Sakanassi, Jorge; Mendoza-Mondragón, Fortino

    2018-01-01

    We propose a controller for velocity regulation in switched reluctance motors under magnetic flux saturation conditions. Both hysteresis and proportional control are employed in the internal electric current loops. A classical PI velocity controller is employed in the external loop. Our control law is the simplest one proposed in the literature but provided with a formal stability proof. We prove that the state is bounded having an ultimate bound which can be rendered arbitrarily small by a s...

  8. Determination of equilibrium composition of thermally ionized monoatomic gas under different physical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanova, M. S.; Rydalevskaya, M. A.

    2017-05-01

    Perfect gas mixtures that result from thermal ionization of spatially and chemically homogeneous monoatomic gases are considered. Equilibrium concentrations of the components of such mixtures are determined using integration over the momentum space and summation with respect to energy levels of the distribution functions that maximize the entropy of system under condition for constancy of the total number of nuclei and electrons. It is demonstrated that such a method allows significant simplification of the calculation of the equilibrium composition for ionized mixtures at different temperatures and makes it possible to study the degree of ionization of gas versus gas density and number in the periodic table of elements.

  9. Velocity Regulation in Switched Reluctance Motors under Magnetic Flux Saturation Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor M. Hernández-Guzmán

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a controller for velocity regulation in switched reluctance motors under magnetic flux saturation conditions. Both hysteresis and proportional control are employed in the internal electric current loops. A classical PI velocity controller is employed in the external loop. Our control law is the simplest one proposed in the literature but provided with a formal stability proof. We prove that the state is bounded having an ultimate bound which can be rendered arbitrarily small by a suitable selection of controller gains. Furthermore, this result stands when starting from any initial condition within a radius which can be arbitrarily enlarged using suitable controller gains. We present a simulation study where even convergence to zero of velocity error is observed as well as a good performance when regulating velocity in the presence of unknown step changes in external torque disturbances.

  10. Does pre-dawn water potential reflect conditions of equilibrium in plant and soil water status?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellin, Arne

    1999-02-01

    Variation in base water potential ( Ψb, a daily maximum level of plant water potential, which is presumed to correspond to the equilibrium between soil and plant water potentials) was examined in shoots of Picea abies and Vaccinium myrtillus with respect to soil (available water storage, water potential, temperature) and atmospheric (temperature, relative humidity, vapour pressure deficit) conditions. The available soil water storage (W tr) accounted for 77% of the dynamics of Ψb, while the influence of atmospheric factors became evident under high evaporative demand. Ψb was not always observable immediately before dawn, but on 30% of observation days, the recovery continued up to an hour or two after dawn. Full equilibrium between soil and plant water potentials in P. abies in northern conditions is rather improbable by dawn in summer-time, because of the shortness of the dark period and probable night-time transpiration in the case of high atmospheric vapour pressure deficit.

  11. EQUILIBRIUM CONDITION OF RESIDUAL EDGE WEDGE-TYPE NANOTWIN IN POST-DEFORMED SOLID BODY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. V. Vasilevich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An equilibrium condition of residual edge wedge-type nanotwin in a deformed solid body has been derived in the paper. The condition conclusion is based on the necessity to ensure an equilibrium of force balance acting on every twinning dislocation from the side of the rest twin dislocations. In this case dislocation structure and stress condition at nanotwin mouth have not been taken into account. Results of dislocation theory obtained in the framework of elasticity theory and continuum mechanics have been used in the paper. The paper has considered a component of the resultant force acting in a twinning plane under an assumption that there is no motion of twinning dislocations in the direction which is perpendicular to the twinning plane. The following condition has been made in the model: a discrete distribution of twinning dislocations at twin boundaries. In order to reduce cumbersome calculations a limited number of twinning dislocations has been considered in the paper and an assumption has been made about small value of a helical component in the Burgers vector, in other words the paper has considered an edge nanotwin. In order to decrease a number of equations in the system of equilibrium conditions a symmetric property of a shear component in a stress tensor has been used in the paper. The paper contains description how restrictions on the order of twinning dislocation arrangement on twin boundaries have been imposed. In this case it has been assumed that an arrangement of twinning dislocation pairs in different twin boundaries is in one plane which is perpendicular to the twinning plane. It is necessary to keep in mind that only one twinning dislocation can be located in one twinning plane. Calculations have shown that it is possible to ensure a stable and unstable equilibrium of an edge nanotwin in an ideal unloaded crystal. Sustainable balance is provided by alignment of twinning dislocations in a wall. This leads to a twin

  12. Short-Term Expectation Formation Versus Long-Term Equilibrium Conditions: The Danish Housing Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Hetland

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary contribution of this paper is to establish that the long-swings behavior observed in the market price of Danish housing since the 1970s can be understood by studying the interplay between short-term expectation formation and long-run equilibrium conditions. We introduce an asset market model for housing based on uncertainty rather than risk, which under mild assumptions allows for other forms of forecasting behavior than rational expectations. We test the theory via an I(2 cointegrated VAR model and find that the long-run equilibrium for the housing price corresponds closely to the predictions from the theoretical framework. Additionally, we corroborate previous findings that housing markets are well characterized by short-term momentum forecasting behavior. Our conclusions have wider relevance, since housing prices play a role in the wider Danish economy, and other developed economies, through wealth effects.

  13. Evolution of Zinc Oxide Nanostructures from Non-Equilibrium Deposition Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-11

    DD-MM-YYYY) 16-06-2016 2. REPORT TYPE Final report 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 27-Mar-2013 to 31-Mar-2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evolution of Zinc...nanoscale under conditions far away from equilibrium. First, the wedding cake growth mechanism in the formation of 1D and 2D ZnO nanostructures was observed...the type of report, such as final, technical, interim, memorandum, master’s thesis , progress, quarterly, research, special, group study, etc. 3

  14. Generalized paired-agent kinetic model for in vivo quantification of cancer cell-surface receptors under receptor saturation conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghipour, N.; Davis, S. C.; Tichauer, K. M.

    2017-01-01

    New precision medicine drugs oftentimes act through binding to specific cell-surface cancer receptors, and thus their efficacy is highly dependent on the availability of those receptors and the receptor concentration per cell. Paired-agent molecular imaging can provide quantitative information on receptor status in vivo, especially in tumor tissue; however, to date, published approaches to paired-agent quantitative imaging require that only ‘trace’ levels of imaging agent exist compared to receptor concentration. This strict requirement may limit applicability, particularly in drug binding studies, which seek to report on a biological effect in response to saturating receptors with a drug moiety. To extend the regime over which paired-agent imaging may be used, this work presents a generalized simplified reference tissue model (GSRTM) for paired-agent imaging developed to approximate receptor concentration in both non-receptor-saturated and receptor-saturated conditions. Extensive simulation studies show that tumor receptor concentration estimates recovered using the GSRTM are more accurate in receptor-saturation conditions than the standard simple reference tissue model (SRTM) (% error (mean  ±  sd): GSRTM 0  ±  1 and SRTM 50  ±  1) and match the SRTM accuracy in non-saturated conditions (% error (mean  ±  sd): GSRTM 5  ±  5 and SRTM 0  ±  5). To further test the approach, GSRTM-estimated receptor concentration was compared to SRTM-estimated values extracted from tumor xenograft in vivo mouse model data. The GSRTM estimates were observed to deviate from the SRTM in tumors with low receptor saturation (which are likely in a saturated regime). Finally, a general ‘rule-of-thumb’ algorithm is presented to estimate the expected level of receptor saturation that would be achieved in a given tissue provided dose and pharmacokinetic information about the drug or imaging agent being used, and physiological

  15. Bacteria transport and retention in intact calcareous soil columns under saturated flow conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farrokhian Firouzi Ahmad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Study of bacterial transport and retention in soil is important for various environmental applications such as groundwater contamination and bioremediation of soil and water. The main objective of this research was to quantitatively assess bacterial transport and deposition under saturated conditions in calcareous soil. A series of leaching experiments was conducted on two undisturbed soil columns. Breakthrough curves of Pseudomonas fluorescens and Cl were measured. After the leaching experiment, spatial distribution of bacteria retention in the soil columns was determined. The HYDRUS-1D one- and two-site kinetic models were used to predict the transport and deposition of bacteria in soil. The results indicated that the two-site model fits the observed data better than one-site kinetic model. Bacteria interaction with the soil of kinetic site 1 revealed relatively fast attachment and slow detachment, whereas attachment to and detachment of bacteria from kinetic site 2 was fast. Fast attachment and slow detachment of site 1 can be attributed to soil calcium carbonate that has favorable attachment sites for bacteria. The detachment rate was less than 0.02 of the attachment rate, indicating irreversible attachment of bacteria. High reduction rate of bacteria was also attributed to soil calcium carbonate.

  16. Processive and Distributive Extension of Human Telomeres by Telomerase Under Homeostatic and Non-equilibrium Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yong; Abreu, Eladio; Kim, Jinyong; Stadler, Guido; Eskiocak, Ugur; Terns, Michael P.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Shay, Jerry W.; Wright, Woodring E.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Specific information about how telomerase acts in vivo is necessary for understanding telomere dynamics in human tumor cells. Our results imply that under homeostatic telomere length-maintenance conditions only one molecule of telomerase acts at each telomere during every cell division and processively adds ~60 nt to each end. In contrast, multiple molecules of telomerase act at each telomere when telomeres are elongating (non-equilibrium conditions). Telomerase extension is less processive during the first few weeks following the reversal of long-term treatment with the telomerase inhibitor GRN163L, a time when Cajal bodies fail to deliver telomerase RNA to telomeres. This result implies that processing of telomerase by Cajal bodies may affect its processivity. Overexpressed telomerase is also less processive than the endogenously expressed telomerase. These findings reveal two major distinct extension modes adopted by telomerase in vivo. PMID:21549308

  17. A note on exact conditional and unconditional tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Guogen

    2013-01-01

    The exact conditional approach is frequently used for testing Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in population genetics. This approach respects the test size as compared to the traditionally used asymptotic approaches. It is a full-enumeration method and very computational. Many efficient algorithms have been successfully developed to implement this exact approach. An alternative to the conditional approach is the unconditional approach, which relaxes the restriction of the fixed number of allelic counts as in the conditional approach. The first unconditional test considered in this study is the one based on maximization, which has been shown to be more powerful than the conditional test to loci with two alleles for small sample sizes. By using the p value of the conditional approach as a test statistic in the following maximization step, the second unconditional test is uniformly more powerful than the conditional approach. We compared these exact tests based on three commonly used test statistics with regards to type I error rate and power. It is recommended to use the second unconditional approach in practice due to the power gain in the case with two alleles.

  18. Equilibrium and kinetic models for colloid release under transient solution chemistry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A; Torkzaban, Saeed; Leij, Feike; Simunek, Jiri

    2015-10-01

    We present continuum models to describe colloid release in the subsurface during transient physicochemical conditions. Our modeling approach relates the amount of colloid release to changes in the fraction of the solid surface area that contributes to retention. Equilibrium, kinetic, equilibrium and kinetic, and two-site kinetic models were developed to describe various rates of colloid release. These models were subsequently applied to experimental colloid release datasets to investigate the influence of variations in ionic strength (IS), pH, cation exchange, colloid size, and water velocity on release. Various combinations of equilibrium and/or kinetic release models were needed to describe the experimental data depending on the transient conditions and colloid type. Release of Escherichia coli D21g was promoted by a decrease in solution IS and an increase in pH, similar to expected trends for a reduction in the secondary minimum and nanoscale chemical heterogeneity. The retention and release of 20nm carboxyl modified latex nanoparticles (NPs) were demonstrated to be more sensitive to the presence of Ca(2+) than D21g. Specifically, retention of NPs was greater than D21g in the presence of 2mM CaCl2 solution, and release of NPs only occurred after exchange of Ca(2+) by Na(+) and then a reduction in the solution IS. These findings highlight the limitations of conventional interaction energy calculations to describe colloid retention and release, and point to the need to consider other interactions (e.g., Born, steric, and/or hydration forces) and/or nanoscale heterogeneity. Temporal changes in the water velocity did not have a large influence on the release of D21g for the examined conditions. This insensitivity was likely due to factors that reduce the applied hydrodynamic torque and/or increase the resisting adhesive torque; e.g., macroscopic roughness and grain-grain contacts. Our analysis and models improve our understanding and ability to describe the amounts

  19. Oxidative weathering chemical migration under variably saturated conditions and supergene copper enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, K.; Brimhall, G.

    1999-04-01

    Transport of oxygen gas from the land surface through an unsaturated zone has a strong influence on oxidative weathering processes. Oxidation of sulfide minerals such as pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), one of the most common naturally occurring minerals, is the primary source of acid drainage from mines and waste rock piles. Here we present a detailed numerical model of supergene copper enrichment that involves the oxidative weathering of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) and chalcopyrite (CuFeS{sub 2}), and acidification that causes mobilization of metals in the unsaturated zone, with subsequent formation of enriched ore deposits of chalcocite (CuS) and covellite (Cu{sub 2}S) in the reducing conditions below the water table. We examine and identify some significant conceptual and computational issues regarding the oxidative weathering processes through the modeling tool. The dissolution of gaseous oxygen induced by the oxidation reduces oxygen partial pressure, as well as the total pressure of the gas phase. As a result, the gas flow is modified, then the liquid phase flow. Results indicate that this reaction effect on the fluid flow may not be important under ambient conditions, and gas diffusion can be a more important mechanism for oxygen supply than gas or liquid advection. Acidification, mobilization of metals, and alteration of primary minerals mostly take place in unsaturated zone (oxidizing), while precipitation of secondary minerals mainly occurs in saturated zone (reducing). The water table may be considered as an interface between oxidizing and reducing zones. Moving water table due to change of infiltration results in moving oxidizing zone and redistributing aqueous chemical constitutes and secondary mineral deposits. The oxidative weathering processes are difficult to model numerically, because concentrations of redox sensitive chemical species such as O{sub 2}(aq), SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} and HS{sup -} may change over tens of orders of magnitude between oxidizing and reducing

  20. Continuous central venous oxygen saturation monitoring under varying physiological conditions in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissoon, N; Spenceley, N; Krahn, G; Milner, R

    2010-09-01

    We compared saturations from a paediatric central venous oximetry catheter with co-oximetry values with changes in drug infusions, intravascular blood volume and hypoxia in an animal model. Piglets (large white) were anaesthetised, intubated and mechanically ventilated. PediaSat oximetry catheters were placed in the superior vena cava via jugular vein cut-down and in the inferior vena cava percutaneously via the femoral vein. A carotid arterial catheter was placed via cut-down for blood sampling and pressure monitoring. Anaesthesia was maintained with continuous thiopentone and supplemental morphine. Haemodynamics (heart rate, mean arterial blood, central venous pressure), fibreoptic ScvO2 (ScvO2-inferior) from inferior vena cava, fibreoptic ScvO2 (ScvO2-superior) from superior vena cava and blood gas oximetry (ScvO2-co-ox) were measured simultaneously at predetermined intervals during increasing adrenaline and sodium nitroprusside infusions and during increasing hypoxia and hypovolaemia. There was good agreement of both superior vena cava and inferior vena cava ScvO2 catheters with co-oximetry during adrenaline and sodium nitroprusside infusions. During the hypoxia study there was good agreement between the co-oximeter to ScvO2-superior catheter but poor agreement with to the inferior vena cava catheter samples. In the hypovolaemic phase of the experiment there was good agreement between the measured co-oximetry value and ScvO2-superior catheter until the mean blood pressure reached 43 mmHg. The oximetry catheter is capable of identifying changes in ScvO2 under physiological conditions usually encountered in clinical medicine but was less accurate at the extremes of physiology and when placed in the inferior vena cava catheter especially during hypovolaemia and hypoxia.

  1. Transport properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock under partially saturated conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jougnot, D.; Revil, A.; Lu, N.; Wayllace, A.

    2010-08-01

    A series of experiments were performed to characterize the permeability, the specific storage, the capillary pressure, the streaming potential coupling coefficient, and the electrical conductivity of a very low permeability Callovo-Oxfordian clay rock at different water saturations. The Callovo-Oxfordian formation is presently investigated as a potential host to store nuclear wastes because of its very low permeability (typically 10 nd at saturation) and high specific surface area. We first present the constitutive transport equations including an electrokinetic cross-coupling term in the generalized Darcy and Ohm constitutive equations. Then we present new experimental results using measurements of transient weight losses of samples submitted to a change in the relative humidity imposed by an automated humidity system in a hermetic chamber. These experiments are interpreted with a 1-D analytical model of the coupled hydromechanical and transport equations. The hydromechanical transport properties (relative permeability and specific storage) of this clay rock are investigated in the relative saturation range from 0.23 to 0.70. We demonstrate that below 30% in relative humidity, the flux of the vapor phase with respect to the flux of the liquid water phase cannot be neglected. The relative apparent permeability can be described by a simple power law relationship with the saturation. In addition, we measure the electrical conductivity and the streaming potential coupling coefficient at various saturations. The electrical conductivity is described by a model accounting for electrical double-layer contributions to surface conductivity. The measurement of the streaming potential coupling coefficient agrees with a power law model for the coupling coefficient versus the relative water saturation. A relationship between the exponent used to characterize the relative permeability and the second Archie's exponent used to describe the dependence of the electrical conductivity

  2. Coupled effects of hydrodynamic and solution chemistry conditions on long-term nanoparticle transport and deposition in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study aims to systematically explore the coupled effects of hydrodynamic and solution chemistry conditions on the long-term transport and deposition kinetics of nanoparticles (NPs) in saturated porous media. Column transport experiments were carried out at various solution ionic strengths (IS),...

  3. Real-time powder diffraction studies of energy materials under non-equilibrium conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa K. Peterson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Energy materials form the central part of energy devices. An essential part of their function is the ability to reversibly host charge or energy carriers, and analysis of their phase composition and structure in real time under non-equilibrium conditions is mandatory for a full understanding of their atomic-scale functional mechanism. Real-time powder diffraction is increasingly being applied for this purpose, forming a critical step in the strategic chemical engineering of materials with improved behaviour. This topical review gives examples of real-time analysis using powder diffraction of rechargeable battery electrodes and porous sorbent materials used for the separation and storage of energy-relevant gases to demonstrate advances in the insights which can be gained into their atomic-scale function.

  4. Real-time powder diffraction studies of energy materials under non-equilibrium conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Vanessa K.; Auckett, Josie E.; Pang, Wei-Kong

    2017-09-01

    Energy materials form the central part of energy devices. An essential part of their function is the ability to reversibly host charge or energy carriers, and analysis of their phase composition and structure in real time under non-equilibrium conditions is mandatory for a full understanding of their atomic-scale functional mechanism. Real-time powder diffraction is increasingly being applied for this purpose, forming a critical step in the strategic chemical engineering of materials with improved behaviour. This topical review gives examples of real-time analysis using powder diffraction of rechargeable battery electrodes and porous sorbent materials used for the separation and storage of energy-relevant gases to demonstrate advances in the insights which can be gained into their atomic-scale function.

  5. Entropy Production and Equilibrium Conditions of General-Covariant Spin Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Muschik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In generalizing the special-relativistic one-component version of Eckart’s continuum thermodynamics to general-relativistic space-times with Riemannian or post-Riemannian geometry as presented by Schouten (Schouten, J.A. Ricci-Calculus, 1954 and Blagojevic (Blagojevic, M. Gauge Theories of Gravitation, 2013 we consider the entropy production and other thermodynamical quantities, such as the entropy flux and the Gibbs fundamental equation. We discuss equilibrium conditions in gravitational theories, which are based on such geometries. In particular, thermodynamic implications of the non-symmetry of the energy-momentum tensor and the related spin balance equations are investigated, also for the special case of general relativity.

  6. Comments on the compatibility of thermodynamic equilibrium conditions with lattice propagators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canfora, Fabrizio [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECs), Valdivia (Chile); Giacomini, Alex [Universidad Austral de Chile, Instituto de Ciencias Fisicas y Matematicas, Valdivia (Chile); Pais, Pablo [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECs), Valdivia (Chile); Universite Libre de Bruxelles and International Solvay Institutes, Physique Theorique et Mathematique, Brussels (Belgium); Rosa, Luigi [Universita di Napoli Federico II, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Dipartimento di Fisica, Naples (Italy); Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Naples (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Napoli, Naples (Italy); Zerwekh, Alfonso [Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Departamento de Fisica and Centro Cientifico-Tecnologico de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2016-08-15

    In this paper the compatibility is analyzed of the non-perturbative equations of state of quarks and gluons arising from the lattice with some natural requirements for self-gravitating objects at equilibrium: the existence of an equation of state (namely, the possibility to define the pressure as a function of the energy density), the absence of superluminal propagation and Le Chatelier's principle. It is discussed under which conditions it is possible to extract an equation of state (in the above sense) from the non-perturbative propagators arising from the fits of the latest lattice data. In the quark case, there is a small but non-vanishing range of temperatures in which it is not possible to define a single-valued functional relation between density and pressure. Interestingly enough, a small change of the parameters appearing in the fit of the lattice quark propagator (of around 10 %) could guarantee the fulfillment of all the three conditions (keeping alive, at the same time, the violation of positivity of the spectral representation, which is the expected signal of confinement). As far as gluons are concerned, the analysis shows very similar results. Whether or not the non-perturbative quark and gluon propagators satisfy these conditions can have a strong impact on the estimate of the maximal mass of quark stars. (orig.)

  7. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihani, Abhishek [University of Texas at Austin; Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas at Austin; Cook, Ann [Ohio State University; Glosser, Deborah [Ohio State University; Shushtarian, Arash [University of Texas at Austin

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  8. Pore Size Distribution and Methane Equilibrium Conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihani, A. D.; Daigle, H.; Cook, A.; Glosser, D.; Shushtarian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  9. Correction: Electrochemical Investigation of the Corrosion of Different Microstructural Phases of X65 Pipeline Steel under Saturated Carbon Dioxide Conditions. Materials 2015, 8, 2635–2649

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Yang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the published manuscript “Electrochemical Investigation of the Corrosion of Different Microstructural Phases of X65 Pipeline Steel under Saturated Carbon Dioxide Conditions. [...

  10. Process-based, long-term morphodynamic modeling to investigate conditions for equilibrium estuarine geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wegen, M.; Wang, Z. B.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Roelvink, J. A.

    2009-04-01

    Literature review suggests that alluvial estuaries all over the world have a shape that exponentially widens towards the mouth. In strongly tapering estuaries, the tidal characteristics mimic a standing wave in the sense that the phase difference between maximum water level and maximum velocity is 1 •2 ?, whereas the tidal wave still propagates along the estuary [Friedrichs and Aubrey (1994), Jay (1991), Prandle (2003), Savenije (2001)]. Furthermore, it has been suggested that, for equilibrium conditions, the tidal water level amplitude and the velocity amplitude remain fairly constant along the estuary. This latter condition also implies that sediment transport along the estuary is constant [Friedrichs (1995)]. The aim of the current research is to investigate the development of these assumed equilibrium conditions with a morphodynamic, process-based numerical model (Delft3D). Model results cover an evolution of a time span of about 6400 years in a 300 km long tidal embayment under constant tidal forcing conditions. This is an extended version of an 80 km basin described in earlier research [Van der Wegen et al. (2008)]. The model starts from a highly schematised rectangular cross-section which is uniform along the embayment. The model allows for bank erosion, bed slope effects and drying and flooding of intertidal area, whereas short waves are not considered. Grid resolution is 100 m by 200 m which covers the length scale of the major patterns. Because of this detailed grid and the long timescale calculations took months on a decent PC. Model results show considerable widening at the mouth (roughly along an exponentially narrowing profile) and a slower development more landward. The 1 •2 ? time lag between maximum water level and maximum velocity, the constant water level amplitude and the constant velocity amplitude develop within centuries and are most pronounced in the widened part of the embayment. More landward, the tidal wave characteristics still reflect

  11. Sorption of benzothiazoles onto sandy aquifer material under equilibrium and nonequlibrium conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kragulj Marijana M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the sorption behaviour of 1,3-benzothiazole (BT and 2-(methylthiobenzothiazole (MTBT was investigated on Danube geosorbent under equilibrium and nonequilibrium conditions. All sorption isotherms fitted well with the Freundlich model (R2=0.932-0.993. The results showed that organic matter of the Danube geosorbent has a higher sorption affinity for the more hydrophobic MTBT compared to BT. However, sorption-desorption experiments showed that MTBT was more easily desorbed than BT molecules, which indicates the importance of absorption relative to adsorption in the overall sorption mechanism of MTBT. In general, molecules of BT and MTBT were more easily desorbed in the lower concentration range, which resulted in an increase in the hysteresis indices with increasing concentrations. Column experiments revealed that retention of the investigated compounds on the aquifer material followed the compound’s hydrophobicity. BT showed a lower retention, in accordance with its lower sorption affinity obtained in the static experiments, while MTBT showed a greater sorption affinity, and thus had a longer retention time on the column. Thus during transport BT represent greater risk for groundwaters than MTBT. These results have increased our understanding of benzothiazoles sorption and desorption process which represent one of the most important factors which influence the behaviour of organic compounds in the environment.

  12. Border control! Capillary pressure / saturation relationships in a diphasic flow in a random medium: Influence of the boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Eve-Agnès; Toussaint, Renaud; Moura, Marcel; Jankov, Mihailo; Schäfer, Gerhard; Jørgen Måløy, Knut

    2013-04-01

    Solving problems involving biphasic flows in porous media, at a scale larger than the pore one, normally requires the use of relationships between pressure and saturation. These allow the closure of generalized Darcy flow models for two phases, commonly used in hydrology or large scale problems of diphasic flow in porous media. There are mathematical models which approximate experimental records with curve-fitting equations. The two most common models are the Brooks-Corey and van Genüchten ones, they are used to complete a system of generalized Darcy equations. The purpose of the current study is the influence of the boundary conditions on the relationship between pressure and saturation. We perform numerical simulations of drainage experiments. Water is the wetting fluid and air is the non wetting fluid. The results highlight the fact that a filter which allows only water to flow at the exit face of the system modifies both the shape of the curve and the value of the residual saturation. The pressure of the models that are commonly used does not match with the pressure of real flows since there is no filter to cross, to flow from an elementary volume to another. Experiments performed in transparent Hele-Shaw cells exhibit the same features, showing the influence of the semi permeable boundary conditions on the pressure-saturation measures obtained. This effect corresponding to the formation of localized plugging clusters at the boundaries, is obtained in slow flow conditions, and is independent of any dynamic fingering, also known to affect such relations (1,2,3). Modeling flows in open media thus would require to use the central part of the curves pressure saturation where the effect of the boundaries is the least important, or to modify properly these relationships to extract the behavior unaffected by boundaries. References: (1) Two-phase flow: structure, upscaling, and consequences for macroscopic transport properties Renaud Toussaint ; Knut Jørgen M

  13. Under What Conditions Can Equilibrium Gas-Particle Partitioning Be Expected to Hold in the Atmosphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Huajun; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Flagan, Richard C; Seinfeld, John H

    2015-10-06

    The prevailing treatment of secondary organic aerosol formation in atmospheric models is based on the assumption of instantaneous gas-particle equilibrium for the condensing species, yet compelling experimental evidence indicates that organic aerosols can exhibit the properties of highly viscous, semisolid particles, for which gas-particle equilibrium may be achieved slowly. The approach to gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is controlled by gas-phase diffusion, interfacial transport, and particle-phase diffusion. Here we evaluate the controlling processes and the time scale to achieve gas-particle equilibrium as a function of the volatility of the condensing species, its surface accommodation coefficient, and its particle-phase diffusivity. For particles in the size range of typical atmospheric organic aerosols (∼50-500 nm), the time scale to establish gas-particle equilibrium is generally governed either by interfacial accommodation or particle-phase diffusion. The rate of approach to equilibrium varies, depending on whether the bulk vapor concentration is constant, typical of an open system, or decreasing as a result of condensation into the particles, typical of a closed system.

  14. Effect of gas saturation conditions on the expansion ratio of microcellular poly(lactic acid/wood-flour composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Poly(lactic acid or PLA and PLA/wood-flour composites were microcellular foamed with CO2 through a batch foaming process. Specifically, the gas saturation pressure and time varied during processing to produce PLA foams with a high expansion ratio. A ten fold expansion ratio resulted in microcellular foamed PLA over unfoamed counterpart. The foaming conditions associated with such a high expansion ratio involved a lower gas saturation pressure up to 2.76 MPa, which corresponds to a critical gas concentration of approximately 9.4%. Beyond this critical value, foam expansion decreased significantly. Investigations also studied the effect of incorporating wood flour on the foamability of the resulting PLA/wood-flour composites. The addition of wood flour into the PLA matrix significantly affected the expansion ratio of PLA/wood-flour composite foams.

  15. Fluid dynamics with saturated minijet initial conditions in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paatelainen, R.; Eskola, K.J.; Niemi, H. [Department of Physics, PO Box 35, FI-40014 University of Jyväskylä (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, PO Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Tuominen, K. [Department of Physics, PO Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Helsinki Institute of Physics, PO Box 64, FI-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2014-04-04

    Using next-to-leading order perturbative QCD and a conjecture of saturation to suppress the production of low-energy partons, we calculate the initial energy densities and formation times for the dissipative fluid dynamical evolution of the quark–gluon plasma produced in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. We identify the model uncertainties and demonstrate the predictive power of the approach by a good global agreement with the measured centrality dependence of charged particle multiplicities, transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow simultaneously for the Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC and Au+Au at RHIC. In particular, the shear viscosity in the different phases of QCD matter is constrained in this new model simultaneously by all these data.

  16. Chemical Equilibrium and Mineral Saturation in Waters from Oil Wells of the Activo Luna Field, Tabasco, Mexico; Equilibrio quimico y grado de saturacion de minerales en aguas de pozos petroleros de Activo Luna, Tabasco, Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan R, Rosa Maria; Arellano G, Victor M.; Portugal M, Enrique; Torres R, Vicente [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (Mexico); Torres Alvarado, Ignacio [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (Mexico); Ascencio C, Fernando; Martinez A; Ana E [Petroleos Mexicanos (Mexico)

    2001-09-01

    Chemical equilibrium of formation waters from seven oil wells of the Activo Luna field (Tabasco, Mexico) was modelled. Saturation indices of characteristic hydrothermal minerals were calculated at ambient and reservoir conditions in order to predict scaling potential of deep and surface installations. The salinity of waters was found to be in the range from 43,000 (well Escuintle 2) to 250,000 (well Lune 3B) mg/kg as total dissolved solids. The water samples were classified as sodium-chioride type. Ionic strength for the solutions was found to be between 0.75 and 6.5. Activity coefficients were estimated by virial (Pitzer equations) methods using the GEOCHEMIST WORKENCH (GWB) software. Minerals such as anhydrite, halite, alunite, fluorite and barite were found to be supersaturated at reservoir conditions. A solid scale sample obtained from well Luna-3B was analysed. Analysis indicate the presence of calcite, anhydrite, fluorite and sphalerite which suggest the occurrence of temperatures of at least 180 Celcius degrees with acidic conditions and high chemical corrosion potential. [Spanish] Se modelo el equilibrio quimico de aguas de formacion producidas por siete pozos petroleros pertenecientes al Activo Luna, en el estado de Tabasco, Mexico, se calcularon los indices de saturacion de minerales caracteristicos tanto en las condiciones ambiente como en las de yacimiento, con el proposito de apoyar el control de incrustaciones en las instalaciones superficiales y profundas. La salinidad de las salmueras se encontro en el rango de 43,000 (pozos Escuintle 2) a 250,000 (pozos Luna 3B) mg/kg de solidos disueltos totales y las muestras se clasificaron como del tipo clorurado-sodico. La fuerza ionica de las soluciones varia entre 0.75 y 6.5 molar, por lo que los coeficientes de actividad de la modelacion de equilibrio quimico se estimaron por metodos viriales empleando las ecuaciones de Pitzer mediante el programa GEOCHEMIST WORKBENCH (GWB). Minerales como anhidrita, halita

  17. Linear response theory and optimal control for a molecular system under non-equilibrium conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Han; Hartmann, Carsten; Schütte, Christof

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a straightforward generalisation of the linear response theory on a finite time-horizon to systems in non-equilibrium that are subject to external forcing. We briefly revisit the standard linear response result for equilibrium systems, where we consider Langevin dynamics as a special case, and then give an alternative derivation using a change-of-measure argument that does not rely on any stationarity or reversibility assumption. This procedure easily enables us to calculate the second-order correction to the linear response formula (which may or may not be useful in practice). Furthermore, we outline how the novel non-equilibrium linear response formula can be used to compute optimal controls of molecular systems for cases in which one wants to steer the system to maximise a certain target expectation value. We illustrate our approach with simple numerical examples.

  18. Carbonate mineral saturation states in the East China Sea: present conditions and future scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.-C. Chou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available To assess the impact of rising atmospheric CO2 and eutrophication on the carbonate chemistry of the East China Sea shelf waters, saturation states (Ω for two important biologically relevant carbonate minerals – calcite (Ωc and aragonite (Ωa – were calculated throughout the water column from dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC and total alkalinity (TA data collected in spring and summer of 2009. Results show that the highest Ωc (∼9.0 and Ωa (∼5.8 values were found in surface water of the Changjiang plume area in summer, whereas the lowest values (Ωc = ∼2.7 and Ωa = ∼1.7 were concurrently observed in the bottom water of the same area. This divergent behavior of saturation states in surface and bottom waters was driven by intensive biological production and strong stratification of the water column. The high rate of phytoplankton production, stimulated by the enormous nutrient discharge from the Changjiang, acts to decrease the ratio of DIC to TA, and thereby increases Ω values. In contrast, remineralization of organic matter in the bottom water acts to increase the DIC to TA ratio, and thus decreases Ω values. The projected result shows that continued increases of atmospheric CO2 under the IS92a emission scenario will decrease Ω values by 40–50% by the end of this century, but both the surface and bottom waters will remain supersaturated with respect to calcite and aragonite. Nevertheless, superimposed on such Ω decrease is the increasing eutrophication, which would mitigate or enhance the Ω decline caused by anthropogenic CO2 uptake in surface and bottom waters, respectively. Our simulation reveals that, under the combined impact of eutrophication and augmentation of atmospheric CO2, the bottom water of the Changjiang plume area will become undersaturated with respect to aragonite (Ωa = ∼0.8 by the end of this century, which would threaten the health of the benthic ecosystem.

  19. Convective hydromagnetic instabilities of a power-law liquid saturating a porous medium: Flux conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahtour, C.; Ben Hamed, H.; Beji, H.; Guizani, A.; Alimi, W.

    2018-01-01

    We investigate how an external imposed magnetic field affects thermal instability in a horizontal shallow porous cavity saturated by a non-Newtonian power-law liquid. The magnetic field is assumed to be constant and parallel to the gravity. A uniform heat flux is applied to the horizontal walls of the layer while the vertical walls are adiabatic. We use linear stability analysis to find expressions for the critical Rayleigh number as a function of the power-law index and the intensity of the magnetic field. We use nonlinear parallel flow theory to find some explicit solutions of the problem, and we use finite difference numerical simulations to solve the full nonlinear equations. We show how the presence of magnetic field alters the known hydrodynamical result of Newtonian flows and power-law flows and how it causes the presence of subcritical finite amplitude convection for both pseudoplastic and dilatant fluids. We also show that in the limit of very strong magnetic field, the dissipation of energy by Joule effect dominates the dissipation of energy by shear stress and gives to the liquid an inviscid character.

  20. Modified Thermodynamic Equilibrium Model for Biomass Gasification: A Study of the Influence of Operating Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puig Arnavat, Maria; Bruno, Juan Carlos; Coronas, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for biomass gasification processes developed in the equation solver program Engineering Equation Solver (EES) with an implemented user-friendly interface. It is based on thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and includes some modifications to be adapted......, and oxygen enrichment] on producer gas. The model predicts the behavior of different kinds of biomass and becomes a useful tool to simulate the biomass gasification process by allowing its integration in complete energy supply systems, such as co-generation plants....... to a real process, in which only a partial approach to chemical equilibrium is achieved. The model can be used to predict the producer gas composition, yield, and heating value for a certain biomass with a specific ultimate composition and moisture content. It has been validated with published experimental...

  1. Local stability condition of the equilibrium of an oligopoly market with bounded rationality adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Adyda; Saaban, Azizan; Zaibidi, Nerda Zura

    2017-11-01

    This paper considers an n-firm oligopoly market where each firm produces a single homogenous product under a constant unit cost. Nonlinearity is introduced into the model of this oligopoly market by assuming the market has an isoelastic demand function. Furthermore, instead of the usual assumption of perfectly rational firms, they are assumed to be boundedly rational in adjusting their outputs at each period. The equilibrium of this n discrete dimensional system is obtained and its local stability is calculated.

  2. Energy and Emission Characteristics of a Short-Arc Xenon Flash Lamp Under "Saturated" Optical Brightness Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamrukov, A. S.; Kireev, S. G.; Kozlov, N. P.; Shashkovskii, S. G.

    2017-09-01

    We present the results of a study of the electrical, energy, and spectral brightness characteristics of an experimental three-electrode high-pressure xenon flash lamp under conditions ensuring close to maximum possible spectral brightness for the xenon emission. We show that under saturated optical brightness conditions (brightness temperature in the visible region of the spectrum 30,000 K), emission of a pulsed discharge in xenon is quite different from the emission from an ideal blackbody: the maximum brightness temperatures are 24,000 K in the short-wavelength UV region and 19,000 K in the near IR range. The relative fraction of UV radiation in the emission spectrum of the lamp is >50%, which lets us consider such lamps as promising broadband sources of radiation with high spectral brightness for many important practical applications.

  3. Supramolecular gel phase crystallization: orthogonal self-assembly under non-equilibrium conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, D Krishna; Steed, Jonathan W

    2014-04-07

    This tutorial review charts the history of gel phase crystallization from its origins in Liesegang ring formation to current research in the generation of new pharmaceutical solid forms in low molecular weight organogels. The growth of molecular crystals under a supersaturation gradient within the same space and timescale as the formation of a gel phase material is placed into context as an example of orthogonal self-assembly. Such multi-component, weakly coupled orthogonal self-assembly processes occurring far from equilibrium represent a powerful conceptual paradigm for generating fascinating emergent behaviour in chemical systems.

  4. A Conditionally Stable Scheme for a Transient Flow of a Non-Newtonian Fluid Saturating a Porous Medium

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-06-02

    The problem of thermal dispersion effects on unsteady free convection from an isothermal horizontal circular cylinder to a non-Newtonian fluid saturating a porous medium is examined numerically. The Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer model is employed to describe the flow field. The thermal diffusivity coefficient has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The simultaneous development of the momentum and thermal boundary layers are obtained by using finite difference method. The stability conditions are determined for each difference equation. Using an explicit finite difference scheme, solutions at each time-step have been found and then stepped forward in time until reaching steady state solution. Velocity and temperature profiles are shown graphically. It is found that as time approaches infinity, the values of friction factor and heat transfer coefficient approach the steady state values.

  5. Facilitated transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by humic substances in saturated porous media under acidic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruichang; Zhang, Haibo; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Li, Lianzhen; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The transport behavior of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs, 30 nm in diameter) was studied in well-defined porous media composed of clean quartz sand over a range of solution chemistry under acidic conditions. Transport of TiO2 NPs was dramatically enhanced by humic substances (HS) at acidic pH (4.0, 5.0 and 6.0), even at a low HS concentration of 0.5 mg L-1. Facilitated transport of TiO2 NPs was likely attributable to the increased stability of TiO2 NPs and repulsive interaction between TiO2 NPs and quartz sands due to the adsorbed HS. The mobility of TiO2 NPs was also increased with increasing pH from 4.0 to 6.0. Although transport of TiO2 NPs was insensitive to low ionic strength, it was significantly inhibited by high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl2. In addition, calculated Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy indicated that high energy barriers were responsible for the high mobility of TiO2 NPs, while the secondary energy minimum could play an important role in the retention of TiO2 NPs at 100 mmol L-1 NaCl. Straining and gravitational settlement of larger TiO2 NPs aggregates at 1 mg L-1 HS, pH 5.0, and 2 mmol L-1 CaCl2 could be responsible for the significant retention even in the presence of high energy barriers. Moreover, more favorable interaction between approaching TiO2 NPs and TiO2 NPs that had been already deposited on the collector resulted in a ripening-shape breakthrough curve at 2 mmol L-1 CaCl2. Overall, a combination of mechanisms including DLVO-type force, straining, and physical filtration was involved in the retention of TiO2 NPs over the range of solution chemistry examined in this study.

  6. Consistency between kinetics and thermodynamics: general scaling conditions for reaction rates of nonlinear chemical systems without constraints far from equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlad, Marcel O; Popa, Vlad T; Ross, John

    2011-02-03

    We examine the problem of consistency between the kinetic and thermodynamic descriptions of reaction networks. We focus on reaction networks with linearly dependent (but generally kinetically independent) reactions for which only some of the stoichiometric vectors attached to the different reactions are linearly independent. We show that for elementary reactions without constraints preventing the system from approaching equilibrium there are general scaling relations for nonequilibrium rates, one for each linearly dependent reaction. These scaling relations express the ratios of the forward and backward rates of the linearly dependent reactions in terms of products of the ratios of the forward and backward rates of the linearly independent reactions raised to different scaling powers; the scaling powers are elements of the transformation matrix, which relates the linearly dependent stoichiometric vectors to the linearly independent stoichiometric vectors. These relations are valid for any network of elementary reactions without constraints, linear or nonlinear kinetics, far from equilibrium or close to equilibrium. We show that similar scaling relations for the reaction routes exist for networks of nonelementary reactions described by the Horiuti-Temkin theory of reaction routes where the linear dependence of the mechanistic (elementary) reactions is transferred to the overall (route) reactions. However, in this case, the scaling conditions are valid only at the steady state. General relationships between reaction rates of the two levels of description are presented. These relationships are illustrated for a specific complex reaction: radical chlorination of ethylene.

  7. Transport of cerium oxide nanoparticles in saturated silica media: influences of operational parameters and aqueous chemical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhaohan; Gao, Peng; Qiu, Ye; Liu, Guohong; Feng, Yujie; Wiesner, Mark

    2016-10-03

    This paper aimed to investigate the influences of operational parameters and aqueous chemical conditions on transport behaviors of cerium oxides nanoparticles (CeO2-NPs) in saturated silica media. Results indicated that increasing rates of attachment efficiency (α) were related with cationic types, and critical deposition concentration (CDC) for divalent cation (Ca2+ and Mg2+) were more than 31-fold of that for monovalent cation (Na+ and K+). Increase or reduction of electrolyte pH could both promote the mobility of CeO2-NPs in glass beads, while influence was more evident at alkaline conditions. α increased linearly with NPs concentrations, while decreased linearly with flow velocity in the column, and effects were related with electrolyte contents. Presence of surfactants could sharply decreased α, and SDS was more effective to facilitate CeO2-NPs transport than Triton X-100. With DOMs concentrations increasing, α firstly kept constant, then sharply declined, and finally reduced very slowly. The influence of DOMs on NPs deposition was in order of SA > HA > TA >  BSA. Overall, this study revealed that aqueous chemical conditions was crucial to NPs transport in porous media, and would provide significant information for our understanding on the fate and transport of nanoparticles in natural environment.

  8. Dual Mechanism Conceptual Model for Cr Isotope Fractionation during Reduction by Zerovalent Iron under Saturated Flow Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson-Hanes, Julia H; Amos, Richard T; Blowes, David W; Ptacek, Carol J

    2015-05-05

    Chromium isotope analysis is rapidly becoming a valuable complementary tool for tracking Cr(VI) treatment in groundwater. Evaluation of various treatment materials has demonstrated that the degree of isotope fractionation is a function of the reaction mechanism, where reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) induces the largest fractionation. However, it has also been observed that uniform flow conditions can contribute complexity to isotope measurements. Here, laboratory batch and column experiments were conducted to assess Cr isotope fractionation during Cr(VI) reduction by zerovalent iron under both static and saturated flow conditions. Isotope measurements were accompanied by traditional aqueous geochemical measurements (pH, Eh, concentrations) and solid-phase analysis by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Increasing δ(53)Cr values were associated with decreasing Cr(VI) concentrations, which indicates reduction; solid-phase analysis showed an accumulation of Cr(III) on the iron. Reactive transport modeling implemented a dual mechanism approach to simulate the fractionation observed in the experiments. The faster heterogeneous reaction pathway was associated with minimal fractionation (ε=-0.2‰), while the slower homogeneous pathway exhibited a greater degree of fractionation (ε=-0.9‰ for the batch experiment, and ε=-1.5‰ for the column experiment).

  9. Ge deposition on Si(1 0 0) in the conditions close to dynamic equilibrium between islands growth and their decay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shklyaev, A.A., E-mail: shklyaev@isp.nsc.ru [A.V. Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, SB RAS, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Budazhapova, A.E. [Novosibirsk State Technical University, Novosibirsk 630055 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Solid source MBE is used for island growth by Ge deposition on Si(1 0 0) at 700–900 °C. • Islands acquire a monomodal size distribution at temperatures above 800 °C. • Islands form ordered arrays during Ge deposition at 900 °C. • Conditions close to dynamic equilibrium are realized for growth and decay of islands at 900 °C. • Shape of ordered islands is cone with shallow sidewalls. - Abstract: The formation of islands arrays during Ge deposition on Si(1 0 0) at high temperatures is studied using scanning tunneling and electron microscopies. It is found that the island size and shape distributions, which are known to be bimodal at growth temperatures below 700 °C, become monomodal at temperatures above 800 °C. The obtained data suggest that the processes such as island nucleation and Ostwald ripening become less significant in the surface morphology formation, giving the advantage to selective attachment of deposited Ge atoms to island sidewalls and spatially inhomogeneous Si-Ge intermixing, as the temperature increases. At 900 °C, the islands exhibit a tendency to form laterally ordered arrays when the growth conditions approach the dynamic equilibrium between the growth of islands and their decay by means of Si-Ge intermixing. The islands ordering is accompanied by their shape transformation into the cone with shallow sidewalls inclined from (1 0 0) by angles of around 10°.

  10. Experimental study and theoretical interpretation of saturation effect on ultrasonic velocity in tight sandstones under different pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongqing; Wei, Jianxin; Di, Bangrang; Ding, Pinbo; Huang, Shiqi; Shuai, Da

    2018-03-01

    Understanding the influence of lithology, porosity, permeability, pore structure, fluid content and fluid distribution on the elastic wave properties of porous rocks is of great significance for seismic exploration. However, unlike conventional sandstones, the petrophysical characteristics of tight sandstones are more complex and less understood. To address this problem, we measured ultrasonic velocity in partially saturated tight sandstones under different effective pressures. A new model is proposed, combining the Mavko-Jizba-Gurevich relations and the White model. The proposed model can satisfactorily simulate and explain the saturation dependence and pressure dependence of velocity in tight sandstones. Under low effective pressure, the relationship of P-wave velocity to saturation is pre-dominantly attributed to local (pore scale) fluid flow and inhomogeneous pore-fluid distribution (large scale). At higher effective pressure, local fluid flow gradually decreases, and P-wave velocity gradually shifts from uniform saturation towards patchy saturation. We also find that shear modulus is more sensitive to saturation at low effective pressures. The new model includes wetting ratio, an adjustable parameter that is closely related to the relationship between shear modulus and saturation.

  11. Elimination of carbon vacancies in 4H-SiC employing thermodynamic equilibrium conditions at moderate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayedh, H. M.; Svensson, B. G. [University of Oslo, Department of Physics/Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Nipoti, R. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Microelettronica e Microsistemi, Sezione di Bologna (CNR-IMM of Bologna), I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Hallén, A. [Royal Institute of Technology, School of Information and Communication Technology (ICT), SE-164 40 Kista-Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-12-21

    The carbon vacancy (V{sub C}) is a major point defect in high-purity 4H-SiC epitaxial layers limiting the minority charge carrier lifetime. In layers grown by chemical vapor deposition techniques, the V{sub C} concentration is typically in the range of 10{sup 12 }cm{sup −3}, and after device processing at temperatures approaching 2000 °C, it can be enhanced by several orders of magnitude. In the present study, both as-grown layers and a high-temperature processed one have been annealed at 1500 °C and the V{sub C} concentration is demonstrated to be strongly reduced, exhibiting a value of only a few times 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −3} as determined by deep-level transient spectroscopy measurements. The value is reached already after annealing times on the order of 1 h and is evidenced to reflect thermodynamic equilibrium under C-rich ambient conditions. The physical processes controlling the kinetics for establishment of the V{sub C} equilibrium are estimated to have an activation energy below ∼3 eV and both in-diffusion of carbon interstitials and out-diffusion of V{sub C}'s are discussed as candidates. This concept of V{sub C} elimination is flexible and readily integrated in a materials and device processing sequence.

  12. Adsorption of hydrogen fluoride onto activated carbon under vacuum conditions: Equilibrium, kinetic and thermodynamic investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Bahrami Hussein; Safdari Jaber; Moosavian Ali Mohammad; Torab-Mostaedi Meisam

    2012-01-01

    In this study, the adsorption of HF gas by three types of activated carbon has been investigated under vacuum condition. The effects of experimental parameters such as initial pressure of the HF gas, contact time and temperature on adsorption process have been investigated. The results showed that the adsorption of the HF gas onto activated carbon increased by increasing initial pressure of gas, while it decreased with increase in temperature. The Freundlich isotherm model fitted the eq...

  13. Estimation of In-Situ Groundwater Conditions Based on Geochemical Equilibrium Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Hokari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a means of estimating in-situ groundwater pH and oxidation-redox potential (ORP, two very important parameters for species migration analysis in safety assessments for radioactive waste disposal or carbon dioxide sequestration. The method was applied to a pumping test in a deep borehole drilled in a tertiary formation in Japan for validation. The following application examples are presented: when applied to several other pumping tests at the same site, it could estimate distributions of the in-situ groundwater pH and ORP; applied to multiple points selected in the groundwater database of Japan, it could help estimate the in-situ redox reaction governing the groundwater conditions in some areas.

  14. Axisymmetric equilibrium models for magnetized neutron stars in General Relativity under the Conformally Flat Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pili, A. G.; Bucciantini, N.; Del Zanna, L.

    2014-04-01

    Extremely magnetized neutron stars with magnetic fields as strong as ˜1015-16 G, or magnetars, have received considerable attention in the last decade due to their identification as a plausible source for Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-ray Pulsars. Moreover, this class of compact objects has been proposed as a possible engine capable of powering both Long and Short Gamma-Ray Bursts, if the rotation period in their formation stage is short enough (˜1 ms). Such strong fields are expected to induce substantial deformations of the star and thus to produce the emission of gravitational waves. Here we investigate, by means of numerical modelling, axisymmetric static equilibria of polytropic and strongly magnetized stars in full general relativity, within the ideal magneto-hydrodynamic regime. The eXtended Conformally Flat Condition (XCFC) for the metric is assumed, allowing us to employ the techniques introduced for the X-ECHO code, proven to be accurate, efficient, and stable. The updated XNS code for magnetized neutron star equilibria is made publicly available for the community (see www.arcetri.astro.it/science/ahead/XNS). Several sequences of models are here retrieved, from the purely toroidal (resolving a controversy in the literature) or poloidal cases, to the so-called twisted torus mixed configurations, expected to be dynamically stable, which are solved for the first time in the non-perturbative regime.

  15. Defluoridation of groundwater using aluminum-coated bauxite: Optimization of synthesis process conditions and equilibrium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salifu, Abdulai; Petrusevski, Branislav; Mwampashi, Emmanuel S; Pazi, Iddi A; Ghebremichael, Kebreab; Buamah, Richard; Aubry, Cyril; Amy, Gary L; Kenedy, Maria D

    2016-10-01

    There is no known effective treatment for fluoride-related health disorders, hence prevention through water defluoridation is necessary. This study explored the possibility of modifying the physico-chemical properties of bauxite, a locally available material in many countries including Ghana, by thermal treatment and an aluminum coating, for water defluoridation. The study mainly focused on investigating the effects of varying synthesis process conditions on the defluoridation efficiency of Granular Aluminum Coated Bauxite (GACB). GACB performed better than raw bauxite (RB) and was able to reduce fluoride concentration in groundwater from 5 ± 0.2 mg/L to ≤ 1.5 mg/L, World Health Organization (WHO) guideline. Based on nonlinear Chi-square (χ(2)) analysis, the best-fitting isotherm model for the fluoride-GACB system was in the order: Freundlich > Redlich-Perterson ≈ Langmuir > Temkin. The fluoride adsorption capacity of GACB (qmax = 12.29 mg/g) based on the Langmuir model was found to be either comparable or higher than the capacities of some reported fluoride adsorbents. Aluminum (Al) coating procedures optimized in this study could therefore be a useful approach for synthesizing an effective fluoride adsorbent using bauxite, a locally available material. Kinetic and isotherm analysis, thermodynamic calculations, as well as FTIR and Raman analysis suggested the mechanism of fluoride adsorption onto GACB was complex and involved both physical adsorption and chemisorption processes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Risk Assessment and Monitoring of Stored CO2 in Organic Rocks Under Non-Equilibrium Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malhotra, Vivak

    2014-06-30

    shale cores, which were pressurized with high pressure CO2, determine the fate of sequestered CO2 in these cores. Our results suggested that Illinois bituminous coal in its unperturbed state, i.e., when not pressurized with CO2, showed large variations in the mechanical properties. Modulus varied from 0.7 GPa to 3.4 GPa even though samples were extracted from a single large chunk of coal. We did not observe any glass transition for Illinois bituminous coal at - 100oC ≤ T ≤ 300oC, however, when the coal was pressurized with CO2 at ambient ≤ P ≤ 20.7 MPa, the viscosity of the coal decreased and inversely scaled with the CO2 pressure. The decrease in viscosity as a function of pressure could pose CO2 injection problems for coal as lower viscosity would allow the solid coal to flow to plug the fractures, fissures, and cleats. Our experiments also showed a very small fraction of CO2 was absorbed in coal; and when CO2 pressurized coals were exposed to atmospheric conditions, the loss of CO2 from coals was massive. Half of the sequestered gas from the coal cores was lost in less than 20 minutes. Our shockwave experiments on Illinois bituminous coal, New Albany shale (Illinois), Devonian shale (Ohio), and Utica shale (Ohio) presented clear evidence that the significant emission of the sequestered CO2 from these formations cannot be discounted during seismic activity, especially if caprock is compromised. It is argued that additional shockwave studies, both compressive and transverse, would be required for successfully mapping the risks associated with sequestering high pressure CO2 in coal and shale formations.

  17. A Model of Equilibrium Conditions of Roof Rock Mass Giving Consideration to the Yielding Capacity of Powered Supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczuk, Marek; Pawlikowski, Arkadiusz

    2017-12-01

    The work presents the model of interactions between the powered roof support units and the rock mass, while giving consideration to the yielding capacity of the supports - a value used for the analysis of equilibrium conditions of roof rock mass strata in geological and mining conditions of a given longwall. In the model, the roof rock mass is kept in equilibrium by: support units, the seam, goafs, and caving rocks (Fig. 1). In the assumed model of external load on the powered roof support units it is a new development - in relation to the model applied in selection of supports based on the allowable deflection of roof theory - that the load bearing capacity is dependent on the increment of the inclination of the roof rock mass and on the properties of the working medium, while giving consideration to the air pockets in the hydraulic systems, the load of the caving rocks on the caving shield, introducing the RA support value of the roof rock mass by the coal seam as a closed-form expression and while giving consideration to the additional support provided by the rocks of the goaf as a horizontal component R01H of the goaf reaction. To determine the roof maintenance conditions it is necessary to know the characteristics linking the yielding capacity of the support units with the heading convergence, which may be measured as the inclination angle of the roof rock mass. In worldwide mining, Ground Reaction Curves are used, which allow to determine the required yielding capacity of support units based on the relation between the load exerted on the unit and the convergence of the heading ensuring the equilibrium of the roof rock mass. (Figs. 4 and 8). The equilibrium of the roof rock mass in given conditions is determined at the displacement of the rock mass by the α angle, which impacts the following values: yielding capacity of units FN, vertical component of goaf reaction R01V and the horizontal component of goaf reaction R01H. In the model of load on the support

  18. Equilibrium Dynamics of β-N-Methylamino-L-Alanine (BMAA) and Its Carbamate Adducts at Physiological Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, David; Goto, Joy J.; Krishnan, Viswanathan V

    2016-01-01

    Elevated incidences of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis/Parkinsonism Dementia complex (ALS/PDC) is associated with β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), a non-protein amino acid. In particular, the native Chamorro people living in the island of Guam were exposed to BMAA by consuming a diet based on the cycad seeds. Carbamylated forms of BMAA are glutamate analogues. The mechanism of neurotoxicity of the BMAA is not completely understood, and BMAA acting as a glutamate receptor agonist may lead to excitotoxicity that interferes with glutamate transport systems. Though the interaction of BMAA with bicarbonate is known to produce carbamate adducts, here we demonstrate that BMAA and its primary and secondary adducts coexist in solution and undergoes a chemical exchange among them. Furthermore, we determined the rates of formation/cleavage of the carbamate adducts under equilibrium conditions using two-dimensional proton exchange NMR spectroscopy (EXSY). The coexistence of the multiple forms of BMAA at physiological conditions adds to the complexity of the mechanisms by which BMAA functions as a neurotoxin. PMID:27513925

  19. Hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of a mobile bed confluence under equilibrium conditions for different values of the flow discharge ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birjukova Canelas, Olga; Lage Ferreira, Rui Miguel; Heleno Cardoso, António

    2017-04-01

    Under steady water and sediment feeding in laboratory conditions, sediment fluxes tend to reach a steady state and bed morphology tends to equilibrium. This laboratory study states two objectives: i) to provide a detailed three-dimensional characterization of the flow field at a movable bed confluence and ii) to contribute to the characterization of the effect of the flow discharge ratio (Qr = Qt/Qm, Qt - tributary flow discharge and Qm - main channel flow discharge) on the flow field. While the junction angle between the main channel and the tributary as well as the sediment discharge ratio were kept constant, two scenarios corresponding to two different flow discharge ratios with dominant main channel flow discharge (Qm > Qt) were analyzed. Prior to the flow velocity measurements, both channels were fed with water and sand mixtures and tests were run until the equilibrium condition was reached, i.e. until the moment where the difference between the total supplied sand discharge and the total outgoing sand discharge was smaller than ± 5%. During the experiments, bed topography was systematically recorded. Then, the flow was stopped, the water was slowly drained and the bed was carefully fixed with a cement and vernix coat and allowed to dry to guarantee that it remained stable from there on, while the clear water (free of sand) discharges were fed again to the fixed bed converging channels. A 3D side looking Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), installed on a remotely controlled and precisely positioned (± 0.1 mm) robotic arm, was used to measure the instantaneous velocities at a very dense mesh. Once the velocities measured and recorded, the water surface levels were surveyed. For the case with more dominant tributary flow (Qr = 0.17), as expected, the scour hole formed at the tributary mouth is much deeper and larger and extends towards the outer bank of the post-confluence channel, as well as upstream the junction corner. The avalanche slopes are, consequently

  20. The chemical equilibrium under non-ideal conditions: industrial applications; El equilibrio quimico bajo condiciones no ideales: aplicaciones industriales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Martinez, Susana; Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto; Quere, Alain [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico)

    1993-05-01

    In this paper is described the application of a computer program to the chemical equilibrium in non-ideal conditions (aqueous solutions of multicomponent electrolytes in the ionic forces interval: 0 < 1 < 6 mol/Kg H{sub 2}O and temperatures close to 25 celsius degrees), and its importance at industrial scale. The calculation of the thermodynamic properties of the solution (activity coefficients, osmotic coefficient, and water activity) is based in one of the most modern theories of the electrolytes; the theoretical results, compared with the experimental ones have an error of 10% or better. [Espanol] En este trabajo se describe la aplicacion de un programa de computo al equilibrio quimico en condiciones no ideales (soluciones acuosas de electrolitos multicomponentes en el intervalo de fuerzas ionicas: 0 < 1 < 6 mol/Kg H{sub 2}O y temperaturas cercanas a 25 grados celsius) y su importancia a escala industrial. El calculo de las propiedades termodinamicas (coeficientes de actividad, coeficiente osmotico y actividad del agua) de la solucion, esta basado en una de las teorias mas modernas de los electrolitos; los resultados teoricos comparados con los experimentales tienen un error del 10% o mejor.

  1. Heterogeneity of equilibrium molten globule state of cytochrome c induced by weak salt denaturants under physiological condition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamidur Rahaman

    Full Text Available While many proteins are recognized to undergo folding via intermediate(s, the heterogeneity of equilibrium folding intermediate(s along the folding pathway is less understood. In our present study, FTIR spectroscopy, far- and near-UV circular dichroism (CD, ANS and tryptophan fluorescence, near IR absorbance spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS were used to study the structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the native (N, denatured (D and intermediate state (X of goat cytochorme c (cyt-c induced by weak salt denaturants (LiBr, LiCl and LiClO4 at pH 6.0 and 25°C. The LiBr-induced denaturation of cyt-c measured by Soret absorption (Δε400 and CD ([θ]409, is a three-step process, N ↔ X ↔ D. It is observed that the X state obtained along the denaturation pathway of cyt-c possesses common structural and thermodynamic characteristics of the molten globule (MG state. The MG state of cyt-c induced by LiBr is compared for its structural and thermodynamic parameters with those found in other solvent conditions such as LiCl, LiClO4 and acidic pH. Our observations suggest: (1 that the LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c retains the native Met80-Fe(III axial bond and Trp59-propionate interactions; (2 that LiBr-induced MG state of cyt-c is more compact retaining the hydrophobic interactions in comparison to the MG states induced by LiCl, LiClO4 and 0.5 M NaCl at pH 2.0; and (3 that there exists heterogeneity of equilibrium intermediates along the unfolding pathway of cyt-c as highly ordered (X1, classical (X2 and disordered (X3, i.e., D ↔ X3 ↔ X2 ↔ X1 ↔ N.

  2. Effects of Dietary Fat and Saturated Fat Content on Liver Fat and Markers of Oxidative Stress in Overweight/Obese Men and Women under Weight-Stable Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marina, Anna; von Frankenberg, Anize Delfino; Suvag, Seda; Callahan, Holly S.; Kratz, Mario; Richards, Todd L.; Utzschneider, Kristina M.

    2014-01-01

    Dietary fat and oxidative stress are hypothesized to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and progression to steatohepatitis. To determine the effects of dietary fat content on hepatic triglyceride, body fat distribution and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, overweight/obese subjects with normal glucose tolerance consumed a control diet (CONT: 35% fat/12% saturated fat/47% carbohydrate) for ten days, followed by four weeks on a low fat (LFD (n = 10): 20% fat/8% saturated fat/62% carbohydrate) or high fat diet (HFD (n = 10): 55% fat/25% saturated fat/27% carbohydrate). Hepatic triglyceride content was quantified by MRS and abdominal fat distribution by MRI. Fasting biomarkers of inflammation (plasma hsCRP, IL-6, IL-12, TNFα, IFN-γ) and oxidative stress (urinary F2-α isoprostanes) were measured. Body weight remained stable. Compared to the CONT, hepatic triglyceride decreased on the LFD (mean (95% CI): change −2.13% (−3.74%, −0.52%)), but did not change on the HFD and there was no significant difference between the LFD and HFD. Intra-abdominal fat did not change significantly on either diet, but subcutaneous abdominal fat increased on the HFD. There were no significant changes in fasting metabolic markers, inflammatory markers and urinary F2-α isoprostanes. We conclude that in otherwise healthy overweight/obese adults under weight-neutral conditions, a diet low in fat and saturated fat has modest effects to decrease liver fat and may be beneficial. On the other hand, a diet very high in fat and saturated fat had no effect on hepatic triglyceride or markers of metabolism, inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:25353663

  3. Experimental Study on Anisotropic Strength and Deformation Behavior of a Coal Measure Shale under Room Dried and Water Saturated Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingyi Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental investigation of anisotropic strength and deformation behavior of coal measure shale. The effect of two factors (i.e., anisotropy and water content on shale strength and deformation behavior was studied. A series of uniaxial and triaxial compression tests were conducted on both room dried and water saturated samples for different lamination angles. The test results indicate that (1 the compressive strength, cohesion, internal friction angle, tangent Young’s modulus, and axial strain corresponding to the peak and residual strengths of room dried specimens exhibit anisotropic behavior that strongly depends on the orientation angle (β; (2 in comparison to the room dried samples, the compressive strength and Young’s modulus as well as the anisotropy are all reduced for water saturated specimens; and (3 the failure mechanism of the samples can be summarized into two categories: sliding along lamination and shearing of rock material, with the type occurring in a particular situation depending strongly on the lamination orientation angles with respect to the major principal stress. According to the findings, it is strongly recommended that the effect of anisotropy and water content on the strength and deformation behavior of the rock must be considered in ground control designs.

  4. Phase equilibrium engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Brignole, Esteban Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, the teaching of phase equilibria emphasizes the relationships between the thermodynamic variables of each phase in equilibrium rather than its engineering applications. This book changes the focus from the use of thermodynamics relationships to compute phase equilibria to the design and control of the phase conditions that a process needs. Phase Equilibrium Engineering presents a systematic study and application of phase equilibrium tools to the development of chemical processes. The thermodynamic modeling of mixtures for process development, synthesis, simulation, design and

  5. Electrochemical Investigation of the Corrosion of Different Microstructural Phases of X65 Pipeline Steel under Saturated Carbon Dioxide Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanfeng Yang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the influence of metallurgy on the corrosion behaviour of separate weld zone (WZ and parent plate (PP regions of X65 pipeline steel in a solution of deionised water saturated with CO2, at two different temperatures (55 °C and 80 °C and at initial pH~4.0. In addition, a non-electrochemical immersion experiment was also performed at 80 °C in CO2, on a sample portion of X65 pipeline containing part of a weld section, together with adjacent heat affected zones (HAZ and parent material. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS was used to evaluate the corrosion behaviour of the separate weld and parent plate samples. This study seeks to understand the significance of the different microstructures within the different zones of the welded X65 pipe in CO2 environments on corrosion performance; with particular attention given to the formation of surface scales; and their composition/significance. The results obtained from grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD measurements suggest that, post immersion, the parent plate substrate is scale free, with only features arising from ferrite (α-Fe and cementite (Fe3C apparent. In contrast, at 80 °C, GIXRD from the weld zone substrate, and weld zone/heat affected zone of the non-electrochemical sample indicates the presence of siderite (FeCO3 and chukanovite (Fe2CO3(OH2 phases. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM on this surface confirmed the presence of characteristic discrete cube-shaped crystallites of siderite together with plate-like clusters of chukanovite.

  6. Equilibrium moisture content of wood at different temperature/moisture conditions in the cladding of wooden constructions and in the relation to their reliability and service life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdeňka Havířová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the natural properties of wood and wood-based materials is their soaking capacity (hy­gro­sco­pi­ci­ty. The moisture content of wood and building constructions of wood and wood based materials significantly influences the service life and reliability of these constructions and buildings. The equilibrium weight moisture content of built-in wood corresponding to temperature/moisture conditions inside the cladding has therefore a decisive influence on the basic requirements placed on building constructions. The wood in wooden frame cladding changes its moisture content depending on temperature and moisture conditions of the environment it is built into. The water vapor condensation doesn’t necessarily have to occur right in the wooden framework of the cladding for the equilibrium moisture content to rise over the level permissible for the reliable function of a given construction. In spite of the fact that the common heat-technical assessment cannot be considered fully capable of detecting the effects of these factors on the functional reliability of wood-based constructions and buildings, an extension has been proposed of the present method of design an assessment of building constructions according to the ČSN 73 0540 standard regarding the interpretation of equilibrium moisture content in relation to the temperature/moisture conditions and their time behavior inside a construction.

  7. Global Stability of an Eco-Epidemiological Model with Time Delay and Saturation Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuxue Mao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a delayed eco-epidemiological model with disease in predator and saturation incidence. First, by comparison arguments, the permanence of the model is discussed. Then, we study the local stability of each equilibrium of the model by analyzing the corresponding characteristic equations and find that Hopf bifurcation occurs when the delay τ passes through a sequence of critical values. Next, by means of an iteration technique, sufficient conditions are derived for the global stability of the disease-free planar equilibrium and the positive equilibrium. Numerical examples are carried out to illustrate the analytical results.

  8. Numerical investigation of saturated upward flow boiling of water in a vertical tube using VOF model: effect of different boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanpour, B.; Irandoost, M. S.; Hassani, M.; Kouhikamali, R.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper a numerical simulation of upward two-phase flow evaporation in a vertical tube has been studied by considering water as working fluid. To this end, the computational fluid dynamic simulations of this system are performed with heat and mass transfer mechanisms due to energy transfer during the phase change interaction near the heat transfer surface. The volume of fluid model in an available Eulerian-Eulerian approach based on finite volume method is utilized and the mass source term in conservation of mass equation is implemented using a user defined function. The characteristics of water flow boiling such as void fraction and heat transfer coefficient distribution are investigated. The main cause of fluctuations on heat transfer coefficient and volume fraction is velocity increment in the vapor phase rather than the liquid phase. The case study of this research including convective heat transfer coefficient and tube diameter are considered as a parametric study. The operating conditions are considered at high pressure in saturation temperature and the physical properties of water are determined by considering system's inlet temperature and pressure in saturation conditions. Good agreement is achieved between the numerical and the experimental values of heat transfer coefficients.

  9. Phase equilibrium constraints on the howardite-eucrite-diogenite association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, John; Pan, Vivian

    1988-01-01

    Model determinations of fractional crystallization and equilibrium partial melting in the 0-10-kbar range have been performed for a series of compositions relevant to diogenite and eucrite petrogenesis. Olivine is found to react with diogenite parent liquids along the plagioclase-absent olivine/low-Ca pyroxene liquidus boundary under conditions of both fractional and equilibrium crystallization up to about 2 kbar. Olivine also reacts with eucritic liquids saturated with plagioclase and low-Ca pyroxene to pressures in excess of 2 kbar. The ability of simple fractional crystallization at 2 kbar to account for mineralogical and chemical features of the diogenite-eucrite association is discussed.

  10. The relative efficiency of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium-likelihood and the conditional on parental genotype-likelihood methods for candidate-gene association studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knapp, M.; Baur, M.P. [Univ. of Bonn (Germany); Wassmer, G. [GSF-Institute for Epidemiology, Neuherberg (Germany)

    1995-12-01

    Selecting a control group that is perfectly matched for ethnic ancestry with a group of affected individuals is a major problem in studying the association of a candidate gene with a disease. This problem can be avoided by a design that uses parental data in place of nonrelated controls. Schaid and Sommer presented two new methods for the statistical analysis using this approach: (1) a likelihood method (Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium [HWE] method), which rests on the assumption that HWE holds, and (2) a conditional likelihood method (conditional on parental genotype [CPG] method) appropriate when HWE is absent. Schaid and Sommer claimed that the CPG method can be more efficient than the HWE method, even when equilibrium holds. It can be shown, however, that in the equilibrium situation the HWE method is always more efficient than the CPG method. For a dominant disease, the differences are slim. But for a recessive disease, the CPG method requires a much larger sample size to achieve a prescribed power than the HWE method. Additionally, we show how the relative risks for the various candidate-gene genotypes can be estimated without relying on iterative methods. For the CPG method, we present an asymptotic power approximation that is sufficiently precise for planning the sample size of an association study. 12 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Impact of water flow conditions on the fate of ammonium and nitrate at the interface of the unsaturated and saturated zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckler, David; Gassen, Niklas; Stumpp, Christine

    2017-04-01

    Elevated nitrate concentrations in groundwater have caused severe environmental issues in the last decades. Mitigation strategies need to be developed to reduce the amount of nitrate without reducing crop yield though. Therefore, we need to understand nitrogen turnover processes and how they are influenced by hydrogeochemical conditions in the unsaturated and saturated zone. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of flow conditions on transport processes and the fate of ammonium and nitrate released from slurry application. Experiments were conducted under controlled conditions in an aquifer model setup (1.1 x 0.6 x 0.2 m3). A diluted slurry mix was injected continuously. The inorganic nitrogen compounds were traced under different water regimes regarding recharge rates and water table position (steady-state, transient and stagnant flow conditions). Conservative tracers and mathematical modeling were used to identify water flow and transport. Spatiotemporal changes of dissolved oxygen, ammonium, nitrite, nitrate, dissolved organic carbon and matrix potential were identified through high resolution monitoring (0.05 m). The ecosystem immediately responded to the slurry application with enhanced microbial respiration and the first step of nitrification converting ammonium to nitrite. This process was dominating during the first ten days of the experiment. A complete nitrification was established after 20 days resulting in increasing nitrate concentrations. Less nitrate was measured below the water table during steady state flow conditions in contrast to transient conditions with a fluctuating water table which seemed to inhibit denitrification. Still denitrification was not the dominating process despite high concentration of dissolved organic carbon (4-20 mg/L). Even under stagnant flow conditions, nitrate stayed in the system and denitrification was limited. Anoxic conditions were not established due to the low bioavailability of the dissolved

  12. Universal thermodynamics in different gravity theories: Conditions for generalized second law of thermodynamics and thermodynamical equilibrium on the horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Mitra, Saugata; Chakraborty, Subenoy

    2016-01-01

    The present work deals with a detailed study of universal thermodynamics in different modified gravity theories. The validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics (GSLT) and thermodynamical equilibrium (TE) of the Universe bounded by a horizon (apparent/event) in f(R)-gravity, Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity, RS-II brane scenario and DGP brane model has been investigated. In the perspective of recent observational evidences, the matter in the Universe is chosen as interacting holographic dark energy model. The entropy on the horizons are evaluated from the validity of the unified first law and as a result there is a correction (in integral form) to the usual Bekenstein entropy. The other thermodynamical parameter namely temperature on the horizon is chosen as the recently introduced corrected Hawking temperature. The above thermodynamical analysis is done for homogeneous and isotropic flat FLRW model of the Universe. The restrictions for the validity of GSLT and the TE are presented in tabular form f...

  13. Practical determination of alkalinity in waters and usefulness of the saturation-equilibrium indexes; Determinacion practica de la alcalinidad de un agua y utilidad de los indices de sturacion y equilibrio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marin Galvin, R.; Rodriguez Mellado, J. M. [Universidad de Rabanales. Cordoba (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    A practical study related to the carbonic equilibrium has been carried out over 24 natural and treated waters. In this way, carbonic equilibrium is undoubtedly essential to lead the physicochemical behaviour of aquatic systems. Experimental results demonstrate that alkalinity analysis by Gran's titulation yield values 75% lower than those obtained by alkalimetric titulation (AT). Nevertheless, determination of the end valoration point is more objective with Gran's than with alkalimetric titulation. Thus, Gran's could be a better technique to measure alkalinity values lower than 200 mg/l of HCO3-and TAC for higher values. On the other way, the calculated values of equilibrium pH (pHE) and Langelier's and Ryznar's indexes (iL and iR) inform qualitatively about the carbonic behaviour in the 60% of studied waters. Moreover, the time of 48 hours applied in the calcite assay must be increased up to around 7 days to yield results more consistent according to the practical carbonic behaviour of waters. Finally, it is necessary to carry out deeper studies about alkalinity of waters to obtain sounder conclusions. (Author) 7 refs.

  14. Adsorption of geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol onto powdered activated carbon at non-equilibrium conditions: influence of NOM and process modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoschke, Kristin; Engel, Christina; Börnick, Hilmar; Worch, Eckhard

    2011-10-01

    The adsorption of the taste and odour (T&O) compounds geosmin and 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB) onto powdered activated carbon (PAC) has been studied under conditions which are typical for a drinking water treatment plant that uses reservoir water for drinking water production. The reservoir water as well as the pre-treated water (after flocculation) contains NOM that competes with the trace compounds for the adsorption sites on the carbon surface. Although the DOC concentrations in the reservoir water and in the pre-treated water were different, no differences in the competitive adsorption could be seen. By using two special characterisation methods for NOM (adsorption analysis, LC/OCD) it could be proved that flocculation removes only NOM fractions which are irrelevant for competitive adsorption. Different model approaches were applied to describe the competitive adsorption of the T&O compounds and NOM, the tracer model, the equivalent background compound model, and the simplified equivalent background compound model. All these models are equilibrium models but in practice the contact time in flow-through reactors is typically shorter than the time needed to establish the adsorption equilibrium. In this paper it is demonstrated that the established model approaches can be used to describe competitive adsorption of T&O compounds and NOM also under non-equilibrium conditions. The results of the model applications showed that in particular the simplified equivalent background compound model is a useful tool to determine the PAC dosage required to reduce the T&O compounds below the threshold concentration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Effects of slip condition and Newtonian heating on MHD flow of Casson fluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet saturated in a porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ullah

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of slip condition on MHD free convective flow of non-Newtonian fluid over a nonlinearly stretching sheet saturated in porous medium with Newtonian heating is analyzed. The governing nonlinear coupled partial differential equations with auxiliary conditions are transformed into the system of coupled ordinary differential equations via similarity transformations and then solved numerically using Keller-box method. The results for skin friction coefficient and the reduced Nusselt number are obtained and compared with previous results in the literature and are found to be in excellent agreement. Results show that the slip parameter reduces the velocity of Casson fluid and enhances the shear stress. It is also observed that slip effect is more pronounced on temperature profile in comparison with velocity profile. It is also seen that velocity and dimensionless temperature are increasing functions of Newtonian heating parameter. Further, temperature gradient is an increasing function of thermal buoyancy parameter and Newtonian heating parameter whereas a decreasing function of porosity parameter and nonlinear stretching sheet parameter.

  16. A demonstration experiment for studying the properties of saturated vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenev, Igor V.; Lebedeva, Olga V.; Polushkina, Svetlana V.

    2017-11-01

    The paper proposes an important demonstration experiment that can be used at secondary schools in physics. The described experiment helps students learn the main concepts of the topic ‘saturated vapor’, namely, evaporation, condensation, dynamic equilibrium, saturation vapor, partial pressure, and the dependence of saturated vapor pressure on temperature.

  17. Computation of threshold conditions for epidemiological models and global stability of the disease-free equilibrium (DFE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamgang, Jean Claude; Sallet, Gauthier

    2008-05-01

    One goal of this paper is to give an algorithm for computing a threshold condition for epidemiological systems arising from compartmental deterministic modeling. We calculate a threshold condition T(0) of the parameters of the system such that if T(0)1, the DFE is unstable. The second objective, by adding some reasonable assumptions, is to give, depending on the model, necessary and sufficient conditions for global asymptotic stability (GAS) of the DFE. In many cases, we can prove that a necessary and sufficient condition for the global asymptotic stability of the DFE is R(0)Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases: Model Building, Analysis and Interpretation, Wiley, New York, 2000]. To illustrate our results, we apply our techniques to examples taken from the literature. In these examples we improve the results already obtained for the GAS of the DFE. We show that our algorithm is relevant for high dimensional epidemiological models.

  18. Trend to equilibrium of weak solutions of the Boltzmann equation in a slab with diffusive boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cercignani, C. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy)

    1996-08-01

    Recently R. Illner and the author proved that, under a physically realistic truncation on the collision kernel, the Boltzmann equation in the one-dimensional slab [0,1] with general diffusive boundary conditions at 0 and 1 has a global weak solution in the traditional sense. Here it is proved that when the Maxwellians associated with the boundary conditions at x=0 and x = 1 are the same Maxwellian M{sub w}, then the solution is uniformly bounded and tends to M{sub w} for t {r_arrow}{infinity}.

  19. Maximin equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ismail, M.S.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a new concept which extends von Neumann and Morgenstern's maximin strategy solution by incorporating `individual rationality' of the players. Maximin equilibrium, extending Nash's value approach, is based on the evaluation of the strategic uncertainty of the whole game. We show that

  20. Co-transport of Pb(2+) and TiO2 nanoparticles in repacked homogeneous soil columns under saturation condition: Effect of ionic strength and fulvic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing; Zhang, Keke; Sun, Peide; Lin, Daohui; Shen, Bing; Luo, Yan

    2016-11-15

    This study investigated the effects of suspended TiO2 nanoparticles (nTiO2) on the transport of Pb(2+) in saturated repacked soil columns under different ionic strengths (IS) and in the presence of fulvic acid (FA). Also, the contribution of soil colloids to the mobility of Pb(2+) was discussed. In the absence of nTiO2, little amount of Pb(2+) was detected in the effluent even in the presence of FA. However, the presence of nTiO2 significantly enhanced the mobility of Pb(2+) in soil columns under all tested conditions and nTiO2-associated Pb(2+) was the major migration species of Pb(2+). Increasing the solution IS decreased the nTiO2-associated Pb(2+) migration due to the significant decrease in the mobility of nTiO2 in soil. FA remarkably increased the nTiO2-associated Pb(2+) mobility in soil column, which was mainly to increase the mobility of nTiO2 in soil and decrease desorption rate of Pb(2+) from nTiO2 during transport. Moreover, nTiO2 significantly enhanced the release of Fe-Al soil colloids, which in turn was also responsible for the enhancement of Pb(2+) mobility in soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Equilibrium phase experimental determination of petroleum + gas systems at supercritical condition using ultrasonic technology; Estudo experimental do equilibrio de fases de sistemas de fracoes de petroleo e gases em condicoes supercriticas utilizando tecnicas de ultra-som: aparato experimental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehl, Ana; Pessoa, Fernando L.P.; Silva, Silvia M.C. da [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Escola de Quimica; Feiteira, Jose F. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia

    2008-07-01

    In separation process of multicomponent systems based on phase equilibrium is essential know the phase behavior and the critical points of the system for determination and optimization of the operational conditions. The experimental apparatus presents the challenge of determine the equilibrium phase dates of a system composed by petroleum residua and supercritical solvent. The used method, named acoustic method, allows the composition identification of the phases in equilibrium also in cloudy systems as they are the systems formed by residues of crude oil. For this reason, the acoustic methodology, based on the ultra-sound technology will be used in the study of the phase equilibrium and experimental characterization of the system, in benches scale, operating in severe conditions of temperature and pressure.The acoustic method is one not invasive and not subjective technique, what becomes the work in high pressures safer. (author)

  2. Saturation in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Lappi, T

    2010-01-01

    This talk discusses some recent studies of gluon saturation in nuclei. We stress the connection between the initial condition in heavy ion collisions and observables in deep inelastic scattering (DIS). The dominant degree of freedom in the small x nuclear wavefunction is a nonperturbatively strong classical gluon field, which determines the initial condition for the glasma fields in the initial stages of a heavy ion collision. A correlator of Wilson lines from the same classical fields, known as the dipole cross section, can be used to compute many inclusive and exclusive observables in DIS.

  3. Kinetics of Materials at Extreme Conditions: Understanding the Time Dependent Approach to Equilibrium at MaRIE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraus, R. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mcnabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kumar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eggert, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Borg, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cerreta, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dattelbaum, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fried, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Greeff, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Stolken, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-04-21

    The National Nuclear Security Agency has recently recognized that a long-term need exists to establish a stronger scientific basis for the assessment and qualification of materials and manufacturing processes for the nuclear stockpile and other national security applications. These materials may have undergone substantial changes with age, or may represent new materials that are being introduced because of difficulties associated with reusing or recreating materials used in original stockpile components. Also, with advancements in manufacturing methods, the NNSA anticipates opportunities for an enhanced range of control over fabricated components, an enhanced pace of materials development, and enhanced functionality. The development of qualification standards for these new materials will require the ability to understand and control material characteristics that affect both mechanical and dynamic performance. A unique aspect for NNSA is that the performance requirements for materials are often set by system hydrodynamics, and these materials must perform in extreme environments and loading conditions. Thus, the scientific motivation is to understand “Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes (MaRIE).”

  4. Facts about saturated fats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fat diary with low-fat or nonfat milk, yogurt, and cheese. Eat more fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and other foods with low or no saturated fat. Alternative Names Cholesterol - saturated fat; Atherosclerosis - saturated fat; Hardening of the ...

  5. Saturated fat (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturated fat can raise blood cholesterol and can put you at risk for heart disease and stroke. You should ... limit any foods that are high in saturated fat. Sources of saturated fat include whole-milk dairy ...

  6. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, Mário J

    2013-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions.  These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This textbo...

  7. Equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    de Oliveira, Mário J

    2017-01-01

    This textbook provides an exposition of equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to several areas of physics with particular attention to phase transitions and critical phenomena. The applications include several areas of condensed matter physics and include also a chapter on thermochemistry. Phase transitions and critical phenomena are treated according to the modern development of the field, based on the ideas of universality and on the Widom scaling theory. For each topic, a mean-field or Landau theory is presented to describe qualitatively the phase transitions. These theories include the van der Waals theory of the liquid-vapor transition, the Hildebrand-Heitler theory of regular mixtures, the Griffiths-Landau theory for multicritical points in multicomponent systems, the Bragg-Williams theory of order-disorder in alloys, the Weiss theory of ferromagnetism, the Néel theory of antiferromagnetism, the Devonshire theory for ferroelectrics and Landau-de Gennes theory of liquid crystals. This new edit...

  8. The Geometry of Finite Equilibrium Datasets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely non collinear....

  9. The geometry of finite equilibrium sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the geometry of finite datasets defined by equilibrium prices, income distributions, and total resources. We show that the equilibrium condition imposes no restrictions if total resources are collinear, a property that is robust to small perturbations. We also show that the set...... of equilibrium datasets is pathconnected when the equilibrium condition does impose restrictions on datasets, as for example when total resources are widely noncollinear....

  10. (Vapour + liquid) equilibrium of binary mixtures (1,3-dioxolane or 1,4-dioxane + 2-methyl-1-propanol or 2-methyl-2-propanol) at isobaric conditions[(Vapour+liquid) equilibrium; Cyclic ethers; Butanols; ASOG; UNIFAC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Antonio; Lafuente, Carlos; Minones, Jose; Kragl, Udo; Royo, Felix M. E-mail: femer@posta.unizar.es

    2004-02-01

    Isobaric (vapour + liquid) equilibrium of (1,3-dioxolane or 1,4-dioxane + 2-methyl-1-propanol or 2-methyl-2-propanol) at 40.0 kPa and 101.3 kPa has been studied with a dynamic recirculating still. The experimental VLE data are thermodynamically consistent. From these data, activity coefficients were calculated and correlated with the Margules, van Laar, Wilson, NRTL and UNIQUAC equations. The VLE results have been compared with the predictions by the UNIFAC and ASOG methods.

  11. FY2002 Final Report for EMSP Project No.70108 Effects of Fluid Distribution on Measured Geophysical Properties for Partially Saturated, Shallow Subsurface Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berge, P A; Bonner, B P; Roberts, J J; Wildenschild, D; Aracne-Ruddle, C M; Berryman, J G; Bertete-Aguirre, H; Boro, C O; Carlberg, E D; Ruddle, D G; Toffelmier, D A; Du Frane, W L; Lee, S K

    2002-06-11

    Our goal is to improve geophysical imaging of the vadose zone. We are achieving this goal by providing new methods to improve interpretation of field data. The purpose of this EMSP project is to develop relationships between laboratory measured geophysical properties and porosity, saturation, and fluid distribution, for partially saturated soils. Algorithms for relationships between soil composition, saturation, and geophysical measurements will provide new methods to interpret geophysical field data collected in the vadose zone at sites such as Hanford, WA. This report summarizes work after 32 months of a 3-year project. We modified a laboratory ultrasonics apparatus developed in a previous EMSP project (No.55411) so that we can make velocity measurements for partially-saturated samples rather than fully-saturated or dry samples. Modifications included adding tensiometers and changing the fluid system so that pore fluid pressure can be controlled and capillary pressure can be determined. We made a series of measurements to determine properties of partially saturated Ottawa sand and Santa Cruz aggregate samples as well as sand-clay samples and some preliminary measurements on natural soils. Current measurements include investigations of effects of pore fluid chemistry on grain cementation and velocities for calcite-cemented sand samples. We analyzed these measurements as well as velocity and electrical properties measurements made as part of the earlier EMSP project and developed relationships between measured geophysical properties and parameters of interest, including lithology, fluid content and distribution, and soil microstructure. Our laboratory velocity measurements have confirmed recent field observations of extremely low seismic velocities of a few hundred m/s in shallow soils, and we have shown that these values are consistent with effective medium theories. We have shown that the laboratory velocities for partially saturated sands, collected at

  12. Numerical solution for 5-layer laminate technique to determine saturation solubility of a drug in a thin film of pressure sensitive adhesive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bänsch, Eberhard; Reismann, Simone; Lee, Geoffrey

    2014-08-01

    A numerical solution of the one-dimensional diffusion equation is presented to describe the 5-layer laminate technique for estimating the saturation solubility of a drug in a thin polymer film. The boundary and initial conditions encompass a donor layer, a separating membrane, and an acceptor layer. Alteration of the drug's partition coefficient between donor and separating membrane has little influence on drug accumulation with the acceptor. The diffusivity in the separating membrane should be high to promote a short experimental time to achieve saturation equilibrium in the acceptor layer. The essential parameter to give rapid equilibrium is the thickness of the acceptor polymer film. For values of diffusivity typical for drugs of molecular weight around 500 an acceptor layer thickness of 10 µm-20 µm is required to achieve equilibrium within less than 10 d. These simulations allow the selection of suitable experimental conditions to make the 5-layer laminate technique a viable method for routine use.

  13. A Multiperiod Equilibrium Pricing Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minsuk Kwak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an equilibrium pricing model in a dynamic multiperiod stochastic framework with uncertain income. There are one tradable risky asset (stock/commodity, one nontradable underlying (temperature, and also a contingent claim (weather derivative written on the tradable risky asset and the nontradable underlying in the market. The price of the contingent claim is priced in equilibrium by optimal strategies of representative agent and market clearing condition. The risk preferences are of exponential type with a stochastic coefficient of risk aversion. Both subgame perfect strategy and naive strategy are considered and the corresponding equilibrium prices are derived. From the numerical result we examine how the equilibrium prices vary in response to changes in model parameters and highlight the importance of our equilibrium pricing principle.

  14. Open problems in non-equilibrium physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusnezov, D.

    1997-09-22

    The report contains viewgraphs on the following: approaches to non-equilibrium statistical mechanics; classical and quantum processes in chaotic environments; classical fields in non-equilibrium situations: real time dynamics at finite temperature; and phase transitions in non-equilibrium conditions.

  15. The use of saturation in qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Janiece L

    2012-01-01

    Understanding qualitative research is an important component of cardiovascular nurses' practice and allows them to understand the experiences, stories, and perceptions of patients with cardiovascular conditions. In understanding qualitative research methods, it is essential that the cardiovascular nurse understands the process of saturation within qualitative methods. Saturation is a tool used for ensuring that adequate and quality data are collected to support the study. Saturation is frequently reported in qualitative research and may be the gold standard. However, the use of saturation within methods has varied. Hence, the purpose of this column is to provide insight for the cardiovascular nurse regarding the use of saturation by reviewing the recommendations for which qualitative research methods it is appropriate to use and how to know when saturation is achieved. In understanding saturation, the cardiovascular nurse can be a better consumer of qualitative research.

  16. Effects of initial saturation on properties modification and displacement of tetrachloroethene with aqueous isobutanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Glen R; Ocampo-Gómez, Ana M; Li, Minghua; Husserl, Johana

    2006-11-20

    Packed column experiments were conducted to study effects of initial saturation of tetrachloroethene (PCE) in the range of 1.0-14% pore volume (PV) on mobilization and downward migration of the non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) product upon contact with aqueous isobutanol ( approximately 10 vol.%). This study focused on the consequences of swelling beyond residual saturation. Columns were packed with mixtures of neat PCE, water and glass beads and waterflooded to establish a desired homogeneous residual saturation, and then flooded with aqueous isobutanol under controlled hydraulic conditions. Results showed a critical saturation of approximately 8% PV for these packed column experimental conditions. At low initial PCE saturations (8% PV), results showed NAPL-product mobilization and downward migration which was attributed to interfacial tension (IFT) reduction, swelling of the NAPL-product, and reduced density modification. Packed column results were compared with good agreement to theoretical predictions of NAPL-product mobilization using the total trapping number, N(T). In addition to the packed column study, preliminary batch experiments were conducted to study the effects of PCE volumetric fraction in the range of 0.5-20% on density, viscosity, and IFT modification as a function of time following contact with aqueous isobutanol ( approximately 10 vol.%). Modified NAPL-product fluid properties approached equilibrium within approximately 2 h of contact for density and viscosity. IFT reduction occurred immediately as expected. Measured fluid properties were compared with good agreement to theoretical equilibrium predictions based on UNIQUAC. Overall, this study demonstrates the importance of initial DNAPL saturation, and the associated risk of downward NAPL-product migration, in applying alcohol flooding for remediation of DNAPL contaminated ground water sites.

  17. Effects of kaolinite colloids on Cd²⁺ transport through saturated sand under varying ionic strength conditions: Column experiments and modeling approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikiniyadhanee, Rakkreat; Chotpantarat, Srilert; Ong, Say Kee

    2015-11-01

    Column experiments were performed under various ionic strengths (0.0-0.9 mM) using 10 mg L(-1) of Cd(2+) without kaolinite colloids and 10 mg L(-1) Cd(2+) mixed with 100 mg L(-1) kaolinite colloids. The nonequilibrium two-site model (TSM) described the behavior of both Cd(2+) transport and Cd(2+) co-transported with kaolinite colloids better than the equilibrium model (CD(eq)) (R(2)=0.978-0.996). The results showed that an increase in ionic strength negatively impacted the retardation factors (R) of both Cd(2+) and Cd(2+) mixed with kaolinite colloids. The presence of kaolinite colloids increased the retardation factors of Cd(2+) from 7.23 to 7.89, 6.76 to 6.61 and 3.79 to 6.99 for ionic strengths of 0.225, 0.45 and 0.9 mM, respectively. On the other hand, the presence of kaolinite colloids decreased the retardation factor of Cd(2+) from 8.13 to 7.83 for ionic strength of 0.0 mM. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites (f) parameters, kinetic constant for sorption sites (α) and Freundlich constant (K(f)) were estimated from HYDRUS-1D of TSM for Cd(2+) transport. The fraction of instantaneous sorption sites was found to increase for an increase in ionic strength. K(f) values of Cd(2+) transport without kaolinite colloids for 0.0, 0.225 and 0.45 mM were found to be higher than those of Cd(2+) transport with kaolinite colloids, except for ionic strength of 0.9 mM. Hence, the presence of kaolinite colloids probably retarded the mobility of Cd(2+) in porous media for higher ionic strengths. Furthermore, retardation factors and K(f) values of both Cd(2+) transport and Cd(2+) co-transport were shown to decrease when ionic strength increased. Interestingly, according to TSM, the fraction of instantaneous sorption sites tends to increase for an increase in ionic strength, which imply that the mechanism of Cd(2+) sorption onto quartz sand can be better described using equilibrium sorption rather than nonequilibrium sorption for an increase in ionic strength. Copyright

  18. Saturated Switching Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Benzaouia, Abdellah

    2012-01-01

    Saturated Switching Systems treats the problem of actuator saturation, inherent in all dynamical systems by using two approaches: positive invariance in which the controller is designed to work within a region of non-saturating linear behaviour; and saturation technique which allows saturation but guarantees asymptotic stability. The results obtained are extended from the linear systems in which they were first developed to switching systems with uncertainties, 2D switching systems, switching systems with Markovian jumping and switching systems of the Takagi-Sugeno type. The text represents a thoroughly referenced distillation of results obtained in this field during the last decade. The selected tool for analysis and design of stabilizing controllers is based on multiple Lyapunov functions and linear matrix inequalities. All the results are illustrated with numerical examples and figures many of them being modelled using MATLAB®. Saturated Switching Systems will be of interest to academic researchers in con...

  19. A sulfide-saturated lunar mantle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenan, James M.; Mungall, James E.

    2017-04-01

    Although much work has been done to understand the controls on the sulfur content at sulfide saturation (SCSS) for terrestrial melt compositions, little information exists to evaluate the SCSS for the high FeO compositions typical of lunar magmas, and at the reduced conditions of the Moon's interior. Experiments were done to measure the SCSS for a model low Ti mare basalt with 20 wt% FeO at 1400oC as a function of fO2 and pressure. Synthetic lunar basalt was encapsulated along with stoichiometric FeS in capsules made from Fe-Ir alloy. The fO2 of the experiment can be estimated by the heterogeneous equilibrium: Femetal + 1 /2 O2 = FeOsilicate Variation in the metal composition, by addition of Ir, serves to change the fO2 of the experiment. Capsule compositions spanning the range Fe25Ir75 to Fe96Ir4 (at%) were synthesized by sintering of pressed powders under reducing conditions. Fe100 capsules were fabricated from pure Fe rod. For a melt with 20 wt% FeO, this range in capsule composition spans the fO2 interval of ˜IW-1 (Fe100, Fe96Ir4) to IW+2.2 (Fe25Ir75). Experiments were done over the pressure interval of 0.1 MPa to 2 GPa. Results for experiments involving Fe100capsules indicate that the SCSS decreases from ˜2000 ppm (0.1 MPa) to 700 ppm (2 GPa). Experiments done thus far at 1 GPa, involving the range of capsule compositions indicated, show a marked decrease in SCSS as the Fe content of the capsule increases (fO2 decreases). Complementary to the decrease in SCSS is a drop in the sulfur content of the coexisting sulfide melt, from ˜50 at% at ΔIW = +2.2 to ˜20 at% at ΔIW-1. In fact, both the composition of the sulfide melt and the SCSS are essentially indistinguishable for Fe96Ir4 and Fe100 compositions. Results thus far indicate that at reduced conditions and high pressure, the SCSS for high FeO lunar compositions is low, and overlaps with Apollo 11 melt inclusion data. Importantly, such low SCSS does not require Fe metal saturation, and suggests that some

  20. Lower bounds for ballistic current and noise in non-equilibrium quantum steady states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyon, Benjamin, E-mail: benjamin.doyon@kcl.ac.uk

    2015-03-15

    Let an infinite, homogeneous, many-body quantum system be unitarily evolved for a long time from a state where two halves are independently thermalized. One says that a non-equilibrium steady state emerges if there are nonzero steady currents in the central region. In particular, their presence is a signature of ballistic transport. We analyze the consequences of the current observable being a conserved density; near equilibrium this is known to give rise to linear wave propagation and a nonzero Drude peak. Using the Lieb–Robinson bound, we derive, under a certain regularity condition, a lower bound for the non-equilibrium steady-state current determined by equilibrium averages. This shows and quantifies the presence of ballistic transport far from equilibrium. The inequality suggests the definition of “nonlinear sound velocities”, which specialize to the sound velocity near equilibrium in non-integrable models, and “generalized sound velocities”, which encode generalized Gibbs thermalization in integrable models. These are bounded by the Lieb–Robinson velocity. The inequality also gives rise to a bound on the energy current noise in the case of pure energy transport. We show that the inequality is satisfied in many models where exact results are available, and that it is saturated at one-dimensional criticality.

  1. Lower bounds for ballistic current and noise in non-equilibrium quantum steady states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Doyon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Let an infinite, homogeneous, many-body quantum system be unitarily evolved for a long time from a state where two halves are independently thermalized. One says that a non-equilibrium steady state emerges if there are nonzero steady currents in the central region. In particular, their presence is a signature of ballistic transport. We analyze the consequences of the current observable being a conserved density; near equilibrium this is known to give rise to linear wave propagation and a nonzero Drude peak. Using the Lieb–Robinson bound, we derive, under a certain regularity condition, a lower bound for the non-equilibrium steady-state current determined by equilibrium averages. This shows and quantifies the presence of ballistic transport far from equilibrium. The inequality suggests the definition of “nonlinear sound velocities”, which specialize to the sound velocity near equilibrium in non-integrable models, and “generalized sound velocities”, which encode generalized Gibbs thermalization in integrable models. These are bounded by the Lieb–Robinson velocity. The inequality also gives rise to a bound on the energy current noise in the case of pure energy transport. We show that the inequality is satisfied in many models where exact results are available, and that it is saturated at one-dimensional criticality.

  2. Accelerating Multiagent Reinforcement Learning by Equilibrium Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yujing; Gao, Yang; An, Bo

    2015-07-01

    An important approach in multiagent reinforcement learning (MARL) is equilibrium-based MARL, which adopts equilibrium solution concepts in game theory and requires agents to play equilibrium strategies at each state. However, most existing equilibrium-based MARL algorithms cannot scale due to a large number of computationally expensive equilibrium computations (e.g., computing Nash equilibria is PPAD-hard) during learning. For the first time, this paper finds that during the learning process of equilibrium-based MARL, the one-shot games corresponding to each state's successive visits often have the same or similar equilibria (for some states more than 90% of games corresponding to successive visits have similar equilibria). Inspired by this observation, this paper proposes to use equilibrium transfer to accelerate equilibrium-based MARL. The key idea of equilibrium transfer is to reuse previously computed equilibria when each agent has a small incentive to deviate. By introducing transfer loss and transfer condition, a novel framework called equilibrium transfer-based MARL is proposed. We prove that although equilibrium transfer brings transfer loss, equilibrium-based MARL algorithms can still converge to an equilibrium policy under certain assumptions. Experimental results in widely used benchmarks (e.g., grid world game, soccer game, and wall game) show that the proposed framework: 1) not only significantly accelerates equilibrium-based MARL (up to 96.7% reduction in learning time), but also achieves higher average rewards than algorithms without equilibrium transfer and 2) scales significantly better than algorithms without equilibrium transfer when the state/action space grows and the number of agents increases.

  3. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant

  4. [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] is an effective catalyst for nitrene transfer reactions and amination of saturated hydrocarbons with sulfonyl and aryl azides as nitrogen source under thermal and microwave-assisted conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yungen; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-09-10

    [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] (F(20)-tpp=meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrinato dianion) is an effective catalyst for imido/nitrene insertion reactions using sulfonyl and aryl azides as nitrogen source. Under thermal conditions, aziridination of aryl and alkyl alkenes (16 examples, 60-95 % yields), sulfimidation of sulfides (11 examples, 76-96 % yields), allylic amidation/amination of α-methylstyrenes (15 examples, 68-83 % yields), and amination of saturated C--H bonds including that of cycloalkanes and adamantane (eight examples, 64-80 % yields) can be accomplished by using 2 mol % [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] as catalyst. Under microwave irradiation conditions, the reaction time of aziridination (four examples), allylic amination (five examples), sulfimidation (two examples), and amination of saturated C--H bonds (three examples) can be reduced by up to 16-fold (24-48 versus 1.5-6 h) without significantly affecting the product yield and substrate conversion.

  5. Statistical equilibrium equations for trace elements in stellar atmospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Kubat, Jiri

    2010-01-01

    The conditions of thermodynamic equilibrium, local thermodynamic equilibrium, and statistical equilibrium are discussed in detail. The equations of statistical equilibrium and the supplementary equations are shown together with the expressions for radiative and collisional rates with the emphasize on the solution for trace elements.

  6. Kinetics and dynamics of nanosecond streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure gas bubble suspended in distilled water under saturated vapor pressure conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Sharma, Ashish

    2016-09-08

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamer discharges generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the discharge kinetics. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are different at low and high positive trigger voltages with the axial streamer evolution dominant for low voltages and a surface hugging mode favored for high voltages. We also find a substantial difference in initiation, transition and evolution stages of discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages on account of the presence of multiple streamers. We observe that the presence of water vapor does not affect the breakdown voltage even for oversaturated conditions but significantly influences the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer as well as the flux of the dominant species on the bubble surface. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Kinetics and dynamics of nanosecond streamer discharge in atmospheric-pressure gas bubble suspended in distilled water under saturated vapor pressure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashish; Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.; Cha, Min Suk

    2016-10-01

    We perform computational studies of nanosecond streamer discharges generated in helium bubbles immersed in distilled water under atmospheric pressure conditions. The model takes into account the presence of water vapor in the gas bubble for an accurate description of the discharge kinetics. We find that the dynamic characteristics of the streamer discharge are different at low and high positive trigger voltages with the axial streamer evolution dominant for low voltages and a surface hugging mode favored for high voltages. We also find a substantial difference in initiation, transition and evolution stages of discharge for positive and negative trigger voltages with the volumetric distribution of species in the streamer channel much more uniform for negative trigger voltages on account of the presence of multiple streamers. We observe that the presence of water vapor does not affect the breakdown voltage even for oversaturated conditions but significantly influences the composition of dominant species in the trail of the streamer as well as the flux of the dominant species on the bubble surface.

  8. Ion exchange equilibrium constants

    CERN Document Server

    Marcus, Y

    2013-01-01

    Ion Exchange Equilibrium Constants focuses on the test-compilation of equilibrium constants for ion exchange reactions. The book first underscores the scope of the compilation, equilibrium constants, symbols used, and arrangement of the table. The manuscript then presents the table of equilibrium constants, including polystyrene sulfonate cation exchanger, polyacrylate cation exchanger, polymethacrylate cation exchanger, polysterene phosphate cation exchanger, and zirconium phosphate cation exchanger. The text highlights zirconium oxide anion exchanger, zeolite type 13Y cation exchanger, and

  9. Quantity Constrained General Equilibrium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babenko, R.; Talman, A.J.J.

    2006-01-01

    In a standard general equilibrium model it is assumed that there are no price restrictions and that prices adjust infinitely fast to their equilibrium values.In case of price restrictions a general equilibrium may not exist and rationing on net demands or supplies is needed to clear the markets.In

  10. Exploring the Gap between Perfect Bayesian Equilibrium and Sequential Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Bonanno

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In (Bonanno, 2013, a solution concept for extensive-form games, called perfect Bayesian equilibrium (PBE, was introduced and shown to be a strict refinement of subgame-perfect equilibrium; it was also shown that, in turn, sequential equilibrium (SE is a strict refinement of PBE. In (Bonanno, 2016, the notion of PBE was used to provide a characterization of SE in terms of a strengthening of the two defining components of PBE (besides sequential rationality, namely AGM consistency and Bayes consistency. In this paper we explore the gap between PBE and SE by identifying solution concepts that lie strictly between PBE and SE; these solution concepts embody a notion of “conservative” belief revision. Furthermore, we provide a method for determining if a plausibility order on the set of histories is choice measurable, which is a necessary condition for a PBE to be a SE.

  11. Statistical physics ""Beyond equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecke, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The scientific challenges of the 21st century will increasingly involve competing interactions, geometric frustration, spatial and temporal intrinsic inhomogeneity, nanoscale structures, and interactions spanning many scales. We will focus on a broad class of emerging problems that will require new tools in non-equilibrium statistical physics and that will find application in new material functionality, in predicting complex spatial dynamics, and in understanding novel states of matter. Our work will encompass materials under extreme conditions involving elastic/plastic deformation, competing interactions, intrinsic inhomogeneity, frustration in condensed matter systems, scaling phenomena in disordered materials from glasses to granular matter, quantum chemistry applied to nano-scale materials, soft-matter materials, and spatio-temporal properties of both ordinary and complex fluids.

  12. Indoor/outdoor connections exemplified by processes that depend on an organic compound's saturation vapor pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weschler, Charles J.

    2003-01-01

    Outdoor and indoor environments are profitably viewed as parts of a whole connected through various physical and chemical interactions. This paper examines four phenomena that share a dependence on vapor pressure-the extent to which an organic compound in the gas phase sorbs on airborne particles...... first estimates of the above processes. For typical indoor conditions, only larger compounds with lower-saturation vapor pressures (e.g., tetracosane, pentacosane, or di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate) have airborne particle concentrations comparable to or larger than gas phase concentrations. Regardless......'s saturation vapor pressure correlates in a linear fashion with the logarithms of equilibrium coefficients characteristic of each of these four phenomena. Since, to a rough approximation, the log of an organic compound's vapor pressure scales with its molecular weight, molecular weight can be used to make...

  13. Sampling the Denatured State of Polypeptides in Water, Urea, and Guanidine Chloride to Strict Equilibrium Conditions with the Help of Massively Parallel Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Roberto; Camilloni, Carlo; Tiana, Guido

    2014-02-11

    The denatured state of polypeptides and proteins, stabilized by chemical denaturants like urea and guanidine chloride, displays residual secondary structure when studied by nuclear-magnetic-resonance spectroscopy. However, these experimental techniques are weakly sensitive, and thus molecular-dynamics simulations can be useful to complement the experimental findings. To sample the denatured state, we made use of massively-parallel computers and of a variant of the replica exchange algorithm, in which the different branches, connected with unbiased replicas, favor the formation and disruption of local secondary structure. The algorithm is applied to the second hairpin of GB1 in water, in urea, and in guanidine chloride. We show with the help of different criteria that the simulations converge to equilibrium. It results that urea and guanidine chloride, besides inducing some polyproline-II structure, have different effect on the hairpin. Urea disrupts completely the native region and stabilizes a state which resembles a random coil, while guanidine chloride has a milder effect.

  14. Assessment of surface reactivity of thorium oxide in conditions close to chemical equilibrium by isotope exchange {sup 229}Th/{sup 232}Th method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki-Muresan, Tomo; Perrigaud, Katy; Vandenborre, Johan; Ribet, Solange; Grambow, Bernd [Nantes Univ., CNRS/IN2P3 (France). SUBATECH Unite Mixte de Recherche 6457; Takamasa, Inai [TOKAI Univ., Kanagawa (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    This work aims to assess the solubility and the surface reactivity of crystallized thorium at pH 3.0 in presence of three types of solids: synthesized powder at 1300 C, crushed kernel, and intact kernel. In this study, the kernel is composed by the core solid from high temperature reactors (HTR) sphere particles. The originality of this work consisted in following in a sequential order the kinetic of dissolution, the surface reactivity in presence of isotope tracer {sup 229}Th, and its desorption process. Long time experiments (634 days) allowed to get deeper understanding on the behavior of the surface reactivity in contact with the solution. Solubility values are ranging from 0.3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} to 3 x 10{sup -7} mol.L{sup -1} with a dissolution rate of 10{sup -6}-10{sup -4} g.m{sup -2} day{sup -1}. PHREEQC modeling showed that crystallized ThO{sub 2}(cr, 20 nm) phase controls the equilibrium in solution. Isotope exchange between {sup 229}Th and {sup 232}Th indicated that well-crystallized phase exist as an inert surface regarding to the absence of exchange between surface solid and solution.

  15. Non-equilibrium condensation of supercritical carbon dioxide in a converging-diverging nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameli, Alireza; Afzalifar, Ali; Turunen-Saaresti, Teemu

    2017-03-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a promising alternative as a working fluid for future energy conversion and refrigeration cycles. CO2 has low global warming potential compared to refrigerants and supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle ought to have better efficiency than today’s counter parts. However, there are several issues concerning behaviour of supercritical CO2 in aforementioned applications. One of these issues arises due to non-equilibrium condensation of CO2 for some operating conditions in supercritical compressors. This paper investigates the non-equilibrium condensation of carbon dioxide in the course of an expansion from supercritical stagnation conditions in a converging-diverging nozzle. An external look-up table was implemented, using an in-house FORTRAN code, to calculate the fluid properties in supercritical, metastable and saturated regions. This look-up table is coupled with the flow solver and the non-equilibrium condensation model is introduced to the solver using user defined expressions. Numerical results are compared with the experimental measurements. In agreement with the experiment, the distribution of Mach number in the nozzle shows that the flow becomes supersonic in upstream region near the throat where speed of sound is minimum also the equilibrium reestablishment occurs at the outlet boundary condition.

  16. Venous oxygen saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartog, Christiane; Bloos, Frank

    2014-12-01

    Early detection and rapid treatment of tissue hypoxia are important goals. Venous oxygen saturation is an indirect index of global oxygen supply-to-demand ratio. Central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO2) measurement has become a surrogate for mixed venous oxygen saturation (SvO2). ScvO2 is measured by a catheter placed in the superior vena cava. After results from a single-center study suggested that maintaining ScvO2 values >70% might improve survival rates in septic patients, international practice guidelines included this target in a bundle strategy to treat early sepsis. However, a recent multicenter study with >1500 patients found that the use of central hemodynamic and ScvO2 monitoring did not improve long-term survival when compared to the clinical assessment of the adequacy of circulation. It seems that if sepsis is recognized early, a rapid initiation of antibiotics and adequate fluid resuscitation are more important than measuring venous oxygen saturation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Metamaterial saturable absorber mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayal, Govind; Ramakrishna, S Anantha

    2013-02-01

    We propose a metamaterial saturable absorber mirror at midinfrared wavelengths that can show a saturation of absorption with intensity of incident light and switch to a reflecting state. The design consists of an array of circular metallic disks separated by a thin film of vanadium dioxide (VO(2)) from a continuous metallic film. The heating due to the absorption in the absorptive state causes the VO(2) to transit to a metallic phase from the low temperature insulating phase. The metamaterial switches from an absorptive state (R≃0.1%) to a reflective state (R>95%) for a specific threshold intensity of the incident radiation corresponding to the phase transition of VO(2), resulting in the saturation of absorption in the metamaterial. The computer simulations show over 99.9% peak absorbance, a resonant bandwidth of about 0.8 μm at 10.22 μm wavelengths, and saturation intensity of 140 mW cm(-2) for undoped VO(2) at room temperature. We also carried out numerical simulations to investigate the effects of localized heating and temperature distribution by solving the heat diffusion problem.

  18. LP Well-Posedness for Bilevel Vector Equilibrium and Optimization Problems with Equilibrium Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Khanh, Phan Quoc; Plubtieng, Somyot; Sombut, Kamonrat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is introduce several types of Levitin-Polyak well-posedness for bilevel vector equilibrium and optimization problems with equilibrium constraints. Base on criterion and characterizations for these types of Levitin-Polyak well-posedness we argue on diameters and Kuratowski’s, Hausdorff’s, or Istrǎtescus measures of noncompactness of approximate solution sets under suitable conditions, and we prove the Levitin-Polyak well-posedness for bilevel vector equilibrium and op...

  19. Internal equilibrium layer growth over forest

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, E.; Jensen, N.O.

    2000-01-01

    the magnitude of the scatter. Different theoretical friction velocity profiles for the Internal Boundary Layer (IBL) are tested against the forest data. The results yield information on the Internal Equilibrium Layer (IEL) growth and an equation for the IEL height fur neutral conditions is derived. For stable...... conditions the results indicate that very long fetches are required in order to measure parameters in equilibrium with the actual surface....

  20. Saturated and trans fats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shader, Richard I

    2014-01-01

    ... Original Pancake Mix plus ingredients suggested by the recipe: 2 g saturated fat (SF) and no trans fatty acids or trans fat (TFA); bacon, Oscar Mayer Lower Sodium Bacon: 2.5 g SF and no TFA; sausages, Jimmy Dean Original Pork Sausage Links: 8 g SF and no TFA; potatoes, Ore-Ida Mini Tater Tots: 2 g SF and no TFA; and nondairy creamer, Nestlé Coffee-...

  1. Avaliação do regime estacionário em colunas de amostras deformadas de solo sob saturação Evaluation of the stationary condition in disturbed saturated soil columns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana de Pinho Cunha

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Estudos sobre o movimento de solutos no solo freqüentemente são realizados em laboratório, sob condições aparentemente controladas. Uma revisão desses estudos mostrou, no entanto, que a variável tempo, para obtenção do regime estacionário tem sido freqüentemente negligenciada. Face ao exposto, o presente trabalho teve por objetivo registrar o tempo para que o fluxo da água no solo sob condições de saturação atinja o equilíbrio dinâmico, medindo-se a condutividade hidráulica saturada (K0 do solo. A condição de equilíbrio dinâmico é a etapa que antecede a aplicação do íon no solo em estudos de eluição de solutos. Utilizaram-se amostras deformadas de três solos com diferentes granulometrias: muito argilosa, média e arenosa, coletadas em área experimental da ESALQ/USP. As amostras foram acondicionadas em colunas de PVC, e utilizou-se água destilada e deaerada para saturação e posterior escoamento nas colunas, conforme montagem experimental do permeâmetro de carga constante. Pelos resultados, constatou-se que, nas amostras dos solos muito argiloso e médio, o equilíbrio dinâmico foi atingido após 15 dias de drenagem e, para o arenoso, após 27 dias, sendo a variabilidade de K0 maior nos primeiros seis dias depois de iniciado o ensaio. Essa situação evidenciou que a adoção de um tempo fixo para adição dos solutos pode levar a uma baixa confiabilidade nos resultados.Studies about solute movement in soil are frequently realized under laboratory conditions, in apparently controlled situations. A review of these studies showed that the variable time, to obtain the stationary condition, is frequently neglected. In view of this fact, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the time it takes until the water flow in saturated soil reaches the steady-state, by measuring saturated hydraulic conductivity (K0. The steady-state is the stage that precedes the application of the ion into soil samples in solute elution

  2. Disturbances in equilibrium function after major earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Motoyasu; Endo, Nobutaka; Osada, Yoshihisa; Kim, Yoshiharu; Kuriyama, Kenichi

    2012-10-01

    Major earthquakes were followed by a large number of aftershocks and significant outbreaks of dizziness occurred over a large area. However it is unclear why major earthquake causes dizziness. We conducted an intergroup trial on equilibrium dysfunction and psychological states associated with equilibrium dysfunction in individuals exposed to repetitive aftershocks versus those who were rarely exposed. Greater equilibrium dysfunction was observed in the aftershock-exposed group under conditions without visual compensation. Equilibrium dysfunction in the aftershock-exposed group appears to have arisen from disturbance of the inner ear, as well as individual vulnerability to state anxiety enhanced by repetitive exposure to aftershocks. We indicate potential effects of autonomic stress on equilibrium function after major earthquake. Our findings may contribute to risk management of psychological and physical health after major earthquakes with aftershocks, and allow development of a new empirical approach to disaster care after such events.

  3. Non-Equilibrium Properties from Equilibrium Free Energy Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Calculating free energy in computer simulations is of central importance in statistical mechanics of condensed media and its applications to chemistry and biology not only because it is the most comprehensive and informative quantity that characterizes the eqUilibrium state, but also because it often provides an efficient route to access dynamic and kinetic properties of a system. Most of applications of equilibrium free energy calculations to non-equilibrium processes rely on a description in which a molecule or an ion diffuses in the potential of mean force. In general case this description is a simplification, but it might be satisfactorily accurate in many instances of practical interest. This hypothesis has been tested in the example of the electrodiffusion equation . Conductance of model ion channels has been calculated directly through counting the number of ion crossing events observed during long molecular dynamics simulations and has been compared with the conductance obtained from solving the generalized Nernst-Plank equation. It has been shown that under relatively modest conditions the agreement between these two approaches is excellent, thus demonstrating the assumptions underlying the diffusion equation are fulfilled. Under these conditions the electrodiffusion equation provides an efficient approach to calculating the full voltage-current dependence routinely measured in electrophysiological experiments.

  4. 2,4-D adsorption to biochars: effect of preparation conditions on equilibrium adsorption capacity and comparison with commercial activated carbon literature data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearns, J P; Wellborn, L S; Summers, R S; Knappe, D R U

    2014-10-01

    Batch isotherm experiments were conducted with chars to study adsorption of the herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D). Chars generated from corncobs, bamboo and wood chips in a laboratory pyrolyzer at 400-700 °C were compared with traditional kiln charcoals collected from villages in S/SE Asia and with activated carbons (ACs). 2,4-D uptake by laboratory chars obtained from bamboo and wood chips after 14 h of pyrolysis at 700 °C, from wood chips after 96 h of pyrolysis at 600 °C, and one of the field-collected chars (basudha) was comparable to ACs. H:C and O:C ratios declined with pyrolysis temperature and duration while surface area increased to >500 m(2)/g. Increasing pyrolysis intensity by increasing temperature and/or duration of heating was found to positively influence adsorption capacity yield (mg(2,4-D/g(feedstock))) over the range of conditions studied. Economic analysis showed that high temperature chars can be a cost-effective alternative to ACs for water treatment applications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Combination of Experimental Design and Desirability Function as a Genuine Method to Achieve Common Optimal Conditions for the Adsorption of Pb(II and Cu(II onto the Poplar Tree Leaves: Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Jadali

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ashes of poplar tree leaves are applied as an efficient, accessible and inexpensive biosorbent for the removal of heavy metals Pb2+ and Cu+2 in aqueous solutions. In the adsorption processes, the success of the ions removal highly depends on the level of several experimental factors such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and temperature. Therefore, a genuine statistical experiment design method is required to achieve a common experimental conditions where both ions have been removed from aqueous solutions to a great degree. Here, this common optimal conditions are obtained by the combination of experimental design and desirability function methods. For a mixture of Pb2+ and Cu+2, the following optimal conditions were achieved: pH of 5.4, contact time of 23 min, adsorbent dosage of 0.14 g, and temperature of 280C; at 150 mg L-1 of Pb2+ and 120 mg L-1 Cu2+. The removal efficiencies of Pb2+ and Cu+2 were 92.8% and 94.9%, respectively, which verified the applicability of this biosorbent for the ions removal. Moreover, the equilibrium and kinetic behavior of the adsorption processes are investigated and then thermodynamic parameters, ΔG0(Kj mol-1, ΔH(Kj mol-10, and ΔS0 (Kj mol-1, are evaluated which reveal that both processes are endothermic and spontaneous.

  6. Non-equilibrium Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Martinás

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A microeconomic, agent based framework to dynamic economics is formulated in a materialist approach. An axiomatic foundation of a non-equilibrium microeconomics is outlined. Economic activity is modelled as transformation and transport of commodities (materials owned by the agents. Rate of transformations (production intensity, and the rate of transport (trade are defined by the agents. Economic decision rules are derived from the observed economic behaviour. The non-linear equations are solved numerically for a model economy. Numerical solutions for simple model economies suggest that the some of the results of general equilibrium economics are consequences only of the equilibrium hypothesis. We show that perfect competition of selfish agents does not guarantee the stability of economic equilibrium, but cooperativity is needed, too.

  7. Equilibrium and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Oury

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a reduction of the termination problem for a Turing machine (in the simplified form of the Post correspondence problem to the problem of determining whether a continuous-time Markov chain presented as a set of Kappa graph-rewriting rules has an equilibrium. It follows that the problem of whether a computable CTMC is dissipative (ie does not have an equilibrium is undecidable.

  8. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Mayer, J E

    1968-01-01

    The International Encyclopedia of Physical Chemistry and Chemical Physics, Volume 1: Equilibrium Statistical Mechanics covers the fundamental principles and the development of theoretical aspects of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Statistical mechanical is the study of the connection between the macroscopic behavior of bulk matter and the microscopic properties of its constituent atoms and molecules. This book contains eight chapters, and begins with a presentation of the master equation used for the calculation of the fundamental thermodynamic functions. The succeeding chapters highlight t

  9. Methods for Solving Generalized Nash Equilibrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biao Qu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The generalized Nash equilibrium problem (GNEP is an extension of the standard Nash equilibrium problem (NEP, in which each player's strategy set may depend on the rival player's strategies. In this paper, we present two descent type methods. The algorithms are based on a reformulation of the generalized Nash equilibrium using Nikaido-Isoda function as unconstrained optimization. We prove that our algorithms are globally convergent and the convergence analysis is not based on conditions guaranteeing that every stationary point of the optimization problem is a solution of the GNEP.

  10. Microwave Mapping Demonstration Using the Thermochromic Cobalt Chloride Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Vu D.; Birdwhistell, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    An update to the thermochromic cobalt(II) chloride equilibrium demonstration is described. Filter paper that has been saturated with aqueous cobalt(II) chloride is heated for seconds in a microwave oven, producing a color change. The resulting pink and blue map is used to colorfully demonstrate Le Châtelier's principle and to illuminate the…

  11. Thermodynamics and fluctuations far from equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, John

    2008-01-01

    This book deals with the formulation of the thermodynamics of chemical and other systems far from equilibrium, including connections to fluctuations. It contains applications to non-equilibrium stationary states and approaches to such states, systems with multiple stationary states, stability and equi-stability conditions, reaction diffusion systems, transport properties, and electrochemical systems. The theoretical treatment is complemented by experimental results to substantiate the formulation. Dissipation and efficiency are analyzed in autonomous and externally forced reactions, including several biochemical systems.

  12. Impact strength of Luehea divaricata wood on different moisture conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clovis Roberto Haselein

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to compare the impact strength of Luehea divaricata wood tested under conditions of equilibrium at 12% and saturated moisture content. Trees from two different physiographic regions of Rio Grande do Sul state were used. The specimens were submitted to the impact using a pendulum of Charpy and evaluated with relationship to the resistance offered to the application of the load in the radial and tangential plans and with the positions in the log (pith - bark for the two physiographic regions at each moisture condition. Also the specific gravity at 12% moisture content and in saturated conditions, the moisture content, the work absorbed, the impact strength, coefficient of resilience and dynamic quota were determined. The results showed that the Luehea divaricata in saturated wood, presented greater strength, indicating that the specie is more resistant to the impact when it is green than when it is at 12% moisture content.

  13. Global stability and Hopf bifurcation of a delayed computer virus propagation model with saturation incidence rate and temporary immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunxian; Lin, Yiping; Zhao, Huitao; Khalique, Chaudry Masood

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a delayed computer virus propagation model with a saturation incidence rate and a time delay describing temporary immune period is proposed and its dynamical behaviors are studied. The threshold value ℜ0 is given to determine whether the virus dies out completely. By comparison arguments and iteration technique, sufficient conditions are obtained for the global asymptotic stabilities of the virus-free equilibrium and the virus equilibrium. Taking the delay as a parameter, local Hopf bifurcations are demonstrated. Furthermore, the direction of Hopf bifurcation and the stabilities of the bifurcating periodic solutions are determined by the normal form theory and the center manifold theorem for functional differential equations (FDEs). Finally, numerical simulations are carried out to illustrate the main theoretical results.

  14. Local Nash equilibrium in social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yichao; Aziz-Alaoui, M A; Bertelle, Cyrille; Guan, Jihong

    2014-08-29

    Nash equilibrium is widely present in various social disputes. As of now, in structured static populations, such as social networks, regular, and random graphs, the discussions on Nash equilibrium are quite limited. In a relatively stable static gaming network, a rational individual has to comprehensively consider all his/her opponents' strategies before they adopt a unified strategy. In this scenario, a new strategy equilibrium emerges in the system. We define this equilibrium as a local Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we present an explicit definition of the local Nash equilibrium for the two-strategy games in structured populations. Based on the definition, we investigate the condition that a system reaches the evolutionary stable state when the individuals play the Prisoner's dilemma and snow-drift game. The local Nash equilibrium provides a way to judge whether a gaming structured population reaches the evolutionary stable state on one hand. On the other hand, it can be used to predict whether cooperators can survive in a system long before the system reaches its evolutionary stable state for the Prisoner's dilemma game. Our work therefore provides a theoretical framework for understanding the evolutionary stable state in the gaming populations with static structures.

  15. Quantitative 1D saturation profiles on chalk by NMR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dan; Topp, Simon; Stensgaard, Anders

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative one-dimensional saturation profiles showing the distribution of water and oil in chalk core samples are calculated from NMR measurements utilizing a 1D CSI spectroscopy pulse sequence. Saturation profiles may be acquired under conditions of fluid flow through the sample. Results reveal...... that strong saturation gradients exist in chalk core samples after core floods, due to capillary effects. The method is useful in analysis of corefloods, e.g., for determination of capillary pressure functions...

  16. Local Stellarator Equilibrium Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Stuart R.; Hegna, Chris C.; Lewandowski, Jerome W.

    2000-10-01

    Extensive calculations of ballooning and drift waves spectrums in asymmetric toroidal configurations (e.g. stellarators) to appreciate the role of magnetic geometry and profile variations are usually are usually prohibitive as the evaluation of the magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium is in itself a non-trivial problem. Although simple analytical MHD model equilibria do exist for tokamak configurations, their stellarator counterparts are usually crude or very approximate. In order to make more extensive stability calculations (of both ideal ballooning and drift-type modes), a technique for generating three-dimensional magneto-static equilibria, localized to a magnetic surface, has been developed. The technique allows one to easily manipulate various 3-D shaping and profile effects on a magnetic surface avoiding the need to recompute an entire three dimensional solution of the equilibrium. The model equilibrium has been implemented into existing ideal MHD ballooning and drift wave numerical codes. Marginal ballooning stability diagrams and drift wave calculations will be reported.

  17. Equilibrium moisture content of radiata pine at elevated temperature and pressure reveals measurement challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pearson, Hamish; Gabbitas, Brian; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2012-01-01

    Relatively few studies have been performed on the equilibrium moisture content (EMC) of wood under conditions of elevated temperature and pressure. Eight studies indicated that EMC near saturation decreased between 100 and 150 °C, whilst five studies indicated that EMC increased. The aim...... of this study was to identify the likely source of the disagreement using radiata pine (Pinus radiata D. Don) sapwood which was conditioned to a moisture content of around 3 % and then exposed for 1 h at 150 °C and relative humidities of either 50, 70 or 90 %. Mean values of EMC, obtained through in situ...... conditions with minimal standard error, (2) specimens with low initial moisture content to avoid unwanted wood mass loss over time, (3) a relative humidity upper limit that avoids drift above 95 %, and (4) extrapolation of data to humidity approaching 100 %....

  18. Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2005-01-01

    Beyond Equilibrium Thermodynamics fills a niche in the market by providing a comprehensive introduction to a new, emerging topic in the field. The importance of non-equilibrium thermodynamics is addressed in order to fully understand how a system works, whether it is in a biological system like the brain or a system that develops plastic. In order to fully grasp the subject, the book clearly explains the physical concepts and mathematics involved, as well as presenting problems and solutions; over 200 exercises and answers are included. Engineers, scientists, and applied mathematicians can all use the book to address their problems in modelling, calculating, and understanding dynamic responses of materials.

  19. Computation of Phase Equilibrium and Phase Envelopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritschel, Tobias Kasper Skovborg; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    and 2) nonideal gases and liquids modeled with cubic equations of state. Next, we derive the equilibrium conditions for an isothermal-isobaric (constant temperature, constant pressure) vapor-liquid equilibrium process (PT flash), and we present a method for the computation of phase envelopes. We......In this technical report, we describe the computation of phase equilibrium and phase envelopes based on expressions for the fugacity coefficients. We derive those expressions from the residual Gibbs energy. We consider 1) ideal gases and liquids modeled with correlations from the DIPPR database...... formulate the involved equations in terms of the fugacity coefficients. We present expressions for the first-order derivatives. Such derivatives are necessary in computationally efficient gradient-based methods for solving the vapor-liquid equilibrium equations and for computing phase envelopes. Finally, we...

  20. Transport of strontium and cesium in simulated hanford tank waste leachate through quartz sand under saturated and unsaturated flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rod, Kenton A; Um, Wooyong; Flury, Markus

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the effects of water saturation and secondary precipitate formation on Sr and Cs transport through quartz sand columns under saturated and unsaturated flow. Column experiments were conducted at effective water saturation ranging from 0.2 to 1.0 under steady-state flow using either 0.1 M NaNO(3) or simulated tank waste leachate (STWL; 1 M NaNO(3) and 1 M NaOH) mimicking Hanford (Washington, USA) tank waste. In 0.1 M NaNO(3) columns, Sr transported like a conservative tracer, whereas Cs was retarded relative to Sr. The transport of Sr and Cs in the 0.1 M NaNO(3) columns under all water saturations could be described with the equilibrium convection-dispersion equation (CDE). In STWL columns, Sr mobility was significantly reduced compared to the 0.1 M NaNO(3) column, because Sr was incorporated into or sorbed to neo-formed secondary precipitates. Strontium sequestration by precipitates was confirmed by additional batch and electron micrograph analyses. In contrast(,) the transport of Cs was less affected by the STWL; retardation of Cs in STWL columns was similar to that found in 0.1 M NaNO(3) columns. Analysis of STWL column data revealed that both Sr and Cs breakthrough curves showed nonideal behavior that suggest nonequilibrium conditions, although nonlinear geochemical behavior cannot be ruled out.

  1. Equilibrium shoreface profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Troels; Hughes, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale coastal behaviour models use the shoreface profile of equilibrium as a fundamental morphological unit that is translated in space to simulate coastal response to, for example, sea level oscillations and variability in sediment supply. Despite a longstanding focus on the shoreface prof...

  2. On Quantum Microcanonical Equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Dorje C. Brody; Hook, Daniel W.; Hughston, Lane P.

    2007-01-01

    A quantum microcanonical postulate is proposed as a basis for the equilibrium properties of small quantum systems. Expressions for the corresponding density of states are derived, and are used to establish the existence of phase transitions for finite quantum systems. A grand microcanonical ensemble is introduced, which can be used to obtain new rigorous results in quantum statistical mechanics. Accepted version

  3. On quantum microcanonical equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brody, Dorje C [Department of Mathematics, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Hook, Daniel W [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Hughston, Lane P [Department of Mathematics, King' s College London, The Strand, London WC2R 2LS (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    A quantum microcanonical postulate is proposed as a basis for the equilibrium properties of small quantum systems. Expressions for the corresponding density of states are derived, and are used to establish the existence of phase transitions for finite quantum systems. A grand microcanonical ensemble is introduced, which can be used to obtain new rigorous results in quantum statistical mechanics.

  4. Differential Equation of Equilibrium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    ABSTRACT. Analysis of underground circular cylindrical shell is carried out in this work. The forth order differential equation of equilibrium, comparable to that of beam on elastic foundation, was derived from static principles on the assumptions of P. L Pasternak. Laplace transformation was used to solve the governing ...

  5. Volatility in Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Tim; Sizova, Natalia; Tauchen, George

    Stock market volatility clusters in time, carries a risk premium, is fractionally inte- grated, and exhibits asymmetric leverage effects relative to returns. This paper develops a first internally consistent equilibrium based explanation for these longstanding empirical facts. The model is cast...

  6. Differential Equation of Equilibrium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    differential equation of equilibrium, comparable to that of beam on elastic foundation, was derived from static principles on the ... tedious and more time saving than the classical method in the solution of the aforementioned differential equation. ... silos, pipelines, bridge arches or wind turbine towers [3]. The objective of this ...

  7. Microeconomics : Equilibrium and Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ten Raa, T.

    2013-01-01

    Microeconomics: Equilibrium and Efficiency teaches how to apply microeconomic theory in an innovative, intuitive and concise way. Using real-world, empirical examples, this book not only covers the building blocks of the subject, but helps gain a broad understanding of microeconomic theory and

  8. Thermodynamic modelling of phase equilibrium in system Ti-B-Si-C, synthesis and phases composition of borides and carbides layers on titanic alloyVT-1 at electron beam treatment in vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnyagina, N. N.; Khaltanova, V. M.; Lapina, A. E.; Dasheev, D. E.

    2017-01-01

    Composite layers on the basis of carbides and borides the titan and silicon on titanic alloy VT-1 are generated at diffused saturation in vacuum. Formation in a composite of MAX phase Ti3SiC2 is shown. Thermodynamic research of phase equilibrium in systems Ti-Si-C and Ti-B-C in the conditions of high vacuum is executed. The thermodynamics, formation mechanisms of superfirm layers borides and carbides of the titan and silicon are investigated.

  9. Strontium isotope fractionation during strontianite (SrCO3) dissolution, precipitation and at equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Harrison, Anna L.; Eisenhauer, Anton; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-12-01

    In this study we examine the behavior of stable Sr isotopes between strontianite [SrCO3] and reactive fluid during mineral dissolution, precipitation, and at chemical equilibrium. Experiments were performed in batch reactors at 25 °C in 0.01 M NaCl solutions wherein the pH was adjusted by bubbling of a water saturated gas phase of pure CO2 or atmospheric air. The equilibrium Sr isotope fractionation between strontianite and fluid after dissolution of the solid under 1 atm CO2 atmosphere was estimated as Δ88/86SrSrCO3-fluid = δ88/86Sr SrCO3 - δ88/86Srfluid = -0.05 ± 0.01‰. On the other hand, during strontianite precipitation, an enrichment of the fluid phase in 88Sr, the heavy isotopomer, was observed. The evolution of the δ88/86Srfluid during strontianite precipitation can be modeled using a Rayleigh distillation approach and the estimated, kinetically driven, fractionation factor αSrCO3-fluid between solid and fluid is calculated to be 0.99985 ± 0.00003 corresponding to Δ88/86SrSrCO3-fluid = -0.15‰. The obtained results further support that under chemical equilibrium conditions between solid and fluid a continuous exchange of isotopes occurs until the system approaches isotopic equilibrium. This isotopic exchange is not limited to the outer surface layer of the strontianite crystal, but extends to ∼7-8 unit cells below the crystal surface. The behavior of Sr isotopes in this study is in excellent agreement with the concept of dynamic equilibrium and it suggests that the time needed for achievement of chemical equilibrium is generally shorter compared to that for isotopic equilibrium. Thus it is suggested that in natural Sr-bearing carbonates an isotopic change may still occur close to thermodynamic equilibrium, despite no observable change in aqueous elemental concentrations. As such, a secondary and ongoing change of Sr isotope signals in carbonate minerals caused by isotopic re-equilibration with fluids has to be considered in order to use Sr

  10. Brine Distribution after Vacuum Saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Kathrine; Andersen, Bertel Lohmann

    1999-01-01

    Experiments with the vacuum saturation method for brine in plugs of chalk showed that a homogeneous distribution of brine cannot be ensured at saturations below 20% volume. Instead of a homogeneous volume distribution the brine becomes concentrated close to the surfaces of the plugs...

  11. Misconceptions in Reporting Oxygen Saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toffaletti, John; Zijlstra, Willem G.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We describe some misconceptions that have become common practice in reporting blood gas and cooximetry results. In 1980, oxygen saturation was incorrectly redefined in a report of a new instrument for analysis of hemoglobin (Hb) derivatives. Oxygen saturation (sO(2)) was redefined as the

  12. An analysis of the saturation of a high gain FEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gluckstern, R.L.; Okamoto, Hiromi (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States). Dept. of Physics); Krinsky, S. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-12-01

    We study the saturated state of an untapered free electron laser in the Compton regime, arising after exponential amplification of an initial low level of radiation by an initially monoenergetic, unbunched electron beam. The saturated state of the FEL is described by oscillations about an equilibrium state. Using the two invariants of the motion, and certain assumptions motivated by computer simulations, we provide approximate analytic descriptions of the radiation field and electron distribution in the saturation regime. We first consider a one-dimensional approximation, and later extend our approach to treat an electron beam of finite radial extent. Of note is a result on the radiated power in the case of an electron beam with small radius.

  13. An analytical model of crater count equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirabayashi, Masatoshi; Minton, David A.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2017-06-01

    Crater count equilibrium occurs when new craters form at the same rate that old craters are erased, such that the total number of observable impacts remains constant. Despite substantial efforts to understand this process, there remain many unsolved problems. Here, we propose an analytical model that describes how a heavily cratered surface reaches a state of crater count equilibrium. The proposed model formulates three physical processes contributing to crater count equilibrium: cookie-cutting (simple, geometric overlap), ejecta-blanketing, and sandblasting (diffusive erosion). These three processes are modeled using a degradation parameter that describes the efficiency for a new crater to erase old craters. The flexibility of our newly developed model allows us to represent the processes that underlie crater count equilibrium problems. The results show that when the slope of the production function is steeper than that of the equilibrium state, the power law of the equilibrium slope is independent of that of the production function slope. We apply our model to the cratering conditions in the Sinus Medii region and at the Apollo 15 landing site on the Moon and demonstrate that a consistent degradation parameterization can successfully be determined based on the empirical results of these regions. Further developments of this model will enable us to better understand the surface evolution of airless bodies due to impact bombardment.

  14. Problems in equilibrium theory

    CERN Document Server

    Aliprantis, Charalambos D

    1996-01-01

    In studying General Equilibrium Theory the student must master first the theory and then apply it to solve problems. At the graduate level there is no book devoted exclusively to teaching problem solving. This book teaches for the first time the basic methods of proof and problem solving in General Equilibrium Theory. The problems cover the entire spectrum of difficulty; some are routine, some require a good grasp of the material involved, and some are exceptionally challenging. The book presents complete solutions to two hundred problems. In searching for the basic required techniques, the student will find a wealth of new material incorporated into the solutions. The student is challenged to produce solutions which are different from the ones presented in the book.

  15. Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Zyvoloski

    2003-12-17

    The purpose of this model report is to document the components of the site-scale saturated-zone flow model at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in accordance with administrative procedure (AP)-SIII.lOQ, ''Models''. This report provides validation and confidence in the flow model that was developed for site recommendation (SR) and will be used to provide flow fields in support of the Total Systems Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application. The output from this report provides the flow model used in the ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'', MDL-NBS-HS-000010 Rev 01 (BSC 2003 [162419]). The Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport model then provides output to the SZ Transport Abstraction Model (BSC 2003 [164870]). In particular, the output from the SZ site-scale flow model is used to simulate the groundwater flow pathways and radionuclide transport to the accessible environment for use in the TSPA calculations. Since the development and calibration of the saturated-zone flow model, more data have been gathered for use in model validation and confidence building, including new water-level data from Nye County wells, single- and multiple-well hydraulic testing data, and new hydrochemistry data. In addition, a new hydrogeologic framework model (HFM), which incorporates Nye County wells lithology, also provides geologic data for corroboration and confidence in the flow model. The intended use of this work is to provide a flow model that generates flow fields to simulate radionuclide transport in saturated porous rock and alluvium under natural or forced gradient flow conditions. The flow model simulations are completed using the three-dimensional (3-D), finite-element, flow, heat, and transport computer code, FEHM Version (V) 2.20 (software tracking number (STN): 10086-2.20-00; LANL 2003 [161725]). Concurrently, process-level transport model and methodology for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone at Yucca

  16. Interfaces at equilibrium: A guide to fundamentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmur, Abraham

    2017-06-01

    The fundamentals of the thermodynamics of interfaces are reviewed and concisely presented. The discussion starts with a short review of the elements of bulk thermodynamics that are also relevant to interfaces. It continues with the interfacial thermodynamics of two-phase systems, including the definition of interfacial tension and adsorption. Finally, the interfacial thermodynamics of three-phase (wetting) systems is discussed, including the topic of non-wettable surfaces. A clear distinction is made between equilibrium conditions, in terms of minimizing energies (internal, Gibbs or Helmholtz), and equilibrium indicators, in terms of measurable, intrinsic properties (temperature, chemical potential, pressure). It is emphasized that the equilibrium indicators are the same whatever energy is minimized, if the boundary conditions are properly chosen. Also, to avoid a common confusion, a distinction is made between systems of constant volume and systems with drops of constant volume. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Equilibrium statistical mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Jackson, E Atlee

    2000-01-01

    Ideal as an elementary introduction to equilibrium statistical mechanics, this volume covers both classical and quantum methodology for open and closed systems. Introductory chapters familiarize readers with probability and microscopic models of systems, while additional chapters describe the general derivation of the fundamental statistical mechanics relationships. The final chapter contains 16 sections, each dealing with a different application, ordered according to complexity, from classical through degenerate quantum statistical mechanics. Key features include an elementary introduction t

  18. Soil moisture storage estimation based on steady vertical fluxes under equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amvrosiadi, Nino; Bishop, Kevin; Seibert, Jan

    2017-10-01

    Soil moisture is an important variable for hillslope and catchment hydrology. There are various computational methods to estimate soil moisture and their complexity varies greatly: from one box with vertically constant volumetric soil water content to fully saturated-unsaturated coupled physically-based models. Different complexity levels are applicable depending on the simulation scale, computational time limitations, input data and knowledge about the parameters. The Vertical Equilibrium Model (VEM) is a simple approach to estimate the catchment-wide soil water storage at a daily time-scale on the basis of water table level observations, soil properties and an assumption of hydrological equilibrium without vertical fluxes above the water table. In this study VEM was extended by considering vertical fluxes, which allows conditions with evaporation and infiltration to be represented. The aim was to test the hypothesis that the simulated volumetric soil water content significantly depends on vertical fluxes. The water content difference between the no-flux, equilibrium approach and the new constant-flux approach greatly depended on the soil textural class, ranging between ∼1% for silty clay and ∼44% for sand at an evapotranspiration rate of 5 mm·d-1. The two approaches gave a mean volumetric soil water content difference of ∼1 mm for two case studies (sandy loam and organic rich soils). The results showed that for many soil types the differences in estimated storage between the no-flux and the constant flux approaches were relatively small.

  19. Saturation current spikes eliminated in saturable core transformers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, F. C.

    1971-01-01

    Unsaturating composite magnetic core transformer, consisting of two separate parallel cores designed so impending core saturation causes signal generation, terminates high current spike in converter primary circuit. Simplified waveform, demonstrates transformer effectiveness in eliminating current spikes.

  20. Stabilization of Neutral Systems with Saturating Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. El Haoussi

    2012-01-01

    to determine stabilizing state-feedback controllers with large domain of attraction, expressed as linear matrix inequalities, readily implementable using available numerical tools and with tuning parameters that make possible to select the most adequate solution. These conditions are derived by using a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional on the vertices of the polytopic description of the actuator saturations. Numerical examples demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  1. Multi-period equilibrium/near-equilibrium in electricity markets based on locational marginal prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Bertrand, Raquel

    In this dissertation we propose an equilibrium procedure that coordinates the point of view of every market agent resulting in an equilibrium that simultaneously maximizes the independent objective of every market agent and satisfies network constraints. Therefore, the activities of the generating companies, consumers and an independent system operator are modeled: (1) The generating companies seek to maximize profits by specifying hourly step functions of productions and minimum selling prices, and bounds on productions. (2) The goals of the consumers are to maximize their economic utilities by specifying hourly step functions of demands and maximum buying prices, and bounds on demands. (3) The independent system operator then clears the market taking into account consistency conditions as well as capacity and line losses so as to achieve maximum social welfare. Then, we approach this equilibrium problem using complementarity theory in order to have the capability of imposing constraints on dual variables, i.e., on prices, such as minimum profit conditions for the generating units or maximum cost conditions for the consumers. In this way, given the form of the individual optimization problems, the Karush-Kuhn-Tucker conditions for the generating companies, the consumers and the independent system operator are both necessary and sufficient. The simultaneous solution to all these conditions constitutes a mixed linear complementarity problem. We include minimum profit constraints imposed by the units in the market equilibrium model. These constraints are added as additional constraints to the equivalent quadratic programming problem of the mixed linear complementarity problem previously described. For the sake of clarity, the proposed equilibrium or near-equilibrium is first developed for the particular case considering only one time period. Afterwards, we consider an equilibrium or near-equilibrium applied to a multi-period framework. This model embodies binary

  2. Equilibrium thermodynamics - Callen's postulational approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongschaap, R.J.J.; Öttinger, Hans Christian

    2001-01-01

    In order to provide the background for nonequilibrium thermodynamics, we outline the fundamentals of equilibrium thermodynamics. Equilibrium thermodynamics must not only be obtained as a special case of any acceptable nonequilibrium generalization but, through its shining example, it also elucidates

  3. conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Venkatesulu

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Solutions of initial value problems associated with a pair of ordinary differential systems (L1,L2 defined on two adjacent intervals I1 and I2 and satisfying certain interface-spatial conditions at the common end (interface point are studied.

  4. Average inbreeding or equilibrium inbreeding?

    OpenAIRE

    Hedrick, P. W.

    1986-01-01

    The equilibrium inbreeding is always higher than the average inbreeding. For human populations with high inbreeding levels, the inbreeding equilibrium is more than 25% higher than the average inbreeding. Assuming no initial inbreeding in the population, the equilibrium inbreeding value is closely approached in 10 generations or less. A secondary effect of this higher inbreeding level is that the equilibrium frequency of recessive detrimental alleles is somewhat lower than expected using avera...

  5. The equilibrium of overpressurized polytropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huré, J.-M.; Hersant, F.; Nasello, G.

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the impact of an external pressure on the structure of self-gravitating polytropes for axially symmetric ellipsoids and rings. The confinement of the fluid by photons is accounted for through a boundary condition on the enthalpy H. Equilibrium configurations are determined numerically from a generalized `self-consistent-field' method. The new algorithm incorporates an intraloop re-scaling operator R(H), which is essential for both convergence and getting self-normalized solutions. The main control parameter is the external-to-core enthalpy ratio. In the case of uniform rotation rate and uniform surrounding pressure, we compute the mass, the volume, the rotation rate and the maximum enthalpy. This is repeated for a few polytropic indices, n. For a given axial ratio, overpressurization globally increases all output quantities, and this is more pronounced for large n. Density profiles are flatter than in the absence of an external pressure. When the control parameter asymptotically tends to unity, the fluid converges towards the incompressible solution, whatever the index, but becomes geometrically singular. Equilibrium sequences, obtained by varying the axial ratio, are built. States of critical rotation are greatly exceeded or even disappear. The same trends are observed with differential rotation. Finally, the typical response to a photon point source is presented. Strong irradiation favours sharp edges. Applications concern star-forming regions and matter orbiting young stars and black holes.

  6. Equilibrium Arrival Times to Queues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Jesper; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    a symmetric (mixed) Nash equilibrium, and show that there is at most one symmetric equilibrium. We provide a numerical method to compute this equilibrium and demonstrate by a numerical example that the social effciency can be lower than the effciency induced by a similar queueing system that serves customers...

  7. Extended Mixed Vector Equilibrium Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijanur Rahaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study extended mixed vector equilibrium problems, namely, extended weak mixed vector equilibrium problem and extended strong mixed vector equilibrium problem in Hausdorff topological vector spaces. Using generalized KKM-Fan theorem (Ben-El-Mechaiekh et al.; 2005, some existence results for both problems are proved in noncompact domain.

  8. A Progression of Static Equilibrium Laboratory Exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutzner, Mickey; Kutzner, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Although simple architectural structures like bridges, catwalks, cantilevers, and Stonehenge have been integral in human societies for millennia, as have levers and other simple tools, modern students of introductory physics continue to grapple with Newton's conditions for static equilibrium. As formulated in typical introductory physics…

  9. Rumor Propagation Model: An Equilibrium Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto C. Piqueira

    2010-01-01

    information is analogous phenomena. Here, in an analogy with the SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Removed epidemiological model, the ISS (Ignorant-Spreader-Stifler rumor spreading model is studied. By using concepts from the Dynamical Systems Theory, stability of equilibrium points is established, according to propagation parameters and initial conditions. Some numerical experiments are conducted in order to validate the model.

  10. Mass transfer and adsorption equilibrium study in MFI zeolites: application to the separation of mono and di-branched hydrocarbons in silicalite; Etude et modelisation de l'adsorption et du transfert de matiere dans les zeolithes de structure MFI. Application a la separation des hydrocarbures satures mono et di-branches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jolimaitre, E.

    1999-11-30

    The aim of this study was to develop a model representing the breakthrough of hydrocarbon mixtures in fixed bed, and to estimate the parameters of this model. Equilibrium isotherms and effective diffusivities of 3-methyl-pentane, isopentane and 2,2-dimethyl-butane in silicalite were measured between 150 and 300 deg. C and for different concentrations, with a linear chromatography technique. Parameter estimation was made by mean of a linear model developed for this work, on which a parameter identifiability study was made. The method used for the parameter identifiability study can be applied to any linear fixed bed model. Experimental single component and mixtures breakthrough curves of 2-methyl-pentane, isopentane and 2,2-dimethyl-butane were then realized at 200 deg. C. Adsorption isotherms and self diffusivities were estimated from single-component curves, using a non linear model of the bed. The non-linear model was also developed and validated during this work. These parameters were injected into the non-linear model to simulate the experimental mixture breakthrough curves. Influence of the velocity variation in the bed and of the diffusion driving-force (Maxwell-Stefan or Fick theory) was studied. Most of the experimental breakthrough curves are correctly predicted by the model, expect for the isopentane-2,2-dimethyl-butane mixture, for which predicted breakthrough time is inferior to experimental values. (author)

  11. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O (t4) and O (t1) , respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O (t5) and O (t2) , respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  12. Non-equilibrium dynamics from RPMD and CMD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsch, Ralph; Song, Kai; Shi, Qiang; Althorpe, Stuart C; Miller, Thomas F

    2016-11-28

    We investigate the calculation of approximate non-equilibrium quantum time correlation functions (TCFs) using two popular path-integral-based molecular dynamics methods, ring-polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) and centroid molecular dynamics (CMD). It is shown that for the cases of a sudden vertical excitation and an initial momentum impulse, both RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs for linear operators that are exact for high temperatures, in the t = 0 limit, and for harmonic potentials; the subset of these conditions that are preserved for non-equilibrium TCFs of non-linear operators is also discussed. Furthermore, it is shown that for these non-equilibrium initial conditions, both methods retain the connection to Matsubara dynamics that has previously been established for equilibrium initial conditions. Comparison of non-equilibrium TCFs from RPMD and CMD to Matsubara dynamics at short times reveals the orders in time to which the methods agree. Specifically, for the position-autocorrelation function associated with sudden vertical excitation, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t4) and O(t1), respectively; for the position-autocorrelation function associated with an initial momentum impulse, RPMD and CMD agree with Matsubara dynamics up to O(t5) and O(t2), respectively. Numerical tests using model potentials for a wide range of non-equilibrium initial conditions show that RPMD and CMD yield non-equilibrium TCFs with an accuracy that is comparable to that for equilibrium TCFs. RPMD is also used to investigate excited-state proton transfer in a system-bath model, and it is compared to numerically exact calculations performed using a recently developed version of the Liouville space hierarchical equation of motion approach; again, similar accuracy is observed for non-equilibrium and equilibrium initial conditions.

  13. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    De Groot, Sybren Ruurds

    1984-01-01

    The study of thermodynamics is especially timely today, as its concepts are being applied to problems in biology, biochemistry, electrochemistry, and engineering. This book treats irreversible processes and phenomena - non-equilibrium thermodynamics.S. R. de Groot and P. Mazur, Professors of Theoretical Physics, present a comprehensive and insightful survey of the foundations of the field, providing the only complete discussion of the fluctuating linear theory of irreversible thermodynamics. The application covers a wide range of topics: the theory of diffusion and heat conduction, fluid dyn

  14. General equilibrium without utility functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balasko, Yves; Tvede, Mich

    2010-01-01

    How far can we go in weakening the assumptions of the general equilibrium model? Existence of equilibrium, structural stability and finiteness of equilibria of regular economies, genericity of regular economies and an index formula for the equilibria of regular economies have been known...... and the diffeomorphism of the equilibrium manifold with a Euclidean space; (2) the diffeomorphism of the set of no-trade equilibria with a Euclidean space; (3) the openness and genericity of the set of regular equilibria as a subset of the equilibrium manifold; (4) for small trade vectors, the uniqueness, regularity...... and stability of equilibrium for two version of tatonnement; (5) the pathconnectedness of the sets of stable equilibria....

  15. On financial equilibrium with intermediation costs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markeprand, Tobias Ejnar

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the set of competitive equilibria in financial economies with intermediation costs. We consider an arbitrary dividend structure, which includes options and equity with limited liabilities.We show a general existence result and upper-hemi continuity of the equilibrium correspond......This paper studies the set of competitive equilibria in financial economies with intermediation costs. We consider an arbitrary dividend structure, which includes options and equity with limited liabilities.We show a general existence result and upper-hemi continuity of the equilibrium...... correspondence. Finally, we prove that when intermediation costs approach zero, unbounded volume of asset trades is a necessary and sufficient condition, provided that, there is no financial equilibrium without intermediation costs....

  16. Equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Y.N.I.; Hill, F.B.; Wong, Y.W.

    1979-01-01

    The equilibrium theory of heatless adsorption was derived for the case of isothermal removal of a single trace adsorbable component from an inert carrier. The adsorbing component obeyed a linear distribution law. A modification is made in order to render all material balances exact. The modified theory is presented and extended to the case of the two-component system in which both components are adsorbable. A survey was made of the predictions of the corrected theory. Calculations were made of the steady state performance of a single heatless adsorption stage when operating at the condition of complete removal of the trace component from the product stream. Quantities calculated included the critical purge to feed ratio, enrichments in the purge and in the blowdown gas, and overall enrichment. Operation at the critical purge to feed ratio for perfect cleanup and the shortest column length corresponds to the condition of maximum sorbent utilization, providing an upper bound on the performance of the column. The overall enrichment increases with pressure ratio and decreases with the equilibrium parameter ..beta... It is dominated by the enrichment in the purge stream for small values of ..beta... At a purge to feed ratio greater than the critical, the overall enrichment is diminished and exhibits a maximum with respect to pressure ratio. For separation factors less than unity, only modest depletion of the trace component in th product stream is found, and this depletion is relatively insensitive to pressure ratio. From transient calculations, the number of cycles required to reach steady state increases with pressure ratio.

  17. Thermal equilibrium of goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Alex S C; Nascimento, Sheila T; Nascimento, Carolina C N; Gebremedhin, Kifle G

    2016-05-01

    The effects of air temperature and relative humidity on thermal equilibrium of goats in a tropical region was evaluated. Nine non-pregnant Anglo Nubian nanny goats were used in the study. An indirect calorimeter was designed and developed to measure oxygen consumption, carbon dioxide production, methane production and water vapour pressure of the air exhaled from goats. Physiological parameters: rectal temperature, skin temperature, hair-coat temperature, expired air temperature and respiratory rate and volume as well as environmental parameters: air temperature, relative humidity and mean radiant temperature were measured. The results show that respiratory and volume rates and latent heat loss did not change significantly for air temperature between 22 and 26°C. In this temperature range, metabolic heat was lost mainly by convection and long-wave radiation. For temperature greater than 30°C, the goats maintained thermal equilibrium mainly by evaporative heat loss. At the higher air temperature, the respiratory and ventilation rates as well as body temperatures were significantly elevated. It can be concluded that for Anglo Nubian goats, the upper limit of air temperature for comfort is around 26°C when the goats are protected from direct solar radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The distribution of saturated clusters in wetted granular materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuoqi; Hanaor, Dorian; Gan, Yixiang

    2017-06-01

    The hydro-mechanical behaviour of partially saturated granular materials is greatly influenced by the spatial and temporal distribution of liquid within the media. The aim of this paper is to characterise the distribution of saturated clusters in granular materials using an optical imaging method under different water drainage conditions. A saturated cluster is formed when a liquid phase fully occupies the pore space between solid grains in a localized region. The samples considered here were prepared by vibrating mono-sized glass beads to form closely packed assemblies in a rectangular container. A range of drainage conditions were applied to the specimen by tilting the container and employing different flow rates, and the liquid pressure was recorded at different positions in the experimental cell. The formation of saturated clusters during the liquid withdrawal processes is governed by three competing mechanisms arising from viscous, capillary, and gravitational forces. When the flow rate is sufficiently large and the gravity component is sufficiently small, the viscous force tends to destabilize the liquid front leading to the formation of narrow fingers of saturated material. As the water channels along these liquid fingers break, saturated clusters are formed inside the specimen. Subsequently, a spatial and temporal distribution of saturated clusters can be observed. We investigated the resulting saturated cluster distribution as a function of flow rate and gravity to achieve a fundamental understanding of the formation and evolution of such clusters in partially saturated granular materials. This study serves as a bridge between pore-scale behavior and the overall hydro-mechanical characteristics in partially saturated soils.

  19. Theory of graphene saturable absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, A.; Cox, J. D.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2017-03-01

    Saturable absorption is a nonperturbative nonlinear optical phenomenon that plays a pivotal role in the generation of ultrafast light pulses. Here we show that this effect emerges in graphene at unprecedentedly low light intensities, thus opening avenues to new nonlinear physics and applications in optical technology. Specifically, we theoretically investigate saturable absorption in extended graphene by developing a semianalytical nonperturbative single-particle approach, describing electron dynamics in the atomically-thin material using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions, which is recast in the form of generalized Bloch equations. By solving the electron dynamics nonperturbatively, we account for both interband and intraband contributions to the intensity-dependent saturated conductivity and conclude that the former dominates regardless of the intrinsic doping state of the material. We obtain results in qualitative agreement with atomistic quantum-mechanical simulations of graphene nanoribbons including electron-electron interactions, finite-size, and higher-band effects. Remarkably, such effects are found to affect mainly the linear absorption, while the predicted saturation intensities are in good quantitative agreement in the limit of extended graphene. Additionally, we find that the modulation depth of saturable absorption in graphene can be electrically manipulated through an externally applied gate voltage. Our results are relevant for the development of graphene-based optoelectronic devices, as well as for applications in mode-locking and random lasers.

  20. A thermodynamic treatment of partially saturated soils revealing the structure of effective stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yimin; Einav, Itai; Liu, Mario

    2017-03-01

    A rigorous thermodynamic treatment of partially saturated soils is developed using a minimal number of assumptions. The derivation is carried out in a way that does not require to explicitly track the complex shapes of interfaces between the solid, fluid and gas domains. Instead, suction is the property being recovered explicitly through the minimisation of energy around an ideal 'suctionless limit', while considering the different compressibilities of the three domains. In interpreting experimental data the derivation ensures the thermodynamic equilibrium between the chemical potentials of the soil and measurement cells, while carefully distinguishing intrinsic from measured pressures and suctions. A most general expression for the effective stress of partially saturated soils is then derived that is strictly linked to the soil-water retention curve (SWRC). The structure of the effective stress broadly depends on the three thermodynamic densities characterising the solid, liquid and gas domains. Special cases of SWRC are explored, which reveals conditions for which the structure of the effective stress may agree with previously proposed empirical relationships.

  1. Lattice Boltzmann simulations of supercritical CO2-water drainage displacement in porous media: CO2 saturation and displacement mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamabe, Hirotatsu; Tsuji, Takeshi; Liang, Yunfeng; Matsuoka, Toshifumi

    2015-01-06

    CO2 geosequestration in deep aquifers requires the displacement of water (wetting phase) from the porous media by supercritical CO2 (nonwetting phase). However, the interfacial instabilities, such as viscous and capillary fingerings, develop during the drainage displacement. Moreover, the burstlike Haines jump often occurs under conditions of low capillary number. To study these interfacial instabilities, we performed lattice Boltzmann simulations of CO2-water drainage displacement in a 3D synthetic granular rock model at a fixed viscosity ratio and at various capillary numbers. The capillary numbers are varied by changing injection pressure, which induces changes in flow velocity. It was observed that the viscous fingering was dominant at high injection pressures, whereas the crossover of viscous and capillary fingerings was observed, accompanied by Haines jumps, at low injection pressures. The Haines jumps flowing forward caused a significant drop of CO2 saturation, whereas Haines jumps flowing backward caused an increase of CO2 saturation (per injection depth). We demonstrated that the pore-scale Haines jumps remarkably influenced the flow path and therefore equilibrium CO2 saturation in crossover domain, which is in turn related to the storage efficiency in the field-scale geosequestration. The results can improve our understandings of the storage efficiency by the effects of pore-scale displacement phenomena.

  2. Emergent supersymmetry in local equilibrium systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ping; Liu, Hong

    2018-01-01

    Many physical processes we observe in nature involve variations of macroscopic quantities over spatial and temporal scales much larger than microscopic molecular collision scales and can be considered as in local thermal equilibrium. In this paper we show that any classical statistical system in local thermal equilibrium has an emergent supersymmetry at low energies. We use the framework of non-equilibrium effective field theory for quantum many-body systems defined on a closed time path contour and consider its classical limit. Unitarity of time evolution requires introducing anti-commuting degrees of freedom and BRST symmetry which survive in the classical limit. The local equilibrium is realized through a Z 2 dynamical KMS symmetry. We show that supersymmetry is equivalent to the combination of BRST and a specific consequence of the dynamical KMS symmetry, to which we refer as the special dynamical KMS condition. In particular, we prove a theorem stating that a system satisfying the special dynamical KMS condition is always supersymmetrizable. We discuss a number of examples explicitly, including model A for dynamical critical phenomena, a hydrodynamic theory of nonlinear diffusion, and fluctuating hydrodynamics for relativistic charged fluids.

  3. An equilibrium profile model for tidal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Bernabeu

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available During a full tidal cycle, the beach profile is exposed to continuously changing hydrodynamical conditions. Consequently, the profile evolves constantly to adapt to these changes. The equilibrium condition on tidal beaches is defined in terms of the relative occurrence of swash, surf zone and shoaling processes. We have assumed that the tidal beach profile is in equilibrium when the net sediment transport along a tidal cycle is zero. In this model the contribution of swash is considered negligible. A simple and easy-to-apply equilibrium profile formulation is proposed. This model is based on the assumption that surf zone processes dominate the profile morphology wherever wave breaking occurs during the tidal cycle. The obtained equilibrium profile is valid from the high tide level to the breaker point at low tide level. The tidal influence on the profile morphology is the lengthening of the surf profile. The higher the tidal range, the longer the surf profile. The model was tested against field and laboratory data, showing reasonable predictions of measured beach profiles.

  4. Equilibrium models and variational inequalities

    CERN Document Server

    Konnov, Igor

    2007-01-01

    The concept of equilibrium plays a central role in various applied sciences, such as physics (especially, mechanics), economics, engineering, transportation, sociology, chemistry, biology and other fields. If one can formulate the equilibrium problem in the form of a mathematical model, solutions of the corresponding problem can be used for forecasting the future behavior of very complex systems and, also, for correcting the the current state of the system under control. This book presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts in economics, including several models from related sciences.- Presents a unifying look on different equilibrium concepts and also the present state of investigations in this field- Describes static and dynamic input-output models, Walras, Cassel-Wald, spatial price, auction market, oligopolistic equilibrium models, transportation and migration equilibrium models- Covers the basics of theory and solution methods both for the complementarity and variational inequality probl...

  5. Optimal oxygen saturation in premature infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meayoung Chang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available There is a delicate balance between too little and too much supplemental oxygen exposure in premature infants. Since underuse and overuse of supplemental oxygen can harm premature infants, oxygen saturation levels must be monitored and kept at less than 95% to prevent reactive oxygen species-related diseases, such as retinopathy of prematurity and bronchopulmonary dysplasia. At the same time, desaturation below 80 to 85% must be avoided to prevent adverse consequences, such as cerebral palsy. It is still unclear what range of oxygen saturation is appropriate for premature infants; however, until the results of further studies are available, a reasonable target for pulse oxygen saturation (SpO2 is 90 to 93% with an intermittent review of the correlation between SpO2 and the partial pressure of arterial oxygen tension (PaO2. Because optimal oxygenation depends on individuals at the bedside making ongoing adjustments, each unit must define an optimal target range and set alarm limits according to their own equipment or conditions. All staff must be aware of these values and adjust the concentration of supplemental oxygen frequently.

  6. Methane Hydrate Fformation in a Coarse-Grained, Brine-Saturated Sample Through the Induction of a Propagating Gas Front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, D.

    2016-12-01

    We generate methane hydrate in a coarse-grained, brine-saturated, vertically-oriented sample through gas injection. From 0 - 80 hours, we estimate a hydrate saturation of 0.56 behind the formation front, using mass balance, indicating that hydrate formation is limited by locally-elevated salinity creating three-phase equilibrium conditions. After 80 hours, the hydrate phase saturation drops to 0.50 and the magnitude of the pressure drop-rebound cycles increases, suggesting temporary reductions in permeability and the development of heterogeneous distributions of free gas in the sample. The sample consists of an industrial, fine sand mixed with a 0.5 wt% fraction of natural, smectitic clay from the Eugene Island region in the Gulf of Mexico (5.08cm diameter, 11.79cm length). The sample is initially saturated with a 7 wt% sodium chloride brine, pressurized to 12.24 MPa, and cooled to 1 degree Celsius, to bring the sample into the hydrate stability zone. Syringe pumps filled with methane gas and brine are connected to the top and bottom of the sample, respectively, to control fluid flow. We withdraw from the base of the sample at a rate of 0.0005 mL/min and inject methane to maintain a constant pressure, initiating hydrate formation. We analyze this experiment, as well as a gas flood experiment executed under the same conditions, using computed-tomography scans and an analytical solution to investigate the formation behavior and thermodynamic state of hydrate in gas-rich, coarse-grained reservoirs.

  7. Phase equilibrium in system Ti-Si-C-B and synthesis of MAX phase layers in vacuum under the influence of electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnyagina, N. N.; Khaltanova, V. M.; Dasheev, D. E.; Lapina, A. E.

    2017-05-01

    Composite layers on the basis of carbides and borides the titan and silicon on titanic alloy VТ-1 are generated at diffused saturation by electron beam treatment in vacuum. Formation in a composite of MAX phase Ti3SiC2 is shown. Thermodynamic research of phase equilibrium in systems Ti-Si-C and Ti-B-C in the conditions of high vacuum is executed. The thermodynamics, formation mechanisms of superfirm layers borides and carbides of the titan and silicon are investigated.

  8. Applicability of Donnan equilibrium theory at nanochannel-reservoir interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huanhuan; Zhang, Li; Wang, Moran

    2015-08-15

    Understanding ionic transport in nanochannels has attracted broad attention from various areas in energy and environmental fields. In most pervious research, Donnan equilibrium has been applied widely to nanofluidic systems to obtain ionic concentration and electrical potential at channel-reservoir interfaces; however, as well known that Donnan equilibrium is derived from classical thermodynamic theories with equilibrium assumptions. Therefore the applicability of the Donnan equilibrium may be questionable when the transport at nanochannel-reservoir interface is strongly non-equilibrium. In this work, the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model for ion transport is numerically solved to obtain the exact distributions of ionic concentration and electrical potential. The numerical results are quantitatively compared with the Donnan equilibrium predictions. The applicability of Donnan equilibrium is therefore justified by changing channel length, reservoir ionic concentration, surface charge density and channel height. The results indicate that the Donnan equilibrium is not applicable for short nanochannels, large concentration difference and wide openings. A non-dimensional parameter, Q factor, is proposed to measure the non-equilibrium extent and the relation between Q and the working conditions is studied in detail. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gain dynamics and saturation in semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2004-01-01

    Quantum dot (QD)-based semiconductor optical amplifiers offer unique properties compared with conventional devices based on bulk or quantum well material. Due to the bandfilling properties of QDs and the existence of a nearby reservoir of carriers in the form of a wetting layer, QD semiconductor...... optical amplifiers may be operated in regimes of high linearity, i.e. with a high saturation power, but can also show strong and fast nonlinearities by breaking the equilibrium between discrete dot states and the continuum of wetting layer states. In this paper, we analyse the interplay of these two...

  10. Nonlinear saturation of ballooning modes in tokamaks and stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; Garabedian, P.; Betancourt, O.

    1988-01-01

    The spectral code BETAS computes plasma equilibrium in a toroidal magnetic field B = [unk]s × [unk]Ψ with remarkable accuracy because the finite difference scheme employed in the radial direction allows for discontinuities of the flux function Ψ across the nested surfaces s = const. Instability of higher modes in stellarators like the Heliotron E can be detected in roughly an hour on the best supercomputers by calculating bifurcated equilibria that are defined over just one field period. The method has been validated by comparing results about nonlinear saturation of ballooning modes in tokamaks with numerical data from the PEST code. PMID:16593984

  11. The quasi-equilibrium phase of nonlinear chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equilibrium' phase that appears to be independent of initial conditions, possesses Gaussian velocity distribution, and has a higher mean kinetic energy and larger range of kinetic energy fluctuations as compared to the pure harmonic system with  ...

  12. Napoleon Is in Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Rob

    2015-03-01

    It has been said that the cell is the test tube of the twenty-first century. If so, the theoretical tools needed to quantitatively and predictively describe what goes on in such test tubes lag sorely behind the stunning experimental advances in biology seen in the decades since the molecular biology revolution began. Perhaps surprisingly, one of the theoretical tools that has been used with great success on problems ranging from how cells communicate with their environment and each other to the nature of the organization of proteins and lipids within the cell membrane is statistical mechanics. A knee-jerk reaction to the use of statistical mechanics in the description of cellular processes is that living organisms are so far from equilibrium that one has no business even thinking about it. But such reactions are probably too hasty given that there are many regimes in which, because of a separation of timescales, for example, such an approach can be a useful first step. In this article, we explore the power of statistical mechanical thinking in the biological setting, with special emphasis on cell signaling and regulation. We show how such models are used to make predictions and describe some recent experiments designed to test them. We also consider the limits of such models based on the relative timescales of the processes of interest.

  13. Beyond equilibrium climate sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutti, Reto; Rugenstein, Maria A. A.; Hegerl, Gabriele C.

    2017-10-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity characterizes the Earth's long-term global temperature response to increased atmospheric CO2 concentration. It has reached almost iconic status as the single number that describes how severe climate change will be. The consensus on the 'likely' range for climate sensitivity of 1.5 °C to 4.5 °C today is the same as given by Jule Charney in 1979, but now it is based on quantitative evidence from across the climate system and throughout climate history. The quest to constrain climate sensitivity has revealed important insights into the timescales of the climate system response, natural variability and limitations in observations and climate models, but also concerns about the simple concepts underlying climate sensitivity and radiative forcing, which opens avenues to better understand and constrain the climate response to forcing. Estimates of the transient climate response are better constrained by observed warming and are more relevant for predicting warming over the next decades. Newer metrics relating global warming directly to the total emitted CO2 show that in order to keep warming to within 2 °C, future CO2 emissions have to remain strongly limited, irrespective of climate sensitivity being at the high or low end.

  14. Predicting wave-induced ripple equilibrium geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert Nelson, Timothy; Voulgaris, George; Traykovski, Peter

    2013-06-01

    A comprehensive database of existing (since 1954) field and laboratory measurements of ripple geometry is compiled and combined with newly collected field data to examine the performance of ripple equilibrium predictors. Reanalysis of this enlarged ripple geometry data set reveals that ripples formed from monochromatic waves scale differently than ripples formed from random waves for many existing ripple predictors. Our analysis indicates that ripple wavelengths from the two data sets collapse into a single scaling when the semiorbital excursion and sediment grain diameter are used as normalizing factors. Ripple steepness remains relatively constant for both regular and irregular wave conditions, and it only slightly increases for shorter ripple wavelengths. These findings allowed for the development of a new equilibrium ripple predictor suitable for application in a wide range of wave and sediment conditions.

  15. An equilibrium and kinetic modeling

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2007-06-18

    Jun 18, 2007 ... The Langmuir and Freundlich adsorption models fitted well with the equilibrium data of the process studied. ... followed the first order rate expression. Key words: Penicillin-G wastewater, Phanerochate chrysosporium, equilibrium, kinetic study. ... Ammonia-nitrogen (mg/l). 300 - 500. Total phosphate (mg/l).

  16. Non-equilibrium phase transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Henkel, Malte; Lübeck, Sven

    2009-01-01

    This book describes two main classes of non-equilibrium phase-transitions: (a) static and dynamics of transitions into an absorbing state, and (b) dynamical scaling in far-from-equilibrium relaxation behaviour and ageing. The first volume begins with an introductory chapter which recalls the main concepts of phase-transitions, set for the convenience of the reader in an equilibrium context. The extension to non-equilibrium systems is made by using directed percolation as the main paradigm of absorbing phase transitions and in view of the richness of the known results an entire chapter is devoted to it, including a discussion of recent experimental results. Scaling theories and a large set of both numerical and analytical methods for the study of non-equilibrium phase transitions are thoroughly discussed. The techniques used for directed percolation are then extended to other universality classes and many important results on model parameters are provided for easy reference.

  17. On the Existence of Evolutionary Learning Equilibriums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masudul Alam Choudhury

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The usual kinds of Fixed-Point Theorems formalized on the existence of competitive equilibrium that explain much of economic theory at the core of economics can operate only on bounded and closed sets with convex mappings. But these conditions are hardly true of the real world of economic and financial complexities and perturbations. The category of learning sets explained by continuous fields of interactive, integrative and evolutionary behaviour caused by dynamic preferences at the individual and institutional and social levels cannot maintain the assumption of closed, bounded and convex sets. Thus learning sets and multi-system inter-temporal relations explained by pervasive complementarities and  participation between variables and entities, and evolution by learning, have evolutionary equilibriums. Such a study requires a new methodological approach. This paper formalizes such a methodology for evolutionary equilibriums in learning spaces. It briefly points out the universality of learning equilibriums in all mathematical structures. For a particular case though, the inter-systemic interdependence between sustainable development and ethics and economics in the specific understanding of learning domain is pointed out.

  18. Equilibrium without Friction of a Particle on a Mobile Surface with Bilateral Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae–Doru Stănescu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we will study the equilibrium of a particle on a mobile surface in the case characterized by bilateral constraints between the particle and the surface, and the absence of friction. Based on our previous work, the conditions for the equilibrium are obtained. We prove that the positions of equilibrium on a mobile surface are no longer the same with those obtained for a fixed surface, the system could have either other equilibrium positions, completely different, or some more equilibrium positions, or no equilibrium position.

  19. Saturation of the turbulent dynamo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schober, J; Schleicher, D R G; Federrath, C; Bovino, S; Klessen, R S

    2015-08-01

    The origin of strong magnetic fields in the Universe can be explained by amplifying weak seed fields via turbulent motions on small spatial scales and subsequently transporting the magnetic energy to larger scales. This process is known as the turbulent dynamo and depends on the properties of turbulence, i.e., on the hydrodynamical Reynolds number and the compressibility of the gas, and on the magnetic diffusivity. While we know the growth rate of the magnetic energy in the linear regime, the saturation level, i.e., the ratio of magnetic energy to turbulent kinetic energy that can be reached, is not known from analytical calculations. In this paper we present a scale-dependent saturation model based on an effective turbulent resistivity which is determined by the turnover time scale of turbulent eddies and the magnetic energy density. The magnetic resistivity increases compared to the Spitzer value and the effective scale on which the magnetic energy spectrum is at its maximum moves to larger spatial scales. This process ends when the peak reaches a characteristic wave number k☆ which is determined by the critical magnetic Reynolds number. The saturation level of the dynamo also depends on the type of turbulence and differs for the limits of large and small magnetic Prandtl numbers Pm. With our model we find saturation levels between 43.8% and 1.3% for Pm≫1 and between 2.43% and 0.135% for Pm≪1, where the higher values refer to incompressible turbulence and the lower ones to highly compressible turbulence.

  20. Slow light in saturable absorbers

    OpenAIRE

    Macke, Bruno; Ségard, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    International audience; In connection with the experiments recently achieved on doped crystals, biological samples, doped optical fibers and semiconductor heterostructures, we revisit the theory of the propagation of a pulse-modulated light in a saturable absorber. Explicit analytical expressions of the transmitted pulse are obtained, enabling us to determine the parameters optimizing the time-delay of the transmitted pulse with respect to the incident pulse. We finally compare the maximum fr...

  1. Saturation of Van Allen's belts

    CERN Document Server

    Le Bel, E

    2002-01-01

    The maximum number of electrons that can be trapped in van Allen's belts has been evaluated at CEA-DAM more precisely than that commonly used in the space community. The modelization that we have developed allows to understand the disagreement (factor 50) observed between the measured and predicted electrons flux by US satellites and theory. This saturation level allows sizing-up of the protection on a satellite in case of energetic events. (authors)

  2. Minimizing the Free Energy: A Computer Method for Teaching Chemical Equilibrium Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, Emerson F.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a computer method for teaching chemical equilibrium concepts using material balance conditions and the minimization of the free energy. Method for the calculation of chemical equilibrium, the computer program used to solve equilibrium problems and applications of the method are also included. (HM)

  3. Transition to Turbulent Dynamo Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshasayanan, Kannabiran; Gallet, Basile; Alexakis, Alexandros

    2017-11-01

    While the saturated magnetic energy is independent of viscosity in dynamo experiments, it remains viscosity dependent in state-of-the-art 3D direct numerical simulations (DNS). Extrapolating such viscous scaling laws to realistic parameter values leads to an underestimation of the magnetic energy by several orders of magnitude. The origin of this discrepancy is that fully 3D DNS cannot reach low enough values of the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. To bypass this limitation and investigate dynamo saturation at very low Pm, we focus on the vicinity of the dynamo threshold in a rapidly rotating flow: the velocity field then depends on two spatial coordinates only, while the magnetic field consists of a single Fourier mode in the third direction. We perform numerical simulations of the resulting set of reduced equations for Pm down to 2 ×10-5. This parameter regime is currently out of reach to fully 3D DNS. We show that the magnetic energy transitions from a high-Pm viscous scaling regime to a low-Pm turbulent scaling regime, the latter being independent of viscosity. The transition to the turbulent saturation regime occurs at a low value of the magnetic Prandtl number, Pm ≃10-3 , which explains why it has been overlooked by numerical studies so far.

  4. SATURATED PICRIC ACID PREVENTS AUTOPHAGIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Rahimi-Movaghar

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "nThe dysesthesia and paresthesia that occurs in laboratory rats after spinal cord injury (SCI results in autophagia. This self-destructive behavior interferes with functional assessments in designed studies and jeopardizes the health of the injured rat. In this study, we evaluated role of saturated picric acid in the prevention of autophagia and self-mutilation. All rats were anesthetized with an intraperitoneal injection of a mixture of ketamine (100 mg/kg and xylazine (10 mg/kg for the SCI procedures. In the first 39 rats, no solution applied to the hind limbs, but in the next 26 cases, we smeared the saturated picric acid on the tail, lower extremities, pelvic, and abdomen of the rats immediately after SCI. In the rats without picric acid, 23 rats died following autophagia, but in the 26 rats with picric acid, there was no autophagia (P < 0.001. Picric acid side effects in skin and gastrointestinal signs such as irritation, redness and diarrhea were not seen in any rat. Saturated picric acid is a topical solution that if used appropriately and carefully, might be safe and effectively prevents autophagia and self-mutilation. When the solution is applied to the lower abdomen and limbs, we presume that its bitterness effectively prevents the rat from licking and biting the limb.

  5. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-09-18

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  6. Spontaneity and Equilibrium: Why "?G Equilibrium" Are Incorrect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Lionel M.

    2014-01-01

    The fundamental criteria for chemical reactions to be spontaneous in a given direction are generally incorrectly stated as ?G equilibrium are also misstated as being ?G = 0 or ?A = 0. Following a brief review of the…

  7. Equilibrium with arbitrary market structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodal, Birgit; Vind, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Fifty years ago Arrow [1] introduced contingent commodities and Debreu [4] observed that this reinterpretation of a commodity was enough to apply the existing general equilibrium theory to uncertainty and time. This interpretation of general equilibrium theory is the Arrow-Debreu model....... The complete market predicted by this theory is clearly unrealistic, and Radner [10] formulated and proved existence of equilibrium in a multiperiod model with incomplete markets. In this paper the Radner result is extended. Radner assumed a specific structure of markets, independence of preferences...

  8. Central venous oxygen saturation does not correlate with the venous oxygen saturation at the surgical site during abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinrich, Malte; Scheingraber, Stefan; Stephan, Bernhard; Weiss, Christel; Kayser, Anna; Kopp, Berit; Schilling, Martin K

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of central venous oxygen saturation has become a surrogate parameter for fluid administration, blood transfusions and treatment with catecholamines in (early) goal directed therapy in the treatment of acute septic patients. These strategies are not easily transferred to the postoperative management of abdominal surgery due to the different conditions in surgical patients. A study population of 15 patients (8 females/7 males) underwent elective major abdominal surgery: 6 gastrectomies, 5 major liver resections and 4 lower anterior rectum resections. Surgery was performed for primary or secondary malignancy. The patients' age was 65.4+/-12.7 (mean+/-standard deviation, range 44-84, median 62) years. Blood samples were taken intraoperatively from indwelling central venous lines as well as from draining veins at the surgical site. Blood gas analyses to determine the oxygen saturations were performed immediately. All patients were operated in standardized general anesthesia including epidural analgesia and in a balanced volume status. Central venous oxygen saturations and oxygen saturations in blood from the draining veins of the surgical site showed a wide range with high intra- and interindividual differences intraoperatively. Overall, at most time points no correlation between the two oxygen saturations could be detected in three operation types. A significant correlation was only observed at one time point during liver resections. Our results show a lack of correlation between central venous oxygen saturations and oxygen saturations in the draining veins of the surgical site during major abdominal surgery. Measurement of central venous oxygen saturations does not seem to be a good surrogate for the local oxygen supply in the field of interest in major abdominal surgery even under standardized conditions.

  9. Adaptive Learning in Extensive Form Games and Sequential Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies adaptive learning in extensive form games and provides conditions for convergence points of adaptive learning to be sequential equilibria. Precisely, we present a set of conditions on learning sequences such that an assessment is a sequential equilibrium if and only...... if there is a learning sequence fulfilling the conditions, which leads to the assessment...

  10. Capture rate and efficiency of an oscillating non-ideal trap interacting with a sea of random diffusing particles. A non-equilibrium Fokker–Planck picture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, A., E-mail: agrassi@unict.it [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, v.le A. Doria 6, Università di Catania, 95125 Catania (Italy); Lombardo, G.M. [Dipartimento di Scienze del Farmaco, v.le A. Doria 6, Università di Catania, 95125 Catania (Italy); Pannuzzo, M., E-mail: martina.pannuzzo@gmail.com [Department of Computational Biology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Staudtstrasse 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Raudino, A., E-mail: araudino@dipchi.unict.it [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, v.le A. Doria 6, Università di Catania, 95125 Catania (Italy)

    2015-02-06

    Highlights: • We analyzed the particles dynamics subject to an oscillating “trap”. • Numerical solution to FPE with various trap's oscillating frequencies and amplitudes. • Out-of-equilibrium calculations describe the evolution toward a “pseudo” equilibrium state. • At pseudo-equilibrium state trapped particles density depends on frequency and amplitude. - Abstract: We investigated the time evolution of a distribution of random diffusing particles around an oscillating non-ideal trap. The problem has been addressed by numerically solving a mono-dimensional Fokker–Planck equation (FPE) for a confined distribution of particles in the presence of an oscillating potential well (trap) of finite depth. Accurate numerical solutions of the FPE have been obtained and expressed as a function of the trap oscillation amplitudes and frequencies. Results show a marked influence of the oscillations both on the capture kinetics and trap efficiency in equilibrium conditions. All the calculated properties exhibit a saturation behavior both at high and low frequencies.

  11. Equilibrium and Orientation in Cephalopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budelmann, Bernd-Ulrich

    1980-01-01

    Describes the structure of the equilibrium receptor system in cephalopods, comparing it to the vertebrate counterpart--the vestibular system. Relates the evolution of this complex system to the competition of cephalopods with fishes. (CS)

  12. Instability of quantum equilibrium in Bohm's dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colin, Samuel; Valentini, Antony

    2014-11-08

    We consider Bohm's second-order dynamics for arbitrary initial conditions in phase space. In principle, Bohm's dynamics allows for 'extended' non-equilibrium, with initial momenta not equal to the gradient of phase of the wave function (as well as initial positions whose distribution departs from the Born rule). We show that extended non-equilibrium does not relax in general and is in fact unstable. This is in sharp contrast with de Broglie's first-order dynamics, for which non-standard momenta are not allowed and which shows an efficient relaxation to the Born rule for positions. On this basis, we argue that, while de Broglie's dynamics is a tenable physical theory, Bohm's dynamics is not. In a world governed by Bohm's dynamics, there would be no reason to expect to see an effective quantum theory today (even approximately), in contradiction with observation.

  13. Non-Equilibrium Quantum Dissipation

    OpenAIRE

    Segal, Dvira; Reichman, David R.; Millis, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    Dissipative processes in non-equilibrium many-body systems are fundamentally different than their equilibrium counterparts. Such processes are of great importance for the understanding of relaxation in single molecule devices. As a detailed case study, we investigate here a generic spin-fermion model, where a two-level system couples to two metallic leads with different chemical potentials. We present results for the spin relaxation rate in the nonadiabatic limit for an arbitrary coupling to ...

  14. Free energy for non-equilibrium quasi-stationary states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahverdyan, A. E.; Martirosyan, N. H.

    2017-03-01

    We study a class of non-equilibrium quasi-stationary states for a Markov system interacting with two different thermal baths. We show that the work done under a slow, external change of parameters admits a potential, i.e., the free energy. Three conditions are needed for the existence of free energy in this non-equilibrium system: time-scale separation between variables of the system, partial controllability (external fields couple only with the slow variable), and an effective detailed balance. These conditions are facilitated in the continuous limit for the slow variable. In contrast to its equilibrium counterpart, the non-equilibrium free energy can increase with temperature. One example of this is that entropy reduction by means of external fields (cooling) can be easier (in the sense of the work cost) if it starts from a higher temperature.

  15. Promoter analysis by saturation mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baliga Nitin

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression and regulation are mediated by DNA sequences, in most instances, directly upstream to the coding sequences by recruiting transcription factors, regulators, and a RNA polymerase in a spatially defined fashion. Few nucleotides within a promoter make contact with the bound proteins. The minimal set of nucleotides that can recruit a protein factor is called a cis-acting element. This article addresses a powerful mutagenesis strategy that can be employed to define cis-acting elements at a molecular level. Technical details including primer design, saturation mutagenesis, construction of promoter libraries, phenotypic analysis, data analysis, and interpretation are discussed.

  16. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast terahertz signals

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in the terahertz THz frequency range at room temperature using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. The saturation mechanism is based on a decrease in electron conductivity of semiconductors at high electron momentum states, due to conduction band onparabolicity and scattering into satellite valleys in strong THz fields. Saturable absorber parameters, such as linear and nonsaturable transmission, and saturation fluen...

  17. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast terahertz signals

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductorsGaAs,GaP, and Ge in the terahertz (THz) frequency range at room temperature using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. The saturation mechanism is based on a decrease in electron conductivity of semiconductors at high electron momentum states, due to conduction band nonparabolicity and scattering into satellite valleys in strong THz fields. Saturable absorber parameters, such as linear and nonsaturable transmission, and saturation flue...

  18. Fundamental challenges in electrowetting: from equilibrium shapes to contact angle saturation and drop dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2009-01-01

    Electrowetting is a versatile tool for manipulating typically submillimetre-sized drops in various microfluidic applications. In recent years the microscopic understanding of the electrowetting effect has substantially improved leading to a detailed description of the drop shape and the (singular)

  19. Shape characteristics of equilibrium and non-equilibrium fractal clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansfield, Marc L; Douglas, Jack F

    2013-07-28

    It is often difficult in practice to discriminate between equilibrium and non-equilibrium nanoparticle or colloidal-particle clusters that form through aggregation in gas or solution phases. Scattering studies often permit the determination of an apparent fractal dimension, but both equilibrium and non-equilibrium clusters in three dimensions frequently have fractal dimensions near 2, so that it is often not possible to discriminate on the basis of this geometrical property. A survey of the anisotropy of a wide variety of polymeric structures (linear and ring random and self-avoiding random walks, percolation clusters, lattice animals, diffusion-limited aggregates, and Eden clusters) based on the principal components of both the radius of gyration and electric polarizability tensor indicates, perhaps counter-intuitively, that self-similar equilibrium clusters tend to be intrinsically anisotropic at all sizes, while non-equilibrium processes such as diffusion-limited aggregation or Eden growth tend to be isotropic in the large-mass limit, providing a potential means of discriminating these clusters experimentally if anisotropy could be determined along with the fractal dimension. Equilibrium polymer structures, such as flexible polymer chains, are normally self-similar due to the existence of only a single relevant length scale, and are thus anisotropic at all length scales, while non-equilibrium polymer structures that grow irreversibly in time eventually become isotropic if there is no difference in the average growth rates in different directions. There is apparently no proof of these general trends and little theoretical insight into what controls the universal anisotropy in equilibrium polymer structures of various kinds. This is an obvious topic of theoretical investigation, as well as a matter of practical interest. To address this general problem, we consider two experimentally accessible ratios, one between the hydrodynamic and gyration radii, the other

  20. Ion Association versus Ion Interaction Models in Examining Electrolyte Solutions: Application to Calcium Hydroxide Solubility Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, M. Isabel; Borge, Javier

    2014-01-01

    The heterogeneous equilibrium of the solubility of calcium hydroxide in water is used to predict both its solubility product from solubility and solubility values from solubility product when inert salts, in any concentration, are present. Accepting the necessity of including activity coefficients to treat the saturated solution of calcium…

  1. Modeling of the Equilibrium Moisture Content (EMC) of Tarragon (Artemisia Dracunculus L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ArabHosseini, A.; Huisman, W.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.; Mueller, J.

    2005-01-01

    The equilibrium moisture content of tarragon, Artemisia dracunculus L. (stem and leaf separately) was determined by using the saturated salt solutions method at three temperatures (25, 50 and 70°C) within a range of 5 to 90% relative humidity. Both adsorption and desorption methods were used for

  2. "Non-equilibrium" block copolymer micelles with glassy cores: a predictive approach based on theory of equilibrium micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Ramanathan

    2015-07-01

    Micelles generated in water from most amphiphilic block copolymers are widely recognized to be non-equilibrium structures. Typically, the micelles are prepared by a kinetic process, first allowing molecular scale dissolution of the block copolymer in a common solvent that likes both the blocks and then gradually replacing the common solvent by water to promote the hydrophobic blocks to aggregate and create the micelles. The non-equilibrium nature of the micelle originates from the fact that dynamic exchange between the block copolymer molecules in the micelle and the singly dispersed block copolymer molecules in water is suppressed, because of the glassy nature of the core forming polymer block and/or its very large hydrophobicity. Although most amphiphilic block copolymers generate such non-equilibrium micelles, no theoretical approach to a priori predict the micelle characteristics currently exists. In this work, we propose a predictive approach for non-equilibrium micelles with glassy cores by applying the equilibrium theory of micelles in two steps. In the first, we calculate the properties of micelles formed in the mixed solvent while true equilibrium prevails, until the micelle core becomes glassy. In the second step, we freeze the micelle aggregation number at this glassy state and calculate the corona dimension from the equilibrium theory of micelles. The condition when the micelle core becomes glassy is independently determined from a statistical thermodynamic treatment of diluent effect on polymer glass transition temperature. The predictions based on this "non-equilibrium" model compare reasonably well with experimental data for polystyrene-polyethylene oxide diblock copolymer, which is the most extensively studied system in the literature. In contrast, the application of the equilibrium model to describe such a system significantly overpredicts the micelle core and corona dimensions and the aggregation number. The non-equilibrium model suggests ways to

  3. Temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption cross-section above 298 K and determination of the equilibrium constant for NO3 + NO2 N2O5 at atmospherically relevant conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthoff, Hans D; Pilling, Michael J; Ravishankara, A R; Brown, Steven S

    2007-11-21

    The reaction NO3 + NO2 N2O5 was studied over the 278-323 K temperature range. Concentrations of NO3, N2O5, and NO2 were measured simultaneously in a 3-channel cavity ring-down spectrometer. Equilibrium constants were determined over atmospherically relevant concentration ranges of the three species in both synthetic samples in the laboratory and ambient air samples in the field. A fit to the laboratory data yielded Keq = (5.1 +/- 0.8) x 10(-27) x e((10871 +/- 46)/7) cm3 molecule(-1). The temperature dependence of the NO3 absorption cross-section at 662 nm was investigated over the 298-388 K temperature range. The line width was found to be independent of temperature, in agreement with previous results. New data for the peak cross section (662.2 nm, vacuum wavelength) were combined with previous measurements in the 200 K-298 K region. A least-squares fit to the combined data gave sigma = [(4.582 +/- 0.096) - (0.00796 +/- 0.00031) x T] x 10(-17) cm2 molecule(-1).

  4. Local Equilibrium and Retardation Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott K; Vesselinov, Velimir V

    2018-01-01

    In modeling solute transport with mobile-immobile mass transfer (MIMT), it is common to use an advection-dispersion equation (ADE) with a retardation factor, or retarded ADE. This is commonly referred to as making the local equilibrium assumption (LEA). Assuming local equilibrium, Eulerian textbook treatments derive the retarded ADE, ostensibly exactly. However, other authors have presented rigorous mathematical derivations of the dispersive effect of MIMT, applicable even in the case of arbitrarily fast mass transfer. We resolve the apparent contradiction between these seemingly exact derivations by adopting a Lagrangian point of view. We show that local equilibrium constrains the expected time immobile, whereas the retarded ADE actually embeds a stronger, nonphysical, constraint: that all particles spend the same amount of every time increment immobile. Eulerian derivations of the retarded ADE thus silently commit the gambler's fallacy, leading them to ignore dispersion due to mass transfer that is correctly modeled by other approaches. We then present a particle tracking simulation illustrating how poor an approximation the retarded ADE may be, even when mobile and immobile plumes are continually near local equilibrium. We note that classic "LEA" (actually, retarded ADE validity) criteria test for insignificance of MIMT-driven dispersion relative to hydrodynamic dispersion, rather than for local equilibrium. Published 2017. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Modeling of equilibrium hollow objects stabilized by electrostatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Ethayaraja; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K

    2011-05-18

    The equilibrium size of two largely different kinds of hollow objects behave qualitatively differently with respect to certain experimental conditions. Yet, we show that they can be described within the same theoretical framework. The objects we consider are 'minivesicles' of ionic and nonionic surfactant mixtures, and shells of Keplerate-type polyoxometalates. The finite-size of the objects in both systems is manifested by electrostatic interactions. We emphasize the importance of constant charge and constant potential boundary conditions. Taking these conditions into account, indeed, leads to the experimentally observed qualitatively different behavior of the equilibrium size of the objects.

  6. Modeling of equilibrium hollow objects stabilized by electrostatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mani, Ethayaraja; Groenewold, Jan; Kegel, Willem K, E-mail: w.k.kegel@uu.nl [Van' t Hoff Laboratory for Physical and Colloid Chemistry, Debye Institute, Utrecht University, Padualaan 8, 3584 CH Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2011-05-18

    The equilibrium size of two largely different kinds of hollow objects behave qualitatively differently with respect to certain experimental conditions. Yet, we show that they can be described within the same theoretical framework. The objects we consider are 'minivesicles' of ionic and nonionic surfactant mixtures, and shells of Keplerate-type polyoxometalates. The finite-size of the objects in both systems is manifested by electrostatic interactions. We emphasize the importance of constant charge and constant potential boundary conditions. Taking these conditions into account, indeed, leads to the experimentally observed qualitatively different behavior of the equilibrium size of the objects.

  7. The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium Approach to Far-From-Local-Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hameed Metghalchi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Rate-Controlled Constrained-Equilibrium (RCCE method for the description of the time-dependent behavior of dynamical systems in non-equilibrium states is a general, effective, physically based method for model order reduction that was originally developed in the framework of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. A generalized mathematical formulation is presented here that allows including nonlinear constraints in non-local equilibrium systems characterized by the existence of a non-increasing Lyapunov functional under the system’s internal dynamics. The generalized formulation of RCCE enables to clarify the essentials of the method and the built-in general feature of thermodynamic consistency in the chemical kinetics context. In this paper, we work out the details of the method in a generalized mathematical-physics framework, but for definiteness we detail its well-known implementation in the traditional chemical kinetics framework. We detail proofs and spell out explicit functional dependences so as to bring out and clarify each underlying assumption of the method. In the standard context of chemical kinetics of ideal gas mixtures, we discuss the relations between the validity of the detailed balance condition off-equilibrium and the thermodynamic consistency of the method. We also discuss two examples of RCCE gas-phase combustion calculations to emphasize the constraint-dependent performance of the RCCE method.

  8. Measurement and modeling of CO2 solubility in NaCl brine and CO2–saturated NaCl brine density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Wei; Huang, Shengli; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2011-01-01

    over climate change and energy security. This work is an experimental and modeling study of two fundamental properties in high pressure CO2–NaCl brine equilibrium, i.e., CO2 solubility in NaCl brine and CO2–saturated NaCl brine density. A literature review of the available data was presented first....... The corresponding density data at the same conditions were also measured. For solubility, two models used in the Eclipse simulator were tested: the correlations of Chang et al. and the Søreide and Whitson equation of state (EoS) model. The latter model was modified to improve its performance for high salinity brine...... of CO2 increases the brine density only if the apparent mass density of CO2 in brine is higher than the brine density at the same conditions....

  9. Chemical Principles Revisited: Using the Equilibrium Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D., Ed.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the concept of equilibrium in chemical systems, particularly in relation to predicting the position of equilibrium, predicting spontaneity of a reaction, quantitative applications of the equilibrium constant, heterogeneous equilibrium, determination of the solubility product constant, common-ion effect, and dissolution of precipitates.…

  10. The Equilibrium Rule--A Personal Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Examples of equilibrium are evident everywhere and the equilibrium rule provides a reasoned way to view all things, whether in static (balancing rocks, steel beams in building construction) or dynamic (airplanes, bowling balls) equilibrium. Interestingly, the equilibrium rule applies not just to objects at rest but whenever any object or system of…

  11. Kinetic, Equilibrium and thermodynamic studies on the biosorption ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The kinetics, equilibrium and thermodynamics of the biosorption of Cd (II) from aqueous solution by the leaf biomass of Calotropis procera popularly known in western Nigeria as 'bom bom'and genrally known as Sodom apple were investigated at different experimental conditions. Optimum conditions of pH, contact time, ...

  12. Analysis on Inductance and Torque of PMSM Considering Magnetic Saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Xin; Wei, Heng

    2017-07-01

    This paper analyses the surface-mounted PMSM which controlled by Id=0 vector control based on Ansoft in which finite element simulation of 2D static magnetic field can be operated on, then calculating and analysing the data with MATLAB, and then operating on the analysis of the change law of torque and inductance under different load conditions, and then paying more attention on the impact of magnetic saturation to torque and inductance. With the analysis of magnetic saturation, this paper puts forward a scheme of control and design used by PMSM.

  13. Nash equilibrium with lower probabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groes, Ebbe; Jacobsen, Hans Jørgen; Sloth, Birgitte

    1998-01-01

    We generalize the concept of Nash equilibrium in mixed strategies for strategic form games to allow for ambiguity in the players' expectations. In contrast to other contributions, we model ambiguity by means of so-called lower probability measures or belief functions, which makes it possible...... to distinguish between a player's assessment of ambiguity and his attitude towards ambiguity. We also generalize the concept of trembling hand perfect equilibrium. Finally, we demonstrate that for certain attitudes towards ambiguity it is possible to explain cooperation in the one-shot Prisoner's Dilemma...

  14. Computational methods for reversed-field equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, J.K.; Auerbach, S.P.; Willmann, P.A.; Berk, H.L.; McNamara, B.

    1980-04-15

    Investigating the temporal evolution of reversed-field equilibrium caused by transport processes requires the solution of the Grad-Shafranov equation and computation of field-line-averaged quantities. The technique for field-line averaging and the computation of the Grad-Shafranov equation are presented. Application of Green's function to specify the Grad-Shafranov equation boundary condition is discussed. Hill's vortex formulas used to verify certain computations are detailed. Use of computer software to implement computational methods is described.

  15. Revealing patterns of cultural transmission from frequency data: equilibrium and non-equilibrium assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crema, Enrico R.; Kandler, Anne; Shennan, Stephen

    2016-12-01

    A long tradition of cultural evolutionary studies has developed a rich repertoire of mathematical models of social learning. Early studies have laid the foundation of more recent endeavours to infer patterns of cultural transmission from observed frequencies of a variety of cultural data, from decorative motifs on potsherds to baby names and musical preferences. While this wide range of applications provides an opportunity for the development of generalisable analytical workflows, archaeological data present new questions and challenges that require further methodological and theoretical discussion. Here we examine the decorative motifs of Neolithic pottery from an archaeological assemblage in Western Germany, and argue that the widely used (and relatively undiscussed) assumption that observed frequencies are the result of a system in equilibrium conditions is unwarranted, and can lead to incorrect conclusions. We analyse our data with a simulation-based inferential framework that can overcome some of the intrinsic limitations in archaeological data, as well as handle both equilibrium conditions and instances where the mode of cultural transmission is time-variant. Results suggest that none of the models examined can produce the observed pattern under equilibrium conditions, and suggest. instead temporal shifts in the patterns of cultural transmission.

  16. Equilibrium points in the asteroid 2001SN263

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, L. B. T.; Prado, A. F. B. A.; Sanchez, D. M.

    2017-10-01

    In the present work we develop a study based on the Restricted Full Three-Body Problem (RFTBP), where we take into account the size and shape of the bodies studied. The equations of motion and their solutions are discussed for a circular coplanar orbit in order to find the equilibrium points. All the analysis made are based on the physical and orbital characteristics of the most massive bodies of the triple asteroid system 2001SN 263. A total of nine equilibrium points were found for this system. Five of these points are collinear and the other four are coplanar. Finally, an analysis of the stability conditions of these equilibrium points are investigated, and it was concluded that only the equilibrium points L 4 and L 5 are linearly stable.

  17. Methods of integral saturation elimination in automatic regulation systems with PID-controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Дмитро Олегович Кроніковський

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of integral saturation that reduces the quality of regulation appears with classic PID-controller usage in the real conditions.The pulp dryer of sugar factory as the real object of automation is considered. The impact of integral saturation is demonstrated based on the control processes modeling in pulp dryer. A modern methods to eliminate the integral saturation are considered. 

  18. Approach to equilibrium in weakly coupled nonabelian plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Kurkela, Aleksi

    2014-01-01

    We follow the time evolution of nonabelian gauge bosons from far-from-equilibrium initial conditions to thermal equilibrium by numerically solving an effective kinetic equation that becomes accurate in the weak coupling limit. We consider initial conditions that are either highly overoccupied or underoccupied. We find that overoccupied systems thermalize through a turbulent cascade reaching equilibrium in multiples of a thermalization time $t\\approx 72./ (1-0.12\\log \\lambda)/\\lambda^2 T$, whereas underoccupied systems undergo a "bottom-up" thermalization in a time $t\\approx (34. +21. \\ln(Q/T))/ (1-0.037\\log \\lambda)(Q/T)^{1/2}/\\lambda^2 T$, where $Q$ is the characteristic momentum scale of the initial condition. We apply this result to model initial stages of heavy-ion collisions and find rapid thermalization roughly in a time $Qt \\lesssim 10$ or $t\\lesssim 1$ fm/c.

  19. Game Theory-Nash Equilibrium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 3; Issue 7. Game Theory - Nash Equilibrium. P G Babu. General Article Volume 3 Issue 7 July 1998 pp 53- ... Author Affiliations. P G Babu1. Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research Gen. A K Vaidya Marg Goregaon(East) Mumbai 400 065, India.

  20. Understanding Thermal Equilibrium through Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Shirish; Huli, Saurabhee; Nachane, Madhura; Ladage, Savita; Pradhan, Hemachandra

    2015-01-01

    Thermal equilibrium is a basic concept in thermodynamics. In India, this concept is generally introduced at the first year of undergraduate education in physics and chemistry. In our earlier studies (Pathare and Pradhan 2011 "Proc. episteme-4 Int. Conf. to Review Research on Science Technology and Mathematics Education" pp 169-72) we…

  1. Equilibrium theory : A salient approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schalk, S.

    1999-01-01

    Whereas the neoclassical models in General Equilibrium Theory focus on the existence of separate commodities, this thesis regards 'bundles of trade' as the unit objects of exchange. Apart from commodities and commodity bundles in the neoclassical sense, the term `bundle of trade' includes, for

  2. Incentives in Supply Function Equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetter, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    The author analyses delegation in homogenous duopoly under the assumption that the firm-managers compete in supply functions. In supply function equilibrium, managers’ decisions are strategic complements. This reverses earlier findings in that the author finds that owners give managers incentives...

  3. Risk premia in general equilibrium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Posch, Olaf

    solutions of dynamic stochastic general equilibrium models, including a novel solution with endogenous labor supply, to obtain closed-form expressions for the risk premium in production economies. We find that the curvature of the policy functions affects the risk premium through controlling the individual...

  4. Power flow control using distributed saturable reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D.

    2016-02-13

    A magnetic amplifier includes a saturable core having a plurality of legs. Control windings wound around separate legs are spaced apart from each other and connected in series in an anti-symmetric relation. The control windings are configured in such a way that a biasing magnetic flux arising from a control current flowing through one of the plurality of control windings is substantially equal to the biasing magnetic flux flowing into a second of the plurality of control windings. The flow of the control current through each of the plurality of control windings changes the reactance of the saturable core reactor by driving those portions of the saturable core that convey the biasing magnetic flux in the saturable core into saturation. The phasing of the control winding limits a voltage induced in the plurality of control windings caused by a magnetic flux passing around a portion of the saturable core.

  5. Using X-ray computed tomography to evaluate the initial saturation resulting from different saturation procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Britt Stenhøj Baun; Wildenschild, D; Jensen, K.H.

    2006-01-01

    for saturation. Evaluation of the different enhanced saturation techniques was done with Xray computed tomography (CT) and gravimetrically. The use of CT scanning makes it possible to observe the spatial distribution of wetting and non-wetting phases in the porous medium in a non-destructive way. In this case...... with pressurized nitrogen between each saturation and allowed to saturate for the same length of time for all the different procedures. Both gravimetric measurements and CT attenuation levels showed that venting the sample with carbon dioxide prior to saturation clearly improved initial saturation whereas the use...

  6. Exact expression for the effective acoustics of patchy-saturated rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogelaar, B.; Smeulders, D.M.J.; Harris, J.

    2010-01-01

    Seismic effects of a partially gas-saturated subsurface have been known for many years. For example, patches of nonuniform saturation occur at the gas-oil and gas-water contacts in hydrocarbon reservoirs. Open-pore boundary conditions are applied to the quasi-static Biot equations of poroelasticity

  7. Far-from-equilibrium sheared colloidal liquids: Disentangling relaxation, advection, and shear-induced diffusion

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Neil Y. C.

    2013-12-01

    Using high-speed confocal microscopy, we measure the particle positions in a colloidal suspension under large-amplitude oscillatory shear. Using the particle positions, we quantify the in situ anisotropy of the pair-correlation function, a measure of the Brownian stress. From these data we find two distinct types of responses as the system crosses over from equilibrium to far-from-equilibrium states. The first is a nonlinear amplitude saturation that arises from shear-induced advection, while the second is a linear frequency saturation due to competition between suspension relaxation and shear rate. In spite of their different underlying mechanisms, we show that all the data can be scaled onto a master curve that spans the equilibrium and far-from-equilibrium regimes, linking small-amplitude oscillatory to continuous shear. This observation illustrates a colloidal analog of the Cox-Merz rule and its microscopic underpinning. Brownian dynamics simulations show that interparticle interactions are sufficient for generating both experimentally observed saturations. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  8. Dynamics of a Delayed HIV-1 Infection Model with Saturation Incidence Rate and CTL Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ting; Liu, Haihong; Xu, Chenglin; Yan, Fang

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics of a five-dimensional virus model incorporating saturation incidence rate, CTL immune response and three time delays which represent the latent period, virus production period and immune response delay, respectively. We begin this model by proving the positivity and boundedness of the solutions. Our model admits three possible equilibrium solutions, namely the infection-free equilibrium E0, the infectious equilibrium without immune response E1 and the infectious equilibrium with immune response E2. Moreover, by analyzing corresponding characteristic equations, the local stability of each of the feasible equilibria and the existence of Hopf bifurcation at the equilibrium point E2 are established, respectively. Further, by using fluctuation lemma and suitable Lyapunov functionals, it is shown that E0 is globally asymptotically stable when the basic reproductive numbers for viral infection R0 is less than unity. When the basic reproductive numbers for immune response R1 is less than unity and R0 is greater than unity, the equilibrium point E1 is globally asymptotically stable. Finally, some numerical simulations are carried out for illustrating the theoretical results.

  9. Stochastic Modeling of Macrodispersion in Variably Saturated, Spatially Heterogeneous Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, David

    2015-04-01

    The macrodispersion tensor, D, plays an important role in solute transport on the field scale. A key problem is how to relate D to the properties of the spatially heterogeneous formation. Under unsaturated flow conditions, the problem is further complicated inasmuch as the relevant flow parameters, the hydraulic conductivity and the water capacity, which depend on the formation properties, depend also on flow-controlled attributes in a highly nonlinear fashion. Consequently, under variably saturated conditions, quantification of D requires several simplifying assumptions regarding the constitutive relationships for unsaturated flow, the flow regime, and the spatial structure of the formation heterogeneity. The present talk focuses on the quantification of D in a variably saturated, spatially heterogeneous formation, accomplished by using a two-stage approach. The approach combines a stochastic, continuum description of a steady-state unsaturated flow, based on small-perturbation, first-order approximation of Darcy's law and the continuity equation for unsaturated flow, with a general Lagrangian description of the motion of an indivisible particle of a passive solute that is carried by the steady-state flow. The resultant, time-dependent D depends on the covariances of the water saturation and the components of the water flux vector, and their cross-covariances, which, in turn, depend on the (cross-)covariances of the relevant formation properties and the pressure head. The effect of few characteristics of the spatially heterogeneous, variably saturated flow system, on D is analyzed and discussed. Main findings reveal that under variably saturated flow conditions, the travel distance required for the principal components of D to approach their asymptotic values may be exceedingly large, particularly in relatively wet formations with significant stratification and with coarse-textured soil material associated with small capillary forces. Hence, in many practical

  10. Equilibrium and Non-Equilibrium Condensation Phenomena in Tuneable 3D and 2D Bose Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0009 Equilibrium and non- equilibrium condensation phenomena in tuneable 3D and 2D Bose gases Zoran Hadzibabic THE CHANCELLOR...31-Aug-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Equilibrium and non- equilibrium condensation phenomena in tuneable 3D and 2D Bose gases 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER... equilibrium and non- equilibrium many-body phenomena, trapping ultracold atomic gases in different geometries including both 3 and 2 spatial dimensions

  11. Protonation Equilibrium of Linear Homopolyacids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Požar J.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a short summary of investigations dealing with protonation equilibrium of linear homopolyacids, in particularly those of high charge density. Apart from the review of experimental results which can be found in the literature, a brief description of theoretical models used in processing the dependence of protonation constants on monomer dissociation degree and ionic strength is given (cylindrical model based on Poisson-Boltzmann equation, cylindrical Stern model, the models according to Ising, Högfeldt, Mandel and Katchalsky. The applicability of these models regarding the polyion charge density, electrolyte concentration and counterion type is discussed. The results of Monte Carlo simulations of protonation equilibrium are also briefly mentioned. In addition, frequently encountered errors connected with calibration of of glass electrode and the related unreliability of determined protonation constants are pointed out.

  12. Transonic flow of steam with non-equilibrium and homogenous condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virk, Akashdeep Singh; Rusak, Zvi

    2017-11-01

    A small-disturbance model for studying the physical behavior of a steady transonic flow of steam with non-equilibrium and homogeneous condensation around a thin airfoil is derived. The steam thermodynamic behavior is described by van der Waals equation of state. The water condensation rate is calculated according to classical nucleation and droplet growth models. The current study is based on an asymptotic analysis of the fluid flow and condensation equations and boundary conditions in terms of the small thickness of the airfoil, small angle of attack, closeness of upstream flow Mach number to unity and small amount of condensate. The asymptotic analysis gives the similarity parameters that govern the problem. The flow field may be described by a non-homogeneous transonic small-disturbance equation coupled with a set of four ordinary differential equations for the calculation of the condensate mass fraction. An iterative numerical scheme which combines Murman & Cole's (1971) method with Simpson's integration rule is applied to solve the coupled system of equations. The model is used to study the effects of energy release from condensation on the aerodynamic performance of airfoils operating at high pressures and temperatures and near the vapor-liquid saturation conditions.

  13. Using Noble Gas Measurements to Derive Air-Sea Process Information and Predict Physical Gas Saturations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamme, Roberta C.; Emerson, Steven R.; Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.; Long, Matthew C.; Yashayaev, Igor

    2017-10-01

    Dissolved gas distributions are important because they influence oceanic habitats and Earth's climate, yet competing controls by biology and physics make gas distributions challenging to predict. Bubble-mediated gas exchange, temperature change, and varying atmospheric pressure all push gases away from equilibrium. Here we use new noble gas measurements from the Labrador Sea to demonstrate a technique to quantify physical processes. Our analysis shows that water-mass formation can be represented by a quasi steady state in which bubble fluxes and cooling push gases away from equilibrium balanced by diffusive gas exchange forcing gases toward equilibrium. We quantify the rates of these physical processes from our measurements, allowing direct comparison to gas exchange parameterizations, and predict the physically driven saturation of other gases. This technique produces predictions that reasonably match N2/Ar observations and demonstrates that physical processes should force SF6 to be ˜6% more supersaturated than CFC-11 and CFC-12, impacting ventilation age calculations.

  14. Nash Equilibrium in Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Salehisadaghiani, Farzad

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we investigate an application of a Nash equilibrium seeking algorithm in a social network. In a networked game each player (user) takes action in response to other players' actions in order to decrease (increase) his cost (profit) in the network. We assume that the players' cost functions are not necessarily dependent on the actions of all players. This is due to better mimicking the standard social media rules. A communication graph is defined for the game through which players...

  15. An introduction to equilibrium thermodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Morrill, Bernard; Hartnett, James P; Hughes, William F

    1973-01-01

    An Introduction to Equilibrium Thermodynamics discusses classical thermodynamics and irreversible thermodynamics. It introduces the laws of thermodynamics and the connection between statistical concepts and observable macroscopic properties of a thermodynamic system. Chapter 1 discusses the first law of thermodynamics while Chapters 2 through 4 deal with statistical concepts. The succeeding chapters describe the link between entropy and the reversible heat process concept of entropy; the second law of thermodynamics; Legendre transformations and Jacobian algebra. Finally, Chapter 10 provides a

  16. Ascending auctions and Walrasian equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Ben-Zwi, Oren; Lavi, Ron; Newman, Ilan

    2013-01-01

    We present a family of submodular valuation classes that generalizes gross substitute. We show that Walrasian equilibrium always exist for one class in this family, and there is a natural ascending auction which finds it. We prove some new structural properties on gross-substitute auctions which, in turn, show that the known ascending auctions for this class (Gul-Stacchetti and Ausbel) are, in fact, identical. We generalize these two auctions, and provide a simple proof that they terminate in...

  17. Punctuated equilibrium comes of age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephan Jay; Eldredge, Niles

    1993-11-01

    The intense controversies that surrounded the youth of punctuated equilibrium have helped it mature to a useful extension of evolutionary theory. As a complement to phyletic gradualism, its most important implications remain the recognition of stasis as a meaningful and predominant pattern within the history of species, and in the recasting of macroevolution as the differential success of certain species (and their descendants) within clades.

  18. Synthesis and characterization of saturated polyester and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and nanocomposites derived from glycolyzed PET waste with varied compositions. SUNAIN KATOCH. ∗ ... Water vapour transmission (WVT) was determined for saturated polyester nanocomposite sheets according to ... ing the synthesis of saturated polyester (from GPET waste). This has been done for the estimation of the ...

  19. Ultrafast THz Saturable Absorption in Semiconductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Hoffmann, Matthias C.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate THz saturable absorption in n-doped semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in a nonlinear THz time-domain spectroscopy experiment. Saturable absorption is caused by sample conductivity modulation due to electron heating and satellite valley scattering in the field of a strong THz pulse....

  20. Fault tolerant control of systems with saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents framework for fault tolerant controllers (FTC) that includes input saturation. The controller architecture known from FTC is based on the Youla-Jabr-Bongiorno-Kucera (YJBK) parameterization is extended to handle input saturation. Applying this controller architecture in connec...

  1. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast terahertz signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors GaAs, GaP, and Ge in the terahertz THz frequency range at room temperature using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. The saturation mechanism is based on a decrease in electron conductivity of semiconductors at high electron momentum...

  2. Local equilibrium in bird flocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M.; Del Castello, Lorenzo; Ginelli, Francesco; Melillo, Stefania; Parisi, Leonardo; Viale, Massimiliano; Cavagna, Andrea; Giardina, Irene

    2016-12-01

    The correlated motion of flocks is an example of global order emerging from local interactions. An essential difference with respect to analogous ferromagnetic systems is that flocks are active: animals move relative to each other, dynamically rearranging their interaction network. This non-equilibrium characteristic has been studied theoretically, but its impact on actual animal groups remains to be fully explored experimentally. Here, we introduce a novel dynamical inference technique, based on the principle of maximum entropy, which accommodates network rearrangements and overcomes the problem of slow experimental sampling rates. We use this method to infer the strength and range of alignment forces from data of starling flocks. We find that local bird alignment occurs on a much faster timescale than neighbour rearrangement. Accordingly, equilibrium inference, which assumes a fixed interaction network, gives results consistent with dynamical inference. We conclude that bird orientations are in a state of local quasi-equilibrium over the interaction length scale, providing firm ground for the applicability of statistical physics in certain active systems.

  3. Determination of saturation functions and wettability for chalk based on measured fluid saturations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, D.; Bech, N.; Moeller Nielsen, C.

    1998-08-01

    The end effect of displacement experiments on low permeable porous media is used for determination of relative permeability functions and capillary pressure functions. Saturation functions for a drainage process are determined from a primary drainage experiment. A reversal of the flooding direction creates an intrinsic imbibition process in the sample, which enables determination if imbibition saturation functions. The saturation functions are determined by a parameter estimation technique. Scanning effects are modelled by the method of Killough. Saturation profiles are determined by NMR. (au)

  4. Characterizing particle-scale equilibrium adsorption and kinetics of uranium(VI) desorption from U-contaminated sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoliker, Deborah L.; Liu, Chongxuan; Kent, Douglas B.; Zachara, John M.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of U(VI) release from individual dry-sieved size fractions of a field-aggregated, field-contaminated composite sediment from the seasonally saturated lower vadose zone of the Hanford 300-Area were examined in flow-through reactors to maintain quasi-constant chemical conditions. The principal source of variability in equilibrium U(VI) adsorption properties of the various size fractions was the impact of variable chemistry on adsorption. This source of variability was represented using surface complexation models (SCMs) with different stoichiometric coefficients with respect to hydrogen ion and carbonate concentrations for the different size fractions. A reactive transport model incorporating equilibrium expressions for cation exchange and calcite dissolution, along with rate expressions for aerobic respiration and silica dissolution, described the temporal evolution of solute concentrations observed during the flow-through reactor experiments. Kinetic U(VI) desorption was well described using a multirate SCM with an assumed lognormal distribution for the mass-transfer rate coefficients. The estimated mean and standard deviation of the rate coefficients were the same for all distribution of mass-transfer rate coefficients, possibly caused by the abundance of microporous basaltic rock fragments.

  5. Phase equilibrium of methane and nitrogen at low temperatures - Application to Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvaris, Louis C.; Flasar, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    Since the vapor phase composition of Titan's methane-nitrogen lower atmosphere is uniquely determined as a function of the Gibbs phase rule, these data are presently computed via integration of the Gibbs-Duhem equation. The thermodynamic consistency of published measurements and calculations of the vapor phase composition is then examined, and the saturated mole fraction of gaseous methane is computed as a function of altitude up to the 700-mbar level. The mole fraction is found to lie approximately halfway between that computed from Raoult's law, for a gas in equilibrium with an ideal solution of liquid nitrogen and methane, and that for a gas in equilibrium with pure liquid methane.

  6. Modelling suction instabilities in soils at varying degrees of saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buscarnera Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wetting paths imparted by the natural environment and/or human activities affect the state of soils in the near-surface, promoting transitions across different regimes of saturation. This paper discusses a set of techniques aimed at quantifying the role of hydrologic processes on the hydro-mechanical stability of soil specimens subjected to saturation events. Emphasis is given to the mechanical conditions leading to coupled flow/deformation instabilities. For this purpose, energy balance arguments for three-phase systems are used to derive second-order work expressions applicable to various regimes of saturation. Controllability analyses are then performed to relate such work input with constitutive singularities that reflect the loss of strength under coupled and/or uncoupled hydro-mechanical forcing. A suction-dependent plastic model is finally used to track the evolution of stability conditions in samples subjected to wetting, thus quantifying the growth of the potential for coupled failure modes upon increasing degree of saturation. These findings are eventually linked with the properties of the field equations that govern pore pressure transients, thus disclosing a conceptual link between the onset of coupled hydro-mechanical failures and the evolution of suction with time. Such results point out that mathematical instabilities caused by a non-linear suction dependent behaviour play an important role in the advanced constitutive and/or numerical tools that are commonly used for the analysis of geomechanical problems in the unsaturated zone, and further stress that the relation between suction transients and soil deformations is a key factor for the interpretation of runaway failures caused by intense saturation events.

  7. The concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, Henk W.M.

    1997-01-01

    Many organization theories consist of an interpretation frame and an idea about the ideal equilibrium state. This article explains how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or

  8. The concept of equilibrium in organization theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, H.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Many organization theories consist of an interpretation frame and an idea about the ideal equilibrium state. This article explains how the equilibrium concept is used in four organization theories: the theories of Fayol, Mintzberg, Morgan, and Volberda. Equilibrium can be defined as balance, fit or

  9. Global Identification from the equilibrium Manifold under Incomplete markets

    OpenAIRE

    Carvajal, Andreas; Riascos, Alvaro

    2004-01-01

    We show that, even under incomplete markets, the equilibrium manifold identifies individual demands everywhere in their domains. For this, we assume conditions of smoothness, interiority and regularity, and avoid observational requirements at the individual level. It is crucial that there be date-zero consumption. As a by-product, we develop some duality theory under incomplete markets.

  10. The quasi-equilibrium phase of nonlinear chains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    'quasi-equilibrium' phase that appears to be independent of initial conditions, possesses. Gaussian velocity ... ear dynamics and statistical physics ever since the pioneering work of Fermi, Pasta and Ulam (FPU) [4] in the ... with i being the position index of the particle in the chain, vi its velocity and xi its displacement from its ...

  11. Modeling of equilibrium hollow objects stabilized by electrostatics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mani, E.; Groenewold, J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/161973590; Kegel, W.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/113729464

    2011-01-01

    The equilibrium size of two largely different kinds of hollow objects behave qualitatively differently with respect to certain experimental conditions. Yet, we show that they can be described within the same theoretical framework. The objects we consider are ‘minivesicles’ of ionic and nonionic

  12. Growth and decay of large fluctuations far from equilibrium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 121; Issue 5 ... interesting `detailed balance' like condition in the steady state which is manifested in the time reversal symmetry between growth and decay of fluctuation far from equilibrium, similar to what is observed in thermally equilibrated systems, is demonstrated.

  13. The Role of Desorption Kinetics on the Colloid-Facilitated Transport of Cesium and Strontium in a Partially-Saturated Quartz Sand Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.; Ryan, J. N.; Saiers, J. E.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid-facilitated transport (CFT) is a mechanism for enhanced transport of contaminants under certain environmental conditions. In order for CFT to be significant, three conditions must be met: (1) colloids must be present at a significant concentration, 2) the contaminant must associate with and remain associated with the colloids, and 3) colloids must be transported faster than the contaminant on its own. Colloids are often present in significant concentrations; therefore, CFT strongly depends on slow desorption kinetics and colloid mobility. The goal of this research was to identify and quantify the effects of desorption kinetics on the transport of cesium and strontium through a quartz sand column at different degrees of saturation (moisture contents). Breakthrough experiments were conducted using a rainfall simulator suspended over a column (12.7 cm diameter, 33.5 cm depth) packed with clean, sieved quartz sand (d50 = 360 µm). The effluent was collected with a fraction collector. Cesium and strontium were used as model contaminants because they are common contaminants found on Department of Energy sites in the US and because they have contrasting sorption kinetics with illite, which was used as the model colloid. The column was instrumented with three tensiometers and three moisture sensors to ensure uniform flow under partially-saturated conditions. Relative saturations of 0.33, 0.80, and 1.0 were established in the column. For aqueous breakthrough experiments, solutions at pH 7.3 containing cesium or strontium at a concentration of 7.5 x 10-6 M were applied to the top of the column until breakthrough (C/C0 > 0.5) was achieved. Following breakthrough, the solution was switched to a cesium- or strontium-free pH 7.3 solution for about 40 pore volumes. These experiments were repeated with the addition of illite colloids at a concentration of 100 mg L-1 in equilibrium with the cesium of strontium solution. Cesium and strontium breakthrough was monitored by

  14. SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard Schultz

    2010-08-01

    Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

  15. Pore-scale Analysis of Equilibrium and Non-equilibrium DNAPL Mass Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, K. L.; Willson, C. S.; Thompson, K. E.; Moe, W. M.

    2008-12-01

    A large number of groundwater aquifers are contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPL) comprised of chlorinated hydrocarbons. While there have been a large number of experimental and modeling studies investigating NAPL dissolution at various length scales, rate-limiting processes involved in DNAPL dissolution remain poorly understood. Appropriate mathematical models for describing localized phenomena in a manner conducive to continuum scale modeling are not yet fully developed or have not been robustly tested in comparison to experimental data. Here, high-resolution (i.e., ~10 micron) synchrotron X-ray tomography was used to non-destructively obtain three-dimensional images of the internal structure of a series of unconsolidated porous media (40/50 Accusand) systems at various stages of tetrachloroethene (PCE) dissolution during equilibrium and non-equilibrium mass transfer conditions. Algorithms developed by our group were used to: (1) quantify the granular packing characteristics (e.g., grain sizes, shapes, coordination number); (2) pore network structure (e.g., individual pore body geometry and connectivity); and (3) DNAPL blob characteristics (e.g., blobs sizes, interfacial areas); and (4) correlations between the blob characteristics and pore network structure. Generation of the detailed pore network structure allowed pore network modeling to be performed on the actual void space geometry and topology. A unique aspect of this approach is that it directly incorporated pore-scale preferential flow paths that formed due to pore-level heterogeneities and NAPL blob location and geometry. Analysis of the granular packing and pore network structure properties indicate that the column preparation technique resulted in uniform packing among the different systems. This allowed us to assess the impact of flowrates and local pore-level properties on mass transfer and dissolution of individual DNAPL blobs. Experimental results from columns subjected to low flow

  16. Opening-mode cracking in asphalt pavements : crack initiation and saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    This paper investigates the crack initiation and saturation for opening-mode cracking. Using elastic governing equations : and a weak form stress boundary condition, we derive an explicit solution of elastic fields in the surface course and : obtain ...

  17. Insights to emitter saturation current densities of boron implanted samples based on defects simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mok, K.R.C.; Naber, R.C.G.; Nanver, L.K.

    2012-01-01

    Emitter saturation current densities, Joe have been investigated with different boron implantation dose and annealing conditions. The higher thermal budgets used here are shown experimentally to improve Joe, implying more complete defect dissolution. Simulations show that significant degradation in

  18. Inferring immobile and in-situ water saturation from laboratory and field measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belen, Rodolfo P., Jr.

    2000-06-01

    Analysis of experimental data and numerical simulation results of dynamic boiling experiments revealed that there is an apparent correlation between the immobile water saturation and the shape of the steam saturation profile. An elbow in the steam saturation profile indicates the sudden drop in steam saturation that marks the transition from steam to two-phase conditions inside the core during boiling. The immobile water saturation can be inferred from this elbow in the steam saturation profile. Based on experimental results obtained by Satik (1997), the inferred immobile water saturation of Berea sandstone was found to be about 0.25, which is consistent with results of relative permeability experiments reported by Mahiya (1999). However, this technique may not be useful in inferring the immobile water saturation of less permeable geothermal rocks because the elbow in the steam saturation profile is less prominent. Models of vapor and liquid-dominated geothermal reservoirs that were developed based on Darcy's law and material and energy conservation equations proved to be useful in inferring the in-situ and immobile water saturations from field measurements of cumulative mass production, discharge enthalpy, and downhole temperature. Knowing rock and fluid properties, and the difference between the stable initial, T{sub o}, and dry-out, T{sub d}, downhole temperatures, the in-situ and immobile water saturations of vapor-dominated reservoirs can be estimated. On the other hand, the in-situ and immobile water saturations, and the change in mobile water content of liquid-dominated reservoirs can be inferred from the cumulative mass production, {Delta}m, and enthalpy, h{prime}, data. Comparison with two-phase, radial flow, numerical simulation results confirmed the validity and usefulness of these models.

  19. Effect of solution saturation state and temperature on diopside dissolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carroll Susan A

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Steady-state dissolution rates of diopside are measured as a function of solution saturation state using a titanium flow-through reactor at pH 7.5 and temperature ranging from 125 to 175°C. Diopside dissolved stoichiometrically under all experimental conditions and rates were not dependent on sample history. At each temperature, rates continuously decreased by two orders of magnitude as equilibrium was approached and did not exhibit a dissolution plateau of constant rates at high degrees of undersaturation. The variation of diopside dissolution rates with solution saturation can be described equally well with a ion exchange model based on transition state theory or pit nucleation model based on crystal growth/dissolution theory from 125 to 175°C. At 175°C, both models over predict dissolution rates by two orders of magnitude indicating that a secondary phase precipitated in the experiments. The ion exchange model assumes the formation of a Si-rich, Mg-deficient precursor complex. Lack of dependence of rates on steady-state aqueous calcium concentration supports the formation of such a complex, which is formed by exchange of protons for magnesium ions at the surface. Fit to the experimental data yields Rate (moldiopsidecm−2s−1=k×10−Ea/2.303RT(aH+2aMg2+n MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaafiart1ev1aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacH8akY=wiFfYdH8Gipec8Eeeu0xXdbba9frFj0=OqFfea0dXdd9vqai=hGuQ8kuc9pgc9s8qqaq=dirpe0xb9q8qiLsFr0=vr0=vr0dc8meaabaqaciaacaGaaeqabaqabeGadaaakeaaieaacqWFsbGucqWFHbqycqWF0baDcqWFLbqzcqqGGaaicqGGOaakcqWFTbqBcqWFVbWBcqWFSbaBcqWFGaaicqWFKbazcqWFPbqAcqWFVbWBcqWFWbaCcqWFZbWCcqWFPbqAcqWFKbazcqWFLbqzcqWFGaaicqWFJbWycqWFTbqBdaahaaWcbeqaaiabgkHiTiabikdaYaaakiab=bcaGiab=nhaZnaaCaaaleqabaGaeyOeI0IaeGymaedaaOGaeiykaKIaeyypa0Jaem4AaSMaey41aqRaeeymaeJaeeimaaZaaWbaaSqabeaacqGHsislcqWGfbqrdaWgaaadbaGaemyyaegabeaaliabc+caViabikdaYiabc6caUiabioda

  20. Are the Concepts of Dynamic Equilibrium and the Thermodynamic Criteria for Spontaneity, Nonspontaneity, and Equilibrium Compatible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverberg, Lee J.; Raff, Lionel M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermodynamic spontaneity-equilibrium criteria require that in a single-reaction system, reactions in either the forward or reverse direction at equilibrium be nonspontaneous. Conversely, the concept of dynamic equilibrium holds that forward and reverse reactions both occur at equal rates at equilibrium to the extent allowed by kinetic…

  1. Local thermal equilibrium for quantum fields on cosmological spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gransee, Michael [MPI Mathematics in the Sciences, Leipzig (Germany); Universitaet Leipzig (Germany); Knospe, Alexander; Verch, Rainer [Universitaet Leipzig (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We investigate the consistency of local thermal equilibrium for scalar and Dirac fields on cosmological spacetimes with respect to general covariance and the Hadamard renormalization prescription for the stress-energy tensor. The renormalized stress-energy tensor fulfilling the local thermal equilibrium condition has a thermal part, a dynamical part and a purely geometrical part. The latter contains the renormalization freedom. Since the thermal part differs from the total stress-energy, one finds a temperature dependence on cosmological time which has a stronger singularity in the limit of early cosmological times than in the classical treatment of radiation.

  2. A Characterization of Conserved Quantities in Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Romero

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The well-known Noether theorem in Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics associates symmetries in the evolution equations of a mechanical system with conserved quantities. In this work, we extend this classical idea to problems of non-equilibrium thermodynamics formulated within the GENERIC (General Equations for Non-Equilibrium Reversible-Irreversible Coupling framework. The geometric meaning of symmetry is reviewed in this formal setting and then utilized to identify possible conserved quantities and the conditions that guarantee their strict conservation. Examples are provided that demonstrate the validity of the proposed definition in the context of finite and infinite dimensional thermoelastic problems.

  3. Existence of collateral Equilibrium without survival assumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Orrillo

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the existence of a collateral equilibrium without assuming any hypotheses on the strict positivity, be they individual initial endowments, including the ex post initial endowments, or aggregated initial endowments. Because of dropping the strict positivity of social initial endowment we fail to get an equilibrium. Instead, we get a quasi-equilibrium. Then, appealing to the concept of irreducibility (introduced by McKenzie in 1959 which is adapted to the collateral model, we show that the quasi-equilibrium is indeed a legitime equilibrium.

  4. [Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in genetic epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Hu, Yonghua

    2010-01-01

    Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test is the base of genetic epidemiology. The new methods for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test involve: X chromosome-linked single nucleotide polymorphism Hardy-Weinberg test, inbreeding coefficient (F) test, an incomplete enumeration algorithm for an exact test of Hardy-Weinberg proportions with multiple alleles, and graphical tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium based on the ternary plot. It is necessary to conduct Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium test in genetic epidemiology studies and adjust the associations as deviation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium occurs.

  5. CFD analysis of laboratory scale phase equilibrium cell operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama, Mohamed Ali; Nikiforow, Kaj; Qureshi, Muhammad Saad; Alopaeus, Ville

    2017-10-01

    For the modeling of multiphase chemical reactors or separation processes, it is essential to predict accurately chemical equilibrium data, such as vapor-liquid or liquid-liquid equilibria [M. Šoóš et al., Chem. Eng. Process.: Process Intensif. 42(4), 273-284 (2003)]. The instruments used in these experiments are typically designed based on previous experiences, and their operation verified based on known equilibria of standard components. However, mass transfer limitations with different chemical systems may be very different, potentially falsifying the measured equilibrium compositions. In this work, computational fluid dynamics is utilized to design and analyze laboratory scale experimental gas-liquid equilibrium cell for the first time to augment the traditional analysis based on plug flow assumption. Two-phase dilutor cell, used for measuring limiting activity coefficients at infinite dilution, is used as a test case for the analysis. The Lagrangian discrete model is used to track each bubble and to study the residence time distribution of the carrier gas bubbles in the dilutor cell. This analysis is necessary to assess whether the gas leaving the cell is in equilibrium with the liquid, as required in traditional analysis of such apparatus. Mass transfer for six different bio-oil compounds is calculated to determine the approach equilibrium concentration. Also, residence times assuming plug flow and ideal mixing are used as reference cases to evaluate the influence of mixing on the approach to equilibrium in the dilutor. Results show that the model can be used to predict the dilutor operating conditions for which each of the studied gas-liquid systems reaches equilibrium.

  6. CFD analysis of laboratory scale phase equilibrium cell operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jama, Mohamed Ali; Nikiforow, Kaj; Qureshi, Muhammad Saad; Alopaeus, Ville

    2017-10-01

    For the modeling of multiphase chemical reactors or separation processes, it is essential to predict accurately chemical equilibrium data, such as vapor-liquid or liquid-liquid equilibria [M. Šoóš et al., Chem. Eng. Process Intensif. 42(4), 273-284 (2003)]. The instruments used in these experiments are typically designed based on previous experiences, and their operation verified based on known equilibria of standard components. However, mass transfer limitations with different chemical systems may be very different, potentially falsifying the measured equilibrium compositions. In this work, computational fluid dynamics is utilized to design and analyze laboratory scale experimental gas-liquid equilibrium cell for the first time to augment the traditional analysis based on plug flow assumption. Two-phase dilutor cell, used for measuring limiting activity coefficients at infinite dilution, is used as a test case for the analysis. The Lagrangian discrete model is used to track each bubble and to study the residence time distribution of the carrier gas bubbles in the dilutor cell. This analysis is necessary to assess whether the gas leaving the cell is in equilibrium with the liquid, as required in traditional analysis of such apparatus. Mass transfer for six different bio-oil compounds is calculated to determine the approach equilibrium concentration. Also, residence times assuming plug flow and ideal mixing are used as reference cases to evaluate the influence of mixing on the approach to equilibrium in the dilutor. Results show that the model can be used to predict the dilutor operating conditions for which each of the studied gas-liquid systems reaches equilibrium.

  7. State-Feedback Control for Fractional-Order Nonlinear Systems Subject to Input Saturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junhai Luo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We give a state-feedback control method for fractional-order nonlinear systems subject to input saturation. First, a sufficient condition is derived for the asymptotical stability of a class of fractional-order nonlinear systems. Then based on Gronwall-Bellman lemma and a sector bounded condition of the saturation function, a linear state-feed back controller is designed. Finally, two simulation examples are presented to show the validity of the proposed method.

  8. Toroidal Energy Principle (TEP) and perturbed equilibrium code STB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Hu, Di

    2016-10-01

    The MHD energy principle TEP is presented in terms of perturbations of the vector potential, rather than plasma displacement. This form makes TEP capable to discribe both the ideal plasmas stability and the perturbed equilibria. The functional is expressed in two terms. The first one represents the energy of magnetic field and is calculated using working equilibrium coordinate system. The second term, containing plasma displacement is expressed in the compact form using Hamada coordinates. This representation uses the same combinations of metric coefficients as in the equilibrium calculations. The STB code implements the TEP for both ideal MHD and perturbed equilibria. In the first case, it uses the matching conditions of the ideal MHD. In the second case, the 2-D equilibrium islands are introduced in order to resolve the singularity and match the solutions across the resonant surfaces Partially by (a) US DoE Contract No. DE-AC02-09-CH11466, (b) General Fusion Inc.

  9. EQQYAC: Program for determining geothermal reservoir chemical equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan, R. M.; Nieva, D. G.

    The computer program EQQYAC calculates the equilibrium distribution of inorganic aqueous ion species in geothermal reservoirs, using the chemical composition of discharged fluids and in situ physical measurements. The program, written in FORTRAN IV for a VAX/11-780 computer system, is suited to handle data from wells that produce both steam and liquid phase water. The program has been successfully used with data of wells from Los Azufres geothermal field. EQQYAC estimates the reservoir steam fraction, (excess steam), that could be present in the total discharge fluid. In order to carry out this calculation, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction is assumed to be at equilibrium at reservoir conditions. The deviation of the concentrations of the participant ions from the expected values at equilibrium, are considered due to the excess steam. This program also may be used to study chemical changes in the deep fluid as a consequence of reservoir boiling.

  10. An equilibrium-conserving taxation scheme for income from capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempere, Jacques

    2018-02-01

    Under conditions of market equilibrium, the distribution of capital income follows a Pareto power law, with an exponent that characterizes the given equilibrium. Here, a simple taxation scheme is proposed such that the post-tax capital income distribution remains an equilibrium distribution, albeit with a different exponent. This taxation scheme is shown to be progressive, and its parameters can be simply derived from (i) the total amount of tax that will be levied, (ii) the threshold selected above which capital income will be taxed and (iii) the total amount of capital income. The latter can be obtained either by using Piketty's estimates of the capital/labor income ratio or by fitting the initial Pareto exponent. Both ways moreover provide a check on the amount of declared income from capital.

  11. Fluorescence lifetime components reveal kinetic intermediate states upon equilibrium denaturation of carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemtseva, Elena V; Lashchuk, Olesya O; Gerasimova, Marina A; Melnik, Tatiana N; Nagibina, Galina S; Melnik, Bogdan S

    2017-12-21

    In most cases, intermediate states of multistage folding proteins are not 'visible' under equilibrium conditions but are revealed in kinetic experiments. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy was used in equilibrium denaturation studies. The technique allows for detecting changes in the conformation and environment of tryptophan residues in different structural elements of carbonic anhydrase II which in its turn has made it possible to study the intermediate states of carbonic anhydrase II under equilibrium conditions. The results of equilibrium and kinetic experiments using wild-type bovine carbonic anhydrase II and its mutant form with the substitution of leucine for alanine at position 139 (L139A) were compared. The obtained lifetime components of intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence allowed for revealing that, the same as in kinetic experiments, under equilibrium conditions the unfolding of carbonic anhydrase II ensues through formation of intermediate states.

  12. Combinatorics of saturated secondary structures of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, P

    2006-11-01

    Following Zuker (1986), a saturated secondary structure for a given RNA sequence is a secondary structure such that no base pair can be added without violating the definition of secondary structure, e.g., without introducing a pseudoknot. In the Nussinov-Jacobson energy model (Nussinov and Jacobson, 1980), where the energy of a secondary structure is -1 times the number of base pairs, saturated secondary structures are local minima in the energy landscape, hence form kinetic traps during the folding process. Here we present recurrence relations and closed form asymptotic limits for combinatorial problems related to the number of saturated secondary structures. In addition, Python source code to compute the number of saturated secondary structures having k base pairs can be found at the web servers link of bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/.

  13. Saturated fat, carbohydrate, and cardiovascular disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siri-Tarino, Patty W; Sun, Qi; Hu, Frank B; Krauss, Ronald M

    2010-01-01

    A focus of dietary recommendations for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention and treatment has been a reduction in saturated fat intake, primarily as a means of lowering LDL-cholesterol concentrations...

  14. Saturated thickness, High Plains aquifer, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents the saturated thickness of the High Plains aquifer of the United States, 2009, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  15. The geometry of structural equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRobie, Allan

    2017-03-01

    Building on a long tradition from Maxwell, Rankine, Klein and others, this paper puts forward a geometrical description of structural equilibrium which contains a procedure for the graphic analysis of stress resultants within general three-dimensional frames. The method is a natural generalization of Rankine's reciprocal diagrams for three-dimensional trusses. The vertices and edges of dual abstract 4-polytopes are embedded within dual four-dimensional vector spaces, wherein the oriented area of generalized polygons give all six components (axial and shear forces with torsion and bending moments) of the stress resultants. The relevant quantities may be readily calculated using four-dimensional Clifford algebra. As well as giving access to frame analysis and design, the description resolves a number of long-standing problems with the incompleteness of Rankine's description of three-dimensional trusses. Examples are given of how the procedure may be applied to structures of engineering interest, including an outline of a two-stage procedure for addressing the equilibrium of loaded gridshell rooves.

  16. The geometry of structural equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Building on a long tradition from Maxwell, Rankine, Klein and others, this paper puts forward a geometrical description of structural equilibrium which contains a procedure for the graphic analysis of stress resultants within general three-dimensional frames. The method is a natural generalization of Rankine’s reciprocal diagrams for three-dimensional trusses. The vertices and edges of dual abstract 4-polytopes are embedded within dual four-dimensional vector spaces, wherein the oriented area of generalized polygons give all six components (axial and shear forces with torsion and bending moments) of the stress resultants. The relevant quantities may be readily calculated using four-dimensional Clifford algebra. As well as giving access to frame analysis and design, the description resolves a number of long-standing problems with the incompleteness of Rankine’s description of three-dimensional trusses. Examples are given of how the procedure may be applied to structures of engineering interest, including an outline of a two-stage procedure for addressing the equilibrium of loaded gridshell rooves. PMID:28405361

  17. On the foundation of equilibrium quantum-statistical mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casati, G. (International Center for the Study of Dynamical Systems, Como (Italy) INFM-INFN, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica della Materia-Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Milan (Italy))

    1999-01-01

    The paper discusses the condition for the validity of equilibrium quantum-statistical mechanics in the light of recent developments in the understanding of classical and quantum-chaotic motion. In particular, the ergodicity parameter introduced by Casati and Chirikov is shown to provide the conditions under which quantum-statistical distributions can be derived from the quantum dynamics of a classical ergodic Hamiltonian system.

  18. Semiconductor saturable absorbers for ultrafast THz signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Matthias C.; Turchinovich, Dmitry

    We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors in the THz frequency range using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. Further, we observe THz pulse shortening and increase of the group refractive index at high field strengths.......We demonstrate saturable absorber behavior of n-type semiconductors in the THz frequency range using nonlinear THz spectroscopy. Further, we observe THz pulse shortening and increase of the group refractive index at high field strengths....

  19. Probing bias reduction to improve comparability of lint cotton water and moisture contents at moisture equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Karl Fischer Titration (KFT) reference method is specific for water in lint cotton and was designed for samples conditioned to moisture equilibrium, thus limiting its biases. There is a standard method for moisture content – weight loss – by oven drying (OD), just not for equilibrium moisture c...

  20. Raoult's law revisited: accurately predicting equilibrium relative humidity points for humidity control experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Bowler, Michael G; Bowler, Matthew W

    2016-01-01

    The equilibrium relative humidity values for a number of the most commonly used precipitants in biological macromolecule crystallisation have been measured using a new humidity control device. A simple argument in statistical mechanics demonstrates that the saturated vapour pressure of a solvent is proportional to its mole fraction in an ideal solution (Raoult's Law). The same argument can be extended to the case where solvent and solute molecules are of different size.

  1. KMS-like properties of local equilibrium states in quantum field theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gransee, Michael; Pinamonti, Nicola; Verch, Rainer

    2017-07-01

    A new condition, called ;Local KMS Condition;, characterizing states of a quantum field to which one can ascribe, at a given spacetime point, a temperature, is introduced in this article. It will be shown that the Local KMS Condition (LKMS condition) is equivalent to the Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE) condition, proposed previously by Buchholz, Ojima and Roos, for states of the quantized scalar Klein-Gordon field that fulfill the analytic microlocal spectrum condition. Therefore, known examples of states fulfilling the LTE condition provide examples of states obeying the LKMS condition with a temperature distribution varying in space and time. The results extend to the generalized cases of mixed-temperature LKMS and LTE states. The LKMS condition therefore provides a promising generalization of the KMS condition, which characterizes global thermal equilibrium states with respect to an inertial time evolution, to states which are globally out of equilibrium but still possess a local temperature distribution.

  2. Modeling equilibrium Fe isotope fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbar, A.; Jarzecki, A.; Spiro, T.

    2003-04-01

    Research into the stable isotope biogeochemistry of Fe and other transition metals has been driven primarily by analytical innovations which have revealed significant isotope effects in nature and the laboratory. Further development of these new isotope systems requires complementary theoretical research to guide analytical efforts. The results of the first such studies show some discrepancies with experiments. For example, Johnson et al. (2002) report an experimentally-determined 56Fe/54Fe equilibrium fractionation factor between Fe(II) and Fe(III) aquo complexes of ˜1.0025. This effect is ˜50% smaller than predicted theoretically by Schauble et al. (2001). It is important to resolve such discrepancies. Equilibrium isotope fractionation factors can be predicted from vibrational spectroscopic data of isotopically-substituted complexes, or from theoretical predictions of some or all of these frequencies obtained using force field models. The pioneering work of Schauble et al. (2001) utilized a modified Urey-Bradley force field (MUBFF) model. This approach is limiting in at least three ways: First, it is not ab initio, requiring as input some measured vibrational frequencies. Such data are not always available, or may have significant uncertainties. Second, the MUBFF does not include potentially important effects of solvent interaction. Third, because it makes certain assumptions about molecular symmetry, the MUBFF-based approach is not able to model the spectra of mixed-ligand complexes. To address these limitations, we are evaluating the use of density functional theory (DFT) as an ab initio method to predict vibrational frequencies of isotopically-substituted complexes and, hence, equilibrium fractionation factors. In a preliminary examination of the frequency shift upon isotope substitution of the bending and asymmetric stretching modes of the tetrahedral FeCl_42- complex, we find substantial differences between MUBFF and DFT predictions. Results for other Fe

  3. Thermodynamic equilibrium at heterogeneous pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrijmoed, Johannes C.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.

    2014-05-01

    Recent advances in metamorphic petrology point out the importance of grain-scale pressure variations in high-temperature metamorphic rocks. Pressures derived from chemical zonation using unconventional geobarometry based on equal chemical potentials fit mechanically feasible pressure variations. Here a thermodynamic equilibrium method is presented that predicts chemical zoning as a result of pressure variations by Gibbs energy minimization. Equilibrium thermodynamic prediction of the chemical zoning in the case of pressure heterogeneity is done by constraint Gibbs minimization using linear programming techniques. Compositions of phases considered in the calculation are discretized into 'pseudo-compounds' spanning the entire compositional space. Gibbs energies of these discrete compounds are generated for a given range and resolution of pressures for example derived by barometry or from mechanical model predictions. Gibbs energy minimization is subsequently performed considering all compounds of different composition and pressure. In addition to constraining the system composition a certain proportion of the system is constraint at a specified pressure. Input pressure variations need to be discretized and each discrete pressure defines an additional constraint for the minimization. The proportion of the system at each different pressure is equally distributed over the number of input pressures. For example if two input pressures P1 and P2 are specified, two constraints are added: 50 percent of the system is constraint at P1 while the remaining 50 percent is constraint at P2. The method has been tested for a set of 10 input pressures obtained by Tajčmanová et al. (2014) using their unconventional geobarometry method in a plagioclase rim around kyanite. Each input pressure is added as constraint to the minimization (1/10 percent of the system for each discrete pressure). Constraining the system composition to the average composition of the plagioclase rim

  4. Time scales of relaxation dynamics during transient conditions in two-phase flow: RELAXATION DYNAMICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlüter, Steffen [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Berg, Steffen [Shell Global Solutions International B.V., Rijswijk Netherlands; Li, Tianyi [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA; Vogel, Hans-Jörg [Department Soil Physics, Helmholtz-Centre for Environmental Research-UFZ, Halle Germany; Institut für Agrar- und Ernährungswissenschaften, Martin-Luther-Universität Halle-Wittenberg, Halle Germany; Wildenschild, Dorthe [School of Chemical, Biological and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis Oregon USA

    2017-06-01

    The relaxation dynamics toward a hydrostatic equilibrium after a change in phase saturation in porous media is governed by fluid reconfiguration at the pore scale. Little is known whether a hydrostatic equilibrium in which all interfaces come to rest is ever reached and which microscopic processes govern the time scales of relaxation. Here we apply fast synchrotron-based X-ray tomography (X-ray CT) to measure the slow relaxation dynamics of fluid interfaces in a glass bead pack after fast drainage of the sample. The relaxation of interfaces triggers internal redistribution of fluids, reduces the surface energy stored in the fluid interfaces, and relaxes the contact angle toward the equilibrium value while the fluid topology remains unchanged. The equilibration of capillary pressures occurs in two stages: (i) a quick relaxation within seconds in which most of the pressure drop that built up during drainage is dissipated, a process that is to fast to be captured with fast X-ray CT, and (ii) a slow relaxation with characteristic time scales of 1–4 h which manifests itself as a spontaneous imbibition process that is well described by the Washburn equation for capillary rise in porous media. The slow relaxation implies that a hydrostatic equilibrium is hardly ever attained in practice when conducting two-phase experiments in which a flux boundary condition is changed from flow to no-flow. Implications for experiments with pressure boundary conditions are discussed.

  5. SATURATED ZONE IN-SITU TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.W. REIMUS

    2004-11-08

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters used in the development of parameter distributions for total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Flow Model (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170037]), Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]), Saturated Zone Colloid Transport (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170006]), and ''Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Abstraction'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170042]). Specifically, this scientific analysis contributes the following to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as part of a natural barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvial Testing Complex (ATC) located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass

  6. Soil-water characteristics of Gaomiaozi bentonite by vapour equilibrium technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjing Sun

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil-water characteristics of Gaomiaozi (GMZ Ca-bentonite at high suctions (3–287 MPa are measured by vapour equilibrium technique. The soil-water retention curve (SWRC of samples with the same initial compaction states is obtained in drying and wetting process. At high suctions, the hysteresis behaviour is not obvious in relationship between water content and suction, while the opposite holds between degree of saturation and suction. The suction variation can change its water retention behaviour and void ratio. Moreover, changes of void ratio can bring about changes in degree of saturation. Therefore, the total change in degree of saturation includes changes caused by suction and that by void ratio. In the space of degree of saturation and suction, the SWRC at constant void ratio shifts to the direction of higher suctions with decreasing void ratio. However, the relationship between water content and suction is less affected by changes of void ratio. The degree of saturation decreases approximately linearly with increasing void ratio at a constant suction. Moreover, the slope of the line decreases with increasing suction and they show an approximately linear relationship in semi-logarithmical scale. From this linear relationship, the variation of degree of saturation caused by the change in void ratio can be obtained. Correspondingly, SWRC at a constant void ratio can be determined from SWRC at different void ratios.

  7. Equilibrium Analysis in Cake Cutting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branzei, Simina; Miltersen, Peter Bro

    2013-01-01

    Cake cutting is a fundamental model in fair division; it represents the problem of fairly allocating a heterogeneous divisible good among agents with different preferences. The central criteria of fairness are proportionality and envy-freeness, and many of the existing protocols are designed...... to guarantee proportional or envy-free allocations, when the participating agents follow the protocol. However, typically, all agents following the protocol is not guaranteed to result in a Nash equilibrium. In this paper, we initiate the study of equilibria of classical cake cutting protocols. We consider one...... of the simplest and most elegant continuous algorithms -- the Dubins-Spanier procedure, which guarantees a proportional allocation of the cake -- and study its equilibria when the agents use simple threshold strategies. We show that given a cake cutting instance with strictly positive value density functions...

  8. Pre-equilibrium effects in charge-asymmetric low-energy reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Zheng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the pre-equilibrium dipole response in the charge-asymmetric reaction Sn132+Ni58 at Elab=10 MeV/A, within a semi-classical transport model employing effective interactions for the nuclear mean-field. In particular, we adopt the recently introduced SAMi-J Skyrme interactions, whose parameters are specifically tuned to improve the description of spin–isospin properties of nuclei. Within the same framework, we also discuss pre-equilibrium nucleon emission. Our results show that both mechanisms, i.e., pre-equilibrium dipole oscillations and nucleon emission, are sensitive to the symmetry energy below the saturation density ρ0 (in the range 0.6ρ0−ρ0, to the momentum dependence of the mean-field potential and to the nucleon–nucleon cross section. Finally, a correlation analysis is applied to examine the impact of the model parameters on observables of experimental interest.

  9. Non-Equilibrium Solidification of Undercooled Metallic Melts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dieter M. Herlach

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available If a liquid is undercooled below its equilibrium melting temperature an excess Gibbs free energy is created. This gives access to solidification of metastable solids under non-equilibrium conditions. In the present work, techniques of containerless processing are applied. Electromagnetic and electrostatic levitation enable to freely suspend a liquid drop of a few millimeters in diameter. Heterogeneous nucleation on container walls is completely avoided leading to large undercoolings. The freely suspended drop is accessible for direct observation of rapid solidification under conditions far away from equilibrium by applying proper diagnostic means. Nucleation of metastable crystalline phases is monitored by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation during non-equilibrium solidification. While nucleation preselects the crystallographic phase, subsequent crystal growth controls the microstructure evolution. Metastable microstructures are obtained from deeply undercooled melts as supersaturated solid solutions, disordered superlattice structures of intermetallics. Nucleation and crystal growth take place by heat and mass transport. Comparative experiments in reduced gravity allow for investigations on how forced convection can be used to alter the transport processes and design materials by using undercooling and convection as process parameters.

  10. Physical Equilibrium Evaluation in Parkinson Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt, Paula da Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The Parkinson disease can be among the multiple causes of alterations in the physical equilibrium. Accordingly, this study has the objective to evaluate Parkinson patients' physical equilibrium. Method: Potential study in which 12 Parkinson individuals were evaluated by way of tests of static and dynamic equilibrium, dynamic posturography and vectoelectronystagmograph. To compare the dynamic posturography results a group of gauged control was used. Results: Alterations in Romberg-Barré, Unterberger and Walk tests were found. The vestibular exam revealed 06 normal cases, 04 central vestibular syndrome and 02 cases of peripheral vestibular syndrome. In the dynamic posturography, an equilibrium alteration has been verified, when compared to the control group in all Sensorial Organization Tests, in average and in the utilization of vestibular system. Conclusion: Parkinson patients present a physical equilibrium alteration. The dynamic posturography was more sensitive to detect the equilibrium alterations than vectoelectronystagmograph.

  11. Equilibrium Solubility of CO2 in Alkanolamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; von Solms, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Equilibrium solubility of CO2 were measured in aqueous solutions of Monoethanolamine (MEA) and N,N-diethylethanolamine(DEEA). Equilibrium cells are generally used for these measurements. In this study, the equilibrium data were measured from the calorimetry. For this purpose a reaction calorimeter...... (model CPA 122 from ChemiSens AB, Sweden) was used. The advantage of this method is being the measurement of both heats of absorption and equilibrium solubility data of CO2 at the same time. The measurements were performed for 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA solutions as a function of CO2 loading at three...... different temperatures 40, 80 and 120 ºC. The measured 30 mass % MEA and 5M DEEA data were compared with the literature data obtained from different equilibrium cells which validated the use of calorimeters for equilibrium solubility measurements....

  12. Saturated fats and cardiovascular disease risk: A review

    OpenAIRE

    Ishi Khosla; Gayatri C Khosla1

    2017-01-01

    Saturated fats have been in the line of fire for more than three decades. The major mistake in understanding fats was to equate all saturated fatty acids as one. The oversimplification of the relationship of saturated fats with cardiovascular disease (CVD) led to unwarranted removal of some valuable fats from our diets. Recently, the relationship of dietary saturated fats and that of individual saturated fatty acids (SFAs) to CVD risk has been reevaluated. All saturated fats are not equal and...

  13. Uncertainty Quantification of Equilibrium Climate Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, D. D.; Brandon, S. T.; Covey, C. C.; Domyancic, D. M.; Johannesson, G.; Klein, R.; Tannahill, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Significant uncertainties exist in the temperature response of the climate system to changes in the levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide. We report progress to quantify the uncertainties of equilibrium climate sensitivity using perturbed parameter ensembles of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Through a strategic initiative at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been developing uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods and incorporating them into a software framework called the UQ Pipeline. We have applied this framework to generate a large number of ensemble simulations using Latin Hypercube and other schemes to sample up to three dozen uncertain parameters in the atmospheric (CAM) and sea ice (CICE) model components of CESM. The parameters sampled are related to many highly uncertain processes, including deep and shallow convection, boundary layer turbulence, cloud optical and microphysical properties, and sea ice albedo. An extensive ensemble database comprised of more than 46,000 simulated climate-model-years of recent climate conditions has been assembled. This database is being used to train surrogate models of CESM responses and to perform statistical calibrations of the CAM and CICE models given observational data constraints. The calibrated models serve as a basis for propagating uncertainties forward through climate change simulations using a slab ocean model configuration of CESM. This procedure is being used to quantify the probability density function of equilibrium climate sensitivity accounting for uncertainties in climate model processes. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 and was funded by the Uncertainty Quantification Strategic Initiative Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project at LLNL under project tracking code 10-SI-013. (LLNL-ABS-491765)

  14. Mathematical models and equilibrium in irreversible microeconomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoly M. Tsirlin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A set of equilibrium states in a system consisting of economic agents, economic reservoirs, and firms is considered. Methods of irreversible microeconomics are used. We show that direct sale/purchase leads to an equilibrium state which depends upon the coefficients of supply/demand functions. To reach the unique equilibrium state it is necessary to add either monetary exchange or an intermediate firm.

  15. Non-equilibrium reactive flux: A unified framework for slow and fast reaction kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2017-10-01

    The flux formulation of reaction rate theory is recast in terms of the expectation value of the reactive flux with an initial condition that corresponds to a non-equilibrium, factorized reactant density. In the common case of slow reactive processes, the non-equilibrium expression reaches the plateau regime only slightly slower than the equilibrium flux form. When the reactants are described by a single quantum state, as in the case of electron transfer reactions, the factorized reactant density describes the true initial condition of the reactive process. In such cases, the time integral of the non-equilibrium flux expression yields the reactant population as a function of time, allowing characterization of the dynamics in cases where there is no clear separation of time scales and thus a plateau regime cannot be identified. The non-equilibrium flux offers a unified approach to the kinetics of slow and fast chemical reactions and is ideally suited to mixed quantum-classical methods.

  16. Non-equilibrium reactive flux: A unified framework for slow and fast reaction kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Amartya; Makri, Nancy

    2017-10-21

    The flux formulation of reaction rate theory is recast in terms of the expectation value of the reactive flux with an initial condition that corresponds to a non-equilibrium, factorized reactant density. In the common case of slow reactive processes, the non-equilibrium expression reaches the plateau regime only slightly slower than the equilibrium flux form. When the reactants are described by a single quantum state, as in the case of electron transfer reactions, the factorized reactant density describes the true initial condition of the reactive process. In such cases, the time integral of the non-equilibrium flux expression yields the reactant population as a function of time, allowing characterization of the dynamics in cases where there is no clear separation of time scales and thus a plateau regime cannot be identified. The non-equilibrium flux offers a unified approach to the kinetics of slow and fast chemical reactions and is ideally suited to mixed quantum-classical methods.

  17. Current and Noise Saturation in Graphene Superlattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Lu, Xiaobo; Berthou, Simon; Wilmart, Quentin; Boukhicha, Mohamed; Voisin, Christophe; Zhang, Guangyu; Placais, Bernard

    One of the merits of graphene is that the Fermi level can be easily tuned by electrical gating, which render charge carriers n type or p type, or even insulating around the Dirac point (DP). By aligning graphene on top of Boron Nitride (BN), the presence of graphene superlattice makes transport properties even more versatile owning to the emergence of secondary Dirac points (SDPs). Here we present a study of high electric field performance of graphene superlattice obtained from epitaxial approach. By using microwave cavity, noise produced from graphene by joule heating is recorded up to 5GHz. Current and noise saturation are observed and investigated. Depending on Fermi energy, saturation can be attributed to intrinsic optical or remote surface polar phonon scattering at a doping far away from DP, while no saturation are found around DP. Moreover, noise saturation is identified around Fermi energy between DP and SDP, which can be attributed to the influence of van Hove singularity arising from the superlattice. Lastly, saturation due to the bias induced shift of DP, or so called Dirac fermion pinch-off, is well observed by local top gate technique. EU Graphene flagship project (Contract No. 604391).

  18. Equilibrium sampling by reweighting nonequilibrium simulation trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng; Wan, Biao; Xu, Shun; Wang, Yanting; Zhou, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Based on equilibrium molecular simulations, it is usually difficult to efficiently visit the whole conformational space of complex systems, which are separated into some metastable regions by high free energy barriers. Nonequilibrium simulations could enhance transitions among these metastable regions and then be applied to sample equilibrium distributions in complex systems, since the associated nonequilibrium effects can be removed by employing the Jarzynski equality (JE). Here we present such a systematical method, named reweighted nonequilibrium ensemble dynamics (RNED), to efficiently sample equilibrium conformations. The RNED is a combination of the JE and our previous reweighted ensemble dynamics (RED) method. The original JE reproduces equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium trajectories but requires that the initial distribution of these trajectories is equilibrium. The RED reweights many equilibrium trajectories from an arbitrary initial distribution to get the equilibrium distribution, whereas the RNED has both advantages of the two methods, reproducing equilibrium from lots of nonequilibrium simulation trajectories with an arbitrary initial conformational distribution. We illustrated the application of the RNED in a toy model and in a Lennard-Jones fluid to detect its liquid-solid phase coexistence. The results indicate that the RNED sufficiently extends the application of both the original JE and the RED in equilibrium sampling of complex systems.

  19. Lipid order, saturation and surface property relationships: a study of human meibum saturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudgil, Poonam; Borchman, Douglas; Yappert, Marta C; Duran, Diana; Cox, Gregory W; Smith, Ryan J; Bhola, Rahul; Dennis, Gary R; Whitehall, John S

    2013-11-01

    Tear film stability decreases with age however the cause(s) of the instability are speculative. Perhaps the more saturated meibum from infants may contribute to tear film stability. The meibum lipid phase transition temperature and lipid hydrocarbon chain order at physiological temperature (33 °C) decrease with increasing age. It is reasonable that stronger lipid-lipid interactions could stabilize the tear film since these interactions must be broken for tear break up to occur. In this study, meibum from a pool of adult donors was saturated catalytically. The influence of saturation on meibum hydrocarbon chain order was determined by infrared spectroscopy. Meibum is in an anhydrous state in the meibomian glands and on the surface of the eyelid. The influence of saturation on the surface properties of meibum was determined using Langmuir trough technology. Saturation of native human meibum did not change the minimum or maximum values of hydrocarbon chain order so at temperatures far above or below the phase transition of human meibum, saturation does not play a role in ordering or disordering the lipid hydrocarbon chains. Saturation did increase the phase transition temperature in human meibum by over 20 °C, a relatively high amount. Surface pressure-area studies showing the late take off and higher maximum surface pressure of saturated meibum compared to native meibum suggest that the saturated meibum film is quite molecularly ordered (stiff molecular arrangement) and elastic (molecules are able to rearrange during compression and expansion) compared with native meibum films which are more fluid agreeing with the infrared spectroscopic results of this study. In saturated meibum, the formation of compacted ordered islands of lipids above the surfactant layer would be expected to decrease the rate of evaporation compared to fluid and more loosely packed native meibum. Higher surface pressure observed with films of saturated meibum compared to native meibum

  20. Soil Structure and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houskova, B.; Nagy, V.

    The role of soil structure on saturated hydraulic conductivity changes is studied in plough layers of texturally different soils. Three localities in western part of Slovakia in Zitny ostrov (Corn Island) were under investigation: locality Kalinkovo with light Calcaric Fluvisol (FAO 1970), Macov with medium heavy Calcari-mollic Fluvisol and Jurova with heavy Calcari-mollic Fluvisol. Soil structure was determined in dry as well as wet state and in size of macro and micro aggregates. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured by the help of double ring method. During the period of ring filling the soil surface was protected against aggregates damage by falling water drops. Spatial and temporal variability of studied parameters was evaluated. Cultivated crops were ensilage maize at medium heavy and heavy soil and colza at light soil. Textural composition of soil and actual water content at the beginning of measurement are one of major factor affecting aggregate stability and consequently also saturated hydraulic conductivity.

  1. Perturbative Saturation and the Soft Pomeron

    CERN Document Server

    Kovner, A; Kovner, Alex; Wiedemann, Urs Achim

    2002-01-01

    We show that perturbation theory provides two distinct mechanisms for the power like growth of hadronic cross sections at high energy. One, the leading BFKL effect is due to the growth of the parton density, and is characterized by the leading BFKL exponent. The other mechanism is due to the infrared diffusion, or the long range nature of the Coulomb field of perturbatively massless gluons. When perturbative saturation effects are taken into account, the first mechanism is rendered ineffective but the second one persists. We suggest that these two distinct mechanisms are responsible for the appearance of two pomerons. The density growth effects are responsible for the hard pomeron and manifest themselves in small systems (e.g. gamma^* or small size fluctuations in the proton wave function) where saturation effects are not important. The soft pomeron is the manifestation of the exponential growth of the black saturated regions which appear in typical hadronic systems. We point out that the nonlinear generaliza...

  2. Interger multiplication with overflow detection or saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulte, M.J.; Balzola, P.I.; Akkas, A.; Brocato, R.W.

    2000-01-11

    High-speed multiplication is frequently used in general-purpose and application-specific computer systems. These systems often support integer multiplication, where two n-bit integers are multiplied to produce a 2n-bit product. To prevent growth in word length, processors typically return the n least significant bits of the product and a flag that indicates whether or not overflow has occurred. Alternatively, some processors saturate results that overflow to the most positive or most negative representable number. This paper presents efficient methods for performing unsigned or two's complement integer multiplication with overflow detection or saturation. These methods have significantly less area and delay than conventional methods for integer multiplication with overflow detection and saturation.

  3. The Danish tax on saturated fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallgårda, Signild; Holm, Lotte; Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Health promoters have repeatedly proposed using economic policy tools, taxes and subsidies, as a means of changing consumer behaviour. As the first country in the world, Denmark introduced a tax on saturated fat in 2011. It was repealed in 2012. In this paper, we present...... on saturated fat had been suggested by two expert committees and was introduced with a majority in parliament, as a part of a larger economic reform package. Many actors, including representatives from the food industry and nutrition researchers, opposed the tax both before and after its introduction, claiming......, research was published showing that consumption of saturated fat had declined in Denmark. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis indicates that the Danish tax on fat was introduced mainly to increase public revenue. As the tax had no strong proponents and many influential adversaries, it was repealed. New research...

  4. Network model investigation of interfacial area, capillary pressure and saturation relationships in granular porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joekar-Niasar, V.; Prodanović, M.; Wildenschild, D.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2010-06-01

    We have developed a new approach for generating pore throat cross sections of various shapes based on distributions of shape factors and radii of inscribed circles. These distributions are obtained from analysis of grains packing. General formulas for calculating geometrical properties and entry capillary pressure for given shape factor and inscribed circle radius are developed. These relationships are employed in a pore network, which has a number of special features. In particular, it is highly flexible in terms of location of pore bodies, variable coordination number, as well as variable cross-sectional shapes. The pore network model is employed for simulating the equilibrium distribution of two fluids in a granular porous medium, under both drainage and imbibition conditions. The pore network model is verified by comparing simulation results with experimental data of quasi-static drainage and imbibition experiments in a glass bead medium. The pore-level topology and geometrical description of pore bodies and pore throats, essential for building the network, are rigorously extracted from experimental data using image analysis (3DMA-Rock software). Calculated capillary pressure-saturation (Pc - Sw) and specific interfacial area-saturation (anw - Sw) curves show very good agreement with measured ones, for both drainage and imbibition. We show that the shape factor can significantly influence the form of macroscopic Pc - Sw and anw - Sw curves, if the length and volumes associated to the pore throats are considerable. Furthermore, using continuous generation of shape factor distribution, the model can be validated against the grain size distribution. After validating the model against experiments, in addition to primary and main curves, we simulate many scanning curves to generate Pc - Sw - anw surfaces for drainage and imbibition, separately. Results show that these two surfaces lie very close to each other, and the average normalized difference is small, in the

  5. Philicities, Fugalities, and Equilibrium Constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Herbert; Ofial, Armin R

    2016-05-17

    The mechanistic model of Organic Chemistry is based on relationships between rate and equilibrium constants. Thus, strong bases are generally considered to be good nucleophiles and poor nucleofuges. Exceptions to this rule have long been known, and the ability of iodide ions to catalyze nucleophilic substitutions, because they are good nucleophiles as well as good nucleofuges, is just a prominent example for exceptions from the general rule. In a reaction series, the Leffler-Hammond parameter α = δΔG(⧧)/δΔG° describes the fraction of the change in the Gibbs energy of reaction, which is reflected in the change of the Gibbs energy of activation. It has long been considered as a measure for the position of the transition state; thus, an α value close to 0 was associated with an early transition state, while an α value close to 1 was considered to be indicative of a late transition state. Bordwell's observation in 1969 that substituent variation in phenylnitromethanes has a larger effect on the rates of deprotonation than on the corresponding equilibrium constants (nitroalkane anomaly) triggered the breakdown of this interpretation. In the past, most systematic investigations of the relationships between rates and equilibria of organic reactions have dealt with proton transfer reactions, because only for few other reaction series complementary kinetic and thermodynamic data have been available. In this Account we report on a more general investigation of the relationships between Lewis basicities, nucleophilicities, and nucleofugalities as well as between Lewis acidities, electrophilicities, and electrofugalities. Definitions of these terms are summarized, and it is suggested to replace the hybrid terms "kinetic basicity" and "kinetic acidity" by "protophilicity" and "protofugality", respectively; in this way, the terms "acidity" and "basicity" are exclusively assigned to thermodynamic properties, while "philicity" and "fugality" refer to kinetics

  6. Tracking Controller for Intrinsic Output Saturated Systems in Presence of Amplitude and Rate Input Saturations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chater, E.; Giri, F.; Guerrero, Josep M.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the problem of controlling plants that are subject to multiple saturation constraints. Especially, we are interested in linear systems whose input is subject to amplitude and rate constraints of saturation type. Furthermore, the considered systems output is also subject to an intrinsi...

  7. Femoral venous oxygen saturation is no surrogate for central venous oxygen saturation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beest, Paul A.; van der Schors, Alice; Liefers, Henriette; Coenen, Ludo G. J.; Braam, Richard L.; Habib, Najib; Braber, Annemarije; Scheeren, Thomas W. L.; Kuiper, Michael A.; Spronk, Peter E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective:  The purpose of our study was to determine if central venous oxygen saturation and femoral venous oxygen saturation can be used interchangeably during surgery and in critically ill patients. Design:  Prospective observational controlled study. Setting:  Nonacademic university-affiliated

  8. Saturated poroelastic actuators generated by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Casper Schousboe; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the fluid-structure interaction problem of a saturated porous media is considered. The pressure coupling properties of porous saturated materials change with the microstructure and this is utilized in the design of an actuator using a topology optimized porous material. By maximizing...... the coupling of internal fluid pressure and elastic shear stresses a slab of the optimized porous material deflects/deforms when a pressure is imposed and an actuator is created. Several phenomenologically based constraints are imposed in order to get a stable force transmitting actuator....

  9. On the saturation of astrophysical dynamos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil; Archontis, Vasilis

    2004-01-01

    In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate in the li......In the context of astrophysical dynamos we illustrate that the no-cosines flow, with zero mean helicity, can drive fast dynamo action and we study the dynamo's mode of operation during both the linear and non-linear saturation regimes. It turns out that in addition to a high growth rate...

  10. Discontinuities in hygroscopic growth below and above water saturation for laboratory surrogates of oligomers in organic atmospheric aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Hodas

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Discontinuities in apparent hygroscopicity below and above water saturation have been observed for organic and mixed organic–inorganic aerosol particles in both laboratory studies and in the ambient atmosphere. However, uncertainty remains regarding the factors that contribute to observations of low hygroscopic growth below water saturation but enhanced cloud condensation nuclei (CCN activity for a given aerosol population. Utilizing laboratory surrogates for oligomers in atmospheric aerosols, we explore the extent to which such discontinuities are influenced by organic component molecular mass and viscosity, non-ideal thermodynamic interactions between aerosol components, and the combination of these factors. Measurements of hygroscopic growth under subsaturated conditions and the CCN activity of aerosols comprised of polyethylene glycol (PEG with average molecular masses ranging from 200 to 10 000 g mol−1 and mixtures of PEG with ammonium sulfate (AS were conducted. Experimental results are compared to calculations of hygroscopic growth at thermodynamic equilibrium conducted with the Aerosol Inorganic Organic Mixtures Functional groups Activity Coefficients (AIOMFAC model, and the potential influence of kinetic limitations on observed water uptake was further explored through estimations of water diffusivity in the PEG oligomers. Particle-phase behavior, including the prevalence of liquid–liquid phase separation (LLPS, was also modeled with AIOMFAC. Under subsaturated relative humidity (RH conditions, we observed little variability in hygroscopic growth across PEG systems with different molecular masses; however, an increase in CCN activity with increasing PEG molecular mass was observed. This effect is most pronounced for PEG–AS mixtures, and, in fact, an enhancement in CCN activity was observed for the PEG10000–AS mixture as compared to pure AS, as evidenced by a 15 % reduction in critical activation diameter at a

  11. Evaluation of the Performance of Grouting Materials for Saturated Riprap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehyeon Kim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, four types of grout were developed to evaluate the effect of grouting of saturated riprap layers on ground water flow. The developed types of grout are divided into a quick-setting type and a general-type, and also into high and low viscosities. A number of grout tests were performed in a model acrylic chamber, 0.4 m in diameter and 2.0 m in length, for visual observation of injection. To reproduce the field flow condition of the saturated riprap layers (approach flow, the grout tests were carried out at 0 cm/s and 100 cm/s for the flow speed and 10 L/min for the grout injection speed after installing a flow injection opening on the lower part of the chamber. Based on the results of the grout tests, the injection of each grout in the saturated riprap layers was examined to find out the most effective grout.

  12. Role of non-equilibrium conformations on driven polymer translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, H. H.; Muthukumar, M.

    2018-01-01

    One of the major theoretical methods in understanding polymer translocation through a nanopore is the Fokker-Planck formalism based on the assumption of quasi-equilibrium of polymer conformations. The criterion for applicability of the quasi-equilibrium approximation for polymer translocation is that the average translocation time per Kuhn segment, ⟨τ⟩/NK, is longer than the relaxation time τ0 of the polymer. Toward an understanding of conditions that would satisfy this criterion, we have performed coarse-grained three dimensional Langevin dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics simulations. We have studied the role of initial conformations of a polyelectrolyte chain (which were artificially generated with a flow field) on the kinetics of its translocation across a nanopore under the action of an externally applied transmembrane voltage V (in the absence of the initial flow field). Stretched (out-of-equilibrium) polyelectrolyte chain conformations are deliberately and systematically generated and used as initial conformations in translocation simulations. Independent simulations are performed to study the relaxation behavior of these stretched chains, and a comparison is made between the relaxation time scale and the mean translocation time (⟨τ⟩). For such artificially stretched initial states, ⟨τ⟩/NK theory of polyelectrolyte dynamics reveals that the Zimm relaxation time (τZimm) is shorter than the mean translocation time for several polymers including single stranded DNA (ssDNA), double stranded DNA (dsDNA), and synthetic polymers. Even when these data are rescaled assuming a constant effective velocity of translocation, it is found that for flexible (ssDNA and synthetic) polymers with NK Kuhn segments, the condition ⟨τ⟩/NK < τZimm is satisfied. We predict that for flexible polymers such as ssDNA, a crossover from quasi-equilibrium to non-equilibrium behavior would occur at NK ˜ O(1000).

  13. Colin Rowe and ' Dynamic Equilibrium'

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo López Marín

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIn 1944 Gyorgy Kepes published what undoubtless will be his most influential text, "The language of vision". What Kepes tried to do was a guide of grammar and syntax of vision, which allows to face art as purely sensory experience or just visual, devisted of any literary , semantic or sentimental meaning.Among all the concepts that Kepes developes in his essay perhaps the most decisive one is the so called dynamic equilibrium, which is introduced in this work for fi rst time, verbalizing something that was in the air, orbiting around the entire modern plastic but far only explained in an empirical way.Colin Rowe reverberates the recent readed kepesian ideas on his own writings Transparency: Literal and Phenomenal and Neo-'Classicism' and Modern Architecture I and II, when the author tries to highlight the founding principles of the modern movement refusing the plastic  dimension of the discipline . The article will try to expose and explain this influence.

  14. Experimental investigation of non-equilibrium thermal-hydraulic processes in a new passive VVER core reflooding system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergey G Kalyakin; Andrey V Morozov; Oleg V Remizov; Alexandr A Tzyganok [State Scientific Center of Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering by A.I. Leypunsky, IPPE, 1, Bondarenko sq., Obninsk, 249030 (Russian Federation)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the systems of passive reactor cooling and core reflooding from above under accident conditions, the cold water flows out into countercurrent steam flow; that is, the direct contact between steam and liquid occurs simultaneously over all cross-sections of pipes/closed spaces. The process is complicated by additional effect of steam condensation and droplet flow towards the steam flow. The processes of heat and mass transfer proceed simultaneously at variable liquid level. These factors give rise to a nonsteady, non-equilibrium two-phase flow. The operating conditions of such a non-steady process, the main of which being the time of closed water volume dump (or the flow coefficient), can be obtained only experimentally. The present work is devoted to the experimental investigations of the interaction of saturated steam with cold water at its flowing out from a closed space with a variable level and some characteristics of dynamic two-phase layer at the steam/liquid interface. With reference to the system of passive heat removal from VVER core, the processes of interaction of saturated steam, steam-water mixture, and air with cold water at its flowing out from a vertical plugged pipe with an internal diameter of 50 and 100 mm have been studied at a pressure of 0.5 MPa. It has been stated experimentally that the dump rate of subcooled water from a plugged pipe into steam is nearly an order of magnitude less than that into non-condensable gas media. The semi-empirical correlation describing the processes of water outflow from plugged pipes into steam is of the form of: W-bar = C{sub 0} {radical}(gd), where C{sub 0} is the dimensionless constant, d is the pipe internal diameter, m, g = 9.81 m/s{sup 2}. (authors)

  15. Equilibrium configurations of a cable drogue system towed in a helical motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Y.; Manor, H.

    The dynamical equilibrium configuration of a system consisting of a drogue attached to a towed flexible cable is examined for the particular case depicted by a helical vertical descent. The motion equations, together with boundary conditions, were solved numerically after nondimensional treatment, and a region was found where results are of multivalued nature. Different cable configurations in dynamic equilibrium conditions were presented; the influence of constrained factors such as angular velocity, radius of towpoint and vertical rate of descent are discussed.

  16. Sulfur Saturation Limits in Silicate Melts and their Implications for Core Formation Scenarios for Terrestrial Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzheid, Astrid; Grove, Timothy L.

    2002-01-01

    This study explores the controls of temperature, pressure, and silicate melt composition on S solubility in silicate liquids. The solubility of S in FeO-containing silicate melts in equilibrium with metal sulfide increases significantly with increasing temperature but decreases with increasing pressure. The silicate melt structure also exercises a control on S solubility. Increasing the degree of polymerization of the silicate melt structure lowers the S solubility in the silicate liquid. The new set of experimental data is used to expand the model of Mavrogenes and O'Neill(1999) for S solubility in silicate liquids by incorporating the influence of the silicate melt structure. The expected S solubility in the ascending magma is calculated using the expanded model. Because the negative pressure dependence of S solubility is more influential than the positive temperature dependence, decompression and adiabatic ascent of a formerly S-saturated silicate magma will lead to S undersaturation. A primitive magma that is S-saturated in its source region will, therefore, become S-undersaturated as it ascends to shallower depth. In order to precipitate magmatic sulfides, the magma must first cool and undergo fractional crystallization to reach S saturation. The S content in a metallic liquid that is in equilibrium with a magma ocean that contains approx. 200 ppm S (i.e., Earth's bulk mantle S content) ranges from 5.5 to 12 wt% S. This range of S values encompasses the amount of S (9 to 12 wt%) that would be present in the outer core if S is the light element. Thus, the Earth's proto-mantle could be in equilibrium (in terms of the preserved S abundance) with a core-forming metallic phase.

  17. Non-equilibrium modelling of distillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesselingh, JA; Darton, R

    1997-01-01

    There are nasty conceptual problems in the classical way of describing distillation columns via equilibrium stages, and efficiencies or HETP's. We can nowadays avoid these problems by simulating the behaviour of a complete column in one go using a non-equilibrium model. Such a model has phase

  18. Approximate Equilibrium Problems and Fixed Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Mazaheri

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We find a common element of the set of fixed points of a map and the set of solutions of an approximate equilibrium problem in a Hilbert space. Then, we show that one of the sequences weakly converges. Also we obtain some theorems about equilibrium problems and fixed points.

  19. Equilibrium theory of island biogeography: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angela D. Yu; Simon A. Lei

    2001-01-01

    The topography, climatic pattern, location, and origin of islands generate unique patterns of species distribution. The equilibrium theory of island biogeography creates a general framework in which the study of taxon distribution and broad island trends may be conducted. Critical components of the equilibrium theory include the species-area relationship, island-...

  20. The Equilibrium of Life-Career Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byars-Winston, Angela

    Over a 100 years ago, fixed wing aircraft flight was made possible by Orville and Wilbur Wright's breakthrough invention of a three-axis control that allowed effective steering and maintenance of airplanes' equilibrium. The significance of the Wright brothers' control invention is that it facilitated recovery of lateral balance, or equilibrium, when the wind tilts the aircraft to one side or another.

  1. equilibrium approach in thederivation of differential equations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    In this paper, the differential equations of Mindlin plates are derived from basic principles by simultaneous satisfaction of the differential equations of equilibrium, the stress-strain laws and the strain-displacement relations for isotropic, homogenous linear elastic materials. Equilibrium method was adopted in the derivation.

  2. Do intertidal flats ever reach equilibrium?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maan, D.C.; van Prooijen, B.C.; Wang, Z.B.; de Vriend, H.J.

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have identified a strong relation between the hydrodynamic forces and the equilibrium profile for intertidal flats. A thorough understanding of the interplay between the hydrodynamic forces and the morphology, however, concerns more than the equilibrium state alone. We study the

  3. A Holistic Equilibrium Theory of Organization Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Baiyin; Zheng, Wei

    2005-01-01

    This paper proposes a holistic equilibrium theory of organizational development (OD). The theory states that there are three driving forces in organizational change and development--rationality, reality, and liberty. OD can be viewed as a planned process of change in an organization so as to establish equilibrium among these three interacting…

  4. Implementing an Equilibrium Law Teaching Sequence for Secondary School Students to Learn Chemical Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardi, Marco; Marchetti, Fabio; Pettinari, Claudio; Regis, Alberto; Roletto, Ezio

    2015-01-01

    A didactic sequence is proposed for the teaching of chemical equilibrium law. In this approach, we have avoided the kinetic derivation and the thermodynamic justification of the equilibrium constant. The equilibrium constant expression is established empirically by a trial-and-error approach. Additionally, students learn to use the criterion of…

  5. On the definition of equilibrium and non-equilibrium states in dynamical systems

    OpenAIRE

    Akimoto, Takuma

    2008-01-01

    We propose a definition of equilibrium and non-equilibrium states in dynamical systems on the basis of the time average. We show numerically that there exists a non-equilibrium non-stationary state in the coupled modified Bernoulli map lattice.

  6. An SIRS Epidemic Model with Vital Dynamics and a Ratio-Dependent Saturation Incidence Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinli Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an investigation on the dynamics of an epidemic model with vital dynamics and a nonlinear incidence rate of saturated mass action as a function of the ratio of the number of the infectives to that of the susceptibles. The stabilities of the disease-free equilibrium and the endemic equilibrium are first studied. Under the assumption of nonexistence of periodic solution, the global dynamics of the model is established: either the number of infective individuals tends to zero as time evolves or it produces bistability in which there is a region such that the disease will persist if the initial position lies in the region and disappears if the initial position lies outside this region. Computer simulation shows such results.

  7. Synonymous nucleotide divergence: What is {open_quotes}saturation{close_quotes}?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, J.M.; Smith, N.H. [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The nucleotide divergence at synonymous third sites between two lineages will increase with time since the latest common ancestor, up to some saturation level. The {open_quotes}null-hypothesis divergence{close_quotes} is defined as the percentage of difference predicted at synonymous third sites, allowing for amino acid composition and codon bias, but assuming that codon bias is the same at all sites occupied by a given amino acid, when equilibrium has been reached between forward and backward substitutions. For two highly expressed genes, gapA and ompA, in the enterobacteria, the estimated values of the null-hypothesis divergence are 39.3 and 38.15%, respectively, compared to estimated values of saturation divergence of 19.0 and 25.4%. A possible explanation for this discrepancy is that different codons for a given amino acid are favored at different sites in the same gene. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Phase equilibrium measurements on nine binary mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilding, W.V. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.; Giles, N.F.; Wilson, L.C. [Wiltec Research Co. Inc., Provo, UT (United States)

    1996-11-01

    Phase equilibrium measurements have been performed on nine binary mixtures. The PTx method was used to obtain vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the following systems at two temperatures each: (aminoethyl)piperazine + diethylenetriamine; 2-butoxyethyl acetate + 2-butoxyethanol; 2-methyl-2-propanol + 2-methylbutane; 2-methyl-2-propanol + 2-methyl-2-butene; methacrylonitrile + methanol; 1-chloro-1,1-difluoroethane + hydrogen chloride; 2-(hexyloxy)ethanol + ethylene glycol; butane + ammonia; propionaldehyde + butane. Equilibrium vapor and liquid phase compositions were derived form the PTx data using the Soave equation of state to represent the vapor phase and the Wilson or the NRTL activity coefficient model to represent the liquid phase. A large immiscibility region exists in the butane + ammonia system at 0 C. Therefore, separate vapor-liquid-liquid equilibrium measurements were performed on this system to more precisely determine the miscibility limits and the composition of the vapor phase in equilibrium with the two liquid phases.

  9. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzà, F.; Vedral, V.

    2017-03-01

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  10. Information-theoretic equilibrium and observable thermalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzà, F; Vedral, V

    2017-03-07

    A crucial point in statistical mechanics is the definition of the notion of thermal equilibrium, which can be given as the state that maximises the von Neumann entropy, under the validity of some constraints. Arguing that such a notion can never be experimentally probed, in this paper we propose a new notion of thermal equilibrium, focused on observables rather than on the full state of the quantum system. We characterise such notion of thermal equilibrium for an arbitrary observable via the maximisation of its Shannon entropy and we bring to light the thermal properties that it heralds. The relation with Gibbs ensembles is studied and understood. We apply such a notion of equilibrium to a closed quantum system and show that there is always a class of observables which exhibits thermal equilibrium properties and we give a recipe to explicitly construct them. Eventually, an intimate connection with the Eigenstate Thermalisation Hypothesis is brought to light.

  11. Equilibrium, scale and inheritance in geomorphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahnert, Frank

    1994-12-01

    Of the many "equilibrium" terms that have been proposed, only two are needed: dynamic equilibrium in the original sense of G.K. Gilbert (1877) and steady state. The former refers to the relationship between the process components of a system, the latter to the system as a whole. The tendency towards establishing a dynamic equilibrium is inherent in all natural systems that contain negative feedbacks between processes capable of compensating each other. In geomorphology, equilibrium tendencies of the mass budget are more relevant than those of the energy budget. The validity of the equilibrium concept is discussed at several scales from a slope point to entire slopes, drainage basins and mountain ranges. The effects of eksystemic changes vary depending upon the length of the intervals between such changes in comparison to the length of the required relaxation times. This relationship also applies to the influence of inherited forms, patterns and materials that have become components of present-day systems.

  12. Simplified method for calculation of equilibrium plasma composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydalevskaya, Maria A.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a simplified method for the evaluation of equilibrium composition of plasmas consisted of monoatomic species is proposed. Multicomponent gas systems resulting from thermal ionization of spatially uniform mixtures are assumed enough rarefied to be treated as ideal gases even after multiple ionization steps. The method developed for the calculation of equilibrium composition of these mixtures makes use of the fundamental principles of statistical physics. Equilibrium concentrations of mixture components are determined by integration of distribution functions over the space of momentum and summation over electronic energy levels. These functions correspond to the entropy maximum. To determine unknown parameters, the systems of equations corresponding to the normalization conditions are derived. It is shown that the systems may be reduced to one algebraic equation if the equilibrium temperature is known. Numeral method to solve this equation is proposed. Special attention is given to the ionized mixtures, generated from the atoms of a single chemical species and the situations, when in the gas only the first- or the first- and second-order ionization are possible.

  13. Fullerene Transport in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    We investigated the effects of background solution chemistry and residence time within the soil column on the transport of aqu/C60 through saturated ultrapure quartz sand columns. Aqu/C60 breakthrough curves were obtained under different pore water velocities, solution pHs, and i...

  14. Oxygenation of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 118; Issue 5. Oxygenation of saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons with sodium periodate catalyzed by manganese(III) tetra-arylporphyrins, to study the axial ligation of imidazole. Reza Tayebee. Volume 118 Issue 5 September 2006 pp 429-433 ...

  15. Nasal pulse oximetry overestimates oxygen saturation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, J; Pedersen, M H

    1990-01-01

    Ten surgical patients were monitored with nasal and finger pulse oximetry (Nellcor N-200) for five study periods with alternating mouth and nasal breathing and switching of cables and sensors. Nasal pulse oximetry was found to overestimate arterial oxygen saturation by 4.7 (SD 1.4%) (bias...

  16. Determination of saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The estimation of hydraulic conductivity indicates how fluids flow through a substance and thus determine the water balance in the soil profile. In determining the saturated and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of soil, five plots of 5.0 x 4.0 m were prepared with a PVC access tube installed in each plot. The plots were ...

  17. Understanding 'saturation' of radar signals over forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Neha; Mitchard, Edward T A; Brolly, Matthew; Schumacher, Johannes; Fernández-Landa, Alfredo; Johannsen, Vivian Kvist; Marchamalo, Miguel; Fensholt, Rasmus

    2017-06-14

    There is an urgent need to quantify anthropogenic influence on forest carbon stocks. Using satellite-based radar imagery for such purposes has been challenged by the apparent loss of signal sensitivity to changes in forest aboveground volume (AGV) above a certain 'saturation' point. The causes of saturation are debated and often inadequately addressed, posing a major limitation to mapping AGV with the latest radar satellites. Using ground- and lidar-measurements across La Rioja province (Spain) and Denmark, we investigate how various properties of forest structure (average stem height, size and number density; proportion of canopy and understory cover) simultaneously influence radar backscatter. It is found that increases in backscatter due to changes in some properties (e.g. increasing stem sizes) are often compensated by equal magnitude decreases caused by other properties (e.g. decreasing stem numbers and increasing heights), contributing to the apparent saturation of the AGV-backscatter trend. Thus, knowledge of the impact of management practices and disturbances on forest structure may allow the use of radar imagery for forest biomass estimates beyond commonly reported saturation points.

  18. Wave propagation in thermoelastic saturated porous medium

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Biot 's theory for wave propagation in saturated porous solid is modified to study the propagation of thermoelastic waves in poroelastic medium. Propagation of plane harmonic waves is considered in isotropic poroelastic medium. Relations are derived among the wave-induced temperature in the medium and the ...

  19. Spontaneous emission from saturated parametric amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rottwitt, Karsten; Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Steffensen, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    Noise performance of parametric amplifiers is typically calculated assuming un-depleted operation. However, in many applications especially when applied as regenerative amplifiers in systems based on phase shift keyed modulation schemes, this assumption is not valid. Here we show the impact...... on accumulated spontaneous emission for a parametric amplifier operated in saturation....

  20. Elevated transferrin saturation and risk of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Andersen, Henrik Ullits

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We tested the hypothesis that elevated transferrin saturation is associated with an increased risk of any form of diabetes, as well as type 1 or type 2 diabetes separately. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We used two general population studies, The Copenhagen City Heart Study (CCHS, N = 9...

  1. Saturated fat, carbohydrates and cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, R. S.; de Graaf, D. J.; Luxwolda, M. F.; Muskiet, M. H. A.; Dijck-Brouwer, D. A. J.; Muskiet, F. A. J.

    The dietary intake of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) is associated with a modest increase in serum total cholesterol, but not with cardiovascular disease (CVD). Replacing dietary SAFA with carbohydrates (CHO), notably those with a high glycaemic index, is associated with an increase in CVD risk in

  2. Two-beam interaction in saturable media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schjødt-Eriksen, Jens; Schmidt, Michel R.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1998-01-01

    The dynamics of two coupled soliton solutions of the nonlinear Schrodinger equation with a saturable nonlinearity is investigated It is shown by means of a variational method and by direct numerical calculations that two well-separated solitons can orbit around each other, if their initial velocity...

  3. Synthesis and characterization of saturated polyester and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Saturated polyester resin, derived from the glycolysis of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET) was examined as an effective way for PET recycling. The glycolyzed PET (GPET) was reacted with the mixture of phthalic anhydride and ethylene glycol (EG) with varied compositions and their reaction kinetic were studied. During ...

  4. Multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savelieva, Tatiana A.; Stratonnikov, Aleksander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.

    2008-06-01

    The system of multi-spectral imaging of oxygen saturation is an instrument that can record both spectral and spatial information about a sample. In this project, the spectral imaging technique is used for monitoring of oxygen saturation of hemoglobin in human tissues. This system can be used for monitoring spatial distribution of oxygen saturation in photodynamic therapy, surgery or sports medicine. Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in the visible range is an effective and extensively used technique for the non-invasive study and characterization of various biological tissues. In this article, a short review of modeling techniques being currently in use for diffuse reflection from semi-infinite turbid media is presented. A simple and practical model for use with a real-time imaging system is proposed. This model is based on linear approximation of the dependence of the diffuse reflectance coefficient on relation between absorbance and reduced scattering coefficient. This dependence was obtained with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon propagation in turbid media. Spectra of the oxygenated and deoxygenated forms of hemoglobin differ mostly in the red area (520 - 600 nm) and have several characteristic points there. Thus four band-pass filters were used for multi-spectral imaging. After having measured the reflectance, the data obtained are used for fitting the concentration of oxygenated and free hemoglobin, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation.

  5. Nash Equilibrium in Rent-Seeking Games with Endogenous Rent

    OpenAIRE

    Koji, Okuguchi; 岐阜聖徳学園大学経済情報学会

    1999-01-01

    We formulate one-stage and two-stage rent seeking games with endogenously determined rent. Under reasonable assumptions, both games have a unique pure Nash equilibrium. We derive conditions for aggregate efforts to increase and for the total rent to dissipate as the number of agents increase for the two-stage rent-seeking game. JEL Classification Number: D72, L13, D43, C71, C64,

  6. Mechanical equilibrium of two-component gas mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Gorbunov, A. A.; Kryukov, A. P.; Levashov, V. Yu

    2013-01-01

    Evaporation of liquid into a vapor-gas mixture is interesting and important process as for fundamental research and for different applications. In general, the rate at which a liquid evaporates is dependent on the transport of mass and energy occurring within both the liquid and vapor phases. This study is carried out on the base of continuum conservation equations for two-component medium. At the beginning the stability conditions for mechanical equilibrium are deduced. This paper is devoted...

  7. TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal MultiphaseReactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated GeologicMedia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-12-07

    TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase fluid and heat flow simulator TOUGH2. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, ionic strength, and pH and Eh. Interactions between mineral assemblages and fluids can occur under local equilibrium or kinetic rates. The gas phase can be chemically active. Precipitation and dissolution reactions can change formation porosity and permeability. The program can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. Here we present two examples to illustrate applicability of the program: (1) injectivity effects of mineral scaling in a fractured geothermal reservoir and (2) CO2 disposal in a deep saline aquifer.

  8. Microscopic analysis of saturable absorbers: Semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors versus graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hader, J.; Moloney, J. V. [Nonlinear Control Strategies, Inc., 3542 N. Geronimo Ave., Tucson, Arizona 85705 (United States); College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Yang, H.-J.; Scheller, M. [College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Koch, S. W. [Department of Physics and Materials Sciences Center, Philipps Universität Marburg, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany)

    2016-02-07

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to study the influence of strong sub-picosecond pulses on the carrier distributions and corresponding optical response in saturable absorbers used for mode-locking—semiconductor (quantum well) saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) and single layer graphene based saturable absorber mirrors (GSAMs). Unlike in GSAMs, the saturation fluence and recovery time in SESAMs show a strong spectral dependence. While the saturation fluence in the SESAM is minimal at the excitonic bandgap, the optimal recovery time and least pulse distortion due to group delay dispersion are found for excitation higher in the first subband. For excitation near the SESAM bandgap, the saturation fluence is about one tenth of that in the GSAM. At energies above the bandgap, the fluences in both systems become similar. A strong dependence of the saturation fluence on the pulse width in both systems is caused by carrier relaxation during the pulse. The recovery time in graphene is found to be about two to four times faster than that in the SESAMs. The occurrence of negative differential transmission in graphene is shown to be caused by dopant related carriers. In SESAMs, a negative differential transmission is found when exciting below the excitonic resonance where excitation induced dephasing leads to an enhancement of the absorption. Comparisons of the simulation data to the experiment show a very good quantitative agreement.

  9. Microscopic analysis of saturable absorbers: Semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors versus graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hader, J.; Yang, H.-J.; Scheller, M.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2016-02-01

    Fully microscopic many-body calculations are used to study the influence of strong sub-picosecond pulses on the carrier distributions and corresponding optical response in saturable absorbers used for mode-locking—semiconductor (quantum well) saturable absorber mirrors (SESAMs) and single layer graphene based saturable absorber mirrors (GSAMs). Unlike in GSAMs, the saturation fluence and recovery time in SESAMs show a strong spectral dependence. While the saturation fluence in the SESAM is minimal at the excitonic bandgap, the optimal recovery time and least pulse distortion due to group delay dispersion are found for excitation higher in the first subband. For excitation near the SESAM bandgap, the saturation fluence is about one tenth of that in the GSAM. At energies above the bandgap, the fluences in both systems become similar. A strong dependence of the saturation fluence on the pulse width in both systems is caused by carrier relaxation during the pulse. The recovery time in graphene is found to be about two to four times faster than that in the SESAMs. The occurrence of negative differential transmission in graphene is shown to be caused by dopant related carriers. In SESAMs, a negative differential transmission is found when exciting below the excitonic resonance where excitation induced dephasing leads to an enhancement of the absorption. Comparisons of the simulation data to the experiment show a very good quantitative agreement.

  10. Effect of organic matter on CO(2) hydrate phase equilibrium in phyllosilicate suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taehyung; Kyung, Daeseung; Lee, Woojin

    2014-06-17

    In this study, we examined various CO2 hydrate phase equilibria under diverse, heterogeneous conditions, to provide basic knowledge for successful ocean CO2 sequestration in offshore marine sediments. We investigated the effect of geochemical factors on CO2 hydrate phase equilibrium. The three-phase (liquid-hydrate-vapor) equilibrium of CO2 hydrate in the presence of (i) organic matter (glycine, glucose, and urea), (ii) phyllosilicates [illite, kaolinite, and Na-montmorillonite (Na-MMT)], and (iii) mixtures of them was measured in the ranges of 274.5-277.0 K and 14-22 bar. Organic matter inhibited the phase equilibrium of CO2 hydrate by association with water molecules. The inhibition effect decreased in the order: urea phase equilibrium, while Na-MMT (expandable clay) affected the phase equilibrium because of its interlayer cations. The CO2 hydrate equilibrium conditions, in the illite and kaolinite suspensions with organic matter, were very similar to those in the aqueous organic matter solutions. However, the equilibrium condition in the Na-MMT suspension with organic matter changed because of reduction of its inhibition effect by intercalated organic matter associated with cations in the Na-MMT interlayer.

  11. Experimental study on distributed optical fiber-based approach monitoring saturation line in levee engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huaizhi; Li, Hao; Kang, Yeyuan; Wen, Zhiping

    2018-02-01

    Seepage is one of key factors which affect the levee engineering safety. The seepage danger without timely detection and rapid response may likely lead to severe accidents such as seepage failure, slope instability, and even levee break. More than 90 percent of levee break events are caused by the seepage. It is very important for seepage behavior identification to determine accurately saturation line in levee engineering. Furthermore, the location of saturation line has a major impact on slope stability in levee engineering. Considering the structure characteristics and service condition of levee engineering, the distributed optical fiber sensing technology is introduced to implement the real-time observation of saturation line in levee engineering. The distributed optical fiber temperature sensor system (DTS)-based monitoring principle of saturation line in levee engineering is investigated. An experimental platform, which consists of DTS, heating system, water-supply system, auxiliary analysis system and levee model, is designed and constructed. The monitoring experiment of saturation line in levee model is implemented on this platform. According to the experimental results, the numerical relationship between moisture content and thermal conductivity in porous medium is identified. A line heat source-based distributed optical fiber method obtaining the thermal conductivity in porous medium is developed. A DTS-based approach is proposed to monitor the saturation line in levee engineering. The embedment pattern of optical fiber for monitoring saturation line is presented.

  12. A thermodynamic data base for Tc to calculate equilibrium solubilities at temperatures up to 300 deg C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puigdomenech, I. [Studsvik AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Bruno, J. [Intera Information Technologies SL, Cerdanyola (Spain)

    1995-04-01

    Thermodynamic data has been selected for solids and aqueous species of technetium. Equilibrium constants have been calculated in the temperature range 0 to 300 deg C at a pressure of 1 bar for T<100 deg C and at the steam saturated pressure at higher temperatures. For aqueous species, the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers model is used for temperature extrapolations. The data base contains a large amount of estimated data, and the methods used for these estimations are described in detail. A new equation is presented that allows the estimation of {Delta}{sub r}Cdeg{sub pm} values for mononuclear hydrolysis reactions. The formation constants for chloro complexes of Tc(V) and Tc(IV), whose existence is well established, have been estimated. The majority of entropy and heat capacity values in the data base have also been estimated, and therefore temperature extrapolations are largely based on estimations. The uncertainties derived from these calculations are described. Using the data base developed in this work, technetium solubilities have been calculated as a function of temperature for different chemical conditions. The implications for the mobility of Tc under nuclear repository conditions are discussed. 70 refs.

  13. Time-Dependent Variational Inequality for an Oligopolistic Market Equilibrium Problem with Production and Demand Excesses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria Barbagallo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is concerned with the variational formulation of the oligopolistic market equilibrium problem in presence of both production and demand excesses. In particular, we generalize a previous model in which the authors, instead, considered only the problem with production excesses, by allowing also the presence of demand excesses. First we examine the equilibrium conditions in terms of the well-known dynamic Cournot-Nash principle. Next, the equilibrium conditions will be expressed in terms of Lagrange multipliers by means of the infinite dimensional duality theory. Then, we show the equivalence between the two conditions that are both expressed by an appropriate evolutionary variational inequality. Moreover, thanks to the variational formulation, some existence and regularity results for equilibrium solutions are proved. At last, a numerical example, which illustrates the features of the problem, is provided.

  14. Reaction Equilibrium of the ω-Transamination of (S)-Phenylethylamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voges, Matthias; Abu, Rohana; Deslauriers, Maria Gundersen

    2017-01-01

    This work focuses on the thermodynamic equilibrium of the ω-transaminase-catalyzed reaction of (S)-phenylethylamine with cyclohexanone to acetophenone and cyclohexylamine in aqueous solution. For this purpose, the equilibrium concentrations of the reaction were experimentally investigated under...... varying reaction conditions. It was observed that the temperature (30 and 37 °C), the pH (between pH 7 and pH 9), as well as the initial reactant concentrations (between 5 and 50 mmol·kg-1) influenced the equilibrium position of the reaction. The position of the reaction equilibrium was moderately shifted...... position to the reactant side. In order to explain these effects, the activity coefficients of the reacting agents were calculated and the activity-based thermodynamic equilibrium constant Kth of the reaction was determined. For this purpose, the activity coefficients of the reacting agents were modeled...

  15. Multimodal Network Equilibrium with Stochastic Travel Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The private car, unlike public traffic modes (e.g., subway, trolley running along dedicated track-ways, is invariably subject to various uncertainties resulting in travel time variation. A multimodal network equilibrium model is formulated that explicitly considers stochastic link capacity variability in the road network. The travel time of combined-mode trips is accumulated based on the concept of the mean excess travel time (METT which is a summation of estimated buffer time and tardy time. The problem is characterized by an equivalent VI (variational inequality formulation where the mode choice is expressed in a hierarchical logit structure. Specifically, the supernetwork theory and expansion technique are used herein to represent the multimodal transportation network, which completely represents the combined-mode trips as constituting multiple modes within a trip. The method of successive weighted average is adopted for problem solutions. The model and solution method are further applied to study the trip distribution and METT variations caused by the different levels of the road conditions. Results of numerical examples show that travelers prefer to choose the combined travel mode as road capacity decreases. Travelers with different attitudes towards risk are shown to exhibit significant differences when making travel choice decisions.

  16. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Transcriptional Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Lemus, Enrique

    Gene transcription or Gene Expression (GE) is the process which transforms the information encoded in DNA into a functional RNA message. It is known that GE can occur in bursts or pulses. Transcription is irregular, with strong periods of activity, interspersed by long periods of inactivity. If we consider the average behavior over millions of cells, this process appears to be continuous. But at the individual cell level, there is considerable variability, and for most genes, very little activity at any one time. Some have claimed that GE bursting can account for the high variability in gene expression occurring between cells in isogenic populations. This variability has a big impact on cell behavior and thus on phenotypic conditions and disease. In view of these facts, the development of a thermodynamic framework to study gene expression and transcriptional regulation to integrate the vast amount of molecular biophysical GE data is appealing. Application of such thermodynamic formalism is useful to observe various dissipative phenomena in GE regulatory dynamics. In this chapter we will examine at some detail the complex phenomena of transcriptional bursts (specially of a certain class of anomalous bursts) in the context of a non-equilibrium thermodynamics formalism and will make some initial comments on the relevance of some irreversible processes that may be connected to anomalous transcriptional bursts.

  17. Binding Energy and Equilibrium of Compact Objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germano M.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical analysis of the existence of a limit mass for compact astronomic ob- jects requires the solution of the Einstein’s equations of g eneral relativity together with an appropriate equation of state. Analytical solutions exi st in some special cases like the spherically symmetric static object without energy sou rces that is here considered. Solutions, i.e. the spacetime metrics, can have a singular m athematical form (the so called Schwarzschild metric due to Hilbert or a nonsingula r form (original work of Schwarzschild. The former predicts a limit mass and, conse quently, the existence of black holes above this limit. Here it is shown that, the origi nal Schwarzschild met- ric permits compact objects, without mass limit, having rea sonable values for central density and pressure. The lack of a limit mass is also demonst rated analytically just imposing reasonable conditions on the energy-matter densi ty, of positivity and decreas- ing with radius. Finally the ratio between proper mass and to tal mass tends to 2 for high values of mass so that the binding energy reaches the lim it m (total mass seen by a distant observer. As it is known the negative binding energ y reduces the gravitational mass of the object; the limit of m for the binding energy provides a mechanism for stable equilibrium of any amount of mass to contrast the gravitatio nal collapse.

  18. Existence and Linear Stability of Equilibrium Points in the Robe’s Restricted Three-Body Problem with Oblateness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadish Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the positions and linear stability of an infinitesimal body around the equilibrium points in the framework of the Robe’s circular restricted three-body problem, with assumptions that the hydrostatic equilibrium figure of the first primary is an oblate spheroid and the second primary is an oblate body as well. It is found that equilibrium point exists near the centre of the first primary. Further, there can be one more equilibrium point on the line joining the centers of both primaries. Points on the circle within the first primary are also equilibrium points under certain conditions and the existence of two out-of-plane points is also observed. The linear stability of this configuration is examined and it is found that points near the center of the first primary are conditionally stable, while the circular and out of plane equilibrium points are unstable.

  19. Replacing foods high in saturated fat by low-saturated fat alternatives: a computer simulation of the potential effects on reduction of saturated fat consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schickenberg, B.; Assema, P.; Brug, J.; Verkaik-Kloosterman, J.; Ocke, M.C.; Vries, de N.

    2009-01-01

    10 en%) increased from 23.3 % to 86.0 %. We conclude that the replacement of relatively few important high-saturated fat products by available lower-saturated fat alternatives can significantly reduce saturated fat intake and increase the proportion of individuals complying with recommended intake

  20. Gaussian random bridges and a geometric model for information equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengütürk, Levent Ali

    2018-03-01

    The paper introduces a class of conditioned stochastic processes that we call Gaussian random bridges (GRBs) and proves some of their properties. Due to the anticipative representation of any GRB as the sum of a random variable and a Gaussian (T , 0) -bridge, GRBs can model noisy information processes in partially observed systems. In this spirit, we propose an asset pricing model with respect to what we call information equilibrium in a market with multiple sources of information. The idea is to work on a topological manifold endowed with a metric that enables us to systematically determine an equilibrium point of a stochastic system that can be represented by multiple points on that manifold at each fixed time. In doing so, we formulate GRB-based information diversity over a Riemannian manifold and show that it is pinned to zero over the boundary determined by Dirac measures. We then define an influence factor that controls the dominance of an information source in determining the best estimate of a signal in the L2-sense. When there are two sources, this allows us to construct information equilibrium as a functional of a geodesic-valued stochastic process, which is driven by an equilibrium convergence rate representing the signal-to-noise ratio. This leads us to derive price dynamics under what can be considered as an equilibrium probability measure. We also provide a semimartingale representation of Markovian GRBs associated with Gaussian martingales and a non-anticipative representation of fractional Brownian random bridges that can incorporate degrees of information coupling in a given system via the Hurst exponent.

  1. Global dynamics of non-equilibrium gliding in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeaton, Isaac J; Socha, John J; Ross, Shane D

    2017-03-17

    Gliding flight-moving horizontally downward through the air without power-has evolved in a broad diversity of taxa and serves numerous ecologically relevant functions such as predator escape, expanding foraging locations, and finding mates, and has been suggested as an evolutionary pathway to powered flight. Historically, gliding has been conceptualized using the idealized conditions of equilibrium, in which the net aerodynamic force on the glider balances its weight. While this assumption is appealing for its simplicity, recent studies of glide trajectories have shown that equilibrium gliding is not the norm for most species. Furthermore, equilibrium theory neglects the aerodynamic differences between species, as well as how a glider can modify its glide path using control. To investigate non-equilibrium glide behavior, we developed a reduced-order model of gliding that accounts for self-similarity in the equations of motion, such that the lift and drag characteristics alone determine the glide trajectory. From analysis of velocity polar diagrams of horizontal and vertical velocity from several gliding species, we find that pitch angle, the angle between the horizontal and chord line, is a control parameter that can be exploited to modulate glide angle and glide speed. Varying pitch results in changing locations of equilibrium glide configurations in the velocity polar diagram that govern passive glide dynamics. Such analyses provide a new mechanism of interspecies comparison and tools to understand experimentally-measured kinematics data and theory. In addition, this analysis suggests that the lift and drag characteristics of aerial and aquatic autonomous gliders can be engineered to passively alter glide trajectories with minimal control effort.

  2. Solvent Isotope-induced Equilibrium Perturbation for Isocitrate Lyase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartararo, Christine E.; Hadi, Timin; Cahill, Sean M.; Blanchard, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Isocitrate lyase (ICL) catalyzes the reversible retro-aldol cleavage of isocitrate to generate glyoxylate and succinate. ICL is the first enzyme of the glyoxylate shunt, which allows for the anaplerosis of citric acid cycle intermediates under nutrient limiting conditions. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the source of ICL for these studies, ICL is vital for the persistence phase of the bacteria’s life cycle. Solvent kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) in the direction of isocitrate cleavage of D2OV = 2.0 ± 0.1 and D2O[V/Kisocitrate] = 2.2 ± 0.3 arise from the initial deprotonation of the C2 hydroxyl group of isocitrate or the protonation of the aci-acid of succinate product of the isocitrate aldol cleavage by a solvent-derived proton. This KIE suggested that an equilibrium mixture of all protiated isocitrate, glyoxylate and succinate prepared in D2O, would undergo transient changes in equilibrium concentrations as a result of the solvent KIE and solvent-derived deuterium incorporation into both succinate and isocitrate. No change in the isotopic composition of glyoxylate was expected or observed. We have directly monitored the changing concentrations of all isotopic species of all reactants and products using a combination of NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Continuous monitoring of glyoxylate by 1H NMR spectroscopy shows a clear equilibrium perturbation in D2O. The final equilibrium isotopic composition of reactants in D2O revealed di-deuterated succinate, protiated glyoxylate, and mono-deuterated isocitrate, with the transient appearance and disappearance of mono-deuterated succinate. A model for the equilibrium perturbation of substrate species, and their time-dependent isotopic composition is presented. PMID:24261638

  3. Saturated Zone In-Situ Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. W. Reimus; M. J. Umari

    2003-12-23

    The purpose of this scientific analysis is to document the results and interpretations of field experiments that have been conducted to test and validate conceptual flow and radionuclide transport models in the saturated zone (SZ) near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations provide estimates of flow and transport parameters that are used in the development of parameter distributions for Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations. These parameter distributions are documented in the revisions to the SZ flow model report (BSC 2003 [ 162649]), the SZ transport model report (BSC 2003 [ 162419]), the SZ colloid transport report (BSC 2003 [162729]), and the SZ transport model abstraction report (BSC 2003 [1648701]). Specifically, this scientific analysis report provides the following information that contributes to the assessment of the capability of the SZ to serve as a barrier for waste isolation for the Yucca Mountain repository system: (1) The bases for selection of conceptual flow and transport models in the saturated volcanics and the saturated alluvium located near Yucca Mountain. (2) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated fractured volcanics at the C-wells complex near Yucca Mountain. The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, anisotropy in hydraulic conductivity, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, matrix diffusion coefficients, fracture apertures, and colloid transport parameters. (3) Results and interpretations of hydraulic and tracer tests conducted in saturated alluvium at the Alluvium Testing Complex (ATC), which is located at the southwestern corner of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The test interpretations include estimates of hydraulic conductivities, storativities, total porosities, effective porosities, longitudinal dispersivities, matrix diffusion mass transfer coefficients, and

  4. Mixed quantum-classical equilibrium: Surface hopping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, J R; Parandekar, Priya V; Tully, John C

    2008-07-28

    We re-examine the analysis of the equilibrium limits of the fewest switches surface hopping algorithm for mixed quantum-classical dynamics. In contrast with previously reported results, we show that surface hopping does not, in general, exactly yield Boltzmann equilibrium, but that in practice the observed deviations are quite small. We also demonstrate that surface hopping does approach the exact equilibrium distribution in both the limits of small adiabatic splitting and/or strong nonadiabatic coupling. We verify these analytical results with numerical simulations for a simple two-level quantum system connected to a bath of classical particles.

  5. Binary systems from quantum cluster equilibrium theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brüssel, Marc; Perlt, Eva; Lehmann, Sebastian B C; von Domaros, Michael; Kirchner, Barbara

    2011-11-21

    An extension of the quantum cluster equilibrium theory to treat binary mixtures is introduced in this work. The necessary equations are derived and a possible implementation is presented. In addition an alternative sampling procedure using widely available experimental data for the quantum cluster equilibrium approach is suggested and tested. An illustrative example, namely, the binary mixture of water and dimethyl sulfoxide, is given to demonstrate the new approach. A basic cluster set is introduced containing the relevant cluster motifs. The populations computed by the quantum cluster equilibrium approach are compared to the experimental data. Furthermore, the excess Gibbs free energy is computed and compared to experiments as well.

  6. Statistical optimization of effective parameters on saturation magnetization of nanomagnetite particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramimoghadam, Donya; Bagheri, Samira; Yousefi, Amin Termeh; Abd Hamid, Sharifah Bee

    2015-11-01

    In this study, nanomagnetite particles have been successfully prepared via the coprecipitation method. The effect of the key explanatory variables on the saturation magnetization of synthetic nanomagnetite particles was investigated using the response surface methodology (RSM). The correlation of the involved parameters with the growth process was examined by employing the central composite design method through designating set up experiments that will determine the interaction of the variables. The vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) was used to confirm the statistical analysis. Furthermore, the regression analysis monitors the priority of the variables' influence on the saturation magnetization of nanomagnetite particles by developing the statistical model of the saturation magnetization. According to the investigated model, the highest interaction of variable belongs to the pH and temperature with the optimized condition of 9-11, and 75-85 °C, respectively. The response obtained by VSM suggests that the saturation magnetization of nanomagnetite particles can be controlled by restricting the effective parameters.

  7. Comparison of pulseoximetry oxygen saturation and arterial oxygen saturation in open heart intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mahoori

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulseoximetry is widely used in the critical care setting, currently used to guide therapeutic interventions. Few studies have evaluated the accuracy of SPO2 (puls-eoximetry oxygen saturation in intensive care unit after cardiac surgery. Our objective was to compare pulseoximetry with arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2 during clinical routine in such patients, and to examine the effect of mild acidosis on this relationship.Methods: In an observational prospective study 80 patients were evaluated in intensive care unit after cardiac surgery. SPO2 was recorded and compared with SaO2 obtained by blood gas analysis. One or serial arterial blood gas analyses (ABGs were performed via a radial artery line while a reliable pulseoximeter signal was present. One hundred thirty seven samples were collected and for each blood gas analyses, SaO2 and SPO2 we recorded.Results: O2 saturation as a marker of peripheral perfusion was measured by Pulseoxim-etry (SPO2. The mean difference between arterial oxygen saturation and pulseoximetry oxygen saturation was 0.12%±1.6%. A total of 137 paired readings demonstrated good correlation (r=0.754; P<0.0001 between changes in SPO2 and those in SaO2 in samples with normal hemoglobin. Also in forty seven samples with mild acidosis, paired readings demonstrated good correlation (r=0.799; P<0.0001 and the mean difference between SaO2 and SPO2 was 0.05%±1.5%.Conclusion: Data showed that in patients with stable hemodynamic and good signal quality, changes in pulseoximetry oxygen saturation reliably predict equivalent changes in arterial oxygen saturation. Mild acidosis doesn’t alter the relation between SPO2 and SaO2 to any clinically important extent. In conclusion, the pulse oximeter is useful to monitor oxygen saturation in patients with stable hemodynamic.

  8. [Monitoring of jugular venous oxygen saturation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shunsuke

    2011-04-01

    The continuous monitoring of jugular venous oxygen saturation(SjO2) has become a practical method for monitoring global cerebral oxygenation and metabolism. SjO2 reflects the balance between the cerebral blood flow and the cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen (CMRO2), if arterial oxyhemoglobin saturation, hemoglobin concentration remain constant. Normal SjO2 values range between 55% and 75%. Low SjO2 indicates cerebral hypoperfusion or ischemia. Conversely, an increased SjO2 indicates either cerebral hyperemia or a disorder that decreases CMRO2. In minimizing secondary brain damage following resuscitation from cardiopulmonary arrest, SjO2 monitoring is thus considered to be an integral part of multimodality monitoring and can provide important information for the management of patients in neurointensive care.

  9. The danish tax on saturated fat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård; Smed, Sinne

    Denmark introduced a new tax on saturated fat in food products with effect from October 2011. The objective of this paper is to make an effect assessment of this tax for some of the product categories most significantly affected by the new tax, namely fats such as butter, butter-blends, margarine...... on saturated fat in food products has had some effects on the market for the considered products, in that the level of consumption of fats dropped by 10 – 20%. Furthermore, the analysis points at shifts in demand from high-price supermarkets towards low-price discount stores – a shift that seems to have been...... – and broaden – the analysis at a later stage, when data are available for a longer period after the introduction of the fat tax....

  10. Nonlinear saturation of Weibel-type instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Cagas, Petr; Hakim, Ammar

    2017-10-01

    Weibel-type instabilities, which grow in plasmas with anisotropic velocity distribution, have been studied for many years and drawn recent interest due to their broad applicability spanning from laboratory laser plasmas to origins of intergalactic magnetic fields in astrophysical plasmas. Magnetic particle trapping has been considered as the main mechanism of the nonlinear saturation of these instabilities. However, novel continuum kinetic and two-fluid five moment simulations show that there are additional effects - the transverse flow introduced by the magnetic field creates a secondary electrostatic two-stream instability which alters the saturation and is responsible for a quasi-periodic behavior in the nonlinear phase. This research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under Grant Number FA9550-15-1-0193.

  11. WAter Saturation Shift Referencing (WASSR) for chemical exchange saturation transfer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mina; Gillen, Joseph; Landman, Bennett. A.; Zhou, Jinyuan; van Zijl, Peter C.M.

    2010-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a contrast mechanism exploiting exchange-based magnetization transfer (MT) between solute and water protons. CEST effects compete with direct water saturation and conventional MT processes and generally can only be quantified through an asymmetry analysis of the water saturation spectrum (Z-spectrum) with respect to the water frequency, a process that is exquisitely sensitive to magnetic field inhomogeneities. Here, it is shown that direct water saturation imaging allows measurement of the absolute water frequency in each voxel, allowing proper centering of Z-spectra on a voxel-by-voxel basis independent of spatial B0 field variations. Optimal acquisition parameters for this “water saturation shift referencing” or “WASSR” approach were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations and later confirmed experimentally. The optimal ratio of the WASSR sweep width to the linewidth of the direct saturation curve was found to be 3.3–4.0, requiring a sampling of 16–32 points. The frequency error was smaller than 1 Hz at signal to noise ratios of 40 or higher. The WASSR method was applied to study glycogen, where the chemical shift difference between the hydroxyl (OH) protons and bulk water protons at 3T is so small (0.75–1.25 ppm) that the CEST spectrum is inconclusive without proper referencing. PMID:19358232

  12. Water saturation shift referencing (WASSR) for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mina; Gillen, Joseph; Landman, Bennett A; Zhou, Jinyuan; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2009-06-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is a contrast mechanism that exploits exchange-based magnetization transfer (MT) between solute and water protons. CEST effects compete with direct water saturation and conventional MT processes, and generally can only be quantified through an asymmetry analysis of the water saturation spectrum (Z-spectrum) with respect to the water frequency, a process that is exquisitely sensitive to magnetic field inhomogeneities. Here it is shown that direct water saturation imaging allows measurement of the absolute water frequency in each voxel, allowing proper centering of Z-spectra on a voxel-by-voxel basis independently of spatial B(0) field variations. Optimal acquisition parameters for this "water saturation shift referencing" (WASSR) approach were estimated using Monte Carlo simulations and later confirmed experimentally. The optimal ratio of the WASSR sweep width to the linewidth of the direct saturation curve was found to be 3.3-4.0, requiring a sampling of 16-32 points. The frequency error was smaller than 1 Hz at signal-to-noise ratios of 40 or higher. The WASSR method was applied to study glycogen, where the chemical shift difference between the hydroxyl (OH) protons and bulk water protons at 3T is so small (0.75-1.25 ppm) that the CEST spectrum is inconclusive without proper referencing.

  13. Gluon saturation beyond (naive) leading logs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beuf, Guillaume

    2014-12-15

    An improved version of the Balitsky–Kovchegov equation is presented, with a consistent treatment of kinematics. That improvement allows to resum the most severe of the large higher order corrections which plague the conventional versions of high-energy evolution equations, with approximate kinematics. This result represents a further step towards having high-energy QCD scattering processes under control beyond strict Leading Logarithmic accuracy and with gluon saturation effects.

  14. 2D Saturable Absorbers for Fibre Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert I. Woodward

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional (2D nanomaterials are an emergent and promising platform for future photonic and optoelectronic applications. Here, we review recent progress demonstrating the application of 2D nanomaterials as versatile, wideband saturable absorbers for Q-switching and mode-locking fibre lasers. We focus specifically on the family of few-layer transition metal dichalcogenides, including MoS2, MoSe2 and WS2.

  15. Thermohydraulic design of saturated temperature capsule for IASCC irradiation test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ide, Hiroshi; Matsui, Yoshinori; Itabashi, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-10-01

    An advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is being developed in JAERI, to perform irradiation tests for irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) research concerned with aging of LWR. This device enables the irradiation tests under the water chemistry condition and the temperature, which simulate the conditions for BWR core internals. The advanced water chemistry controlled irradiation research device is composed of saturated temperature capsule inserted into the JMTR core and the water chemistry control unit installed in the reactor building. Regarding the saturated temperature capsule, the Thermohydraulic design of capsule structure was done, aimed at controlling the specimen's temperature, feeding water velocity on specimen's surface to the environment of BWR nearer. As the result of adopting the new capsule structure based on the design study, it was found out that feeding water velocity at the surface of specimen's is increased to about 10 times as much as before, and nuclear heat generated in the capsule components can be removed safely even in the abnormal event such as the case of loss of feeding water. (author)

  16. Controlled nonperturbative dynamics of quantum fields out of equilibrium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berges, Juergen E-mail: j.berges@thphys.uni-heidelberg.de

    2002-03-11

    We compute the nonequilibrium real-time evolution of an O(N)-symmetric scalar quantum field theory from a systematic 1/N expansion of the 2PI effective action to next-to-leading order, which includes scattering and memory effects. In contrast to the standard 1/N expansion of the 1PI effective action, the next-to-leading-order expansion in presence of a possible expectation value for the composite operator leads to a bounded-time evolution where the truncation error may be controlled by higher powers in 1/N. We present a detailed comparison with the leading-order results and determine the range of validity of standard mean-field-type approximations. We investigate 'quench' and 'tsunami' initial conditions frequently used to mimic idealized far-from-equilibrium pion dynamics in the context of heavy-ion collisions. For spatially homogeneous initial conditions, we find three generic regimes, characterized by an early-time exponential damping, a parametrically slow (power-law) behavior at intermediate times, and a late-time exponential approach to thermal equilibrium. The different time scales are obtained from a numerical solution of the time-reversal invariant equations in 1+1 dimensions without further approximations. We discuss in detail the out-of-equilibrium behavior of the nontrivial n-point correlation functions as well as the evolution of a particle number distribution and inverse slope parameter.

  17. Inference of directional selection and mutation parameters assuming equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Claus; Bergman, Juraj

    2015-12-01

    In a classical study, Wright (1931) proposed a model for the evolution of a biallelic locus under the influence of mutation, directional selection and drift. He derived the equilibrium distribution of the allelic proportion conditional on the scaled mutation rate, the mutation bias and the scaled strength of directional selection. The equilibrium distribution can be used for inference of these parameters with genome-wide datasets of "site frequency spectra" (SFS). Assuming that the scaled mutation rate is low, Wright's model can be approximated by a boundary-mutation model, where mutations are introduced into the population exclusively from sites fixed for the preferred or unpreferred allelic states. With the boundary-mutation model, inference can be partitioned: (i) the shape of the SFS distribution within the polymorphic region is determined by random drift and directional selection, but not by the mutation parameters, such that inference of the selection parameter relies exclusively on the polymorphic sites in the SFS; (ii) the mutation parameters can be inferred from the amount of polymorphic and monomorphic preferred and unpreferred alleles, conditional on the selection parameter. Herein, we derive maximum likelihood estimators for the mutation and selection parameters in equilibrium and apply the method to simulated SFS data as well as empirical data from a Madagascar population of Drosophila simulans. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Non-Equilibrium Turbulence and Two-Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Two-equation turbulence models are analyzed from the perspective of spectral closure theories. Kolmogorov theory provides useful information for models, but it is limited to equilibrium conditions in which the energy spectrum has relaxed to a steady state consistent with the forcing at large scales; it does not describe transient evolution between such states. Transient evolution is necessarily through nonequilibrium states, which can only be found from a theory of turbulence evolution, such as one provided by a spectral closure. When the departure from equilibrium is small, perturbation theory can be used to approximate the evolution by a two-equation model. The perturbation theory also gives explicit conditions under which this model can be valid, and when it will fail. Implications of the non-equilibrium corrections for the classic Tennekes-Lumley balance in the dissipation rate equation are drawn: it is possible to establish both the cancellation of the leading order Re1/2 divergent contributions to vortex stretching and enstrophy destruction, and the existence of a nonzero difference which is finite in the limit of infinite Reynolds number.

  19. Renormalisation of out-of-equilibrium quantum fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsanyi, Sz. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton, East Sussex BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Reinosa, U. [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, 91198, Palaiseau (France)

    2009-04-01

    We consider the initial value problem and its renormalisation in the framework of the two-particle-irreducible (2PI) effective action. We argue that in the case of appropriately chosen self-consistent initial conditions, the counterterms needed to renormalise the system in equilibrium are also sufficient to renormalise its time evolution. In this way we improve on Gaussian initial conditions which have the disadvantage of generically not showing a continuum limit. For a more detailed discussion see [Sz. Borsanyi and U. Reinosa, (arXiv:0809.0496)].

  20. Saturated Dispersive Extinction Theory of Red Shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ling Jun

    2012-03-01

    The Dispersive Extinction Theory (DET) proposed by WangfootnotetextWang, Ling Jun, Physics Essays, 18, No. 2, (2005). offers an alternative to the Big Bang. According to DET, the cosmic red shift is caused by the dispersive extinction of the star light during the propagation from the stars to the earth, instead of being caused by the Doppler shift due to the expansion of the universe.footnotetextHubble, E., Astrophys. J. 64, 321 (1926).^,footnotetextHubble, E., The Realm of the Nebulae, (Yale University Press, New Haven, 1936). DET allows an infinite, stable, non expanding universe, and is immune of the fundamental problems inherent to the Big Bang such as the horizon problem, the extreme violation of the conservation of mass, energy and charge, and the geocentric nature which violates the principle of relativity.footnotetextWang, Ling Jun, Physics Essays, 20, No. 2, (2007). The scenario dealt with in Reference (1) is a one in which the extinction by the space medium is not saturated. This work deals with a different scenario when the extinction is saturated. The saturated extinction causes limited energy loss, and the star light can travel a much greater distance than in the unsaturated scenario.

  1. Role of non-equilibrium conformations on driven polymer translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katkar, H H; Muthukumar, M

    2018-01-14

    One of the major theoretical methods in understanding polymer translocation through a nanopore is the Fokker-Planck formalism based on the assumption of quasi-equilibrium of polymer conformations. The criterion for applicability of the quasi-equilibrium approximation for polymer translocation is that the average translocation time per Kuhn segment, ⟨τ⟩/NK, is longer than the relaxation time τ0 of the polymer. Toward an understanding of conditions that would satisfy this criterion, we have performed coarse-grained three dimensional Langevin dynamics and multi-particle collision dynamics simulations. We have studied the role of initial conformations of a polyelectrolyte chain (which were artificially generated with a flow field) on the kinetics of its translocation across a nanopore under the action of an externally applied transmembrane voltage V (in the absence of the initial flow field). Stretched (out-of-equilibrium) polyelectrolyte chain conformations are deliberately and systematically generated and used as initial conformations in translocation simulations. Independent simulations are performed to study the relaxation behavior of these stretched chains, and a comparison is made between the relaxation time scale and the mean translocation time (⟨τ⟩). For such artificially stretched initial states, ⟨τ⟩/NK equilibrium approximation. Nevertheless, we observe a scaling of ⟨τ⟩ ∼ 1/V over the entire range of chain stretching studied, in agreement with the predictions of the Fokker-Planck model. On the other hand, for realistic situations where the initial artificially imposed flow field is absent, a comparison of experimental data reported in the literature with the theory of polyelectrolyte dynamics reveals that the Zimm relaxation time (τZimm) is shorter than the mean translocation time for several polymers including single stranded DNA (ssDNA), double stranded DNA (dsDNA), and synthetic polymers. Even when these data are rescaled assuming a

  2. Bridge pressure flow scour for clear water conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    The equilibrium scour at a bridge caused by pressure flow with critical approach velocity in clear-water simulation conditions was studied both analytically and experimentally. The flume experiments revealed that (1) the measured equilibrium scour pr...

  3. A century of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Oliver

    2008-06-01

    Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (HWE) is the state of the genotypic frequency of two alleles of one autosomal gene locus after one discrete generation of random mating in an indefinitely large population: if the alleles are A and a with frequencies p and q(=1-p), then the equilibrium gene frequencies are simply p and q and the equilibrium genotypic frequencies for AA, Aa and aa are p2, 2pq and q2. It was independently identified in 1908 by G. H. Hardy and W. Weinberg after earlier attempts by W. E. Castle and K. Pearson. Weinberg, well known for pioneering studies of twins, made many important contributions to genetics, especially human genetics. Existence of this equilibrium provides a reference point against which the effects of selection, linkage, mutation, inbreeding and chance can be detected and estimated. Its discovery marked the initiation of population genetics.

  4. Quantum mechanical evolution towards thermal equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, Noah; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J; Winter, Andreas

    2009-06-01

    The circumstances under which a system reaches thermal equilibrium, and how to derive this from basic dynamical laws, has been a major question from the very beginning of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Despite considerable progress, it remains an open problem. Motivated by this issue, we address the more general question of equilibration. We prove, with virtually full generality, that reaching equilibrium is a universal property of quantum systems: almost any subsystem in interaction with a large enough bath will reach an equilibrium state and remain close to it for almost all times. We also prove several general results about other aspects of thermalization besides equilibration, for example, that the equilibrium state does not depend on the detailed microstate of the bath.

  5. Equilibrium Molecular Interactions in Pure Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris I. Sedunov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The equilibrium molecular interactions in pure real gases are investigated based on the chemical thermodynamics principles. The parallels between clusters in real gases and chemical compounds in equilibrium media have been used to improve understanding of the real gas structure. A new approach to the equilibrium constants for the cluster fractions and new methods to compute them and their significant parameters from the experimental thermophysical data are developed. These methods have been applied to some real gases, such as Argon and Water vapors and gaseous Alkanes. It is shown that the four-particle clusters make a noticeable contribution in the thermophysical properties of the equilibrium Water vapor. It is shown also that the effective bond energy for dimers in Alkanes linearly grows with the number of carbon atoms in the molecule.

  6. Equilibrium Reconstruction on the Large Helical Device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuel A. Lazerson, D. Gates, D. Monticello, H. Neilson, N. Pomphrey, A. Reiman S. Sakakibara, and Y. Suzuki

    2012-07-27

    Equilibrium reconstruction is commonly applied to axisymmetric toroidal devices. Recent advances in computational power and equilibrium codes have allowed for reconstructions of three-dimensional fields in stellarators and heliotrons. We present the first reconstructions of finite beta discharges in the Large Helical Device (LHD). The plasma boundary and magnetic axis are constrained by the pressure profile from Thomson scattering. This results in a calculation of plasma beta without a-priori assumptions of the equipartition of energy between species. Saddle loop arrays place additional constraints on the equilibrium. These reconstruction utilize STELLOPT, which calls VMEC. The VMEC equilibrium code assumes good nested flux surfaces. Reconstructed magnetic fields are fed into the PIES code which relaxes this constraint allowing for the examination of the effect of islands and stochastic regions on the magnetic measurements.

  7. Referesher Course on Contemporary Non-Equilibrium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 15; Issue 7. Referesher Course on Contemporary Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics. Information and Announcements Volume 15 Issue 7 July 2010 pp 678-678 ...

  8. The equilibrium structure of thin magnetic flux tubes. I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, A.; Massaglia, S.; Kalkofen, W.; Rosner, R.; Bodo, G.

    1985-01-01

    A model atmosphere within a thin magnetic flux tube that is embedded in an arbitrarily stratified medium is presently constructed by solving the radiative transfer equation in the two-stream approximation for gray opacity, under the assumption that the magnetic field is sufficiently strong to warrant the neglect of both thermal conduction and convective diffusion; energy inside the flux tube therefore being transported solely by radiation. The structure of the internal atmosphere is determined on the basis of the hydrostatic and radiative equilibrium conditions of the tube embedded in an external atmosphere. The gas temperature along the axis of the tube is computed, and the geometry of the flux tube is determined on the basis of magnetic flux conservation and total pressure equilibrium.

  9. Testing Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium: an objective Bayesian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consonni, Guido; Moreno, Elías; Venturini, Sergio

    2011-01-15

    We analyze the general (multiallelic) Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium problem from an objective Bayesian testing standpoint. We argue that for small or moderate sample sizes the answer is rather sensitive to the prior chosen, and this suggests to carry out a sensitivity analysis with respect to the prior. This goal is achieved through the identification of a class of priors specifically designed for this testing problem. In this paper, we consider the class of intrinsic priors under the full model, indexed by a tuning quantity, the training sample size. These priors are objective, satisfy Savage's continuity condition and have proved to behave extremely well for many statistical testing problems. We compute the posterior probability of the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium model for the class of intrinsic priors, assess robustness over the range of plausible answers, as well as stability of the decision in favor of either hypothesis. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Out of equilibrium process in Ising quantum chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Platini, T; Karevski, D [Laboratoire de Physique des Materiaux, UMR CNRS No. 7556, Universite Henri Poincare (Nancy 1), B.P. 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre les Nancy cedex (France)

    2006-05-15

    In this paper we present the results obtained concerning the relaxation behaviour of a non equilibrium Ising quantum chain. In particular, we have focues our attention into the transverse magnetization. The out-of-equilibriumness is generated by setting up an initial thermal inhomogeneity. We present two different initial conditions: a completely factorized state, where all the spins are thermalized independently and second a system-bath case, where half of the chain called the system is thermalized at a temperature T{sub s} and the remaining half is at a temperature T{sub b}. In both cases, the magnetization profiles are calculated either analytically or numerically and show a scaling behaviour. It is also found that in the two-temperature case the magnetization relaxes in quantized steps in the strong transverse field region.

  11. Equilibrium depth of scour at straight guide banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjunsburgs, B.; Bulankina, V.

    2017-10-01

    The equilibrium stage of scour at the head of straight guide banks with a uniform and stratified bed conditions have been studied. The contraction of the river by bridge crossing with straight guide banks considerably alters the flow pattern. The streamlines become curve and the concentration of streamlines, longitudinal and transverse slopes of the water surface, a local increase in velocity, vortex and eddy structures, and the origin of a flow separation zone between the extreme streamlines and the guide bank are observed and local scour is developing at the head of the straight guide banks. New formulae for calculation of equilibrium depth of scour at straight guide banks at uniform and stratified river bed is elaborated and confirmed by tests and computer modelling results.

  12. Approach to equilibrium of quarkonium in quark-gluon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xiaojun; Müller, Berndt

    2018-01-01

    We calculate the dissociation and recombination rates of Υ (1 S ) in quark-gluon plasma by using potential nonrelativistic QCD. We then study the dynamical in-medium evolution of the b b ¯-Υ system in a periodic box via the Boltzmann equation and explore how the system reaches equilibrium. We find that interactions between the free heavy quarks and the medium are necessary for the system to reach equilibrium. We find that the angular distribution of Υ (1 S ) probes the stages at which recombination occurs. Finally, we study the system under a longitudinal expansion and show that different initial conditions evolve to distinct final ratios of hidden and open b flavors. We argue that experimental measurements of the ratio could address open questions in the quarkonium production in heavy ion collisions.

  13. Tanzania’s Equilibrium Real Exchange Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Niko A Hobdari

    2008-01-01

    Tanzania's real effective exchange rate (REER) has depreciated sharply since end-2000, reversing the appreciation that took place in the second half of the 1990s. Single-country and panel data estimates, and the external sustainability approach, suggest that Tanzania's REER is currently modestly undervalued relative to its estimated equilibrium level. Looking forward, a modest trend appreciation of the equilibrium REER is expected, consistent with continued high GDP growth and an expected rec...

  14. Quantum mechanical evolution towards thermal equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    Linden, Noah; Popescu, Sandu; Short, Anthony J.; Winter, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    The circumstances under which a system reaches thermal equilibrium, and how to derive this from basic dynamical laws, has been a major question from the very beginning of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. Despite considerable progress, it remains an open problem. Motivated by this issue, we address the more general question of equilibration. We prove, with virtually full generality, that reaching equilibrium is a universal property of quantum systems: Almost any subsystem in interacti...

  15. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    OpenAIRE

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser, David

    2015-01-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system ("working fluid") coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) called sometimes work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical m...

  16. The Cournot Equilibrium for n Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Ioan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Oligopoly is a market situation where there are a small number of bidders (at least two of a good non-substituent and a sufficient number of consumers. The paper analyses the Cournot equilibrium in both cases where each firm assumes the role of leadership and after when firms act simultaneously on market. There are obtained the equilibrium productions, maximum profits and sales price.

  17. Equilibrium gels of limited valence colloids

    OpenAIRE

    Sciortino, Francesco; Zaccarelli, Emanuela

    2017-01-01

    Gels are low-packing arrested states of matter which are able to support stress. On cooling, limited valence colloidal particles form open networks stabilized by the progressive increase of the interparticle bond lifetime. These gels, named equilibrium gels, are the focus of this review article. Differently from other types of colloidal gels, equilibrium gels do not require an underlying phase separation to form. Oppositely, they form in a region of densities deprived of thermodynamic instabi...

  18. Non-equilibrium dog-flea model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerson, Bruce J.

    2017-11-01

    We develop the open dog-flea model to serve as a check of proposed non-equilibrium theories of statistical mechanics. The model is developed in detail. Then it is applied to four recent models for non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Comparison of the dog-flea solution with these different models allows checking claims and giving a concrete example of the theoretical models.

  19. Comparison of isocaloric very low carbohydrate/high saturated fat and high carbohydrate/low saturated fat diets on body composition and cardiovascular risk

    OpenAIRE

    James Anthony P; Keogh Jennifer B; Foster Paul R; Noakes Manny; Mamo John C; Clifton Peter M

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background It is speculated that high saturated fat very low carbohydrate diets (VLCARB) have adverse effects on cardiovascular risk but evidence for this in controlled studies is lacking. The objective of this study was to compare, under isocaloric conditions, the effects of a VLCARB to 2 low saturated fat high carbohydrate diets on body composition and cardiovascular risk. Methods Eighty three subjects, 48 ± 8 y, total cholesterol 5.9 ± 1.0 mmol/L, BMI 33 ± 3 kg/m2 were randomly al...

  20. Stability of Equilibrium Points of Fractional Difference Equations with Stochastic Perturbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikhet Leonid

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available It is supposed that the fractional difference equation , has an equilibrium point and is exposed to additive stochastic perturbations type of that are directly proportional to the deviation of the system state from the equilibrium point . It is shown that known results in the theory of stability of stochastic difference equations that were obtained via V. Kolmanovskii and L. Shaikhet general method of Lyapunov functionals construction can be successfully used for getting of sufficient conditions for stability in probability of equilibrium points of the considered stochastic fractional difference equation. Numerous graphical illustrations of stability regions and trajectories of solutions are plotted.

  1. Characterization of the Equilibrium Strategy of Fuzzy Bimatrix Games Based on L-R Fuzzy Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cun-lin Li

    2012-01-01

    variable. In this paper, we generalized Maeda’s model to the non-symmetrical environment. In other words, we investigated the fuzzy bimatrix games based on nonsymmetrical L-R fuzzy variables. Then the pseudoinverse of a nonconstant monotone function was given and the concept of crisp parametric bimatrix games was introduced. At last, the existence condition of Nash equilibrium strategies of the fuzzy bimatrix games is proposed and (weak Pareto equilibrium of the fuzzy bimatrix games was obtained through the Nash equilibrium of the crisp parametric bimatrix.

  2. Price competition and equilibrium analysis in multiple hybrid channel supply chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Guihua; Wang, Aihu; Sha, Jin

    2017-06-01

    The amazing boom of Internet and logistics industry prompts more and more enterprises to sell commodity through multiple channels. Such market conditions make the participants of multiple hybrid channel supply chain compete each other in traditional and direct channel at the same time. This paper builds a two-echelon supply chain model with a single manufacturer and a single retailer who both can choose different channel or channel combination for their own sales, then, discusses the price competition and calculates the equilibrium price under different sales channel selection combinations. Our analysis shows that no matter the manufacturer and retailer choose same or different channel price to compete, the equilibrium price does not necessarily exist the equilibrium price in the multiple hybrid channel supply chain and wholesale price change is not always able to coordinate supply chain completely. We also present the sufficient and necessary conditions for the existence of equilibrium price and coordination wholesale price.

  3. Anomalous Thermoelectric Response in an Orbital-Ordered Oxide Near and Far from Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishina, Yasuo; Okazaki, Ryuji; Yasui, Yukio; Nakamura, Fumihiko; Terasaki, Ichiro

    2017-09-01

    We report the thermoelectric transport properties in the orbital-ordered Mott insulating phase of Ca2RuO4 close to and far from equilibrium. Near equilibrium conditions where the temperature gradient is only applied to the sample, an insulating but non-monotonic temperature variation of the Seebeck coefficient is observed, which is accounted for in terms of a temperature-induced suppression of the orbital order. In non-equilibrium conditions where we have applied high electrical currents, we find that the Seebeck coefficient is anomalously increased in magnitude with increasing external current. The present result clearly demonstrates a non-thermal effect since the heating simply causes a decrease of the Seebeck coefficient, implying a non-trivial non-equilibrium effect such as a modification of the spin and orbital state in currents.

  4. Non-equilibrium Simulation of CO­2-hydrate Phase Transitions from Mixtures of CO2 and N2 Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qorbani Nashaqi, K.

    2015-12-01

    Storage of CO2 in aquifers is one of several options for reducing the emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere. Generally this option requires sealing integrity through layers of clay or shale. Many reservoirs have regions of temperature and pressure inside hydrate formation conditions. Whether hydrate formation can provide long term extra sealing still remains unverified in view of all co-existing phases that affect hydrate stability. Yet another storage option for CO2 is in the form of hydrate through exchange of in situ CH4 hydrate. Injection of CO2 into hydrate filled sediments is challenging due to the partial filling of pores with hydrate which results in low porosity and low permeability. Formation of new hydrate from injected CO2 will enhance these problems, Mixing N2 gas with the CO2 will increase permeability and will reduce driving forces for formation of new hydrate from pore water and injection gas. Hydrate can generally not reach thermodynamic equilibrium due to Gibbs' phase rule and the combined first and second laws of thermodynamics. These thermodynamic constraints on distribution of masses over co-existing phases are dynamically coupled to local mass- and heat-transport. Reservoir simulations are one possible method for investigation of possible scenarios related to injection of CO2 with N2 into aquifers containing CH4 hydrate. In this work we have developed prevoiusly modified RetrasoCodeBrite (RCB) simulator to handle injection of CO2/N2 gas mixtures. Hydrate formation and dissociation were determined by investigating Gibbs free energy differences between hydrate and hydrate formers. Gibbs free energy differences were calculated from changes in chemical potentials, which were obtained using non-equilibrium thermodynamic approach. Further extension of RCB has been implemented in this work through adding on-the-fly thermodynamic calculations. Correspondingly, hydrate phase transitions are calculated directly inside the code as a result of super-saturation

  5. Two-phase flows during draining of liquefied gases initially undersaturated. Validation by water and CFC11; Ecoulements diphasiques lors de la vidange de gaz liquifies initialement sous satures. Validation par l`eau et le CFC11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    May, L.

    1996-12-11

    In petroleum industry, the safety studies require to estimate the two-phase flow during accidental draining of pressurized liquefied gas storages. Meanwhile the mass flow strongly depends of initial conditions. Then it is primordial to be able to reckon it in the case where it is the highest, that is to say when the fluid is initially undersaturated. An experimental installation has been carried out. The used fluids are water and CFC11. The experimental measures show that the thermodynamic conditions at the inlet of the pipe (P at +/- 15 mbar and T at +/- 0.15 degrees Celsius) are well controlled. The measured mass flows are compared to different models. The frictions in the monophase domain have been taken into account. It has been shown that the extensive H.E.M. model perfectly estimates the mass flow (as well as for water than for CFC11) for large deviations to saturation. In order to correctly predict the domain of weak variation to saturation, D.E.M. (out of equilibrium) models or H.R.M. (homogeneous model of relaxation) models have to be used. (O.M.) 50 refs.

  6. Requirements for reliable determination of binding affinity constants by saturation analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgna, Jean-Louis

    2004-12-01

    Accurate calculation of the equilibrium association constant (K) and binding site concentration (N) related to a receptor (R)/ligand (L) interaction, via R saturation analysis, requires exact determination of the specifically bound L concentration (B(S)) and the unbound L concentration (U) at equilibrium. However, most binding determinations involve a procedure for separation of bound and unbound L. In such situations, it was previously shown that correct calculation of B(S) and U from binding data requires prior determination of alpha, i.e. the procedure parameter representing the proportion of equilibrium B(S) recovered after running the separation process, and of kn, i.e. the equilibrium nonspecific binding coefficient. For the simplest model of R/L interaction, the consequences of alpha neglect and/or kn neglect on determination of K and N, via R saturation analysis, are investigated. When alpha but not kn has been determined, B(S) can be accurately calculated, whereas U is overestimated by factor (kn + 1). Consequently the type (linear or hyperbolic) of theoretic curves obtained by usual representations (such as the Scatchard, the Lineweaver-Burk or the Michaelis-Menten plot) of the R/L binding is unchanged; these curves afford correct N and underestimation of K by factor (kn + 1). When alpha (alpha determined B(S) and U are underestimated and overestimated, respectively. Then erroneous representations of the R/L binding result (e.g. instead of regular straight line segments, Scatchard plot and Lineweaver-Burk plot involve convex-upward and convex-downward hyperbola portions, respectively, suggestive of positive cooperativity of L binding), which leads to incorrect N and K. Errors in N and K would depend on (i) the binding (K, N and kn) and method (alpha) parameters and (ii) the expressions used to calculate approximate B(S) and U values. Simulations involving variable alpha, KN and kn values indicate that: (1) the magnitude of error in N determination (mainly

  7. Non-Equilibrium Kinetics and Transport Properties in Reacting Flows in Nozzles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrova, T. Yu.; Chikhaoui, A.; Kustova, E. V.; Nagnibeda, E. A.

    2003-05-01

    Non-equilibrium vibration-dissociation kinetics, transport properties and dissociation rate coefficients in expanding flows are studied on the basis of different kinetic theory approaches: state-to-state, multi-temperature and one-temperature ones. The limits of validity of more simple models are discussed, the influence of non-equilibrium vibrational distributions, initial conditions, nozzle profile on the macroscopic parameters, heat transfer and reaction rates is investigated.

  8. High-Temperature Studies of Glass Dissolution Rates Close to Saturation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M; Roberts, S; Zhao, P; Williams, R; Rose, T; Rainer, A; Pawloski, G

    2004-06-14

    Most long-lived radionuclides associated with an underground nuclear test are incorporated into a melt glass and are released by glass dissolution to become part of the hydrologic source term (HST) (Pawloski et al., 2001). Although the rates of rhyolite glass dissolution are well known under conditions where the fluid is far from saturation with respect to glass, the rates are not well known under conditions where the fluid approaches saturation. These rates are commonly much lower than the far-fromsaturation rates, often by a factor greater than 100. In recent HST simulations (Pawloski et al., 2001; Pawloski et al., 2000; Tompson et al., 1999), we conservatively estimated steady-state release rates based on a far-from-saturation fluid conditions. In recent CHESHIRE near-field simulations (Pawloski et al., 2001), it was predicted that {approx}30% of the nuclear melt glass dissolved over 1000 years. Although the ''far-from-saturation rate'' approach provides a conservative estimate of glass dissolution, it may greatly overestimate the rates of melt glass dissolution. At CHESHIRE, less conservative estimates suggest that only {approx}1% of the nuclear melt glass will dissolve in 1000 years. Lower glass dissolution rates result in lower radionuclide release rates from nuclear melt glass. The following report documents glass dissolution experiments performed to measure glass dissolution rates close to saturation.

  9. Strong convergence theorems for equilibrium problems and fixed point problems: A new iterative method, some comments and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du Wei-Shih

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper, we introduce a new approach method to find a common element in the intersection of the set of the solutions of a finite family of equilibrium problems and the set of fixed points of a nonexpansive mapping in a real Hilbert space. Under appropriate conditions, some strong convergence theorems are established. The results obtained in this paper are new, and a few examples illustrating these results are given. Finally, we point out that some 'so-called' mixed equilibrium problems and generalized equilibrium problems in the literature are still usual equilibrium problems. 2010 Mathematics Subject Classification: 47H09; 47H10, 47J25.

  10. PLD-grown thin film saturable absorbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tellkamp, Friedjof

    2012-11-01

    The subject of this thesis is the preparation and characterization of thin films made of oxidic dielectrics which may find their application as saturable absorber in passively Q-switched lasers. The solely process applied for fabrication of the thin films was the pulsed laser deposition (PLD) which stands out against other processes by its flexibility considering the composition of the systems to be investigated. Within the scope of this thesis the applied saturable absorbers can be divided into two fundamentally different kinds of functional principles: On the one hand, saturable absorption can be achieved by ions embedded in a host medium. Most commonly applied bulk crystals are certain garnets like YAG (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}) or the spinel forsterite (Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}), in each case with chromium as dopant. Either of these media was investigated in terms of their behavior as PLD-grown saturable absorber. Moreover, experiments with Mg{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}, Ca{sub 2}GeO{sub 4}, Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and further garnets like YSAG or GSGG took place. The absorption coefficients of the grown films of Cr{sup 4+}:YAG were determined by spectroscopic investigations to be one to two orders of magnitude higher compared to commercially available saturable absorbers. For the first time, passive Q-switching of a Nd:YAG laser at 1064 nm with Cr{sup 4+}:YAG thin films could be realized as well as with Cr:Sc{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films. On the other hand, the desirable effect of saturable absorption can also be generated by quantum well structures. For this purpose, several layer system like YAG/LuAG, Cu{sub 2}O/MgO, and ZnO/corumdum were investigated. It turned out that layer systems with indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) did not only grew in an excellent way but also showed up a behavior regarding their photo luminescence which cannot be explained by classical considerations. The observed luminescence at roughly 3 eV (410 nm) was assumed to be of excitonic nature and its

  11. Image-based calculation of perfusion and oxyhemoglobin saturation in skeletal muscle during submaximal isometric contractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Christopher P; Cook, Ryan N; Chance, Marti A; Copenhaver, Elizabeth A; Damon, Bruce M

    2010-09-01

    The relative oxygen saturation of hemoglobin and the rate of perfusion are important physiological quantities, particularly in organs such as skeletal muscle, in which oxygen delivery and use are tightly coupled. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the image-based calculation of the relative oxygen saturation of hemoglobin and quantification of perfusion in skeletal muscle during isometric contractions. This was accomplished by establishing an empirical relationship between the rate of radiofrequency-reversible dephasing and near-infrared spectroscopy-observed oxyhemoglobin saturation (relative oxygen saturation of hemoglobin) under conditions of arterial occlusion and constant blood volume. A calibration curve was generated and used to calculate the relative oxygen saturation of hemoglobin from radiofrequency-reversible dephasing changes measured during contraction. Twelve young healthy subjects underwent 300 s of arterial occlusion and performed isometric contractions of the dorsiflexors at 30% of maximal contraction for 120 s. Muscle perfusion was quantified during contraction by arterial spin labeling and measures of muscle T(1). Comparisons between the relative oxygen saturation of hemoglobin values predicted from radiofrequency-reversible dephasing and that measured by near-infrared spectroscopy revealed no differences between methods (P = 0.760). Muscle perfusion reached a value of 34.7 mL 100 g(-1) min(-1) during contraction. These measurements hold future promise in measuring muscle oxygen consumption in healthy and diseased skeletal muscle. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. The effect of fluid saturation on the dynamic shear modulus of tight sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongqing; Wei, Jianxin; Di, Bangrang; Ding, Pinbo; Shuai, Da

    2017-10-01

    Tight sandstones have become important targets in the exploration of unconventional oil and gas reservoirs. However, due to low porosity, low permeability, complex pore structure and other petrophysical properties of tight sandstones, the applicability of Gassmann’s fluid substitution procedure becomes debatable. Aiming at this problem, this paper attempts to explore the applicability of Gassmann’s theory in tight sandstones. Our focus is to investigate the sensitivity of dynamic shear modulus to fluid saturation and the possible mechanism. Ultrasonic velocity in dry and saturated tight sandstone samples was measured in the laboratory under an effective pressure within the range of 1-60 MPa. This study shows that the shear modulus of the water-saturated samples appears to either increase or decrease, and the soft porosity model (SPM) can be used to quantitatively estimate the variation of shear modulus. Under the condition of in situ pressure, samples dominated by secondary pores and microcracks are prone to show shear strengthening with saturation, which is possibly attributed to the local flow dispersion. Samples that mainly have primary pores are more likely to show shear weakening with saturation, which can be explained by the surface energy mechanism. We also find good correlation between changes in shear modulus and inaccurate Gassmann-predicted saturated velocity. Therefore, understanding the variation of shear modulus is helpful to improving the applicability of Gassmann’s theory in tight sandstones.

  13. Prediction of phase equilibrium and hydration free energy of carboxylic acids by Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Nicolas; Gedik, Ibrahim; Lachet, Véronique; Pigeon, Laurent; Lugo, Rafael

    2013-06-13

    In this work, a new transferable united-atom force field has been developed to predict phase equilibrium and hydration free energy of carboxylic acids. To take advantage of the transferability of the AUA4 force field, all Lennard-Jones parameters of groups involved in the carboxylic acid chemical function are reused from previous parametrizations of this force field. Only a unique set of partial electrostatic charges is proposed to reproduce the experimental gas phase dipole moment, saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures. Phase equilibrium properties of various pure carboxylic acids (acetic acid, propanoic acid, butanoic acid, pentanoic acid, hexanoic acid) and one diacid (1,5-pentanedioic) are studied through Monte Carlo simulations in the Gibbs ensemble. A good accuracy is obtained for pure compound saturated liquid densities and vapor pressures (average deviation of 2% and 6%, respectively), as well as for critical points. The vaporization enthalpy is, however, poorly predicted for short acids, probably due to a limitation of the force field to correctly describe the significant dimerization in the vapor phase. Pressure-composition diagrams for two binary mixtures (acetic acid + n-butane and propanoic acid + pentanoic acid) are also computed with a good accuracy, showing the transferability of the proposed force field to mixtures. Hydration free energies are calculated for three carboxylic acids using thermodynamic integration. A systematic overestimation of around 10 kJ/mol is observed compared to experimental data. This new force field parametrized only on saturated equilibrium properties appears insufficient to reach an acceptable precision for this property, and only relative hydration free energies between two carboxylic acids can be correctly predicted. This highlights the limitation of the transferability feature of force fields to properties not included in the parametrization database.

  14. Trans Fat Now Listed With Saturated Fat and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trans Fat Now Listed With Saturated Fat and Cholesterol Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... I Do About Saturated Fat, Trans Fat, and Cholesterol? When comparing foods, look at the Nutrition Facts ...

  15. Calcium phosphate saturation in the western Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.; Reddy, C.V.G.

    Temperature, inorganic phosphate concentration and pH seem to be the major factors influencing the degree of saturation of calcium phosphate in sea water. Two water regions can be demarcated in the study area based on the saturation patterns...

  16. Heavy Flavor Production in DGLAP improved Saturation Model

    CERN Document Server

    Sapeta, S

    2007-01-01

    The saturation model with DGLAP evolution is shown to give good description of the production of the charm and beauty quarks in deep inelastic scattering. The modifications of saturation properties caused by the presence of heavy quarks are also discussed.

  17. Rigid aleph_epsilon-saturated models of superstable theories

    OpenAIRE

    Shami, Ziv; Shelah, Saharon

    1999-01-01

    In a countable superstable NDOP theory, the existence of a rigid aleph_epsilon-saturated model implies the existence of 2^lambda rigid aleph_epsilon-saturated models of power lambda for every lambda>2^{aleph_0}.

  18. Silica fractal atomic clusters saturated with OH

    CERN Document Server

    Olivi-Tran, N

    2003-01-01

    We constructed regular fractal SiOH atomic clusters which pending bonds are saturated with OH molecules. We calculated the binding energies of these clusters as well as for sp sup 2 hybridization as for sp sup 3 hybridizations. The result are the following: for the two hybridizations, the total binding energies have a linear dependence on the size of the fractal cluster, which comes directly from the scaling law of the fractal characteristic of the building of the cluster. We related by a scaling law, the number of electronic bonds and the total bonding energy.

  19. Chloride diffusion in partially saturated cementitious material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Erik Pram; Geiker, Mette Rica

    2003-01-01

    The paper proposes a combined application of composite theory and Powers' model for microstructural development for the estimation of the diffusion coefficient as a function of the moisture content of a defect-free cementitious material. Measurements of chloride diffusion in mortar samples (440 kg....../m(3) rapid-hardening Portland cement, w/c = 0.5, maturity minimum 6 months) stored at 65% and 85% RH, as well as in vacuum-saturated mortar samples, illustrate the applicability of the method. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  20. Inheritance of reduced saturated fatty acid content in sunflower oil

    OpenAIRE

    Vick Brady A.; Jan C.C.; Miller Jerry F.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, consumers have become concerned with reducing the saturated fat content of their diet. Studies have indicated that high levels of saturated fat consumption are correlated with increased risk of coronary heart disease. The total saturated fat content of oil from current sunflower hybrids averages about 130 g kg-1. To identify sunflower germplasm with reduced saturated fatty acid composition, a total of 884 cultivated sunflower accessions from the USDA-ARS North Central Regiona...

  1. Analysis of a Heroin Epidemic Model with Saturated Treatment Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Mwangi Wangari

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is developed that examines how heroin addiction spreads in society. The model is formulated to take into account the treatment of heroin users by incorporating a realistic functional form that “saturates” representing the limited availability of treatment. Bifurcation analysis reveals that the model has an intrinsic backward bifurcation whenever the saturation parameter is larger than a fixed threshold. We are particularly interested in studying the model’s global stability. In the absence of backward bifurcations, Lyapunov functions can often be found and used to prove global stability. However, in the presence of backward bifurcations, such Lyapunov functions may not exist or may be difficult to construct. We make use of the geometric approach to global stability to derive a condition that ensures that the system is globally asymptotically stable. Numerical simulations are also presented to give a more complete representation of the model dynamics. Sensitivity analysis performed by Latin hypercube sampling (LHS suggests that the effective contact rate in the population, the relapse rate of heroin users undergoing treatment, and the extent of saturation of heroin users are mechanisms fuelling heroin epidemic proliferation.

  2. Non-equilibrium condensation process in holographic superconductor with nonlinear electrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yunqi; Gong, Yungui [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology,Wuhan, Hubei 430074 (China); Wang, Bin [IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University,Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2016-02-17

    We study the non-equilibrium condensation process in a holographic superconductor with nonlinear corrections to the U(1) gauge field. We start with an asymptotic Anti-de-Sitter(AdS) black hole against a complex scalar perturbation at the initial time, and solve the dynamics of the gravitational systems in the bulk. When the black hole temperature T is smaller than a critical value T{sub c}, the scalar perturbation grows exponentially till saturation, the final state of spacetime approaches to a hairy black hole. In the bulk theory, we find the clue of the influence of nonlinear corrections in the gauge filed on the process of the scalar field condensation. We show that the bulk dynamics in the non-equilibrium process is completely consistent with the observations on the boundary order parameter. Furthermore we examine the time evolution of horizons in the bulk non-equilibrium transformation process from the bald AdS black hole to the AdS hairy hole. Both the evolution of apparent and event horizons show that the original AdS black hole configuration requires more time to finish the transformation to become a hairy black hole if there is nonlinear correction to the electromagnetic field. We generalize our non-equilibrium discussions to the holographic entanglement entropy and find that the holographic entanglement entropy can give us further understanding of the influence of the nonlinearity in the gauge field on the scalar condensation.

  3. Investigation of Non-Equilibrium Radiation for Earth Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandis, A. M.; Johnston, C. O.; Cruden, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    For Earth re-entry at velocities between 8 and 11.5 km/s, the accuracy of NASA's computational uid dynamic and radiative simulations of non-equilibrium shock layer radiation is assessed through comparisons with measurements. These measurements were obtained in the NASA Ames Research Center's Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility. The experiments were aimed at measuring the spatially and spectrally resolved radiance at relevant entry conditions for both an approximate Earth atmosphere (79% N2 : 21% O2 by mole) as well as a more accurate composition featuring the trace species Ar and CO2 (78.08% N2 : 20.95% O2 : 0.04% CO2 : 0.93% Ar by mole). The experiments were configured to target a wide range of conditions, of which shots from 8 to 11.5 km/s at 0.2 Torr (26.7 Pa) are examined in this paper. The non-equilibrium component was chosen to be the focus of this study as it can account for a significant percentage of the emitted radiation for Earth re-entry, and more importantly, non-equilibrium has traditionally been assigned a large uncertainty for vehicle design. The main goals of this study are to present the shock tube data in the form of a non-equilibrium metric, evaluate the level of agreement between the experiment and simulations, identify key discrepancies and to examine critical aspects of modeling non-equilibrium radiating flows. Radiance pro les integrated over discreet wavelength regions, ranging from the Vacuum Ultra Violet (VUV) through to the Near Infra-Red (NIR), were compared in order to maximize both the spectral coverage and the number of experiments that could be used in the analysis. A previously defined non-equilibrium metric has been used to allow comparisons with several shots and reveal trends in the data. Overall, LAURA/HARA is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 40% and over-predict by as much as 12% depending on the shock speed. DPLR/NEQAIR is shown to under-predict EAST by as much as 50% and over-predict by as much as 20% depending

  4. Prediction of the critical heat flux for saturated upward flow boiling water in vertical narrow rectangular channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Gil Sik, E-mail: choigs@kaist.ac.kr; Chang, Soon Heung; Jeong, Yong Hoon

    2016-07-15

    A study, on the theoretical method to predict the critical heat flux (CHF) of saturated upward flow boiling water in vertical narrow rectangular channels, has been conducted. For the assessment of this CHF prediction method, 608 experimental data were selected from the previous researches, in which the heated sections were uniformly heated from both wide surfaces under the high pressure condition over 41 bar. For this purpose, representative previous liquid film dryout (LFD) models for circular channels were reviewed by using 6058 points from the KAIST CHF data bank. This shows that it is reasonable to define the initial condition of quality and entrainment fraction at onset of annular flow (OAF) as the transition to annular flow regime and the equilibrium value, respectively, and the prediction error of the LFD model is dependent on the accuracy of the constitutive equations of droplet deposition and entrainment. In the modified Levy model, the CHF data are predicted with standard deviation (SD) of 14.0% and root mean square error (RMSE) of 14.1%. Meanwhile, in the present LFD model, which is based on the constitutive equations developed by Okawa et al., the entire data are calculated with SD of 17.1% and RMSE of 17.3%. Because of its qualitative prediction trend and universal calculation convergence, the present model was finally selected as the best LFD model to predict the CHF for narrow rectangular channels. For the assessment of the present LFD model for narrow rectangular channels, effective 284 data were selected. By using the present LFD model, these data are predicted with RMSE of 22.9% with the dryout criterion of zero-liquid film flow, but RMSE of 18.7% with rivulet formation model. This shows that the prediction error of the present LFD model for narrow rectangular channels is similar with that for circular channels.

  5. Effect of Particle Size and Soil Compaction on Gas Transport Parameters in Variably Saturated, Sandy Soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Møldrup, Per; Kawamoto, Ken

    2009-01-01

    the water retention curve), both exhibiting similar and exponential relationships with D50. Under variably saturated conditions, higher Dp and ka in coarser sand (larger D50) were observed due to rapid gas diffusion and advection through the less tortuous large-pore networks. In addition, soil compaction......The soil gas diffusion coefficient (Dp) and air permeability (ka) and their dependency on soil air content ( ) control gas diffusion and advection in soils. This study investigated the effects of average particle size (D50) and dry bulk density ( b) on Dp and ka for six sandy soils under variably...... saturated conditions. Data showed that particle size markedly affects the effective diameter of the drained pores active in leading gas through the sample at –100 cm H2O of soil water matric potential (calculated from Dp and ka) as well as the average pore diameter at half saturation (calculated from...

  6. Quantum phase transition in a far-from-equilibrium steady state of an XY spin chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosen, Tomaz; Pizorn, Iztok

    2008-09-05

    Using quantization in the Fock space of operators, we compute the nonequilibrium steady state in an open Heisenberg XY spin 1/2 chain of a finite but large size coupled to Markovian baths at its ends. Numerical and theoretical evidence is given for a far-from-equilibrium quantum phase transition with the spontaneous emergence of long-range order in spin-spin correlation functions, characterized by a transition from saturation to linear growth with the size of the entanglement entropy in operator space.

  7. Cooperative equilibrium curves generated by ordered ligand binding to multi-site molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Denis

    2007-09-01

    The sigmoid shape of equilibrium curves in normal axes and Hill coefficients higher than unity, are indexes of cooperativity or homotropic allostery where the affinity for the ligand increases as saturation progresses. The mathematical transformation of the Adair scheme of equilibria in the Hill plot, reveals that sigmoid binding curves can also be generated by ordered ligand binding to a receptor with multiple binding sites of identical microscopic association constants. This mechanism only based on the law of mass action, could participate to some extent to certain cooperative effects observed in non-biological systems and perhaps in the physiological binding of oxygen to heme proteins.

  8. Blocking effect of colloids on arsenate adsorption during co-transport through saturated sand columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Guo, Huaming; Lei, Mei; Wan, Xiaoming; Zhang, Hanzhi; Feng, Xiaojuan; Wei, Rongfei; Tian, Liyan; Han, Xiaokun

    2016-06-01

    Transport of environmental pollutants through porous media is influenced by colloids. Co-transport of As(V) and soil colloids at different pH were systematically investigated by monitoring breakthrough curves (BTCs) in saturated sand columns. A solute transport model was applied to characterize transport and retention sites of As(V) in saturated sand in the presence of soil colloids. A colloid transport model and the DLVO theory were used to reveal the mechanism and hypothesis of soil colloid-promoted As(V) transport in the columns. Results showed that rapid transport of soil colloids, regulated by pH and ionic strength, promoted As(V) transport by blocking As(V) adsorption onto sand, although soil colloids had low adsorption for As(V). The promoted transport was more significant at higher concentrations of soil colloids (between 25 mg L(-1) and 150 mg L(-1)) due to greater blocking effect on As(V) adsorption onto the sand surfaces. The blocking effect of colloids was explained by the decreases in both instantaneous (equilibrium) As adsorption and first-order kinetic As adsorption on the sand surface sites. The discovery of this blocking effect improves our understanding of colloid-promoted As transport in saturated porous media, which provides new insights into role of colloids, especially colloids with low As adsorption capacity, in As transport and mobilization in soil-groundwater systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transport of water and ions in partially water-saturated porous media. Part 2. Filtration effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revil, A.

    2017-05-01

    A new set of constitutive equations describing the transport of the ions and water through charged porous media and considering the effect of ion filtration is applied to the problem of reverse osmosis and diffusion of a salt. Starting with the constitutive equations derived in Paper 1, I first determine specific formula for the osmotic coefficient and effective diffusion coefficient of a binary symmetric 1:1 salt (such as KCl or NaCl) as a function of a dimensionless number Θ corresponding to the ratio between the cation exchange capacity (CEC) and the salinity. The modeling is first carried with the Donnan model used to describe the concentrations of the charge carriers in the pore water phase. Then a new model is developed in the thin double layer approximation to determine these concentrations. These models provide explicit relationships between the concentration of the ionic species in the pore space and those in a neutral reservoir in local equilibrium with the pore space and the CEC. The case of reverse osmosis and diffusion coefficient are analyzed in details for the case of saturated and partially saturated porous materials. Comparisons are done with experimental data from the literature obtained on bentonite. The model predicts correctly the influence of salinity (including membrane behavior at high salinities), porosity, cation type (K+ versus Na+), and water saturation on the osmotic coefficient. It also correctly predicts the dependence of the diffusion coefficient of the salt with the salinity.

  10. Aerospace Applications of Non-Equilibrium Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankson, Isaiah M.

    2016-01-01

    Nonequilibrium plasma/non-thermal plasma/cold plasmas are being used in a wide range of new applications in aeronautics, active flow control, heat transfer reduction, plasma-assisted ignition and combustion, noise suppression, and power generation. Industrial applications may be found in pollution control, materials surface treatment, and water purification. In order for these plasma processes to become practical, efficient means of ionization are necessary. A primary challenge for these applications is to create a desired non-equilibrium plasma in air by preventing the discharge from transitioning into an arc. Of particular interest is the impact on simulations and experimental data with and without detailed consideration of non-equilibrium effects, and the consequences of neglecting non-equilibrium. This presentation will provide an assessment of the presence and influence of non-equilibrium phenomena for various aerospace needs and applications. Specific examples to be considered will include the forward energy deposition of laser-induced non-equilibrium plasmoids for sonic boom mitigation, weakly ionized flows obtained from pulsed nanosecond discharges for an annular Hall type MHD generator duct for turbojet energy bypass, and fundamental mechanisms affecting the design and operation of novel plasma-assisted reactive systems in dielectric liquids (water purification, in-pipe modification of fuels, etc.).

  11. Test of Scintillometer Saturation Correction Methods Using Field Experimental Data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleissl, J.; Hartogensis, O.K.; Gomez, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    Saturation of large aperture scintillometer (LAS) signals can result in sensible heat flux measurements that are biased low. A field study with LASs of different aperture sizes and path lengths was performed to investigate the onset of, and corrections for, signal saturation. Saturation already

  12. Ultrafast non-equilibrium carrier dynamics in semiconductor laser mode-locking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hader, J.; Scheller, M.; Laurain, A.; Kilen, I.; Baker, C.; Moloney, J. V.; Koch, S. W.

    2017-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results on the mode-locking dynamics in vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers with semiconductor and graphene saturable absorber mirrors are reviewed with an emphasis on the role of nonequilibrium carrier effects. The systems are studied theoretically using a fully microscopic many-body model for the carrier distributions and polarizations, coupled to Maxwell’s equations for the field propagation. Pump-probe measurements are performed with (sub-) 100 fs resolution. The analysis shows that the non-equilibrium carrier dynamics in the gain quantum-wells and saturable absorber medium significantly influences the system’s response and the resulting mode-locked pulses. The microscopic model is used to study the pulse build up from spontaneous emission noise and to determine the dependence of achievable pulse lengths and fluences on the amounts of saturable and non-saturable losses and the optical gain. The change of the group delay dispersion (GDD) on the pump level is examined and the dependence of the pulse lengths on the total amount of GDD is demonstrated experimentally. Theory-experiment comparisons are used to demonstrate the highly quantitative accuracy of the fully microscopic modeling.

  13. Equilibrium isotope exchange kinetics of native and site-specific mutant forms of E. coli aspartate transcarbamoylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wedler, F.C.; Hsuanyu, Y.; Kantrowitz, E.R.

    1987-05-01

    Isotope exchange kinetics at equilibrium (EIEK) have been used to probe the kinetic and regulatory mechanisms of native aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from E. coli at pH 7.0, 30/sup 0/. Substrate saturation patterns were most consistent with a preferred order random kinetic mechanism: C-P prior to L-Asp, C-Asp released before Pi, with the Asp in equilibrium C-Asp exchange rate 5X faster than C-P in equilibrium Pi. Computer simulations allow one to fit the EIEK experimental data and to arrive at the best set of kinetic constants for a given enzyme state. These approaches have been applied to modified ATCase. Bound CTP and ATP were observed, respectively, to inhibit and activate differentially Asp in equilibrium C-Asp, but not C-P in equilibrium Pi, indicating that these modifiers alter the association-dissociation rates of L-Asp and C-Asp but not of C-P or Pi. Low levels of PALA activated both exchange rates (due to shifting the T-R equilibrium), but higher (PALA) completely blocked both exchanges. The effects of a site-specific mutation of Tyr240 Phe have been similarly probed by EIEK methods. The Phe240 mutant enzyme exhibited kinetic properties markedly different from native ATCase: the data indicate that Phe240 ATCase is much closer to an R-state enzyme than is native enzyme.

  14. Equilibrium moisture content of OSB panels produced with veneer inclusion and different types of adhesive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourival Marin Mendes

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate different statistical models to estimate the equilibrium moisture content of OSB panels exposed to different conditions of air temperature and relative humidity, And also to evaluate the influence of the adhesive and veneer inclusion in the equilibrium moisture content. The panels were produced with three different adhesive types (phenol-formaldehyde - FF, melamine-urea-formaldehyde - MUF, and phenol-melamine-urea-formaldehyde - PMUF and with and without veneer inclusion. The evaluation of the equilibrium moisture content of the panels was carried out at temperatures of 30, 40 and 50°C and relative humidity of 40, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90%. The modeling of equilibrium moisture content was performed using the statistical non-linear and polynomial models. In general, the polynomial models are most indicated for determining the equilibrium moisture content of OSB. The models adjusted only with air relative humidity presented the best precision measurements. The type of adhesive affected the equilibrium moisture content of the panels, being observed for adhesives PMUF and FF the same trend of variation, and the highest values obtained for the panels produced with adhesive MUF. The veneer inclusion decreased the equilibrium moisture content only in the panels with MUF adhesive.

  15. Equilibrium state of a cylindrical particle with flat ends in nematic liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, S Masoomeh; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    A continuum theory is employed to numerically study the equilibrium orientation and defect structures of a circular cylindrical particle with flat ends under a homeotropic anchoring condition in a uniform nematic medium. Different aspect ratios of this colloidal geometry from thin discotic to long rodlike shapes and several colloidal length scales ranging from mesoscale to nanoscale are investigated. We show that the equilibrium state of this colloidal geometry is sensitive to the two geometrical parameters: aspect ratio and length scale of the particle. For a large enough mesoscopic particle, there is a specific asymptotic equilibrium angle associated to each aspect ratio. Upon reducing the particle size to nanoscale, the equilibrium angle follows a descending or ascending trend in such a way that the equilibrium angle of a particle with the aspect ratio bigger than 1:1 (a discotic particle) goes to a parallel alignment with respect to the far-field nematic, whereas the equilibrium angle for a particle with the aspect ratio 1:1 and smaller (a rodlike particle) tends toward a perpendicular alignment to the uniform nematic direction. The discrepancy between the equilibrium angles of the mesoscopic and nanoscopic particles originates from the significant differences between their defect structures. The possible defect structures related to mesoscopic and nanoscopic colloidal particles of this geometry are also introduced.

  16. Phase Equilibrium, Chemical Equilibrium, and a Test of the Third Law: Experiments for Physical Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannhauser, Walter

    1980-01-01

    Described is an experiment designed to provide an experimental basis for a unifying point of view (utilizing theoretical framework and chemistry laboratory experiments) for physical chemistry students. Three experiments are described: phase equilibrium, chemical equilibrium, and a test of the third law of thermodynamics. (Author/DS)

  17. Computing stationary distributions in equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems with Forward Flux Sampling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valeriani, C.; Allen, R.J.; Morelli, M.J.; Frenkel, D.; ten Wolde, P.R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a method for computing stationary distributions for activated processes in equilibrium and non-equilibrium systems using Forward Flux Sampling (FFS). In this method, the stationary distributions are obtained directly from the rate constant calculations for the forward and backward

  18. Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium calculations of cross-sections of (p ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Equilibrium and pre-equilibrium calculations of cross-sections of (, ) reactions on 89Y, 90Zr and 94Mo targets used for the production of 89Zr, 90Nb and 94Tc ... Bülent Ecevit University, 67100 Zonguldak, Turkey; Faculty of Arts and Science, Department of Physics, Osmaniye Korkut Ata University, Osmaniye, Turkey ...

  19. SITE-SCALE SATURATED ZONE TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. KELLER

    2004-11-03

    This work provides a site-scale transport model for calculating radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain, for use in the abstractions model in support of ''Total System Performance Assessment for License Application'' (TSPA-LA). The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation for the components of the site-scale SZ transport model in accordance with administrative procedure AP-SIII.10Q, Models. The initial documentation of this model report was conducted under the ''Technical Work Plan For: Saturated Zone Flow and Transport Modeling and Testing'' (BSC 2003 [DIRS 163965]). The model report has been revised in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan For: Natural System--Saturated Zone Analysis and Model Report Integration'', Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]) to incorporate Regulatory Integration Team comments. All activities listed in the technical work plan that are appropriate to the transport model are documented in this report and are described in Section 2.1.1.4 (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171421]). This report documents: (1) the advection-dispersion transport model including matrix diffusion (Sections 6.3 and 6.4); (2) a description and validation of the transport model (Sections 6.3 and 7); (3) the numerical methods for simulating radionuclide transport (Section 6.4); (4) the parameters (sorption coefficient, Kd ) and their uncertainty distributions used for modeling radionuclide sorption (Appendices A and C); (5) the parameters used for modeling colloid-facilitated radionuclide transport (Table 4-1, Section 6.4.2.6, and Appendix B); and (6) alternative conceptual models and their dispositions (Section 6.6). The intended use of this model is to simulate transport in saturated fractured porous rock (double porosity) and alluvium. The particle-tracking method of simulating radionuclide transport is incorporated in the finite-volume heat and mass transfer numerical

  20. Phase Equilibrium Modeling for Shale Production Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandoval Lemus, Diego Rolando

    simulator, which was then used to assess the impact of the capillary pressure on phase behavior in oil and gas production from tight reservoirs. Since capillary pressure and adsorption occur simultaneously in shale, its combined effect was studied. A model comparison for high-pressure adsorption in shale...... is presented. The adsorption data in shale is generally scarce, therefore, additional capabilities besides the accuracy were considered in the comparison. The multicomponent potential theory of adsorption yields the best results. Moreover, it shows to be useful to extrapolate adsorption data for hydrocarbons...... calculation tools for phase equilibrium in porous media with capillary pressure and adsorption effects. Analysis using these tools have shown that capillary pressure and adsorption have non-negligible effects on phase equilibrium in shale. As general tools, they can be used to calculate phase equilibrium...

  1. Module description of TOKAMAK equilibrium code MEUDAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Masaei; Hayashi, Nobuhiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Ozeki, Takahisa [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of an axisymmetric MHD equilibrium serves as a foundation of TOKAMAK researches, such as a design of devices and theoretical research, the analysis of experiment result. For this reason, also in JAERI, an efficient MHD analysis code has been developed from start of TOKAMAK research. The free boundary equilibrium code ''MEUDAS'' which uses both the DCR method (Double-Cyclic-Reduction Method) and a Green's function can specify the pressure and the current distribution arbitrarily, and has been applied to the analysis of a broad physical subject as a code having rapidity and high precision. Also the MHD convergence calculation technique in ''MEUDAS'' has been built into various newly developed codes. This report explains in detail each module in ''MEUDAS'' for performing convergence calculation in solving the MHD equilibrium. (author)

  2. Non-equilibrium quantum heat machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicki, Robert; Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, David

    2015-11-01

    Standard heat machines (engine, heat pump, refrigerator) are composed of a system (working fluid) coupled to at least two equilibrium baths at different temperatures and periodically driven by an external device (piston or rotor) sometimes called the work reservoir. The aim of this paper is to go beyond this scheme by considering environments which are stationary but cannot be decomposed into a few baths at thermal equilibrium. Such situations are important, for example in solar cells, chemical machines in biology, various realizations of laser cooling or nanoscopic machines driven by laser radiation. We classify non-equilibrium baths depending on their thermodynamic behavior and show that the efficiency of heat machines powered by them is limited by the generalized Carnot bound.

  3. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics in Multiphase Flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mauri, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Non-equilibrium thermodynamics is a general framework that allows the macroscopic description of irreversible processes. This book introduces non-equilibrium thermodynamics and its applications to the rheology of multiphase flows. The subject is relevant to graduate students in chemical and mechanical engineering, physics and material science. This book is divided into two parts. The first part presents the theory of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, reviewing its essential features and showing, when possible, some applications. The second part of this book deals with how the general theory can be applied to model multiphase flows and, in particular, how to determine their constitutive relations. Each chapter contains problems at the end, the solutions of which are given at the end of the book. No prior knowledge of statistical mechanics is required; the necessary prerequisites are elements of transport phenomena and on thermodynamics. “The style of the book is mathematical, but nonetheless it remains very re...

  4. Communication: Microphase equilibrium and assembly dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Yuan; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2017-09-01

    Despite many attempts, ordered equilibrium microphases have yet to be obtained in experimental colloidal suspensions. The recent computation of the equilibrium phase diagram of a microscopic, particle-based microphase former [Zhuang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 098301 (2016)] has nonetheless found such mesoscale assemblies to be thermodynamically stable. Here, we consider their equilibrium and assembly dynamics. At intermediate densities above the order-disorder transition, we identify four different dynamical regimes and the structural changes that underlie the dynamical crossovers from one disordered regime to the next. Below the order-disorder transition, we also find that periodic lamellae are the most dynamically accessible of the periodic microphases. Our analysis thus offers a comprehensive view of the dynamics of disordered microphases and a route to the assembly of periodic microphases in a putative well-controlled, experimental system.

  5. Relativistic perfect fluids in local thermal equilibrium

    CERN Document Server

    Coll, Bartolomé; Sáez, Juan Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The inverse problem for conservative perfect fluid energy tensors provides a striking result. Namely that, in spite of its name, its historic origin or its usual conceptualization, the notion of {\\em local thermal equilibrium} for a perfect fluid is a {\\em purely hydrodynamic}, not thermodynamic, notion. This means that it may be thought, defined and detected using exclusively hydrodynamic quantities, without reference to temperature or any other thermodynamic concept, either of equilibrium or irreversible: a relativistic perfect fluid evolves in local thermal equilibrium if, and only if, its hydrodynamic variables evolve keeping a certain relation among them. This relation fixes, but only fixes, a precise fraction of the thermodynamics of the fluid, namely that relating the speed of its sound waves to the hydrodynamic variables. All thermodynamic schemes (sets of thermodynamic variables and their mutual relations) compatible with such a relation on the sole hydrodynamic variables are obtained. This hydrodyna...

  6. Procyanidins in Lotus L. genotypes grown in soil with different saturations of aluminum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia Ortiz Chini

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Condensed tannins are formed by monomers of procyanidins and prodelfinidins, where the proportion and concentration of their monomers varies according to the plant species and environmental conditions. In Lotus spp., condensed tannins prevent tympanism in ruminants that feed on them. This study aimed to evaluate the concentration of procyanidins and their monomers, catechin and epicatechin in the genotypes of Lotus L. grown in soil with different saturations of aluminum. A two-factor (genotype × Al saturation assay was performed, where the genotypes São Gabriel, Ganador, and UFRGS (Lotus corniculatus L.; Serrano (Lotus uliginosus; and El Rincón (Lotus subbiflorus were cultivated in soil with an Al saturation of 0-20%. The procyanidins were evaluated using high-performance liquid chromatography, which was previously validated for catechin and epicatechin. The concentration of procyanidins and the proportion of epicatechin:catechin were affected by the genotype × environment interaction. In L. corniculatus and L. subbiflorus, the concentration of procyanidin was significantly higher when they were grown in the soil with an Al saturation of 20% compared to that when they were grown in the soil with 0% Al saturation, but the opposite effect was observed in L. uliginosus. The proportion of epicatechin:catechin decreased in plants grown in soil without Al, and only the UFRGS genotype maintained a similar proportion under both the soil acidity conditions. The predominant monomer was epicatechin, which varied from 57% to 75% according to the soil in which the plants were grown.

  7. Pre-equilibrium Longitudinal Flow in the IP-Glasma Framework for Pb+Pb Collisions at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Scott; Shen, Chun; Fillion-Gourdeau, François; Jeon, Sangyong; Gale, Charles

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we debut a new implementation of IP-Glasma and quantify the pre-equilibrium longitudinal flow in the IP-Glasma framework. The saturation physics based IP-Glasma model naturally provides a non-zero initial longitudinal flow through its pre-equilibrium Yang-Mills evolution. A hybrid IP-Glasma+MUSIC+UrQMD frame-work is employed to test this new implementation against experimental data and to make further predictions about hadronic flow observables in Pb+Pb collisions at 5.02 TeV. Finally, the non-zero pre-equilibrium longitudinal flow of the IP-Glasma model is quantified, and its origin is briefly discussed.

  8. 14 CFR 67.305 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.305..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a third-class airman... by, or that may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  9. 14 CFR 67.105 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.105..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a first-class airman... may reasonably be expected to be manifested by, vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  10. 14 CFR 67.205 - Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium. 67.205..., nose, throat, and equilibrium. Ear, nose, throat, and equilibrium standards for a second-class airman..., vertigo or a disturbance of equilibrium. ...

  11. QMD application of sub-saturated nuclear matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Toshiki; Maruyama, Tomoyuki; Iwamoto, Akira [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Niita, Koji; Chikamatsu, Kazuhiro

    1997-05-01

    QMD (quantum molecular dynamics) has not been applied to supernova and neutron star matter. We begun to apply QMD, microscopic simulation of nuclear reaction, to the infinite system of nuclear matter. The infinite system was simulated by N particles system under the periodic boundary condition. Pauli potential introduced repulsive force which the same kinds of particles could not approach at phase space, instead of antisymmetrization of the system. Supernova matter was appropriate to the symmetric nuclear matter, the inhomogeneous structure was observed less than 0.8 {rho}{sub 0} of density, but homogeneous more than it. Each nucleus was seen to separate from others less than 0.2 {rho}{sub 0}. Neutron star matter attains {beta} equilibrium and not symmetric matter and the lowest energy was obtained at about 0.03-0.08 of proton content. (S.Y.)

  12. Particle Sorting and Motility Out of Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Cato

    The theory of equilibrium statistical physics, formulated over a century ago, provides an excellent description of physical systems which have reached a static, relaxed state. Such systems can be loosely thought of as maximally disordered, in keeping with the Second Law of Thermodynamics which states that a thermal system in equilibrium has reached a state of highest entropy. However, many entities in the world around us maintain themselves in an remarkably ordered and dynamic state, and must pay for this by producing entropy in their surroundings. Organisms, for example, convert chemical energy (food) into heat, which is then dumped into the environment, raising its entropy. Systems which produce entropy through any mechanism must be described by theories of non-equilibrium statistical physics, for which there currently exists no unified framework or ontology. Here we examine two specific cases of non-equilibrium phenomena from a theoretical perspective. First, we explore the behaviour of microscopic particles which continually dissipate energy to propel themselves through their environment. Second, we consider how devices which distinguish between different types of particles can exploit non-equilibrium processes to enhance their performance. For the case of self-propelled particles, we consider a theoretical model where the particle's propulsion force has "memory"--it is a random process whose instantaneous value depends on its past evolution. This introduces a persistence in the particle's motion, and requires the dissipation of energy into its surroundings. These particles are found to exhibit a variety of behaviours forbidden in equilibrium systems: for instance they may cluster around barriers, exert unbalanced forces, and sustain steady flows through space. We develop the understanding of these particles' dynamics through a combination of explicit calculations, approximations and numerical simulation which characterise and quantify their non-equilibrium

  13. Putting A Human Face on Equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickstein, Neil

    2005-03-01

    A short biography of chemist Fritz Haber is used to personalize the abstract concepts of equilibrium chemistry for high school students in an introductory course. In addition to giving the Haber Bosch process an historic, an economic, and a scientific background the reading and subsequent discussion allows students for whom the human perspective is of paramount importance a chance to investigate the irony of balance or equilibrium in Haber's life story. Since the inclusion of the Haber biography, performance in the laboratory and on examinations for those students who are usually only partially engaged has dramatically improved.

  14. Quantum gambling based on Nash-equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Wang, Yun-Long; Liu, Bi-Heng; Shadbolt, Pete; Zhang, Yong-Sheng; Gao, Hong; Li, Fu-Li; O'Brien, Jeremy L.

    2017-06-01

    The problem of establishing a fair bet between spatially separated gambler and casino can only be solved in the classical regime by relying on a trusted third party. By combining Nash-equilibrium theory with quantum game theory, we show that a secure, remote, two-party game can be played using a quantum gambling machine which has no classical counterpart. Specifically, by modifying the Nash-equilibrium point we can construct games with arbitrary amount of bias, including a game that is demonstrably fair to both parties. We also report a proof-of-principle experimental demonstration using linear optics.

  15. Entropy and equilibrium via games of complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topsøe, Flemming

    2004-09-01

    It is suggested that thermodynamical equilibrium equals game theoretical equilibrium. Aspects of this thesis are discussed. The philosophy is consistent with maximum entropy thinking of Jaynes, but goes one step deeper by deriving the maximum entropy principle from an underlying game theoretical principle. The games introduced are based on measures of complexity. Entropy is viewed as minimal complexity. It is demonstrated that Tsallis entropy ( q-entropy) and Kaniadakis entropy ( κ-entropy) can be obtained in this way, based on suitable complexity measures. A certain unifying effect is obtained by embedding these measures in a two-parameter family of entropy functions.

  16. Using noble gas tracers to estimate residual CO2 saturation in the field: results from the CO2CRC Otway residual saturation and dissolution test

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaForce, T.; Ennis-King, J.; Paterson, L.

    2013-12-01

    Residual CO2 saturation is a critically important parameter in CO2 storage as it can have a large impact on the available secure storage volume and post-injection CO2 migration. A suite of single-well tests to measure residual trapping was conducted at the Otway test site in Victoria, Australia during 2011. One or more of these tests could be conducted at a prospective CO2 storage site before large-scale injection. The test involved injection of 150 tonnes of pure carbon dioxide followed by 454 tonnes of CO2-saturated formation water to drive the carbon dioxide to residual saturation. This work presents a brief overview of the full test sequence, followed by the analysis and interpretation of the tests using noble gas tracers. Prior to CO2 injection krypton (Kr) and xenon (Xe) tracers were injected and back-produced to characterise the aquifer under single-phase conditions. After CO2 had been driven to residual the two tracers were injected and produced again. The noble gases act as non-partitioning aqueous-phase tracers in the undisturbed aquifer and as partitioning tracers in the presence of residual CO2. To estimate residual saturation from the tracer test data a one-dimensional radial model of the near-well region is used. In the model there are only two independent parameters: the apparent dispersivity of each tracer and the residual CO2 saturation. Independent analysis of the Kr and Xe tracer production curves gives the same estimate of residual saturation to within the accuracy of the method. Furthermore the residual from the noble gas tracer tests is consistent with other measurements in the sequence of tests.

  17. Energy dependent saturable and reverse saturable absorption in cube-like polyaniline/polymethyl methacrylate film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thekkayil, Remyamol [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695 547 (India); Philip, Reji [Light and Matter Physics Group, Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Bangalore 560 080 (India); Gopinath, Pramod [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695 547 (India); John, Honey, E-mail: honey@iist.ac.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Valiamala, Thiruvananthapuram 695 547 (India)

    2014-08-01

    Solid films of cube-like polyaniline synthesized by inverse microemulsion polymerization method have been fabricated in a transparent PMMA host by an in situ free radical polymerization technique, and are characterized by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques. The nonlinear optical properties are studied by open aperture Z-scan technique employing 5 ns (532 nm) and 100 fs (800 nm) laser pulses. At the relatively lower laser pulse energy of 5 μJ, the film shows saturable absorption both in the nanosecond and femtosecond excitation domains. An interesting switchover from saturable absorption to reverse saturable absorption is observed at 532 nm when the energy of the nanosecond laser pulses is increased. The nonlinear absorption coefficient increases with increase in polyaniline concentration, with low optical limiting threshold, as required for a good optical limiter. - Highlights: • Synthesized cube-like polyaniline nanostructures. • Fabricated polyaniline/PMMA nanocomposite films. • At 5 μJ energy, saturable absorption is observed both at ns and fs regime. • Switchover from SA to RSA is observed as energy of laser beam increases. • Film (0.1 wt % polyaniline) shows high β{sub eff} (230 cm GW{sup −1}) and low limiting threshold at 150 μJ.

  18. Femoral venous oxygen saturation and central venous oxygen saturation in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Wang, Jiandong; Dong, Yun; Chen, Youdai

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the relationship between central venous oxygen saturation (ScvO(2)) and femoral venous oxygen saturation (SfvO(2)) in a large group of critically ill patients. Observational study. A group of unselected critically ill patients with central line placed into superior vena cava were included. A 26-bed intensive care unit in a tertiary referral hospital. None. Venous blood samples of superior vena cava and femoral vein were collected within an interval of 5 to 15 minutes and analyzed with blood gas/electrolyte analyzer immediately. Although SfvO(2) was significantly correlated with ScvO(2) (r = 0.493, P 731 pairs of blood samples collected from 357 patients. The fit line of scatter diagram ScvO(2) vs SfvO(2) had a large intercept (48.68%) and a low slope (0.2978); ScvO(2) was still around 50% while SfvO(2) was nearing 0%. The distribution of blood flow, measured with Doppler ultrasound, had a similar trend in 237 patients and 412 measurements. The ratio of femoral artery flow over common carotid artery flow varied widely (from 0 to 7.13). Blood flow was not distributed in a fixed ratio to the superior vena cava-drained organs and tissues. Central venous oxygen saturation was not representative of the whole systemic circulation in critically ill patients. Central venous oxygen saturation alone might be misleading in goal-directed therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Advanced Takagi‒Sugeno fuzzy systems delay and saturation

    CERN Document Server

    Benzaouia, Abdellah

    2014-01-01

    This monograph puts the reader in touch with a decade’s worth of new developments in the field of fuzzy control specifically those of the popular Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) type. New techniques for stabilizing control analysis and design based on multiple Lyapunov functions and linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), are proposed. All the results are illustrated with numerical examples and figures and a rich bibliography is provided for further investigation. Control saturations are taken into account within the fuzzy model. The concept of positive invariance is used to obtain sufficient asymptotic stability conditions for the fuzzy system with constrained control inside a subset of the state space. The authors also consider the non-negativity of the states. This is of practical importance in many chemical, physical and biological processes that involve quantities that have intrinsically constant and non-negative sign: concentration of substances, level of liquids, etc. Results for linear systems are then extended to l...

  20. Saturated Zone Plumes in Volcanic Rock: Implications for Yucca Mountain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Kelkar; R. Roback; B. Robinson; G. Srinivasan; C. Jones; P. Reimus

    2006-02-14

    This paper presents a literature survey of the occurrences of radionuclide plumes in saturated, fractured rocks. Three sites, Idaho National laboratory, Hanford, and Oak Ridge are discussed in detail. Results of a modeling study are also presented showing that the length to width ratio of a plume starting within the repository footprint at the Yucca Mountain Project site, decreases from about 20:1 for the base case to about 4:1 for a higher value of transverse dispersivity, indicating enhanced lateral spreading of the plume. Due to the definition of regulatory requirements, this lateral spreading does not directly impact breakthrough curves at the 18 km compliance boundary, however it increases the potential that a plume will encounter reducing conditions, thus significantly retarding the transport of sorbing radionuclides.