WorldWideScience

Sample records for sativum leaf agglutinin

  1. Interaction of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin with midgut brush border membrane vesicles proteins and its stability in Helicoverpa armigera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Mishra, Manisha; Singh, Harpal; Ranjan, Amol; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa; Verma, Praveen Chandra; Singh, Pradhyumna Kumar; Tuli, Rakesh

    2010-12-01

    Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) binds to several proteins in the midgut of Helicoverpa armigera and causes toxicity. Most of these were glycosylated. Six ASAL-binding proteins were selected for identification. PMF and MS/MS data showed their similarity with midgut aminopeptidase APN2, polycalins and alkaline phosphatase of H. armigera, cadherin-N protein (partial AGAP009726-PA) of Acyrthosiphon pisum, cytochrome P450 (CYP315A1) of Manduca sexta and alkaline phosphatase of Heliothis virescens. Some of the ASAL-binding midgut proteins were similar to the larval receptors responsible for the binding of δ-endotoxin proteins of Bacillus thuringiensis. Galanthus nivalis agglutinin also interacted with most of the ASAL-binding proteins. The ASAL showed resistance to midgut proteases and was detected in the larval hemolymph and excreta. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the presence of ASAL in the body tissue also. Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Allergenicity assessment of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin, a potential candidate protein for developing sap sucking insect resistant food crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Hossain Ali; Chakraborti, Dipankar; Majumder, Pralay; Roy, Pampa; Roy, Amit; Bhattacharya, Swati Gupta; Das, Sampa

    2011-01-01

    Mannose-binding Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) is highly antinutritional and toxic to various phloem-feeding hemipteran insects. ASAL has been expressed in a number of agriculturally important crops to develop resistance against those insects. Awareness of the safety aspect of ASAL is absolutely essential for developing ASAL transgenic plants. Following the guidelines framed by the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization, the source of the gene, its sequence homology with potent allergens, clinical tests on mammalian systems, and the pepsin resistance and thermostability of the protein were considered to address the issue. No significant homology to the ASAL sequence was detected when compared to known allergenic proteins. The ELISA of blood sera collected from known allergy patients also failed to show significant evidence of cross-reactivity. In vitro and in vivo assays both indicated the digestibility of ASAL in the presence of pepsin in a minimum time period. With these experiments, we concluded that ASAL does not possess any apparent features of an allergen. This is the first report regarding the monitoring of the allergenicity of any mannose-binding monocot lectin having insecticidal efficacy against hemipteran insects.

  3. Transgenic rice expressing Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) exhibits high-level resistance against major sap-sucking pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarasi, Bharathi; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Immanni, China Pasalu; Vudem, Dasavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2008-01-01

    Background Rice (Oryza sativa) productivity is adversely impacted by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. An approximate 52% of the global production of rice is lost annually owing to the damage caused by biotic factors, of which ~21% is attributed to the attack of insect pests. In this paper we report the isolation, cloning and characterization of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (asal) gene, and its expression in elite indica rice cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. The stable transgenic lines, expressing ASAL, showed explicit resistance against major sap-sucking pests. Results Allium sativum leaf lectin gene (asal), coding for mannose binding homodimeric protein (ASAL) from garlic plants, has been isolated and introduced into elite indica rice cultivars susceptible to sap-sucking insects, viz., brown planthopper (BPH), green leafhopper (GLH) and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH). Embryogenic calli of rice were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium harbouring pSB111 super-binary vector comprising garlic lectin gene asal along with the herbicide resistance gene bar, both under the control of CaMV35S promoter. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the genomes of rice plants. Northern and western blot analyses revealed expression of ASAL in different transgenic rice lines. In primary transformants, the level of ASAL protein, as estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, varied between 0.74% and 1.45% of the total soluble proteins. In planta insect bioassays on transgenic rice lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on BPH, GLH and WBPH insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects. Conclusion In planta insect bioassays were carried out on asal transgenic rice lines employing standard screening techniques followed in conventional breeding for selection of insect resistant plants. The ASAL expressing rice plants, bestowed with high

  4. Transgenic rice expressing Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL exhibits high-level resistance against major sap-sucking pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vudem Dasavantha

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice (Oryza sativa productivity is adversely impacted by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. An approximate 52% of the global production of rice is lost annually owing to the damage caused by biotic factors, of which ~21% is attributed to the attack of insect pests. In this paper we report the isolation, cloning and characterization of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (asal gene, and its expression in elite indica rice cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. The stable transgenic lines, expressing ASAL, showed explicit resistance against major sap-sucking pests. Results Allium sativum leaf lectin gene (asal, coding for mannose binding homodimeric protein (ASAL from garlic plants, has been isolated and introduced into elite indica rice cultivars susceptible to sap-sucking insects, viz., brown planthopper (BPH, green leafhopper (GLH and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH. Embryogenic calli of rice were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium harbouring pSB111 super-binary vector comprising garlic lectin gene asal along with the herbicide resistance gene bar, both under the control of CaMV35S promoter. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the genomes of rice plants. Northern and western blot analyses revealed expression of ASAL in different transgenic rice lines. In primary transformants, the level of ASAL protein, as estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, varied between 0.74% and 1.45% of the total soluble proteins. In planta insect bioassays on transgenic rice lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on BPH, GLH and WBPH insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects. Conclusion In planta insect bioassays were carried out on asal transgenic rice lines employing standard screening techniques followed in conventional breeding for selection of insect resistant plants. The ASAL expressing rice

  5. Transgenic rice expressing Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) exhibits high-level resistance against major sap-sucking pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarasi, Bharathi; Sadumpati, Vijayakumar; Immanni, China Pasalu; Vudem, Dasavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2008-10-14

    Rice (Oryza sativa) productivity is adversely impacted by numerous biotic and abiotic factors. An approximate 52% of the global production of rice is lost annually owing to the damage caused by biotic factors, of which approximately 21% is attributed to the attack of insect pests. In this paper we report the isolation, cloning and characterization of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (asal) gene, and its expression in elite indica rice cultivars using Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method. The stable transgenic lines, expressing ASAL, showed explicit resistance against major sap-sucking pests. Allium sativum leaf lectin gene (asal), coding for mannose binding homodimeric protein (ASAL) from garlic plants, has been isolated and introduced into elite indica rice cultivars susceptible to sap-sucking insects, viz., brown planthopper (BPH), green leafhopper (GLH) and whitebacked planthopper (WBPH). Embryogenic calli of rice were co-cultivated with Agrobacterium harbouring pSB111 super-binary vector comprising garlic lectin gene asal along with the herbicide resistance gene bar, both under the control of CaMV35S promoter. PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed stable integration of transgenes into the genomes of rice plants. Northern and western blot analyses revealed expression of ASAL in different transgenic rice lines. In primary transformants, the level of ASAL protein, as estimated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, varied between 0.74% and 1.45% of the total soluble proteins. In planta insect bioassays on transgenic rice lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on BPH, GLH and WBPH insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects. In planta insect bioassays were carried out on asal transgenic rice lines employing standard screening techniques followed in conventional breeding for selection of insect resistant plants. The ASAL expressing rice plants, bestowed with high entomotoxic

  6. Biological safety assessment of mutant variant of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL), a novel antifungal protein for future transgenic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Prithwi; Roy, Amit; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Das, Sampa

    2013-12-04

    Genetic engineering has established itself to be an important tool for crop improvement. Despite the success, there is always a risk of food allergy induced by alien gene products. The present study assessed the biosafety of mutant Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL), a potent antifungal protein generated by site directed mutagenesis of Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL). mASAL was cloned in pET28a+ and expressed in E. coli, and the safety assessment was carried out according to the FAO/WHO guideline (2001). Bioinformatics analysis, pepsin digestion, and thermal stability assay showed the protein to be nonallergenic. Targeted sera screening revealed no significant IgE affinity of mASAL. Furthermore, mASAL sensitized Balb/c mice showed normal histopathology of lung and gut tissue. All results indicated the least possibility of mASAL being an allergen. Thus, mASAL appears to be a promising antifungal candidate protein suitable for agronomical biotechnology.

  7. Deciphering the mode of action of a mutant Allium sativum Leaf Agglutinin (mASAL), a potent antifungal protein on Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Prithwi; Roy, Amit; Hess, Daniel; Ghosh, Anupama; Das, Sampa

    2015-10-26

    Mutant Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL) is a potent, biosafe, antifungal protein that exhibits fungicidal activity against different phytopathogenic fungi, including Rhizoctonia solani. The effect of mASAL on the morphology of R.solani was monitored primarily by scanning electron and light microscopic techniques. Besides different fluorescent probes were used for monitoring various intracellular changes associated with mASAL treatment like change in mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of programmed cell death (PCD). In addition ligand blot followed by LC-MS/MS analyses were performed to detect the putative interactors of mASAL. Knowledge on the mode of function for any new protein is a prerequisite for its biotechnological application. Detailed morphological analysis of mASAL treated R. solani hyphae using different microscopic techniques revealed a detrimental effect of mASAL on both the cell wall and the plasma membrane. Moreover, exposure to mASAL caused the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and the subsequent intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the target organism. In conjunction with this observation, evidence of the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) was also noted in the mASAL treated R. solani hyphae. Furthermore, we investigated its interacting partners from R. solani. Using ligand blots followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses, we identified different binding partners including Actin, HSP70, ATPase and 14-3-3 protein. Taken together, the present study provides insight into the probable mode of action of the antifungal protein, mASAL on R. solani which could be exploited in future biotechnological applications.

  8. A new high molecular weight agglutinin from garlic (Allium sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Sandhu, R S

    1997-01-01

    Erythrocyte agglutination by lectins from Allium sativum was inhibited only by mannose of the sugars tested. However, asialofetuin was more effective inhibitor of agglutination as compared to mannose. This led to the use of an asialofetuin-silica affinity column to isolate agglutinins of 110 and 25 kDa (ASA110 and ASA25). While ASA25 is a dimeric protein comprising of subunits of 12.5 and 13.0 kDa, ASA110 is a glycoprotein of two identical subunits of 47 kDa. ASA110 revealed to have a high content of aspartic acid, glycine, leucine and serine but low content of cysteine and methionine. It contains 14 residues of neutral sugars in addition to 43 residues of hexosamines per mole of lectin and requires metal ions for its functional conformation. Serological cross-reactions with other species showed some common epitopes of ASA110 and ASA25 present in A. porrum, A. ascalonicum, Narcissus alba, PHA and Con A but not in A. cepa. ASA110 with CHO cells indicated it to be weakly cytotoxic with LD50 of 160 microg/ml.

  9. Development of transgenic cotton lines expressing Allium sativum agglutinin (ASAL) for enhanced resistance against major sap-sucking pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajhala, Chakravarthy S K; Sadumpati, Vijaya Kumar; Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1-2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects.

  10. Development of Transgenic Cotton Lines Expressing Allium sativum Agglutinin (ASAL) for Enhanced Resistance against Major Sap-Sucking Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunna, Hariprasad Rao; Puligundla, Sateesh Kumar; Vudem, Dashavantha Reddy; Khareedu, Venkateswara Rao

    2013-01-01

    Mannose-specific Allium sativum leaf agglutinin encoding gene (ASAL) and herbicide tolerance gene (BAR) were introduced into an elite cotton inbred line (NC-601) employing Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation. Cotton transformants were produced from the phosphinothricin (PPT)-resistant shoots obtained after co-cultivation of mature embryos with the Agrobacterium strain EHA105 harbouring recombinant binary vector pCAMBIA3300-ASAL-BAR. PCR and Southern blot analysis confirmed the presence and stable integration of ASAL and BAR genes in various transformants of cotton. Basta leaf-dip assay, northern blot, western blot and ELISA analyses disclosed variable expression of BAR and ASAL transgenes in different transformants. Transgenes, ASAL and BAR, were stably inherited and showed co-segregation in T1 generation in a Mendelian fashion for both PPT tolerance and insect resistance. In planta insect bioassays on T2 and T3 homozygous ASAL-transgenic lines revealed potent entomotoxic effects of ASAL on jassid and whitefly insects, as evidenced by significant decreases in the survival, development and fecundity of the insects when compared to the untransformed controls. Furthermore, the transgenic cotton lines conferred higher levels of resistance (1–2 score) with minimal plant damage against these major sucking pests when bioassays were carried out employing standard screening techniques. The developed transgenics could serve as a potential genetic resource in recombination breeding aimed at improving the pest resistance of cotton. This study represents the first report of its kind dealing with the development of transgenic cotton resistant to two major sap-sucking insects. PMID:24023750

  11. Experimental study on differential diagnosis of tumor from inflammation by using /sup 125/I labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1987-12-01

    We have reported that Pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), a plant lectin which recognizes mannosyl residues, accumulates markedly in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) and suggested the possibility of applying PSA to tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals. In the present work, an inflammation was induced by implantation of cotton thread in the left rear leg skeletal muscle of ddY mice and Ehrlich ascites tumor cells were inoculated into the right rear leg. /sup 67/Ga-citrate accumulated in the tumor tissue and the inflammatory lesion to almost equal extents. On the other hand, /sup 125/I-PSA preferentially accumulated in tumor tissues in mice bearing both tumor and inflammation. The results suggest that differential diagnosis of tumor from inflammation using radiolabeled PSA may be possible.

  12. Ectopically expressed leaf and bulb lectins from garlic (Allium sativum L.) protect transgenic tobacco plants against cotton leafworm (Spodoptera littoralis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Amin; Smagghe, Guy; Broeders, Sylvia; Hernalsteens, Jean-Pierre; De Greve, Henri; Peumans, Willy J; Van Damme, Els J M

    2008-02-01

    The insecticidal activity of the leaf (ASAL) and bulb (ASAII) agglutinins from Allium sativum L. (garlic) against the cotton leafworm, Spodoptera littoralis Boisd. (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was studied using transgenic tobacco plants expressing the lectins under the control of the constitutive CaMV35S promoter. PCR analysis confirmed that the garlic lectin genes were integrated into the plant genome. Western blots and semi-quantitative agglutination assays revealed lectin expression at various levels in the transgenic lines. Biochemical analyses indicated that the recombinant ASAL and ASAII are indistinguishable from the native garlic lectins. Insect bioassays using detached leaves from transgenic tobacco plants demonstrated that the ectopically expressed ASAL and ASAII significantly (P transgenic approach.

  13. Monitoring the efficacy of mutated Allium sativum leaf lectin in transgenic rice against Rhizoctonia solani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Prithwi; Sen, Senjuti; Chakraborty, Joydeep; Das, Sampa

    2016-03-01

    Rice sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani is one of the most devastating diseases of rice. It is associated with significant reduction in rice productivity worldwide. A mutant variant of mannose binding Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (mASAL) was previously reported to exhibit strong antifungal activity against R. solani. In this study, the mASAL gene has been evaluated for its in planta antifungal activity in rice plants. mASAL was cloned into pCAMBIA1301 binary vector under the control of CaMV35S promoter. It was expressed in an elite indica rice cv. IR64 by employing Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Molecular analyses of transgenic plants confirmed the presence and stable integration of mASAL gene. Immunohistofluorescence analysis of various tissue sections of plant parts clearly indicated the constitutive expression of mASAL. The segregation pattern of mASAL transgene was observed in T1 progenies in a 3:1 Mendelian ratio. The expression of mASAL was confirmed in T0 and T1 plants through western blot analysis followed by ELISA. In planta bioassay of transgenic lines against R. solani exhibited an average of 55 % reduction in sheath blight percentage disease index (PDI). The present study opens up the possibility of engineering rice plants with the antifungal gene mASAL, conferring resistance to sheath blight.

  14. Calcium-calmodulin signalling is involved in light-induced acidification by epidermal leaf cells of pea, Pisum sativum L.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Staal, M; Prins, HBA

    1997-01-01

    Pathways of signal transduction of red and blue light-dependent acidification by leaf epidermal cells were studied using epidermal strips of the Argenteum mutant of Pisum sativum. In these preparations the contribution of guard cells to the acidification is minimal. The hydroxypyridine nifedipine, a

  15. Auxin transport inhibitor induced low complexity petiolated leaves and sessile leaf-like stipules and architectures of heritable leaf and stipule mutants in Pisum sativum suggest that its simple lobed stipules and compound leaf represent ancestral forms in angiosperms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Sharma, Vishakha; Khan, Moinuddin; Hindala, Mali Ram; Kumar, Sushil

    2013-04-01

    In angiosperms, leaf and stipule architectures are inherited species-specific traits. Variation in leaf and stipule sizes, and forms result from the interaction between abiotic and biotic stimuli, and gene regulatory network(s) that underlie the leaf and stipule developmental programme(s). Here, correspondence between variation in leaf and stipule architectures described for extant angiosperms and that induced mutationally and by imposition of stress in model angiosperm species, especially in Pisum sativum, was detected. Following inferences were drawn from the observations. (i) Several leaf forms in P. sativum have origin in fusion of stipule and leaf primordia. Perfoliate (and amplexicaul and connate) simple sessile leaves and sessile adnate leaves are the result of such primordial fusions. Reversal of changes in the gene regulatory network responsible for fusion products are thought to restore original stipule and leaf conditions. (ii) Compound leaf formation in several different model plants, is a result of promotion of pathways for such condition by gene regulatory networks directed by KNOx1 and LEAFY transcription factors or intercalation of the gene networks directed by them. (iii) Gene regulatory network for compound leaves in P. sativum when mutated generates highly complex compound leaves on one hand and simple leaves on other hand. These altered conditions are mutationally reversible. (vi) Simple leaves in model plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana despite overexpression of KNOx1 orthologues do not become compound. (v) All forms of leaves, including simple leaf, probably have origins in a gene regulatory network of the kind present in P. sativum.

  16. NADH induces the generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes. [Pisum sativum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Rio, L.A.; Sandalio, L.M.; Palma, J.M. (Unidad de Bioquimica Vegetal, Granada (Spain)); Fernandez, V.M.; Ruperez, F.L. (Instituto de Catalisis, Madrid (Spain))

    1989-03-01

    In peroxisomes isolated from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) the production of superoxide free radicals (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) by xanthine and NADH was investigated. In peroxisomal membranes, 100 micromolar NADH induced the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals. In the soluble fractions of peroxisomes, no generation of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} radicals was observed by incubation with either NADH or xanthine, although xanthine oxidase was found located predominantly in the matrix of peroxisomes. The failure of xanthine to induce superoxide generation was probably due to the inability to fully suppress the endogenous Mn-superoxide dismutase activity by inhibitors which were inactive against xanthine oxidase. The generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes together with the recently described production of these oxygen radicals in glyoxysomes suggests that O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} generation could be a common metabolic property of peroxisomes and further supports the existence of active oxygen-related roles for peroxisomes in cellular metabolism.

  17. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of Nickel Oxide Nanoparticles Using Coriandrum sativum Leaf Extract and Their Structural-Magnetic Catalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishnan Azhagu Raj

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, using Coriandrum sativum L., a leaf-extracted, assisted microwave method (MM was used to synthesize nickel oxide formation. We synthesized nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO with a crystal size in the range of 15–16 nm by a Coriandrum sativum leaf-assisted microwave method (LAMM. The synthesized materials show that an X-ray diffraction (XRD study confirmed the formation of a single phase structure exhibiting a crystallite size in the range of 15–16 nm using Scherrer’s method. The nickel oxide prepared by the MM had a surface area of 60.35 m2/g, pore volume of 0.9427 cm3/g and an average pore diameter of 13.27 Å. Surface morphology was analyzed by the scanning electron microscope (SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET analysis, and the vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM. Catalytic activity (CA tended toward the oxidation of styrene to benzaldehyde. The inexpensive catalyst tested is likely effective as a catalyst due to synergistic interactions between metal oxides with high dispersion. In comparison with other findings, LAMM is easy and eco-friendly. The current study obtained nanocrystalline NiO that was suitable for potential applications in catalysis. The synthesized NiO could potentially be used in therapeutic field due to their competent antibacterial activity.

  18. Effect of olive leaf, Satureja khuzestanica, and Allium sativum extracts on Giardia lamblia cysts compared with metronidazole in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Sh; Rostami, A; Delfan, B; Pournia, Y; Rashidipour, M

    2016-12-01

    Giardia lamblia is one of the common causes of worldwide diarrhea in children. Appropriate medicinal treatment for giardiasis is available but there are some evidences of drug resistance, insufficient efficacy, and unpleasant side effects. In order to reach a more natural drug with suitable efficacy and the lowest side effects, the effects of the hydroalcoholic extracts of olive leaf, Satureja khuzestanica, and Allium sativum on G. lamblia cysts were evaluated in vitro, as well as antigiardial effect of the extracts was compared with metronidazole as the drug of choice. 2 and 5 mg of the plants extracts and powder of metronidazole 250 mg pills were added to 1 ml of G. lamblia cysts suspension (containing 5,000 cyst/ml normal saline), and the percentages of bioavailability of G. lamblia cysts were examined at the 2nd and 4th h after exposure and in 4 and 37 °C temperatures using eosin 0.1 % and a haemocytometer. The data were analyzed by multiway ANOVA test, Tukey's test, and the SPSS software, version 18. The examinations demonstrated that olive leaf extract had the most fatality rate on G. lamblia cysts in vitro (37.90 ± 7.01 %), followed by the extract of S. khuzestanica (32.52 ± 9.07 %). Metronidazole 250 mg pills had relatively effective fatality rate on G. lamblia cysts in vitro (28.75 ± 10.30 %), whereas A. sativum (garlic) had the lowest fatality effect on G. lamblia cysts in vitro (22.65 ± 10.47 %). With respect to higher fatality effect of olive leaf and S. khuzestanica extracts compared with metronidazole in vitro, these plants can be used as suitable candidates to make new antigiardial drugs with low side effects and without drug resistance in the treatment of giardiasis in children.

  19. Signal Integration by ABA in the Blue Light-Induced Acidification of Leaf Pavement Cells in Pea (Pisum sativum L. var. Argenteum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Os, Désirée; Staal, Marten; Elzenga, J Theo M

    2007-05-01

    Leaf pavement cell expansion in light depends on apoplastic acidification by a plasma membrane proton-pumping ATPase, modifying cell wall extensibility and providing the driving force for uptake of osmotically active solutes generating turgor. This paper shows that the plant hormone ABA inhibits light-induced leaf disk growth as well as the blue light-induced pavement cell growth in pea (Pisum sativum L.). In the phytochrome chromophore-deficient mutant pcd2, the effect of ABA on the blue light-induced apoplastic acidification response, which exhibits a high fluence phase via phytochrome and a low fluence phase via an unknown blue light receptor, is still present, indicating an interaction of ABA with the blue light receptor pathway. Furthermore, it is shown that ABA inhibits the blue light-induced apoplastic acidification reversibly. These results indicate that the effect of ABA on apoplastic acidification can provide a mechanism for short term, reversible adjustment of leaf growth rate to environmental change.

  20. Stemphylium Leaf Blight of Garlic (Allium sativum in Spain: Taxonomy and In Vitro Fungicide Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gálvez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The most serious aerial disease of garlic is leaf blight caused by Stemphylium spp. Geographical variation in the causal agent of this disease is indicated. Stemphylium vesicarium has been reported in Spain, whereas S. solani is the most prevalent species recorded in China. In this study, Stemphylium isolates were obtained from symptomatic garlic plants sampled from the main Spanish production areas. Sequence data for the ITS1–5.8S–ITS2 region enabled assignation of the isolates to the Pleospora herbarum complex and clearly distinguished the isolates from S. solani. Conidial morphology of the isolates corresponded to that of S. vesicarium and clearly discriminated them from S. alfalfae and S. herbarum on the basis of the size and septation pattern of mature conidia. Conidial morphology as well as conidial length, width and length:width ratio also allowed the Spanish isolates to be distinguished from S. botryosum and S. herbarum. Control of leaf blight of garlic is not well established. Few studies are available regarding the effectiveness of chemical treatments to reduce Stemphylium spp. incidence on garlic. The effectiveness of nine fungicides of different chemical groups to reduce Stemphylium mycelial growth in vitro was tested. Boscalid + pyraclostrobin (group name, succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors + quinone outside inhibitors, iprodione (dicar-boximide, and prochloraz (demethylation inhibitors were highly effective at reducing mycelial growth in S. vesicarium with EC₅₀ values less than 5 ppm. In general, the effectiveness of the fungicide was enhanced with increasing dosage.

  1. Stemphylium Leaf Blight of Garlic (Allium sativum ) in Spain: Taxonomy and In Vitro Fungicide Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, Laura; Gil-Serna, Jéssica; García, Marta; Iglesias, Concepción; Palmero, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The most serious aerial disease of garlic is leaf blight caused by Stemphylium spp. Geographical variation in the causal agent of this disease is indicated. Stemphylium vesicarium has been reported in Spain, whereas S. solani is the most prevalent species recorded in China. In this study, Stemphylium isolates were obtained from symptomatic garlic plants sampled from the main Spanish production areas. Sequence data for the ITS1–5.8S–ITS2 region enabled assignation of the isolates to the Pleospora herbarum complex and clearly distinguished the isolates from S. solani. Conidial morphology of the isolates corresponded to that of S. vesicarium and clearly discriminated them from S. alfalfae and S. herbarum on the basis of the size and septation pattern of mature conidia. Conidial morphology as well as conidial length, width and length:width ratio also allowed the Spanish isolates to be distinguished from S. botryosum and S. herbarum. Control of leaf blight of garlic is not well established. Few studies are available regarding the effectiveness of chemical treatments to reduce Stemphylium spp. incidence on garlic. The effectiveness of nine fungicides of different chemical groups to reduce Stemphylium mycelial growth in vitro was tested. Boscalid + pyraclostrobin (group name, succinate dehydrogenase inhibitors + quinone outside inhibitors), iprodione (dicar-boximide), and prochloraz (demethylation inhibitors) were highly effective at reducing mycelial growth in S. vesicarium with EC50 values less than 5 ppm. In general, the effectiveness of the fungicide was enhanced with increasing dosage. PMID:27721688

  2. S-Nitrosylated proteins in pea (Pisum sativum L.) leaf peroxisomes: changes under abiotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Galisteo, Ana P; Rodríguez-Serrano, María; Pazmiño, Diana M; Gupta, Dharmendra K; Sandalio, Luisa M; Romero-Puertas, María C

    2012-03-01

    Peroxisomes, single-membrane-bounded organelles with essentially oxidative metabolism, are key in plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses. Recently, the presence of nitric oxide (NO) described in peroxisomes opened the possibility of new cellular functions, as NO regulates diverse biological processes by directly modifying proteins. However, this mechanism has not yet been analysed in peroxisomes. This study assessed the presence of S-nitrosylation in pea-leaf peroxisomes, purified S-nitrosylated peroxisome proteins by immunoprecipitation, and identified the purified proteins by two different mass-spectrometry techniques (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization tandem time-of-flight and two-dimensional nano-liquid chromatography coupled to ion-trap tandem mass spectrometry). Six peroxisomal proteins were identified as putative targets of S-nitrosylation involved in photorespiration, β-oxidation, and reactive oxygen species detoxification. The activity of three of these proteins (catalase, glycolate oxidase, and malate dehydrogenase) is inhibited by NO donors. NO metabolism/S-nitrosylation and peroxisomes were analysed under two different types of abiotic stress, i.e. cadmium and 2,4-dichlorophenoxy acetic acid (2,4-D). Both types of stress reduced NO production in pea plants, and an increase in S-nitrosylation was observed in pea extracts under 2,4-D treatment while no total changes were observed in peroxisomes. However, the S-nitrosylation levels of catalase and glycolate oxidase changed under cadmium and 2,4-D treatments, suggesting that this post-translational modification could be involved in the regulation of H(2)O(2) level under abiotic stress.

  3. Heating up cold agglutinins

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stone, Marvin J

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Blood, Berentsen and coworkers describe a high response rate which is durable in some patients who receive combination fludarabine and rituximab for chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD...

  4. Heating up cold agglutinins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Marvin J

    2010-10-28

    In this issue of Blood, Berentsen and coworkers describe a high response rate which is durable in some patients who receive combination fludarabine and rituximab for chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD). If confirmed, this is a significant advance in therapy for a frequently difficult clinical problem.

  5. Allium sativum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Correspondence: Tel.: 08134576173 e-mail Lawrence_aka@yahoo.com. Abstract. This study evaluated the effects of Garlic (Allium sativum) on taste responses and relative organ weights in albino rats. Graded dietary supplementations of garlic viz: 0, 5, ...

  6. Remote Sensing Study of the Influence of Different Herbicides on the Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Fluorescence of Pea Plants (Pisum sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora; Yanev, Tony; Iliev, Ilko; Alexieva, Vera; Tsaneva, Mariana

    The effective use of airborne and satellite-based remote sensor systems in resource management, agriculture, mineral exploration and environmental monitoring requires an understanding of the nature and limitations of the high-resolution remote sensing data and of various strategies for processing and interpreting it. In developing the necessary knowledge base, ground-based measurements are the expedient source of information. In this study, remote sensing techniques were applied in laboratory for detection of the influence of herbicides 2.4-D, glyphosate, fluridone and acifluorfen on the leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.). According to the classification of the Herbicide Resistance Action Committee with reference to their mode of action they belong to different groups: synthetic auxins - O (2.4-D), inhibition of EPSP synthase - G (glyphosate), photobleaching - F1 (fluridone), and inhibition of PPO - E (acifluorfen). During the last 40 years, these herbicides are among the ones used most widely in agriculture worldwide. The plants studied were grown hydroponically in a growth chamber in a nutritious medium to which every herbicide was added at two low concentrations (1 µM, 0.1 µM) with respect to the field dose applied in the agricultural practice. High-resolution spectral data for leaf spectral reflectance and fluorescence were collected from freshly detached leaves using three multichannel spectrometers. Spectral reflectance characteristics were obtained from the leaf reflectance referenced against a standard (white diffuse screen) in the visible and near infrared ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum (450÷850 nm). Fluorescence spectra were taken in the spectral range 650-850 nm. To assess the changes arising in leaf spectral reflectance under the herbicide action we developed and applied an analytical approach based on discriminant analysis and other statistical methods. The spectral characteristics were analyzed in

  7. Datura stramonium Agglutinin 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broekaert, Willem F.; Lambrechts, Diane; Verbelen, Jean-Pierre; Peumans, Willy J.

    1988-01-01

    The distribution of Datura stramonium agglutinin over different tissues of D. stramonium L. seeds was visualized by immunocytochemical techniques and quantified by agglutination assays. The lectin occurs predominantly in the outer seed tissues (seed coat and seed epidermis), where it is associated, at least in part, with the cell walls. Developing D. stramonium seeds secrete newly synthesized lectin polypeptides into the incubation medium, which confirms the extracellular location of the lectin. Imbibition of mature decoated seeds results in a rapid and highly specific release of lectin. Indeed, imbibition solutions contain almost exclusively the lectin together with a few other carbohydrate-binding proteins; this is indicative of the predominance of these proteins in the seed surface layer. The presence of important amounts of lectin in the outer tissues of the seed is consistent with a possible role in the mediation of cell-cell interactions. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 9 PMID:16665947

  8. RED AND BLUE LIGHT-STIMULATED PROTON EFFLUX BY EPIDERMAL LEAF-CELLS OF THE ARGENTEUM MUTANT OF PISUM-SATIVUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STAAL, M; ELZENGA, JTM; VANELK, AG; PRINS, HBA; VANVOLKENBURGH, E

    Light stimulates leaf expansion in dicotyledons by increasing apoplastic acidification, cell wall loosening and solute accumulation for turgor maintenance. Red and blue light enhance growth via different photosystems, but the cellular location and modes of action of these systems is not known. Here,

  9. PRODUCTION OF BREAD–SPREAD FROM BLENDS OF SHEA BUTTER (VITELLARIA PARADOXA, GARLIC (ALLIUM SATIVUM, GINGER (ZINGIBER OFFICINALE, SCENT LEAF (OCCIMUM GRATISSIMUM, AND SUYA SPICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice O.T. Ifesan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at production of bread-spread from blends of shea butter with spices such as ginger, garlic, scent leaf, and suya spice. Two different ratios, 70% shea butter: 30% spices and 85% shea butter:15% spices were prepared from raw shea butter and various spices. The treatments were packaged in a transparent plastic bowl and stored at room temperature for 4 weeks while samples were taken for analysis at 0, 2 and 4 weeks of storage. Samples were examined for chemical, antioxidant properties, anti-nutritional factors and sensory evaluation. Saponification value ranged from 47.7 mg KOH/g -104.5 mg KOH/g while shea butter + spices exhibited lower values compared to 100% shea butter (control. It was observed that iodine value of both the blends and control decreased as storage days increased except for samples of shea butter + ginger (SGG and shea butter + suya spice (SSS at 70:30 ratio. Addition of spices to shea butter increased the 1,1-diphenyl-2 picrylhydrazyl (DPPH values (44.96%-77.98% and total phenol content (0.36 mg TAE/g-0.51 mg TAE/g of the crude shea butter significantly. Phytate content of the blends increased upon addition of spices, whereas, a drastic reduction was observed in the alkaloid contents of the blends from 29.79% (control to 2.29% in shea butter + scent leave. The sensory evaluation result revealed that the general acceptability of shea butter treated with suya spice (70:30 and 100% shea butter were scored above average and were not different significantly.

  10. Dynamic light scattering study of peanut agglutinin: Size, shape and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 31; Issue 5. Dynamic light scattering study of peanut agglutinin: Size, shape and urea denaturation ... Peanut agglutinin (PNA) is a homotetrameric protein with a unique open quaternary structure. PNA shows non-two state profile in chaotrope induced denaturation. It passes ...

  11. Antityphoid agglutinins in African School aged children with malaria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Enhanced agglutinin to DO and DH may be a phenomenon associated with childhood malaria. Keywords: Anti-typhoid, Agglutinins, Malaria, Children Résume Introduction: Anticorps salmonelloses sont connues de réagir en travers avec d\\'autres antigènes y compris ceux de Escherichia coli. Les antigènes du ...

  12. Accumulation of calcium in the centre of leaves of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is due to an uncoupling of water and ion transport

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matt Kerton; H. John Newbury; David Hand; Jeremy Pritchard

    .... Accumulation of calcium was measured on bulk coriander leaf tissue (Coriandrum sativum L. cv. Lemon) using ion chromatography and calcium uptake was visualized using phosphor-images of 45 Ca 2...

  13. Cold agglutinin activity in 2 dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas-Temahuay, Gabriela; Crain, Sarah; Benson, Catherine; Sharkey, Leslie; Nothnagel, Geneva

    2014-09-01

    A 5-year-old neutered male Mastiff and an 8-year-old spayed female Labrador Retriever were presented to the University of Minnesota Veterinary Medical Center. The Mastiff was presented for evaluation of lameness and pyoderma one month prior in Missouri, where he tested positive for Ehrlichia canis by serum ELISA test, treated with doxycycline. PCR for Ehrlichia sp, Anaplasma sp, Babesia sp, and Bartonella sp, and PCR for antigen receptor rearrangement were negative, serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) revealed polyclonal gammopathy, and mildly reactive lymphoid cells were seen cytologically. The Labrador presented with a proliferative rostral mandibular gingival mass and lipomas for further presurgical evaluation of cold agglutinin activity documented by a commercial laboratory 2 years earlier prior to removal of a grade II mast cell tumor. This dog had a negative SNAP4Dx, normal SPE, and persistently increased serum ALP activity and polyuria/polydipsia suggestive for hyperadrenocorticism. Both dogs had markedly agglutinated RBC in the EDTA samples that dispersed with warming, and normal plasma color. Cold agglutinin activity was demonstrated by direct saline agglutination testing using whole blood and washed erythrocytes demonstrating agglutination at 30°C, 25°C, 15°C, and 4°C, but not at 37°C. CBC results (ADVIA 2120i) from the Mastiff revealed no significant differences in the RBC results obtained at room temperature (RT) and at 37°C; however, the RT run demonstrated negative bias in neutrophil and platelet concentrations attributed to rapid RBC settling. This uncommon hematologic condition may cause artifacts on the automated leukogram and platelet count, and may be subclinical for long periods. © 2014 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology and European Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  14. [Alpha and beta natural agglutinin titers in neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gota, F

    1979-01-01

    A serological analysis of alpha and beta agglutinin titres has been carried out in cancer patients. Statistics of the patients' blood groups were also taken. The study showed an increased agglutinin titre, the expression of the functioning of the organism's defensive powers. Only in the terminal stage of the neoplastic disease were antibody titres low, the sign of low antibody reactivity of the affected organism.

  15. Bile duct-specific lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin and peanut agglutinin, as probes in mouse hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, K; Viviano, C J; Elwell, M R; Bakewell, W E; Kuwahara, M; Nakashima, N; Blackwell, B N; Maronpot, R R

    1995-09-01

    It is well established that alterations in the expression of cell surface glycoproteins occur during the course of tumorigenesis and can be detected immunohistochemically. However, no consistent markers of malignancy in mouse hepatocellular tumors have yet been identified. Lectin histochemistry, using three bile duct-specific lectins, Dolichos biflorus agglutinin (DBA), peanut agglutinin (PNA) and soybean agglutinin (SBA), and anti-epidermal keratin immunohistochemistry, was conducted on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues of a spectrum of benign and malignant hepatocellular proliferative lesions of mice, including hepatocholangiocarcinomas. DBA- and PNA-binding glycoproteins in normal livers and in bile and liver tumors of mice were verified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot analysis. Normal bile duct cells stained strongly with DBA but minimally to moderately with PNA and SBA. DBA-positive tumor cells were present in 96% of hepatocholangiocarcinomas, 89% of hepatocellular carcinomas, and 35% of hepatocellular adenomas. In comparison, 43% of hepatocholangiocarcinomas, 37% of hepatocellular carcinomas, and 24% of hepatocellular adenomas exhibited PNA staining. SBA did not specifically stain tumor cells. Normal hepatocytes and those in altered foci were consistently negative for these three lectins. Keratin-positive staining was found only in normal bile ductular cells and ductal elements in 70% of hepatocholangiocarcinomas. Electrophoresis and Western blot analysis demonstrated that, in normal livers, DBA and PNA bound to the 13- to 16-kDa and 27- to 30-kDa glycoproteins believed to be of bile duct cell origin and commonly present in hepatocellular adenomas, hepatocellular carcinomas, and hepatocholangiocarcinomas, with strongest expression in the last. In addition, hepatocholangiocarcinomas had the same high molecular mass glycoprotein (> 200 kDa) labeled with DBA as detected in bile. Our results suggest that some malignant hepatocytes, especially in mouse

  16. Llama-Derived Single Domain Antibodies Specific for Abrus Agglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Carney

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Llama derived single domain antibodies (sdAb, the recombinantly expressed variable heavy domains from the unique heavy-chain only antibodies of camelids, were isolated from a library derived from llamas immunized with a commercial abrin toxoid preparation. Abrin is a potent toxin similar to ricin in structure, sequence and mechanism of action. The selected sdAb were evaluated for their ability to bind to commercial abrin as well as abrax (a recombinant abrin A-chain, purified abrin fractions, Abrus agglutinin (a protein related to abrin but with lower toxicity, ricin, and unrelated proteins. Isolated sdAb were also evaluated for their ability to refold after heat denaturation and ability to be used in sandwich assays as both capture and reporter elements. The best binders were specific for the Abrus agglutinin, showing minimal binding to purified abrin fractions or unrelated proteins. These binders had sub nM affinities and regained most of their secondary structure after heating to 95 °C. They functioned well in sandwich assays. Through gel analysis and the behavior of anti-abrin monoclonal antibodies, we determined that the commercial toxoid preparation used for the original immunizations contained a high percentage of Abrus agglutinin, explaining the selection of Abrus agglutinin binders. Used in conjunction with anti-abrin monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, these reagents can fill a role to discriminate between the highly toxic abrin and the related, but much less toxic, Abrus agglutinin and distinguish between different crude preparations.

  17. Coriandrum sativum and Melia azedarach

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aghomotsegin

    2015-10-07

    Oct 7, 2015 ... Indian J. Exp. Biol. 45:853-60. Martins AP, Salgueiro LR, da Cunha AP (2003). Essential oil composition of Eryngium foetidum from S. Tomé e Príncipe. J. Essent. Oil Res. 15(2):93-95. Mohammad AS, Zahra H, Mohd HS (2011). Eryngium foetidum L. Coriandrum sativum and Persicaria odotata L.: A Review.

  18. Detection of Salmonella typhi agglutinins in sera of patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and Methods: Sera from 50 healthy blood donors were compared for the presence of Salmonella agglutinins in various groups of patients with other febrile illnesses using Widal test in the division of Serology and Immunology at King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh. The patient groups of other febrile illnesses ...

  19. Complement activation by salivary agglutinin is secretor status dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunput, S.T.G.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Terlouw, B.; Brouwer, M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Wouters, D.

    2015-01-01

    After mucosal damage or gingival inflammation, complement proteins leak into the oral cavity and mix with salivary proteins such as salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp-340/DMBT1). This protein is encoded by the gene Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1), and it aggregates bacteria, viruses and fungi,

  20. Brucella abortus agglutinins in dogs in Zaria, Nigeria | Osinubi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serum samples from dogs brought for routine physical examination, vaccination and other complaints at the Veterinary Teaching Hospital (VTH) of Ahmadu Bello University and other parts of Zaria were tested for Brucella abortus antibodies. Forty-three (21.5%) of the 200 dogs studied were positive for B. abortus agglutinins ...

  1. Complement activation by salivary agglutinin is secretor status dependent

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunput, Sabrina T. G.; Ligtenberg, Antoon J. M.; Terlouw, Bas; Brouwer, Mieke; Veerman, Enno C. I.; Wouters, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract After mucosal damage or gingival inflammation, complement proteins leak into the oral cavity and mix with salivary proteins such as salivary agglutinin (SAG/gp-340/DMBT1). This protein is encoded by the gene Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1), and it aggregates bacteria, viruses

  2. Bendamustine plus rituximab for chronic cold agglutinin disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berentsen, Sigbjørn; Randen, Ulla; Oksman, Markku

    2017-01-01

    Primary chronic cold agglutinin disease (CAD) is a well-defined clinicopathologic entity in which a bone marrow clonal B-cell lymphoproliferation results in autoimmune hemolytic anemia and cold-induced circulatory symptoms. Rituximab monotherapy and fludarabine-rituximab in combination are docume...

  3. Phyto-agglutinin, total proteins and amino assimilating enzymatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the amino assimilating (glutamine synthetase) enzymatic activity. Both of KK-1 and Hassan-2K cultivars extract showed highly phyto-agglutination of human erythrocytes with reproductive organs and other tissues, which represents the presence of potent lectins (phyto-agglutinin). The amino assimilating enzymatic activity ...

  4. Effect of centrifugation and microagglutination techniques on Brucella agglutinin titers.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, G C; Behan, K A; Brown, S L; Couch, E E

    1982-01-01

    The microagglutination technique without centrifugation was more effective than centrifugation of the standard tube test for increasing Brucella agglutinin titers of specimens with a titer greater than or equal to 160 but was less effective than centrifugation of the standard tube test for specimens with a titer less than 160.

  5. Antityphoid agglutinins in African School aged children with malaria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antityphoid agglutinins in African School aged children with malaria .... Typhoid sep- ticaemia is readily fulminant unless early diagnosis is made and adequate therapy offered.2 The conventional method of culturing the offending Salmonella organism, in a bid ... of the disease, recourse is often made to other methods.

  6. Histochemical comparison of specificity of three bowel carcinoma-reactive lectins, Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II, peanut agglutinin and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ota, H; Nakayama, J; Katsuyama, T; Kanai, M

    1988-12-01

    A comparison of the histochemical affinities of three lectins reputedly specific to human large bowel carcinoma, namely Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II (GSA-II), peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), was done using 28 specimens in which normal mucosa, adenoma and carcinoma tissue were present and in contact with each other. In the normal mucosa, GSA-II and PNA revealed only weak affinity to the Golgi region of epithelial cells, whereas UEA-I showed binding to the apical surface of columnar cells and goblet cell mucins, especially in the right colon. Adenoma was characterized by relatively intense reactivity of the Golgi regions of epithelial cells for GSA-II and PNA as well as reactivity of the apical surface of the columnar cells for UEA-I. In carcinomas the apical surface of columnar cell-type tumor cells was stained most intensely with UEA-I, and then in descending order with GSA-II and PNA. GSA-II- and PNA-reactive carcinoma cells occurred more frequently in invasive carcinoma than in intramucosal carcinoma. Goblet cell-type tumor cells retained the properties of their normal counterparts. Staining with these lectins, especially GSA-II-horseradish peroxidase, might be helpful in the identification of carcinoma cells and for analysis of carcinoma-associated antigens.

  7. Effect Of Walnut Leaf, Coriander And Pomegranate On Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mechanism of most of herbal used for diabetes mellitus treatment has not been well defined. This study was performed to investigate hypoglycemic effect of walnut leaf (Juglans regia L.), coriander leaf (Coriandrum sativum L.) or pomegranate seed (Punica granatum L.), and their possible role on pancreatic tissue. Diabetes ...

  8. Prevalence of cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) disliking among different ethnocultural groups

    OpenAIRE

    Mauer Lilli; El-Sohemy Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Cilantro, the leaf of the Coriandrum sativum plant, is an herb that is widely consumed globally and has purported health benefits ranging from antibacterial to anticancer activities. Some individuals report an extreme dislike for cilantro, and this may explain the different cilantro consumption habits between populations. However, the prevalence of cilantro dislike has not previously been reported in any population. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalen...

  9. Serum antileptospiral agglutinins in freshwater turtles from Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Éverton F; Seyffert, Núbia; Cerqueira, Gustavo M.; Leihs, Karl P.; Athanazio, Daniel A.; Valente, Ana L. S.; Dellagostin, Odir A.; Brod, Claudiomar S.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we observed the presence of antileptospiral agglutinins in freshwater turtles of two urban lakes of Pelotas, Southern Brazil. Forty animals (29 Trachemys dorbigny and 11 Phrynops hilarii) were captured and studied. Attempts to isolate leptospires from blood and urine samples were unsuccessful. Serum samples (titer > 100) reactive to pathogenic strains were observed in 11 animals. These data encourage surveys of pet turtles to evaluate the risk of transmission of pathogenic leptospires to humans. PMID:24031348

  10. Micropropagation and cryopreservation of garlic (Allium sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, E R Joachim; Senula, Angelika

    2013-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) is a very important medicinal and spice plant. It is conventionally propagated by daughter bulbs ("cloves") and bulbils from the flower head. Micropropagation is used for speeding up the vegetative propagation mainly using the advantage to produce higher numbers of healthy plants free of viruses, which have higher yield than infected material. Using primary explants from bulbs and/or bulbils (shoot tips) or unripe inflorescence bases, in vitro cultures are initiated on MS-based media containing auxins, e.g., naphthalene acetic acid, and cytokinins, e.g., 6-γ-γ-(dimethylallylaminopurine) (2iP). Rooting is accompanying leaf formation. It does not need special culture phases. The main micropropagation methods rely on growth of already formed meristems. Long-term storage of micropropagated material, cryopreservation, is well-developed to maintain germplasm. The main method is vitrification using the cryoprotectant mixture PVS3.

  11. Role of lipopolysaccharide in wheat germ agglutinin-mediated agglutination of Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    OpenAIRE

    Frasch, C E

    1980-01-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin, having specificity for N-acetyl glucosamine, agglutinated known nonencapsulated Neisseria meningtidis strains, but failed to agglutinate encapsulated strains of all serogroups tested Presence of a capsule, therefore, blocked wheat germ agglutinin agglutination of N. meningitidis strains. In contrast, Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains were strongly agglutinated, providing additional evidence for nonencapsulation of N. meningitidis strains. In contrast, Neisseria gonorrhoeae ...

  12. Differentiating between cold agglutinins and rouleaux: a case series of seven patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Michele; Walker, Julie; Barbeito, Atilio; Williams, Adam; Welsby, Ian; Maxwell, Cory; Daneshmand, Mani; Haney, John; Hoffman, Maureane

    2017-08-01

    We present a case series of seven patients with suspected cold agglutinin antibodies, discovered after initiation of bypass. Laboratory analysis of blood samples intraoperatively determined the cause of the aggregation to be rouleaux formation in three of the patients and cold agglutinins in the other four.

  13. Molecular genetic diversity study of Lepidium sativum population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of L. sativum population from Ethiopia using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker. Molecular ... human abdominal ache and diarrhea. Moreover, L. sativum is also used to treat ..... Composition and Physical Properties of Cress (Lepidium sativum L.) and Field Pennycress ...

  14. Wheat germ agglutinin and Lens culinaris agglutinin sensitized anisotropic silver nanoparticles in detection of bacteria: A simple photometric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaelyan, Mariam V; Poghosyan, Gayane G; Hendrickson, Olga D; Dzantiev, Boris B; Gasparyan, Vardan K

    2017-08-15

    Efficacy of anisotropic silver nanoparticles sensitized with wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) was studied for detection of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. It was demonstrated that interaction of these nanoparticles with bacteria stabilizes them and prevents their aggregation upon addition of sodium chloride; such stabilization depends on bacteria concentration. High concentration of bacteria results in higher stabilization whereas low concentration leads to aggregation of nanoparticles. Optical changes as a result of aggregation correlate with bacteria concentration. The developed approach allows the detection of Gram-positive bacteria (S.aureus) with the lowest detectable concentration of 103 cells/mL and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) with the lowest detectable concentration of 3 × 103 cells/mL using WGA-sensitized nanoparticles. In the case of LCA-sensitized nanoparticles the lowest detection was 5 × 103 cells/mL for S. aureus and 5 × 104 cells/mL for E. coli. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Chronic Allium sativum administration alters spontaneous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arun Kumar Agnihotri

    cerebral cortex of the frontal lobe involved in the planning of complex cognitive behavior, personality expression, decision making, and moderating social behaviour11. The widespread culinary use of Allium sativum and the anticipated effect it would portend to cognitive behaviour, as well as a recent report on its adverse ...

  16. Synergistic antiosteoporotic effect of Lepidium Sativum and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alendronate belongs to a class of drugs called bisphosphonates. Bisphosphonates (BP) therapy is a vital option to reduce the risk of bone fracture in people who suffer from osteoporosis. Yet, bisphosphonate have displayed several side effects. Lepidium sativum (LS) seeds have been used in traditional folk medicine to ...

  17. Efficacy of Allium sativum (garlic) against experimental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maha Reda Gaafar

    2012-01-18

    Jan 18, 2012 ... allicin, eight minerals (germanium, calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, selenium and zinc), enzymes as allin- ase, and the vitamins A, B1 and C. The physiological activity of dietary A. sativum is attributed to allicin (diallyl thiosulph- inate), which is one of the organosulphate compounds found.

  18. Efficacy of Allium sativum (garlic) against experimental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: Due to increasing problems of inadequate and unreliable medical treatments for Cryptosporidium enteritis, alternative therapies are being sought. Objective: The current study was designed to evaluate the prophylactic and therapeutic efficacy of Allium sativum (garlic) against Cryptosporidium infection ...

  19. Role of lipopolysaccharide in wheat germ agglutinin-mediated agglutination of Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasch, C E

    1980-10-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin, having specificity for N-acetyl glucosamine, agglutinated known nonencapsulated Neisseria meningtidis strains, but failed to agglutinate encapsulated strains of all serogroups tested Presence of a capsule, therefore, blocked wheat germ agglutinin agglutination of N. meningitidis strains. In contrast, Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains were strongly agglutinated, providing additional evidence for nonencapsulation of N. meningitidis strains. In contrast, Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains were strongly agglutinated, providing additional evidence for nonencapsulation of N. gonorrhoeae. Purified lipopolysaccharide from a single N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae strains tested. Thus, in absence of capsular polysaccharide wheat germ agglutinin agglutinates Niesseria strains through interaction with lipoplysaccharide in the outer membrane. Of 34 nongroupable throat N. meningitidis isolates, 10 failed to agglutinate in wheat germ agglutinin, suggesing that at least some nongroupable. N. meningitidis strains may possess capsule-like materials.

  20. Inhibition of proliferation and induction of differentiation of glioma cells with Datura stramonium agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, T; Yamazaki, K; Yamori, T; Endo, T

    2002-10-07

    We found that a lectin, Datura stramonium agglutinin, induced irreversible differentiation in C6 glioma cells. The differentiated cells had long processes, a low rate of proliferation and a high content of glial fibrillary acidic protein. When the medium was replaced with Datura stramonium agglutinin-free medium after 1 h, cell proliferation continued to be inhibited. Experiments with several other lectins indicated that both recognition of linear N-acetyllactosamine repeats and recognition of multiantennary units of cell-surface glycans were required for the inhibition of C6 proliferation. Proliferation of four human glial tumour cells was also inhibited by Datura stramonium agglutinin. Further, these differentiated human glial tumour cells had long processes and a high content of glial fibrillary acidic protein similar to differentiated C6 glioma cells. Taken together, these observations suggest that Datura stramonium agglutinin may be useful as a new therapy for treating glioma without side effects. Copyright 2002 Cancer Research UK

  1. Antioxidant and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of Trigonella foenum-graecum L, Murraya koenigii , Coriandrum sativum and Centella asiatica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghamitra Dutta

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are naturally occurring substances that combat oxidative damage in biological entities. An antioxidant achieves this by slowing or preventing the oxidation process that can damage cells in the body. It does this by getting oxidized itself in place of the cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the in vitro antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities of aqueous and 95% methanol leaf extracts of four herbs viz. Trigonella foenum-graecum L, Murraya koenigii, Coriandrum sativum and Centella asiatica which have frequent use in Indian cuisine. Both aqueous and 95% methanol leaf extracts have shown significant amount reducing power. Both aqueous and 95% methanol leaf extracts of Coriandrum sativum had significant DPPH radical scavenging activity with IC50 value of 0.21± 0.3 mg/L and 0.176 ± 0.008 mg/L respectively. The aqueous leaf extract of Trigonella foenum-graecum L showed low scavenging activity. Among all the leaf extracts, the aqueous leaf extract of Centella asiatica has exhibited significantly high NO radical scavenging activity (80% with IC50 value of 0.11 ± 0.17 mg/L. The aqueous leaf extracts of the samples have showed significantly high superoxide radical scavenging activity. The activity was maximum for the aqueous leaf extract of Centella asiatica, IC50 value is 4.36 ± 0.41 mg/L. anti lipid peroxide activities were very high ( 90 % for aqueous leaf extracts of Coriandrum sativum (IC50 = 0.064 ± 0.85 mg/L and Centella asiatica (IC50 = 0.066 ± 0.9mg/L at a concentration of 0.16 mg/L. The aqueous leaf extracts of the samples were found to contain large amounts of flavonoids and phenolic compounds and exhibited high antioxidant and free radical scavenging activities. These in vitro assays indicate that these plant extracts are significant source of natural antioxidants which might be helpful in preventing the progress of various oxidative stresses.

  2. Bioactivity of flours of seeds of leguminous crops Pisum sativum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioactivity of flours of seeds of leguminous crops Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris and Glycine max used as botanical insecticides against Sitophilus oryzae Linnaeus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) on sorghum grains.

  3. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I binds to developing gastrin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Z H; Blom, J; Larsson, L I

    1998-03-01

    We have previously reported that antropyloric gastrin (G) and somatostatin (D) cells derive from precursor (G/D) cells that coexpress both hormones. We have now analyzed this endocrine cell pedigree for binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), which previously has been reported to represent a useful marker for cell differentiation. Subpopulations of G/D, D, and G cells were all found to express UEA-I binding. Labelling with bromodeoxyuridine showed that UEA-I positive G cells possessed a higher labelling index than UEA-I negative G cells. These data suggest that the UEA-I positive G cells represent maturing cells still involved in DNA synthesis and cell division. Electron microscopically, specific UEA-I binding sites were localized to the secretory granules and the apical cell membrane of G cells. We conclude that UEA-I represents a differentiation marker for G cells. Moreover, the presence of UEA-I binding sites in these cells may be relevant for Helicobacter pylori-mediated disturbances of gastric acid secretion and gastrin hypersecretion.

  4. Proximate analysis of Lepidium sativum leaves | Umar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... crude protein (5.82±0.07%), fiber (8.69±0.01%), and appreciable percentage of lipid (1.01±0.01%), Ash (3.25±0.03%) and Carbohydrate (8.08±0.02%). The result indicated that lepidium sativum have high amounts of proteins, fats and fiber. Therefore, this plant is recommended for consumers as vegetable in their diet so ...

  5. Prevalence of cilantro (Coriandrum sativum disliking among different ethnocultural groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauer Lilli

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cilantro, the leaf of the Coriandrum sativum plant, is an herb that is widely consumed globally and has purported health benefits ranging from antibacterial to anticancer activities. Some individuals report an extreme dislike for cilantro, and this may explain the different cilantro consumption habits between populations. However, the prevalence of cilantro dislike has not previously been reported in any population. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of cilantro dislike among different ethnocultural groups from a population of young adults living in Canada. Subjects (n = 1,639 between the ages of 20 and 29 years were participants of the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. Individuals rated their preference for cilantro on a 9-point scale from ‘dislike extremely’ to ‘like extremely’. Subjects also had the option to select ‘have not tried’ or ‘would not try’. Subjects who selected 1 to 4 were classified as disliking cilantro. Results The prevalence of dislike ranged from 3 to 21%. The proportion of subjects classified as disliking cilantro was 21% for East Asians, 17% for Caucasians, 14% for those of African descent, 7% for South Asians, 4% for Hispanics, and 3% for Middle Eastern subjects. Conclusions These findings show that the prevalence of cilantro dislike differs widely between various ethnocultural groups.

  6. Transient cold agglutinins associated with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkos, Alyssa C; Friedrichs, Kristen R; Monaghan, Kelly N; Sample, Saundra H; Trepanier, Lauren A

    2015-12-01

    This report details a case of reversible cold agglutinins in a dog with Mycoplasma cynos pneumonia. An 11-month-old female spayed Rhodesian Ridgeback was presented for lethargy and cough. Thoracic radiographs revealed an alveolar pattern present bilaterally in the cranioventral lung lobes. Septic neutrophilic inflammation with suspected Mycoplasma sp. organisms was noted on cytologic examination of a trans-tracheal wash, and the dog was treated empirically with IV ampicillin/sulbactam and enrofloxacin pending culture results. Red blood cell agglutination was noted unexpectedly on several blood film reviews during hospitalization; however, the dog never developed clinical or laboratory evidence of hemolysis. Cold agglutinins were demonstrated based on the results of a saline dilution and cold agglutinin test that showed agglutination at 4°C but not at room temperature (21°C) or 37°C. Based on a positive culture for M cynos, the dog was treated for 8 weeks with oral enrofloxacin. After clinical and radiographic resolution of the pneumonia, repeated saline dilution and cold agglutinin tests of peripheral blood were negative at all temperatures. Reversible, asymptomatic cold agglutinins are common in human patients with mycoplasma pneumonia, but this is the first reported case in a dog. © 2015 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  7. Serial observations of colonic carcinogenesis in the rat. Premalignant mucosa binds Ulex europeus agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioda, Y; Brown, W R; Ahnen, D J

    1987-01-01

    We evaluated certain histochemical tests for their ability to detect premalignant mucosa in the dimethylhydrazine model of colonic carcinogenesis. Biweekly colonoscopic biopsies of the descending colon were performed for 29 wk in control and dimethylhydrazine-treated rats. Biopsy specimens of the splenic flexure, rectum, and any visualized tumors were taken. The specimens were stained with periodic acid-Schiff to detect neutral mucins, high-iron diamine alcian blue to detect sialylated and sulfated mucins, fluoresceinated peanut agglutinin, and fluoresceinated Ulex europeus agglutinin. None of the first three tests consistently detected premalignant mucosa. However, Ulex europeus agglutinin, which bound to only 3% of control biopsy specimens throughout the course of the study, bound to increasing numbers of biopsy specimens in the dimethylhydrazine-treated animals, reaching a maximum of 90% positivity by 13-16 wk. Moreover, Ulex europeus agglutinin bound strongly to all biopsy specimens from tissues adjacent to tumors and to 93% of tumors. Mucosal atrophy and focal dysplasia were present more frequently in specimens taken from the rectum (but not the splenic flexure) of dimethylhydrazine-treated animals than of control animals, but there was no correlation between the histochemical markers and either atrophy or dysplasia. We conclude that Ulex europeus agglutinin binding is a consistent feature of premalignant colonic mucosa in dimethylhydrazine-treated rats.

  8. Trypanocidal efficacy of Allium sativum bulb extract, diminazene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The combination of these two agents appear to act synergistically, while aqueous extract of Allium sativum appears to possibly potentiate the chemotherapeutic activity of diminazene aceturate in the treatment of T. brucei brucei infection in rats. Key words: Allium sativum, diminazene aceturate, trypanosoma brucei brucei, ...

  9. Effect of Allium sativum on growth, feed utilization and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Result also shows that fish blood electrolytes such as (Na, K, CL and HCO3) were within their normal range. Allium sativum inclusion in fish diet at (1.5g/kg) concentration is therefore beneficial for use in aquaculture to enhance fish resistance to disease of C. gariepinus. Keywords: Clarias gariepinus, Allium sativum, ...

  10. Histological effects of aqueous extract of Allium sativum (Alliaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allium sativum , (garlic) is a popular medicinal plant and a member of the Alliaceae family used for treatments of various ailments. The study was aimed at investigating the histological effects of aqueous extract of Allium sativum bulb on the lungs, an organ of the mononuclear phagocyte system using adult Wistar Rats.

  11. Histological effects aqueous extract of Allium sativum (Alliaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Allium sativum , commonly known as garlic is a member of the Alliaceae family and it is one of the earliest known medicinal plant. The aim of this study is to evaluate the histological effects of aqueous extract of Allium sativum bulb on selected organs (bone marrow and spleen) of the mononuclear phagocyte system using ...

  12. Inflammatory and anti-inflammatory effects of soybean agglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin C.F.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Soybean agglutinin (SBA lectin, a protein present in raw soybean meals, can bind to and be extensively endocytosed by intestinal epithelial cells, being nutritionally toxic for most animals. In the present study we show that SBA (5-200 µg/cavity injected into different cavities of rats induced a typical inflammatory response characterized by dose-dependent exudation and neutrophil migration 4 h after injection. This effect was blocked by pretreatment with glucocorticoid (0.5 mg/kg or by co-injection of N-acetyl-galactosamine (100 x [M] lectin, but not of other sugars (100 x [M] lectin, suggesting an inflammatory response related to the lectin activity. Neutrophil accumulation was not dependent on a direct effect of SBA on the macrophage population since the effect was not altered when the number of peritoneal cells was increased or decreased in vivo. On the other hand, SBA showed chemotactic activity for human neutrophils in vitro. A slight increase in mononuclear cells was observed 48 h after ip injection of SBA. Phenotypic analysis of these cells showed an increase in the CD4+/CD8- lymphocyte population that returned to control levels after 15 days, suggesting the development of an immune response. SBA-stimulated macrophages presented an increase in the expression of CD11/CD18 surface molecules and showed some characteristics of activated cells. After intravenous administration, SBA increased the number of circulating neutrophils and inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the neutrophil migration induced by ip injection of carrageenan into peritoneal cavities. The co-injection of N-acetyl-galactosamine or mannose, but not glucose or fucose, inhibited these effects. The data indicate that soybean lectin is able to induce a local inflammatory reaction but has an anti-inflammatory effect when present in circulating blood

  13. Cold agglutinins in patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara, David W; Mauermann, William J; Neal, James R; Abel, Martin D; Schaff, Hartzell V; Winters, Jeffrey L

    2013-09-01

    Cold agglutinins (CA) are circulating autoantibodies present in most humans. They are active below normal body temperatures. Cold hemagglutinin disease involves the presence of CA sufficiently active at temperatures in the periphery to produce hemolysis or agglutination. Systemic hypothermia and cold cardioplegia may result in agglutination or hemolysis. We reviewed the experience of a large referral center in managing patients with CA and cold hemagglutinin disease undergoing cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. The electronic medical records from 2002 to 2010 were searched to identify patients with CA or cold hemagglutinin disease who underwent cardiac surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Information related to preoperative CA testing and treatment, surgery, cardiopulmonary bypass, postoperative complications, and mortality was recorded. Sixteen patients underwent 19 procedures requiring cardiopulmonary bypass. Six patients had cold hemagglutinin disease. The identification of CA was made intraoperatively in 3 patients. One patient underwent preoperative plasma exchange. Cold blood cardioplegia was used in 2 of 16 procedures using cardioplegia, with the remaining using warmer blood cardioplegia. The lowest recorded intraoperative core temperature was less than 34 °C in 1 case. CA-related postoperative hemolysis requiring transfusion was present in 1 patient, which was resolved with active warming. No patient had evidence of permanent myocardial dysfunction, had a neurologic event, required dialysis, or died within 30 days. All patients with CA/cold hemagglutinin disease at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine safely underwent cardiac surgery without major adverse morbidity or mortality. Patients with CA but without evidence of cold hemagglutinin disease can safely undergo normothermic cardiopulmonary bypass at 37°C and warm cardioplegia without further testing. Patients with cold hemagglutinin disease should undergo laboratory testing including

  14. Overall carbohydrate-binding properties of Castanea crenata agglutinin (CCA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Keiichi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Hirose, Masaaki; Nakamura, Sachiko; Yagi, Fumio

    2005-09-05

    The carbohydrate-binding properties of Castanea crenata agglutinin (CCA) were investigated by an enzyme-linked lectin absorbent assay. The binding ability of each carbohydrate was compared using IC(50) values. CCA exhibited mannose/glucose specificity, as observed with many mannose-binding jacalin-related lectins. For oligosaccharides containing glucose, it has been shown that the degree of polymerization and the linkage mode of glucose residues have no effect on CCA-carbohydrate interaction; thus, only the non-reducing end glucose unit in glucooligosaccharides may be involved in the interaction with CCA. Among mannooligosaccharides, CCA strongly recognized alpha-(1-->3)-D-Man-[alpha-D-Man-(1-->6)]-D-Man, which is a core in N-linked carbohydrate chains. By considering the results with glycoproteins, it is likely that CCA binds preferentially to mono- or non-sialylated biantennary carbohydrate chains. We also obtained K(d) values by analysis of the dependency of the IC(50) on CCA concentration, based on the hypothesis that CCA has a single binding site or two equivalent binding sites. The estimated K(d) values for mannose, glucose and alpha-(1-->3)-D-Man-[alpha-D-Man-(1-->6)]-D-Man were 2.39, 7.19 and 0.483 mM, respectively. The relative binding abilities showed good agreement with the relative inhibition intensities. Isothermal calorimetric titration was carried out to directly estimate the dissociation constants of CCA for mannose and for alpha-D-Man-(1-->3)-D-Man. The values were 2.34 mM for mannose and 0.507 mM alpha-D-Man-(1-->3)-D-Man. These results suggest that the relative inhibition intensity represents the ratio of K(d) values and that CCA has a single or two equivalent binding sites.

  15. Platelet cold agglutinins and thrombocytopenia: A diagnostic dilemma in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TV Bharath Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of pseudo-thrombocytopenia due to cold agglutinins against platelets. These cold agglutinins were the cause for diagnostic confusion and resulted in extensive workup and unnecessary therapeutic precautions. A thirty two year old female with Guillain-Barre syndrome was admitted in the ICU and serial work-up showed markedly low levels of platelets. The patient had no symptoms of bleeding and patient was investigated extensively for deciphering the etiology of low platelet count. In-vitro clumping of platelets was suspected and in-vitro studies showed marked clumping of platelets with ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid, citrate and heparinized samples. The manual platelet count was found to be within normal limits. Thrombocytopenia as a result of platelet cold agglutinins is a rare cause of in-vitro low platelet counts. No clinical problems have been reported due to the same.

  16. Foliar spray of phyto-extracts supplemented with silicon: an efficacious strategy to alleviate the salinity-induced deleterious effects in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    SHAHID, MUHAMMAD ADNAN; BALAL, RASHAD MUKHTAR; PERVEZ, MUHAMMAD ASLAM; ABBAS, TAHIRA; AQUEEL, MUHAMMAD ANJUM; JAVAID, MUHAMMAD MANSOOR; GARCIA-SANCHEZ, FRANCISCO

    2015-01-01

    A pot culture study was conducted to assess the ameliorative effect of silicon, Melia azadirachta leaf extract, and sugar beet root extract, each applied individually or in different combinations, on salinity-induced detrimental effects in pea (Pisum sativum L.). Salinity markedly inhibited the growth, various gas exchange attributes, total phenol contents, membrane stability index, and productivity. On the other hand, lipid peroxidation, electrolyte leakage, H2O2 content, antioxidant activit...

  17. Characterization of the binding specificity of Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA) in comparison to Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldus, S E; Thiele, J; Park, Y O; Hanisch, F G; Bara, J; Fischer, R

    1996-08-01

    Using immunochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the binding site of Anguilla anguilla agglutinin (AAA) was characterized and compared with the related fucose-specific lectin from Ulex europaeus (UEA-I). In solid-phase enzyme-linked immunoassays, the two lectins recognized Fuc alpha 1-2Gal beta-HSA. AAA additionally cross-reacted with neoglycolipids bearing lacto-N-fucopentaose (LNFP) I [H type 1] and II [Le(a)] and lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) as glycan moieties. UEA-I, on the other hand, bound to a LDFT-derived neoglycolipid but not to the other neoglycolipids tested. Binding of AAA to gastric mucin was competitively neutralized by Le(a)-specific monoclonal antibodies. UEA-I binding, on the other hand, was reduced after co-incubation with H type 2- and Le(y)-specific monoclonal antibodies. According to our results, AAA reacts with fucosylated type 1 chain antigens, whereas UEA-I binds only to the alpha 1-2-fucosylated LDFT-derived neoglycolipid. In immunohistochemical studies, the reactivity of AAA and UEA-I in normal pyloric mucosa from individuals with known Lewis and secretor status was analysed. AAA showed a broad reaction in the superficial pyloric mucosa from secretors and non-secretors, but AAA reactivity was more pronounced in Le(a+b-) individuals. On the other hand, UEA-I stained the superficial pyloric mucosa only from secretor individuals. A staining of deep mucous glands by the lectins was found in all specimens. Both reacted with most human carcinomas of different origin. Slight differences in their binding pattern were observed and may be explained by the different fine-specificities of the lectins.

  18. Human salivary agglutinin binds to lung surfactant protein-D and is identical with scavenger receptor protein gp-340

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ligtenberg, T J; Bikker, F J; Groenink, J

    2001-01-01

    by quadrupole time-of-flight (Q-TOF) tandem MS. The sequence showed 100% identity with part of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich ('SRCR') domain found in gp-340/DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumours-1). The mass spectrum revealed 11 peaks with an identical mass as a computer-simulated trypsin digest....../PAGE and the amino acid composition of agglutinin, was found to be nearly identical with that of gp-340. It was shown by Western blotting that monoclonal antibodies against gp-340 reacted with salivary agglutinin, and monoclonals against agglutinin reacted with gp-340. It was demonstrated that gp-340 and agglutinin...... bound in a similar way to Streptococcus mutans and surfactant protein-D. Histochemically, the distribution of gp-340 in the submandibular salivary glands was identical with the agglutinin distribution, as shown in a previous paper [Takano, Bogert, Malamud, Lally and Hand (1991) Anat. Rec. 230, 307...

  19. The CRC orthologue from Pisum sativum shows conserved functions in carpel morphogenesis and vascular development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourquin, Chloé; Primo, Amparo; Martínez-Fernández, Irene; Huet-Trujillo, Estefanía; Ferrándiz, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims CRABS CLAW (CRC) is a member of the YABBY family of transcription factors involved in carpel morphogenesis, floral determinacy and nectary specification in arabidopsis. CRC orthologues have been functionally characterized across angiosperms, revealing additional roles in leaf vascular development and carpel identity specification in Poaceae. These studies support an ancestral role of CRC orthologues in carpel development, while roles in vascular development and nectary specification appear to be derived. This study aimed to expand research on CRC functional conservation to the legume family in order to better understand the evolutionary history of CRC orthologues in angiosperms. Methods CRC orthologues from Pisum sativum and Medicago truncatula were identified. RNA in situ hybridization experiments determined the corresponding expression patterns throughout flower development. The phenotypic effects of reduced CRC activity were investigated in P. sativum using virus-induced gene silencing. Key Results CRC orthologues from P. sativum and M. truncatula showed similar expression patterns, mainly restricted to carpels and nectaries. However, these expression patterns differed from those of other core eudicots, most importantly in a lack of abaxial expression in the carpel and in atypical expression associated with the medial vein of the ovary. CRC downregulation in pea caused defects in carpel fusion and style/stigma development, both typically associated with CRC function in eudicots, but also affected vascular development in the carpel. Conclusions The data support the conserved roles of CRC orthologues in carpel fusion, style/stigma development and nectary development. In addition, an intriguing new aspect of CRC function in legumes was the unexpected role in vascular development, which could be shared by other species from widely diverged clades within the angiosperms, suggesting that this role could be ancestral rather than derived, as so far

  20. Palladium uptake by Pisum sativum: partitioning and effects on growth and reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchini, Matteo; Cherchi, Laura; Cantamessa, Simone; Lanfranchi, Marco; Vianelli, Alberto; Gerola, Paolo; Berta, Graziella; Fumagalli, Alessandro

    2015-05-01

    Environmental palladium levels are increasing because of anthropogenic activities. The considerable mobility of the metal, due to solubilisation phenomena, and its known bioavailability may indicate interactions with higher organisms. The aim of the study was to determine the Pd uptake and distribution in the various organs of the higher plant Pisum sativum and the metal-induced effects on its growth and reproduction. P. sativum was grown in vermiculite with a modified Hoagland's solution of nutrients in the presence of Pd at concentrations ranging 0.10-25 mg/L. After 8-10 weeks in a controlled environment room, plants were harvested and dissected to isolate the roots, stems, leaves, pods and peas. The samples were analysed for Pd content using AAS and SEM-EDX. P. sativum absorbed Pd, supplied as K₂PdCl₄, beginning at seed germination and continuing throughout its life. Minimal doses (0.10-1.0 mg Pd/L) severely inhibited pea reproductive processes while showing a peculiar hormetic effect on root development. Pd concentrations ≥1 mg/L induced developmental delay, with late growth resumption, increased leaf biomass (up to 25%) and a 15-20% reduction of root mass. Unsuccessful repeated blossoming efforts led to misshapen pods and no seed production. Photosynthesis was also disrupted. The absorbed Pd (ca. 0.5 % of the supplied metal) was primarily fixed in the root, specifically in the cortex, reaching concentrations up to 200 μg/g. The metal moved through the stem (up to 1 μg/g) to the leaves (2 μg/g) and pods (0.3 μg/g). The presence of Pd in the pea fruits, together with established evidence of environmental Pd accumulation and bioavailability, suggests possible contamination of food plants and propagation in the food chain and must be the cause for concern.

  1. Different patterns of vein loading of exogenous ( sup 14 C)sucrose in leaves of pisum sativum and coleus blumei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, R.; Wimmers, L.E. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1988-05-01

    Vein loading of exogenous ({sup 14}C)sucrose was studied using short uptake and wash periods to distinguish between direct loading into veins and loading via mesophyll tissue. Mature leaf tissue of Pisum sativum L. cv Little Marvel, or Coleus blumei Benth. cv Candidum, was abraded and leaf discs were floated on ({sup 14}C)sucrose solution for 1 or 2 minutes. Discs were then washed for 1 to 30 min either at room temperature or in the cold and were frozen, lyophilized, and autoradiographed. In P. sativum, veins were clearly labeled after 1 minute uptake and 1 minute wash periods. Autoradiographic images did not change appreciably with longer times of uptake or wash. Vein loading was inhibited by p-chloromercuribenzenesulfonic acid. These results indicate that uptake of exogenous sucrose occurs directly into the veins in this species. When C. blumei leaf discs were floated on ({sup 14}C)sucrose for 2 minutes and washed in the cold, the mesophyll was labeled but little, if any, minor vein loading occurred. When discs were labeled for 2 minutes and washed at room temperature, label was transferred from the mesophyll to the veins within minutes. These results indicate that there may be different patterns of phloem loading of photosynthetically derived sucrose in these two species.

  2. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) essential oil: Chemistry and biological activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, Mr. Shyamapada; Mandal, Manisha

    2015-01-01

    Coriandrum sativum L. (C. sativum) is one of the most useful essential oil bearing spices as well as medicinal plants, belonging to the family Umbelliferae/Apiaceae. The leaves and seeds of the plant are widely used in folk medicine in addition to its use as a seasoning in food preparation. The C. sativum essential oil and extracts possess promising antibacterial, antifungal and anti-oxidative activities as various chemical components in different parts of the plant, which thus play a great r...

  3. Phaseolus vulgaris leuco-agglutinin immunohistochemistry. A comparison between autoradiographic and lectin tracing of neuronal efferents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horst, G.J. ter; Karst, H.; Luiten, P.G.M.

    1984-01-01

    The autoradiographic pattern of anterograde labeling as a result from injections with tritiated amino acids is compared to the labeling of efferents with Phaseolus vulgaris leuco-agglutinin after lectin injections in the same nucleus visualized by immunohistochemical methods. This comparison is made

  4. Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Wheat Germ Agglutinin and Starvation in Drosophila melanogaster Larval Midgut

    Science.gov (United States)

    One function of plant lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is to serve as defenses against herbivorous insects. The midgut is one critical site affected by dietary lectins. We observed marked cellular, structural, and gene expression changes in the midguts of Drosophila melanogaster third-i...

  5. Cold agglutinins in a patient undergoing normothermic cardiac operation with warm cardioplegia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tatsuhiko

    2017-10-10

    Cold agglutinins are autoantibodies that agglutinate red blood cells at low temperatures, leading to haemagglutination and haemolysis. They are generally of no clinical significance. However, when people with cold agglutinins undergo cardiac operation with hypothermia and cold cardioplegia, they can experience complications. Thus, different perioperative management is required for such patients. We describe a 74-year-old man with cold agglutinins incidentally detected on the preoperative screening test. He had never experienced any complications or developed a haematological disease. Since cold agglutinins were incidentally detected on the preoperative test, a special strategy was used to manage the temperature of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) and cardioplegia. He successfully underwent normothermic cardiac operation with warm cardioplegia. A continuous retrograde hyperkalaemic infusion and intermittent antegrade infusion of warm cardioplegia with normothermic CPB is one of the best methods to avoid hypothermia and excessive activity and metabolism of the heart, and to provide a suitable operative field. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  6. Resolution of Serologic Problems Due to Cold Agglutinins in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javed, Rizwan; Datta, Suvro Sankha; Basu, Sabita; Chakrapani, Anupam

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia can be classified depending on presence of warm, cold or mixed type of autoantibodies that are directed against antigens on the red blood cell surface. Here we report a case of pathological cold agglutinin disease which was eventually detected due to blood group discrepancy. A request was sent to the blood bank for two units of packed red cells in a diagnosed case of CLL which showed type IV discrepancy during blood grouping.The discrepancy was subsequently resolved after warm saline washing of red cells along with repetition of reverse grouping with pre-warmed serum. The direct antiglobulin test was positive and revealed autoanibodies against C3b/C3d only. Indirect antiglobulin test was performed with 3-cell panel in a polyspecific gel card (IgG+C3d) showed a pan-reactive pattern along with a positive autocontrol. Subsequently a cold agglutinin titration was performed and titers of 1024 at 4 °C; titer of 2 at room temperature were detected. Dithiothreitol (DTT) treatment of serum was undertaken and IgM type of autoantibody was detected in this case confirming a case of secondary cold agglutinin disease in this patient. Two units of red cells were transfused to this patient after successfully performing cross-match with pre-warmed serum. It was advised from the blood bank that the blood should be transfused slowly through a blood-warmer and patient should be kept in warm condition to avoid in-vivo hemolysis due to high titer of cold agglutinin. The transfusion was uneventful and patient is on regular follow-up till now. Thus we concluded that serological discrepancies observed in blood bank can successfully guide the bedside transfusion protocol in case of cold agglutinin disease.

  7. Effect of Allium sativum (garlic) methanol extract on viability and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Allium sativum (garlic) methanol extract on viability and apoptosis of human leukemic cell lines. ... bromide (MTT) assay at concentrations of 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 ug/mL of Allium sativum extract following 48-h treatment on U-937, Jurkat Clone E6-1 and K-562 cell lines. The mode of cell ...

  8. Accumulation of calcium in the centre of leaves of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is due to an uncoupling of water and ion transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerton, Matt; Newbury, H. John; Hand, David; Pritchard, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study is to understand the parameters regulating calcium ion distribution in leaves. Accumulation of ions in leaf tissue is in part dependent on import from the xylem. This import via the transpiration stream is more important for ions such as calcium that are xylem but not phloem mobile and cannot therefore be retranslocated. Accumulation of calcium was measured on bulk coriander leaf tissue (Coriandrum sativum L. cv. Lemon) using ion chromatography and calcium uptake was visualized using phosphor-images of 45Ca2+. Leaves of plants grown in hydroponics had elevated calcium in the centre of the leaf compared with the leaf margin, while K+ was distributed homogeneously over the leaf. This calcium was shown to be localised to the mesophyll vacuoles using EDAX. Stomatal density and evapotranspiration (water loss per unit area of leaf) were equal at inner and outer sections of the leaf. Unequal ion distribution but uniformity of water loss suggested that there was a difference in the extent of uncoupling of calcium and water transport between the inner and outer leaf. Since isolated tissue from the inner and outer leaf were able to accumulate similar amounts of calcium, it is proposed that the spatial variation of leaf calcium concentration is due to differential ion delivery to the two regions rather than tissue/cell-specific differences in ion uptake capacity. There was a positive correlation between whole leaf calcium concentration and the difference in calcium concentration between inner and outer leaf tissue. Exposing the plants to increased humidity reduced transpiration and calcium delivery to the leaf and abolished this spatial variation of calcium concentration. Mechanisms of calcium delivery to leaves are discussed. An understanding of calcium delivery and distribution within coriander will inform strategies to reduce the incidence of calcium-related syndromes such as tip-burn and provides a robust model for the transport of ions and other

  9. Ultrastructural localization of carbohydrates on thin sections of Staphylococcus aureus with silver methenamine and wheat germ agglutinin-gold complex.

    OpenAIRE

    Morioka, H; Tachibana, M; Suganuma, A

    1987-01-01

    Postembedding staining of intracellular carbohydrates on thin sections of Staphylococcus aureus was studied by the silver methenamine and the wheat germ agglutinin-gold techniques. Staining of silver grains was observed on both the cell wall and the cross wall. The staining was interpreted to be due to teichoic acid. Labeling by wheat germ agglutinin-gold particles was observed on both the cell wall and the cross wall, and the staining pattern resembled that of silver methenamine staining. Th...

  10. Antiplatelet activity of Allium ursinum and Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiyasat, Bahi; Sabha, Dina; Grotzinger, Kristina; Kempfert, Joerg; Rauwald, Johann-Wilhelm; Mohr, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Dhein, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has a well-established reputation as a protective agent against cardiovascular disease, while nearly nothing is known about its cousin Allium ursinum. The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiaggregatory mechanism of garlic and to compare the effects of A. ursinum and A. sativum. In a prospective study, extracts were prepared from A. sativum powder made from fresh A. sativum bulbs and fresh A. ursinum leaves by maceration. The extracts were characterized by thin layer chromatography. Their in vitro effects on human platelet aggregation were examined by light transmission aggregometry after induction by adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, A23187, epinephrine and arachidonic acid (ARA) in platelets from healthy volunteers. A. ursinum and A. sativum exert similar antiaggregatory effects: they inhibit platelet aggregation induced via the ADP pathway and to a lesser extent aggregation induced by epinephrine, whereas ARA-, collagen- and A23187-induced aggregation was not affected. It became clear that the alcoholic extract of A. ursinum is the potent form, while the aqueous extract exerted an unspecific activity. The effects were strictly dose related. A. ursinum and A. sativum extracts exhibited similar potencies. Both A. ursinum and A. sativum exert antiaggregatory effects. Garlic extracts are acting by inhibition of the ADP pathway; their mechanisms of action are comparable to that of the clinically used drug clopidogrel. The pharmacologically active component of the extracts appears to be lipophilic rather than hydrophilic, but the precise chemical substance is still unknown. This is the first report on the antiplatelet activity of A. ursinum. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Detachment of agglutinin-bonded red blood cells. III. Mechanical analysis for large contact areas.

    OpenAIRE

    Berk, D.; Evans, E

    1991-01-01

    An experimental method and analysis are introduced which provide direct quantitation of the strength of adhesive contact for large agglutinin-bonded regions between macroscopically smooth membrane capsules (e.g., red blood cells). The approach yields intrinsic properties for separation of adherent regions independent of mechanical deformation of the membrane capsules during detachment. Conceptually, the micromechanical method involves one rigid test-capsule surface (in the form of a perfect s...

  12. Purification of murine endothelial cell cultures by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labeled griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin.

    OpenAIRE

    Sahagun, G.; Moore, S. A.; Fabry, Z.; Schelper, R. L.; Hart, M. N.

    1989-01-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin (GSA) is a valuable histochemical tool in the identification of endothelium. In this study GSA labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (GSA-FITC) was used to purify cultures of murine cerebral microvascular endothelium. Cultures were stained with GSA-FITC, then sorted using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). GSA-positive endothelial cells were collected, re-cultured, and subsequently re-analyzed by FACS using GSA-FITC. Cultures that initially conta...

  13. Anti-Stress and Anti-Amnesic Effects of Coriandrum sativum Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Coriandrum sativum Linn. (Umbelliferae, C. sativum) is cultivated throughout the world for its use as spice and as a folk medicine. This study deals with the anti-stress and anti-amnestic properties of C. sativum extract in rats. Methods: Urinary levels of vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) and ascorbic acid were used to ...

  14. Anti-Stress and Anti-Amnesic Effects of Coriandrum sativum Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    C. sativum are flavonoids, polyphenols and carotenoids [9,10]. Despite the potential medicinal benefits of C. sativum, the stress relieving and memory enhancing effects have not been fully investigated. The aim of the present study was to assess the anti-stress and anti-amnesic effects of aqueous extract of C. sativum in vivo ...

  15. Prostaglandin D2 generation by rat peritoneal mast cells stimulated with Datura stramonium agglutinin and its inhibition by haptenic sugar and wheat germ agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki-Nishimura, Tamiko; Uchida, Masaatsu K

    2002-09-01

    The production of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) by rat peritoneal mast cells incubated with N-acetyl glucosamine (GlcNAc) oligomer-specific Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) for 10 min in the presence of 0.3 mM Ca2+ was examined. Previously, our group reported that the incubation of rat mast cells with DSA (5 - 100 microg/ml) under similar conditions resulted in a calcium influx and histamine release via a pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein pathway of the mast cells, and the histamine release was inhibited by haptenic sugar chitooligosaccharides or GlcNAc-specific lectin wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) (K. Matsuda et al., Jpn J Pharmacol 66, 195 - 204 (1994)). DSA (5 - 100 microg/ml) dose-dependently stimulated the mast cells to generate PGD2. Chitooligosaccharides (1% w/v) and WGA (100 microg/ml) inhibited the production of PGD2 induced by 100 microg/ml of DSA, suggesting that the effect of DSA is sugar-specific. A prostaglandin G/H synthase inhibitor NS-398 (N-[cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl] methanesulfonamide) (10 microM) inhibited the formation of PGD2 induced by DSA (20 microg/ml). These results suggest that the binding of DSA to the corresponding sugar residues on the mast cell surface mediates the signaling of the prostaglandin G/H synthase pathway.

  16. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. essential oil: Chemistry and biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamapada Mandal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Coriandrum sativum L. (C. sativum is one of the most useful essential oil bearing spices as well as medicinal plants, belonging to the family Umbelliferae/Apiaceae. The leaves and seeds of the plant are widely used in folk medicine in addition to its use as a seasoning in food preparation. The C. sativum essential oil and extracts possess promising antibacterial, antifungal and anti-oxidative activities as various chemical components in different parts of the plant, which thus play a great role in maintaining the shelf-life of foods by preventing their spoilage. This edible plant is non-toxic to humans, and the C. sativum essential oil is thus used in different ways, viz., in foods (like flavouring and preservatives and in pharmaceutical products (therapeutic action as well as in perfumes (fragancias and lotions. The current updates on the usefulness of the plant C. sativum are due to scientific research published in different web-based journals.

  17. Production of a new mucilage compound in Lepidium sativum callus by optimizing in vitro growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkar, Pooran; Hadian, Fatemeh; Koohi Dehkordi, Mehrana

    2018-02-15

    The mucilage in Lepidium sativum L. is considered a biologically active compound with diverse medicinal properties. Different explants (hypocotyls and leaf) were transferred to Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium supplemented with twelve different plant growth regulator combinations under two different incubations (light and dark). The best mucilage production from callus (36.76% g g -1 dry weight) was obtained in the MS medium supplemented with 1 mg L -1 of 2, 4-D and 2 mg L -1 of BAP under the light condition. The mucilage produced by callus culture was nearly three times more than the mucilage yield of the seeds. The glucose, arabinose + mannose and galactose were 43.4 (mg g -1 DW), 195.3 (mg g -1 DW) and 86.2 (mg g -1 DW) in the mucilage originated from seed, callus leaf and callus hypocotyl, respectively. The present study proposes an efficient method for producing large scales of mucilage with a favorable sugar aimed at food or pharmaceutical industries.

  18. Comprehensive transcriptome analysis of the highly complex Pisum sativum genome using next generation sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bräutigam Andrea

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The garden pea, Pisum sativum, is among the best-investigated legume plants and of significant agro-commercial relevance. Pisum sativum has a large and complex genome and accordingly few comprehensive genomic resources exist. Results We analyzed the pea transcriptome at the highest possible amount of accuracy by current technology. We used next generation sequencing with the Roche/454 platform and evaluated and compared a variety of approaches, including diverse tissue libraries, normalization, alternative sequencing technologies, saturation estimation and diverse assembly strategies. We generated libraries from flowers, leaves, cotyledons, epi- and hypocotyl, and etiolated and light treated etiolated seedlings, comprising a total of 450 megabases. Libraries were assembled into 324,428 unigenes in a first pass assembly. A second pass assembly reduced the amount to 81,449 unigenes but caused a significant number of chimeras. Analyses of the assemblies identified the assembly step as a major possibility for improvement. By recording frequencies of Arabidopsis orthologs hit by randomly drawn reads and fitting parameters of the saturation curve we concluded that sequencing was exhaustive. For leaf libraries we found normalization allows partial recovery of expression strength aside the desired effect of increased coverage. Based on theoretical and biological considerations we concluded that the sequence reads in the database tagged the vast majority of transcripts in the aerial tissues. A pathway representation analysis showed the merits of sampling multiple aerial tissues to increase the number of tagged genes. All results have been made available as a fully annotated database in fasta format. Conclusions We conclude that the approach taken resulted in a high quality - dataset which serves well as a first comprehensive reference set for the model legume pea. We suggest future deep sequencing transcriptome projects of species

  19. Project LEAF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project LEAF has a goal of educating farmworkers about how to reduce pesticide exposure to their families from pesticide residues they may be inadvertently taking home on their clothing, etc. Find outreach materials.

  20. Molecular genetic diversity study of Lepidium sativum population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vostro 2520

    Full Length Research Paper ... The study was conducted to assess the genetic diversity of L. sativum population from Ethiopia using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker. Molecular data generated from ISSR ... the ISSR data was used to construct unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) and.

  1. Studies on the antimicrobial effects of garlic ( Allium sativum Linn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial effect in vitro of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.), ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) and lime (Citrus aurantifolia Linn.) juice were assayed against Staphylococcus aureus; Bacillus spp., Escherichia coli and Salmonella spp. All the test organisms were susceptible to undiluted ...

  2. Effect of garlic ( Allium sativum ) on Salmonella typhi infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of consumption of garlic (Allium sativum) in treating Salmonella typhi infection and on the gastrointestinal flora and hematological parameters of rats was investigated. Crude garlic extract inhibited the growth of S. typhi on agar plate with a zone of inhibition averaging 23.8 mm in diameter using the agar diffusion ...

  3. Comparative Hypolipidaemic Effects of Allium cepa, Allium sativum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study compares the hypolipidaemic effects of the increasing dosages of A. cepa, A. sativum and Z. officinale aqueous extract on alloxan-diabetic Rattus novergicus for possible use in the management of hyperlipidaemia characteristic of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus was induced in 108 out of a total of 117 adult ...

  4. Antibacterial effect of garlic ( Allium sativum ) on Staphyloccus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Garlic (Allium sativum) has had an important dietary and medicinal role for centuries. It is a large annual plant of the Liliaceae family, which grows in most of Africa and in Ethiopia. Ethiopian garlic is used in traditional medicine for infectious disease and some other cases. The present study tested the aqueous extract ...

  5. Histological Effects Aqueous Extract of Allium sativum (Alliaceae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    Histological Effects Aqueous Extract of Allium sativum (Alliaceae) Bulb on Bone and. Spleen of Adult Wistar Rats. *. 1. ODIASE,DE; OSAZEE LO. *Department of Anatomy, School of Basic Medical Sciences, College of. Medical Sciences, University Of Benin, Benin City, Nigeria. E-mail: daniel.odiase@uniben.edu.

  6. Total phenolic levels in diverse garlics (Allium sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) is a specialty crop that is highly responsive to growth environment with respect to bulb size and coloration. Ten genetically diverse garlic cultivars were grown at twelve locations for two consecutive years. Soil characteristics and bulb phenotypic characters including ...

  7. Toxicological evaluation of the aqueous extract of Allium sativum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Toxicological evaluation of the aqueous extract of Allium sativum bulbs on laboratory mice and rats. Donatien Gatsing, Roseline Aliyu, Jules R Kuiate, Ibrahim H Garba, Kiri H Jaryum, Nestor Tedongmo, Félicité M Tchouanguep, Godwin I Adoga ...

  8. Secondary metabolism responses in two Pisum sativum L. cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study was carried out to investigate the Fe deficiency effect on the secondary metabolism responses in two Pisum sativum cultivars characterized by different tolerance to Fe deficiency. Previous study investigating the physiological responses to Fe deficiency in these two pea cultivars showed that Kelvedon was ...

  9. Investigation of antibacterial effects of garlic ( Allium sativum ), mint ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was done to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the aqueous extracts of garlic (Allium sativum), mint (Menthe spp.) and onion (Allium cepa) in in vitro conditions against the Escherichia coli isolated from broiler chickens. E. coli was isolated from the infected tissues of the chickens which were ...

  10. Toxicological effects of garlic ( Allium sativum ) on some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The toxicological effect of garlic (Allium sativum) on some haematological and biochemical parameters in albino rats was studied. High doses of garlic infusion were found to cause a significant decrease (p<0.05) in the concentration of haemoglobin, packed cell volume, lymphocyte count, aspartate aminotransferase and ...

  11. Effect of Allium cepa and Allium sativum on some immunological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extracts of some spices have been reported to play a contributory role in enhancing immune function. We evaluated and compared the effect(s) of single and combined oral administration of fresh aqueous onion (Allium cepa) and garlic (Allium sativum) extracts at different concentrations on some immunological ...

  12. [Influence of taliblastin and vinblastine on serum agglutinins determined by 2 methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoichkov, I; Mircheva, I

    1977-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of the potential antitumorous preparation taliblastin and the well known cytostatic vinblastin on the formation of serum agglutinins in mice. Two methods were used--the classical reaction of agglutination and the method for inhibition of passive migration of erythrocytes (IPM) described by Schweicer and Gilisen (1974). It was established that vinblastin markedly inhibited the formation of specific agglutinating antibodies, while taliblastin was considerably weaker immunosupresor; The method of IPM was more sensitive than the classical reaction of agglutination and gave a possibility for better determination of immunosuppresive action of cytostatics.

  13. O-linked oligosaccharides from salivary agglutinin: Helicobacter pylori binding sialyl-Lewis x and Lewis b are terminating moieties on hyperfucosylated oligo-N-acetyllactosamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Issa, S.; Moran, A.P.; Ustinov, S.N.; Lin, J.H.; Ligtenberg, A.J.; Karlsson, N.G.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin plays a vital biological role modulating the protective effect in the oral cavity by interacting with a broad range of oral pathogens. Here, we describe the first characterization of the O-linked oligosaccharides of salivary agglutinin identified by negative ion liquid

  14. Effects of long-term reduced tillage on weed infestation of pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Woźniak

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated weed infestation of pea (Pisum sativum L. cultivated under conditions of conventional (CT, reduced (RT and herbicide tillage (HT. It demonstrated the highest weed density per m2 in plots with the herbicide (HT and reduced (RT systems and significantly lower weed infestation in plots cultivated in the conventional system (CT. In addition, more weeds occurred at the third leaf stage (13/14 in BBCH scale than at the pod development stage (73/74 BBCH of pea. The highest biomass was produced by weeds in the herbicide system (HT, a lower one – in the reduced system (RT, and the lowest one – in the conventional system (CT. The air-dry weight of weeds depended also on pea development stage. At the pod development stage (73/74 BBCH, the air-dry weight of weeds was significantly higher than at the third leaf stage (13/14 BBCH. The tillage system was also observed to influence the species composition of weeds. This trait was also affected by the period of weed infestation assessment. At the third leaf stage of pea (13/14 BBCH, there occurred 26 weed species, including 24 annual ones. The most abundant species included: Chenopodium album L., Stellaria media (L. Vill., Capsella bursa-pastoris (L. Med., Matricaria inodora L., Thlaspi arvense L., and Fallopia convolvulus (L. A. Löve. At the pod development stage (73/74 BBCH, the pea crop was colonized by 24 weed species, including 3 perennial ones. At this stage the predominant species included: Avena fatua L., Amaranthus retroflexus L., Papaver rhoeas L., Echinochloa crus-galli (L. P.B., Matricaria inodora L., and Galeopsis tetrahit L.

  15. Allelopathy in agroforestry systems: the effects of leaf extracts ofCupressus lusitanica and threeEucalyptus spp. on four Ethiopian crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisanework N.; Michelsen, Anders

    1993-01-01

    The potential allelopathic effect ofCupressus lusitanica, Eucalyptus globulus, E. camaldulensis andE. saligna on seed germination, radicle and seedling growth was investigated with four crops:Cicer arietinum (chickpea),Zea mays (maize),Pisum sativum (pea) andEragrostis tef (teff). Aqueous leaf ex...

  16. Large bowel carcinoma-specific antigens detected by the lectin, Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, J; Katsuyama, T; Ono, K; Honda, T; Akamatsu, T; Hattori, H

    1985-11-01

    A lectin reactivity specific to human bowel carcinoma is reported. Twenty-six cases of carcinoma of the large intestine were examined. Normal as well as transitional mucosa and carcinoma tissues were removed from surgical specimens, and paraffin sections were stained with a battery of histochemical methods to characterize glycoconjugates, including high iron diamine-Alcian blue pH 2.5, modified PAS reaction to detect various sialic acids, paradoxical concanavalin A (Con A) staining, and stainings with 10 species of lectins labeled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Among the techniques employed, only Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II (GS-II, specific to glucosamine)-HRP staining revealed highly selective affinity to the carcinoma tissues; the apical surface of the carcinoma cells stained most intensely. GS-II reactivity of the cells persisted after prior periodate oxidation, but was significantly enhanced by neuraminidase digestion. Comparison with two other lectin stainings with the same sugar specificity, viz. paradoxical concanavalin A staining and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-HRP staining, showed that the GS-II reactive sites lacked class III Con A reactivity but were possibly included in WGA reactive sites. The GS-II-HRP staining should be helpful in the identification of carcinoma tissue and for analysis of carcinoma-associated antigens.

  17. Purification and immunohistochemistry of Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II-binding mucus glycoprotein in rat stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oinuma, T; Ide, S; Kawano, J; Suganuma, T

    1994-08-01

    Gastric mucus is thought to protect the gastric wall from mechanical trauma, desiccation, pathogenic microorganisms, acid and proteases. We purified Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II (GSA-II)-binding mucus glycoprotein (GMG) from rat gastric mucosa by solubilization in a guanidine-containing buffer, gel permeation chromatography, Ricinus communis agglutinin-I (RCA-I)-affinity chromatography and GSA-II-affinity chromatography. Rat GMG showed high molecular weight on a Sephacryl S-1000 column, and a single band in 0.5% agarose-2% polyacrylamide composite gels and blots. A protein of approximately 60 kDa was contained in the GMG preparation. GMG was deglycosylated with trifluoromethanesulphonic acid treatment. An antibody was raised against deglycosylated GMG (deGMG). The antibody recognized deGMG, GMG, periodic acid-treated deGMG and O-glycanase-digested deGMG, but did not react to trypsin-digested deGMG. These results suggest that the antibody recognizes proteinase-sensitive region or peptide backbone of GMG. In immunohistochemistry, the mucous gel layer of the stomach luminal surface was stained with antibody. The antibody recognized not only gastric mucous neck cells and pyloric gland cells, but also gastric surface mucous cells, mucous cells in the duodenal gland, and goblet cells in the small intestine and colon. These results indicate that GMG is a component of rat gastric mucus, and that the antibody recognizes mucous-secreting cells in rat stomach and intestine.

  18. Problems of Cold Agglutinins in Cardiac Surgery: How to Manage Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Myocardial Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kambiz Alizadeh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cold agglutinins are of unique relevance in cardiac surgerybecause of the use of hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB. Cold autoimmune diseases are defined by the presence of abnormal circulating proteins (usually IgM or IgA antibodies that agglutinate in response to a decrease in body temperature. These disorders include cryoglobulinemia and cold hemagglutinin disease.Immunoglobulin M autoantibodies to red blood cells, which activateat varying levels of hypothermia, can cause catastrophic hemagglutination,microvascular thrombosis, or hemolysis. Management of anesthesia in these patients includes strict maintenance of normothermia. Patients scheduled for the surgery requiring cardiopulmonary bypass present significant challenges. Use of systemic hypothermia may be contraindicated, and cold cardioplegia solutions may precipitate intracoronary hemagglutination with consequent thrombosis, ischemia, or infarction. Management of CPB andmyocardial protection requires individualized planning. We describea case of MV repair and CABG in a patient with high titercold agglutinins and high thermal amplitude for antibody activation.Normothermic CPB and continuous warm blood cardioplegia weresuccessfully used.

  19. Kinetic features of gravicurvature of pea (Pisum sativum) and cress (Lepidium sativum) roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polishchuk, O. V.

    The upper sides of roots oriented horizontally grow more rapidly than the lower sides, causing the root ultimately to grow downward; this phenomenon is known as positive gravitropism. This ability is based on implicit mechanism which is being extensively investigated. Elaborate analysis of kinetic features of gravicurvature may complement the investigation. Pea and cress roots have positive gravitropism as roots of majority of higher plants. Mainly we investigated dependence of gravicurvature angle on time of gravistimulation. Two-day-old seedlings of cress (Lepidium sativum L. cv. P896) and four-day-old pea ones (Pisum sativum L. cv. Damir-2) were placed on 1% agar medium in Petri dishes and turned on angle of gravistimulation. Then they were photographed at the same position each hour of gravistimulation. Photographs were analyzed with the help of Image Tool software program. Both pea and cress roots showed two phases of gravitropic response during gravistimulation for 6 hours when the initial angle of gravistimulation was 135 degrees. Two peaks of the rate of bending were observed. In cress roots, the first peak was much lower and the distance between the two peaks was greater than in pea roots. Curves of gravitropic bending of cress roots grown in agar had one or two inflections while in the case of roots grown on filter paper curves had no inflections. These data are in agreement with the effect of the external medium on the gravitropic curvature of rice roots reported by Staves et al. (1997). Our results may reflect the fact that at least two systems that contribute to gravicurvature may exist in roots. These systems may be ligand-receptor complexes that may be formed with different kinetics in two different regions of the root. The most probable ligand is auxin and the regions appear to be central elongation zone (CEZ) and distal elongation zone (DEZ), that were reported to be centers of tropic bending in roots. Thus, dependence of rate of root bending on

  20. Water stress drastically reduces root growth and inulin yield in Cichorium intybus (var. sativum) independently of photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoorne, B; Mathieu, A-S; Van den Ende, W; Vergauwen, R; Périlleux, C; Javaux, M; Lutts, S

    2012-07-01

    Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a cash crop cultivated for inulin production in Western Europe. This plant can be exposed to severe water stress during the last 3 months of its 6-month growing period. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of a progressive decline in water availability on plant growth, photosynthesis, and sugar metabolism and to determine its impact on inulin production. Water stress drastically decreased fresh and dry root weight, leaf number, total leaf area, and stomatal conductance. Stressed plants, however, increased their water-use efficiency and leaf soluble sugar concentration, decreased the shoot-to-root ratio and lowered their osmotic potential. Despite a decrease in photosynthetic pigments, the photosynthesis light phase remained unaffected under water stress. Water stress increased sucrose phosphate synthase activity in the leaves but not in the roots. Water stress inhibited sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase and fructan:fructan 1 fructosyltransferase after 19 weeks of culture and slightly increased fructan 1-exohydrolase activity. The root inulin concentration, expressed on a dry-weight basis, and the mean degree of polymerization of the inulin chain remained unaffected by water stress. Root chicory displayed resistance to water stress, but that resistance was obtained at the expense of growth, which in turn led to a significant decrease in inulin production.

  1. Water stress drastically reduces root growth and inulin yield in Cichorium intybus (var. sativum) independently of photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoorne, B.; Mathieu, A.-S.; Van den Ende, W.; Vergauwen, R.; Périlleux, C.; Javaux, M.; Lutts, S.

    2012-01-01

    Root chicory (Cichorium intybus var. sativum) is a cash crop cultivated for inulin production in Western Europe. This plant can be exposed to severe water stress during the last 3 months of its 6-month growing period. The aim of this study was to quantify the effect of a progressive decline in water availability on plant growth, photosynthesis, and sugar metabolism and to determine its impact on inulin production. Water stress drastically decreased fresh and dry root weight, leaf number, total leaf area, and stomatal conductance. Stressed plants, however, increased their water-use efficiency and leaf soluble sugar concentration, decreased the shoot-to-root ratio and lowered their osmotic potential. Despite a decrease in photosynthetic pigments, the photosynthesis light phase remained unaffected under water stress. Water stress increased sucrose phosphate synthase activity in the leaves but not in the roots. Water stress inhibited sucrose:sucrose 1-fructosyltransferase and fructan:fructan 1 fructosyltransferase after 19 weeks of culture and slightly increased fructan 1-exohydrolase activity. The root inulin concentration, expressed on a dry-weight basis, and the mean degree of polymerization of the inulin chain remained unaffected by water stress. Root chicory displayed resistance to water stress, but that resistance was obtained at the expense of growth, which in turn led to a significant decrease in inulin production. PMID:22577185

  2. The human glycoprotein salivary agglutinin inhibits the interaction of dc-sign and langerin with oral micro-organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boks, M.A.; Gunput, S.T.G.; Kosten, I.; Gibbs, S.; van Vliet, S.J.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; van Kooyk, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG), also known as gp340 or SALSA, is a glycoprotein encoded by the Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumours 1 gene and is abundantly present in human saliva. SAG aggregates bacteria and viruses, thereby promoting their clearance from the oral cavity. The mucosa lining the oral

  3. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1SAG expression is up-regulated in the presence of salivary gland tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, F J; van der Wal, J E; Ligtenberg, A J M

    2004-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin (SAG) is encoded by the gene Deleted in Malignant Brain Tumors 1 (DMBT1) and represents the salivary variant of DMBT1 (DMBT1(SAG)). While SAG is a bona fide anti-caries factor, DMBT1 was proposed as a candidate tumor-suppressor for brain, digestive tract, and lung cancer. Thou...

  4. Salivary agglutinin is the major component in human saliva that modulates the lectin pathway of the complement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunput, S.T.G.; Wouters, D.; Nazmi, K.; Cukkemane, N.; Brouwer, M.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Saliva interacts with blood after mucosal damage or leakage of gingival crevicular fluid. Surface-adsorbed salivary agglutinin (SAG) activates the lectin pathway (LP) of the complement system via mannose-binding lectin, while SAG in solution inhibits complement activation. In the present study we

  5. Isolation and identification of an allelopathic substance in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato-Noguchi, Hisashi

    2003-04-01

    The residue of peas (Pisum sativum L.) has allelopathic activity and the putative compound causing this inhibitory effect was isolated from a methanol extract of pea shoots. Chemical structure of this compound was determined by high-resolution MS, IR and 1H NMR spectral data as pisatin. Pisatin inhibited growth of cress (Lepidium sativum L.) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) seedlings at concentrations greater than 10 and 30 microM, respectively. The doses required for 50% growth inhibition of roots and hypocotyls of cress were 61 and 91 microM, respectively, and those of lettuce were 78 and 115 microM, respectively. The concentration of pisatin in the pea shoots was 32.7 nmol x g(-1) fresh weight. The effectiveness of pisatin on growth inhibition in cress and lettuce, and its occurrence in pea shoots suggest that it may contribute to the growth inhibitory effect of pea residue, and may play an important role in pea allelopathy.

  6. Investigaciones actuales del empleo de Allium sativum en medicina

    OpenAIRE

    Eslhey María Sánchez Dominguez; Sahily Rojas Pérez; Nilvia Norma Agüero Batista

    2016-01-01

    Desde tiempos ancestrales el ajo Allium sativum ha sido utilizado por sus propiedades medicinales, ampliamente conocidas. Posee múltiples efectos beneficiosos; tales como: antimicrobiano, hipolipidémico, antitrombótico, actividad antitumoral, antihipertensivo, entre otras. Los compuestos sulfurados presentes en el mismo, principalmente alicina y ajoene, constituyen los principios activos responsables de las actividades biológicas referidas. Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica empleando los ...

  7. Comparative Hypolipidaemic Effects of Allium cepa, Allium sativum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Increasing dosages (200, 250 and 300mg/kg bw ip) of A. cepa, A. sativum and Z. officinale aqueous extracts were given to the diabetic rats for six weeks while the control rats got either normal saline (1ml) or increasing dosage of glibenclamide ( 2.5, 3.8 and 5.0mg/kg b wt ip) during the same period. Total serum lipids and ...

  8. Phytotoxicity of glyphosate in the germination of Pisum sativum and its effect on germinated seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subinoy; Kumar, Mousumi; Haque, Smaranya; Kundu, Debajyoti

    2017-01-01

    The present study evaluated the effects of glyphosate on Pisum sativum germination as well as its effect on the physiology and biochemistry of germinated seedlings. Different physico-chemical biomarkers, viz., chlorophyll, root and shoot length, total protein and soluble sugar, along with sodium and potassium concentration, were investigated in germinated seedlings at different glyphosate concentrations. This study reports the influence of different concentrations of glyphosate on pea seeds and seedlings. Physicochemical biomarkers were significantly changed by glyphosate exposure after 15 days. The germination of seedlings under control conditions (0 mg/L) was 100% after 3 days of treatment but at 3 and 4 mg/L glyphosate, germination was reduced to 55 and 40%, respectively. Physiological parameters like root and shoot length decreased monotonically with increasing glyphosate concentration, at 14 days of observation. Average root and shoot length (n=30 in three replicates) were reduced to 14.7 and 17.6%, respectively, at 4 mg/L glyphosate. Leaf chlorophyll content also decreased, with a similar trend to root and shoot length, but the protein content initially decreased and then increased with an increase in glyphosate concentration to 3 mg/L. The study suggests that glyphosate reduces the soluble sugar content significantly, by 21.6% (v/v). But internal sodium and potassium tissue concentrations were significantly altered by glyphosate exposure with increasing concentrations of glyphosate. Biochemical and physiological analysis also supports the inhibitory effect of glyphosate on seed germination and biochemical effects on seedlings.

  9. The effects of boron on improving aluminium tolerance in coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Rezaei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the role of boron (BO33- on improving tolerance of coriander plant (Coriandrum sativum L. subjected to different concentrations of aluminum (Al3+ was evaluated. In this regard, an experiment was implemented with seven different concentrations of aluminum including: 0.25, 0.50, 1.00, 2.00, 3.00 and 4.00 mg/L Al3+ and three concentrations of boron including: 0.25, 0.5 and 0.75 mg/L BO33- with the control treatment. The experiment was concluded based on completely randomized design with three replications. Seeds of coriander were germinated in germinator and seedlings were grown in Hogland´s solution with different boron and aluminium concentrations. Results showed that different levels of Al3+, decreased dry weight, leaf area, length of shoot and root, amount of chlorophyll and aluminium, while proline concentration and Al3+accumulation increased. Nearly, in all concentrations of Al3+, plant height, dry weight and chlorophyll content promoted with increasing boron concentrations, but proline concentration was decreased. It could be concluded that application of boron along with Al3+, might have proved plant growth and neutralized effects of Al toxicity.

  10. Ulex europeus agglutinin-I binding as a potential prognostic marker in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonski, Katharina; Milde-Langosch, Karin; Bamberger, Ana-Maria; Osterholz, Tina; Utler, Christian; Berger, Jürgen; Löning, Thomas; Schumacher, Udo

    2007-01-01

    Ovarian cancer represents the malignant tumour of the female genital tract with the worst prognosis, mainly caused by early intraperitoneal spread. Cell-to-cell and cell-to-matrix interactions play a functionally important role in this spread and are both mediated by the cell membrane. Changes in the glycosylation of the cell membrane, as detected by lectin histochemistry, are sometimes associated with a poor prognosis. The expression of lectin binding of 164 ovarian cancer patients was analysed and the staining results were correlated with the clinical data of the patients. The univariate and multivariate statistical analysis revealed an independent prognostic significance for Ulex europeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) binding. These findings indicate that UEA-I binding can serve as a prognostic factor in ovarian cancer.

  11. Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-2-binding glycoprotein as a novel carbohydrate antigen of human colonic carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, J; Okano, A; Maeda, H; Miyachi, M; Ota, H; Katsuyama, T; Kanai, M

    1990-04-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-2-binding glycoprotein (GBG) in human colonic carcinoma was examined immunochemically and histochemically, GBG was extracted from colonic carcinoma as a serum-type glycoprotein of 160 kilodaltons. GBG was not identical with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), since its molecular weight and localization in tissue sections were different from those of CEA. The non-reducing terminals of GBG probably carry N-acetylglucosamine, but not blood group determinants. Furthermore, GBG was released by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C from cell membrane. GBG was suggested to be anchored to the membrane via linkage to a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol molecule. Among colonic carcinoma-associated antigens, serum-type glycoproteins having N-acetylglucosamine at non-reducing terminals have not previously been reported. GBG is a novel carbohydrate antigen of human colonic carcinoma.

  12. The Mutant crispa Reveals Multiple Roles for PHANTASTICA in Pea Compound Leaf DevelopmentW⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Alexander D.; Turner, Lynda; Knox, Margaret R.; Ambrose, Michael J.; Ellis, T.H. Noel; Hofer, Julie M.I.

    2005-01-01

    Pinnate compound leaves have laminae called leaflets distributed at intervals along an axis, the rachis, whereas simple leaves have a single lamina. In simple- and compound-leaved species, the PHANTASTICA (PHAN) gene is required for lamina formation. Antirrhinum majus mutants lacking a functional gene develop abaxialized, bladeless adult leaves. Transgenic downregulation of PHAN in the compound tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) leaf results in an abaxialized rachis without leaflets. The extent of PHAN gene expression was found to be correlated with leaf morphology in diverse compound-leaved species; pinnate leaves had a complete adaxial domain of PHAN gene expression, and peltate leaves had a diminished domain. These previous studies predict the form of a compound-leaved phan mutant to be either peltate or an abaxialized rachis. Here, we characterize crispa, a phan mutant in pea (Pisum sativum), and find that the compound leaf remains pinnate, with individual leaflets abaxialized, rather than the whole leaf. The mutant develops ectopic stipules on the petiole-rachis axis, which are associated with ectopic class 1 KNOTTED1-like homeobox (KNOX) gene expression, showing that the interaction between CRISPA and the KNOX gene PISUM SATIVUM KNOTTED2 specifies stipule boundaries. KNOX and CRISPA gene expression patterns indicate that the mechanism of pea leaf initiation is more like Arabidopsis thaliana than tomato. PMID:15749758

  13. THE PERSISTENCE OF LEPTOSPIRAL AGGLUTININS TITERS IN HUMAN SERA DIAGNOSED BY THE MICROSCOPIC AGGLUTINATION TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete C. ROMERO

    1998-05-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of agglutinins detected by MAT has created some problems to the interpretation of the results. The aim of this study was to examine the data of serology from 70 patients with serologically confirmed diagnosis of leptospirosis by during 3-13 months after being affected with leptospires in order to elucidate the interpretation of the persistence of agglutinins detected by MAT. Sixty-one patients sera (87.14% had titers equal or greater than 800. Of these, two individuals maintained titers of 800 thirteen months after the onset. This study showed that only one sample of sera with high titers is not reliable to determine the time at which infection occurred.Persistência de títulos de aglutininas anti-leptospiras em soros humanos diagnosticados pelo teste de aglutinação microscópica A persistência de aglutininas detectadas por MAT tem criado problemas na interpretação dos resultados. O objetivo deste trabalho foi examinar os resultados da sorologia de 70 pacientes com confirmação sorológica de leptospirose durante 3-13 meses após terem sido infectados para se poder elucidar a interpretação da persistência de aglutininas detectadas por MAT. Sessenta e um soros de pacientes (87,14% apresentaram títulos iguais, ou maiores, que 800. Destes, 2 indivíduos mantiveram títulos de 800 treze meses após terem sido infectados. Este estudo mostra que apenas uma amostra de soro, mesmo com alto título de aglutininas, não pode ser considerada para determinar a fase da doença.

  14. Osmotic adjustment and the growth response of seven vegetable crops following water-deficit stress. [Phaseolus vulgaris L. ; Beta vulgaris L. ; Abelmoschus esculentus; Pisum sativum L. ; Capsicum annuum L. ; Spinacia oleracea L. ; Lycopersicon esculentum Mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wullschleger, S.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Oosterhuis, D.M. (Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville (United States))

    1991-09-01

    Growth-chamber studies were conducted to examine the ability of seven vegetable crops- Blue Lake beam (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Detroit Dark Red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Burgundy okra (Abelmoschus esculentus) (Moench), Little Marvel pea (Pisum sativum L), California Wonder bell pepper (Capsicum annuum L), New Zealand spinach (Spinacia oleracea L), and Beefsteak tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) - to adjust osmotically in response to water-deficit stress. Water stress was imposed by withholding water for 3 days, and the adjustment of leaf and root osmotic potentials upon relief of the stress and rehydration were monitored with thermocouple psychrometers. Despite similar reductions in leaf water potential and stomatal conductance among the species studied reductions in lead water potential an stomatal conductance among the species, crop-specific differences were observed in leak and root osmotic adjustment. Leaf osmotic adjustment was observed for bean, pepper, and tomato following water-deficit stress. Root osmotic adjustment was significant in bean, okra, pea and tomato. Furthermore, differences in leaf and root osmotic adjustment were also observed among five tomato cultivars. Leaf osmotic adjustment was not associated with the maintenance of leaf growth following water-deficit stress, since leaf expansion of water-stressed bean and pepper, two species capable of osmotic adjustment, was similar to that of spinach, which exhibited no leaf osmotic adjustment.

  15. Garlic (Allium sativum L.) and its wild relatives from Central Asia: evaluation for fertility potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamenetsky, R.; London Safir, I.; Baizerman, M.; Khassanov, F.; Kik, C.; Rabinowitch, H.D.

    2004-01-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) a popular condiment, is completely sterile, and thus is propagated only vegetatively. According to modern taxonomy, A. sativum and its closest wild relative A. longicuspis form a species complex. The collection of a large number of accessions of these taxa is the only

  16. Identification of the bacteria-binding peptide domain on salivary agglutinin (gp-340/DMBT1), a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bikker, Floris J; Ligtenberg, Antoon J M; Nazmi, Kamran

    2002-01-01

    Salivary agglutinin is encoded by DMBT1 and identical to gp-340, a member of the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich (SRCR) superfamily. Salivary agglutinin/DMBT1 is known for its Streptococcus mutans agglutinating properties. This 300-400 kDa glycoprotein is composed of conserved peptide motifs: 14...... SRCR domains that are separated by SRCR-interspersed domains (SIDs), 2 CUB (C1r/C1s Uegf Bmp1) domains, and a zona pellucida domain. We have searched for the peptide domains of agglutinin/DMBT1 responsible for bacteria binding. Digestion with endoproteinase Lys-C resulted in a protein fragment....... Strikingly, this peptide was also able to induce agglutination of S. mutans and a number of other bacteria. The repeated presence of this peptide in the native molecule endows agglutinin/DMBT1 with a general bacterial binding feature with a multivalent character. Moreover, our studies demonstrate...

  17. Cedar leaf oil poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedar leaf oil is made from some types of cedar trees. Cedar leaf oil poisoning occurs when someone swallows this substance. ... The substance in cedar leaf oil that can be harmful is thujone (a hydrocarbon).

  18. Efficient production of human acidic fibroblast growth factor in pea (Pisum sativum L. plants by agroinfection of germinated seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Meiying

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For efficient and large scale production of recombinant proteins in plants transient expression by agroinfection has a number of advantages over stable transformation. Simple manipulation, rapid analysis and high expression efficiency are possible. In pea, Pisum sativum, a Virus Induced Gene Silencing System using the pea early browning virus has been converted into an efficient agroinfection system by converting the two RNA genomes of the virus into binary expression vectors for Agrobacterium transformation. Results By vacuum infiltration (0.08 Mpa, 1 min of germinating pea seeds with 2-3 cm roots with Agrobacteria carrying the binary vectors, expression of the gene for Green Fluorescent Protein as marker and the gene for the human acidic fibroblast growth factor (aFGF was obtained in 80% of the infiltrated developing seedlings. Maximal production of the recombinant proteins was achieved 12-15 days after infiltration. Conclusions Compared to the leaf injection method vacuum infiltration of germinated seeds is highly efficient allowing large scale production of plants transiently expressing recombinant proteins. The production cycle of plants for harvesting the recombinant protein was shortened from 30 days for leaf injection to 15 days by applying vacuum infiltration. The synthesized aFGF was purified by heparin-affinity chromatography and its mitogenic activity on NIH 3T3 cells confirmed to be similar to a commercial product.

  19. Chemical composition and pharmacological activities of Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilani, Md Nazmul Hasan; Sultana, Tamanna; Asabur Rahman, S M; Anisuzzman, Md; Islam, Md Amirul; Shilpi, Jamil A; Hossain, Md Golam

    2017-03-27

    Consumption of vegetables has been proven to be effective in the prevention of different diseases. Traditionally edible aerial part of Pisum sativum L. subsp. sativum (Fabaceae) is used to treat diabetes, heart diseases and as blood purifier. Present study was aimed to explore the traditional use of aerial parts of P. sativum as a source of antidiabetic agent. In addition, antioxidant activity and chemical composition was carried out. Total polyphenol content was spectrophotometrically determined using Folin Chiocalteu's reagent while the flavonoids by aluminum chloride colorimetric assay. Identification of compounds of the extract was made through HPLC and LCMS. Antihyperglycemic activity was assessed by oral glucose tolerance test in mice. Antioxidant activity was determined by DPPH free radical scavenging and reducing power assay. Total polyphenol and total flavonoids content were found to be 51.23 mg gallic acid equivalent and 30.88 mg quercetin equivalent per gram of dried plant extract respectively. Ellagic acid and p-coumeric acid were detected through HPLC. A total of eight compounds including naringenin, β-sitosterol were indentified through LCMS. In OGTT, extract (200 mg/kg bw) showed a 30.24% decrease (P< 0.05) in blood glucose levels at 30 min compared to the normal control. The extract showed IC50 value of 158.52 μg/mL in DPPH scavenging assay and also showed comparable reducing power. Along with other compounds ellagic acid and β-sitosterol present in the extract may be responsible for its antioxidant as well as antihyperglycemic activities. Altogether these results rationalize the use of this vegetable in traditional medicine.

  20. Leaf Collection Posting Log

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset contains leaf collection dates for area and subarea where leaf collection service is provided by Montgomery County Department of Transportation. Update...

  1. High-sensitivity Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive alpha-fetoprotein assay predicts early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Tada, Toshifumi; Kiriyama, Seiki; Tanikawa, Makoto; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Kanamori, Akira; Tanaka, Junko; Kagebayashi, Chiaki; Satomura, Shinji

    2013-01-01

    Background Prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poor because HCC is frequently diagnosed late. Therefore, regular surveillance has been recommended to detect HCC at the early stage when curative treatments can be applied. HCC biomarkers, including Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3), are widely used for surveillance in Japan. A newly developed immunoassay system measures AFP-L3 % with high sensitivity. This retrospective study...

  2. Chromium (VI) induced phytotoxicity and oxidative stress in pea (Pisum sativum L.): biochemical changes and translocation of essential nutrients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, K K; Dwivedi, S; Singh, N K; Rai, U N; Tripathi, R D

    2009-05-01

    Due to widespread industrial use, chromium (Cr) is considered a hazardous environmental pollutant. It is known to inhibit plant growth and development. The present study provides the evidence of the phytotoxicity of this metal on the pea (Pisum sativum L. cv Azad) plants. The plants of pea (Pisum sativum L.) were grown in refined sand under different concentrations i.e. 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mM of Cr (VI) in order to study the effect on growth and yield, photosynthetic pigments, relative water content, non-reducing sugar and protein with activity of certain enzymes like catalase, peroxidase, starch phosphorylase and ribonuclease. The analysis of the results showed that photosynthetic pigments (68.68%), relative water contents (62.77%), non-reducing sugar (66.66%) and protein (81.57%) were decrease along with reduction in plant height (52.69%) and leaf area (50.81%) of the pea plants. However, in response to various concentration of Cr exposed plants showed significant induction of reducing and total sugars with enzymes like catalase, starch phosphorylase and ribonuclease. The translocation of Cr in various part of pea plant have been found in order of root> stem> leaves>seeds which ranged between 34.8 to 217.3 mg g(-1) d.wt. (dry weight) in roots, 6.5 to 173.13 mg g(-1) d.wt. in shoot, 4.2 to 74.43 mg g(-1) d.wt. in leaves and 0.94 to 8.64 mg g(-1) d.wt. in seeds, that is also reflected by the transfer factor of Cr from refined sand to tested species.

  3. Further characterization of some heterophile agglutinins reacting with alkali-labile carbohydrate chains of human erythrocyte glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahr, W; Uhlenbruck, G; Bird, G W

    1975-01-01

    The nature of the receptor sites for several agglutinins is characterized by hemagglutination inhibition assays. The inhibitory activity of human erythrocytes glycoproteins, from which sialic acid, sialic acid and galactose or alkali-labile oligosaccharides have been removed, is compared to the inhibitory effect of compounds with known structure. It is shown that the lectin from Arachis hypogea and anti-T bind to alkali-labile galactosyl-residues. Agglutinins from Bauhinia purpurea and variegata (non- or N-specific), Maclura aurantiaca, Iberis amara, sempervirens, umbellata hybrida and umbellata nana (M- or nonspecific), Moluccella laevis (A- plus N-specific), Helix pomatia, Helix aspersa, Helix lucorum and Caucasotachea atrolabiata interact with alkali-labile N-acetylgalactosamine. The results obtained with the anti-A agglutinins from various snails suggest that human erythrocyte glycoproteins contain, besides the alkali-labile tetrasaccharide, a peptide-linked sialyl-N-acetyl-galactosaminyl-residue. The investigations do not allow a precise definition of the receptor sites for the lectins having M- or N-specificity.

  4. Broad anti-HIV activity of the Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homologue lectin family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Férir, Geoffrey; Huskens, Dana; Noppen, Sam; Koharudin, Leonardus M I; Gronenborn, Angela M; Schols, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    Oscillatoria agardhii agglutinin homologue (OAAH) proteins belong to a recently discovered lectin family. The founding member OAA and a designed hybrid OAAH (OPA) recognize similar but unique carbohydrate structures of Man-9, compared with other antiviral carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs). These two newly described CBAs were evaluated for their inactivating properties on HIV replication and transmission and for their potential as microbicides. Various cellular assays were used to determine antiviral activity against wild-type and certain CBA-resistant HIV-1 strains: (i) free HIV virion infection in human T lymphoma cell lines and PBMCs; (ii) syncytium formation assay using persistently HIV-infected T cells and non-infected CD4+ T cells; (iii) DC-SIGN-mediated viral capture; and (iv) transmission to uninfected CD4+ T cells. OAA and OPA were also evaluated for their mitogenic properties and potential synergistic effects using other CBAs. OAA and OPA inhibit HIV replication, syncytium formation between HIV-1-infected and uninfected T cells, DC-SIGN-mediated HIV-1 capture and transmission to CD4+ target T cells, thereby rendering a variety of HIV-1 and HIV-2 clinical isolates non-infectious, independent of their coreceptor use. Both CBAs competitively inhibit the binding of the Manα(1-2)Man-specific 2G12 monoclonal antibody (mAb) as shown by flow cytometry and surface plasmon resonance analysis. The HIV-1 NL4.3(2G12res), NL4.3(MVNres) and IIIB(GRFTres) strains were equally inhibited as the wild-type HIV-1 strains by these CBAs. Combination studies indicate that OAA and OPA act synergistically with Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin, 2G12 mAb and griffithsin (GRFT), with the exception of OPA/GRFT. OAA and OPA are unique CBAs with broad-spectrum anti-HIV activity; however, further optimization will be necessary for microbicidal application. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights

  5. [The significance of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin binding fibers in various muscular diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, K; Hiraguri, M; Sueishi, M; Takeuchi, M; Nonaka, I; Kawai, M

    1998-05-01

    In the present study, we have reported that Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) lectin labeled muscle fibers in distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV). UEA I binding to muscle fibers was also observed in a small number of biopsies with inflammatory myopathy, but not in other diseases, including neurogenic muscular atrophies and muscular dystrophies. In order to elucidate the relationship between this UEA I binding, rimmed vacuole formation and active autophagocytosis, we examined the UEA I binding fibers in other myopathies which frequently showed rimmed vacuoles, including adult onset acid maltase deficiency, oculo-pharyngo-distal type myopathy and oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. No UEA I lectin labeling fiber was observed in the diseases examined. We then studied UEA I binding behavior on 70 biopsies of inflammatory myopathy to characterize the clinical features of UEA I binding positive patients. UEA I binding fibers were observed in 3 of 28 patients (11%) with other collagen diseases, 11 of 36 (31%) without these disorders, and 2 of 6 (33%) with inclusion body myositis. There were no common clinical histories, complications or laboratory findings among the UEA I binding positive patients. In conclusion, a common process may exist between the muscle fiber degeneration in DMRV and subgroups of inflammatory myopathy patients, but the basic mechanism remains to be elucidated.

  6. Purification and partial characterization of an agglutinin from Octopus maya serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpuche, Juan; Pereyra, Ali; Mendoza-Hernández, Guillermo; Agundis, Concepción; Rosas, Carlos; Zenteno, Edgar

    2010-05-01

    A 66-kDa lectin (OmA) was purified from the serum of the Yucatan peninsula endemic octopus (Octopus maya) by a single step affinity chromatography on glutaraldehyde-fixed stroma from rat erythrocytes. OmA corresponds to 0.8% of the total circulating protein in the hemolymph; it is composed of three equal subunits of 22kDa each, and 7.4% of linked carbohydrates. The amino acids' composition indicated that agglutinin contained mainly aspartic and glutamic acids, and cysteine and methionine were identified in minor proportion. OmA agglutinates mainly rat, guinea pig, and rabbit erythrocytes, and this activity is partially inhibited by galactosamine, melobiose, galacturonic acid, mannose, and methyl alpha and beta galactosides. Hemagglutinating activity is not dependent on divalent cations, such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), or Mn(2+). The OmA subunits showed no identity for any lectin in databases but partial identity with the type A hemocyanin from Octopus dolfleini hemolymph; the main similarities are related to tyrosinase domains and copper A and B sites that conform to the oxygen-binding site of hemocyanin. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Fast detection of alpha-fetoprotein-L3 using lens culinaris agglutinin immobilized gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ying; Qin, Liubin; Liu, Dejun; Liu, Changhong; Sun, Yongwei; Duan, Yourong

    2014-06-01

    Colloidal gold is extensively used for molecular sensing because that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands are affected by changes in the dielectric properties in the close vicinity of these structures due to the binding of ligands to the corresponding receptor molecules immobilized onto the nanostructures through chemi- or physisorption. We describe a simple method for the detection of Alpha-Fetoprotein-L3 which is a new generation of tumor marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) based on the aggregation of Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) Immobilized Gold Nanoparticles. The LCA conjugated GNPs obtained were 15-20 nm in diameter. The visible color change of the gold nanoparticles from purple to blue on interaction with 100 ng/mL of AFP-L3 is the principle applied here for the sensing of AFP-L3 level. UV/Vis spectroscopy also allows assay monitoring by quantifying the red shift of the plasmon resonance wavelength. With this method, the protein AFP-L3 can be rapidly detected as demanded for clinical diagnosis.

  8. Effects of Lens culinaris agglutinin on gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes in the mouse intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervin, Monira; Paeng, Noriko; Yasui, Kensuke; Imai, Shinjiro; Isemura, Mamoru; Yokogoshi, Hidehiko; Nakayama, Tsutomu

    2012-03-15

    Lectins are proteins that bind specifically to the carbohydrate moiety of glyco-conjugates. Japanese mistletoe lectin given intragastrically affected cytokine gene expression in the mouse intestine. This study examines the actions of Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) on the gene expression of gluconeogenic enzymes in the intestine. The results of quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that LCA caused an up-regulation of the gene expression of glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). This change was correlated with an increase in the expression of two transcription factors, HNF1α and HNF4α. Experiments using human colonic cancer Caco-2 cells demonstrated that LCA up-regulated the gene expression of G6Pase and PEPCK whereas insulin had the opposite effect. In addition, the observed up-regulation of HNF4α gene expression in the duodenum raises the possibility that the lectin promotes the colorectal cancer. Lentil beans should be cooked well to avoid unfavourable effects of LCA. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. A chimeric protein of abrin and Abrus precatorius agglutinin that neutralizes abrin mediated lethality in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vinita; Bagaria, Shradha; Karande, Anjali A

    2017-03-01

    Abrin, a type II ribosome inactivating protein from the Abrus precatorius plant, is extremely toxic. It has been shown to be 75 times more potent than its infamous sister toxin, ricin and their potential use in bio-warfare is a cause of major concern. Although several vaccine candidates are under clinical trials for ricin, none are available against abrin. The present study proposes a chimeric protein, comprising of 1-123 amino acids taken from the A chain of abrin and 124-175 amino acids from Abrus precatorius agglutinin A chain, as a vaccine candidate against abrin intoxication. The design was based on the inclusion of the immunogenic region of the full length protein and the minimal essential folding domains required for inducing neutralizing antibody response. The chimera also contains the epitope for the only two neutralizing antibodies; D6F10 and A7C4, reported against abrin till now. Active immunization with the chimera protected all the mice challenged with 45 X LD50 of abrin. Also, passive transfer of antibodies raised against the chimera rescued all mice challenged with 50 X LD50 of toxin. Hence the chimeric protein appears to be a promising vaccine candidate against abrin induced lethality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of snowdrop lectin (Galanthus nivalis agglutinin; GNA) on adults of the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunhe; Romeis, Jörg

    2009-02-01

    Based on the finding that Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA) has direct negative effects on larvae of Chrysoperla carnea, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate its toxicity to the adults. While the ingestion of GNA dissolved in an artificial diet did not affect adult longevity, there were concentration-dependent negative effects on the pre-oviposition period, daily fecundity and total fecundity (number of eggs laid). When GNA was ingested by larvae of C. carnea, it caused a significant extension of larval development time. Adults that had emerged from GNA-fed larvae did not differ from those that developed from control larvae in terms of adult fresh weight, pre-oviposition period and daily or total fecundity. However, fertility (proportion of hatching eggs) was significantly decreased in adults raised from GNA-treated larvae. Western blots revealed that GNA ingested by larvae of C. carnea was partly transferred to the adult stage and was subsequently excreted or digested within a few days. Our toxicity studies (Tier-1 tests) clearly established a hazard of GNA to adult C. carnea when administered to larvae or adults at high concentrations. Implications of these toxicity data for the non-target risk assessment of GNA-expressing transgenic crops are discussed.

  11. The Salivary Scavenger and Agglutinin (SALSA) in Healthy and Complicated Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichhardt, Martin Parnov; Jarva, Hanna; Lokki, Anna Inkeri; Laivuori, Hannele; Vuorela, Piia; Loimaranta, Vuokko; Glasner, Andreas; Siwetz, Monika; Huppertz, Berthold; Meri, Seppo

    2016-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a leading cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality worldwide. The etiology is not clear, but an immune attack towards components of placenta or fetus has been indicated. This involves activation of the complement system in the placenta. We have previously described the presence of the complement-regulating protein salivary scavenger and agglutinin (SALSA) in amniotic fluid. In this study we investigated the potential role of SALSA in pregnancy by analyzing its presence in amniotic fluid and placental tissue during healthy and complicated pregnancies. SALSA levels in amniotic fluid increased during pregnancy. Before 20 weeks of gestation the levels were slightly higher in patients who later developed pre-eclampsia than in gestation age-matched controls. In the placenta of pre-eclamptic patients syncytial damage is often followed by the formation of fibrinoid structures. SALSA was found clustered into these fibrinoid structures in partial co-localization with complement C1q and fibronectin. In vitro analysis showed direct protein binding of SALSA to fibronectin. SALSA binds also to fibrin/fibrinogen but did not interfere with the blood clotting process in vitro. Thus, in addition to antimicrobial defense and epithelial differentiation, the data presented here suggest that SALSA, together with fibronectin and C1q, may be involved in the containment of injured placental structures into fibrinoids.

  12. [Enhancing effect of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I modified liposomes on oral insulin absorption in mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Na; Ping, Qi-neng; Xu, Wen-fang

    2004-12-01

    To investigate the enhancing effect on insulin absorption through GI. tract in mice by using the Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA1) modified liposomes as the carrier. UEA1 modified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) was prepared by conjugating method of 1-ethyl-3-(3'-dimethylaminopropyl) carbodiimide (EDC), then the modified compound (PE-UEA1) was incorporated into the conventional liposomes of insulin to obtain UEA1 modified liposomes. The agglutination test was performed to examine the UEA1 biological activities after synthesis and modification. When liposomes were applied to healthy mice or diabetic mice at insulin dose of 350 u x kg(-1) orally, the hypoglycemic effect was investigated according to the blood glucose level determination. The blood glucose levels of the healthy mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (84 +/- 15)% at 4 h, (78 +/- 11)% at 8 h and (90 +/- 12)% at 12 h after oral administration. The conventional liposomes and saline showed no effect. The blood glucose levels of the diabetic mice reduced by UEA1 modified liposomes were (73 +/- 7)% at 4 h, (74 +/- 9)% at 8 h, (86 +/- 9)% at 12 h after oral administration. The UEA1 modified liposomes promote the oral absorption of insulin due to the specific-site combination on M cell membrane.

  13. Ulex Europaeus Agglutinin-1 Is a Reliable Taste Bud Marker for In Situ Hybridization Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimoto, Joto; Okada, Shinji; Kishi, Mikiya; Misaka, Takumi

    2016-03-01

    Taste signals are received by taste buds. To better understand the taste reception system, expression patterns of taste-related molecules are determined by in situ hybridization (ISH) analyses at the histological level. Nevertheless, even though ISH is essential for determining mRNA expression, few taste bud markers can be applied together with ISH. Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) appears to be a reliable murine taste bud marker based on immunohistochemistry (IHC) analyses. However, there is no evidence as to whether UEA-1 can be used for ISH. Thus, the present study evaluated UEA-1 using various histochemical methods, especially ISH. When lectin staining was performed after ISH procedures, UEA-1 clearly labeled taste cellular membranes and distinctly indicated boundaries between taste buds and the surrounding epithelial cells. Additionally, UEA-1 was determined as a taste bud marker not only when used in single-colored ISH but also when employed with double-labeled ISH or during simultaneous detection using IHC and ISH methods. These results suggest that UEA-1 is a useful marker when conducting analyses based on ISH methods. To clarify UEA-1 staining details, multi-fluorescent IHC (together with UEA-1 staining) was examined, resulting in more than 99% of cells being labeled by UEA-1 and overlapping with KCNQ1-expressing cells. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  14. Preparation and investigation of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I-conjugated liposomes as potential oral vaccine carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, KeXin; Chen, DaWei; Zhao, XiuLi; Hu, HaiYang; Yang, ChunRong; Pang, DaHai

    2011-11-01

    We prepared and optimized Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI)-modified Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-encapsulating liposomes (UEAI-LIP) as oral vaccine carriers and examined the feasibility of inducing systemic and mucosal immune responses by oral administration of UEAILIP. The prepared systems were characterized in vitro for their average size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency (EE%) and conjugation efficiency (CE%). In vitro release studies indicated that the presence of UEAI around the optimized liposomes was able to prevent a burst release of loaded BSA and provide sustained release of the encapsulated protein. In vivo immune-stimulating results in KM mice showed that BSA given intramuscularly generated systemic response only but both systemic and mucosal immune responses could be induced simultaneously in the groups in which BSA-loaded liposomes (LIP) and UEAI-LIP were administered intragastrically. Furthermore, the modification of UEAI on the surface of liposomes could further enhance the IgA and IgG levels obviously. In conclusion, this study demonstrated the high potential of lectin-modified liposomes containing the antigen as carriers for oral vaccine.

  15. Glycoconjugate histochemistry of the rat fundic gland using Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II during the development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihida, K; Suganuma, T; Tsuyama, S; Murata, F

    1988-07-01

    The development and maturation of fundic glands of Wistar rats were studied using Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II (GSA-II) histochemistry at the light microscopic and electron microscopic levels. In adult rats, mucous neck cells and cells intermediate between mucous neck cells and chief cells were specifically labeled with GSA-II, whereas other fundic gland cells were virtually negative. Ontogenetic studies revealed that GSA-II positive cells appeared at the bottom of the gland by 21 days of gestation. With differentiation and aging, the elongation of the fundic gland continued, and the labeling intensity of the mucous neck cells increased by 3 weeks after birth. Cells intermediate between mucous neck cells and chief cells were discernible from 3 days after birth. Typical mucous neck cells appeared at 3 weeks after birth, when their labeling intensity with colloidal gold (CG) particles approximated that of adults. On the other hand, the reactive cell population gradually moved from the bottom toward the middle portion of the gland. Finally, the reactive cells were localized at the neck portion of the fundic gland. These results suggest that GSA-II is a valuable marker for studying mucous neck cells and both their precursor cells and their derivatives.

  16. Purification of murine endothelial cell cultures by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labeled griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahagun, G; Moore, S A; Fabry, Z; Schelper, R L; Hart, M N

    1989-06-01

    Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin (GSA) is a valuable histochemical tool in the identification of endothelium. In this study GSA labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (GSA-FITC) was used to purify cultures of murine cerebral microvascular endothelium. Cultures were stained with GSA-FITC, then sorted using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter (FACS). GSA-positive endothelial cells were collected, re-cultured, and subsequently re-analyzed by FACS using GSA-FITC. Cultures that initially contained 80 +/- 3 to 89 +/- 3% (X +/- SE) GSA-positive cells were purified to 98 +/- 1% positivity. Immunohistochemistry with an anti-muscle-action antibody confirmed that FACS sorting of GSA-FITC-stained cells effectively removed contaminating smooth muscle cells from endothelial cell cultures. Viability, proliferation, and prostaglandin production of the cells was unaltered by lectin staining and FACS sorting. Thus, GSA-FITC can be used in conjunction with flow cytometry to enhance the purity of murine endothelial cell cultures without adversely affecting cell viability, growth, or metabolism.

  17. Molecular Mechanism Underlying the Entomotoxic Effect of Colocasia esculenta Tuber Agglutinin against Dysdercus cingulatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Roy #

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Colocasia esculenta tuber agglutinin (CEA, a mannose binding lectin, exhibits insecticidal efficacy against different hemipteran pests. Dysdercus cingulatus, red cotton bug (RCB, has also shown significant susceptibility to CEA intoxication. However, the molecular basis behind such entomotoxicity of CEA has not been addressed adequately. The present study elucidates the mechanism of insecticidal efficacy of CEA against RCB. Confocal and scanning electron microscopic analyses documented CEA binding to insect midgut tissue, resulting in an alteration of perimicrovillar membrane (PMM morphology. Internalization of CEA into insect haemolymph and ovary was documented by western blotting analyses. Ligand blot followed by mass spectrometric identification revealed the cognate binding partners of CEA as actin, ATPase and cytochrome P450. Deglycosylation and mannose inhibition assays indicated the interaction to probably be mannose mediated. Bioinformatic identification of putative glycosylation or mannosylation sites in the binding partners further supports the sugar mediated interaction. Correlating entomotoxicity of CEA with immune histological and binding assays to the insect gut contributes to a better understanding of the insecticidal potential of CEA and endorses its future biotechnological application.

  18. Lectin Histochemical Study of Cell Surface Glycoconjugate in Gastric Carcinoma Using Helix Pomatia Agglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Arab

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available "nAltered glycosylation of proteins in cancer cells is one of the main processes responsible for anaplasia, invasion and metastatic potential of neoplastic cells. Lectins are nonimmunogenetic compounds which specifically detect certain terminal sugars of glycoconjugates. The aim of the present study was to identify the N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNac containing glycoconjugates in cancer cells in all grades of gastric carcinoma. Paraffin blocks belong to 30 patients of gastric carcinoma (10 cases from each grade was collected from pathology file of Ali-Ebn-Abitaleb Hospital in Zahedan during 2005-2007. Prepared sections (5-7μm in thickness were stained by Alcian Blue, hematoxylin and eosin (H&E and helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA conjugated lectin. Lectin diluted up to 10μg/ml in PBS (0.1M, pH=6.8. Lectin reactivity was visualized by 0.03% diaminobenzidine (DAB solution. Sections were graded according to staining intensity to lectin (0-4+. Although there was some difference for lectin staining intensity between cancer cells in different grades of gastric carcinoma, statistical analysis showed that there was only a significant difference for cancer cells reactivity between histopathological grades of II and III. The pattern of reactivity to HPA lectin were also different from all histopathological grades. It seems that in cancer cells, the amount and distribution of GalNac containing glycoconjugate differ from neoplastic cells of different histopathological grades in gastric carcinoma.

  19. Stress-induced accumulation of wheat germ agglutinin and abscisic acid in roots of wheat seedlings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cammue, B.P.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Kellens, J.T.C.; Peumans, W.J. (Laboratorium voor Plantenbiochemie K. U. Leuven (Belgium)); Raikhel, N.V. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1989-12-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) levels in roots of 2-day-old wheat seedlings increased up to three-fold when stressed by air-drying. Similar results were obtained when seedling roots were incubated either in 0.5 molar mannitol or 180 grams per liter polyethylene glycol 6,000, with a peak level of WGA after 5 hours of stress. Longer periods of osmotic treatment resulted in a gradual decline of WGA in the roots. Since excised wheat roots incorporate more ({sup 35}S)cysteine into WGA under stress conditions, the observed increase of lectin levels is due to de novo synthesis. Measurement of abscisic acid (ABA) levels in roots of control and stressed seedlings indicated a 10-fold increase upon air-drying. Similarly, a five- and seven-fold increase of ABA content of seedling roots was found after 2 hours of osmotic stress by polyethylene glycol 6,000 and mannitol, respectively. Finally, the stress-induced increase of WGA in wheat roots could be inhibited by growing seedlings in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA synthesis. These results indicate that roots of water-stressed wheat seedlings (a) contain more WGA as a result of an increased de novo synthesis of this lectin, and (b) exhibit higher ABA levels. The stress-induced increase of lectin accumulation seems to be under control of ABA.

  20. Isolation and Characterization of Novel EST-Derived Genic Markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Jain

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Novel markers were developed for pea (Pisum sativum from pea expressed sequence tags (ESTs having significant homology to Medicago truncatula gene sequences to investigate genetic diversity, linkage mapping, and cross-species transferability. Methods and Results: Seventy-seven EST-derived genic markers were developed through comparative mapping between M. truncatula and P. sativum in which 75 markers produced PCR products and 33 were polymorphic among 16 pea genotypes. Conclusions: The novel markers described here will be useful for future genetic studies of P. sativum; their amplification in lentil (Lens culinaris demonstrates their potential for use in closely related species.

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are an alternative to the application of chemical fertilizer in the production of the medicinal and aromatic plant Coriandrum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Rui S; Ma, Ying; Rocha, Inês; Carvalho, Maria F; Vosátka, Miroslav; Freitas, Helena

    2016-01-01

    The widespread use of agrochemicals is detrimental to the environment and may exert harmful effects on human health. The consumer demand for organic food plants has been increasing. There is thus a rising need for alternatives to agrochemicals that can foster sustainable plant production. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential use of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus as an alternative to application of chemical fertilizer for improving growth performance of the medicinal and aromatic plant Coriandrum sativum. Plants were inoculated with the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis BEG163 and/or supplemented with a commercial chemical fertilizer (Plant Marvel, Nutriculture Bent Special) in agricultural soil. Plant growth, nutrition, and development of AM fungus were assessed. Plants inoculated with R. irregularis and those supplemented with chemical fertilizer displayed significantly improved growth performances when compared with controls. There were no significant differences in total fresh weight between plants inoculated with R. irregularis or those supplemented with chemical fertilizer. Leaf chlorophyll a + b (82%), shoot nitrogen (44%), phosphorus (254%), and potassium (27%) concentrations increased in plants inoculated with R. irregularis compared to controls. Application of chemical fertilizer inhibited root mycorrhizal colonization and the length of the extraradical mycelium of R. irregularis. Inoculation with R. irregularis was equally or more efficient than application of chemical fertilizer in promoting growth and nutrition of C. sativum. AM fungi may thus contribute to improve biologically based production of food plants and reduce the dependence on agrochemicals in agriculture.

  2. Electrophysiological and behavioral responses of pea weevil Bruchus pisorum L. (Coleóptera: Bruchidae to volatiles collected from its host Pisum sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ceballos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum L. (Coleóptera: Bruchidae is one of the most damaging pests of pea (Pisum sativum L. We investigated the role of pea volatiles on the electrophysiological and behavioral response of B. pisorum using electroantennography (EAG and olfactometry bioassays. Plant volatiles emitted at different phenological stages were collected in situ by headspace on Porapak Q traps and analyzed through gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Most abundant volatiles identified in all phenological stages were terpenes and green leaf volatiles. All tested volatile extracts elicited significant EAG responses in both male and female B. pisorum, with females exhibiting a greater response (1.35 mV than males (1.02 mV to pea-pod volatiles. Volatiles from each phenological stage stimulated an attractant behavioral response of both males and females B. pisorum in olfactometer bioassay. A larger attraction of B. pisorum females was observed to volatiles from pods over other phenological stages (P < 0.001. These results suggest the relative importance of volatiles cues from plant mediating host location by B. pisorum. This work showed that plant volatiles elicited electrophysiological and behavioral responses and that B. pisorum female can discern between phenological stages of P. sativum based on those chemical cues.

  3. Sitona lineatus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) Larval Feeding on Pisum sativum L. Affects Soil and Plant Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárcamo, Héctor A.; Herle, Carolyn E.; Lupwayi, Newton Z.

    2015-01-01

    Adults of Sitona lineatus (pea leaf weevil, PLW) feed on foliage of several Fabaceae species but larvae prefer to feed on nodules of Pisum sativum L. and Vicia faba L. Indirectly, through their feeding on rhizobia, weevils can reduce soil and plant available nitrogen (N). However, initial soil N can reduce nodulation and damage by the weevil and reduce control requirements. Understanding these interactions is necessary to make integrated pest management recommendations for PLW. We conducted a greenhouse study to quantify nodulation, soil and plant N content, and nodule damage by weevil larvae in relation to soil N amendment with urea, thiamethoxam insecticide seed coating and crop stage. PLWs reduced the number of older tumescent (multilobed) nodules and thiamethoxam addition increased them regardless of other factors. Nitrogen amendment significantly increased soil available N (>99% nitrate) as expected and PLW presence was associated with significantly lower levels of soil N. PLW decreased plant N content at early flower and thiamethoxam increased it, particularly at late flower. The study illustrated the complexity of interactions that determine insect herbivory effects on plant and soil nutrition for invertebrates that feed on N-fixing root nodules. We conclude that effects of PLW on nodulation and subsequent effects on plant nitrogen are more pronounced during the early growth stages of the plant. This suggests the importance of timing of PLW infestation and may explain the lack of yield depression in relation to this pest observed in many field studies. Also, pea crops in soils with high levels of soil N are unlikely to be affected by this herbivore and should not require insecticide inputs. PMID:26106086

  4. Effect of Rhizobium inoculation of seeds and foliar fertilization on productivity of Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz Zając

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. is the second most important grain legume crop in the world which has a wide array of uses for human food and fodder. One of the major factors that determines the use of field pea is the yield potential of cultivars. Presently, pre-sowing inoculation of pea seeds and foliar application of microelement fertilizers are prospective solutions and may be reasonable agrotechnical options. This research was undertaken because of the potentially high productivity of the 'afila' morphotype in good wheat complex soils. The aim of the study was to determine the effect of vaccination with Rhizobium and foliar micronutrient fertilization on yield of the afila pea variety. The research was based on a two-year (2009–2010 controlled field experiment, conducted in four replicates and carried out on the experimental field of the Bayer company located in Modzurów, Silesian region. experimental field soil was Umbrisol – slightly degraded chernozem, formed from loess. Nitragina inoculant, as a source of symbiotic bacteria, was applied before sowing seeds. Green area index (GAI of the canopy, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI were determined at characteristic growth stages. The presented results of this study on symbiotic nitrogen fixation by leguminous plants show that the combined application of Nitragina and Photrel was the best combination for productivity. Remote measurements of the pea canopy indexes indicated the formation of the optimum leaf area which effectively used photosynthetically active radiation. The use of Nitragina as a donor of effective Rhizobium for pea plants resulted in slightly higher GAI values and the optimization of PAR and NDVI. It is not recommended to use foliar fertilizers or Nitragina separately due to the slowing of pea productivity.

  5. Effects of organic, biological and chemical fertilizers on vegetative indices and essential oil content of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Aghhavani Shajari

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This experiment was conducted to study the effects of single and combined application of organic, biological and chemical fertilizers on qualitative and quantitative characteristics of vegetative part of coriander, (Coriandrum sativum L.. The experiment was carried out as split plot in time based on Complete Randomized Block Design with three replications and 12 treatments at Research Station, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Iran, during growing season of 2010-2011. Treatments included: (1 mycorrhiza (Glomus mosseae, (2 biosulfur (Thiobacillus sp., (3 chemical fertilizer (NPK, (4 cow manure, (5 vermicompost, (6 mycorrhiza + chemical fertilizer, (7 mycorrhiza + cow manure, (8 mycorrhiza + vermicompost, (9 biosulfur + chemical fertilizer, (10 biosulfur + cow manure, (11 biosulfur + vermicompost and (12 control. Vegetative parts of coriander were cut at 5% of flowering stage in two dates (19 May and 5 June. Results showed that the highest plant height (28 cm and lateral branches (5.2 were obtained in combined application of biosulfur with cow manure treatment. The highest fresh and dry leaf weight, fresh and dry matter yield and stem dry matter weight were obtained in single application of chemical fertilizer. Single application of biosulfur increased leaf/stem ratio. The highest essential oil percentage and essential oil yield were observed in cow manure treatment (0.2% and 1753 g.ha-1, respectively. The maximum leaf/stem ratio were observed in the first cutting, while the highest lateral branches, stem fresh and dry matter yield, essential oil percentage and essential oil yield were obtained in second cut. Overall, results of this study showed that the plant vegetative yield increased by using chemical fertilizer, while essential oil percentage and essential oil yield of coriander were improved by using organic and biological fertilizers.

  6. Modulation of the multidrug efflux pump EmrD-3 from Vibrio cholerae by Allium sativum extract and the bioactive agent allyl sulfide plus synergistic enhancement of antimicrobial susceptibility by A. sativum extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruns, Merissa M; Kakarla, Prathusha; Floyd, Jared T; Mukherjee, Mun Mun; Ponce, Robert C; Garcia, John A; Ranaweera, Indrika; Sanford, Leslie M; Hernandez, Alberto J; Willmon, T Mark; Tolson, Grace L; Varela, Manuel F

    2017-04-21

    The causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae, is a public health concern. Multidrug-resistant V. cholerae variants may reduce chemotherapeutic efficacies of severe cholera. We previously reported that the multidrug efflux pump EmrD-3 from V. cholerae confers resistance to multiple structurally distinct antimicrobials. Medicinal plant compounds are potential candidates for EmrD-3 efflux pump modulation. The antibacterial activities of garlic Allium sativum, although poorly understood, predicts that a main bioactive component, allyl sulfide, modulates EmrD-3 efflux. Thus, we tested whether A. sativum extract acts in synergy with antimicrobials and that a main bioactive component allyl sulfide inhibits EmrD-3 efflux. We found that A. sativum extract and allyl sulfide inhibited ethidium bromide efflux in cells harboring EmrD-3 and that A. sativum lowered the MICs of multiple antibacterials. We conclude that A. sativum and allyl sulfide inhibit EmrD-3 and that A. sativum extract synergistically enhances antibacterial agents.

  7. A multicentric, double-blind randomized, homoeopathic pathogenetic trial of Allium sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K Manchanda

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The pathogenetic response elicited during the proving trial expands the scope of use of the drug A. sativum and will benefit the research scholars and clinicians. The generated symptoms of this drug will carry more value when verified clinically.

  8. A review on the effects of Allium sativum (Garlic) in metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, A; Hosseinzadeh, H

    2015-11-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a common problem world-wide and includes abdominal obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and hyperglycemia disorders. It leads to insulin resistance and the development of diabetes mellitus or cardiovascular disease. Allium sativum (garlic) has been documented to exhibit anti-diabetic, hypotensive, and hypolipidemic properties. This suggests a potential role of A. sativum in the management of metabolic syndrome; however, more studies should be conducted to evaluate its effectiveness. In this review, we discussed the most relevant articles to find out the role of A. sativum in different components of metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Because human reports are rare, further studies are required to establish the clinical value of A. sativum in metabolic syndrome.

  9. Beware Cold Agglutinins in Organ Donors! Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion From an Uncontrolled Donation After Circulatory-Determination-of-Death Donor With a Cold Agglutinin: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataraman, A; Blackwell, J W; Funkhouser, W K; Birchard, K R; Beamer, S E; Simmons, W T; Randell, S H; Egan, T M

    2017-09-01

    We began to recover lungs from uncontrolled donation after circulatory determination of death to assess for transplant suitability by means of ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) and computerized tomographic (CT) scan. Our first case had a cold agglutinin with an interesting outcome. A 60-year-old man collapsed at home and was pronounced dead by Emergency Medical Services personnel. Next-of-kin consented to lung retrieval, and the decedent was ventilated and transported. Lungs were flushed with cold Perfadex, removed, and stored cold. The lungs did not flush well. Medical history revealed a recent hemolytic anemia and a known cold agglutinin. Warm nonventilated ischemia time was 51 minutes. O2-ventilated ischemia time was 141 minutes. Total cold ischemia time was 6.5 hours. At cannulation for EVLP, established clots were retrieved from both pulmonary arteries. At initiation of EVLP with Steen solution, tiny red aggregates were observed initially. With warming, the aggregates disappeared and the perfusate became red. After 1 hour, EVLP was stopped because of florid pulmonary edema. The lungs were cooled to 20°C; tiny red aggregates formed again in the perfusate. Ex vivo CT scan showed areas of pulmonary edema and a pyramidal right middle lobe opacity. Dissection showed multiple pulmonary emboli-the likely cause of death. However, histology showed agglutinated red blood cells in the microvasculature in pre- and post-EVLP biopsies, which may have contributed to inadequate parenchymal preservation. Organ donors with cold agglutinins may not be suitable owing to the impact of hypothermic preservation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. The essential oil of Allium sativum as an alternative agent against Candida isolated from dental prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Juache, Alejandro; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Bermeo-Escalona, Josué R; Gómez-Hernández, Araceli; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury; Sánchez-Vargas, Luis Octavio

    The colonization of the surfaces of dental prostheses by Candida albicans is associated with the development of denture stomatitis. In this context, the use of fluconazole has been proposed, but its disadvantage is microbial resistance. Meanwhile, the oil of Allium sativum has shown an effect in controlling biofilm formation by C. albicans. The objective of this study was to determine the antifungal activities of the essential oil of A. sativum and fluconazole against clinical isolates of Candida species obtained from rigid, acrylic-based partial or total dentures and to compare these agents' effects on both biofilm and planktonic cells. A total of 48 clinical isolates obtained from the acrylic surface of partial or complete dentures were examined, and the following species were identified: C. albicans, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Candida krusei. For each isolate, the antifungal activities of the essential oil of A. sativum and fluconazole against both biofilm and planktonic cells were evaluated using the Clinical & Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) M27-A3 method. The isolates were also evaluated by semiquantitative XTT reduction. All planktonic Candida isolates were susceptible to the essential oil of A. sativum, whereas 4.2% were resistant to fluconazole. Regarding susceptibilities in biofilms, 43.8% of biofilms were resistant to A. sativum oil, and 91.7% were resistant to fluconazole. All planktonic cells of the different Candida species tested are susceptible to sativum oil, and the majority are susceptible to fluconazole. Susceptibility decreases in biofilm cells, with increased resistance to fluconazole compared with A. sativum oil. The essential oil of A. sativum is thus active against clinical isolates of Candida species obtained from dentures, with effects on both biofilm and planktonic cells in vitro. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Presence of oligosaccharides in seed-coat mucilage of Lepidium sativum : role in allelopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Iqbal, Amjad

    2010-01-01

    Lepidimoide is a naturally occurring disaccharide reported to be an oligosaccharin, i.e. to exhibit ‘hormone-like’ biological activity. It was found in cress (Lepidium sativum) root exudates and exerts apparently allelopathic effects on neighbouring Amaranthus seedlings. In the present study the effect of cress root exudates on hypocotyl and root length of Amaranthus caudatus and Lactuca sativa was studied. The seedlings of both species grown with Lepidium sativum seedlings had...

  12. Effects of Soybean Agglutinin on Intestinal Barrier Permeability and Tight Junction Protein Expression in Weaned Piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was developed to provide further information on the intestinal barrier permeability and the tight junction protein expression in weaned piglets fed with different levels of soybean agglutinin (SBA. Twenty-five weaned crossbred barrows (Duroc × Landrace × Yorkshire were selected and randomly allotted to five groups, each group with five replicates. The piglets in the control group were not fed with leguminous products. 0.05, 0.1, 0.15 and 0.2% SBA was added to the control diet to form four experimental diets, respectively. After the experimental period of 7 days (for each group, all the piglets were anesthetized with excess procaine and slaughtered. The D-lactic acid in plasma and the Ileal mucosa diamine oxidase (DAO was analyzed to observe the change in the intestinal permeability. The tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1 in the jejunum tissue distribution and relative expression were detected by immunohistochemistry and Western Blot. The results illustrated that a high dose of SBA (0.1–0.2% could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet had no significant affects. The contents of DAO, D-lactic acid, occludin or ZO-1, had a linear relationship with the SBA levels (0–0.2% in diets. The high dose SBA (0.1–0.2% could increase the intestinal permeability and reduce piglet intestinal epithelial tight junction protein occludin or ZO-1 expression, while low dose of SBA (0.05% of total diet had no affects.

  13. Ulex europaeus agglutinin II (UEA-II) is a novel, potent inhibitor of complement activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekowski, R; Collard, C D; Reenstra, W R; Stahl, G L

    2001-02-01

    Complement is an important mediator of vascular injury following oxidative stress. We recently demonstrated that complement activation following endothelial oxidative stress is mediated by mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and activation of the lectin complement pathway. Here, we investigated whether nine plant lectins which have a binding profile similar to that of MBL competitively inhibit MBL deposition and subsequent complement activation following human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) oxidative stress. HUVEC oxidative stress (1% O(2), 24 hr) significantly increased Ulex europaeus agglutinin II (UEA-II) binding by 72 +/- 9% compared to normoxic cells. UEA-II inhibited MBL binding to HUVEC in a concentration-dependent manner following oxidative stress. Further, MBL inhibited UEA-II binding to HUVEC in a concentration-dependent manner following oxidative stress, suggesting a common ligand. UEA-II (< or = 100 micromol/L) did not attenuate the hemolytic activity, nor did it inhibit C3a des Arg formation from alternative or classical complement pathway-specific hemolytic assays. C3 deposition (measured by ELISA) following HUVEC oxidative stress was inhibited by UEA-II in a concentration-dependent manner (IC(50) = 10 pmol/L). UEA-II inhibited C3 and MBL co-localization (confocal microscopy) in a concentration-dependent manner on HUVEC following oxidative stress (IC(50) approximately 1 pmol/L). Finally, UEA-II significantly inhibited complement-dependent neutrophil chemotaxis, but failed to inhibit fMLP-mediated chemotaxis, following endothelial oxidative stress. These data demonstrate that UEA-II is a novel, potent inhibitor of human MBL deposition and complement activation following human endothelial oxidative stress.

  14. Datura stramonium agglutinin: cloning, molecular characterization and recombinant production in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Keisuke; Tanaka, Kaori; Murakami, Takahiro; Nakashita, Hideo; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Oguri, Suguru

    2015-02-01

    Datura stramonium seeds contain at least three chitin-binding isolectins [termed Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA)] as homo- or heterodimers of A and B subunits. We isolated a cDNA encoding isolectin B (DSA-B) from an immature fruit cDNA library; this contained an open reading frame encoding 279 deduced amino acids, which was confirmed by partial sequencing of the native DSA-B peptide. The sequence consisted of: (i) a cysteine (Cys)-rich carbohydrate-binding domain composed of four conserved chitin-binding domains and (ii) an extensin-like domain of 37 residues containing four SerPro4-6 motifs that was inserted between the second and third chitin-binding domains (CBDs). Although each chitin-binding domain contained eight conserved Cys residues, only the second chitin-binding domain contained an extra Cys residue, which may participate in dimerization through inter-disulfide bridge formation. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the molecular mass of homodimeric lectin composed of two B-subunits was determined as 68,821 Da. The molecular mass of the S-pyridilethylated B-subunit were found to be 37,748 Da and that of the de-glycosylated form was 26,491 Da, which correlated with the molecular weight estimated from the deduced sequence. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the dsa-b demonstrated hemagglutinating activity. Recombinant DSA-B was produced as a homodimeric glycoprotein with a similar molecular mass to that of the native form. Moreover, the N-terminus of the purified recombinant DSA-B protein was identical to that of the native DSA-B, confirming that the cloned cDNA encoded DSA-B. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Antileishmanial and Immunomodulatory Activity of Allium sativum (Garlic): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foroutan-Rad, Masoud; Tappeh, Khosrow Hazrati; Khademvatan, Shahram

    2017-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is caused by an obligate intracellular protozoa belonging to Leishmania genus. The current drugs for treatment of leishmaniasis possess many disadvantages; therefore, researchers are continuously looking for the more effective and safer drugs. The aim of this study is to review the effectiveness, toxicities, and possible mechanisms of pharmaceutical actions of different garlic extracts and organosulfur compounds isolated from garlic against Leishmania spp. in a variety of in vitro, in vivo and clinical trials reports. All relevant databases were searched using the terms "Allium sativum," "Garlic," "Allicin," "Ajoene," "Leishmania," "in vitro," "in vivo," and "clinical trial," alone or in combination from 5 English databases (Web of Science, PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Google Scholar) and 3 Persian databases (Scientific Information Database, Iran Medex, and Magiran) from 1990 to 2014. In summary, garlic with immunomodulatory effects and apoptosis induction contributes to the treatment of leishmaniasis. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Activity of selected hydrolytic enzymes in Allium sativum L. anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarczyk, Krystyna; Gębura, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine enzymatic activity in sterile Allium sativum anthers in the final stages of male gametophyte development (the stages of tetrads and free microspores). The analysed enzymes were shown to occur in the form of numerous isoforms. In the tetrad stage, esterase activity was predominant, which was manifested by the greater number of isoforms of the enzyme. In turn, in the microspore stage, higher numbers of isoforms of acid phosphatases and proteases were detected. The development of sterile pollen grains in garlic is associated with a high level of protease and acid phosphatase activity and lower level of esterase activities in the anther locule. Probably this is the first description of the enzymes activity (ACPH, EST, PRO) in the consecutives stages of cell wall formation which is considered to be one of the causes of male sterility in flowering plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) and its bioactive constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laribi, Bochra; Kouki, Karima; M'Hamdi, Mahmoud; Bettaieb, Taoufik

    2015-06-01

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.), a member of the Apiaceae family, is among most widely used medicinal plant, possessing nutritional as well as medicinal properties. Thus, the aim of this updated review is to highlight the importance of coriander as a potential source of bioactive constituents and to summarize their biological activities as well as their different applications from data obtained in recent literature, with critical analysis on the gaps and potential for future investigations. A literature review was carried out by searching on the electronic databases including PubMed, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Google Scholar for studies focusing on the biological and pharmacological activities of coriander seed and herb bioactive constituents. All recent English-language articles published between 2000 and 2014 were searched using the terms 'C. sativum', 'medicinal plant', 'bioactive constituents', and 'biological activities'. Subsequently, coriander seed and herb essential oils have been actively investigated for their chemical composition and biological activities including antimicrobial, antioxidant, hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, anxiolytic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-convulsant and anti-cancer activities, among others. Although coriander has been reported to possess a wide range of traditional medicinal uses, no report is available in its effectiveness use in reactive airway diseases such as asthma and bronchiolitis. In brief, the information presented herein will be helpful to create more interest towards this medicinal species by defining novel pharmacological and clinical applications and hence, may be useful in developing new drug formulations in the future or by employing coriander bioactive constituents in combination with conventional drugs to enhance the treatment of diseases such as Alzheimer and cancer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Kinetic analysis of the binding of Ulex europeas agglutinin 1 (UEA 1) to H-antigenic fucolipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C J; Surolia, A

    2000-02-01

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of Ulex europeas agglutinin 1-H-antigenic determinant was studied by monitoring the binding of the lectin to H-antigenic fucolipid incorporated in liposomes tethered to the sensor surface by surface plasmon resonance. The second-order rate constants for the interactions are several order of magnitude slower than the diffusion controlled reactions. Analyses of activation parameters reveals that these slow second-order rate constants are a consequence of an unfavorable activation enthalpy term. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Effect of the lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I) on the alpha-amylase secretion of rat pancreas in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkat, U; Damm, I; Schröder, G; Schmidt, K; Wirth, C; Weber, H; Jonas, L

    1998-05-01

    Lectins are able to bind to cholecystokinin (CCK) receptors and other glycosylated membrane proteins. The lectins wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA-I) are used for affinity chromatography to isolate the highly glycosylated CCK-A receptor of pancreatic acinar cells. According to the working hypothesis that lectin binding to the CCK receptor should alter the ligand-receptor interaction, the effect of WGA and UEA-I on CCK-8-induced enzyme secretion was studied on isolated rat pancreatic acini in vitro. In vitro both lectins showed a dosage-dependent inhibition of CCK-8-induced alpha-amylase secretion of acini over 60 min. WGA showed a strong inhibitory effect on amylase secretion, approximately 40%, in vitro. UEA-I caused a smaller, but significant decrease, approximately 20%, in enzyme secretion of isolated acini. Additionally, both lectins inhibited cerulein/secretin- or cerulein-induced pancreatic secretion of rats in vivo, but not after secretin alone. The results are discussed with respect to a possible influence of both lectins on the interaction of CCK or cerulein with the CCK-A receptor.

  20. UV-B antagonises shade avoidance and increases levels of the flavonoid quercetin in coriander (Coriandrum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Donald P; Sharma, Ashutosh; Fletcher, Taryn; Budge, Simon; Moncrieff, Chris; Dodd, Antony N; Franklin, Keara A

    2017-12-19

    Despite controlling a diverse array of regulatory processes in plants, UV-B wavelengths (280-315 nm) are attenuated by common greenhouse materials such as glass and polycarbonate and are therefore depleted in many commercial growing environments. In this study, we analysed the architecture, pigment accumulation and antioxidant capacity of coriander (Coriandrum sativum, also known as cilantro) plants grown with and without supplementary UV-B (1.5 µmol m-2 s-1). We demonstrate that UV-B limits stem elongation responses to neighbour proximity perception (shade avoidance), promoting a more compact plant architecture. In addition, UV-B increased leaf quercetin content and total antioxidant capacity. Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in flavonoid biosynthesis were not impaired in shade avoidance inhibition, suggesting that UV-B-induced flavonoid synthesis is not a component of this response. Our results indicate that UV-B supplementation may provide a method to manipulate the architecture, flavour and nutritional content of potted herbs whilst reducing the deleterious impacts of dense planting on product quality.

  1. AM Fungi Influences the Photosynthetic Activity, Growth and Antioxidant Enzymes in Allium sativum L. under Salinity Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh BORDE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Potential of Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi in alleviating adverse salt effects on growth was tested in garlic (Allium sativum L.. Towards this objective we analyzed the AM root colonization and the activities of various antioxidant enzymes like peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase at 0, 100, 200 and 300 mM salinity levels. The activities of all the antioxidant enzymes studied were found to be increased in AM garlic plants. Antioxidant activity was maximum in 100 and 200 mM NaCl (sodium chloride in AM and non-AM plants. Proline accumulation was induced by salt levels and it was more in leaves as well as roots of AM plants as compared to non-AM plants, this indicating that mycorrhiza reduced salt injury. Growth parameters of garlic plants like leaf area, plant fresh and dry weight and antioxidant enzyme activities were higher at moderate salinity level. This work suggests that the mycorrhiza helps garlic plants to perform better under moderate salinity level by enhancing the antioxidant activity and proline content as compared to non-AM plants.

  2. Effect of water stress and harvesting stages on quantitative and qualitative yields of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Ahmadian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of drought stress and harvesting stages on quantitative and qualitative yields of Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. this experiment was conducted on split plot based on a randomized completely block design with 3 replications in Torbat-e Heydariyeh University, Iran, during growing season of 2010-2011. Treatments were drought stress (in three levels no stress: control and irrigation in 60 and 30 percentage of FC as main plots and harvesting times (in 3 levels consist of: before flowering, flowering and after flowering as sub plots. Results showed that drought stress and harvesting stages had significant affected on leaf number, height, number of stem, wet and dry weight of plant, SPAD, proline content, carbohydrate content, essential oil yield and percentage and components of essential oil of coriander. Increasing water stress decreased yield and its components while enhanced proline and carbohydrate contents. Maximum of essential oil and its main components (linalool, alpha pentene, gamma terpinene, geranial acetate and camphor were in low stress that had significant difference with other stress treatments. Delaying in harvest enhanced yield and its components and essential oil percentage. Proline content had no significant difference between flowering and after flowering stages. Therefore, we can suggest low stress of water and harvest at after flowering stage to get maximum of yield.

  3. Structural basis for carbohydrate binding properties of a plant chitinase-like agglutinin with conserved catalytic machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Roig-Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J; Henrissat, Bernard; van Damme, Els J M; Bourne, Yves

    2015-05-01

    A new chitinase-like agglutinin, RobpsCRA, related to family GH18 chitinases, has previously been identified in black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) bark. The crystal structure of RobpsCRA at 1.85Å resolution reveals unusual molecular determinants responsible for the lack of its ancestral chitinase activity. Unlike other chitinase-like proteins, which lack chitinase catalytic residues, RobpsCRA has conserved its catalytic machinery. However, concerted rearrangements of loop regions coupled to non-conservative substitutions of aromatic residues central to the chitin-binding groove explain the lack of hydrolytic activity against chitin and the switch toward recognition of high-mannose type N-glycans. Identification of close homologs in flowering plants with conservation of sequence motifs associated to the structural adaptations seen in RobpsCRA defines an emerging class of agglutinins, as emphasized by a phylogenetic analysis, that are likely to share a similar carbohydrate binding specificity for high-mannose type N-glycans. This study illustrates the recent evolution and molecular adaptation of a versatile TIM-barrel scaffold within the ancestral GH18 family. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural studies of Helix aspersa agglutinin complexed with GalNAc: A lectin that serves as a diagnostic tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrzyk, Agnieszka J; Bujacz, Anna; Mak, Paweł; Potempa, Barbara; Niedziela, Tomasz

    2015-11-01

    Lectins belong to a differentiated group of proteins known to possess sugar-binding properties. Due to this fact, they are interesting research targets in medical diagnostics. Helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) is a lectin that recognizes the epitopes containing α-d-N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc), which is present at the surface of metastatic cancer cells. Although several reports have already described the use of HAA as a diagnostic tool, this protein was not characterized on the molecular level. Here, we present for the first time the structural information about lectin isolated from mucus of Helix aspersa (garden snail). The amino acid sequence of this agglutinin was determined by Edman degradation and tertiary as well as quaternary structure by X-ray crystallography. The high resolution crystal structure (1.38Å) and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis provide the detailed information about a large part of the HAA natural glycan chain. The topology of the GalNAc binding cleft and interaction with lectin are very well defined in the structure and fully confirmed by STD HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Together, this provides structural clues regarding HAA specificity and opens possibilities to rational modifications of this important diagnostic tool. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Controlling Myzus persicae with recombinant endophytic fungi Chaetomium globosum expressing Pinellia ternata agglutinin: using recombinant endophytic fungi to control aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, G; Lan, N; Ma, X; Yu, Z; Zhao, X

    2011-05-01

    Sap-sucking insect pests have become the major threats to many crops in recent years; however, only a few biopesticides have been developed for controlling those pests. Here, we developed a novel pest management strategy, which uses endophytes to express anti-pest plant lectins. The fungal endophyte of Chaetomium globosum YY-11 with anti-fungal activities was isolated from rape seedlings. Pinellia ternata agglutinin (pta) gene was cloned into YY-11 mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The positive transformants, as selected by antibiotic resistance, were evaluated using PCR and Western blot assay. We found that the recombinant endophytes colonized most of the crops, and the resistance of rape inoculated with recombinant endophytic fungi significantly inhibited the growth and reproduction of Myzus persicae. Our results showed that the recombinant endophytes expressing Pinellia ernata agglutinin (PTA) may endow hosts with resistance against sap-sucking pests. This research may have important implications for using endophytes to deliver insecticidal plant lectin proteins to control sap-sucking pests for crop protection. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2011 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Fluorescence Imaging of Streptococcus pneumoniae with the Helix pomatia agglutinin (HPA) As a Potential, Rapid Diagnostic Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domenech, Mirian; García, Ernesto

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common human pathogen and a major causal agent of life-threatening infections that can either be respiratory or non-respiratory. It is well known that the Helix pomatia (edible snail) agglutinin (HPA) lectin shows specificity for terminal αGalNAc residues present, among other locations, in the Forssman pentasaccharide (αGalNAc1→3βGalNAc1→3αGal1→4βGal1→4βGlc). Based on experiments involving choline-independent mutants and different growth conditions, we propose here that HPA recognizes the αGalNAc terminal residues of the cell wall teichoic and lipoteichoic acids of S. pneumoniae. In addition, experimental evidence showing that pneumococci can be specifically labeled with HPA when growing as planktonic cultures as well as in mixed biofilms of S. pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae has been obtained. It should be underlined that pneumococci were HPA-labeled despite of the presence of a capsule. Although some non-pneumococcal species also bind the agglutinin, HPA-binding combined with fluorescence microscopy constitutes a suitable tool for identifying S. pneumoniae and, if used in conjunction with Gram staining and/or other suitable technique like antigen detection, it may potentially facilitate a fast and accurate diagnosis of pneumococcal infections. PMID:28769901

  7. Leaf mineral nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence and modulation by nutrient deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, Anne; Diquélou, Sylvain; Billard, Vincent; Laîné, Philippe; Garnica, Maria; Prudent, Marion; Garcia-Mina, José-Maria; Yvin, Jean-Claude; Ourry, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Higher plants have to cope with fluctuating mineral resource availability. However, strategies such as stimulation of root growth, increased transporter activities, and nutrient storage and remobilization have been mostly studied for only a few macronutrients. Leaves of cultivated crops (Zea mays, Brassica napus, Pisum sativum, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare) and tree species (Quercus robur, Populus nigra, Alnus glutinosa) grown under field conditions were harvested regularly during their life span and analyzed to evaluate the net mobilization of 13 nutrients during leaf senescence. While N was remobilized in all plant species with different efficiencies ranging from 40% (maize) to 90% (wheat), other macronutrients (K–P–S–Mg) were mobilized in most species. Ca and Mn, usually considered as having low phloem mobility were remobilized from leaves in wheat and barley. Leaf content of Cu–Mo–Ni–B–Fe–Zn decreased in some species, as a result of remobilization. Overall, wheat, barley and oak appeared to be the most efficient at remobilization while poplar and maize were the least efficient. Further experiments were performed with rapeseed plants subjected to individual nutrient deficiencies. Compared to field conditions, remobilization from leaves was similar (N–S–Cu) or increased by nutrient deficiency (K–P–Mg) while nutrient deficiency had no effect on Mo–Zn–B–Ca–Mn, which seemed to be non-mobile during leaf senescence under field conditions. However, Ca and Mn were largely mobilized from roots (-97 and -86% of their initial root contents, respectively) to shoots. Differences in remobilization between species and between nutrients are then discussed in relation to a range of putative mechanisms. PMID:26029223

  8. Leaf mineral nutrient remobilization during leaf senescence and modulation by nutrient deficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne eMaillard

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher plants have to cope with fluctuating mineral resource availability. However strategies such as stimulation of root growth, increased transporter activities, and nutrient storage and remobilization have been mostly studied for only a few macronutrients. Leaves of cultivated crops (Zea mays, Brassica napus, Pisum sativum, Triticum aestivum, Hordeum vulgare and tree species (Quercus robur, Populus nigra, Alnus glutinosa grown under field conditions were harvested regularly during their life span and analysed to evaluate the net mobilization of 13 nutrients during leaf senescence. While N was remobilized in all plant species with different efficiencies ranging from 40% (maize to 90% (wheat, other macronutrients (K-P-S-Mg were mobilized in most species. Ca and Mn, usually considered as having low phloem mobility were remobilized from leaves in wheat and barley. Leaf content of Cu-Mo-Ni-B-Fe-Zn decreased in some species, as a result of remobilization. Overall, wheat, barley and oak appeared to be the most efficient at remobilization while poplar and maize were the least efficient. Further experiments were performed with rapeseed plants subjected to individual nutrient deficiencies. Compared to field conditions, remobilization from leaves was similar (N-S-Cu or increased by nutrient deficiency (K-P-Mg while nutrient deficiency had no effect on Mo-Zn-B-Ca-Mn, which seemed to be non-mobile during leaf senescence under field conditions. However, Ca and Mn were largely mobilized from roots (-97 and -86% of their initial root contents, respectively to shoots. Differences in remobilization between species and between nutrients are then discussed in relation to a range of putative mechanisms.

  9. The Chemical Compositions of the Volatile Oils of Garlic (Allium sativum and Wild Garlic (Allium vineale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabodh Satyal

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Garlic, Allium sativum, is broadly used around the world for its numerous culinary and medicinal uses. Wild garlic, Allium vineale, has been used as a substitute for garlic, both in food as well as in herbal medicine. The present study investigated the chemical compositions of A. sativum and A. vineale essential oils. The essential oils from the bulbs of A. sativum, cultivated in Spain, were obtained by three different methods: laboratory hydrodistillation, industrial hydrodistillation, and industrial steam distillation. The essential oils of wild-growing A. vineale from north Alabama were obtained by hydrodistillation. The resulting essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Both A. sativum and A. vineale oils were dominated by allyl polysulfides. There were minor quantitative differences between the A. sativum oils owing to the distillation methods employed, as well as differences from previously reported garlic oils from other geographical locations. Allium vineale oil showed a qualitative similarity to Allium ursinum essential oil. The compositions of garlic and wild garlic are consistent with their use as flavoring agents in foods as well as their uses as herbal medicines. However, quantitative differences are likely to affect the flavor and bioactivity profiles of these Allium species.

  10. Insecticidal, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of bulb extracts of Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriga, Balaji; Mopuri, Ramgopal; MuraliKrishna, T

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate the insecticidal, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities of bulb extracts of Allium sativum (A. sativum). Dried bulbs of A. sativum were extracted with different solvents and evaluated for insecticidal, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Aqueous and methanol extracts showed highest insecticidal activity (mortality rate of 81% and 64% respectively) against the larvae of Spodoptera litura (S. litura) at a concentration of 1 000 ppm. With regard to antimicrobial activity, aqueous extract exhibited antibacterial activity against gram positive (Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureu,) and gram negative (Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumonia) strains and antifungal activity against Candida albicans. While methanol extract showed antimicrobial activity against all the tested micro organisms except two (Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans), the extracts of hexane, chloroform and ethyl acetate did not show any anti microbial activity. Minimum inhibitory concentration of aqueous and methanol extracts against tested bacterial and fungal strains was 100-150 μg/mL. Antioxidant activity of the bulb extracts was evaluated in terms of inhibition of free radicals by 2, 2'-diphenly-1-picrylhydrazyl. Aqueous and methanol extracts exhibited strong antioxidant activity (80%-90% of the standard). Antioxidant and antimicrobial activity of A. sativum against the tested organisms therefore, provides scientific basis for its utilization in traditional and folk medicine. Also, our results demonstrated the insecticidal efficacy of A. sativum against S. litura, a polyphagous insect. Copyright © 2012 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The clinical utility of Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive thyroglobulin ratio in serum for distinguishing benign from malignant conditions of the thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Kayoko; Nakamura, Kenji; Kobatake, Shinzo; Satomura, Shinji; Maruyama, Masayuki; Kameko, Fumiko; Tajiri, Junichi; Kato, Ryoji

    2007-04-01

    Traditionally, the follow-up of differentiated thyroid carcinoma consists of periodic withdrawal from L-T4-suppressive therapy to allow performance of a highly sensitive serum Tg measurement to detect recurrences. We investigated Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive thyroglobulin ratios in serum to evaluate in usefulness for detection of thyroid carcinoma. The study was conducted on 93 serum sample from 23 healthy volunteers, 32 patients with benign thyroid tumor, 28 patients with thyroid carcinoma without metastasis, and 10 patients with thyroid carcinoma with lymph node metastasis. The Lens culinaris Agglutinin reactive thyroglobulin ratio in patients with thyroid carcinoma was significantly lower than in patients with benign thyroid tumor with serum thyroglobulin concentration >200 ng/ml. Among cases of thyroid carcinoma with lymph node metastasis, Lens culinaris Agglutinin reactive thyroglobulin ratios were significantly lower than in patient with thyroid carcinoma without metastasis and those with benign tumor regardless of serum thyroglobulin concentration. Measurement of Lens culinaris Agglutinin reactive thyroglobulin ratio in serum may be useful for distinguishing between thyroid carcinoma and benign thyroid tumor.

  12. Agglutinin-mediated phagocytosis-associated generation of superoxide anion and nitric oxide by the hemocytes of the giant freshwater prawn Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Thiagarajan; Arumugam, Munusamy; Mullainadhan, Periasamy

    2008-03-01

    Hemocyte mediated phagocytosis is one of the vital components of innate defence mechanisms in crustaceans and this phagocytic process is aided by serum agglutinins. However, literature on agglutinin mediated opsono-phagocytosis is unclear in the case of Macrobrachium rosenbergii hemocytes. Further, very few studies in the case of superoxide anion generation and none with regard to nitric oxide generation during phagocytosis exist among crustaceans. We investigated the occurrence of agglutinins in the serum and the role of serum agglutinins in mediating phagocytosis by the hemocytes. We show that the prawn serum possesses agglutinins that function as opsonins during phagocytosis of HB RBC by the hemocytes. Hemagglutination-inhibition assays revealed the specificity of serum agglutinins for N-acetylated hexoses, namely GalNAc, GlcNAc and ManNAc, with a higher affinity for ManNAc. In addition, ManNAc was able to inhibit the phagocytic response (by about 60%) of the hemocytes against serum pretreated HB RBC, wherein the serum was previously treated with ManNAc. We next investigated the ability of the hemocytes to generate superoxide anion and nitric oxide during HB RBC phagocytosis and results show generation of both these free radicals. In addition, there was an enhancement in generation (75% increase) of these free radicals during agglutinin mediated opsonophagocytosis, when compared to buffer treated targets and interestingly this enhanced generation was inhibited by ManNAc (27% for superoxide anion and 36% for nitric oxide), an inhibitory sugar for phagocytosis. Inhibition of phagocytosis induced superoxide anion generation by DPI (53%), sodium azide (56%) and tropolone (61%), reveals the possible involvement of NADPH-oxidases, peroxidases and probably phenoloxidases, respectively, in the generation of superoxide anion. Similarly, decrease in nitric oxide generation in the presence of l-NIO (47%) during phagocytosis lends support to the role of nitric oxide

  13. Investigaciones actuales del empleo de Allium sativum en medicina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslhey María Sánchez Dominguez

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Desde tiempos ancestrales el ajo Allium sativum ha sido utilizado por sus propiedades medicinales, ampliamente conocidas. Posee múltiples efectos beneficiosos; tales como: antimicrobiano, hipolipidémico, antitrombótico, actividad antitumoral, antihipertensivo, entre otras. Los compuestos sulfurados presentes en el mismo, principalmente alicina y ajoene, constituyen los principios activos responsables de las actividades biológicas referidas. Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica empleando los recursos disponibles en la red Infomed, específicamente Ebsco, PubMed, Hinari y SciELO, a través de los cuales se accedieron a las bases de datos: Medline, Academic Search Premier, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews y MedicLatina, para revisar el estado actual de las investigaciones del ajo en medicina. Existen evidencias científicas que avalan su uso, comprobando los efectos antes referidos. En los últimos años predominan artículos que se centran en el estudio de diferentes formulaciones del ajo: extracto añejo, extracto acuoso, aceite, ajo crudo. En algunas de las referencias consultadas se reconocen limitaciones metodológicas en estas investigaciones. Es consenso que las diferentes formulaciones elaboradas a partir el ajo deben utilizarse como tratamiento complementario.

  14. Seasonal dynamics of important for Coriandrum sativum virus pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dikova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. The objective of the study was the establishment of the seasonal dynamics of some wide spread infectious diseases, caused from virus pathogens on the most important for Bulgaria essential oil-bearing culture coriander – Coriandrum sativum (L., that was a premise for determination of dates and means for the control of these pathogens. The researches for the establishment of viral infection in coriander were carried out by the serological method ELISA (Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, variant DAS-ELISA in the Division for Plant Protection to the Institute of Soil Science, Agrotechnologies and Plant Protection (ISSAPP Nikola Poushkarov, Sofia, Bulgaria. The observations for the establishment of aphids in coriander crop were carried out in the Institute of Roses, Essential and Medical cultures (IREMC near Kasanlak, Bulgaria. A rise of the infection, expressing by the increase of the viral concentration in the summer in comparison with the spring was established for the following pathological for coriander viruses: Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. The number of populations of aphids (carriers – vectors of AMV and CMV as well as the coriander plants with symptoms of viruses increased in the summer in comparison with the spring. The established dependences will be taken into consideration in the cases of the integrated management of pests on coriander.

  15. A polygalacturonase localized in the Golgi apparatus in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Takao; Jinno, Jun; Inoue, Yoshiyuki; Ito, Shoko; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; Ishimizu, Takeshi

    2017-09-01

    Pectin is a plant cell wall constituent that is mainly composed of polygalacturonic acid (PGA), a linear α1,4-d-galacturonic acid (GalUA) backbone. Polygalacturonase (PG) hydrolyzes the α1,4-linkages in PGA. Nearly all plant PGs identified thus far are secreted as soluble proteins. Here we describe the microsomal PG activity in pea (Pisum sativum) epicotyls and present biochemical evidence that it was localized to the Golgi apparatus, where pectins are biosynthesized. The microsomal PG was purified, and it was enzymatically characterized. The purified enzyme showed maximum activity towards pyridylaminated oligogalacturonic acids with six degrees of polymerization (PA-GalUA6), with a Km value of 11 μM for PA-GalUA6. The substrate preference of the enzyme was complementary to that of PGA synthase. The main PG activity in microsomes was detected in the Golgi fraction by sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation. The activity of the microsomal PG was lower in rapidly growing epicotyls, in contrast to the high expression of PGA synthase. The role of this PG in the regulation of pectin biosynthesis or plant growth is discussed. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  16. Stem Rot of Garlic (Allium sativum) Caused by Sclerotium rolfsii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Jin-Hyeuk

    2010-06-01

    Stem rot disease was found in garlic (Allium sativum L.) cultivated from 2008 to 2010 in the vegetable gardens of some farmers in Geumsan-myon, Jinju City, Gyeongnam province in Korea. The initial symptoms of the disease were typical water-soaked spots, which progressed to rotting, wilting, blighting, and eventually death. White mycelial mats had spread over the lesions near the soil line, and sclerotia had formed over the mycelial mats on the stem. The sclerotia were globoid in shape, 1~3 mm in size, and tan to brown in color. The optimum temperature for growth and sclerotia formation on potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium was 30℃. The diameter of the hyphae ranged from approximately 4 to 8 µm. Typical clamp connection structures were observed in the hyphae of the fungus, which was grown on PDA medium for 4 days. On the basis of the mycological characteristics and pathogenicity of the fungus on the host plants, the causal agent was identified as Sclerotium rolfsii Saccardo. This is the first report of stem rot disease in garlic caused by S. rolfsii in Korea.

  17. New report of Phoma glomerata on Coriandrum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeva, R; Carrieri, R; Stoyanova, Z; Dacheva, S; Lahoz, E; Fanigliulo, A; Crescenzi, A

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, coriander plants (Coriandrum sativum L.), showing symptoms of greyish to hell brown lesions with dark brown border between discoloured and asymptomatic tissues, were observed in Bulgaria. Pycnidia with small unicellular conidia appeared in the pale centre of the lesions. In this work, the identification of the causal agent of this disease was made applying Koch's postulates. Moreover, for a rapid and unambiguous identification of the fungal species, the internal transcribed spacers and the 5.8 rDNA gene (ITS1-5.8-ITS2) were amplified by PCR from DNA extracted from the isolated colonies. The amplicon was sequenced and analyzed using BLASTn, and showed a homology of 100% with a corresponding sequence of Phoma glomerata (accession number DQ093699). The fungus isolated, after the morphological and molecular characterization, was ascribed to the species Phoma glomerata (Corda) Wollenweber and Hochapfel. This is the first report of P. glomerata as agent of stem rot of coriander in Bulgaria and elsewhere.

  18. Evaluation of SRAP markers for mapping of Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernanda Guindon

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Linkage maps have become important tools for genetic studies. With the aim of evaluating the SRAP (sequence-related amplified polymorphism technique for linkage mapping in Pisum sativum L., a F2 mapping population derived from an initial cross between cvs. DDR11 and Zav25 was generated. A total of 25 SRAP primer combinations were evaluated in 45 F2 plants and both parental lines, generating 208 polymorphic bands/markers. The markers were analyzed by the chi-square goodness-of-fit test to check the expected Mendelian segregation ratio. The resulting linkage map consists of 112 genetic markers distributed in 7 linkage groups (LGs, covering a total of 528.8 cM. The length of the LGs ranged from 47.6 to 144.3 cM (mean 75.54 cM, with 9 to 34 markers. The linkage map developed in this study indicates that the SRAP marker system could be applied to mapping studies of pea.

  19. Scolicidal effect of Allium sativum flowers on hydatid cyst protoscolices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Esboei, B; Ebrahimzadeh, M A; Fathi, H; Rezaei Anzahaei, F

    2016-01-01

    he s Because there is no effective and safe drug therapy for hydatid cyst, finding of some new agents especially from herbal origin with a desired scolicidal effect attracts great attention for treatment and pre-surgical use to prevent the hydatid cyst recurrence. In this study, the scolicidal effect of ultrasonic methanol extract of Garlic (Allium sativum) flower is investigated. Protoscolices were collected aseptically from sheep livers containing hydatid cyst and were exposed to different concentrations of extract for various exposure times. The viability of protoscolices was confirmed by 0.1% Eosin staining. The scolicidal activity of extract at a concentration of 50 mg ml-1 was 59, 76, 81 and 86% after 10, 30, 60, and 180 min of exposure respectively. The scolicidal effect at 100 mg ml-1 was 67, 78, 85 and 98% after various exposure times, respectively. The results of this study showed that the ultrasonic extract has high scolicidal activity and might be used as a natural scolicidal agent. Garlic flower extracts is a potent protoscolicid and might be used in hydatid cyst treatment and pre-surgery to prevent secondary cyst recurrence.

  20. COCHLEATA controls leaf size and secondary inflorescence ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    UNIFOLIATA [(UNI) or UNIFOLIATA-TENDRILLED ACACIA (UNI-TAC)] expression is known to be negatively regulated by COCHLEATA (COCH) in the differentiating stipules and flowers of Pisum sativum. In this study, additional roles of UNI and COCH in P. sativum were investigated. Comparative phenotyping revealed ...

  1. Allium sativum aqueous extract prevents potassium dichromate-induced nephrotoxicity and lipid oxidation in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio L. Becerra-Torres

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Context: The potassium dichromate (K2Cr2O7 induces nephrotoxicity by oxidative stress mechanisms. Aims: To study the potential protection of an aqueous extract of Allium sativum against the K2Cr2O7-induced nephrotoxicity and lipid oxidation in rats. Methods: Twenty four hours after treatment, biomarkers such as proteinuria, creatinine clearance, malondialdehyde production, specific enzyme activity of gamma glutamyl transpeptidase and alanine aminopeptidase, and renal clearance of para-aminohippuric acid and inulin were measured. Results: The K2Cr2O7 caused significant renal dysfunction, but A. sativum extract prevented this condition by improving all measured biomarkers. Conclusions: A single injection of K2Cr2O7 induced nephrotoxicity in rats, but the supply of an Allium sativum aqueous extract prevented the disorders caused by this metal.

  2. In Vitro Antioxidant Properties of Three Varieties of Allium sativum L. Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Narendhirakannan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many herbs possess antioxidant ingredients that provide efficacy by additive or synergistic activities. Allium sativum L. is a strong astringent, used for the treatment of liver and spleen diseases, rheumatism and tumors. The antioxidant activities of different concentrations of ethanolic extracts of garlic bulb of three varieties were determined by the four assays i.e. DPPH radical scavenging assay, reducing power ability, hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay and total antioxidant capacity. Due to its natural origin and potent free-radical scavenging ability, Allium sativum L. could be used as a potential preventive intervention for free radical-mediated diseases.

  3. Immune haemolytic anaemia associated with ampicillin dependent warm antibodies and high titre cold agglutinins in a patient with Mycoplasma pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mickley, H; Sørensen, P G

    1984-01-01

    A case of severe immune haemolytic anaemia in a 54-year-old man suffering from Mycoplasma pneumonia is presented. A strongly positive direct Coombs test with erythrocyte bound IgG, C3d and C4 was demonstrated during the haemolytic process. Further, serologic investigations revealed ampicillin......-dependent 'warm' antibodies and a cold agglutinin titre greater than 2000. No firm conclusion can be drawn as to which antibody caused the haemolysis. Treatment including withdrawal of antibiotics, blood transfusions (washed red cells, concentrated erythrocyte suspension) and corticosteroids was successful....... It is suggested that tests should be carried out for erythrocyte bound drug-induced antibodies in cases of haemolysis with a history of drug exposure....

  4. Transgene vaccination using Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-1) for targeted mucosal immunization against HIV-1 envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinhai; Kochetkova, Irina; Haddad, Asmahan; Hoyt, Teri; Hone, David M; Pascual, David W

    2005-05-31

    Receptor-mediated gene transfer using an M cell ligand has been shown to be an efficient method for mucosal DNA immunization. To investigate further into alternative M cell ligands, the plant lectin, Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-1), was tested. UEA-1 binds to human intestinal Caco-2 cells, and these cells can be transfected with poly-l-lysine (PL)-conjugated UEA-1 for expression of reporter cDNAs. When tested in vivo, mice nasally immunized with UEA-1-PL complexed to plasmid encoding HIV-1 envelope showed elevated systemic and mucosal antibody responses, and these were supported by tissue antibody-forming cells. Likewise, elevated envelope-specific CTLs were induced. Thus, UEA-1 mediated DNA delivery represents an alternative mucosal formulation for inducing humoral and cellular immunity against HIV-1.

  5. Specific binding of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I lectin to sarcolemma of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatabe, K; Kawai, M

    1997-08-01

    Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA I) binding was studied in 83 patients with various neuromuscular disorders. UEA I labelled endomysial capillaries and endothelial cells of perimysial blood vessels in all the examined muscles. There was no UEA I binding to muscle fibres except for all (9) cases of distal myopathy with rimmed vacuole formation (DMRV), 1 of 5 cases of inclusion body myositis and 1 of 36 cases of inflammatory myopathies. The UEA I binding was completely eliminated by preincubation of UEA I solution with L-fucose. Using electron microscopy, the UEA I binding was localized to sarcolemma and intrasarco-plasmic membranous organelles other than mitochondria. Myosatellite cells were not labelled. These findings revealed the existence of fucosylated proteins or lipids in a subset of skeletal muscles suffering from DMRV. Biochemical identification of the fucosylated substance and further detailed study on subcellular localization of UEA I binding may yield important clues to the unknown pathogenesis of DMRV.

  6. Transgenic tetraploid Isatis indigotica expressing Bt Cry1Ac and Pinellia ternata agglutinin showed enhanced resistance to moths and aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ying; Wang, Kai; Ding, Ruxian; Zhang, Hanming; Di, Peng; Chen, Junfeng; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Wansheng

    2012-01-01

    Co-expression of multiple genes encoding different kinds of insect resistant proteins has been developed to confer a broader spectrum of pest control. Tetraploid Isatis indigotica Fort was transformed with a plasmid, p3300BP, containing Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac gene (Bt) and Pinellia ternata agglutinin gene (Pta) and the selectable marker herbicide resistance gene (Bar) driven by the CaMV35S promoter via Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. The integration and expression of introduced genes in regenerated transgenic plants were confirmed by PCR and Western blot assays. Insect bioassay test demonstrated transgenic lines had significant inhibition to diamondback moths (Plutella xylostella L.) and peach potato aphids (Myzus persicae Sulzer) simultaneously. Our study reported here would be a great motivation for field culture of tetraploid I. indigotica, also providing an efficient molecular breeding strategy to provide insect tolerant plants.

  7. Characterization of onion lectin (Allium cepa agglutinin) as an immunomodulatory protein inducing Th1-type immune response in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Vaddi K; Venkatesh, Yeldur P

    2015-06-01

    Onion (Allium cepa), a bulb crop of economic importance, is known to have many health benefits. The major objective of the present study is to address the immunomodulatory properties of onion lectin (A. cepa agglutinin; ACA). ACA was purified from onion extract by D-mannose-agarose chromatography (yield: ~1 mg/kg). ACA is non-glycosylated and showed a molecular mass of ~12 kDa under reducing/non-reducing SDS-PAGE; glutaraldehyde cross-linking indicated that ACA is a non-covalent tetramer of ~12 kDa subunits. Its N-terminal sequence (RNVLLNNEGL; UniProt KB Accn. C0HJM8) showed 70-90% homology to mannose-specific Allium agglutinins. ACA showed specific hemagglutination activity of 8200 units/mg and is stable in the pH range 6-10 and up to 45° C. The immunomodulatory activity of ACA was assessed using the macrophage cell line, RAW264.7 and rat peritoneal macrophages; at 0.1 μg/well, it showed a significant increase (6-8-fold vs. control) in the production of nitric oxide at 24h, and significantly stimulated (2-4-fold vs. control) the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and IL-12) at 24h. ACA (0.1 μg/well) enhanced the proliferation of murine thymocytes by ~4 fold (vs. control) at 24h; however, ACA does not proliferate B cell-enriched rat splenocytes. Further, it significantly elevated the expression levels of cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-2) over the control in murine thymocytes. Taken together, purified ACA induces a Th1-type immune response in vitro. Though present in low amounts, ACA may contribute to the immune-boosting potential of the popular spice onion since considerable amounts are consumed on a daily basis universally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Composition of the essential oil constituents from leaves and stems of Korean Coriandrum sativum and their immunotoxicity activity on the Aedes aegypti L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Ahmad, Ateeque; Kim, Sun-Jin; Naik, Poornanand Madhava; Nagella, Praveen

    2012-02-01

    The leaves and stems of Coriandrum sativum were extracted and the essential oil composition and immunotoxicity effects were studied. The analyses were conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS), which revealed the essential oils of C. sativum leaves and stems. Thirty-nine components representing 99.62% of the total oil were identified from the leaves. The major components are cyclododecanol (23.11%), tetradecanal (17.86%), 2-dodecenal (9.93%), 1-decanol (7.24%), 13-tetradecenal (6.85%), 1-dodecanol (6.54%), dodecanal (5.16%), 1-undecanol (2.28%), and decanal (2.33%). Thirty-eight components representing 98.46% of the total oil were identified from the stems of the coriander. The major components are phytol (61.86%), 15-methyltricyclo[6.5.2(13,14),0(7,15)]-pentadeca-1,3,5,7,9,11,13-heptene (7.01%), dodecanal (3.18%), and 1-dodecanol (2.47%). The leaf oil had significant toxic effects against the larvae of Aedes aegypti with an LC₅₀ value of 26.93 ppm and an LC₉₀ value of 37.69 ppm and the stem oil has toxic effects against the larvae of A. aegypti with an LC₅₀ value of 29.39 ppm and an LC₉₀ value of 39.95 ppm. Also, the above data indicate that the major compounds may play an important role in the toxicity of essential oils.

  9. The Effects of Drought Stress on Morphological Traits and Yield of Three Medicinal Plants ( Coriandrum sativum, Foeniculum vulgare and Anethum graveolens in Greenhouse Conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R Amiri Deh Ahmadi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought stress is one of the important problems in arid and semi_arid regions. drought stress take place in plants when available water is lesser than evapotranspiration. In order to evaluate the effect of drought stress on morphological traits and yield of three medicinal plants an experiment was carried out during the 2010 year in research greenhouse of faculity of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, in a factoriel arrengement based on a Completely Randomized Block Design with four replications. factors include 4 drought stress levels: Field capacity (100%, 75%, 50% and FC25% and 3 medicinal plants include: Coriandrum sativum, Foeniculum vulgare and Aniethum graveolens. The traits such as plant height, leaf number per plant, number of lateral branches per plant, umbrellas per plant, umbels per umbrellas, seed number per plant, seed weight per plant, 1000 seeds weight and harvest index were measured. Results showed that decreasing content of water in soil lesser than field capacity had significant effects on all of these traits. Coriandrum sativum in FC25% had maximum seed number in umbrellas(14 number, seed number per plant(27 number, Umbrellas per plant(4 number, umbels per umbrellas(10 number and 1000 seeds weight (6.5 gr. also Foeniculum vulgare in FC25% had minimum seed number in umbrellas(2 number, seed number per plant(2 number. Umbrellas per plant(0.25number, umbels per umbrellas(0.5 number and 1000 seeds weight (0.15 gr. Harvest index positive correlation with seed weight per plant and 1000 seeds weight.

  10. Pea (Pisum sativum L. in the Genomic Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert J. Redden

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Pea (Pisum sativum L. was the original model organism used in Mendel’s discovery (1866 of the laws of inheritance, making it the foundation of modern plant genetics. However, subsequent progress in pea genomics has lagged behind many other plant species. Although the size and repetitive nature of the pea genome has so far restricted its sequencing, comprehensive genomic and post genomic resources already exist. These include BAC libraries, several types of molecular marker sets, both transcriptome and proteome datasets and mutant populations for reverse genetics. The availability of the full genome sequences of three legume species has offered significant opportunities for genome wide comparison revealing synteny and co-linearity to pea. A combination of a candidate gene and colinearity approach has successfully led to the identification of genes underlying agronomically important traits including virus resistances and plant architecture. Some of this knowledge has already been applied to marker assisted selection (MAS programs, increasing precision and shortening the breeding cycle. Yet, complete translation of marker discovery to pea breeding is still to be achieved. Molecular analysis of pea collections has shown that although substantial variation is present within the cultivated genepool, wild material offers the possibility to incorporate novel traits that may have been inadvertently eliminated. Association mapping analysis of diverse pea germplasm promises to identify genetic variation related to desirable agronomic traits, which are historically difficult to breed for in a traditional manner. The availability of high throughput ‘omics’ methodologies offers great promise for the development of novel, highly accurate selective breeding tools for improved pea genotypes that are sustainable under current and future climates and farming systems.

  11. Flowering time adaption in Swedish landrace pea (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhala, Tytti; Normann, Kjersti R; Lundström, Maria; Weller, James L; Leino, Matti W; Hagenblad, Jenny

    2016-08-12

    Cultivated crops have repeatedly faced new climatic conditions while spreading from their site of origin. In Sweden, at the northernmost fringe of Europe, extreme conditions with temperature-limited growth seasons and long days require specific adaptation. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) has been cultivated in Sweden for millennia, allowing for adaptation to the local environmental conditions to develop. To study such adaptation, 15 Swedish pea landraces were chosen alongside nine European landraces, seven cultivars and three wild accessions. Number of days to flowering (DTF) and other traits were measured and the diversity of the flowering time genes HIGH RESPONSE TO PHOTOPERIOD (HR), LATE FLOWERING (LF) and STERILE NODES (SN) was assessed. Furthermore, the expression profiles of LF and SN were obtained. DTF was positively correlated with the length of growing season at the site of origin (GSO) of the Swedish landraces. Alleles at the HR locus were significantly associated with DTF with an average difference of 15.43 days between the two detected haplotypes. LF expression was found to have a significant effect on DTF when analysed on its own, but not when HR haplotype was added to the model. HR haplotype and GSO together explained the most of the detected variation in DTF (49.6 %). We show local adaptation of DTF, primarily in the northernmost accessions, and links between genetic diversity and diversity in DTF. The links between GSO and genetic diversity of the genes are less clear-cut and flowering time adaptation seems to have a complex genetic background.

  12. Leaf Size in Swietenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles B. Briscoe; F. Bruce. Lamb

    1962-01-01

    A study was made of the putative hybrid of bigleaf and small-leaf mahoganies. Initial measurements indicated that bigleaf mahogany can be distinguished from small-leaf mahogany by gross measurements of leaflets. Isolated mother trees yield typical progeny. Typical mother trees in mixed stands yield like progeny plus, usually, mediumleaf progeny. Mediumleaf mother trees...

  13. Effects of steam distillation on extraction, composition, and functional properties of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is a summer annual plant commonly used as fresh green herb, spice, or for its essential oil. A newly-developed process combined steam distillation and mechanical pressing to recover the essential oil and edible oil, respectively, from dehulled coriander seeds. The c...

  14. Observation of the garlic antimicrobial activity (Allium sativum) in compulsory Secondary Education laboratory

    OpenAIRE

    López Pérez, José Pedro

    2011-01-01

    El ajo (Allium sativum) ha sido utilizado desde tiempos inmemorables, tanto para uso culinario como por sus propiedades terapéuticas. En esta comunicación se ensaya (in vitro) la propiedad antimicrobiana de este alimento frente a bacterias presentes en la superficie de la piel.

  15. Observation of the garlic antimicrobial activity (Allium sativum in compulsory Secondary Education laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López Pérez, José Pedro

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available El ajo (Allium sativum ha sido utilizado desde tiempos inmemorables, tanto para uso culinario como por sus propiedades terapéuticas. En esta comunicación se ensaya (in vitro la propiedad antimicrobiana de este alimento frente a bacterias presentes en la superficie de la piel.

  16. Subcellular localization of Cd in the root cells of Allium sativum by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ultrastructural investigation of the root cells of Allium sativum L. exposed to three different concentrations of Cd (100 M, 1 mM and 10 mM) for 9 days was carried out. The results showed that Cd induced several significant ultrastructural changes – high vacuolization in cytoplasm, deposition of electron-dense material in ...

  17. Efficacy of onion (Allium cepa l.) and garlic (Allium sativum l.) juice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Meat contains high nutrients that make it get spoilt readily and currently used preservatives like soluble nitrites are carcinogenic. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of Onion (Allium cepa L.) and Garlic (Allium sativum L.) juice as alternative preservatives. Efficacy of the single preservatives an d their ...

  18. Effect of Ascorbic Acid and Allium Sativum on Tissue lead Level in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and Allium sativum (garlic) on the lead levels in bone, brain, muscle, liver and kidney tissues of female rats (Rattus navigicus) were investigated. Group I was Control, rats in Groups II – IV were injected intraperitoneally with 100µmol/kg body weight of lead acetate for 7 days. In addition ...

  19. Effect of TDZ on plant regeneration from mature seeds in pea (Pisum sativum)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shan, Zhihui; Tzitzikas, E.; Raemakers, C.J.J.M.; Zhengqiang, M.; Visser, R.G.F.

    2009-01-01

    Pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Espace) seeds directly cultured on thidiazuron (TDZ)-containing medium formed high numbers of shoots. The number of shoots per seedling depended on the concentration and duration of the TDZ treatment. The best treatment was 12-wk incubation on MS medium supplemented with 4

  20. Pea (Pisum sativum) Seed Production as an Assay for Reproductive Effects Due to Herbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even though herbicide drift can affect plant reproduction, current plant testing protocols emphasize effects on vegetative growth. In this study, we determined whether a short–growing season plant can indicate potential effects of herbicides on seed production. Pea (Pisum sativum...

  1. Anti-Arrhythmic Potential of Coriandrum sativum Seeds in Salt Induced Arrhythmic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Rehman1, Nazish Jahan1*, Khalil-ul-Rahman2, Khalid Mahmood Khan2 and Fatiqa Zafar1

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, the anti-arrhythmic potential of Coriandrum sativum (seeds was evaluated in BaCl2 induced tachycardia and KCl induced bradycardia in rats. Heart rate and electrocardiogram (ECG was recorded during the experimental period. The BaCl2 increased the heart rate from 111/min to 157/min while KCL decreased the heart rate from 112/min to 60/min in the rats of positive control groups. ECG patterns also confirmed the tachy- and brady-arrhythmia in the rats of both positive control groups. The changes in biochemical cardiac biomarkers (CK-MB, LDH, AST, and ALT were also the studied parameters. The level of cardiac biomarkers was significantly elevated in the serum of positive control rats as compared to their respective absolute controls. In case of both curative and preventive mode of treatment the elevated levels of enzymes, cardiac biomarkers were significantly reduced. Electrocardiogram (ECG pattern revealed that the studied plant possesses a very good anti-arrhythmic potential in case of curative mode of treatment. The antiarrhythmic potential through preventive mode of treatment was also encouraging, but comparatively less than the curative mode of treatment. Anti-tachycardial potential of C. sativum was comparable with standard drug while, recovery in bradycardia was relatively slow than standard drug. Gross pathology and ECG pattern of base line group confirmed the innoxious nature of C. sativum seeds. Treatment of rats with Coriandrum sativum (100 mgkg-1 BW normalized the heart rate and attenuated the cardiac arrhythmia.

  2. New cyclic sulfides extracted from Allium sativum: garlicnins P, J2, and Q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru; Nishioka, Naho; Masuda, Fuka; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei

    2017-11-20

    Two atypical cyclic-type sulfides, garlicnin P (1) and garlicnin J2 (2), and one thiabicyclic-type sulfide, garlicnin Q (3), were isolated from the acetone extracts of garlic, Allium sativum, bulbs cultivated in the Kumamoto city area, and their structures characterized. Their production pathways are also discussed.

  3. Allium sativum L.: the anti-immature leech (Limnatis nilotica) activity compared to Niclosomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahmani, Mahmoud; Abbasi, Javad; Mohsenzadegan, Ava; Sadeghian, Sirous; Ahangaran, Majid Gholami

    2013-03-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effects of methanolic extracts of Allium sativum L. on Limnatis nilotica compared with Niclosomide. In this experimental study in September 2010, a number of leeches (70 in total) from the southern area of Ilam province were prepared, and the effects of methanolic extract of A. sativum L. with Niclosomide as the control drug were compared and distilled water was evaluated as the placebo group which investigated L. nilotica using anti-leech assay. The average time of paralysis and death of L. nilotica for Niclosomide (1,250 mg/kg) and the methanol extract of A. sativum L. (600 μg/ml) were 6.22 ± 2.94 and 68.44 ± 28.39 min, respectively. Distilled water and garlic tablets at a dose of 400 mg were determined as the inert group. In this research, the attraction time of the leeches' death among different treatments is significant. In this study, it was determined that Niclosomide, with an intensity of 4+, and methanolic extracts of A. sativum L., with an intensity of 3+, have a good anti-leech effect and can be shown to be effective in cases of leech biting, while distilled water was negative.

  4. De novo assembly and characterization of the garlic (Allium sativum) bud transcriptome by Illumina sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiudong; Zhou, Shumei; Meng, Fanlu; Liu, Shiqi

    2012-10-01

    Garlic is widely used as a spice throughout the world for the culinary value of its flavor and aroma, which are created by the chemical transformation of a series of organic sulfur compounds. To analyze the transcriptome of Allium sativum and discover the genes involved in sulfur metabolism, cDNAs derived from the total RNA of Allium sativum buds were analyzed by Illumina sequencing. Approximately 26.67 million 90 bp paired-end clean reads were achieved in two libraries. A total of 127,933 unigenes were generated by de novo assembly and were compared with the sequences in public databases. Of these, 45,286 unigenes had significant hits to the sequences in the Nr database, 29,514 showed significant similarity to known proteins in the Swiss-Prot database and, 20,706 and 21,952 unigenes had significant similarity to existing sequences in the KEGG and COG databases, respectively. Moreover, genes involved in organic sulfur biosynthesis were identified. These unigenes data will provide the foundation for research on gene expression, genomics and functional genomics in Allium sativum. Key message The obtained unigenes will provide the foundation for research on functional genomics in Allium sativum and its closely related species, and fill the gap of the existing plant EST database.

  5. New cyclic sulfides, garlicnins I2, M, N, and O, from Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nohara, Toshihiro; Ono, Masateru; Nishioka, Naho; Masuda, Fuka; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei

    2017-10-30

    One atypical thiolane-type sulfide, garlicnin I2 (1), two 3,4-dimethylthiolane-type sulfides, garlicnins M (2) and N (3), and one thiabicyclic-type sulfide, garlicnin O (4), were isolated from the acetone extracts of Chinese garlic bulbs, Allium sativum and their structures were characterized. Hypothetical pathways for the production of the respective sulfides were discussed.

  6. Atypical Cyclic Sulfides, Garlicnins G, I, and J, Extracted from Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Masateru; Fujiwara, Yukio; Ikeda, Tsuyoshi; Pan, Cheng; El-Aasr, Mona; Lee, Jong-Hyun; Nakano, Daisuke; Kinjo, Junei; Nohara, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Newly characterized, atypical sulfides, garlicnins G (1), I (2), and J (3), were isolated from the acetone extracts of garlic bulbs, Allium sativum. Their production pathways are regarded as different from those of cyclic sulfoxides, 3,4-dimethyltetrahydrothiophene-S-oxide derivatives such as onionins A1-A3, garlicnins B1-B4 and C1-C3.

  7. The Chemical Compositions of the Volatile Oils of Garlic (Allium sativum) and Wild Garlic (Allium vineale).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyal, Prabodh; Craft, Jonathan D; Dosoky, Noura S; Setzer, William N

    2017-08-05

    Garlic, Alliumsativum, is broadly used around the world for its numerous culinary and medicinal uses. Wild garlic, Allium vineale, has been used as a substitute for garlic, both in food as well as in herbal medicine. The present study investigated the chemical compositions of A. sativum and A. vineale essential oils. The essential oils from the bulbs of A. sativum, cultivated in Spain, were obtained by three different methods: laboratory hydrodistillation, industrial hydrodistillation, and industrial steam distillation. The essential oils of wild-growing A. vineale from north Alabama were obtained by hydrodistillation. The resulting essential oils were analyzed by gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (GC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Both A. sativum and A. vineale oils were dominated by allyl polysulfides. There were minor quantitative differences between the A. sativum oils owing to the distillation methods employed, as well as differences from previously reported garlic oils from other geographical locations. Allium vineale oil showed a qualitative similarity to Allium ursinum essential oil. The compositions of garlic and wild garlic are consistent with their use as flavoring agents in foods as well as their uses as herbal medicines. However, quantitative differences are likely to affect the flavor and bioactivity profiles of these Allium species.

  8. Protective Effects of Quercetin against Dimethoate-Induced Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity in Allium sativum Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Waseem; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal

    2014-01-01

    The present investigation was directed to study the possible protective activity of quercetin-a natural antioxidant against dimethoate-induced cyto- and genotoxicity in meristematic cells of Allium sativum. So far there is no report on the biological properties of quercetin in plant test systems. Chromosome breaks, multipolar anaphase, stick chromosome, and mitotic activity were undertaken in the current study as markers of cyto- and genotoxicity. Untreated control, quercetin controls (@ 5, 10 and 20 μg/mL for 3 h), and dimethoate exposed groups (@ 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h) were maintained. For protection against cytogenotoxicity, the root tip cells treated with dimethoate at 100 and 200 μg/mL for 3 h and quercetin treatment at 5, 10, and 20 μg/mL for 16 h, prior to dimethoate treatment, were undertaken. Quercetin was found to be neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic in Allium sativum control at these doses. A significant increase (P Allium. Pretreatment of Allium sativum with quercetin significantly (P Allium sativum that resides, at least in part, on its antioxidant effects.

  9. Histological Evaluation of Allium sativum Oil as a New Medicament for Pulp Treatment of Permanent Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Shukry Gamal; Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the histo pathology effects of two medicaments Allium sativum oil and formocresol on the remaining pulp tissue of the permanent teething children. A total of 18 premolars were included in this study. Two sound premolars were extracted and subjected to histological examination to show the normal pulp tissue. Pulpo tomy procedure was performed in the rest of the remaining 16 premolars; half of them using Allium sativum oil and the rest of the tested premolars were medicated using formocresol and all were sealed with suitable restoration. Then, premolars extracted at variable intervals (48 hours, 2 weeks, 1 month, 2 months), stained using hemotoxylin and eosin etain (H&E) and prepared for histopathology examination. Histological evaluation seemed far more promising for Allium sativum oil than formocresol. Histological evaluation revealed that teeth treated with Allium sativa oil showed infammatory changes that had been resolved in the end of the study. On the contrary, the severe chronic infammation of pulp tissue accompanied with formocresol eventually produced pulp necrosis with or without fibrosis. In addition, pulp calcification was evidenced in certain cases. Allium sativum oil is a biocompatible material that is compatible with vital human pulp tissue. It offers a good healing potential, leaving the remaining pulp tissue healthy and functioning.

  10. Effect of irrigation Interval on the Yield of Garlic (Allium sativum L.) at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Field trials were conducted during 2010 and 2011 dry seasons under irrigation at the Ajiwa Irrigation Site in Katsina State (Lat. 130 17' N and Long. 70 05' E) to study the effects of irrigation intervals on the yield of garlic (Allium sativum L.). Treatments consisted of four irrigation intervals (2, 4, 6 and 8 day) laid out in a ...

  11. Antioxidative response of Lepidium sativum L. during assisted phytoremediation of Hg contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolinska, Beata; Szczodrowska, Agnieszka

    2017-09-25

    In this study, Lepidium sativum L. was used in repeated phytoextraction processes to remove Hg from contaminated soil, assisted by combined use of compost and iodide (KI). L. sativum L. is sensitive to changes in environmental conditions and has been used in environmental tests. Its short vegetation period and ability to accumulate heavy metals make it suitable for use in repeated phytoextraction. The antioxidant enzymatic system of the plant (catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione S-transferase (GST)) was analysed, to understand the effects of increasing Hg accumulation and translocation. Phytoextraction was repeated six times to decrease Hg contamination in soil, and the efficiency of each step was assessed. The results indicate that L. sativum L. is able to take up and accumulate Hg from contaminated soil. A corresponding increase in enzymatic antioxidants shows that the plant defence system is activated in response to Hg stress. Using compost and KI increases total Hg accumulation and translocation to the above-ground parts of L. sativum L. Repeating the process decreases Hg contamination in pot experiments in all variants of the process. The combined use of compost and KI during repeated phytoextraction increases the efficiency of Hg removal from contaminated soil. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Danish Rhizobium leguminosarum strains nodulating ‘Afghanistan’ pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Erik Steen; Sørensen, Lasse Holst; Engvild, Kjeld Christensen

    1986-01-01

    A wild pea (Pisum sativum L.) native to Afghanistan normally known to be resisant to nodulation with European strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was nodulated early and effectively in field soil in Denmark. Isolates from nodules formed effective nodules abundantly on 'Afghanistan' on reinfection...... pattern with Rhizobium leguminosarum strains isolated from a modern pea variety cultivated in the same field....

  13. In vitro activity of Allium sativum and Aloe vera extract against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rapid increase of antibiotic resistance needs to be taken as a threat to both animals and human being. In this study the arbitrary concentration of 25%, 50% and 75% of individual and combined Allium sativum and Aloe vera were tested against Salmonella Gallinarum. The antimicrobials were extracted using aqueous ...

  14. New Pea (Pisum sativum L. Accesions Obtained at V.R.D.S. Buzau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costel Vinatoru

    2016-11-01

    • Wendy J. Dahl, Lauren M. Foster and Robert T. Tyler (2012. Review of the health benefits of peas (Pisum sativum L.. British Journal of Nutrition, 108, pp S3-S10. doi:10.1017/S0007114512000852. 13 December 2011

  15. Subcellular localization of Cd in the root cells of Allium sativum by ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    metal treatments. Healthy and equal-sized garlic cloves were chosen from. A. sativum. The bulbs had not started the formation of green leaves or root growth. Before commencing the experiment, the dry scales of the bulbs were removed. The bulbs were germinated, and grown in 3 containers with 2 L Hoagland's nutrient ...

  16. First Report of Garlic Rust Caused by Puccinia allii on Allium sativum in Minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    In July 2010, Allium sativum, cultivar German Extra Hardy Porcelain plants showing foliar symptoms typical of rust infection were brought to the Plant Disease Clinic at the University of Minnesota by a commercial grower from Fillmore county Minnesota. Infected leaves showed circular to oblong lesio...

  17. High irradiance induces photoprotective mechanisms and a positive effect on NH4+ stress in Pisum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariz, Idoia; Esteban, Raquel; García-Plazaola, Jose Ignacio; Becerril, José María; Aparicio-Tejo, Pedro María; Moran, Jose Fernando

    2010-09-01

    Photosynthesis provides plant metabolism with reduced carbon (C) but is also the main source of oxidative stress in plants. Likewise, high doses of NH(4)(+) as sole N source have been reported to be toxic for most plants, resulting in reduced plant growth and restricting C availability. The combination of high photosynthetic photon flux densities (PPFD) and NH(4)(+) nutrition may provide higher C availability but could also have a detrimental effect on the plants, therefore the objective of this study is to evaluate whether NH(4)(+) induces photo-oxidative stress that is exacerbated under high light conditions. Pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. sugar-snap) were grown hydroponically with NH(4)(+) (0.5, 2.5, 5 and 10 mM) under high (750 micromol photons m(-2)s(-1)) or low PPFD conditions (350 micromol photons m(-2)s(-1)). High PPFD contributes to a higher tolerance to ammonium by pea plants, as it originated higher biomass content due to higher photosynthetic rates. However, a deficit of N (0.5 and 2.5 mM NH(4)(+)) under high PPFD conditions caused an antioxidant response, as indicated by increased photoprotective pigment and chloroplastic superoxide dismutase contents. Plants grown with higher doses of N and high PPFD showed less need for photoprotection. An increase in the specific leaf weight (SLW) ratio was observed associated not only with high PPFDs but also with the highest NH(4)(+) dose. Overall, these results demonstrate that, despite the activation of some photoprotective responses at high PPFD, there were no photoinhibitory symptoms and a positive effect on NH(4)(+) toxicity, thus suggesting that the harmful effects of NH(4)(+) are not directly related to the generation of photo-oxidative stress. Copyright 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. A Comparison between the Antioxidant Strength of the Fresh and Stale Allium sativum (Garlic Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Taji

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fruits and vegetables are considered as the source of antioxidant and the factor of destroying reactive oxygen species. The effect of this antioxidant might decrease in time. This study was aimed at examining and comparing the antioxidant effect and the level of phenolic and flavonoid compounds as well as allicin level, between fresh and three-month stale Allium sativum (garlic.Materials and Methods: In an experimental study, the ethanolic extract of bushes of fresh and three-month-old Allium sativum was prepared and their antioxidant activities were assessed in linoleic acid and β-carotene linoleate system. The amount of phenolic compounds was measured by Folin-Ciocalteumethod, based on gallic acid; the amount of flavonol and flavonoid compounds by aluminum chloride base on rutin base; and the amount of allicinby spectrophotometry method. SPSS-15 Software and t-statistic tests were used to analyze the mean difference between the results of two groups and p<0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The efficiency of fresh garlic (35.36 in inhibiting the oxidation was higher (p<0.05 comparing to three-month dated Allium sativum (10.2. Phenolic compounds of the fresh garlic (12.61mg/g were more than the three-month dated Allium sativum (2.89mg/g. The amount of allicin was respectively 15 µg/ml and 8 µg/ml in the fresh and three-month dated Allium sativum (p<0.05.Conclusion: The fresh garlic contains more useful substances and it is recommended to be used in its fresh estate.

  19. In vitro effectiveness of garlic (Allium sativum) extract on scolices of hydatid cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazeni, Mohammad; Nazer, Ali

    2010-11-01

    Surgery is still the main treatment for hydatid disease. Recurrence of the infection is one of the end points of surgery in treating the hydatid cyst which results from the dissemination of protoscolices-rich fluid. Installation of a scolicidal agent into the cyst is the most commonly employed measure to prevent recurrence. Many scolicidal agents have been used for inactivation of the cyst's content, but most of them are not safe due to their undesired side effects. In the present study, the scolicidal effect of methanolic extract of Allium sativum is investigated. Protoscolices were aseptically collected from sheep livers containing hydatid cysts. Two concentrations (25 and 50 mg ml(-1)) of garlic extract were used for 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min. Viability of protoscolices was confirmed by 0.1% eosin staining. Allium sativum extract at the concentration of 25 mg ml(-1) killed 87.9, 95.6, 96.8, 98.7, 99.6, and 100% of protoscolices following 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 min of application, respectively. Moreover, the scolicidal activity of Allium sativum extract at the concentration of 50 mg ml(-1) was 100% after 10 min of application. Methanolic extract of Allium sativum had a high scolicidal activity in vitro and thus might be used as a scolicidal agent in the surgical treatment of the hydatid cyst. However, further investigation on the in vivo efficacy of Allium sativum extract and its possible side effects is proposed.

  20. The Effects of Allium sativum Extracts on Biofilm Formation and Activities of Six Pathogenic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohsenipour, Zeinab; Hassanshahian, Mehdi

    2015-08-01

    Garlic is considered a rich source of many compounds, which shows antimicrobial effects. The ability of microorganisms to adhere to both biotic and abiotic surfaces and to form biofilm is responsible for a number of diseases of chronic nature, demonstrating extremely high resistance to antibiotics. Bacterial biofilms are complex communities of sessile microorganisms, embedded in an extracellular matrix and irreversibly attached to various surfaces. The present study evaluated the antimicrobial activity of Allium sativum extract against the biofilms of six pathogenic bacteria and their free-living forms. The clinical isolates in this study had not been studied in any other studies, especially in regard to biofilm disruption and inhibition of biofilm cell metabolic activity. Antimicrobial activities of A. sativum L. extracts (methanol and ethanol extracts) against planktonic forms of bacteria were determined using the disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were evaluated by a macrobroth dilution technique. The anti-biofilm effects were assessed by microtiter plate method. The results showed that the A. sativum L. extract discs did not have any zone of inhibition for the tested bacteria. However, The MIC values of A. sativum L. extracts (0.078 - 2.5 mg/mL) confirmed the high ability of these extracts for inhibition of planktonic bacteria. A. sativum L. extracts were efficient to inhibit biofilm structures and the concentration of each extract had a direct relation with the inhibitory effect. Finally, it can be suggested that the extracts of this plant be applied as antimicrobial agents against these pathogens, particularly in biofilm forms.

  1. Antileishmanial activity of a mixture of Tridax procumbens and Allium sativum in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamboa-Leon, Rubi; Vera-Ku, Marina; Peraza-Sanchez, Sergio R; Ku-Chulim, Carlos; Horta-Baas, Aurelio; Rosado-Vallado, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    We tested a mixture of Tridax procumbens, known for its direct action against Leishmania mexicana, and Allium sativum, known for its immunomodulatory effect, as an alternative to treat cutaneous leishmaniasis. Acute oral toxicity was tested with the Up-and-Down Procedure (UDP) using a group of healthy mice administered with either T. procumbens or A. sativum extracts and compared with a control group. Liver injury and other parameters of toxicity were determined in mice at day 14. The in vivo assay was performed with mice infected with L. mexicana promastigotes and treated with either a mixture of T. procumbens and A. sativum or each extract separately. The thickness of the mice's footpads was measured weekly. After the 12-week period of infection, blood samples were obtained by cardiac puncture to determine the total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a immunoglobulins by a noncommercial indirect ELISA. We showed that the mixture of T. procumbens and A. sativum extracts was better at controlling L. mexicana infection while not being toxic when tested in the acute oral toxicity assay in mice. An increase in the ratio of IgG2a/IgG1 indicated a tendency to raise a Th1-type immune response in mice treated with the mixture. The mixture of T. procumbens and A. sativum extracts is a promising natural treatment for cutaneous leishmaniasis and its healing effects make it a good candidate for a possible new phytomedicine. © R. Gamboa-Leon et al., published by EDP Sciences, 2014.

  2. Preacondicionamiento de la Semilla de Arveja (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henao Omar A

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available En el Centro de Investigación "La selva ", de la Corporación Colombiana de Investigación Agropecuaria. CORPOICA, ubicado en Rionegro, Antioquia. a 2120 msnm, con una temperatura promedio de 17 °C y perteneciente a la formación ecológica Bosque Húmedo Montano Bajo, se llevó a cabo un estudio con la especie arveja (Pisum sativum L., con el fin de evaluar el efecto del tratamiento de preacondicionamiento de las semillas, conocido como humedecimiento-secado, sobre la germinación, la emergencia y el establecimiento de plantas. Adicionalmente se evaluó el procedimiento con diferentes concentraciones del fungicida sistémico benomyl, en comparación con agua destilada, buscándose reducir la pérdida de plantas durante el período de establecimiento del cultivo, y se midió el efecto de los tratamientos con y sin fungicida sobre el rendimiento, en comparación con plantas provenientes de semilla no preacondicionada. A nivel de laboratorio se encontró que el tratamiento que produjo mayor velocidad de germinación fué la imbibición hasta el 75% de peso de la semilla, con secado posterior hasta recobrar el peso inicial. Utilizando el tratamiento anterior, se halló que la adición de benomyl, en diferentes concentraciones, no afectó la velocidad de germinación ni la germinación total, incrementándose el porcentaje de plantas sanas obtenidas en comparación con el preacondicionamiento sin fungicida, con valores máximos al imbibir con una solución de benomyl al 0.1%. En el campo no se observó efecto de los tratamientos de preacondicionamiento con y sin fungicida sobre la velocidad de emergencia y la emergencia total, reduciendo los tratamientos con fungicida la incidencia de plantas muertas en forma sensible con una respuesta diferencial en rendimiento, por parte de las dos variedades estudiadas, al aplicar los diversos procedimientos de preacondicionamiento. Así, mientras que con el cultivar 'Small Sieve All Sweet ', no hubo efecto

  3. Impact of cerium oxide nanoparticles on cilantro ( Coriandrum sativum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Maria Isabel

    Studies have shown that plants exposed to ENPs suffer different types of stress. Other studies have revealed that plants can take up and accumulate CeO2 NPs without modification. Thus, these NPs could enter the food chain through edible plants, posing a threat for human health. Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) is a worldwide culinary and medicinal plant consumed either as a fresh herb or a spice. In this research, cilantro plants were germinated and cultivated for 30 days in organic soil treated with CeO2 NPs at concentrations varying from 0 to 500 mg kg -1. Subsequently, plant organs were analyzed by using spectroscopic techniques and biochemical assays. Results indicate that at 125 mg kg -1, the CeO2 NPs significantly increased the root size compared with the other treatments. The ICP-OES results showed that plants exposed to 500 mg kg-1 had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) more Ce in shoots and roots compared to the other treatments. Results from the biochemical assays showed that at 125 mg kg-1, catalese activity significantly increased in shoots and ascorbate peroxidase in roots (p ≤ 0.05). In addition, the FTIR analyses revealed that at 125 mg kg-1, the CeO2 NPs changed the chemical environment of the carbohydrates within the cilantro shoots, for which changes in the area of the stretching frequencies were observed. Moreover, analyses of antioxidant compounds showed a significant ( p ≤ 0.05) reduction on total phenolic content in shoots of cilantro plants treated with 500 mg CeO2 NPs kg-1 . This suggests that the CeO2 NPs have the potential to diminish the ability of cilantro plants to scavenge reactive oxygen species. The multi-elemental analysis showed that plants treated with CeO2 at the 500 mg kg-1 treatment had a significant ( p ≤ 0.05) reduction in shoots' sulfur, silicon, and zinc accumulation. The results of this research indicate that the CeO2 NPs at 500 mg CeO2 kg-1 concentration cause a reduction in the antioxidant ability and nutritional properties

  4. Characterization of proanthocyanidin metabolism in pea (Pisum sativum) seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Kiva; Jin, Alena L; Nguyen, Trinh-Don; Reinecke, Dennis M; Ozga, Jocelyn A; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2014-09-16

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) accumulate in the seeds, fruits and leaves of various plant species including the seed coats of pea (Pisum sativum), an important food crop. PAs have been implicated in human health, but molecular and biochemical characterization of pea PA biosynthesis has not been established to date, and detailed pea PA chemical composition has not been extensively studied. PAs were localized to the ground parenchyma and epidermal cells of pea seed coats. Chemical analyses of PAs from seeds of three pea cultivars demonstrated cultivar variation in PA composition. 'Courier' and 'Solido' PAs were primarily prodelphinidin-types, whereas the PAs from 'LAN3017' were mainly the procyanidin-type. The mean degree of polymerization of 'LAN3017' PAs was also higher than those from 'Courier' and 'Solido'. Next-generation sequencing of 'Courier' seed coat cDNA produced a seed coat-specific transcriptome. Three cDNAs encoding anthocyanidin reductase (PsANR), leucoanthocyanidin reductase (PsLAR), and dihydroflavonol reductase (PsDFR) were isolated. PsANR and PsLAR transcripts were most abundant earlier in seed coat development. This was followed by maximum PA accumulation in the seed coat. Recombinant PsANR enzyme efficiently synthesized all three cis-flavan-3-ols (gallocatechin, catechin, and afzalechin) with satisfactory kinetic properties. The synthesis rate of trans-flavan-3-ol by co-incubation of PsLAR and PsDFR was comparable to cis-flavan-3-ol synthesis rate by PsANR. Despite the competent PsLAR activity in vitro, expression of PsLAR driven by the Arabidopsis ANR promoter in wild-type and anr knock-out Arabidopsis backgrounds did not result in PA synthesis. Significant variation in seed coat PA composition was found within the pea cultivars, making pea an ideal system to explore PA biosynthesis. PsANR and PsLAR transcript profiles, PA localization, and PA accumulation patterns suggest that a pool of PA subunits are produced in specific seed coat cells early in

  5. Effect of intercropping normal-leafed or semi-leafless winter peas and triticale after shallow and deep ploughing on agronomic performance, grain quality and succeeding winter wheat yield

    OpenAIRE

    Gronle, Annkathrin; Heß, Jürgen; Böhm, Herwart

    2015-01-01

    Winter peas (Pisum sativum L.) are a promising alternative to spring peas in organic farming. Intercroppingwinter peas and cereals may be a beneficial way to improve lodging resistance in normal-leafed andweed suppression in semi-leafless winter peas. At the same time, there is an increasing interest in areduction in tillage intensity, e.g. shallow ploughing. A normal-leafed, coloured-flowered (cv. E.F.B. 33)and a semi-leafless, white-flowered winter pea (cv. James) were cultivated as sole cr...

  6. The reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin with Lens culinaris agglutinin and its usefulness in the diagnosis of neoplastic diseases of the liver.

    OpenAIRE

    Sekine, C; Aoyagi, Y; Suzuki, Y.; Ichida, F.

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) with Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) was studied by crossed immuno-affinity electrophoresis of the sera of 246 subjects from 6 groups (acute virus hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), carcinoma metastatic to the liver and normal controls). Two species of AAT (LCA-reactive and -nonreactive species) were detected on crossed immuno-affinity electrophoresis in a gel containing LCA. The percentages of LCA-reactiv...

  7. Application of Microwave Irradiation for Histochemical Analysis of Griffonia simplicifolia Agglutinin-1 (GSA-1) Binding Sites in Sigmo-rectal Polyps

    OpenAIRE

    Tanaka, Michiko; Watanabe, Makoto

    1997-01-01

    Ten specimens each of carcinoma, adenoma and non-neoplastic mucosa which were obtained by endoscopic biopsy from sigmo-rectal polyps were treated with microwave irradiation and then examined by lectin histochemistry. The results were compared with those obtained by the conventional method. With the conventional method Griffonia simplicifolia Agglutinin-1 (GSA-l) binding sites on the apical surface were positively detected in 4/10 carcinomas but not in adenomas or non-neoplastic mucosa. In the...

  8. Histopathological, oxidative damage, biochemical, and genotoxicity alterations in hepatic rats exposed to deltamethrin: modulatory effects of garlic (Allium sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ncir, Marwa; Ben Salah, Ghada; Kamoun, Hassen; Makni Ayadi, Fatma; Khabir, Abdelmajid; El Feki, Abdelfattah; Saoudi, Mongi

    2016-06-01

    Deltamethrin is a pesticide widely used as a synthetic pyrethroid. The aim of this study was undertaken to investigate the effects of deltamethrin to induce oxidative stress and changes in biochemical parameters, hepatotoxicity and genotoxicity in female rats following a short-term (30 days) oral exposure and attenuation of these effects by Allium sativum extract. Indeed, Allium sativum is known to be a good antioxidant food resource which helps destroy free radical particles. Our results showed that deltamethrin treatment caused an increase in liver enzyme activities of aspartate transaminase (AST), alanine transaminase (ALT), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH); and hepatic lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. However, it induced a decrease in activities of hepatic catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) (p Allium sativum extract normalized significantly (p Allium sativum diminished the adverse effects induced by this synthetic pyrethroid insecticide.

  9. Project LEAF Documents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Project LEAF has a goal of educating farmworkers about how to reduce pesticide exposure to their families from pesticide residues they may be inadvertently taking home on their clothing, etc. Find outreach materials.

  10. INFLUENCE OF NOSTOC VAUCHER EX BORNET ET FLAHAULT STRAINS ON GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT OF PISUM SATIVUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maltsev Ye. I.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the positive impact of cultures cyanobacteria genus Nostoc Vaucher ex Bornet et Flahault on growth and development of higher plants as an example Pisum sativum L. All the Nostoc species have a positive effect on the viability, germination energy, and biometric characteristics of Pisum sativum. The greatest positive influence was registered for N. entophytum Born. et. Flah. and N. linckia (Roth Bornetet Flahault f. linckia.

  11. Assessment of the potential of Allium sativum oil as a new medicament for non-vital pulpotomy of primary teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad, Shukry Gamal; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic effects of Allium sativum oil and formocresol in nonvital pulpotomy in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Twenty children ranging in age from 4 to 8 years were included in the study. In every one of those children, pulpotomy was indicated for the primary molars. Pulpotomy procedure was performed and the radicular pulp tissue of one molar was capped with A. sativum oil in a cotton pellet while the other mola...

  12. Incorporation of Allium sativum in yogurt: In vitro study on inhibition of diabetes- and hypertension-associated enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabboo Amirdivani Amirdivani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of inclusion of Allium sativum on yogurt formation and subsequent storage (4°C, up to 28 days on proteolysis, microbial activity, the inhibition of a-amylase, a-glucosidase and angiotensin-1 converting enzyme (ACE-1 in vitro were investigated. A. sativum-yogurt showed higher rates of pH reduction and increment of TA than plain-yogurt during incubation at 41°C. Highest proteolysis,  on day 7 showed in A. sativum-yogurt (62.7±0.80 mg/mL, which was 2-flod higher than plain yogurt (31.0±0.96 mg/mL. Bacterial counts in A.sativum-yogurt were higher for Lactobacillus spp. but lower for S. thermophillus (p<0.05 compared to those in plain yogurt throughout refrigerated storage. Highest inhibitory activities for α-amylase were recorded on day 14 of storage for A. sativum- and plain-yogurts (IC50= 13.7±1.99and 26.3±2.15mg respectively; p<0.05 and on day 7 for α-glucosidase (IC50= 120.7±22.71 and 192.3±33.24mg respectively; p<0.05. The highest anti-ACE-I activity was observed on day 7 of refrigerated storage with A. sativum-yogurt (IC50=6.9±0.23mg being more potent than plain-yogurt (IC50=9.7±0.12mg; p<0.05. A. sativum-yogurt was not favoured for overall aroma, sourness and bitterness in the sensory evaluations but recorded the same overall preference as plain yogurt. A. sativum enhanced the fermentation of yogurt in favour of the population of Lactobacillus spp, stimulated proteolysis of milk proteins and increased the in vitro inhibition of key enzymes associated with diabetes and hypertension.

  13. In vitro and in vivo anthelmintic activity of seed extract of Coriandrum sativum compared to Niclosamid against Hymenolepis nana infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Samaneh; Ghalesefidi, Maryam Jamshidian; Azami, Mehdi; Mohaghegh, Mohammad Ali; Hejazi, Seyed Hossein; Ghomashlooyan, Mohsen

    2016-12-01

    Phytotherapy can be an alternative for the control of gastrointestinal parasites in human and animals. Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is a medicinal plant which grown as a spice crop all over the world. The seeds of this plant have been used to treat parasitic disease, indigestion, diabetes, rheumatism and pain in the joints. This study was carried out to compare the efficacy of Niclosamid and alcoholic seed extract of C. sativum on Hymenolepis nana infection, in vivo and vitro. For in vivo study, Balb/c mice were used, to compare the efficacy of 50 mg/kg body weight (B.W) of Niclosamid with different doses of alcoholic extracts of C. sativum (250, 500, and 750 mg/kg B.W). It was found that the efficacy of Niclosamid had reached 100 % after 11 days post treatment, while the efficacy of 500 and 750 mg/kg B.W of C. sativum reached to 100 % after 15 days after treatment. For in vitro study, special nutrient broth media was used. It was found that the addition of 1000 mg/ml of Niclosamid had paralyzed and killed worms within 5 min, while C. sativum killed them within 30 min. Our results showed that extract of C. sativum has good effect against H. nana and could be use in traditional medicine for treatment of parasitic disease.

  14. The effects of different fractions of Coriandrum sativum on pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures and brain tissues oxidative damage in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Anaeigoudari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present work, the effects of different fractions of Coriandrum sativum (C. sativum, on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ-induced seizures and brain tissues oxidative damage were investigated in rats. Materials and Methods: The rats were divided into the following groups: (1 vehicle, (2 PTZ (90 mg/kg, (3 water fraction (WF of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg, (4 n-butanol fraction (NBF of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg, and (5 ethyl acetate fraction (EAF of C. sativum (25 and 100 mg/kg. Results: The first generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS latency in groups treated with 100 mg /kg of WF or EAF was significantly higher than that of PTZ group (p< 0.01. In contrast to WF, the EAF and NBF were not effective in increasing the first minimal clonic seizure (MCS latency. Malondialdehyde (MDA levels in both cortical and hippocampal tissues of PTZ group were significantly higher than those of control animals (p< 0.001. Pretreatment with WF, NBF, or EAF resulted in a significant reduction in the MDA levels of hippocampi (pConclusion: The present study showed that different fractions of C. sativum possess antioxidant activity in the brain and WF and EAF of this plant have anticonvulsant effects.

  15. Peanut agglutinin and β-cyclodextrin functionalized polymer monolith: Microextraction of IgG galactosylation coupled with online MS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haijiao; Zhu, Tenggao; Li, Xiqian; Ma, Jiutong; Jia, Qiong

    2017-08-29

    A facile online method coupling polymer monolithic microextraction (PMME) with mass spectrometry (MS) was developed for the detection of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) galactosylation glycopeptides. A peanut agglutinin-β-cyclodextrin (PNA-β-CD) functionalized poly(hydroxyethyl methylacrylate-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) monolith was designed via a click reaction. Thanking to the specificity of PNA-β-CD for the targets, the material exhibited enhanced enrichment selectivity and extraction efficiency for IgG galactosylation glycopeptides. Under optimal conditions, the developed method gave a linear range of 0.005-5 pmol for IgG glycopeptides with the regression coefficient greater than 0.9990, and the detection limit of IgG galactosylation glycopeptides as low as 0.5 fmol was achieved. The PMME-MS method was applied to IgG galactosylation glycopeptides in real samples including human serum and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cell lysate. A series of unique IgG galactosylation glycopeptides were captured by the monolith in the complex samples, indicating satisfactory enrichment ability for IgG galactosylation glycopeptides. The quick and integrated online PMME-MS method exhibited high selectivity for IgG galactosylation, demonstrating its perspectives on the development and broad applications of MS in studying galactosylation proteins regulated biological processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive α-fetoprotein decline after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma predicts survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Sheng, Shile; Sun, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianju; Huang, Gang

    2014-04-20

    Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive α-fetoprotein (AFP-L3) is a fucosylated fraction of AFP that is highly specific for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We studied the relationship between AFP-L3 response and treatment outcome in terms of radiologic response and overall survival in patients undergoing transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). We retrospectively analyzed 152 patients with advanced HCC undergoing TACE. Serum AFP-L3 and AFP levels were measured simultaneously with a novel lectin dual-label time-resolved immunofluorometric assay (lectin dual-label TRFIA). AFP-L3 response was defined as a ≥20% reduction in AFP-L3 level after a minimum of 2 cycles of chemotherapy. A total of 47 AFP-L3 responders had improved median overall survival of 42.9 months compared with 15.4 months in nonresponders (P<0.0001), and AFP-L3 response was strongly associated with radiologic response (P<0.0001). The combination of AFP-L3 response and serum AFP response provided further prognostic information. On multivariate analysis, the prognostic value of AFP-L3 response was independent of maximum tumor diameter and BCLC stage. A significant reduction in AFP-L3 in patients with advanced HCC is an important predictor of survival. Achieving an AFP-L3 response should be one of the therapeutic intents of TACE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Highly sensitive Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive α-fetoprotein: a new tool for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyoda, Hidenori; Kumada, Takashi; Tada, Toshifumi

    2011-01-01

    The highly sensitive Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive α-fetoprotein (hs-AFP-L3), measured using a newly developed method involving microfluidics-based separation technology, was evaluated as a new tool for the management of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in clinical practice. The sensitivity and specificity of hs-AFP-L3 for the diagnosis of HCC and its ability to predict the outcome of patients with HCC were analyzed based on reported studies. Compared to AFP-L3 measured using conventional methods, the sensitivity of hs-AFP-L3 was markedly higher and the specificity was comparable. In all studies, multivariate analysis found that elevation of hs-AFP-L3 was an independent factor that affected patient survival. The use of hs-AFP-L3 improves the true positive rate of patients with HCC at diagnosis, maintaining the high specificity of AFP-L3 and its indicative value for poor prognosis. The utility of this tumor marker for prediction of the development of HCC in high-risk patients under surveillance needs to be investigated. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated liposomes incorporated with cardiolipin to improve neuronal survival in Alzheimer’s disease treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Chih; Lin, Che-Yu; Li, Jay-Shake; Lou, Yung-I

    2017-01-01

    Curcumin (CRM) and nerve growth factor (NGF) were entrapped in liposomes (LIP) with surface wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) to downregulate the phosphorylation of kinases in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) therapy. Cardiolipin (CL)-conjugated LIP carrying CRM (CRM-CL/LIP) and also carrying NGF (NGF-CL/LIP) were used with AD models of SK-N-MC cells and Wistar rats after an insult with β-amyloid peptide (Aβ). We found that CRM-CL/LIP inhibited the expression of phosphorylated p38 (p-p38), phosphorylated c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK), and p-tau protein at serine 202 and prevented neurodegeneration of SK-N-MC cells. In addition, NGF-CL/LIP could enhance the quantities of p-neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 and p-extracellular signal-regulated kinase 5 for neuronal rescue. Moreover, WGA-grafted CRM-CL/LIP and WGA-grafted NGF-CL/LIP significantly improved the permeation of CRM and NGF across the blood–brain barrier, reduced Aβ plaque deposition and the malondialdehyde level, and increased the percentage of normal neurons and cholinergic activity in the hippocampus of AD rats. Based on the marker expressions and in vivo evidence, current LIP carriers can be promising drug delivery systems to protect nervous tissue against Aβ-induced apoptosis in the brain during the clinical management of AD. PMID:28280340

  19. Ulex Europeus Agglutinin (UEA-I) lectin binding in breast carcinoma and its relationship to prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhan, Y; Alkanat, M B; Akyildiz, M; Icoz, G; Yilmaz, R; Erhan, Y

    1996-09-01

    In this study, lectin binding was compared with pathological prognostic factors and clinical follow-up details. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues from 43 cases of breast carcinoma were studied for binding with Ulex Europeus Agglutinin (UEA-I) lectin. Staining results were compared with tumor size, histologic and nuclear grade, lymph node status (number, capsular and pericapsular invasion), blood and lymphatic vessel invasion, ER and PR status, clinical stage and the patients' short-term follow-up details. Analysis of staining with UEA-I showed a significant relationship with blood vessel invasion (P < 0.01) and lymphatic vessel invasion (P < 0.05). Furthermore, PR showed a significant inverse correlation with lectin binding (P < 0.05). Staining with UEA-I related significantly with axilliary lymph node metastases (P < 0.05). UEA-I was positive in four (66.6%) out of six cases with distant organ mestastasis. This study confirms that, in breast cancer, lectin binding to the cancer cells can be a reliable indicator for axilliary metastases, and the need for additional therapeutic interventions.

  20. Application of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I-modified liposomes for oral vaccine: Ex Vivo bioadhesion and in Vivo immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, KeXin; Zhao, Xiuli; Xu, Shiyi; Pang, DaHai; Yang, ChunRong; Chen, DaWei

    2011-01-01

    The conjugation of Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEAI) onto surface of liposomes has been demonstrated to effectively improve the intestinal absorption of antigen, subsequently induced strong mucosal and systemic immune responses. In this context, we prepared bovine serum albumin (BSA)-encapsulating UEAI-modified liposomes (UEAI-LIP) and unmodified ones (LIP). The specific bioadhesion on mice gastro-intestinal mucosa was studied ex vivo. An important increase of interaction between UEAI-conjugated liposomes and the intestinal segments with Peyer's Patches (PPs) was observed compared with the unconjugated one (p<0.01). However, under the presence of α-L-fucose, which is the reported specific sugar for UEAI, specifically inhibited the activity of these conjugates. The immune-stimulating activity in vivo was studied by measuring immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in serum and immunoglobulin A (IgA) levels in intestinal mucosal secretions following oral administration of BSA solution, LIP and UEAI-LIP in mice. Results indicate that antigen encapsulated in liposomes, especially the UEAI-modified ones, was favorable for inducing immune response. At 42 d after the first immunization, the highest IgG and IgA antibody levels produced by UEAI-LIP occurred, respectively showing 4.4-fold and 5-fold higher levels compared to those of the groups receiving BSA alone. This data demonstrated high potential of UEAI-modified liposomes for their use as carrier for oral vaccines.

  1. Systematic comparison of oligosaccharide specificity of Ricinus communis agglutinin I and Erythrina lectins: a search by frontal affinity chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Yoko; Nakamura-Tsuruta, Sachiko; Kominami, Junko; Sharon, Nathan; Kasai, Ken-Ichi; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2007-10-01

    Ricinus communis agglutinin I (RCA120) is considered a versatile tool for the detection of galactose-containing oligosaccharides. However, possible contamination by the highly toxic isolectin 'ricin' has become a critical issue for RCA120's continued use. From a practical viewpoint, it is necessary to find an effective substitute for RCA120. For this purpose, we examined by means of frontal affinity chromatography over 100 lectins which have similar sugar-binding specificities to that of RCA120. It was found that Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECL) showed the closest similarity to RCA120. Both lectins prefer Gal beta1-4GlcNAc (type II) to Gal beta1-3GlcNAc (type I) structures, with increased affinity for highly branched N-acetyllactosamine-containing N-glycans. Their binding strength significantly decreased following modification of the 3-OH, 4-OH and 6-OH of the galactose moiety of the disaccharide, as well as the 3-OH of its N-acetylglucosamine residue. Several differences were also observed in the affinity of the two lectins for various other ligands, as well as effects of bisecting GlcNAc and terminal sialylation. Although six other Erythrina-derived lectins have been reported with different amino acid sequences, all showed quite similar profiles to that of ECL, and thus, to RCA120. Erythrina lectins can therefore serve as effective substitutes for RCA120, taking the above differences into consideration.

  2. Severe acute hepatitis and cold agglutinin-related hemolytic anemia secondary to prime infection with Epstein-Barr virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Ontanilla-Clavijo

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a member of the Herpesviridae family, is responsible for the infectious mononucleosis clinical syndrome, which mainly includes the pharyngitis, fever, and lymphadenopathy triad after incubation for 30-50 days. The liver is involved in 80-90% of patients in a self-limiting transient manner, with jaundice being much more uncommon (5%. From a hematological standpoint it may manifest aplastic anemia, neutropenia, and thrombocytopenia. We report a case of infectious mononucleosis that included severe acute hepatitis and was associated with severe hemolytic anemia secondary to cold agglutinins. After exclusion of other etiologies, and given the clinical suspicion of the above association, which was later confirmed by lab tests, empiric therapy was initiated with antiviral agents (aciclovir + valganciclovir and corticoids, which resulted in a progressive clinical improvement until complete remission. Therefore, we believe that this case report will reinforce the clinical evidence in support of the above combined therapy for serious infectious mononucleosis as a step prior to liver transplantation.

  3. Uji toksisitas ekstrak bawang putih (Allium Sativum terhadap kultur sel fibroblast (Garlic (Allium Sativum extract toxicity test on fibroblast cell culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulie Emilda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Previous studies have found antimicrobial effect of garlic (allium sativum. Garlic has potential as sterilization material for root canal treatment. Nevertheless, such material has to be non toxic and has to have adequate biocompatibility. Purpose: The study was aimed to examine the toxicity of garlic (allium sativum on fibroblast cell culture. Method: Toxicity test was conducted using 50%, 75%, 100% of garlic extract, and Chlorphenol Kamfer Menthol (ChKM as control. BHK-21 cell-culture was put into microplate 96 wells with 2x105 densities and incubated in a 37oC. The garlic extracts in various concentration and ChKM were then placed into the wells. MTT assay test was then use to analyze toxicity, a 50% percentage of living culture-cell was set as a parameter whether the extract is toxic or not. Results: The results showed that in 50%, 75%, and 100% garlic concentration indicates a non toxic characteristic on fibroblast cell culture. The non toxic property was consistent in 72, 96, and 120 hours of observation point. Conclusion: The study revealed that garlic on consentration of 50,%, 75%, 100% did not show toxic effect on fibroblast culture cell, but it needs further research for preparing it as an alternative medicament of root canal treatment.Latar belakang: Penelitian sebelumnya telah menemukan efek antimikroba bawang putih (allium sativum. Bawang putih memiliki potensi sebagai bahan sterilisasi pada perawatan saluran akar. Namun bahan tersebut harus tidak toksik dan memiliki biokompatibilitas yang memadai. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan menguji toksisitas bawang putih (allium sativum terhadap kultur sel fibroblast. Metode: Uji toksisitas dilakukan dengan menggunakan konsentrasi 50%, 75%, 100% dari ekstrak bawang putih, dan Chlorphenol Kamfer Menthol (ChKM sebagai kontrol. BHK-21 kultur sel dimasukkan ke dalam microplate 96 sumuran dengan kepadatan 2x105 dan diinkubasi di suhu 37°C. Ekstrak bawang putih dalam berbagai

  4. METHOD FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF ALUMINUM TOLERANCE OF PEA (Pisum sativum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    M.A. VISHNYAKOVA; E.V. SEMENOVA; I.A. KOSAREVA; N.D. KRAVCHUK; S.I. LOSKUTOV; I.V. PUKHALSKII; A.I. SHAPOSHNIKOV; A.L. SAZANOVA; A.A. BELIMOV

    2015-01-01

    Crops vary considerably in their resistance to acidic soils, and many legumes, including pea (Pisum sativum L.), considered to be sensitive or moderately sensitive crops compared to cereals. The main factor determining the phytotoxicity of acidic soils is the increased concentration of mobile aluminum ions in the soil solution. Accumulation of aluminum in root tissues interferes with cell division, initiation of growth of lateral roots and uptake of minerals and water by plants. Under laborat...

  5. The effect of salinity on seed germination and growth parameters of field pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Jovičić Dušica; Vujaković Milka; Milošević Mirjana; Karagić Đura; Taški-Ajduković Ksenija; Ignjatov Maja; Mikić Aleksandar

    2010-01-01

    Field pea (Pisum sativum L.) seed contains a large amount of proteins, amino acids, sugars, carbohydrates, vitamins A and C, calcium and phosphorous, and hence it is widely used for many purposes. Although field pea has moderate requirements for its growth, it is sensitive to increased salt content in soil. This research included eight varieties (Javor, Jantar, Partner, Kristal, Pionir, Junior, Trezor, Dukat) developed at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad. Sodium chloride sol...

  6. Effect of Foliar Fertilization on Nodulation and Grain Yield of Pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    OpenAIRE

    MILEV, Gencho

    2014-01-01

    During 2011 – 2013, a field experiment with pea (Pisum sativum L.) was carried out in the trial field of Dobrudzha Agricultural Institute. The aim was to find out what is the effect of foliar fertilization with liquid fertilizers on the nodulation ability and the grain yield from a new fodder pea variety. The soil in the trial field was slightly leached chernozem (Luvic phaeozem) with very good agro physical and agro chemical properties. The experiment was designed according to the block meth...

  7. Potency of Allium sativum and Allium cepa Oils against Schistosoma mansoni Infection in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Metwally, Nadia S

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: It has been reported that garlic (Allium sativum) and onion (Allium cepa) are used all over the world in different diseases, such as infections, injuries, gastrointestinal dysfunctions and cardiovascular diseases. Therefore, our aim in this work was to study the ability of garlic and onion oils to offset the infectivity as well as the metabolic disturbances induced by Schistosoma mansoni parasitism. Methods: The two current drugs were given in a dosage of 5ml / kg body weight/ d...

  8. Effect of salinity and ascorbic acid on growth, water and osmotic relations of Lepidium sativum

    OpenAIRE

    Azadeh Najjar-Khodabakhsh; Mohammad Pazhang; Leila Zarandi-Miandoab; Nader Chaparzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Soil salinity is a serious environmental problem in arid and semi-arid regions that have negative impacts on crop production. In this research, because of medicinal and nutritional importance of the garden cress (Lepidium sativum) plant, the interactive effects of salinity (225 mM NaCl) and ascorbic acid (1 mM) were evaluated on growth and its water relations. A completely randomized design with four replications was conducted under controlled conditions. The results showed that salinity decr...

  9. THE INFLUENCE OF HERBICIDES ON GROWTH OF PEA (Pisum sativum L.) NODULATING RHIZOBIAL STRAINS

    OpenAIRE

    Blažinkov, Mihaela; Šnajdar, Ana; Barić, Klara; Sikora, Sanja; Rajnović, Ivana; Sulejman REDŽEPOVIĆ

    2015-01-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation in legume cultivation has an important role in sustainable agriculture production. An important forage legume is the field pea (Pisum sativum L.). Together with nitrogen-fixing bacteria Rhizobium leguminosarum sv. viciae and Rhizobium pisi, field peas provide use of abundant amounts of atmospheric nitrogen, the limiting factor in agricultural production. In order to increase the utilization of biological nitrogen fixation, the inoculation of forage pea seeds is re...

  10. Antioxidant and schistosomicidal effect of Allium sativum and Allium cepa against Schistosoma mansoni different stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantawy, M M; Aly, H F; Zayed, N; Fahmy, Z H

    2012-07-01

    The schistosomicidal properties of garlic (Allium sativum) and onion (Allium cepa) powder were tested in vitro against Schistosoma mansoni miracidia, schistosomula, cercaria and adult worms. Results indicate their strong biocidal effects against all stages of the parasite and also show scavenging inhibitory effect on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and nitric oxide (NO). In the present work, the in vivo effects of A. sativum and A. cepa on lipid peroxide and some antioxidant enzymes; thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione reductase (GR) (as they have a crucial role in host protection against invading parasite) were also studied. The data demonstrate that, there was a significant inhibition in SOD, CAT, GR, TrxR and SDH in infected liver while, significant elevation was detected in lipid peroxide as compared to the normal control. The current resultS clearly revealed that, the used both edible plants enhance the host antioxidant system indicated by lowering in lipid peroxide and stimulation of SOD, CAT, GR, TrxR and SDH enzyme levels. Enhancement of such enzymes using A. sativum and A. cepa could in turn render the parasite vulnerable to damage by the host and may play a role in the antischistosomal potency of the used food ingredients.

  11. Hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis extracts in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajhashemi, Valiollah; Safaei, Azadeh

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate hypnotic effect of Coriandrum sativum, Ziziphus jujuba, Lavandula angustifolia and Melissa officinalis hydroalcoholic extracts in mice to select the most effective ones for a combination formula. Three doses of the extracts (250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg of C. sativum and Z. jujuba and 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis) were orally administered to male Swiss mice (20-25 g) and one hour later pentobarbital (50 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to induce sleep. Onset of sleep and its duration were measured and compared. Control animals and reference group received vehicle (10 ml/kg, p.o.) and diazepam (3 mg/kg, i.p.), respectively. C. sativum and Z. jujuba failed to change sleep parameters. L. angustifolia at doses of 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg shortened sleep onset by 7.6%, 50% and 51.5% and prolonged sleep duration by 9.9%, 43.1% and 80.2%, respectively. Compared with control group the same doses of M. officinalis also decreased sleep onset by 24.7%, 27.5% and 51.2% and prolonged sleep duration by 37.9%, 68.7% and 131.7% respectively. Combinations of L. angustifolia and M. officinalis extracts showed additive effect and it is suggested that a preparation containing both extracts may be useful for insomnia. PMID:26779267

  12. Biological Properties and Characterization of ASL50 Protein from Aged Allium sativum Bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suresh; Jitendra, Kumar; Singh, Kusum; Kapoor, Vaishali; Sinha, Mou; Xess, Immaculata; Das, Satya N; Sharma, Sujata; Singh, Tej P; Dey, Sharmistha

    2015-08-01

    Allium sativum is well known for its medicinal properties. The A. sativum lectin 50 (ASL50, 50 kDa) was isolated from aged A. sativum bulbs and purified by gel filtration chromatography on Sephacryl S-200 column. Agar well diffusion assay were used to evaluate the antimicrobial activity of ASL50 against Candida species and bacteria then minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined. The lipid A binding to ASL50 was determined by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology with varying concentrations. Electron microscopic studies were done to see the mode of action of ASL50 on microbes. It exerted antimicrobial activity against clinical Candida isolates with a MIC of 10-40 μg/ml and clinical Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates with a MIC of 10-80 μg/ml. The electron microscopic study illustrates that it disrupts the cell membrane of the bacteria and cell wall of fungi. It exhibited antiproliferative activity on oral carcinoma KB cells with an IC50 of 36 μg/ml after treatment for 48 h and induces the apoptosis of cancer cells by inducing 2.5-fold higher caspase enzyme activity than untreated cells. However, it has no cytotoxic effects towards HEK 293 cells as well as human erythrocytes even at higher concentration of ASL50. Biological properties of ASL50 may have its therapeutic significance in aiding infection and cancer treatments.

  13. Bacteriological evaluation of Allium sativum oil as a new medicament for pulpotomy of primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Shukry Gamal; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    To compare the effects of Allium sativum oil and formocresol on the pulp tissue of the pulpotomized teeth. Twenty children were selected for this study. All children had a pair of non-vital primary molars. A sterile paper point was dipped in the root canals prior to the mortal pulpotomy. These paper points were collected in transfer media and immediately transported to the microbiological lab to be investigated microbiologically (for Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus). Then the procedure of mortal pulpotomy was performed. After 2 weeks, the cotton pellets were removed and sterile paper points were dipped in the root canals for microbiological examination. Then comparison between the count of bacteria before and after treatment was conducted. Statistical analysis was performed using independent t-test and paired t-test at the significance level of α = 0.05. After application of both medicaments, there was a marked decrease in S. mutans and L. acidophilus counts. The difference between the mean of log values of the count before and after the application was highly significant for both medicaments (P sativum oil was used. A. sativum oil had more powerful antimicrobial effects than formocresol on the bacteria of the infected root canals.

  14. Lepidium sativum Linn.: a current addition to the family of mucilage and its applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Maheriya, Pankaj M; Jani, Girish K; Patil, Prasant D; Patel, Bhumit N

    2014-04-01

    Mucilage from the last decades has been found to be very attractive, interesting and useful in development of desired pharmaceutical dosage forms. Various applications of plant based mucilage have a wide potentiality in drug formulations. Lepidium sativum Linn. (family: Brassicaceae) is one of the mucilage containing fast growing, edible annual herb. Its various parts (roots, leaves and seeds) have been used to treat various human ailments. It mainly contains alkaloids, saponins, anthracene glycosides, carbohydrates, proteins, amino acids, flavanoids, and sterols as chief phytochemical constituents. Its seed extracts have been screened for various biological activities like hypotensive, anti-microbial, bronchodilator, hypoglycemic and allelopathic, whereas its seed coat mucilage has been isolated using different methods to make it effective excipient of desired functionality as a part of pharmaceutical applications. Through keen references of reported work on Lepidium sativum Linn., in this review, we have focused on its seed coat mucilage isolation methods, chemical constituents, pharmacological profile and versatile application of Lepidium sativum Linn. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Efficacy of soluble glycoprotein fraction from Allium sativum purified by size exclusion chromatography on murine Schistosomiasis mansoni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Ibrahim; Taher, Eman E; El-Sayed, Hoda; Mohammed, Faten A; ELnain, Gehan; Hamad, Rabab S; Bayoumy, Elsayed M

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the efficiency of crude MeOH extracts and soluble glycoprotein fraction of Allium sativum purified by size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) on parasitological, histopathological and some biochemical parameters in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice were investigated. Animals were infected by tail immersion with 100 cercariae/each mouse and divided into five groups in addition to the normal control. The results revealed a significant decrease in mean worm burden in all treated mice especially in the group treated with soluble glycoprotein fraction of A. sativum as compared to infected non-treated control with the disappearance of female worms. Administration of the studied extracts revealed remarkable amelioration in the levels of all the measured parameters in S. mansoni infected mice. In addition, treatment of mice with crude A. sativum MeOH extract and soluble glycoprotein fraction of A. sativum decreased significantly the activities of studied enzymes as compared to the infected untreated group. The highest degrees of enhancement in pathological changes was observed in the treated one with soluble glycoprotein fraction of A. sativum compared to the infected group represented by small sized, late fibro-cellular granuloma, the decrease in cellular constituents and degenerative changes in eggs. In conclusion, A. sativum treatment had effective schistosomicidal activities, through reduction of worm burden and tissue eggs, especially when it was given in purified glycoprotein fraction. Moreover, the soluble glycoprotein fraction of A. sativum largely modulates both the size and the number of granulomas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Leaf spring, and electromagnetic actuator provided with a leaf spring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Lemmen, Remco Louis Christiaan

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a leaf spring for an electromagnetic actuator and to such an electromagnetic actuator. The leaf spring is formed as a whole from a disc of plate-shaped, resilient material. The leaf spring comprises a central fastening part, an outer fastening part extending therearound and

  17. LEAF-E: a tool to analyze grass leaf growth using function fitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorend, Wannes; Lootens, Peter; Nelissen, Hilde; Roldán-Ruiz, Isabel; Inzé, Dirk; Muylle, Hilde

    2014-01-01

    In grasses, leaf growth is often monitored to gain insights in growth processes, biomass accumulation, regrowth after cutting, etc. To study the growth dynamics of the grass leaf, its length is measured at regular time intervals to derive the leaf elongation rate (LER) profile over time. From the LER profile, parameters such as maximal LER and leaf elongation duration (LED), which are essential for detecting inter-genotype growth differences and/or quantifying plant growth responses to changing environmental conditions, can be determined. As growth is influenced by the circadian clock and, especially in grasses, changes in environmental conditions such as temperature and evaporative demand, the LER profiles show considerable experimental variation and thus often do not follow a smooth curve. Hence it is difficult to quantify the duration and timing of growth. For these reasons, the measured data points should be fitted using a suitable mathematical function, such as the beta sigmoid function for leaf elongation. In the context of high-throughput phenotyping, we implemented the fitting of leaf growth measurements into a user-friendly Microsoft Excel-based macro, a tool called LEAF-E. LEAF-E allows to perform non-linear regression modeling of leaf length measurements suitable for robust and automated extraction of leaf growth parameters such as LER and LED from large datasets. LEAF-E is particularly useful to quantify the timing of leaf growth, which forms an important added value for detecting differences in leaf growth development. We illustrate the broad application range of LEAF-E using published and unpublished data sets of maize, Miscanthus spp. and Brachypodium distachyon, generated in independent experiments and for different purposes. In addition, we show that LEAF-E could also be used to fit datasets of other growth-related processes that follow the sigmoidal profile, such as cell length measurements along the leaf axis. Given its user-friendliness, ability

  18. Effect of pea cultivar, pathogen isolate, inoculum concentration and leaf wetness duration on Ascochyta blight caused by Mycosphaerella pinodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Setti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of host leaf wetness duration, Mycosphaerella pinodes inoculum concentration and pathogen isolate on the latent period and the incubation period of the pathogen or disease severity were quantifi ed on pea (Pisum sativum L.. Seedlings of two widely grown pea cultivars, Onward and Merveille de Kelvedon, respectively susceptible and moderately resistant to M. pinodes were subjected to six leaf wetness durations of 6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h, and inoculated with fi ve inoculum concentrations, 2.5×103, 4×104, 3.5×105, 4x106, and 5.2×107, in order to determine whether the cultivars reacted differently to M. pinodes isolates inoculated under identical conditions. Increasing the duration of leaf wetness and inoculum concentration caused signifi cant (P<0.001 increases in disease severity within each cultivar. Both the incubation period and the latent period decreased with increasing conidial concentration and leaf wetness duration. Generally, the cv. Onward had a signifi cantly shorter incubation period, and latent period and higher disease severity than cv. Merveille de Kelvedon. Isolates differed in aggressiveness at higher levels of leaf wetness (48 h duration and of inoculum concentration (4×106, but there was no signifi cant interaction between isolates and leaf wetness duration, or between isolates and inoculum concentration. The optimum levels for obtaining a consistent infection and for readily separating the susceptible and the partially resistant cultivars were a leaf wetness of 48 h and an inoculum concentration of 4×106. The study also showed that continuous leaf wetness for 48 h was a threshold for application of fungicides to control the fungus in the susceptible cultivar.

  19. High-sensitivity Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive alpha-fetoprotein assay predicts early detection of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Tada, Toshifumi; Kiriyama, Seiki; Tanikawa, Makoto; Hisanaga, Yasuhiro; Kanamori, Akira; Tanaka, Junko; Kagebayashi, Chiaki; Satomura, Shinji

    2014-03-01

    Prognosis of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poor because HCC is frequently diagnosed late. Therefore, regular surveillance has been recommended to detect HCC at the early stage when curative treatments can be applied. HCC biomarkers, including Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3), are widely used for surveillance in Japan. A newly developed immunoassay system measures AFP-L3 % with high sensitivity. This retrospective study aimed to evaluate clinical utility of high-sensitivity AFP-L3 (hs-AFP-L3) as a predictor of early stage HCC in surveillance at a single site. Of consecutive 2830 patients in the surveillance between 2000 and 2009, 104 HCC-developed and 104 non-HCC patients were selected by eligibility criteria and propensity score matching. Samples were obtained from the HCC patients who had blood drawn annually for 3 years prior to HCC diagnosis. In the present study, hs-AFP-L3 was elevated 1 year prior to diagnosis in 34.3 % of patients. The survival rate of patients with the hs-AFP-L3 ≥ 7 % at 1 year prior to diagnosis was significantly lower than that of patients with hs-AFP-L3 < 7 %. Elevation of hs-AFP-L3 was early predictive of development of HCC even at low AFP levels and in absence of ultrasound findings of suspicious HCC. The hs-AFP-L3 should be added to surveillance programs with US because elevated hs-AFP-L3 may be a trigger to perform enhanced imaging modalities for confirmation of HCC.

  20. Displaying the protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum agglutinin on the cell surface of Bacillus thuringiensis with the S-layer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Guo, Suxia; Hu, Sishun; Xiao, Yuncai; Xu, Qingrong; Li, Zili; Bi, Dingren; Sun, Ming

    2008-07-27

    The S-layer protein CTC surface-display system of Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) was used to test the possibility of displaying the protein of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG) agglutinin (pMGA) on the Bt cell surface. By fusing part of pmga1.2 (pmga1.2p) with the surface-anchoring motif of ctc, two recombinant plasmids, pCTC-PMGA1.2P and pCSPMGA1.2P, were constructed. They harboured the fusion genes ctc-pmga1.2p and csa-ctc-pmga1.2p (csa represents csaAB operon, important in anchoring the S-layer protein on the cell surface), respectively. Two recombinant Bt strains were constructed by electro-transferring recombinant plasmids to a Bt plasmid-free derivative strain BMB171. Strains obtained were BCCG (bearing pCTC-PMGA1.2P and the csaAB operon-carrying plasmid pMIL-CSA) and CG (pCSPMGA1.2P). The vegetative cells of both strains were used as antigens for haemagglutination (HA) and haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. HA and HI assays showed that recombinant PMGA1.2P proteins were not only displayed on the cell surface of BCCG and CG, but also specific to MG-positive serum. After oral immunization of chickens with spores, both BCCG and CG elicited a humoral response to PMGA1.2P and exhibited immunogenicity, as indicated by serum plate agglutination (SPA) assays. This study suggests the possibility of generating heat-stable and oral vaccines against infectious diseases of fowl with Bt surface-display system.

  1. Localization of Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I) in the developing gustatory epithelium of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Ryo; Shi, Lei; Honma, Shiho; Fujii, Masae; Ueda, Katsura; El-Sharaby, Ashraf; Wakisaka, Satoshi

    2004-09-01

    To understand the development of the gustatory structures necessitates a reliable marker for both immature and mature taste buds. It has been reported that the intragemmal cells within the taste buds of adult rats were bound to Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA-I), a specific lectin for alpha-linked fucose, but it has not been determined whether immature taste buds, i.e. taste buds without an apparent taste pore, are labeled with UEA-I. The present study was conducted to examine the UEA-I binding pattern during the development of the rat gustatory epithelium. In adult animals, UEA-I bound to the membrane of taste buds in all examined regions of the gustatory epithelium. Within the individual taste buds, UEA-I labeled almost all intragemmal cells. The binding of UEA-I was occasionally detected below the keratinized layer of the trench wall epithelium but could not be found in the lingual epithelium of the adult animal. During the development of circumvallate papilla, some cells within the immature taste buds were also labeled with UEA-I. The developmental changes in the UEA-I binding pattern in fungiform papillae were almost identical to those in the circumvallate papilla: both immature and mature taste buds were labeled with UEA-I. The present results indicate that UEA-I is a specific lectin for the intragemmal cells of both immature and mature taste buds and, thus, UEA-I can be used as a reliable marker for all taste buds in the rat.

  2. Protective effects of Allium sativum against defects of hypercholesterolemia on pregnant rats and their offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayyad, Hassan I; Abou-El-Naga, Amoura M; Gadallah, Abdelalim A; Bakr, Iman H

    2010-06-10

    Sixty fertile female and male albino rats of Wistar strain (I male/ 3 females) were used in the present study. The females were divided into four groups of ten rats each. Group 1 received water and standard feeds for thirty-four days. Group 2 was fed with a cholesterol-containing diet (1%) for two weeks prior to onset of gestation and maintained administration till parturition, produce atherosclerosis (34 days). Group 3 received intragastric administration of 100mg homogenate of garlic (Allium sativum)/kg body weight for three weeks prior to onset of gestation as well as throughout the gestation period. Group 4 intragastrically administered garlic for one week of group B and maintained with combined garlic-treatment for the mentioned period. At parturition, the pregnant were sacrificed and serum total cholesterol (TCL), triglycerides (TG), HDL, LDL and creatine kinase activity (CK) were determined. The total numbers of offspring were recorded and examined morphological for congenital abnormalities. Biopsies of heart and dorsal aorta of both pregnant and their offspring (1 day-age) were processed for investigation at light and transmission electron microscopy. The skeleton of the newborn of different experimental groups were stained with alizarin red s and mor-phometric assessment of mandibular and appendicular bone length. The study revealed that the myocardium of atherosclerotic mother exhibited leuhkocytic inflammatory cell infiltration associated with necrosis, eosinophilia of myocardiai fibers, and edema of blood vessels. Ultrastructural studies revealed swelling of mitochondria, disruption of cristae in the myocardiai muscle fibers. The dorsal aorta possessed accumulation of extra-cellular lipid in intima lining of endothelium. The collagenous fibrils in the tunica adventitia became fragile and loosely separated from each other. Numerous foamy lipid loaden cells were detected within the tunica intima causing deterioration of the elastic fibers, resulting in

  3. Leaf anatomy and photosynthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuijs, H.N.C.

    2016-01-01

    Keywords: CO2 diffusion, C3 photosynthesis, mesophyll conductance, mesophyll resistance, re-assimilation, photorespiration, respiration, tomato Herman Nicolaas Cornelis Berghuijs (2016). Leaf anatomy and photosynthesis; unravelling the CO2 diffusion pathway in C3 leaves. PhD thesis. Wageningen

  4. The first trimeric Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin of Orchidaceae was found in Dendrobium pendulum: purification, characterization, and effects of stress factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripipatthana, Patthraporn; Phaonakrop, Narumon; Roytrakul, Sittiruk; Senawong, Gulsiri; Mudalige-Jayawickrama, Rasika G; Sattayasai, Nison

    2015-07-01

    Trimeric Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin of Orchidaceae with two conformational forms was first studied in Dendrobium pendulum . It was highly expressed by stress factors. Using mannan-agarose column chromatography, a mannose-binding protein was purified from Dendrobium pendulum Roxb. pseudobulb. After heating in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) with or without 2-mercaptoethanol, the protein showed one band with molecular mass of 14.0 kDa on SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Without heating, three bands were found at positions of 14.0, 39.4, and 41.5 kDa, but a higher amount of 39.4 and 41.5 kDa protein bands were seen in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and database search indicated that the 14.0 kDa protein band contained three peptide fragments identical to parts of a lectin precursor from Dendrobiu m findleyanum Parish & Rchb.f. Native-PAGE and Ferguson plot showed that the purified protein had two native forms with molecular masses of 44.2 and 45.3 kDa, indicating three 14.0 kDa polypeptide subunits. The purified protein exhibited the agglutination activity with trypsinized chicken erythrocytes. It was then recognized as a Galanthus nivalis agglutinin-related lectin and named D. pendulum agglutinin (DPA). Using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and DNA sequencing, the deduced amino acid sequence of DPA precursor showed the highest homology (96.4%) with a lectin precursor of D. findleyanum and contained three mannose-binding sites. Greater amounts of DPA were found when the pseudobulbs were treated with stress factors including ultraviolet light, abscisic acid, hydrogen peroxide, and acetylene gas.

  5. Difference in Ulex europaeus agglutinin I-binding activity of decay-accelerating factor detected in the stools of patients with colorectal cancer and ulcerative colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Hiroaki; Mizuno, Motowo; Nasu, Junichirou; Makidono, Chiho; Hiraoka, Sakiko; Yamamoto, Kazuhide; Okada, Hiroyuki; Fujita, Teizo; Tsuji, Takao; Shiratori, Yasushi

    2004-03-01

    Expression of decay-accelerating factor (DAF, CD55), a complement-regulatory glycoprotein, is enhanced in colorectal-cancer (CC) cells and colonic epithelium in ulcerative colitis (UC), and stools from these patients contain increased amounts of DAF. Carbohydrate chains of glycoproteins are often altered during malignant transformation or inflammation. In this study, we investigated whether DAF molecules in patients with CC and those with UC differ with respect to oligosaccharide side chains. We analyzed DAF in stools and homogenates of colonic-tissue specimens obtained from patients with CC or UC using solid-phase enzyme-linked assay and Western blotting for reactivity with the lectins Ulex europaeus agglutinin I (UEA-I), wheat-germ agglutinin, peanut agglutinin, and concanavalin A. UEA-I bound to DAF in stools from patients with UC but not in that from the stools of CC patients, as demonstrated on the solid-phase enzyme-linked assay (P <.05, Mann-Whitney U test) and Western blotting. Binding of UEA-I was specifically inhibited by the addition of fucose. The difference in UEA-I reactivity with DAF was observed also in colonic-tissue homogenates from patients with UC and those with CC. DAF expressed in the mucosa and excreted into the stools of UC patients is different from that expressed in CC with regard to UEA-I reactivity. Future studies should be directed toward determining whether a qualitatively unique isoform of DAF is present, of which sugar chains are specific to CC in UC patients.

  6. Effect of shoot tip and leaf removal on gravitropism in pea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, H B; Yang, R L

    1997-10-01

    Intact, light-grown pea (Pisum sativum L. cv. Alaska) seedlings were subjected to continuous horizontal gravistimulation and their growth and bending response compared with seedlings whose shoot tip and youngest leaf had been excised and with seedlings to which a counterweight to replace the mass of the decapitated tissue was added. While all seedlings achieved vertical orientation in 2 to 3 h, seedlings that were counterweighted bent upward at a significantly slower rate than the non-counterweighted, decapitated plants. In addition to this effect of mass on the rate of bending, decapitation also removed a major supply of auxin to cells in the bending zone which resulted in the slower bending of treated plants. Thus when using decapitation both the loss of mass and the time course of the response must be considered to understand its effect on gravitropism.

  7. In vitro and in vivo Nematocidal Activity of Allium sativum and Tagetes erecta Extracts Against Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacio- Landín, Josefina; Mendoza-de Gives, Pedro; Salinas-Sánchez, David Osvaldo; López-Arellano, María Eugenia; Liébano-Hernández, Enrique; Hernández-Velázquez, Victor Manuel; Valladares-Cisneros, María Guadalupe

    2015-12-01

    In the Mexican ethno-medicine, a number of plants have shown a successful anthelmintic activity. This fact could be crucial to identify possible green anti-parasitic strategies against nematodes affecting animal production. This research evaluated the in vitro and in vivo nematocidal effects of two single and combined plant extracts: bulbs of Allium sativum (n-hexane) and flowers of Tagetes erecta (acetone). The in vivo assay evaluated the administration of extracts either individually or combined against Haemonchus contortus in experimentally infected gerbils. The in vitro larvicidal activity percentage (LAP) of A. sativum and T. erecta extracts against H. contortus (L3) was determined by means of individual and combined usage of the extracts. Similarly, the extracts were evaluated in terms of reduction in the parasitic population in gerbils infected with H. contortus by individual and combined usage. The LAP at 40 mg/mL was 68% with A. sativum and 36.6% with T. erecta. The combination caused 83.3% mortality of parasites. The oral administration of A. sativum and T. erecta extracts at 40 mg/mL, caused 68.7% and 53.9% reduction of the parasitic burden, respectively. Meanwhile, the combined effect of both extracts shown 87.5% reduction. This study showed evidence about the effect of A. sativum and T. erecta plant extracts by means of individual and combined usage against H. contortus in in vitro and in vivo bioassays in artificially H. contortus-infected gerbils as a model.

  8. Assessment of the potential of Allium sativum oil as a new medicament for non-vital pulpotomy of primary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Shukry Gamal; Baroudi, Kusai

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the clinical and radiographic effects of Allium sativum oil and formocresol in nonvital pulpotomy in primary teeth. Twenty children ranging in age from 4 to 8 years were included in the study. In every one of those children, pulpotomy was indicated for the primary molars. Pulpotomy procedure was performed and the radicular pulp tissue of one molar was capped with A. sativum oil in a cotton pellet while the other molar was capped with formocresol. The teeth were evaluated clinically and radiographically before and after 6 months using standard clinical and radiographic criteria. Statistically, these results revealed significant difference between the radiographic findings of nonvital pulpotomy in primary molars with the two medicaments. Statistical analysis was performed using independent t-test and paired t-test at the significance level of α = 0.05. A. sativum oil has potent antibacterial properties that enable it to combat intracanal microbes in the infected pulp of primary molars. Better results were obtained when A. sativum oil was used. A. sativum oil had more powerful effects than formocresol on the infected pulp of primary nonvital molars.

  9. Glycopeptides from murine teratocarcinoma cells: structure of the determinants recognised by Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I and by sera from patients with ovarian germ cell tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamada, Y; Muramatsu, H; Muramatsu, T; Kawata, M; Sekiya, S; Takamizawa, H

    1988-05-15

    High-molecular-weight glycopeptides synthesised by teratocarcinoma OTT6050 bear the binding site for Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I and are recognised by antibodies in the sera of patients with ovarian germ cell tumors. Digestion of the glycopeptides with endo-beta-D-galactosidase C abolished the lectin binding activity and the antigenic activity. Since the product of the enzymic digestion is alpha-D-Gal-(1----3)-D-Gal, it is concluded that the disaccharide structure is involved in the lectin binding site and the antigenic site.

  10. NADH Induces the Generation of Superoxide Radicals in Leaf Peroxisomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Río, L A; Fernández, V M; Rupérez, F L; Sandalio, L M; Palma, J M

    1989-03-01

    In peroxisomes isolated from pea leaves (Pisum sativum L.) the production of superoxide free radicals (O(2) (-)) by xanthine and NADH was investigated. In peroxisomal membranes, 100 micromolar NADH induced the production of O(2) (-) radicals. In the soluble fractions of peroxisomes, no generation of O(2) (-) radicals was observed by incubation with either NADH or xanthine, although xanthine oxidase was found located predominantly in the matrix of peroxisomes. The failure of xanthine to induce superoxide generation was probably due to the inability to fully suppress the endogenous Mn-superoxide dismutase activity by inhibitors which were inactive against xanthine oxidase. The generation of superoxide radicals in leaf peroxisomes together with the recently described production of these oxygen radicals in glyoxysomes (LM Sandalio, VM Fernández, FL Rupérez, LA del Río [1988] Plant Physiol 87: 1-4) suggests that O(2) (-) generation could be a common metabolic property of peroxisomes and further supports the existence of active oxygen-related rôles for peroxisomes in cellular metabolism.

  11. Arabidopsis onset of leaf death mutants identify a regulatory pathway controlling leaf senescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jing, Hai-Chun; Sturre, Marcel J.G.; Hille, Jacques; Dijkwel, Paul P.

    2002-01-01

    The onset of leaf senescence is controlled by leaf age and ethylene can promote leaf senescence within a specific age window. We exploited the interaction between leaf age and ethylene and isolated mutants with altered leaf senescence that are named as onset of leaf death (old) mutants. Early leaf

  12. Computational Modelling of Pisum Sativum L. Superoxide Dismutase and Prediction of Mutational Variations through in silico Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Vinod Kumar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (SOD is one of the major enzymes expressed in the oxidative stress pathway in plants. Its expression is also evident in other taxonomic group in oxidative reactions. Pisum sativum a common plant is being studied in the present work where SOD is characterized using computational tools. SOD sequence of P. sativum [CAA42737.1] Ala and Leu rich protein with alkaline pI value was used as query sequence and used to obtain nine similar sequences through BLASTp. Phylogenetic tree was constructed using MEGA 5.0 based on neighbour joining method. Physiochemical parameters and amino acid composition was studied and compared with query sequences and other similar sequences. Secondary structures were predicted to understand the dominant components. Homology modeling of P. sativum SOD was done using SWISS MODEL and quality was evaluated using standard methods. 27 active sites were detected in SOD predicted model which were Lys rich.

  13. Stomatal and pavement cell density linked to leaf internal CO2 concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santrůček, Jiří; Vráblová, Martina; Simková, Marie; Hronková, Marie; Drtinová, Martina; Květoň, Jiří; Vrábl, Daniel; Kubásek, Jiří; Macková, Jana; Wiesnerová, Dana; Neuwithová, Jitka; Schreiber, Lukas

    2014-08-01

    Stomatal density (SD) generally decreases with rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, Ca. However, SD is also affected by light, air humidity and drought, all under systemic signalling from older leaves. This makes our understanding of how Ca controls SD incomplete. This study tested the hypotheses that SD is affected by the internal CO2 concentration of the leaf, Ci, rather than Ca, and that cotyledons, as the first plant assimilation organs, lack the systemic signal. Sunflower (Helianthus annuus), beech (Fagus sylvatica), arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and garden cress (Lepidium sativum) were grown under contrasting environmental conditions that affected Ci while Ca was kept constant. The SD, pavement cell density (PCD) and stomatal index (SI) responses to Ci in cotyledons and the first leaves of garden cress were compared. (13)C abundance (δ(13)C) in leaf dry matter was used to estimate the effective Ci during leaf development. The SD was estimated from leaf imprints. SD correlated negatively with Ci in leaves of all four species and under three different treatments (irradiance, abscisic acid and osmotic stress). PCD in arabidopsis and garden cress responded similarly, so that SI was largely unaffected. However, SD and PCD of cotyledons were insensitive to Ci, indicating an essential role for systemic signalling. It is proposed that Ci or a Ci-linked factor plays an important role in modulating SD and PCD during epidermis development and leaf expansion. The absence of a Ci-SD relationship in the cotyledons of garden cress indicates the key role of lower-insertion CO2 assimilation organs in signal perception and its long-distance transport. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Leaf absorbance and photosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurer, Kees

    1994-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of a leaf is often thought to contain some clues to the photosynthetic action spectrum of chlorophyll. Of course, absorption of photons is needed for photosynthesis, but the reverse, photosynthesis when there is absorption, is not necessarily true. As a check on the existence of absorption limits we measured spectra for a few different leaves. Two techniques for measuring absorption have been used, viz. the separate determination of the diffuse reflectance and the diffuse transmittance with the leaf at a port of an integrating sphere and the direct determination of the non-absorbed fraction with the leaf in the sphere. In a cross-check both methods yielded the same results for the absorption spectrum. The spectrum of a Fuchsia leaf, covering the short-wave region from 350 to 2500 nm, shows a high absorption in UV, blue and red, the well known dip in the green and a steep fall-off at 700 nm. Absorption drops to virtually zero in the near infrared, with subsequent absorptions, corresponding to the water absorption bands. In more detailed spectra, taken at 5 nm intervals with a 5 nm bandwidth, differences in chlorophyll content show in the different depths of the dip around 550 nm and in a small shift of the absorption edge at 700 nm. Spectra for Geranium (Pelargonium zonale) and Hibiscus (with a higher chlorophyll content) show that the upper limit for photosynthesis can not be much above 700 nm. No evidence, however, is to be seen of a lower limit for photosynthesis and, in fact, some experiments down to 300 nm still did not show a decrease of the absorption although it is well recognized that no photosynthesis results with 300 nm wavelengths.

  15. Expression of peanut agglutinin-binding mucin-type glycoprotein in human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma as a marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balakrishnan Ramathilakam

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The TF (Thomson – Friedenreich blood group antigen behaves as an onco-foetal carcinoma-associated antigen, showing increased expression in malignancies and its detection and quantification can be used in serologic diagnosis mainly in adenocarcinomas. This study was undertaken to analyze the sera and tissue level detectable mucin-type glycoprotein (TF-antigen by Peanut agglutinin (PNA and its diagnostic index in serum as well tissues of human esophageal squamous cell carcinoma as marker. Results We examined 100 patients for serological analysis by Enzyme Linked Lectin Assay (ELISA and demonstrated a sensitivity of 87.5%, specificity of 90% and a positive predictive value of 95%. The immuno-histochemical localization of TF antigen by Fluorescence Antigen Technique (FAT in 25 specimens of normal esophageal squamous epithelium specimens and 92 specimens with different grades of, allowed a quicker and more precise identification of its increased expression and this did not correlate with gender and tumor size. There was a positive correlation between membrane bound TF antigen expression with different histological progression, from well differentiated to poorly differentiated, determined by PNA binding. Specimens showed morphological changes and a pronounced increase in PNA binding in Golgi apparatus, secretory granules of the cytosol of well differentiated and an increased cell membrane labeling in moderately and poorly differentiated, when compared with ESCC and normal tissues. Conclusion The authors propose that the expression of TF-antigen in human may play an important role during tumorigenesis establishing it as a chemically well-defined carcinoma-associated antigen. Identification of the circulating TF-antigen as a reactive form and as a cryptic form in the healthy individuals, using PNA-ELLA and Immunohistochemical analysis of TF antigen by FAT is positively correlated with the different histological grades as a simple

  16. Use of Wisteria floribunda agglutinin affinity chromatography in the structural analysis of the bovine lactoferrin N-linked glycosylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Leeuwen, Sander S; Schoemaker, Ruud J W; Timmer, Christel J A M; Kamerling, Johannis P; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    2012-09-01

    Over the years, the N-glycosylation of both human and bovine lactoferrin (LF) has been studied extensively, however not all aspects have been studied in as much detail. Typically, the bovine LF complex-type N-glycans include certain epitopes, not found in human LF N-glycans, i.e. Gal(α1-3)Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc (αGal), GalNAc(β1-4)GlcNAc (LacdiNAc), and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). The combined presence of complex-type N-glycans, with αGal, LacdiNAc, LacNAc [Gal(β1-4)GlcNAc], Neu5Ac (N-acetylneuraminic acid), and Neu5Gc epitopes, and oligomannose-type N-glycans complicates the high-throughput analysis of such N-glycoprofiles highly. For the structural analysis of enzymatically released N-glycan pools, containing both LacNAc and LacdiNAc epitopes, a prefractionation protocol based on Wisteria floribunda agglutinin affinity chromatography was developed. The sub pools were analysed by MALDI-TOF-MS and HPLC-FD profiling, including sequential exoglycosidase treatments. This protocol separates the N-glycan pool into three sub pools, with (1) free of LacdiNAc epitopes, (2) containing LacdiNAc epitopes, partially shielded by sialic acid, and (3) containing LacdiNAc epitopes, without shielding by sialic acid. Structural analysis by MALDI-TOF-MS and HPLC-FD showed a complex pattern of oligomannose-, hybrid-, and complex-type di-antennary structures, both with, and without LacdiNAc, αGal and sialic acid. Applying the approach to bovine LF has led to a more detailed N-glycome pattern, including LacdiNAc, αGal, and Neu5Gc epitopes, than was shown in previous studies. Bovine milk proteins contain glycosylation patterns that are absent in human milk proteins; particularly, the LacdiNAc epitope is abundant. Analysis of bovine milk serum proteins is therefore excessively complicated. The presented sub fractionation protocol allows a thorough analysis of the full scope of bovine milk protein glycosylation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Glycoproteomics

  17. Actividad antiinflamatoria de la enzima superóxido dismutasa (SOD), purificada de la especie Allium sativum (ajo)

    OpenAIRE

    Soberón, Mercedes; Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Suárez, Silvia; Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Arnao, Inés; Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Guija, Emilio; Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Troncoso, Luzmila; Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Rojas, Luis; Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Saldaña, Ítalo; Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM; Cordero, Adriana; Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM

    2013-01-01

    Objetivos: Demostrar la actividad antiinflamatoria de la enzima superóxido dismutasa (SOD) purificada de Allium sativum (ajo). Diseño: Experimental. Institución: Centro de Investigación de Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM Material biológico: Ratas y Allium sativum. Principales medidas de resultados: Muestra de ajo triturada con tampón fosfato 50 mM pH 7,4, incubada 40 minutos y filtrada; fue sometida a extracción con cloroformo:etanol 1:1 (v/v). Se descartó la fase acuosa. ...

  18. Eryngium foetidum, Petroselinum crispum and Coriandrum sativum: new apiaceae hosts of Oidiopsis taurica in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Reis, Ailton; Lopes, Carlos A.; Lima, Milton L. Paz; Boiteux, Leonardo S.

    2004-01-01

    Relata-se a infecção natural de plantas de chicória da Amazônia (Eryngium foetidum), coentro (Coriandrum sativum) e salsa (Petroselinum crispum), cultivados em casas de vegetação e campo na Embrapa Hortaliças, Brasília, DF, por Oidiopsis taurica. A provável fonte de inóculo foram plantas doentes de pimentão (Capsicum annuum) e tomate (Lycopersicon esculentum) na casa de vegetação e pimentão no campo.

  19. Pb-induced cellular defense system in the root meristematic cells of Allium sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wusheng; Liu, Donghua

    2010-03-02

    Electron microscopy (EM) techniques enable identification of the main accumulations of lead (Pb) in cells and cellular organelles and observations of changes in cell ultrastructure. Although there is extensive literature relating to studies on the influence of heavy metals on plants, Pb tolerance strategies of plants have not yet been fully explained. Allium sativum L. is a potential plant for absorption and accumulation of heavy metals. In previous investigations the effects of different concentrations (10(-5) to 10(-3) M) of Pb were investigated in A. sativum, indicating a significant inhibitory effect on shoot and root growth at 10(-3) to 10(-4) M Pb. In the present study, we used EM and cytochemistry to investigate ultrastructural alterations, identify the synthesis and distribution of cysteine-rich proteins induced by Pb and explain the possible mechanisms of the Pb-induced cellular defense system in A. sativum. After 1 h of Pb treatment, dictyosomes were accompanied by numerous vesicles within cytoplasm. The endoplasm reticulum (ER) with swollen cisternae was arranged along the cell wall after 2 h. Some flattened cisternae were broken up into small closed vesicles and the nuclear envelope was generally more dilated after 4 h. During 24-36 h, phenomena appeared such as high vacuolization of cytoplasm and electron-dense granules in cell walls, vacuoles, cytoplasm and mitochondrial membranes. Other changes included mitochondrial swelling and loss of cristae, and vacuolization of ER and dictyosomes during 48-72 h. In the Pb-treatment groups, silver grains were observed in cell walls and in cytoplasm, suggesting the Gomori-Swift reaction can indirectly evaluate the Pb effects on plant cells. Cell walls can immobilize some Pb ions. Cysteine-rich proteins in cell walls were confirmed by the Gomori-Swift reaction. The morphological alterations in plasma membrane, dictyosomes and ER reflect the features of detoxification and tolerance under Pb stress. Vacuoles are

  20. Comparing Leaf and Root Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Geldenhuys

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider two ways of inserting a key into a binary search tree: leaf insertion which is the standard method, and root insertion which involves additional rotations. Although the respective cost of constructing leaf and root insertion binary search trees trees, in terms of comparisons, are the same in the average case, we show that in the worst case the construction of a root insertion binary search tree needs approximately 50% of the number of comparisons required by leaf insertion.

  1. Leaf development: A cellular perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerrit TS Beemster

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Through its photosynthetic capacity the leaf provides the basis for growth of the whole plant. In order to improve crops for higher productivity and resistance for future climate scenarios, it is important to obtain a mechanistic understanding of leaf growth and development and the effect of genetic and environmental factors on the process. Cells are both the basic building blocks of the leaf and the regulatory units that integrate genetic and environmental information into the developmental program. Therefore, to fundamentally understand leaf development, one needs to be able to reconstruct the developmental pathway of individual cells (and their progeny from the stem cell niche to their final position in the mature leaf. To build the basis for such understanding, we review current knowledge on the spatial and temporal regulation mechanisms operating on cells, contributing to the formation of a leaf. We focus on the molecular networks that control exit from stem cell fate, leaf initiation, polarity, cytoplasmic growth, cell division, endoreduplication, transition between division and expansion, expansion and differentiation and their regulation by intercellular signaling molecules, including plant hormones, sugars, peptides, proteins and microRNAs. We discuss to what extent the knowledge available in the literature is suitable to be applied in systems biology approaches to model the process of leaf growth, in order to better understand and predict leaf growth starting with the model species Arabidopsis thaliana.

  2. Effect of Allium sativum and fish collagen on the proteolytic and angiotensin-I converting enzyme-inhibitory activities in cheese and yogurt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shori, A B; Baba, A S; Keow, J N

    2012-12-15

    There is an increasing demand of functional foods in developed countries. Yogurt plays an important role in the management of blood pressure. Several bioactive peptides isolated from Allium sativum or fish collagen have shown antihypertensive activity. Thus, in the present study the effects of A. sativum and/or Fish Collagen (FC) on proteolysis and ACE inhibitory activity in yogurt (0, 7 and 14 day) and cheese (0, 14 and 28 day) were investigated. Proteolytic activities were the highest on day 7 of refrigerated storage in A. sativum-FC-yogurt (337.0 +/- 5.3 microg g(-1)) followed by FC-yogurt (275.3 +/- 2.0 microg g(-1)), A. sativum-yogurt (245.8 +/- 4.2 microg g(-1)) and plain-yogurt (40.4 +/- 1.2 microg g(-1)). On the other hand, proteolytic activities in cheese ripening were the highest (p sativum-cheeses (411.4 +/- 4.3 and 528.7 +/- 1.6 microg g(-1), respectively). However, the presence of FC increased the proteolysis to the highest level on day 28 of storage for FC- and A. sativum-FC cheeses (641.2 +/- 0.1 and 1128.4 +/- 4.5 microg g(-1), respectively). In addition, plain- and A. sativum-yogurts with or without FC showed maximal inhibition of ACE on day 7 of storage. Fresh plain- and A. sativum-cheeses showed ACE inhibition (72.3 +/- 7.8 and 50.4 +/- 1.6 % respectively), the presence of FC in both type of cheeses reduced the ACE inhibition to 62.9 +/- 0.8 and 44.5 +/- 5.0%, respectively. However, refrigerated storage increased ACE inhibition in cheeses (p sativum-yogurt or cheese enhanced the proteolytic activity. Thus, it has potential in the development of an effective dietary strategy for hypertension associated cardiovascular diseases.

  3. Duration of feed application of mixed powders of Phyllanthus niruri and Allium sativum for the prevention of Aeromonas hydrophila infection in catfish Clarias sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinamella Wahjuningrum

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Motile Aeromonad Septicaemia (MAS caused by Aeromonas hydrophila induced serious epidemics of disease in catfish Clarias sp. The purposed of this research was to determine optimum durations of feed application of mixed powders Phyllanthus niruri and Allium sativum to prevent MAS. Experimental design that used was Complete Random Design which consist of three treatments and three replications. This research tested on three different of durations of feed application of P. niruri and A. sativum, namely A (powder of P. niruri and A. sativum feed application during 21 days and infected with A. hydrophila 0,1 mL IP, B (powder of P. niruri and A. sativum feed application during 14 days and injected IP with A. hydrophila 0,1 mL, C (powder of P. niruri and A. sativum feed application during seven days and injected IP with A. hydrophila 0,1 mL, and control, namely K- (without P. niruri and A. sativum feed application and injected IP with PBS 0,1 mL and K+ (without P. niruri and A. sativum powder application and injected IP with A. hydrophila 0,1 mL. The treatments was given for 21 days before challenging test, at 22th day test in vivo carried out by injecting A. hydrophila (108 CFU/mL into the fish by intramuscular and observed for 10 days. The highest value of survival rate that consist in treatment K- was 100±0.00%, treatment A was 93.3±11.55%, and treatment B was 73.33±30.55%. While treatment K+ and C have the same survival rate that is, 26.67±11.55%. The application P. niruri and A. sativum powder during 21 days was optimum for preventing MAS in catfish.Keywords: Phyllanthus niruri, Allium sativum, Aeromonas hydrophila, Clarias sp.

  4. Relationships of leaf dark respiration to leaf nitrogen, specific leaf area and leaf life-span: a test across biomes and functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter B. Reich; Michael B. Walters; David S. Ellsworth; [and others; [Editor’s note: James M.. Vose is the SRS co-author for this publication.

    1998-01-01

    Based on prior evidence of coordinated multiple leaf trait scaling, the authors hypothesized that variation among species in leaf dark respiration rate (Rd) should scale with variation in traits such as leaf nitrogen (N), leaf life-span, specific leaf area (SLA), and net photosynthetic capacity (Amax). However, it is not known whether such scaling, if it exists, is...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1028 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.1028 Section 29.1028 Agriculture Regulations... Type 92) § 29.1028 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf. [49 FR 16755, Apr. 20, 1984. Redesignated at 51 FR 25027, July...

  6. 7 CFR 29.3525 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3525 Section 29.3525 Agriculture Regulations... Type 95) § 29.3525 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf. [49 FR 16759, Apr. 20, 1984] ...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3033 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.3033 Section 29.3033 Agriculture Regulations... Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf. [49 FR 16758, Apr. 20, 1984] ...

  8. Allium sativum Compared to Cilostazol as an Inhibitor of Myointimal Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo Roberto da Silva; Bandeira, Francisco Chavier Vieira; Rolim, Janio Cipriano; Nogueira, Manuel Ricardo Sena; Pordeus, Mizael Armando Abrantes; de Oliveira, Andressa Feitosa Bezerra; Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão

    2016-01-01

    Objective Intimal hyperplasia is associated with graft failure and vascular sutures in the first year after surgery and in postangioplasty restenosis. Allium sativum (common garlic) lowers cholesterol and has antioxidant effects; it also has antiplatelet and antitumor properties and, therefore, has great potential to reduce or inhibit intimal hyperplasia of the arteries. Our objective is to determine if the garlic has an efficacy to inhibit myointimal hyperplasia compared to cilostazol. Methods Female New Zealand rabbits were divided into the following groups (n=10 each) according to treatment: group A, garlic, 800 µg×kg-1×day-1, orally; group C, cilostazol, 50 mg.day-1, orally; group PS, 10 ml of 0.9% physiological saline solution, orally. Our primary is the difference of the mean of myointimal hyperplasia. Statistical analysis was performed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests, as well as the Chi-square test. We calculated the 95% confidence interval for each point estimate, and the P value was set as < 0.05. Results Group PS had a mean hyperplasia rate of 35.74% (95% CI, 31.76–39.71%); group C, 16.21% (95% CI, 13.36–19.05%); and group A, 21.12% (95% CI, 17.26–25.01%); P<0.0001. Conclusion We conclude that Allium sativum had the same efficacy in inhibiting myointimal hyperplasia when compared to the positive control, cilostazol. PMID:27849301

  9. Cloning, overexpression, purification and preliminary crystallographic studies of a mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barranco-Medina, Sergio [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain); López-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier, E-mail: fjljara@ugr.es [Instituto de Biotecnología, Campus Fuentenueva, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Bernier-Villamor, Laura [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Sevilla, Francisca [Departamento de Biología del Estrés y Patología Vegetal, Centro de Edafología y Biología Aplicada del Segura, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-30080 Murcia (Spain); Lázaro, Juan-José [Departamento de Bioquímica, Biología Molecular y Celular de Plantas, Estación Experimental del Zaidín, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, E-18008 Granada (Spain)

    2006-07-01

    The isolation, purification, crystallization and molecular-replacement solution of mitochondrial type II peroxiredoxin from P. sativum is reported. A cDNA encoding an open reading frame of 199 amino acids corresponding to a type II peroxiredoxin from Pisum sativum with its transit peptide was isolated by RT-PCR. The 171-amino-acid mature protein (estimated molecular weight 18.6 kDa) was cloned into the pET3d vector and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was purified and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion technique. A full data set (98.2% completeness) was collected using a rotating-anode generator to a resolution of 2.8 Å from a single crystal flash-cooled at 100 K. X-ray data revealed that the protein crystallizes in space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.88, b = 66.40, c = 77.23 Å, α = 102.90, β = 104.40, γ = 99.07°, and molecular replacement using a theoretical model predicted from the primary structure as a search model confirmed the presence of six molecules in the unit cell as expected from the Matthews coefficient. Refinement of the structure is in progress.

  10. Allium sativum Compared to Cilostazol as an Inhibitor of Myointimal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Paulo Roberto da Silva; Bandeira, Francisco Chavier Vieira; Rolim, Janio Cipriano; Nogueira, Manuel Ricardo Sena; Pordeus, Mizael Armando Abrantes; de Oliveira, Andressa Feitosa Bezerra; Pitta, Guilherme Benjamin Brandão

    2016-01-01

    Intimal hyperplasia is associated with graft failure and vascular sutures in the first year after surgery and in postangioplasty restenosis. Allium sativum (common garlic) lowers cholesterol and has antioxidant effects; it also has antiplatelet and antitumor properties and, therefore, has great potential to reduce or inhibit intimal hyperplasia of the arteries. Our objective is to determine if the garlic has an efficacy to inhibit myointimal hyperplasia compared to cilostazol. Female New Zealand rabbits were divided into the following groups (n=10 each) according to treatment: group A, garlic, 800 µg×kg-1×day-1, orally; group C, cilostazol, 50 mg.day-1, orally; group PS, 10 ml of 0.9% physiological saline solution, orally. Our primary is the difference of the mean of myointimal hyperplasia. Statistical analysis was performed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests, as well as the Chi-square test. We calculated the 95% confidence interval for each point estimate, and the P value was set as Allium sativum had the same efficacy in inhibiting myointimal hyperplasia when compared to the positive control, cilostazol.

  11. Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., isolated from effective nodules of Vicia faba and Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu Jing; Zheng, Wen Tao; Everall, Isobel; Young, J Peter W; Zhang, Xiao Xia; Tian, Chang Fu; Sui, Xin Hua; Wang, En Tao; Chen, Wen Xin

    2015-09-01

    Four rhizobia-like strains, isolated from root nodules of Pisum sativum and Vicia faba grown in Anhui and Jiangxi Provinces of China, were grouped into the genus Rhizobium but were distinct from all recognized species of the genus Rhizobium by phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA and housekeeping genes. The combined sequences of the housekeeping genes atpD, recA and glnII for strain CCBAU 23252(T) showed 86.9 to 95% similarity to those of known species of the genus Rhizobium. All four strains had nodC and nifH genes and could form effective nodules with Pisum sativum and Vicia faba, and ineffective nodules with Phaseolus vulgaris, but did not nodulate Glycine max, Arachis hypogaea, Medicago sativa, Trifolium repens or Lablab purpureus in cross-nodulation tests. Fatty acid composition, DNA-DNA relatedness and a series of phenotypic tests also separated these strains from members of closely related species. Based on all the evidence, we propose a novel species, Rhizobium anhuiense sp. nov., and designate CCBAU 23252(T) ( = CGMCC 1.12621(T) = LMG 27729(T)) as the type strain. This strain was isolated from a root nodule of Vicia faba and has a DNA G+C content of 61.1 mol% (Tm).

  12. Allium sativum Compared to Cilostazol as an Inhibitor of Myointimal Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto da Silva Lima

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: Intimal hyperplasia is associated with graft failure and vascular sutures in the first year after surgery and in postangioplasty restenosis. Allium sativum (common garlic lowers cholesterol and has antioxidant effects; it also has antiplatelet and antitumor properties and, therefore, has great potential to reduce or inhibit intimal hyperplasia of the arteries. Our objective is to determine if the garlic has an efficacy to inhibit myointimal hyperplasia compared to cilostazol. Methods: Female New Zealand rabbits were divided into the following groups (n=10 each according to treatment: group A, garlic, 800 µg×kg-1×day-1, orally; group C, cilostazol, 50 mg.day-1, orally; group PS, 10 ml of 0.9% physiological saline solution, orally. Our primary is the difference of the mean of myointimal hyperplasia. Statistical analysis was performed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests, as well as the Chi-square test. We calculated the 95% confidence interval for each point estimate, and the P value was set as < 0.05. Results: Group PS had a mean hyperplasia rate of 35.74% (95% CI, 31.76–39.71%; group C, 16.21% (95% CI, 13.36–19.05%; and group A, 21.12% (95% CI, 17.26–25.01%; P<0.0001. Conclusion: We conclude that Allium sativum had the same efficacy in inhibiting myointimal hyperplasia when compared to the positive control, cilostazol.

  13. Effect of sodium fluoride and sodium nitroprouside on Cicer arietinum and Pisum sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naba Kumar Mondal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In present study, the individual and combine effect of sodium fluoride (NaF and sodium nitroprouside (SNP on germination and biochemical parameters (pigments, sugar, protein, amino acid, and phenol of Bengal gram (Cicer arietinum and peas (Pisum sativum has been studied. After three days of NaF treatment, reductions were observed in percentage of seed germination, root and shoot length, and pigment content with increasing concentration of NaF (1 to 4 mg L-1. Seedlings treated with SNP, both alone and in combination of NaF, showed enhancement in seed germination as well as other growth parameters. NaF-treated seedlings were found to accumulate more soluble sugars and phenols, which were further increased by SNP treatment thereby indicating a synergistic effect of the possible reasons for the ameliorative effects of SNP in seedlings of Pisum sativum growing under NaF stress. Results also demonstrated that SNP application did not show any improvement in both morpho-physiologically and biochemically under sodium fluoride stress condition.

  14. Infraspecific differentiation of garlic (Allium sativum L.) by isozyme and RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maaß, H I; Klaas, M

    1995-07-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum L.) is a sterile species of considerable variability with respect to morphological and physiological features. The crop presumably originated in West to Middle Asia from its progenitor A. longicuspis Regel and was transported from there to the Mediterranean and other areas of cultivation. In order to clarify older classification schemes, often based on small or biased collections, we used isozyme and RAPD markers to analyze and structure a collection of 300 accessions, many of which were gathered in Middle Asia close to the assumed center of origin. All of the accessions were first investigated with isozymes, and 48 were selected for a RAPD analysis. The resulting molecular markers were used to construct neighbor-joining dendrograms to group the accessions and to indicate the genetic distances between them. Based on the dendrograms and in conjunction with some morphological features, we propose an infraspecific classification of garlic with four major groups. In agreement with the results of other workers, A. longicuspis lies within the range of the species A. sativum. Numerous forms with varying degrees of domestication are part of our longicuspis group, from which presumably the more derived cultivar groups originated. The origin and spreading of the crop are discussed with respect to the geographical distribution and the genetic distances of the accessions.

  15. Beneficial effects of Allium sativum, Allium cepa and Commiphora mukul on experimental hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis--a comparative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lata S

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available Oral administration of petroleum ether extract of Allium sativum, Allium cepa and ethylacetate extract of Commiphora mukul in albino rats significantly prevented rise in serum cholesterol and serum triglyceride level, caused by atherogenic diet. All the three agents were also found to confer significant protection against atherogenic diet induced atherosclerosis.

  16. In vitro effects of Coriandrum sativum, Tagetes minuta, Alpinia zerumbet and Lantana camara essential oils on Haemonchus contortus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedo, Iara Tersia Freitas; de Oliveira, Lorena Mayana Beserra; Camurça-Vasconcelos, Ana Lourdes Fernandes; Ribeiro, Wesley Lyeverton Correia; dos Santos, Jessica Maria Leite; de Morais, Selene Maia; de Paula, Haroldo Cesar Beserra; Bevilaqua, Claudia Maria Leal

    2013-01-01

    Phytotherapy can be an alternative for the control of gastrointestinal parasites of small ruminants. This study evaluated the efficacy of Alpinia zerumbet, Coriandrum sativum, Tagetes minuta and Lantana camara essential oils by two in vitro assays on Haemonchus contortus, an egg hatch test (EHT) and larval development test (LDT). No effect was observed for L. camara in the EHT. A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta essential oils exhibited a dose-dependent effect in the EHT, inhibiting 81.2, 99 and 98.1% of H. contortus larvae hatching, respectively, at a concentration of 2.5 mg mL-1. The effective concentration to inhibit 50% (EC50) of egg hatching was 0.94, 0.63 and 0.53 mg mL-1 for A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta essential oils, respectively. In LDT, L. camara, A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta at concentration of 10 mg mL-1 inhibited 54.9, 94.2, 97.8 and 99.5% of H. contortus larval development, presenting EC50 values of 6.32, 3.88, 2.89 and 1.67 mg mL-1, respectively. Based on the promising results presented in this in vitro model, it may be possible use of these essential oils to control gastrointestinal nematodes. However, their anthelmintic activity should be confirmed in vivo.

  17. In vitro effects of Coriandrum sativum, Tagetes minuta, Alpinia zerumbet and Lantana camara essential oils on Haemonchus contortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iara Tersia Freitas Macedo

    Full Text Available Phytotherapy can be an alternative for the control of gastrointestinal parasites of small ruminants. This study evaluated the efficacy of Alpinia zerumbet, Coriandrum sativum, Tagetes minuta and Lantana camaraessential oils by two in vitro assays on Haemonchus contortus, an egg hatch test (EHT and larval development test (LDT. No effect was observed for L. camara in the EHT. A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta essential oils exhibited a dose-dependent effect in the EHT, inhibiting 81.2, 99 and 98.1% of H. contortus larvae hatching, respectively, at a concentration of 2.5 mg mL-1. The effective concentration to inhibit 50% (EC50 of egg hatching was 0.94, 0.63 and 0.53 mg mL-1 for A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta essential oils, respectively. In LDT, L. camara, A. zerumbet, C. sativum and T. minuta at concentration of 10 mg mL-1 inhibited 54.9, 94.2, 97.8 and 99.5% of H. contortus larval development, presenting EC50 values of 6.32, 3.88, 2.89 and 1.67 mg mL-1, respectively. Based on the promising results presented in this in vitro model, it may be possible use of these essential oils to control gastrointestinal nematodes. However, their anthelmintic activity should be confirmed in vivo.

  18. Clinical and Radiographic Evaluation of Allium sativum Oil as a New Medicament for Vital Pulp Treatment of Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Shukry Gamal; Raheel, Syed Ahmed; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare between the clinical and radiographic effects of Allium sativum oil and those of formocresol in vital pulpotomy in primary teeth. A total of 20 children age ranged from 4 to 8 years were included in the study. In every one of those children, the primary molars indicated for pulpotomy. Pulpotomy procedure was performed, and the radicular pulp tissue of one molar capped with A. sativum oil in a cotton pellet, whereas the other molar capped with formocresol, the teeth evaluated clinically and radiographically before and after 6 months, using standard clinical and radiographical criteria. Statistically, these results revealed no significant difference between the radiographic findings of vital pulpotomy in primary molars with the two medicaments was found. A. sativum oil offers a good healing potential, leaving the remaining pulp tissue healthy and functioning. Vital pulpotomy with allium sativa oil was given raise 90% success rate while that with formocresol was 85%. A. sativum oil is a biocompatible material that is compatible with vital human pulp tissue. It offers a good healing potential, leaving the remaining pulp tissue healthy and functioning.

  19. Isolation and characterization of N-feruloyltyramine as the P-selectin expression suppressor from garlic (Allium sativum)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Because garlic (Allium sativum) is believed to have positive health effects on cardiovascular disease, the screening of isolated fractions from a garlic extract against cardiovascular disease related-processes should help identify active compounds. Both P-selectin expression suppressing activity ag...

  20. Developing allometric equations for estimating leaf area and leaf ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Estimation of leaf area (LA) and leaf biomass (LB) is important to understand plant physiological and carbon assimilation processes, and tree growth models. The aim of this study was to develop and compare allometric equations for predicting LA and LB of Artocarpus chaplasha Roxb. taking diameter at breast height ...

  1. 2.2 A resolution structure analysis of two refined N-acetylneuraminyl-lactose--wheat germ agglutinin isolectin complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, C S

    1990-10-20

    The crystal structures of complexes of isolectins 1 and 2 of wheat germ agglutinin (WGA1 and WGA2) with N-acetylneuraminyl-lactose (NeuNAc-alpha(2-3)-Gal-beta(1-4)-Glc) have been refined on the basis of data in the 8 to 2.2 A resolution range to final crystallographic R-factors of 17.2% and 15.3% (Fo greater than 1 sigma), respectively. Specific binding interactions and water association, as well as changes in conformation and mobility of the structure upon ligand binding, were compared in the two complexes. The temperature factors (B = 16.3 A2 and 18.4 A2) were found to be much lower compared with those of their respective native structures (19 to 22 A2). Residues involved in sugar binding, dimerization and in lattice contacts exhibit the largest decreases in B-value, suggesting that sugar binding reduces the overall mobility of the protein molecules in the crystal lattice. The binding mode of this sialyl-trisaccharide, an important cell receptor analogue, has been compared in the two isolectins. Only one of the two unique binding sites (4 per dimer), located in the subunit/subunit interface, is occupied in the crystals. This site, termed the "primary" binding site, contains one of the five amino acid substitutions that differentiate WGA1 and WGA2. Superposition of the refined models in each of the independent crystallographic environments indicates a close match only of the terminal non-reducing NeuNAc residue (root-mean-square delta r of 0.5 to 0.6 A). The Gal-Glc portion was found to superimpose poorly, lack electron density, and possess high atomic thermal factors. In both complexes NeuNAc is stabilized through contact with six amino acid side-chains (Ser114 and Glu115 of subunit 1 and Ser62, Tyr64, Tyr(His)66 and Tyr73 of subunit 2), involving all NeuNAc ring substituents. Refinement has allowed accurate assessment of the contact distances for four hydrogen bonds, a strong buried non-polar contact with the acetamido CH3 group and a large number of van der

  2. (TECTONA GRANDIS LEAF POWDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yash Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the adsorption potential of Teak (Tectona grandis leaf powder (TLP toremove Methylene blue (MB and Malachite Green (MG dye molecules from aqueoussolution was investigated. Batch experiments were conducted to evaluate the influenceof operational parameters such as, pH (2−9, adsorbent dosage (1−7 g/L, contact time(15−150 minutes and initial dye concentration (20−120 mg/L at stirring speed of 150rpm for the adsorption of MB and MG on TLP. Maximum removal efficiency of 98.4%and 95.1% was achieved for MB and MG dye, respectively. The experimentalequilibrium data were analysed using Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin isothermmodels and it was found that, it fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Thesurface structure and morphology of the adsorbent was characterized using scanningelectron microscopy (SEM and the presence of functional groups and its interactionwith the dye molecules were analysed using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy(FTIR. Based on the investigation, it has been demonstrated that the teak leaf powderhas good potential for effective adsorption of methylene blue and malachite green dye.

  3. Studies on the control of ascochyta blight in field peas (Pisum sativum L. caused by Ascochyta pinodes in Zhejiang Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na eLiu

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Ascochyta blight, an infection caused by a complex of Ascochyta pinodes, Ascochyta pinodella, Ascochyta pisi, and/or Phoma koolunga, is a destructive disease in many field peas (Pisum sativum L.-growing regions, and it causes significant losses in grain yield. To understand the composition of fungi associated with this disease in Zhejiang Province, China, a total of 65 single-pycnidiospore fungal isolates were obtained from diseased pea samples collected from 5 locations in this region. These isolates were identified as Ascochyta pinodes by molecular techniques and their morphological and physiological characteristics. The mycelia of ZJ-1 could penetrate pea leaves across the stomas, and formed specific penetration structures and directly pierced leaves. The resistance level of 23 available pea cultivars was tested against their representative isolate A. pinodes ZJ-1 using the excised leaf-assay technique. The ZJ-1 mycelia could penetrate the leaves of all tested cultivars, and they developed typical symptoms, which suggested that all tested cultivars were susceptible to the fungus. Chemical fungicides and biological control agents were screened for management of this disease, and their efficacies were further determined. Most of the tested fungicides (11 out of 14 showed high activity towards ZJ-1 with EC50 < 5 μg/mL. Moreover, fungicides, including tebuconazole, boscalid, iprodione, carbendazim and fludioxonil, displayed more than 80% disease control efficacy under the recorded conditions. Three biocontrol strains of Bacillus sp. and one of Pantoea agglomerans were isolated from pea-related niches and significantly reduced the severity of disease under greenhouse and field conditions. To our knowledge, this is the first study on ascochyta blight in field peas, and results presented here will be useful for controlling the disease in this area.

  4. Effects of phosphorus fertilizer rate and Pseudomonas fluorescens strain on field pea (Pisum sativum subsp. arvense (L. Asch. growth and yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram SALEHI

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted at Rezvanshahr, Guilan province, Iran, to evaluate the effects of phosphorus fertilizer rate and Pseudomonas fluorescens strains on growth and yield of field pea (Pisum sativum L.. The experimental design was a randomized complete block in a factorial arrangement with three replicates. Factors were phosphorus fertilizer rates (0, 25, 50, 75, and 100 kg P2O5 ha-1 as triple superphosphate, and seed inoculation with P. florescens strains [control (non-inoculated, inoculated with strain R41, and strain R187. Analysis of variance showed that plant height, seed yield, pod number per m2, 100-seed weight, biological yield, harvest index, and leaf P concentration were significantly influenced by phosphorus fertilizer rate and P. florescens strain. At the same time, phosphorus fertilizer rate × P. fluorescens strain interaction was significant only for 100-seed weight. On the other hand, seed number per pod was significantly affected neither by phosphorus fertilizer rate nor by pseudomonas strains. Result showed that seed yield was significantly increased from 1099 ± 67 to 1898 ± 118 kg ha-1 as P2O5 application rate increased from 0 to 75 kg ha-1, and thereafter relatively remained constant. There was no significant difference in seed yield between plants raised from inoculated seeds with P. fluorescens, strain R187 (1664 ± 97 kg ha-1 and those raised from inoculated seeds with P. fluorescens, strain R41 (1669 ± 104 kg ha-1. At the same time, plants raised from inoculated seeds with P. fluorescens (both strains produced greater grain yield compared to those raised from uninoculated seeds (1370 ± 80 kg ha-1. Based on the results of this study, P2O5 application at the rate of 75 kg ha-1 and inoculation with pseudomonas bacteria are recommended for obtaining the greatest seed yield in field pea.

  5. How to pattern a leaf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf development presents a tremendous resource for tackling the question of patterning in biology. Leaves can be simple or highly dissected. They may have elaborated parts such as the tendrils of a pea leaf or the rolled blade of a carnivorous pitcher plant. Despite the variation in size, shape, an...

  6. Endothelial markers in malignant vascular tumours of the liver: superiority of QB-END/10 over von Willebrand factor and Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, P P; Ramani, P

    1991-01-01

    A new monoclonal antibody, QB-END/10, raised against the CD34 antigen in human endothelial cell membranes and haemopoietic progenitor cells, was studied for its usefulness as a marker of neoplastic vascular cells in 21 angiosarcomas and seven malignant haemangioendotheliomas of the liver. QB-END/10 was both more sensitive and more specific than Von Willebrand factor (VWF) and Ulex europaeus 1 agglutinin (UEA-1) in labelling endothelial cells and it did not cross react with epithelia as UEA-1 often does. Staining was uniformly strong and clear in all histological variants of these two tumours. QB-END/10 should prove particularly useful in the differential diagnosis of malignant vascular tumours of the liver. Images PMID:1705261

  7. Anchoring of ulex europaeus agglutinin to chitosan nanoparticles-in-microparticles and their in vitro binding activity to bovine submaxillary gland mucin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Qian; Fei, Yi-Bo; Chen, Xu; Qin, Xian-Ju; Liu, Ji-Yong; Zhu, Quan-Gang; Hu, Jin-Hong

    2009-10-01

    Focused on the natural biodegradable material of chitosan (CS), this investigation concerned its spray-dried nanoparticles-in-microparticles (NiMPs) modified with ulex europaeus agglutinin (UEA). Chitosan nanoparticles were obtained by ionotropic gelation process with pentasodium tripolyphosphate as gelatinizer. Then UEA lectin was bound onto the CS nanoparticles activated by glutaraldehyde. The conjugated spherical UEA-CS-NiMPs, prepared by spray drying method, exhibited 12-85% coupling efficiency of UEA depending upon the amount of activator glutaraldehyde. And the UEA-grafted particles showed additional higher binding tendency with bovine submaxillary gland mucin as compared to the plain chitosan microparticles. Furthermore, the activity and intrinsic fucose-specificity of UEA were still maintained after the covalent modification. It is thus evident that the UEA anchored CS-NiMPs might be used as a potential drug delivery system targeted to the specific regions of gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are an alternative to the application of chemical fertilizer in the production of the medicinal and aromatic plant Coriandrum sativum L

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oliviera, R. S.; Ma, Y.; Rocha, I.; Carvalho, M. F.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Freitas, H.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 7 (2016), s. 320-328 ISSN 1528-7394 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * Coriandrum sativum Subject RIV: GC - Agronomy Impact factor: 2.731, year: 2016

  9. Scientific basis of use of fruits Coriandrum sativum L. In food technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Frolova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Today in the world recognized the need for environmentally friendly products for a healthy food and quality life. Products with natural ingredients, including flavoring become very popular. Coriander is one of herbs that functions as both, spice as well as herbal medicine. Coriandrum sativum L. is a major aromatic crop in Ukraine. The plants of Coriandrum sativum contain the essential oils and other compounds in the seeds and leaves and have an important role as flavorings. The main objective was to investigate possibility effective utilization of coriander essential oil in national economy of Ukraine. It was necessary to study the chemical compounds of coriander fruits by instrumental analysis and odor by sensory analysis with following creating new aroma compositions. Search had been carried out throughout 2009 - 2014 years. The aerial parts of aromatic plants were harvested at the plots of National Botanical Garden of National Academy of the Sciences of Ukraine. Essential oil was obtained by hydro distillation procedure in National University of food technology. Main and specific components of essential oils from seeds coriander were characterized. Qualitative structure of essential oils was determined by the gas-liquid chromatography method on the chromatograph Agilent Technologies 6890 with mass-spectrometric detector 5973. The run of components was done using Device of Fractional Distillation. Linalool, limonene, geranyl acetate, d-camphor, myrcene and geraniol were found as the major components. In the composition of essential oils each component has its own flavor, the combination of which determines the flavor of the oil. We investigated the possibility of target separation of essential oils of coriander fruits into fractions of different flavor. The article presents the results of research sequential processing fruits Coriandrum sativum to obtain a series of natural flavors. Principles and laws of the vacuum distillation were used for

  10. Assessment of Anti-Influenza Activity and Hemagglutination Inhibition of Plumbago indica and Allium sativum Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, Rahul Dilip; Shinde, Pramod; Girkar, Kaustubh; Madage, Rajendra; Chowdhary, Abhay

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza is a seasonal disease associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Anti-flu ayurvedic/herbal medicines have played a significant role in fighting the virus pandemic. Plumbagin and allicin are commonly used ingredients in many therapeutic remedies, either alone or in conjunction with other natural substances. Evidence suggests that these extracts are associated with a variety of pharmacological activities. To evaluate anti-influenza activity from Plumbago indica and Allium sativum extract against Influenza A (H1N1)pdm09. Different extraction procedures were used to isolate the active ingredient in the solvent system, and quantitative HPLTC confirms the presence of plumbagin and allicin. The cytotoxicity was carried out on Madin-Darby Canine kidney cells, and the 50% cytotoxic concentration (CC50) values were below 20 mg/mL for both plant extracts. To assess the anti-influenza activity, two assays were employed, simultaneous and posttreatment assay. A. sativum methanolic and ethanolic extracts showed only 14% reduction in hemagglutination in contrast to P. indica which exhibited 100% reduction in both simultaneous and posttreatment assay at concentrations of 10 mg/mL, 5 mg/mL, and 1 mg/mL. Our results suggest that P. indica extracts are good candidates for anti-influenza therapy and should be used in medical treatment after further research. The search for natural antiviral compounds from plants is a promising approach in the development of new therapeutic agents. In the past century, several scientific efforts have been directed toward identifying phytochemicals capable of inhibiting virus. Knowledge of ethnopharmacology can lead to new bioactive plant compounds suitable for drug discovery and development. Macromolecular docking studies provides most detailed possible view of drug-receptor interaction where the structure of drug is designed based on its fit to three dimensional structures of receptor site rather than by analogy to other

  11. Protective effect of Allium sativum (garlic) aqueous extract against lead-induced oxidative stress in the rat brain, liver, and kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoj Kumar, V; Henley, A K; Nelson, C J; Indumati, O; Prabhakara Rao, Y; Rajanna, S; Rajanna, B

    2017-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the ameliorative activity of Allium sativum against lead-induced oxidative stress in the brain, liver, and kidney of male rats. Four groups of male Wistar strain rats (100-120 g) were taken: group 1 received 1000 mg/L sodium acetate and group 2 was given 1000 mg/L lead acetate through drinking water for 2 weeks. Group 3 and 4 were treated with 250 mg/kg body weight/day of A. sativum and 500 mg/kg body weight/day of A. sativum, respectively, by oral intubation for a period of 2 weeks along with lead acetate. The rats were sacrificed after treatment and the brain, liver, and kidney were isolated on ice. In the brain, four important regions namely the hippocampus, cerebellum, cerebral cortex, and brain stem were separated and used for the present investigation. Blood was also drawn by cardiac puncture and preserved in heparinized vials at 4 °C for estimation of delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity. The results showed a significant (p sativum resulted in tissue-specific recovery of oxidative stress parameters namely ROS, LPP, and TPCC. A. sativum treatment also restored the blood delta-ALAD activity back to control. Overall, our results indicate that A. sativum administration could be an effective antioxidant treatment strategy for lead-induced oxidative insult.

  12. Maize YABBY genes drooping leaf1 and drooping leaf2 affect agronomic traits by regulating leaf architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaf architectural traits, such as length, width and angle, directly influence canopy structure and light penetration, photosynthate production and overall yield. We discovered and characterized a maize (Zea mays) mutant with aberrant leaf architecture we named drooping leaf1 (drl1), as leaf blades ...

  13. Leaf Relative Water Content Estimated from Leaf Reflectance and Transmittance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, Vern; Daughtry, Craig; Dahlgren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Remotely sensing the water status of plants and the water content of canopies remain long term goals of remote sensing research. In the research we report here, we used optical polarization techniques to monitor the light reflected from the leaf interior, R, as well as the leaf transmittance, T, as the relative water content (RWC) of corn (Zea mays) leaves decreased. Our results show that R and T both change nonlinearly. The result show that the nonlinearities cancel in the ratio R/T, which appears linearly related to RWC for RWC less than 90%. The results suggest that potentially leaf water status and perhaps even canopy water status could be monitored starting from leaf and canopy optical measurements.

  14. Organic fertilization alters the community composition of root associated fungi in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, L.; Nicolaisen, M.; Ravnskov, S.

    2013-01-01

    Organic fertilization is well known to affect individual functional groups of root associated fungi such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and root pathogens, but limited information is available on the effect of organic fertilization at the fungal community composition level. The main objective...... of the present study was to examine the response of communities of root associated fungi in Pisum sativum to Protamylasse, an organic fertilizer used in pea production. Plants were grown in pots with field soil amended with four different levels of Protamylasse. 454 pyrosequencing was employed to examine...... diversity of root associated fungi and revealed in total 164 non-singleton operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Principle component analysis (PCA) showed response of fungal community structure of the 15 most abundant OTUs to the four fertilization levels. Obligate biotrophic fungi such as the AM fungi Glomus...

  15. Synthesis and Interconversion of Amino Acids in Developing Cotyledons of Pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnicol, Peter K.

    1977-01-01

    Freshly isolated cotyledons from 10-day developing pea (Pisum sativum) seeds were fed radiolabeled precursors for 5 hours, and the specific radioactivity of the free and total protein amino acids was determined using a dansylation procedure. When the seven most abundant amino acids in phloem exudate of pea fruits (asparagine, serine, glutamine, homoserine, alanine, aspartate, glycine) were fed singly, their carbon was distributed widely among the aliphatic amino acids, proline and tryptophan; sporadic labeling of tyrosine and histidine also occurred. Feeding of glucose led to relatively greater labeling of aromatic amino acids including phenylalanine. The data support the involvement of known plant pathways in these interconversions. Labeling patterns were consistent with participation of the cyanoalanine pathway in the conversion of serine to homoserine, and with the synthesis of histidine from adenosine. All of the labeled amino acids were incorporated into protein. PMID:16660090

  16. The effect of salinity on seed germination and growth parameters of field pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovičić Dušica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Field pea (Pisum sativum L. seed contains a large amount of proteins, amino acids, sugars, carbohydrates, vitamins A and C, calcium and phosphorous, and hence it is widely used for many purposes. Although field pea has moderate requirements for its growth, it is sensitive to increased salt content in soil. This research included eight varieties (Javor, Jantar, Partner, Kristal, Pionir, Junior, Trezor, Dukat developed at Institute of Field and Vegetable Crops in Novi Sad. Sodium chloride solutions of various concentrations (0, 50, 100 and 150 mM were added in growing media to simulate saline conditions. The following were subsequently determined: seed germination, seedling length, fresh and dry weight of seedlings and 1000-seed weight. Among the analyzed varieties, variety Jantar expressed a high level of tolerance to increased salt content in growing media under laboratory conditions.

  17. The role of phosphorus in nitrogen fixation by young pea plants (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1985-01-01

    The influence of P on N2 fixation and dry matter production of young pea (P. sativum L. cv. Bodil) plants grown in a soil-sand mixture was investigated in growth cabinet experiments. Nodule dry weight, specific C2H2 reduction and P concentration in shoots responded to P addition before any growth...... in nodules. Combined N applied to plants when N2 fixation had commenced, increased shoot dry weight only at the highest P levels. The smaller plant growth at the low P levels did not result from N deficiency. The reduced nodulation and N2 fixation in P-deficient plants were apparently caused by impaired...... shoot metabolism and not by a direct effect of P deficiency of the nodules....

  18. Cytogenetical and ultrastructural effects of copper on root meristem cells of Allium sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Donghua; Jiang, Wusheng; Meng, Qingmin; Zou, Jin; Gu, Jiegang; Zeng, Muai

    2009-04-01

    Different copper concentrations, as well as different exposure times, were applied to investigate both cytogenetical and ultrastructural alterations in garlic (Allium sativum L.) meristem cells. Results showed that the mitotic index decreased progressively when either copper concentration or exposure time increased. C-mitosis, anaphase bridges, chromosome stickiness and broken nuclei were observed in the copper treated root tip cells. Some particulates containing the argyrophilic NOR-associated proteins were distributed in the nucleus of the root-tip cells and the amount of this particulate material progressively increased with increasing exposure time. Finally, the nucleolar material was extruded from the nucleus into the cytoplasm. Also, increased dictyosome vesicles in number, formation of cytoplasmic vesicles containing electron dense granules, altered mitochondrial shape, disruption of nuclear membranes, condensation of chromatin material, disintegration of organelles were observed. The mechanisms of detoxification and tolerance of copper are briefly discussed.

  19. Purification and characterization of a soluble glycoprotein from garlic (Allium sativum) and its in vitro bioactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Zou, Tingting; Xiang, Minghui; Jin, Chenzhong; Zhang, Xuejiao; Chen, Yong; Jiang, Qiuqing; Hu, Yihong

    2016-10-02

    A soluble glycoprotein was purified to homogeneity from ripe garlic (Allium sativum) bulbs using ammonium sulfate precipitation, Sephadex G-100 gel filtration, and diethylaminoethyl-52 cellulose anion-exchange chromatography. A native mass of 55.7 kDa estimated on gel permeation chromatography and a molecular weight of 13.2 kDa observed on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis supported that the glycoprotein is a homotetramer. β-Elimination reaction result suggested that the glycoprotein is an N-linked type. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy proved that it contains sugar. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometer analysis showed that its sugar component was galactose. The glycoprotein has 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil free radical scavenging activity and the peroxidation inhibition ability to polyunsaturated fatty acid. These results indicated that the glycoprotein has potential for food additives, functional foods, and even biotechnological and medical applications.

  20. Cultivar and Rhizobium Strain Effects on the Symbiotic Performance of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skøt, Leif

    1983-01-01

    The symbiotic performance of four pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars in combination with each of four strains of Rhizobium leguminosarum was studied in growth chamber experiments in order to estimate the effects of cultivars, strains and cultivar × strain interaction on the variation in dry weight, N...... content and dry weight/N ratio. At harvest 63 days after planting, cultivars accounted for 75% of the variation in dry weight, while the Rhizobium strains accounted for 63% of the variation in N-content and 70% of the variation in dry weight/N ratio. Cultivar × strain interactions were statistically...... significant, but of minor quantitative importance, accounting for 5–15% of the total variation. Rhizobium strains also influenced the partitioning of N between reproductive and vegetative plant parts and between root and shoot biomass....

  1. Survival of Bifidobacterium bifidum in cow- and camel-milk yogurts enriched with Cinnamomum verum and Allium sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amal Bakr Shori

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Allium sativum and Cinnamomum verum water extracts on the survival of Bifidobacterium bifidum during 21 days of refrigerated storage and after simulated gastrointestinal digestion (SGD were investigated. Two types of yogurt (cow- and camel-milk yogurts were prepared in the presence of A. sativum or C. verum. The viable cell counts (VCC of B. bifidum in fresh A. sativum- or C. verum-cow milk yogurt (1 day were higher (8.1 × 109 cfu/ml and 6.6 × 109 cfu/ml, respectively; p < 0.05 than plain-yogurt (1.9 × 109 cfu/ml. In contrast, B. bifidum VCC in fresh plain-camel milk yogurt was 1.99 × 109 cfu/ml whereas the presence of A. sativum or C. verum in yogurt increased (p < 0.05 VCC to 19.61 × 109 cfu/ml and 25.55 × 109 cfu/ml, respectively. The VCC of B. bifidum in both herbal-yogurts decreased (p < 0.05 during refrigerated storage for both types of yogurt. The VCC of B. bifidum was ∼1.3 × 109 cfu/ml in all fresh cow milk yogurts after 1 h gastric digestion. Intestinal digestion (1 h increased VCC of B. bifidum in all fresh yogurts but not in 7 day old yogurts (plain- and A. sativum-yogurts. However, prolonged digestion to another 1 h in intestine reduced (p < 0.05 VCC of B. bifidum in all fresh and storage yogurts. In contrast, all fresh camel milk yogurts showed VCC of B. bifidum ⩽1 × 109 cfu/ml after SGD. Seven day old A. sativum – camel milk yogurt showed the lowest survival of B. bifidum after gastric digestion compared to plain- and C. verum-yogurt. The VCC reduced (p < 0.05 in all camel milk-yogurts after 2 h intestinal digestion.

  2. Effect of Terminalia chebula and Allium sativum on in vivo methane emission by sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, A K; Kamra, D N; Bhar, R; Kumar, R; Agarwal, N

    2011-04-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate some plant parts (already tested for their antimethanogenic activity in in vitro gas production test in the authors' laboratory) as feed additive to combat methane emission from sheep. Sixteen male sheep with average body weight of 29.96±1.69 kg (22 months of age) were divided into four groups in a randomized block design. The animals were fed on a diet containing forage to concentrate ratio of 1:1. The concentrate fraction composed (in parts) of maize grain, 32; wheat bran, 45; deoiled soybean meal, 20; mineral mixture, 2 and common salt, 1. The four treatments were control (without additive), seed pulp of Terminalia chebula (Harad), bulb of Allium sativum (Garlic) and a mixture (Mix) of the latter two in equal proportions at the rate of 1% of dry matter (DM) intake. There was no effect on DM intake due to the inclusion of these feed additives. The digestibilities of DM and organic matter tended to be higher (pMethane emission (L/kg digested DM intake) as estimated by open circuit respiration chamber and methane energy loss as per cent of digestible energy intake tended to be lower in T. chebula (p=0.09) and Mix (p=0.08) groups compared with control. The data indicated that T. chebula showed antimethanogenic activity, whereas both T. chebula and A. sativum improved nutrient digestibility. Therefore, these two plants appear to be suitable candidates for use as feed additive to mitigate methane emission and to improve nutrient utilization by sheep. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Allium sativum L. regulates in vitro IL-17 gene expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutia, Mouna; Seghrouchni, Fouad; Abouelazz, Omar; Elouaddari, Anass; Al Jahid, Abdellah; Elhou, Abdelhalim; Nadifi, Sellama; Jamal Eddine, Jamal; Habti, Norddine; Badou, Abdallah

    2016-09-29

    Allium sativum L. (A.S.) "garlic", one of the most interesting medicinal plants, has been suggested to contain compounds that could be beneficial in numerous pathological situations including cancer. In this work, we aimed to assess the immunomodulatory effect of A.S. preparation on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy individuals. Nontoxic doses of A.S. were identified using MTT assay. Effects on CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte proliferation were studied using flow cytometry. The effect of A.S. on cytokine gene expression was studied using qRT-PCR. Finally, qualitative analysis of A.S. was performed by HPLC approach. Data were analyzed statistically by one-way ANOVA test. The nontoxic doses of A.S. preparation did not affect neither spontaneous nor TCR-mediated CD4+ or CD8+ T lymphocyte proliferation. Interestingly, A.S. exhibited a statistically significant regulation of IL-17 gene expression, a cytokine involved in several inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. In contrast, the expression of IL-4, an anti-inflammatory cytokine, was unaffected. Qualitative analysis of A.S. ethanol preparation indicated the presence of three polyphenol bioactive compounds, which are catechin, vanillic acid and ferulic acid. The specific inhibition of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-17 without affecting cell proliferation in human PBMCs by the Allium sativum L. preparation suggests a potential valuable effect of the compounds present in this plant for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and cancer, where IL-17 is highly expressed. The individual contribution of these three compounds to this global effect will be assessed.

  4. Shelf Life Extension of Maple pea (Pisum sativum var. arvense L. Spread Using Sous Vide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ķirse Asnate

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of sous vide packaging on the shelf life of maple pea (Pisum sativum var. arvense L. spread. Pea spreads were made of ground re-hydrated cooked maple peas ‘Bruno’ (Pisum sativum var. arvense L., to which salt, citric acid, oil, and spices were added. Pea spread was stored in polyamide/polyethylene (PA/PE film pouches, packaged in vacuum and hermetically sealed. Pea spread pouches were heat treated in a water bath, then rapidly cooled in ice-water and stored at 4.0 ± 0.5 °C. Sous vide was applied in three different heat regimens +(65.0; 80.0 and 100.0 ± 0.5 °C with cooking times 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min at a constant temperature. Total plate count was determined according to ISO 4833-1:2014 on Plate Count Agar and Enterobacteriaceae determination was performed in accordance with ISO 21528-2:2004 on Violet Red Bile Glucose Agar. Total plate count in pea spread without thermal treatment was 3.41 log10 CFU g−1, in all sous vide packaged pea spread samples microbial contamination was significantly lower (p < 0.05. Enterobacteriaceae were not detected in any samples. It is possible to extend the shelf life of sous vide maple pea spread up to 14 weeks when stored at 4.0 ± 0.5 °C.

  5. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant activities of Tunisian garlic (Allium sativum essential oil and ethanol extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Zouari Chekki

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to establish some nutritional properties of garlic cultivated in Tunisia and to evaluate the antioxidant and the antimicrobial activites of its essential oil and ethanol extract. Tunisian garlic (Allium sativum was characterized for moisture, ash and protein contents which were determined as 66%, 1.4% and 5.2% respectively. In addition, Fe (5.90 mg/kg, Cu (1.61 mg/kg, Mg (15 mg/kg and P (140 mg/kg were reported such as the major minerals in garlic. The fat profile of tunisian garlic was conducted, the main fatty acids identified were lauric acid (49.3% and linoleic acid (20.4%. Essential oil obtained from A. sativum was analysed by capillary GCMS. Diallyl disulfide (49.1% and diallyl trisulfide (30.38% were the main components of the five identified components. The phenolic content of The ethanol extract are analysed for its phenolic profiles, colorimetric analysis revealed that the total phenols, flavonoids and proanthocyanidins contents were respectively 43.63 mg GA/g, 13.18 mg quercetin/g and 24.24 mg of catechin/g. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay, essential oil presented the highest antioxidant activity compared to its ethanolic extract. IC50 values observed for the essential oil and ethanol extract were 300 μg/ml and 600 µg/ml respectively. The essential oil and ethanol extract from raw garlic were tested for antimicrobial activity against seven microorganisms. The results showed that ethanol extract was active against all tested strains: Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Listeria monocytogene, Yersinia enterocolitica and Bacillus cereus.

  6. 7 CFR 29.3036 - Leaf surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3036 Section 29.3036 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf surface. The smoothness or roughness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3528 - Leaf surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf surface. 29.3528 Section 29.3528 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3528 Leaf surface. The roughness or smoothness of the web or lamina of a tobacco leaf. Leaf surface is affected to some extent by the size and shrinkage of the veins or fibers (See Elements...

  8. 7 CFR 30.2 - Leaf tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf tobacco. 30.2 Section 30.2 Agriculture... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.2 Leaf... stemming, sweating or fermenting, and conditioning are not regarded as manufacturing processes. Leaf...

  9. Genetics of Ophraella leaf beetles

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This proposal is to collect samples of each species of Ophraella leaf beetle encountered, not to exceed 50 specimens per species, for genetic analysis using DNA...

  10. Is leaf dry matter content a better predictor of soil fertility than specific leaf area?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hodgson, J.G.; Montserrat-Marti, G.; Charles, M.; Jones, G.; Wilson, P.; Shipley, B.; Sharafi, M.; Cerabolini, B.E.L.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.; Band, S.R.; Bogard, A.; Castro-Diez, P.; Guerrere-Campo, J.; Palmer, C.; Peréz-Rontomé, M.C.; Carter, G.; Hynd, A.; Romo-Diez, A.; De Torres Espuny, L.; Royo Pla, F.

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aims: Specific leaf area (SLA), a key element of the 'worldwide leaf economics spectrum', is the preferred 'soft' plant trait for assessing soil fertility. SLA is a function of leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and leaf thickness (LT). The first, LDMC, defines leaf construction costs and

  11. Agave Americana Leaf Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Hulle

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The growing environmental problems, the problem of waste disposal and the depletion of non-renewable resources have stimulated the use of green materials compatible with the environment to reduce environmental impacts. Therefore, there is a need to design products by using natural resources. Natural fibers seem to be a good alternative since they are abundantly available and there are a number of possibilities to use all the components of a fiber-yielding crop; one such fiber-yielding plant is Agave Americana. The leaves of this plant yield fibers and all the parts of this plant can be utilized in many applications. The “zero-waste” utilization of the plant would enable its production and processing to be translated into a viable and sustainable industry. Agave Americana fibers are characterized by low density, high tenacity and high moisture absorbency in comparison with other leaf fibers. These fibers are long and biodegradable. Therefore, we can look this fiber as a sustainable resource for manufacturing and technical applications. Detailed discussion is carried out on extraction, characterization and applications of Agave Americana fiber in this paper.

  12. Allium sativum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    appetite and food selection. Also high dietary ... affects body weight, organ development and growth particularly at ... supplementation of raw garlic on taste response and relative organ ... period, during which they were fed with poultry growers.

  13. Generic Separations and Leaf Languages

    OpenAIRE

    Matthias Galota; Sven Kosub (Hrsg.); Heribert Vollmer

    2017-01-01

    In the early nineties of the previous century, leaf languages were introduced as a means for the uniform characterization of many complexity classes, mainly in the range between P (polynomial time) and PSPACE (polynomial space). It was shown that the separability of two complexity classes can be reduced to a combinatorial property of the corresponding defining leaf languages. In the present paper, it is shown that every separation obtained in this way holds for every generic oracle in the sen...

  14. 7 CFR 29.2528 - Leaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf. 29.2528 Section 29.2528 Agriculture Regulations...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2528 Leaf. Whole, unstemmed leaf. Leaf, when applied to tobacco in strip form, shall describe the divided unit of a whole leaf. [49 FR 16757, Apr. 20...

  15. ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY EVALUATION OF ALLIUM SATIVUM ESSENTIAL OIL COMPARED TO DIFFERENT PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA STRAINS IN EASTERN ALGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazzouz Dekhil

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemical composition of essential oil extracted from Allium sativum bulbs harvested in the region of El Harrouch in Skikda was studied by gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry; six compounds were identified which predominant materials are: methyl allyl trisulfide (34.61�20and diallyl disulfide (31.65� The antibacterial activity was tested on 52 clinical strains and one reference strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by both variants of the dilution method, the dilution method in liquid medium and the dilution method in solid medium. The results showed that the essential oil of Allium sativum has an inhibitory activity of growth compared to over 50�0of strains tested with MICs relatively averages between 32 and 128 μg•mL-1.

  16. The potential role of garlic (Allium sativum against the multi-drug resistant tuberculosis pandemic: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catia Dini

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldly data show the increasing incidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB and particularly of multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB. In developing countries, TB control programmes are overwhelmed by the complexity of treating MDR-TB infected people, as current tools and therapies are inadequate. MDR-TB could become the main form of TB. Risk factors that make South Africa into one of the main epicentres are analysed. A review of the studies carried out about antitubercular properties of Allium sativum both in vitro and in vivo is provided. The researches about the garlic extracts effectiveness against clinical isolates of MDR-TB are of scientific importance. Allium sativum offers a hope for developing alternative drugs. The involvement of traditional healers (TH in the TB health management could facilitate the administration of garlic extracts to the infected patients.

  17. Detection and thermoluminescence of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) irradiated with {sup 60}Co; Deteccion y termoluminiscencia del cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.) irradiado con {sup 60}Co

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz G, B. [Departamento de Agricultura y Ganaderia, Universidad de Sonora, 083190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico); Cruz Z, E. [Unidad de Irradiacion y Seguridad Radiologica, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAM, A. P. 70-543, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Barboza F, M. [Centro de Investigacion en Fisica, Universidad de Sonora, A. P. 5-088, 083190 Hermosillo, Sonora (Mexico)

    2009-10-15

    The fresh and dried coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is a spice of high commercial value as food for consumption in Mexico. Their hygienic quality is often poor due to some factors: contaminants present in irrigation water and the cultivation atmosphere, harvesting and post harvest handling, mainly. The process by radiation is an alternative to achieve the sterilization to adequate dose for the hygienic quality for its consumption. However, irradiation also involves food detection exposed to radiation. This paper presents detected results on the dried coriander that was obtained from fresh samples and thermoluminescent properties such as glow curves structure from low doses (0.5 Gy) to high (15 kGy), the dose response, thermoluminescent signal decay, in order to determine the loss of stability during the storage of the poly mineral fraction. We obtained the inorganic fraction separation of the organic part of particle sizes of 10 {mu}m by the Zimmerman method. The samples were exposed at two dose ranges; 0.5-400 Gy and 0.5-15 kGy of gamma radiation with {sup 60}Co. The limit of thermoluminescent detection of the irradiated coriander samples was from 1 Gy. The glow curves were at a broad band of 35-400 C, with a maximum thermoluminescence around 182-196 C, and run at 164 C for high doses of 15 kGy. The range of linear response to dose was 4-25 Gy, whereas higher doses than the kGy order the response increase with the dose. The thermoluminescent properties of the coriander poly mineral fraction, show it can be used to identify irradiated food at gamma doses relatively low and even in doses of commercial interest due to the high stability of thermoluminescent signals. (Author)

  18. Modulatory effects of dietary inclusion of garlic (Allium sativum) on gentamycin–induced hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Ademiluyi, Adedayo O.; Ganiyu Oboh; Owoloye, Tosin R; Agbebi, Oluwaseun J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the ameliorative effect of dietary inclusion of garlic (Allium sativum) on gentamycin-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. Methods: Adult male rats were randomly divided into four groups with six animals in each group. Groups 1 and 2 were fed basal diet while Groups 3 and 4 were fed diets containing 2% and 4% garlic respectively for 27 d prior to gentamycin administration. Hepatotoxicity was induced by the intraperitoneal administration of gentamycin (100 mg/kg body we...

  19. A Global Data Set of Leaf Photosynthetic Rates, Leaf N and P, and Specific Leaf Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This global data set of photosynthetic rates and leaf nutrient traits was compiled from a comprehensive literature review. It includes estimates of Vcmax (maximum...

  20. A Global Data Set of Leaf Photosynthetic Rates, Leaf N and P, and Specific Leaf Area

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This global data set of photosynthetic rates and leaf nutrient traits was compiled from a comprehensive literature review. It includes estimates of Vcmax...

  1. Localization of blood-group-related linear poly-N-acetyllactosamine structure in different human tissues by Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II staining following endo-beta-galactosidase digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, N; Kawahara, S; Hirano, Y; Morimura, Y; Nakajima, K; Uchida, K; Hirota, T

    1994-04-01

    Endo-beta-galactosidase from Escherichia freundii cleaves polylactosaminyl structures as follows: R-GlcNAc beta I-3Gal beta I-4GlcNac beta I-R' + H2O-->R-GlcNAc beta I-3Gal + GlcNAc beta I-R'. By staining with Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II following the enzyme digestion, the distribution of R-GlcNAc beta I-3Gal beta I-4GlcNAc can be demonstrated in tissue sections. This carbohydrate chain is one of the backbone structures carrying the blood-group-related antigens and, thus, localization of this structure may provide detailed information about the distribution of variants with different backbone structures. Various formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections were stained by Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin-II with or without prior enzyme digestion and the reactivity of the agglutinin imparted by enzyme digestion was studied in the following tissues and cells: pancreatic acinar cells, gastric surface mucosae, duct cells and mucous cells of salivary glands and tracheal glands, surface epithelium of trachea, goblet cells of large intestine, columnar epithelium of uterine cervical glands, distal and collecting tubules of kidney, certain cells of anterior lobe and colloid of middle lobe of pituitary glands, epithelial reticular cells and Hassall's corpuscles of thymus and Kupffer cells of liver. In gastric surface mucosae, the reactivity of the agglutinin appeared in non-secretor individuals but not in the secretor individuals, and in mucous cells of salivary and tracheal glands the reactivity appeared in Le(a- b-) non-secretor individuals but not in Le(a + b-) non-secretor or secretor individuals.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum models demonstrate that root colonization is an intrinsic trait of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Quist, J Cristian; O'Sullivan, Louise A; Desert, Annaëlle; Fivian-Hughes, Amanda S; Millet, Coralie; Jones, T Hefin; Weightman, Andrew J; Rogers, Hilary J; Berry, Colin; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-02-01

    Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc) bacteria possess biotechnologically useful properties that contrast with their opportunistic pathogenicity. The rhizosphere fitness of Bcc bacteria is central to their biocontrol and bioremediation activities. However, it is not known whether this differs between species or between environmental and clinical strains. We investigated the ability of 26 Bcc strains representing nine different species to colonize the roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and Pisum sativum (pea). Viable counts, scanning electron microscopy and bioluminescence imaging were used to assess root colonization, with Bcc bacteria achieving mean (±sem) levels of 2.49±0.23×10(6) and 5.16±1.87×10(6) c.f.u. per centimetre of root on the A. thaliana and P. sativum models, respectively. The A. thaliana rhizocompetence model was able to reveal loss of colonization phenotypes in Burkholderia vietnamiensis G4 transposon mutants that had only previously been observed in competition experiments on the P. sativum model. Different Bcc species colonized each plant model at different rates, and no statistical difference in root colonization was observed between isolates of clinical or environmental origin. Loss of the virulence-associated third chromosomal replicon (>1 Mb DNA) did not alter Bcc root colonization on A. thaliana. In summary, Bcc bacteria possess intrinsic root colonization abilities irrespective of their species or source. As Bcc rhizocompetence does not require their third chromosomal replicon, the possibility of using synthetic biology approaches to engineer virulence-attenuated biotechnological strains is tractable.

  3. Regulation by S-nitrosylation of the Calvin-Benson cycle fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in Pisum sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Jesús Serrato

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Redox regulation is of great importance in chloroplasts. Many chloroplast enzymes, such as those belonging to the Calvin-Benson cycle (CBC, have conserved regulatory cysteines which form inhibitory disulphide bridges when physiological conditions become unfavourable. Amongst these enzymes, cFBP1, the CBC fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase isoform, is well known to be redox activated by thioredoxin f through the reduction of a disulphide bridge involving Cys153 and Cys173. Moreover, data obtained during recent years point to S-nitrosylation as another redox post-translational modification putatively regulating an increasing number of plant enzymes, including cFBP1. In this study we have shown that the Pisum sativum cFBP1 can be efficiently S-nitrosylated by GSNO and SNAP, triggering the formation of the regulatory disulphide. Using in vivo experiments with P. sativum we have established that cFBP1 S-nitrosylation only occurs during the light period and we have elucidated by activity assays with Cys-to-Ser mutants that this enzyme may be inactivated through the S-nitrosylation of Cys153. Finally, in the light of the new data, we have proposed an extended redox-regulation model by integrating the S-nitrosylation and the TRX f-mediated regulation of cFBP1. Keywords: S-nitrosylation, GSNO, Redox regulation, Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, Pisum sativum, Calvin-Benson cycle

  4. The effect of water shortage on pea (Pisum sativum L. productivity in relation to the pod position on the stem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Klimek-Kopyra

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The literature contains few studies on the effect of temporary soil drought on the development and productivity of pea (Pisum sativum L. pods in relation to their position in the fruiting part of the stem. The aim of this study was to evaluate pod productivity of various pea cultivars in relation to varied weather conditions. Differences in precipitation during two growing seasons resulted in a decrease in yield of 0.62 t ha−1 in a dry year in comparison to a year with better water availability. Pisum sativum ‘Tarchalska’ proved to be the most stable in terms of the number of pods produced, whilst ‘Prophet’ was the least. Weather conditions and cultivars were the determinants of pod production. Pea pods were distinguished by their position on the productive node. Larger and more productive pods were found on the lowest four productive nodes (which had a longer period of nutrient accumulation resulting in higher seed mass. Productivity increased in the year with favorable weather conditions, as more of the upper nodes were reproductive. The first four nodes produced 45–91% of the yield. The number of seeds in the first three nodes was significantly cultivar-dependent, whereas the number of seeds in pods at all nodes was determined by weather conditions. Significantly more seeds were formed from each node in the wetter year. Pisum sativum ‘Audit’ was not sensitive to weather conditions, producing the same yield in the both years of the study.

  5. Sulphur fertilization influences the sulphur species composition in Allium sativum: sulphomics using HPLC-ICPMS/MS-ESI-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Andrea; Ronzan, Marilena; Feldmann, Joerg

    2017-10-18

    Garlic (A. sativum) contains a large number of small sulphur (S)-containing metabolites, which are important for its taste and smell and vary with A. sativum variety and growth conditions. This study was designed to investigate the influence of different sulphur-fertilization regimes on low molecular weight S-species by attempting the first sulphur mass balance in A. sativum roots and bulbs using HPLC-ICPMS/MS-ESI-MS/MS. Species unspecific quantification of acid soluble S-containing metabolites was achieved using HPLC-ICP-MS/MS. For identification of the compounds, high resolution ESI-MS (Orbitrap LTQ and q-TOF) was used. The plants contained up to 54 separated sulphur-containing compounds, which constitute about 80% of the total sulphur present in A. sativum. The roots and bulbs of A. sativum contained the same compounds, but not necessarily the same amounts and proportions. The S-containing metabolites in the roots reacted more sensitively to manipulations of sulphur fertilization than those compounds in the bulbs. In addition to known compounds (e.g. γ-glutamyl-S-1-propenylcysteine) we were able to identify and partially quantify 31 compounds. Three as yet undescribed S-containing compounds were also identified and quantified for the first time. Putative structures were assigned to the oxidised forms of S-1-propenylmercaptoglutathione, S-2-propenylmercaptoglutathione, S-allyl/propenyl-containing PC-2 and 2-amino-3-[(2-carboxypropyl)sulfanyl]propanoic acid. The parallel use of ICP-MS/MS as a sulphur-specific detector and ESI-MS as a molecular detector simplifies the identification and quantification of sulphur containing metabolites without species specific standards. This non-target analysis approach enables a mass balance approach and identifies the occurrence of the so far unidentified organosulphur compounds. The experiments showed that the sulphur-fertilization regime does not influence sulphur-speciation, but the concentration of some S

  6. Leaf hydraulic conductance is coordinated with leaf morpho-anatomical traits and nitrogen status in the genus Oryza

    OpenAIRE

    Xiong, Dongliang; Yu, Tingting; Zhang, Tong; Li, Yong; Peng, Shaobing; Huang, Jianliang

    2014-01-01

    Leaf hydraulic conductance (K leaf) is a major determinant of photosynthetic rate in plants. Previous work has assessed the relationships between leaf morpho-anatomical traits and K leaf with woody species, but there has been very little focus on cereal crops. The genus Oryza, which includes rice (Oryza sativa) and wild species (such as O. rufipogon cv. Griff), is ideal material for identifying leaf features associated with K leaf and gas exchange. Leaf morpho-anatomical traits, K leaf, leaf ...

  7. Retrograde and transganglionic transport of horseradish peroxidase-conjugated cholera toxin B subunit, wheatgerm agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I in primary afferent neurons innervating the rat urinary bladder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H F; Shortland, P; Park, M J; Grant, G

    1998-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated and compared the ability of the cholera toxin B subunit, wheat germ agglutinin and isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I conjugated to horseradish peroxidase, to retrogradely and transganglionically label visceral primary afferents after unilateral injections into the rat urinary bladder wall. Horseradish peroxidase histochemical or lectin-immunofluorescence histochemical labelling of bladder afferents was seen in the L6-S1 spinal cord segments and in the T13-L2 and L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia. In the lumbosacral spinal cord, the most intense and extensive labelling of bladder afferents was seen when cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase was injected. Cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres were found in Lissauer's tract, its lateral and medial collateral projections, and laminae I and IV-VI of the spinal gray matter. Labelled fibres were numerous in the lateral collateral projection and extended into the spinal parasympathetic nucleus. Labelling from both the lateral and medial projections extended into the dorsal grey commissural region. Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase labelling produced a similar pattern but was not as dense and extensive as that of cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase. The isolectin B4 from Griffonia simplicifolia I-horseradish peroxidase-labelled fibres, on the other hand, were fewer and only observed in the lateral collateral projection and occasionally in lamina I. Cell profile counts showed that a larger number of dorsal root ganglion cells were labelled with cholera toxin B subunit-horseradish peroxidase than with wheat germ agglutinin- or isolectin B4-horseradish peroxidase. In the L6-S1 dorsal root ganglia, the majority (81%) of the cholera toxin B subunit-, and almost all of the wheat germ agglutinin- and isolectin B4-immunoreactive cells were RT97-negative (an anti-neurofilament antibody that labels dorsal root ganglion neurons with

  8. Effect of Allium cepa and Allium sativum on some immunological cells in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirabeau, Tatfeng Y; Samson, Enitan S

    2012-01-01

    Extracts of some spices have been reported to play a contributory role in enhancing immune function. We evaluated and compared the effect(s) of single and combined oral administration of fresh aqueous onion (Allium cepa) and garlic (Allium sativum) extracts at different concentrations on some immunological determinants in rats. CD₄ cells of the rats were estimated using Partec flow cytometric technique, while total and differential white blood cell (WBC) counts were estimated using the Sysmsex® automated haematology analyzing technique. Our findings revealed that, CD4 and total WBC counts were significantly increased (P≤0.05) in a dose-dependent manner in both onion (250mg/Kg/d: 349±11cell/ul and 2.75±0.15X10³cell/l; 500mg/Kg/d: 389±10cells/µl and 3.05±0.05 X10³cell/l; 750mg/Kg/d: 600±11cell/µl and 3.25±0.05X10³cells/l) and garlic (250mg/Kg/d: 410±10cell/ul and 2.85±0.15X10³cell/l; 500mg/Kg/d: 494±32cells/µl and 3.30±0.10 X10³cell/l; 750mg/Kg/d: 684±11cell/µl and 3.55±0.05X10³cells/l) treated rats when compared to the zero control (200±11cells/µl and 1.55±0.05X10³cells/l, respectively). Extract of garlic at 750mg/Kg/d had significantly increased the CD4 cells and total white cell count when compared to other concentrations (P≤0.05). However, no significant effect was observed on these parameters when extracts were combined (250mg/Kg/d: 252±21cell/µl and 1.80±0.10X10³cells/l; 500mg/Kg/d: 315±21cells/ul and 2.10±0.10X10³cells/l; 750mg/Kg/d: 368±10cells/µl and 2.35±0.05X10³cells/l, respectively), the differential WBC count showed a significant increase in the proportion of cell types (lymphocytes, neutophils and monocytes) (P≤0.05). The results from this study revealed the immune boosting capabilities of Allium cepa and Allium sativum, but underscored their synergistic activities.

  9. Reference change values for lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive α-fetoprotein and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin in patients with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanke, Futoshi; Kumada, Takashi; Toyoda, Hidenori; Satomura, Shinji

    2012-03-06

    Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive α-fetoprotein (AFP-L3) and des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) have been routinely used as serological tumor markers of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) for surveillance. The aims of this study were: (i) to determine the biological variation of AFP-L3 and DCP in patients with chronic hepatitis C; and (ii) to calculate the reference change values (RCVs) of AFP-L3 and DCP. Ten patients with cirrhosis due to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and without HCC were enrolled in the study. Serum samples were collected at 14-day intervals, and 10 samples in total were obtained for each patient. AFP-L3 and DCP levels were measured by microchip capillary electrophoresis and liquid-phase binding assay. Intra-individual (CV(I)) and inter-individual (CV(G)) biological variations and RCVs were estimated from the data generated. The CV(I) was 29.0% for AFP-L3 and 24.6% for DCP, and CV(G) was 63.5% for AFP-L3 and 40.4% for DCP. The RCVs for AFP-L3 and DCP were 68.3% and 58.5%, respectively. Increases in values for AFP-L3 and DCP within 68.3% and 58.5% may be biological variations. Clinician should take these variations into consideration for the management of patients with HCV infection under surveillance of HCC.

  10. Screening for proteinuria in cats using a conventional dipstick test after removal of cauxin from urine with a Lens culinaris agglutinin lectin tip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Masao; Fujiwara, Kumiko; Suzuta, Yasuyuki; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Taira, Hideharu; Suzuki, Akemi; Yamashita, Tetsuro

    2011-09-01

    Proteinuria is an important indicator of urinary tract disease and urine dipsticks are simple and sensitive tools to screen for this marker. However, the use of dipsticks to screen for proteinuria may not be appropriate in cats, since cauxin, a 70 kDa glycoprotein, is secreted by the kidneys in clinically normal animals of this species. To circumvent this problem, a Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) lectin tip was developed to remove cauxin from feline urine, followed by conventional urine dipstick testing for proteinuria. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) with Coomassie brilliant blue R-250 staining indicated that >90% cauxin in the urine of 13 clinically normal cats was trapped by the LCA lectin tip, so that the dipstick protein 'score' changed from 'positive' (≥30 mg/dL) for untreated urine to 'negative' (≤10 mg/dL) for lectin tip-treated urine. In contrast, SDS-PAGE indicated that lectin tip-treated samples from 20 animals with renal disease contained high concentrations of albumin and low-molecular weight proteins; dipstick testing of lectin tip-treated urine resulted in a consistently positive protein score. The accuracy of the dipstick method for detecting cats with abnormal proteinuria is enhanced if dipsticks are used with urine samples that have first been passed through the LCA lectin tip. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin with Lens culinaris agglutinin and its usefulness in the diagnosis of neoplastic diseases of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, C.; Aoyagi, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Ichida, F.

    1987-01-01

    The reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) with Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) was studied by crossed immuno-affinity electrophoresis of the sera of 246 subjects from 6 groups (acute virus hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), carcinoma metastatic to the liver and normal controls). Two species of AAT (LCA-reactive and -nonreactive species) were detected on crossed immuno-affinity electrophoresis in a gel containing LCA. The percentages of LCA-reactive species of AAT in neoplastic diseases of the liver were significantly higher than those in benign liver diseases and normal controls. There was no correlation between the percentage of LCA-reactive species of AAT and serum AAT concentration in any group. Furthermore, in studying 15 pairs of serum samples before and after the subsequent development of HCC, the percentage of LCA-reactive species of AAT after HCC occurrence was significantly higher than that before, although there was no statistically significant difference between the serum AAT concentration before and after development of the disease. The latter 15 patients were all of the normal protease inhibitor phenotype (PiMM) and no change in phenotype was observed before and after the development of HCC. The results indicate that measurement of the reactivity of AAT with LCA can be a useful marker for the diagnosis of HCC and carcinoma metastatic to the liver, especially when serum concentrations of alpha-foetoprotein or other tumour markers are within the normal ranges. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2822074

  12. The reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin with Lens culinaris agglutinin and its usefulness in the diagnosis of neoplastic diseases of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, C; Aoyagi, Y; Suzuki, Y; Ichida, F

    1987-09-01

    The reactivity of alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT) with Lens culinaris agglutinin (LCA) was studied by crossed immuno-affinity electrophoresis of the sera of 246 subjects from 6 groups (acute virus hepatitis, chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), carcinoma metastatic to the liver and normal controls). Two species of AAT (LCA-reactive and -nonreactive species) were detected on crossed immuno-affinity electrophoresis in a gel containing LCA. The percentages of LCA-reactive species of AAT in neoplastic diseases of the liver were significantly higher than those in benign liver diseases and normal controls. There was no correlation between the percentage of LCA-reactive species of AAT and serum AAT concentration in any group. Furthermore, in studying 15 pairs of serum samples before and after the subsequent development of HCC, the percentage of LCA-reactive species of AAT after HCC occurrence was significantly higher than that before, although there was no statistically significant difference between the serum AAT concentration before and after development of the disease. The latter 15 patients were all of the normal protease inhibitor phenotype (PiMM) and no change in phenotype was observed before and after the development of HCC. The results indicate that measurement of the reactivity of AAT with LCA can be a useful marker for the diagnosis of HCC and carcinoma metastatic to the liver, especially when serum concentrations of alpha-foetoprotein or other tumour markers are within the normal ranges.

  13. Screening method of carbohydrate-binding proteins in biological sources by capillary affinity electrophoresis and its application to determination of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin in tulip bulbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Kazuki; Kinoshita, Mitsuhiro; Oda, Yasuo; Masuko, Takashi; Kaku, Hanae; Shibuya, Naoto; Kakehi, Kazuaki

    2004-09-01

    We developed capillary affinity electrophoresis (CAE) to analyze the molecular interaction between carbohydrate chains and proteins in solution state. A mixture of oligosaccharides derived from a glycoprotein was labeled with 8-aminopyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate (APTS), and used as glycan library without isolation. Interaction of a carbohydrate-binding protein with each oligosaccharide in the mixture could be simultaneously observed, and relative affinities of oligosaccharides toward the protein were accurately determined. In this study, we applied CAE to detect the presence of lectins in some plants (Japanese elderberry bark and tulip bulb). In the crude extract of the elderberry bark, binding activity toward sialo-carbohydrate chains could be easily detected. We also examined the presence of lectins in the crude extract of tulip bulbs and determined the detailed carbohydrate-binding specificity of Tulipa gesneriana agglutinin (TGA), one of the lectins from tulip bulbs. Kinetic studies demonstrated that TGA showed novel carbohydrate-binding specificity and preferentially recognized triantennary oligosaccharides with Gal residues at nonreducing termini and a Fuc residue linked through alpha(1-6) linkage at chitobiose portion of the reducing termini but not tetraantennary carbohydrates. The results described here indicate that CAE will be a valuable method for both screening of lectins in natural sources and determination of their detailed carbohydrate-binding specificities.

  14. AGLUTININAS ANTILEPTÓSPIRA EM EQÜINOS NO ESTADO DE GOIÁS ANTILEPTOSPIRA AGGLUTININS IN EQUINES IN THE GOIÁS STATE, BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marly Francisca Cândido

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Foram analisados 694 hemossoros de eqüinos, procedentes de sete rnunicípios goianos, encontrando-se uma positividade para aglutininas antileptóspira que variou de 8,8 a 25,0%, com o valor médio de 14,4%. Diferentes sorotipos foram pesquisados, pela técnica de GALTON et alii (1962, encontrando-se positividade para os sorotipos grippotyphosa, wolffi, ballum e australis. Os autores concluíram pela necessidade de prosseguimento de novas pesquisas, com a finalidade de averiguar-se a presença ou não de diferentes sorotipos observados em outros Estados e não encontrados na presente pesquisa, além da realização de estudo epidemiológico local e regional.

    694 equine serum blood tests were made from horses of 7 counties of the State of Goiás. Positive rates of Leptospira agglutinins varied from 8.8 to 25.0% with an average of 14.4%. Different serum types were studied by the technique developed by GALTON et alii (1962 finding positiveness for the following serum types: grippotyphosa, wolffi, ballum and australis.

  15. Distribution of binding sites for the plant lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin I on primary sensory neurones in seven different mammalian species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Michelle B; Plenderleith, Mark B

    2002-01-01

    There is an increasing body of evidence to suggest that different functional classes of neurones express characteristic cell-surface carbohydrates. Previous studies have shown that the plant lectin Ulex europaeus agglutinin-I (UEA) binds to a population of small to medium diameter primary sensory neurones in rabbits and humans. This suggests that a fucose-containing glycoconjugate may be expressed by nociceptive primary sensory neurones. In order to determine the extent to which this glycoconjugate is expressed by other species, in the current study, we have examined the distribution of UEA-binding sites on primary sensory neurones in seven different mammals. Binding sites for UEA were associated with the plasma membrane and cytoplasmic granules of small to medium dorsal root ganglion cells and their axon terminals in laminae I-III of the grey matter of the spinal cord, in the rabbit, cat and marmoset monkey. However, no binding was observed in either the dorsal root ganglia or spinal cord in the mouse, rat, guinea pig or flying fox. These results indicate an inter-species variation in the expression of cell-surface glycoconjugates on mammalian primary sensory neurones.

  16. Crystal structure of the GalNAc/Gal-specific agglutinin from the phytopathogenic ascomycete Sclerotinia sclerotiorum reveals novel adaptation of a β-trefoil domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulzenbacher, Gerlind; Roig-Zamboni, Véronique; Peumans, Willy J.; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J.M.; Bourne, Yves

    2010-01-01

    A lectin from the phytopathogenic ascomycete Sclerotina sclerotiorum that shares only weak sequence similarity with characterized fungal lectins has recently been identified. Sclerotina sclerotiorum agglutinin (SSA) is a homodimeric protein consisting of two identical subunits of ∼17 kDa and displays specificity primarily towards Gal/GalNAc. Glycan array screening indicates that SSA readily interacts with Gal/GalNAc-bearing glycan chains. The crystal structures of SSA in the ligand-free form and in complex with the Gal-β1,3-GalNAc (T-antigen) disaccharide have been determined at 1.6 and 1.97 Å resolution, respectively. SSA adopts a β-trefoil domain as previously identified for other carbohydrate-binding proteins of the ricin B-like lectin superfamily and accommodates terminal non-reducing galactosyl and N-acetylgalactosaminyl glycans. Unlike other structurally related lectins, SSA contains a single carbohydrate-binding site at site α. SSA reveals a novel dimeric assembly markedly dissimilar to those described earlier for ricin-type lectins. The present structure exemplifies the adaptability of the β-trefoil domain in the evolution of fungal lectins. PMID:20566411

  17. Surface modification of liposomes using polymer-wheat germ agglutinin conjugates to improve the absorption of peptide drugs by pulmonary administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Mitsutaka; Yonamine, Takashi; Tanaka, Shota; Tahara, Kohei; Tozuka, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a system based on liposomal surface modification with a novel mucoadhesive polymer-lectin conjugate for the pulmonary delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. We covalently attached wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a ligand that specifically interacts with alveolar epithelial cells, to carbopol (CP), a mucoadhesive polymer, using the carbodiimide method and then evaluated the efficacy and potential toxicity of CP-WGA surface-modified liposomes in vivo and in vitro. In association studies, CP-WGA modification enhanced the interaction with A549 lung epithelial cells compared with unmodified or CP-modified liposomes. This increased association was dependent on temperature and the surface concentration of free WGA. These results suggested synergy of WGA and CP, and retention of the biological cell binding activity of WGA, leading to improved liposome-cell interactions. Moreover, improvement of liposomal bioadhesion to lung epithelia significantly enhanced and prolonged the therapeutic efficacy of calcitonin, a model peptide drug, without any evidence of toxicity, following administration of calcitonin-loaded CP-WGA-modified liposomes. Hence, surface modification of liposomes with CP-WGA has potential for effective pulmonary administration of peptides. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Elevated levels of serum antibodies to the lectin wheat germ agglutinin in celiac children lend support to the gluten-lectin theory of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fälth-Magnusson, K; Magnusson, K E

    1995-05-01

    Lectins recognize carbohydrate moities of glycoproteins and glycolipids, and can elicit several biological effects, including cell agglutination, cell activation and mitogenesis. According to the gluten-lectin theory, celiac lesions represent a response to a toxic lectin, putatively wheat germ agglutinin (WGA). In this study we compared the serum antibody levels IgA, IgG and IgM to WGA and to gliadin in children under investigation for celiac disease (CD), as compared to reference children. We found that the levels of IgA and IgG to WGA as well as gliadin were significantly higher in celiac children on a gluten-containing diet, compared to children on gluten-free diet and reference children. These findings lend support to the concept that WGA is a biologically significant component of gluten. Since WGA can mimic the effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) at the cellular level, we hypothesize that the crypt hyperplasia seen in celiac children could be due to a mitogenic response induced by WGA.

  19. Biophysical control of leaf temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, N.; Prentice, I. C.; Wright, I. J.

    2014-12-01

    In principle sunlit leaves can maintain their temperatures within a narrower range than ambient temperatures. This is an important and long-known (but now overlooked) prediction of energy balance theory. Net radiation at leaf surface in steady state (which is reached rapidly) must be equal to the combination of sensible and latent heat exchanges with surrounding air, the former being proportional to leaf-to-air temperature difference (ΔT), the latter to the transpiration rate. We present field measurements of ΔT which confirm the existence of a 'crossover temperature' in the 25-30˚C range for species in a tropical savanna and a tropical rainforest environment. This finding is consistent with a simple representation of transpiration as a function of net radiation and temperature (Priestley-Taylor relationship) assuming an entrainment factor (ω) somewhat greater than the canonical value of 0.26. The fact that leaves in tropical forests are typically cooler than surrounding air, often already by solar noon, is consistent with a recently published comparison of MODIS day-time land-surface temperatures with air temperatures. Theory further predicts a strong dependence of leaf size (which is inversely related to leaf boundary-layer conductance, and therefore to absolute magnitude of ΔT) on moisture availability. Theoretically, leaf size should be determined by either night-time constraints (risk of frost damage to active leaves) or day-time constraints (risk of heat stress damage),with the former likely to predominate - thereby restricting the occurrence of large leaves - at high latitudes. In low latitudes, daytime maximum leaf size is predicted to increase with temperature, provided that water is plentiful. If water is restricted, however, transpiration cannot proceed at the Priestley-Taylor rate, and it quickly becomes advantageous for plants to have small leaves, which do not heat up much above the temperature of their surroundings. The difference between leaf

  20. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MANGOSTEEN LEAF NITROGEN CONTENTS AND LEAF SPAD VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eko Setiawan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated nitrogen contents on mangosteen leaf and related on leaf SPAD value. The experiment was conducted using mangosteen trees grown in commercial orchard in Bogor, Indonesia during May to October 2010. Mangosteen trees of 3 different ages, young (20-year-old, middle-aged (35-year-old, and old (50-year-old trees, each of five trees, were selected for study, and the canopy of each tree was divided into 9 sectors based on height (bottom, middle, top and width (inner, center, outer. SPAD values had a negative correlation with leaf N content in all ages and could be explained by regressionl equations N level (% DW = -0.0099 × SPAD + 2.2366; R² = 0.91; N level (% DW = -0.0177 × SPAD + 2.8001; R² = 0.67; and N level (% DW = -0.0187 × SPAD + 2.7785; R² = 0.45 in young, middle-aged and old trees, respectively. It is suggested that the SPAD value determined by a portable chlorophyll meter can be used to obtain a quick estimation of mangosteen leaf N status. Keywords: age, fruiting position, Garcinia mangostana L., nitrogen, SPAD

  1. Effect of nitrogen supply on leaf appearance, leaf growth, leaf nitrogen economy and photosynthetic capacity in maize (Zea mays L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, J.; Putten, van der P.E.L.; Birch, C.J.

    2005-01-01

    Leaf area growth and nitrogen concentration per unit leaf area, Na (g m-2 N) are two options plants can use to adapt to nitrogen limitation. Previous work indicated that potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) adapts the size of leaves to maintain Na and photosynthetic capacity per unit leaf area. This paper

  2. Age-dependent variation in membrane lipid synthesis in leaves of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellgren, Lars; Sandelius, A.S.

    2001-01-01

    leaf of older plants, acetate was predominantly allocated into phosphatidylglycerol (PG), which remained the major radiolabelled lipid during the 3 d studied. The proportion of radioactivity recovered in MGDG decreased with increasing plant age up to 20 d, suggesting that, in expanded leaves, MGDG...... is more stable and requires renewal to a lower extent than PG. When the second oldest leaf approached senescence, labelling of MGDG again increased, indicating an increased need for thylakoid repair. The proportion of acetate allocated into phosphatidylethanolamine and free sterols was largest in leaves...... of 18-26-d-old plants and in the youngest leaves, respectively. Thus, these results demonstrate that the distribution of newly synthesized fatty acids between acyl lipid synthesis in the chloroplast and extraplastidial membranes strongly varies with leaf age, as do the proportion utilized for sterol...

  3. In-vitro Sensitivity of Selected Enteric Bacteria to Extracts of Allium sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa O. AREKEMASE

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Garlic has been used throughout all of recorded history for culinary and medicinal reasons. The portion of the plant most often consumed is an underground storage structure called a head. The antimicrobial effects of Allium sativum (garlic against some bacterial isolates were investigated using the agar diffusion well method. Standard methods were used to carry out the investigation. Photochemical analyses of the ethanolic extracts showed the presence of many secondary metabolites such as saponins, tannins, alkaloid steroids and glycosides. The minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration of the agent (garlic was determined for both the aqueous and ethanolic extract. The ethanolic extract was more effective than the aqueous extract, inhibiting all the test organisms. While the aqueous extracts was effective against Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Garlic extracts are strictly broad-spectrum with immune boosting phytonutrients from Allium ‘family’. Further research will need to be done to carry out the purification of the active ingredients which have potential for combating human disease. Also, toxicological studies need to be evaluated.

  4. Quality control and in vitro antioxidant potential of Coriandrum sativum Linn.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mhaveer Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Coriandrum sativum Linn., commonly known as coriander, is a well-known spice and drug in India. It has various health-related benefits and used in various Unani formulations. In this present study, quality assessment of coriander fruits was carried out by studying anatomical characters, physicochemical tests, and chemoprofiling using high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy (GC-MS along with in vitro antioxidant potential. Materials and Methods: Standardization was carried out as per the pharmacopeial guidelines. Estimation of heavy metals, pesticides, and aflatoxins was carried out to ascertain the presence of any contaminant in the sample. Chemoprofiling was achieved by thin layer chromatography (TLC by optimizing the mobile phase for different extracts. The most of the pharmacological activities of coriander are based on volatile oil constituents. Hence, GC-MS profiling was also carried out using hexane-soluble fraction of hydro-alcoholic extract. The total phenolic contents and in vitro antioxidant efficacy were determined using previously established methods. Results: The quality control and anatomical studies were very valuable for the identification whereas good antioxidant potential was observed when compared to ascorbic acid. The drug was found free of contaminant when analyzed for pesticides and aflatoxins whereas heavy metals were found under reported limits. Conclusion: The work embodied in this present research can be utilized for the identification and the quality control of the coriander fruit.

  5. Effect of Pisum sativum as protein supplement on buffalo milk production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Grassi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out at an organic buffalo dairy farm in order to investigate the effect of feeding protein peas (Pisum sativum L. as an alternative protein source for buffalo cow diets. Two concentrates were formulated to contain (as fed basis either 350 g/kg of soybean cake (SC or 450 g/kg of peas (PC as the main protein sources. The two concentrates were formulated to be almost isonitrogenous (on average crude protein 240 g/kg DM. Two groups of 10 buffalo cows were used in a 100-day lactation study (from 10 days in milk onwards. Cows were blocked into two groups according to lactation number and previous milk yield and were assigned to one of two dietary treatments: control group was offered in the milking parlour 3 kg of SC, while treatment group was offered the same quantity of PC. All cows were fed a total mixed ration containing 3 kg of SC. Daily milk yield was not affected by treatment, as well as, milk fat and protein percentages, somatic cell count, urea content and fatty acid composition.

  6. Extracellular production of reactive oxygen species during seed germination and early seedling growth in Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kranner, Ilse; Roach, Thomas; Beckett, Richard P; Whitaker, Claire; Minibayeva, Farida V

    2010-07-01

    Extracellularly produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play key roles in plant development, but their significance for seed germination and seedling establishment is poorly understood. Here we report on the characteristics of extracellular ROS production during seed germination and early seedling development in Pisum sativum. Extracellular superoxide (O2(.-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production and the activity of extracellular peroxidases (ECPOX) were determined spectrophotometrically, and O2(.-) was identified by electron paramagnetic resonance. Cell wall fractionation of cotyledons, seed coats and radicles was used in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to investigate substrate specificity and molecular masses of O2(.-)-producing enzymes, and the forces that bind them to the cell wall. Seed imbibition was accompanied by an immediate, transient burst of redox activity that involved O2(.-) and other substances capable of oxidizing epinephrine, and also H2O2. At the final stages of germination, coinciding with radicle elongation, a second increase in O2(.-) but not H2O2 production occurred and was correlated with an increase in extracellular ECPOX activity. Electrophoretic analyses of cell wall fractions demonstrated the presence of enzymes capable of O2(.-) production. The significance of extracellular ROS production during seed germination and early seedling development, and also during seed aging, is discussed. 2010 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Micromonospora cremea sp. nov. and Micromonospora zamorensis sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of Pisum sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Lorena; Pukall, Rüdiger; Spröer, Cathrin; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Trujillo, Martha E

    2012-12-01

    Three actinobacterial strains, CR30(T), CR36 and CR38(T), were isolated from rhizosphere soil of Pisum sativum plants collected in Spain. The strains were filamentous, Gram-stain-positive and produced single spores. Phylogenetic, chemotaxonomic and morphological analyses confirmed that the three strains belonged to the genus Micromonospora. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis of strains CR30(T) and CR36 showed a close relationship to Micromonospora coriariae NAR01(T) (99.3% similarity) while strain CR38(T) had a similarity of 99.0% with Micromonospora saelicesensis Lupac 09(T). In addition, gyrB gene phylogeny clearly differentiated the novel isolates from recognized Micromonospora species. DNA-DNA hybridization, BOX-PCR and ARDRA profiles confirmed that these strains represent novel genomic species. The cell-wall peptidoglycan of strains CR30(T) and CR38(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid. Both strains had MK-10(H(4)) as the main menaquinone and a phospholipid type II pattern. An array of physiological tests also differentiated the isolates from their closest neighbours. Considering all the data obtained, it is proposed that strains CR30(T) and CR36 represent a novel species under the name Micromonospora cremea sp. nov. (type strain CR30(T) = CECT 7891(T) = DSM 45599(T)), whereas CR38(T) represents a second novel species, for which the name Micromonospora zamorensis sp. nov. is proposed, with CR38(T) ( = CECT 7892(T) = DSM 45600(T)) as the type strain.

  8. Micromonospora halotolerans sp. nov., isolated from the rhizosphere of a Pisum sativum plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Lorena; Pukall, Rüdiger; Spröer, Cathrin; Kroppenstedt, Reiner M; Trujillo, Martha E

    2013-06-01

    A filamentous actinomycete strain designated CR18(T) was isolated on humic acid agar from the rhizosphere of a Pisum sativum plant collected in Spain. This isolate was observed to grow optimally at 28 °C, pH 7.0 and in the presence of 5 % NaCl. Phylogenetic analyses based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence indicated a close relationship with the type strains of Micromonospora chersina and Micromonospora endolithica. A further analysis based on a concatenated DNA sequence stretch of 4,523 bp that included partial sequences of the atpD, gyrB, recA, rpoB and 16S rRNA genes clearly differentiated the new strain from recognized Micromonospora species compared. DNA-DNA hybridization studies further supported the taxonomic position of strain CR18(T) as a novel genomic species. Chemotaxonomic analyses which included whole cell sugars, polar lipids, fatty acid profiles and menaquinone composition confirmed the affiliation of the new strain to the genus Micromonospora and also highlighted differences at the species level. These studies were finally complemented with an array of physiological tests to help differentiate between the new strain and its phylogenetic neighbours. Consequently, strain CR18(T) (= CECT 7890(T) = DSM 45598(T)) is proposed as the type strain of a novel species, Micromonospora halotolerans sp. nov.

  9. Characterization of Active Compounds of Different Garlic (Allium sativum L. Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szychowski Konrad A.

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Garlic (Allium sativum L. has a reputation as a therapeutic agent for many different diseases such as microbial infections, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia, diabetes, atherosclerosis and cancer. Health benefits of garlic depend on its content of biologically-active compounds, which differs between cultivars and geographical regions. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the biological activity of aqueous extracts from nine garlic varieties from different countries (Poland, Spain, China, Portugal, Burma, Thailand and Uzbekistan. Antioxidant properties were evaluated through free radical scavenging (DPPH•, ABTS•+ and ion chelation (Fe2+, Cu2+ activities. The cytotoxicity of garlic extracts was evaluated in vitro using Neutral Red Uptake assay in normal human skin fibroblasts. The obtained results revealed that garlic extracts contained the highest amount of syringic and p-hydroxybenzoic acids derivatives. The lowest IC50 values for DPPH•, ABTS•+ scavenging and Cu2+ chelating ability were determined in Chinese garlic extracts (4.63, 0.43 and 14.90 μg/mL, respectively. Extracts from Spanish cultivar Morado and Chinese garlic were highly cytotoxic to human skin fibroblasts as they reduced cellular proliferation by 70–90%. We showed diverse contents of proteins and phenolic components in garlic bulbs from different varieties. The obtained results could help to choose the cultivars of garlic which contain significant amounts of active compounds, have important antioxidant properties and display low antiproliferative effect and/or low cytotoxicity against normal human skin fibroblast BJ.

  10. ALCOHOLIC TINCTURE OF GARLIC (Allium sativum ON GASTROINTESTINAL ENDOPARASITES OF SHEEP- SHORT COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Carlini Cunha Santos

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The continuous and indiscriminate use of anthelmintic drugs has caused a growing problem of parasite resistance to conventional treatments. In this context, plant essential oils and active components can be used as alternatives or in association with current anthel¬mintic treatment. Garlic (Allium sativum is a herbal medicine with various therapeutic properties: immunostimulating, anticancer, hepatoprotective, antioxidant, antiviral, antifungal and antiparasitic. The aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of garlic alcoholic tincture on gastrointestinal endoparasites of sheep. For this, 54 sheep were randomly divided into three treatments. Treatment 1 (T1 received 40 g of garlic alcoholic tincture orally; treatment 2 (T2 received 60 g orally; T3 was the control group. Fecal samples were collected at days 0, 7 and 14, to perform laboratorial tests. Reduction of eggs per gram of feces in T1 and T2 was 0% on days 7 and 14. No difference in larvae genus was identified between treatments or days. In this experiment garlic alcoholic tincture presented no effect on gastrointestinal endoparasites of sheep.

  11. Biological activity of alpha-galactoside preparations from Lupinus angustifolius L. and Pisum sativum L. seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulewicz, Piotr; Szymaniec, Stanisław; Bubak, Barbara; Frias, Juana; Vidal-Valverde, Concepcion; Trojanowska, Krystyna; Gulewicz, Krzysztof

    2002-01-16

    Biological activity tests were performed on alpha-galactoside preparations obtained from Lupinus angustifolius L. cv. Mirela (alkaloid-rich) and Pisum sativum L. cv. Opal seeds. The studies included the following tests: acute toxicity, cytotoxic test, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH), plaque-forming cell number (IgM-PFC), and influence on the growth of bifidobacteria and coliform presence in rat colon. Results of these studies showed that alpha-galactosides from lupin and pea seeds were essentially nontoxic. Their acute toxicity (LD(50)) in mice was >4000 mg kg(-1) of body weight. alpha-galactoside preparations were not cytotoxic for mouse thymocytes in vitro. The in vitro test shows that oligosaccharides from lupin and pea are utilized by selected beneficial colon bacterium strains. The in vivo experiment demonstrated that alpha-galactosides from legume significantly influenced the growth of bifidobacteria in rats colon. Simultaneously, the decrease of the coliform presence was observed. The chemical composition of the tested preparations had no significant effect on their biological activity.

  12. Growth stimulation of dwarf peas (Pisum sativum L.) through homeopathic potencies of plant growth substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, S; Thurneysen, A; Heusser, P

    2004-10-01

    Efficacy of higher homeopathic potencies is controversial. Universally accepted specific detection assays for homeopathic dilutions do not exist. Basic research has to develop a spectrum of standardized tools to investigate the mode of action and nature of homeopathic potencies. Can the shoot growth reaction of dwarf peas (gibberellin- deficient mutants) be regarded as evidence of treatment with homeopathic potencies of plant growth substances? Pea seed (Pisum sativum L. cv. Fruher Zwerg) is immersed for 24 hours in homeopathic potency or control solutions for soaking. Plants germinate and grow in a standard cultivation substrate under controlled environmental conditions. Shoot length is measured 14 days after planting. A screening of homeopathic potencies (12x-30x) of four different plant growth substances revealed biological activity of certain potency levels of gibberellin and kinetin (p Growth stimulation through gibberellin 17x (5 x 10(-18 M)) was assessed in six independent replications; results confirmed those of the screening (p effect of gibberellin 17x seemed to weaken during the course of the experiments. The results back the hypothesis that homeopathic potencies of plant growth substances affect pea shoot growth. Dwarf peas might thus be an interesting system model for studying the action of homeopathic potencies. Further work is required to identify all boundary conditions modulating the reactivity of this system.

  13. Receptors of garlic (Allium sativum) lectins and their role in insecticidal action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Santosh K; Singh, Pradhyumna K

    2012-08-01

    Garlic (Allium sativum) lectins are promising candidate molecules for the protection against chewing (lepidopteran) as well as sap sucking (homopteran) insect pests. Molecular mechanism of toxicity and interaction of lectins with midgut receptor proteins has been described in many reports. Lectins show its effect right from sensory receptors of mouth parts by disrupting the membrane integrity and food detection ability. Subsequently, enter into the gut lumen and interact with midgut glycosylated proteins like alkaline phosphatase (ALP), aminopeptidase-N (APN), cadherin-like proteins, polycalins, sucrase, symbionin and others. These proteins play critical role in life cycle of insect directly or indirectly. Lectins interfere with the activity of these proteins and causes physiological disorders leading to the death of insects. Lectins further transported across the insect gut, accumulated in various body parts (like haemolymph and ovary) and interact with intracellular proteins like symbionin and cytochrome p450. Binding with cytochrome p450 (which involve in ecdysone synthesis) might interfere in the development of insects, which results in growth retardation and pre-mature death.

  14. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation of leek (Allium porrum) and garlic (Allium sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eady, Colin; Davis, Sheree; Catanach, Andrew; Kenel, Fernand; Hunger, Sarah

    2005-06-01

    Transgenic leek (Allium porrum) and garlic (Allium sativum) plants have been recovered by the selective culturing of immature leek and garlic embryos via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation using a method similar to that described by Eady et al. (Plant Cell Rep 19:376-381, 2000) for onion transformation. This method involved the use of a binary vector containing the m-gfp-ER reporter gene and nptII selectable marker, and followed the protocol developed previously for the transformation of onions with only minor modifications pertaining to the post-transformation selection procedure which was simplified to have just a single selection regime. Transgenic cultures were selected for their ability to express the m-gfp-ER reporter gene and grown in the presence of geneticin (20 mg/l). The presence of transgenes in the genome of the plants was confirmed using TAIL-PCR and Southern analysis. This is the first report of leek and "true seed" garlic transformation. It now makes possible the integration of useful agronomic and quality traits into these crops.

  15. The role of cytokinins in the regulation of apical dominance in Pisum sativum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Firstly, the response of all lateral buds on the plant to decapitation of the shoot apex, and the subsequent growth of these buds, was documented. Secondly, a quantitative study of the biological responses which result from the application of a cytokinin to a lateral bud were performed. The different abilities of ten cytokinins tested to release lateral buds from dominance paralleled their activity in a soybean callus bioassay, and were likely a result of the intrinsic activities of the cytokinins due to their structure and their subsequent metabolism in the plant following application. Finally, the metabolism of ({sup 3}H)isopentenyladenine in the intact plant or in isolated explants was investigated in an attempt to relate the biosynthesis, transport, interconversion and degradation of cytokinins to the developmental process of apical dominance. Comparison of the uptake and metabolism of ({sup 3}H)isopentenyladenine by isolated organs of Pisum sativum indicated that the roots, leaves and stems, but not isolated lateral buds had the capacity to metabolize ({sup 3}H)isopentenyladenine to zeatin metabolites.

  16. Essential oil composition of the coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. herb depending on the development stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Nurzyńska-Wierdak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The herbal material of Coriandrum sativum is the fruit. Fresh herb is also used as an aromatic spice. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the content and chemical composition of coriander herb obtained at different plant growth stages. Coriander plants were grown in a glasshouse, the herb was harvested at the initial stage of flowering and from regrowing shoots. Essential oil extraction from the herb was performed by the hydrodistillation method, whereas the assessment of the chemical composition – using GC-MS method. The examined material contained 0.17–0.29 ml × 100g-1 of essential oil, depending on the stage of plant development when the harvest was done. 61 (generative phase and 65 (vegetative phase compounds were found in the examined coriander oil. The essential oil from the coriander herb contained the highest amount of aliphatic aldehydes, among which was decanal, E-2-dodecanol and E-2-decenol had the highest percentages. The contents of most aliphatic aldehydes decreased with each subsequent harvest of the herb. In addition to the above-mentioned aliphatic aldehydes, the presence of linalool, phytol, and oleic acid was found in the essential oil extracted from the coriander herb.

  17. Toxicity assessment of cerium oxide nanoparticles in cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.) plants grown in organic soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Maria Isabel; Rico, Cyren M; Hernandez-Viezcas, Jose Angel; Nunez, Jose E; Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Tafoya, Alejandro; Flores-Marges, Juan Pedro; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2013-07-03

    Studies have shown that CeO₂ nanoparticles (NPs) can be accumulated in plants without modification, which could pose a threat for human health. In this research, cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.) plants were germinated and grown for 30 days in soil amended with 0 to 500 mg kg⁻¹ CeO₂ NPs and analyzed by spectroscopic techniques and biochemical assays. At 125 mg kg⁻¹, plants produced longer roots (p ≤ 0.05), and at 500 mg kg⁻¹, there was higher Ce accumulation in tissues (p ≤ 0.05). At 125 mg, catalase activity significantly increased in shoots and ascorbate peroxidase in roots (p ≤ 0.05). The FTIR analyses revealed that at 125 mg kg⁻¹ the CeO₂ NPs changed the chemical environment of carbohydrates in cilantro shoots, for which changes in the area of the stretching frequencies were observed. This suggests that the CeO₂ NPs could change the nutritional properties of cilantro.

  18. Crayfish chitosan for microencapsulation of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) essential oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duman, Fatih; Kaya, Murat

    2016-11-01

    In this study, chitosan, which was obtained from the waste shells of crayfish (Astacus leptodactylus), was used for the encapsulation of the essential oil isolated from coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) via the spray drying method. The obtained capsules were characterized using SEM, FT-IR, TGA and XRD. The size of the microcapsules was between 400nm - 7μm. It was determined that the swelling characteristic of the capsules was pH sensitive. The release showed bi-phasic characteristics and the maximum degree was reached after 72h. Antimicrobial activity studies showed that pure chitosan more effective than the capsule. The antioxidant activity was recorded concentration-dependent. In contrast the antimicrobial activity, antioxidant activity of the capsule was found much higher than the oil and the pure chitosan. Consequently, it was determined that this product could be used in the food and pharmaceutical industries as a natural antioxidant and antimicrobial agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Raw Crushed Garlic (Allium sativum L.) on Components of Metabolic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Prema Ram; Jani, Rameshchandra D; Sharma, Megh Shyam

    2017-09-28

    Metabolic syndrome consists of a group of risk factors characterized by abdominal obesity, hypertension, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and prothrombotic and proinflammatory conditions. Raw garlic homogenate has been reported to reduce serum lipid levels in animal model; however, no precise studies have been performed to evaluate the effect of raw crushed garlic (Allium sativum L.) on components of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the effect of raw crushed garlic on components of metabolic syndrome. A total of 40 metabolic syndrome patients were randomly selected from the diabetic center of SP Medical College, Bikaner, Rajasthan, India. They underwent treatment with 100 mg/kg body weight raw crushed garlic 2 times a day with standard diet for 4 weeks; their anthropometric and serum biochemical variables were measured at both the beginning and the end of the study. Statistical analysis was performed using IBM SPSS version 20, and Student's paired "t" test was used to compare variables before and after treatment with garlic preparation. Raw crushed garlic significantly reduced components of metabolic syndrome including waist circumference (p .05) of patients with metabolic syndrome after consumption of raw crushed garlic for 4 weeks. Raw crushed garlic has beneficial effects on components of metabolic syndrome; therefore, it can be used as an accompanying remedy for prevention and treatment of patients with metabolic syndrome.

  20. Therapeutic Effects of Allium sativum and Allium cepa in Schistosoma mansoni experimental infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona Mohamed Mantawy

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of both garlic (Allium sativum and onion (Allium cepa on some biochemical parameters in Schistosoma mansoni infected mice individually and mixed either with or without the currently used drug, praziquantel (PZQ were investigated. These involved some immunological parameters, namely IgM, IgG, interleukins 2 and 6 (IL-2 and 6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, some antioxidant enzymes [catalase, superoxide dismutase (SOD and glutathione peroxidase (GPX]. In addition, parasitological and histopathological investigations were performed. No changes were observed in the normal control mice treated with dry extract of onion or garlic, individually or mixed, with or without PZQ, compared to the normal healthy control group. Infection with S. mansoni showed an increase in IgG, IgM, IL-2, IL-6, TNF-α and catalase enzyme, accompanied with a decrease in GPX and SOD antioxidant enzyme activities. Remarkable amelioration was noticed in the levels of all the measured parameters in S. mansoni infected mice after administration of the studied extracts. Moreover a significant reduction in worm burden, hepatic and intestinal eggs and oogram count was noticed which was reflected in normalization of liver architecture.

  1. De Novo Assembly of the Pea (Pisum sativum L. Nodule Transcriptome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A. Zhukov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The large size and complexity of the garden pea (Pisum sativum L. genome hamper its sequencing and the discovery of pea gene resources. Although transcriptome sequencing provides extensive information about expressed genes, some tissue-specific transcripts can only be identified from particular organs under appropriate conditions. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing of polyadenylated transcripts from young pea nodules and root tips on an Illumina GAIIx system, followed by de novo transcriptome assembly using the Trinity program. We obtained more than 58,000 and 37,000 contigs from “Nodules” and “Root Tips” assemblies, respectively. The quality of the assemblies was assessed by comparison with pea expressed sequence tags and transcriptome sequencing project data available from NCBI website. The “Nodules” assembly was compared with the “Root Tips” assembly and with pea transcriptome sequencing data from projects indicating tissue specificity. As a result, approximately 13,000 nodule-specific contigs were found and annotated by alignment to known plant protein-coding sequences and by Gene Ontology searching. Of these, 581 sequences were found to possess full CDSs and could thus be considered as novel nodule-specific transcripts of pea. The information about pea nodule-specific gene sequences can be applied for gene-based markers creation, polymorphism studies, and real-time PCR.

  2. Organic meat quality of dual purpose young bulls supplemented with pea (Pisum sativum L.) or soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzin, Mirco; Piasentier, Edi; Saccà, Elena; Bazzoli, Ilario; Bovolenta, Stefano

    2018-02-01

    One of the main constraints established by organic legislation that limits the development of the rearing of young bulls is the ban on the use of genetically modified organisms (GMO). Most of the worldwide cultivated soybean is GMO, therefore the use of alternative protein sources should be evaluated. In this study, the effect of dietary substitution of soybean with pea (Pisum sativum L.) on carcass characteristics and meat quality of dual purpose young bulls reared following the organic method was investigated. Twenty-four young bulls of Rendena breed were randomly assigned to two diet treatments differing in protein supplement (soybean (SB) or field pea (FP)). Carcass characteristics and meat chemical composition, colour, cooking loss and Warner-Bratzler shear force did not differ between groups. Regarding meat fatty acid composition, SB showed higher concentrations of C18:0 and C18:1 t and lower C16:1n-9c, C14:0, C17:1n-9c and C18:1n-9c than FP. In descriptive sensory analysis, trained judges were not able to differentiate meats from SB and FP, which also had similar overall liking expressed by consumers. The results of this study indicate that FP can replace SB in the diet of dual purpose young bulls with only a minor influence on fatty acid composition and no effect on carcass characteristics and meat quality. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Adaptation of plum pox virus to a herbaceous host (Pisum sativum) following serial passages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Christopher M; Stone, Andrew L; Sherman, Diana J; Damsteegt, Vernon D; Gildow, Fred E; Schneider, William L

    2007-10-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) populations from peaches are able to adapt consistently to herbaceous hosts, characterized by a reduction in time to symptom development, increases in inoculation efficiency and increased titres. PPV adaptation was studied by using pea (Pisum sativum) as an alternative host. Two isolates of PPV from peaches were inoculated and passaged in peas ten times using either aphid or mechanical inoculation, generating four independent passage lines. Mechanical-transmission efficiency from peach to pea improved from 3 % at passage 1 to 100 % by serial passage 4 on peas. Inoculation using aphid vectors required six to ten serial passages in pea to reach a peak of 50-60 % transmission efficiency. Sequence analyses of all four PPV population lines inoculated sequentially to pea identified a specific mutation occurring consistently in the NIb gene when compared with the same PPV isolates passaged in parallel in peach. The mutation allowed PPV to replicate up to 20 times faster in the new host. Pea-adapted strains of PPV at every passage were also tested for their ability to infect the original host, peach. Regardless of the number of previous passages, all pea-adapted PPV strains consistently infected peach at low levels using aphid inoculation.

  4. Garlic (Allium sativum) feeding impairs Sertoli cell junctional proteins in male Wistar rat testis: microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, I; Nahdi, A; Atig, F; El May, A; El May, M V

    2016-12-01

    Sertoli cell junctions, such as adhesion junction (AJ), gap junction (GJ) and tight junction (TJ), are important for maintaining spermatogenesis. In previous studies, we showed the inhibitory effect of crude garlic (Allium sativum, As) on spermatogenesis and steroidogenesis. The aim of this work was to complete our investigation on the impact of this plant, especially on Sertoli cell junctional proteins (SCJPs). During 1 month, 24 male rats were divided into groups: group control (0% of As) and treated groups fed 5%, 10% and 15% of As. Light and electron microscopy observations were performed to localise junctional proteins: connexin-43, Zona Occluding-1 and N-cadherin (immunohistochemistry) and to describe junctions. We showed that the specific cells involved in the localisation of the SCJP were similar in both control and treated groups, but with different immunoreactivity intensity between them. The electron microscopy observation focused on TJs between Sertoli cells, constituting the blood-testis barrier, showed ultrastructural changes such as fragmentation of TJs between adjacent Sertoli cell membranes and dilatation of rough endoplasmic reticulum saccules giving an aspect of scale to these junctions. We concluded that crude garlic consumption during 1 month induces perturbations on Sertoli cell junctions. These alterations can explain apoptosis in testicular germ cells previously showed. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Allium sativum L. Improves Visual Memory and Attention in Healthy Human Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnim, Sara; Haque, Parsa Sanjana; Bari, Md. Sazzadul; Hossain, Md. Monir; Islam, Sardar Mohd. Ashraful; Shahriar, Mohammad; Bhuiyan, Mohiuddin Ahmed; Bin Sayeed, Muhammad Shahdaat

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown that Allium sativum L. (AS) protects amyloid-beta peptide-induced apoptosis, prevents oxidative insults to neurons and synapses, and thus prevent Alzheimer's disease progression in experimental animals. However, there is no experimental evidence in human regarding its putative role in memory and cognition. We have studied the effect of AS consumption by healthy human volunteers on visual memory, verbal memory, attention, and executive function in comparison to control subjects taking placebo. The study was conducted over five weeks and twenty volunteers of both genders were recruited and divided randomly into two groups: A (AS) and B (placebo). Both groups participated in the 6 computerized neuropsychological tests of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) twice: at the beginning and after five weeks of the study. We found statistically significant difference (p 0.05) beneficial effects on verbal memory and executive function within a short period of time among the volunteers. Study for a longer period of time with patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases might yield more relevant results regarding the potential therapeutic role of AS. PMID:26351508

  6. The relaxant effect induced by Allium sativum L. bulb aqueous extract on rat isolated trachea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehri, Badreddine; Ahmed, Mueen K.K.; Aiache, Jean-Marc

    2011-01-01

    Background: Garlic plays an important role in complementary and alternative medicine. Most people believe in and use herbal products even when they have not been as thoroughly researched as garlic. Garlic is also known for its beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. Materials and Methods: The relaxant effect of Allium sativum L. bulb aqueous extract (ASBAE) containing 0.06%-0.10% of allicin was studied on isolated smooth muscle of trachea of rats precontracted using acetylcholine (10−5 M). Results: It was found that ASBAE induced a dose-dependent relaxation with recorded EC 50 values of 71.87 ± 5.90 µg/mL (n = 7). Pretreatments with mepyramine (10−7 M), methysergide (10−7 M), caffeine (10−6 M), theophylline (10−6 M), nifedipine (10−6 M), and dipyridamole (10−6 M) did not alter ASBAE concentration-response curves. In turn, concentration-response curves to ASBAE were significantly shifted toward right in the presence of aspirin (3.10−3 M), indomethacin (10−6 M), prazosin (10−6 M), and propranolol (10−7 M). Conclusion: It is suggested that the recorded relaxation results are due to the release of prostaglandins E 1 and E 2 consecutively to α- and β-adrenoreceptor stimulation. PMID:21472073

  7. Amelioration of lead-induced hepatotoxicity by Allium sativum extracts in Swiss albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arti; Sharma, Veena; Kansal, Leena

    2010-01-01

    Lead is a blue–gray and highly toxic divalent metal that occurs naturally in the earth's crust and is spread throughout the environment by various human activities. The efficacy of garlic (Allium sativum) to reduce hepatotoxicity induced by lead nitrate was evaluated experimentally in male mice. Oral treatment with lead nitrate at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight daily for 40 days (1/45 of LD50) induced a significant increase in the levels of hepatic aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, cholesterol, lipid peroxidation, and lead nitrate. In parallel, hepatic protein levels in lead-exposed mice were significantly depleted. Lead nitrate exposure also produced detrimental effects on the redox status of the liver indicated by a significant decline in the levels of liver antioxidants such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione. After exposure to lead nitrate (50 mg/kg body weight for 10 days), the animals received aqueous garlic extract (250 mg/kg body weight and 500 mg/kg body weight) and ethanolic garlic extract (100 mg/kg body weight and 250 mg/kg body weight), and partially restored the deranged parameters significantly. Histological examination of the liver also revealed pathophysiological changes in lead nitrate-exposed group and treatment with garlic improved liver histology. Our data suggest that garlic is a phytoantioxidant that can counteract the deleterious effects of lead nitrate. PMID:21483544

  8. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles by Allium sativum extract and their assessment as SERS substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Cristina; Leopold, Loredana Florina; Rugină, Olivia Dumitriţa; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Leopold, Nicolae; Tofană, Maria; Socaciu, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    A green synthesis was used for preparing stable colloidal gold nanoparticles by using Allium sativum aqueous extract both as reducing and capping agent. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and transmission electron microscopy. Moreover, their potential to be used as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate was investigated. The obtained gold nanoparticles have spherical shape with mean diameters of 9-15 nm (depending on the amount of reducing agent used under boiling conditions) and are stable up to several months. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the nanoparticles are capped by protein molecules from the extract. The protein shell offers a protective coating, relatively impervious to external molecules, thus, rendering the nanoparticles stable and quite inert. These nanoparticles have the potential to be used as SERS substrates, both in solution and inside human fetal lung fibroblast HFL-1 living cells. We were able to demonstrate both the internalization of the nanoparticles inside HFL-1 cells and their ability to preserve the SERS signal after cellular internalization.

  9. Mining, characterization and validation of EST derived microsatellites from the transcriptome database of Allium sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Subodh Kumar; Nanda, Satyabrata; Rout, Ellojita; Joshi, Raj Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) with comprehensive transcript information are valuable resources for development of molecular markers as they are derived from conserved genic regions. The present study highlights the mining of EST database to deduce the class I hyper variable SSRs in A. sativum. From 21694 garlic EST sequences, 642 non-redundant SSRs were identified with an average frequency of 1 per 14.9 kb of garlic transcriptome. The most abundant SSR motifs were the mononucleotides (32.86%) followed by trinucleotides (28.50%) and dinucleotides (13.39%). Among the individual SSRs, (A/T)n accounted for the highest number (137; 21.33%) followed by (G/C)n (74; 11.52%) and (AAG)n (63;9.81%). Primers designed from a robust set of 7 AsESTSSRs resulted in the amplification of 63 polymorphic alleles in 14 accessions of garlic. The resolving power of the markers varied from 4.286 (AsSSR7) to 18.143 (AsSSR13) while the average marker index (MI) was 5.087. These EST-SSRs markers for garlic could be useful for the improvement of garlic linkage map and could be used for evaluating genetic variation and comparative genomics studies in Allium species.

  10. Inhibitory effects of Enteromorpha linza polysaccharide on micronucleus of Allium sativum root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongshan; Wang, Xiaomei; Li, Jingfen; Liu, Chongbin; Zhang, Quanbin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the antimutagenic function of the polysaccharide from Enteromorpha linza with the micronucleus test of Allium sativum root cells induced by sulfur dioxide and ultraviolet was studied. The concentration-effect relation of the two inducers was firstly evaluated. The results showed that an increase of genotoxicity damage was demonstrated and micronuclei frequency induced by sulfur dioxide and ultraviolet displayed dose dependent increases. All the doses of polysaccharide did affect the micronuclei frequency formation compared with the negative control. And also, the significant increase in inhibition rate of micronuclei frequency was observed with the increase of the dose of polysaccharide. It was showed maximum inhibition of micronuclei frequency cells (71.74% and 66.70%) at a concentration of 200g/mL in three experiments. The low molecular weight polysaccharide showed higher inhibition rate than raw polysaccharide at the higher concentration (50g/mL) in the absence of sulfur dioxide and ultraviolet. It was confirmed to be a good mutant inhibitor. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A novel natural compound from garlic (Allium sativum L.) with therapeutic effects against experimental polymicrobial sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Kyun; Park, Yoo Jung; Ko, Min Jung; Wang, Ziyu; Lee, Ha Young; Choi, Young Whan; Bae, Yoe-Sik

    2015-08-28

    Sepsis is a serious, life-threatening, infectious disease. In this study, we demonstrate that sucrose methyl 3-formyl-4-methylpentanoate (SMFM), a novel natural compound isolated from garlic (Allium sativum L.), markedly enhances survival rates by inhibiting lung inflammation in a cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) experimental polymicrobial sepsis model. SMFM strongly reduced bacterial colony units from peritoneal fluid in CLP mice by stimulating the generation of reactive oxygen species. Lymphocyte apoptosis in spleens from CLP mice was also markedly decreased by SMFM administration. SMFM also significantly inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α, interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-6, in CLP mice. Lipopolysaccharide-stimulated production of TNF-α and IL-6 were also strongly inhibited by SMFM in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages. Taken together, our results indicate that SMFM has therapeutic effects against polymicrobial sepsis that are mediated by enhanced microbial killing and blockage of cytokine storm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Antifungal saponins from bulbs of garlic, Allium sativum L. var. Voghiera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzotti, Virginia; Barile, Elisa; Antignani, Vincenzo; Bonanomi, Giuliano; Scala, Felice

    2012-06-01

    A bioassay-guided phytochemical analysis of the polar extract from the bulbs of garlic, Allium sativum L., var. Voghiera, typical of Voghiera, Ferrara (Italy), allowed the isolation of ten furostanol saponins; voghieroside A1/A2 and voghieroside B1/B2, based on the rare agapanthagenin aglycone; voghieroside C1/C2, based on agigenin aglycone; and voghieroside D1/D2 and E1/E2, based on gitogenin aglycone. In addition, we found two known spirostanol saponins, agigenin 3-O-trisaccharide and gitogenin 3-O-tetrasaccharide. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were established through a combination of extensive nuclear magnetic resonance, mass spectrometry and chemical analyses. High concentrations of two eugenol diglycosides were also found for the first time in Allium spp. The isolated compounds were evaluated for their antimicrobial activity towards two fungal species, the air-borne pathogen Botrytis cinerea and the antagonistic fungus Trichoderma harzianum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Phospholipase D from Allium sativum bulbs: A highly active and thermal stable enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, Hafeeza; Talat, Sariya; Younus, Hina

    2008-05-01

    This is the first report on the identification and partial characterization of phospholipase D (EC 3.1.4.4) from Allium sativum (garlic) bulbs (PLD(GB)). The enzyme shares the phenomenon of interfacial activation with other lipolytic enzymes, i.e. the hydrolytic rate increases when the substrate changes to a more aggregated state. The enzyme activity is highly temperature tolerant and the temperature optimum was measured to be 70 degrees C. PLD(GB) unlike many plant PLDs exhibited high thermal stability. It was activated further after exposure to high temperatures, i.e. 80 degrees C, indicating that the enzyme refolds better upon cooling back to room temperature after short exposure to thermal stress. The activity of PLD(GB) is optimum in 70mM calcium ion concentration and the enzyme is activated further in the presence of phosphatidyl-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). PLD(GB) exhibited both hydrolytic and transphosphatidylation activities, both of which appear to be higher than those of PLD from cabbage leaves (PLD(CL)).

  14. Development and Characterization of 37 Novel EST-SSR Markers in Pisum sativum (Fabaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaofeng Zhuang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Simple sequence repeat markers were developed based on expressed sequence tags (EST-SSR and screened for polymorphism among 23 Pisum sativum individuals to assist development and refinement of pea linkage maps. In particular, the SSR markers were developed to assist in mapping of white mold disease resistance quantitative trait loci. Methods and Results: Primer pairs were designed for 46 SSRs identified in EST contiguous sequences assembled from a 454 pyrosequenced transcriptome of the pea cultivar, ‘LIFTER’. Thirty-seven SSR markers amplified PCR products, of which 11 (30% SSR markers produced polymorphism in 23 individuals, including parents of recombinant inbred lines, with two to four alleles. The observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0 to 0.43 and from 0.31 to 0.83, respectively. Conclusions: These EST-SSR markers for pea will be useful for refinement of pea linkage maps, and will likely be useful for comparative mapping of pea and as tools for marker-based pea breeding.

  15. Garlic (Allium sativum: diet based therapy of 21st century–a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafiz Ansar Rasul Suleria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Functional and nutraceutical foods provide an opportunity to improve one’s health by reducing health care costs and to support economic development in rural communities. For this reason, various phyto-based functional foods are becoming popular worldwide owing to number of evidences for their safer therapeutic applications. Garlic (Allium sativum L., is an essential vegetable that has been widely utilized as seasoning, flavoring, culinary and in herbal remedies. The consumption of traditional plants especially garlic has progressively increased worldwide because of their great effectiveness, fewer side effects and relatively low cost. Garlic is well known to contain an array of phytochemicals. These bioactive molecules are playing pivotal role in maintaining human health and having potential to reduce various ailments. It has distinct nutritional profile with special reference to its various bioactive components that can be used in different diet based therapies to cure various life-style related disorders. The present review is an attempt to explore the functional/nutraceutical role of garlic against various threats including dyslipidemia and hyperglycemia, cardiovascular disorders, antioxidant capacity and carcinogenic perspectives.

  16. Effect of salinity and ascorbic acid on growth, water and osmotic relations of Lepidium sativum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Najjar-Khodabakhsh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Soil salinity is a serious environmental problem in arid and semi-arid regions that have negative impacts on crop production. In this research, because of medicinal and nutritional importance of the garden cress (Lepidium sativum plant, the interactive effects of salinity (225 mM NaCl and ascorbic acid (1 mM were evaluated on growth and its water relations. A completely randomized design with four replications was conducted under controlled conditions. The results showed that salinity decreased growth, relative water content, osmotic potential and soluble proteins and increased soluble sugars, amino acids and proline contents. Many of salinity damaged characteristic were improved by adding exogenous ascorbic acid to salty environment. Exogenous ascorbic acid alone, in comparison with control, enhanced the growth of garden cress by increasing relative water content, soluble sugars and soluble proteins contents. The results indicated that usage of ascorbic acid, as an antioxidant, reduced harmful effects of salinity stress and led to growth improvement in garden cress plants.

  17. Genetic divergence and its implication in breeding of desired plant type in coriander -Coriandrum sativum L.-

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh S.P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy germplasm lines of coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. of diverse eco-geographical origin were undertaken in present investigation to determine the genetic divergence following multivariate and canonical analysis for seed yield and its 9 component traits. The 70 genotypes were grouped into 9 clusters depending upon the genetic architecture of genotypes and characters uniformity and confirmed by canonical analysis. Seventy percent of total genotypes (49/70 were grouped in 4 clusters (V, VI, VIII and IX, while apparent diversity was noticed for 30 percent genotypes (21/70 that diverged into 5 clusters (I, II, III, FV, and VII. The maximum inter cluster distance was between I and IV (96.20 followed by III and IV (91.13 and I and VII (87.15. The cluster VI was very unique having genotypes of high mean values for most of the component traits. The cluster VII had highest seeds/umbel (35.3 ± 2.24, and leaves/plant (12.93 ± 0.55, earliest flowering (65.05 ± 1.30 and moderately high mean values for other characters. Considering high mean and inter cluster distance breeding plan has been discussed to select desirable plant types.

  18. Efectos alelopáticos de Rumex Crispus L. sobre Pissum Sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno B. Luis Francisco

    1989-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Se investigaron los efectos alelopáticos de R. Crispus sobre P. sativum mediante 3 ensayos: el primero consistió en incorporar residuos de diferentes partes de la maleza a un cultivo de arveja: los otros dos, en aplicar extractos acuosos y etéricos, en diferentes concentraciones, a semillas de arveja puestas a germinar. El estudio se realizó bajo un diseño completamente al azar en parcelas divididas. El efecto se evaluó mediante la varianza y pruebas de Desviación Standard Media (DSM. Se halló que la maleza inhibe la germinación,  afecta el crecimiento y aspecto de la radicula e incrementa el crecimiento y acumulación de biomasa. Se concluye que la planta presenta alelopatía, mediante inhibidores presentes en las hojas. Esta investigación es de utilidad práctica en manejo de agroecosisternas. Por su carácter preliminar, plantea nuevas investigaciones que deberán hacerse para completar la información adquirida.

  19. Effect of alcoholic extract of garlic (Allium sativum on some food born pathogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghiami Rad

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available According to consumers' desire to consume foods without preservatives or containing a natural preservative, the use of plant extracts as a food preservative instead of chemicals has increased. This study was conducted to determine the antibacterial effect of different concentration of alcoholic extract of garlic (Allium sativum on standard strains of Salmonella enteritidis, Bacillus subtilis, Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia entrocolitica. For this purpose, the agar well diffusion method was used. Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC were measured with microtiter plate method using the rezazurin reagent. The results showed that garlic alcoholic extract had an inhibitory effect on any four tested bacteria. The highest inhibitory effect was observed on B. subtilis;meanwhile,the slightest effect was found on S. enteritidis. The minimum inhibitory concentration of 0.39 mg/ml was observed for B. subtilis, however the highest amount was estimated at 12.5 mg/ml for S. enteritidis. According to the results of recent research it was concluded that alcoholic extract of garlic had appropriate antibacterial impact against bacteria and therefore could be used as a natural preservative in various foods.

  20. Evaluation of genetic divergence and heritability in pea (Pisum sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Georgieva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An experiment on genetic evaluation of five genotypes of forage pea (Glyans, Svit, Kamerton, Modus, Pleven 4 was conducted during 2012-2014 period. Analysis of variance showed significant differences among genotypes for the traits pod width, seeds per plant, seed weight per plant and 1000 seed weight. The estimates of genetic parameters of five varieties of Pisum sativum L. indicated a good amount of genetic variation in the experimental materials under investigation. Moderate phenotypic and genotypic coefficients of variation were observed for most of traits except pod length and pod width. For the traits studied seeds per plant, seed weight per plant and plant height were found high heritability along with high genetic gain indicating preponderance of additive effects. Therefore, selection programme based on these characters would be more effective in improving yield parameters of forage pea. The seed yield was positively and significantly correlated with 1000 seed weight and pod stem, which suggested the possibilities of improving seed yield by simultaneous improvement of these traits.

  1. Studies on antioxidative enzymes induced by cadmium in pea plants (Pisum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Nalini; Singh, Gaurav Kumar

    2012-03-01

    Pea plants (Pisum sativum cv. Swati) exposed to different concentration of cadmium (50,100, 200 microM Cd) under controlled glass house conditions were quantified for different physiological parameters and antioxidative enzymes. In pea plants, Cd produced a significant inhibition of growth and induced chlorosis, marginal yellowing and necrosis in young leaves, the effect being most pronounced at 200 microM Cd supply. An alteration in the activated oxygen metabolism of pea plants were also detected as evidenced by an increase in concentration of H2O2 and TBARS along with decrease in the chlorophyll and carotenoid concentration in leaves. Cadmium toxicity induced an increase in non-protein thiol, ascorbate, proline and cysteine concentration. A significant increment in the activity of SOD, APX and GR, and a decrease in CAT was observed as a result of Cd treatment. The enhanced activity of SOD and inhibition of CAT and POD produces a high build up of H2O2 which appears to be the main cause of oxidative stress due to Cd toxicity in pea plants.

  2. Effects of planting pattern on pea (Pissum sativum L. production in dryland situation of Lorestan province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    karim moosavi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to select optimum spatial arrangement (row and plant space and its effects on grain and biological yield of pea (Pissum sativum L., Spring Pea-2 line, a 2-years (2002-3, and 2003-4 growing season field experiment were conducted in Agricultural Research Station of Kohdasht in Lorestan Province. The experimental design was a split-plot with 4 replications. The experiment had 2 factors: row spacing at 2 levels (30 and 50 cm as main plot, and plant space at 4 levels (5, 10, 15, and 20 cm as subplot. Increase in row space from 30 to 50 cm, and plant space from 5 to 20 cm, reduced pea pod number per unit area by 30, and 67 % , respectively. Pea biomass and seed production showed an asymptotic respopnse to crop density. On the basis of hyperbolic function, maximum grain yield for 2002 and 2003 years were estimated as 2738 and 1067 kg/ha, respectively. On the basis of 2 years results, the maximum grain yield (1050 kg/ha and biomass (3001 kg/ha was belonged to the 30×5 cm spatial arrangement with density of 67 plants/m2. Therefore, this spatial arrangement is recommended for grain or forage production in dryland situation of Lorestan Province and other similar climates.

  3. Comportement agronomique d'une collection de pois (Pisum sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouslama, M.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Agronomical Behaviour of a Pea Collection (Pisum sativum L.. This experience was achieved under greenhouse conditions. Twelve genotypes of pea were used (Asgrow, Jumbo, Lincoln, Merveille de Kelvedon, Purser, Rajai Torpe, Snajor Kosep, Korai,Wando, Rondo, local genotype, Major Kosep Korai and Surgevil. They were cultivated on peat during 5.5 months (from October to April. Some agronomical parameters were studied: resistance to diseases, (Powdery-mildew, mildew, top yellow virus, anthracnose, browning, fresh matter, number of branches/plant, number of flowers/plant, number of pods/ plant and the yield of grains /plant. Results showed that only the genotype Purser is resistant to all diseases and Surgevil is sensitive only to the Top Yellow virus. The local genotype is sensitive to three frequent diseases (Powdery-mildew, mildew and Anthracnose. With regard to vegetative growth, the highest yield of fresh matter do not contribute towards a high fertility rate. In fact, only the genotypes having a weak yield of fresh matter (Snajor Kosep Korai, Asgrow, Major Kosep Korai, Rajai Torpe and Purser have the most important rate of fertility (> 30%. Within this group, the most important yield (> 9 g/plant is a result of high: number of pods/plant (7.5 to 21.6 and of grains/pod (2.8 to 4.92. Finally, genotype Purser should be retained for farmers and programs of genetic amelioration for its resistance to diseases and agronomical performances.

  4. Application of SNPs to improve yield of Pisum sativum L. (pea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmood, Ansar; Murtaza, Ghulam

    2017-06-01

    Nanotechnology opens an enormous scope of novel application in the fields of biotechnology and agricultural industries, because nanoparticles (NPs) have unique physicochemical properties, i.e. high surface area, high reactivity, tunable pore size and particle morphology. Present study was carried out to determine the role of silver NPs (SNPs) to improve yield of Pisum sativum L. SNPs (10-100 nm) were synthesised by green method using extract of Berberis lycium Royle. Pea seeds were soaked and seedling were foliage sprayed by 0, 30, 60 and 90 ppm SNPs. The experiment was arranged as split-split plot randomised complete block design with three replicates. The application of SNPs enhanced significantly number of seeds pod-1, number of pods plant-1, hundred seed weight, biological yield and green pod yield over control. The highest yield was found when 60 ppm SNPs were applied. However, exposure to 90 ppm SNPs, the yield of the pea decreased significantly as compared with 30 and 60 ppm. This research shows that SNPs have definite ability to improve growth and yield of crops. Nevertheless, a comprehensive experimentation is needed to establish the most appropriate concentration, size and mode of application of SNPs for higher growth and maximum yield of pea.

  5. Calculated Leaf Carbon and Nitrogen, 1992 (ACCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Study plot canopy chemistry values were calculated from leaf chemistry and litterfall weight values. Average leaf concentrations of nitrogen and carbon were used to...

  6. An Innovative Way to Monitor Leaf Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnello, A.; Paredes, K.; Trinh, U.; Saleska, S. R.; Wu, J.

    2013-12-01

    Anthony John Garnello, Karina Paredes, Uyen Khanh Ho Trinh, Jin Wu, Scott Saleska Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, USA Abstract: Leaf age is an important characteristic for controlling plant functional performance and is associated with the changes of leaf physical, chemical, and physiological properties. Understanding how plant physiology changes over time will allow more accurate predictions of growth patterns, and a more comprehensive understanding of vegetative life histories. There still lacks an efficient technique in monitoring leaf age, tagging leaves is still the only way to accurately monitor leaf age. The goal of this study is to develop a multi-metric, accurate technique for better monitoring of leaf age. In order to acquire true leaf age records, 10 individual plant species were selected at the University of Arizona campus, and newly flushing leaves were tagged and monitored during the Monsoon season (from early June, 2013, to mid October, 2013). Every 2 weeks, 10 to 15 leaves in relative age order were harvested from each 1-meter branch to measure multiple key leaf metrics, including leaf thickness (via micrometer), fresh and dry weight, fresh and dry area (via ImageJ software), and leaf hyperspectral reflectance (via a handheld ASD Field Pro). Other leaf traits were also derived from our measurements, such as specific leaf area (SLA), leaf density (fresh weight/leaf volume), water percentage, and shrinkage ratio (1-dry area/fresh area). The hyperspectral version of vegetation index (a ratio derived from two spectral channels) was generated for each branch sample, by randomly selecting two channels from within the spectral domain of 350 nm to 2500 nm. The preliminary result documents three types of hyperspectral vegetation index (VI) which are highly related with leaf relative age order (R2>0.9). These include the sensitive spectral domains correlated with (a) leaf pigments (~550nm) and leaf physical

  7. The correlation between leaf-surface and leaf-tissue secondary metabolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheng, Dandan; Mulder, Patrick P.J.; Meijden, van der Eddy; Klinkhamer, Peter G.L.; Vrieling, Klaas

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Usually whole plant or whole leaf extracts are analyzed to study the chemical ecology of insect-plant interactions. For herbivore species the contact with the leaf surface enables them to estimate the quality of the plant. The relationship between the leaf-surface and leaf-tissue

  8. Free amino acid and cysteine sulfoxide composition of 11 garlic (Allium sativum L.) cultivars by gas chromatography with flame ionization and mass selective detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungmin; Harnly, James M

    2005-11-16

    Two garlic subspecies (n = 11), Allium sativum L. var. opioscorodon (hardneck) and Allium sativum L. var. sativum (softneck), were evaluated for their free amino acid composition. The free amino acid content of garlic samples analyzed ranged from 1121.7 to 3106.1 mg/100 g of fresh weight (mean = 2130.7 +/- 681.5 mg/100 g). Hardneck garlic had greater methiin, alliin, and total free amino acids contents compared to softneck garlic. The major free amino acid present in all but one subspecies was glutamine (cv. Mother of Pearl had aspartic acid as the major free amino acid). Cv. Music Pink garlic (a rocambole hardneck variety) contained the most methiin, alliin, and total free amino acids. The solid-phase extraction, alkylchloroformate derivatization, GC-FID, and GC-MS methods used in this study were simple and rapid, allowing 18 free amino acids in garlic to be separated within 10 min.

  9. 7 CFR 29.3034 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3034 Section 29.3034 Agriculture... Leaf scrap. A by-product of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. [24 FR 8771, Oct. 29, 1959. Redesignated at 49 FR...

  10. 7 CFR 29.2277 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2277 Section 29.2277 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Official Standard Grades for Virginia Fire-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Type 21) § 29.2277 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists...

  11. 7 CFR 29.3526 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.3526 Section 29.3526 Agriculture... Type 95) § 29.3526 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. [30 FR 9207, July 23, 1965...

  12. 7 CFR 29.6022 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.6022 Section 29.6022 Agriculture... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6022 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or broken leaves. ...

  13. 7 CFR 29.2529 - Leaf scrap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf scrap. 29.2529 Section 29.2529 Agriculture...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2529 Leaf scrap. A byproduct of unstemmed tobacco. Leaf scrap results from handling unstemmed tobacco and consists of loose and tangled whole or...

  14. 7 CFR 29.1030 - Leaf structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.1030 Section 29.1030 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1030 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See...

  15. 7 CFR 29.3527 - Leaf structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3527 Section 29.3527 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3527 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity. (See...

  16. 7 CFR 29.3035 - Leaf structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.3035 Section 29.3035 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its porosity or solidity. (See Elements...

  17. 7 CFR 29.6023 - Leaf structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Leaf structure. 29.6023 Section 29.6023 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6023 Leaf structure. The cell development of a leaf as indicated by its...

  18. EFEITO DA COBERTURA MORTA NO CRESCIMENTO E NA PRODUÇÃO DO ALHO (Allium sativum L. THE EFFECT OF THE MULCHING IN THE GROWTH AND BULB PRODUCTION OF GARLIC (Allium sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jácomo Divino Borges

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Foi avaliado o efeito das coberturas mortas do solo: palha de arroz, casca de arroz, cepilho de madeira, grama cortada e folhas de árvores, no crescimento e na produção do alho (Allium sativum L. cultivar Cateto Roxo. Os tratamentos de cobertura do solo foram feitos logo após o plantio e em camada suficiente apenas para cobrir o solo. Concluiu-se que a cobertura morta favoreceu o crescimento inicial e a produção de bulbos. Os materiais testados em cobertura do solo mostraram-se equivalentes, porém com tendência para o tratamento com casca de arroz superar os demais.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Alho; AIlium sativum; cobertura morta dos solos; produção.

    The effect of flue mulching in the growth and bulb production of garlic (Allium sativum L. cv. ‘Cateto Roxo’, was evaluated. The soil cover treatments: rice straw, rice husk, smoothing plane, cut grass and dry leaves of tree, was done just after planting and in layers just to cover the soil. It was concluded that mulching favoured initial growing and bulb production. Tested materials were showed to be equivalent however with tendency to rice husk overcome the other ones.

    KEY-WORDS: Garlic; production; mulching; growth.

  19. Comparison and Characterization of Garlic (Allium sativum L. Bulbs Extracts and Their Effect on Mortality and Repellency of Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae Comparación y Caracterización de Extractos de Bulbos de Ajo (Allium sativum L. y su Efecto en a Mortalidad y Repelencia de Tetranychus urticae Koch (Acari: Tetranychidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Hincapié Ll

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Tetranychus urticae Koch is a pest that causes great economic losses because it attacks a wide range of host plants. Also, some populations have developed resistance against commercial acaricides. This work compares different extracts from garlic (Allium sativum L. bulbs measuring their toxicity and repellency effects on T. urticae. Extracts were obtained using as solvents CO2 in supercritical conditions (CSC, ethanol and petroleum ether using soxhlet and soaking methods and soaking in water. The supercritical fluid extraction technique allows for obtaining extracts at low temperature using high pressures, avoiding compound degradation and making possible solvent separation by exposing the extract at room temperature. Mites were bred on bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris L. in a laboratory environment in Laureles Campus, Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, Medellín, Colombia. Mortality was evaluated putting 10 mites in P. vulgaris 3 cm diameter leaf discs previously submersed in the extract. The lowest mean lethal concentrations (LC50 were obtained with the CSC method (8.1188, 5.4105, 2.8206 mg g-1 at 24, 48 and 72 h, respectively. Extracts were characterized using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS, finding vinyl dithiins (63.11%, diallyl disulfide (10.88% and diallyl trisulfide (10.4% as the main compounds in the CSC extract. The main conclusion is that, in comparison with other techniques of extraction from garlic bulbs used in this study, supercritical fluids allow for obtaining extracts with a higher concentration of biologically active compounds against T. urticae.Tetranychus urticae Koch es una plaga que causa grandes pérdidas económicas porque ataca un numeroso grupo de cultivos. Además, algunas poblaciones han desarrollado resistencia a acaricidas comerciales. Este trabajo compara diferentes extractos a partir de bulbos de ajo (Allium sativum L. a través de su toxicidad y repelencia sobre T. urticae. Los extractos se

  20. 7 CFR 28.471 - Below Leaf Grade Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Below Leaf Grade Cotton. 28.471 Section 28.471... REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSING, TESTING, AND STANDARDS Standards Below Leaf Grade Cotton § 28.471 Below Leaf Grade Cotton. Below leaf grade cotton is American Upland cotton which is lower in leaf grade than Leaf...

  1. Diversity of Micromonospora strains isolated from nitrogen fixing nodules and rhizosphere of Pisum sativum analyzed by multilocus sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carro, Lorena; Spröer, Cathrin; Alonso, Pilar; Trujillo, Martha E

    2012-03-01

    It was recently reported that Micromonospora inhabits the intracellular tissues of nitrogen fixing nodules of the wild legume Lupinus angustifolius. To determine if Micromonospora populations are also present in nitrogen fixing nodules of cultivated legumes such as Pisum sativum, we carried out the isolation of this actinobacterium from P. sativum plants collected in two man-managed fields in the region of Castilla and León (Spain). In this work, we describe the isolation of 93 Micromonospora strains recovered from nitrogen fixing nodules and the rhizosphere of P. sativum. The genomic diversity of the strains was analyzed by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA). Forty-six isolates and 34 reference strains were further analyzed using a multilocus sequence analysis scheme developed to address the phylogeny of the genus Micromonospora and to evaluate the species distribution in the two studied habitats. The MLSA results were evaluated by DNA-DNA hybridization to determine their usefulness for the delineation of Micromonospora at the species level. In most cases, DDH values below 70% were obtained with strains that shared a sequence similarity of 98.5% or less. Thus, MLSA studies clearly supported the established taxonomy of the genus Micromonospora and indicated that genomic species could be delineated as groups of strains that share > 98.5% sequence similarity based on the 5 genes selected. The species diversity of the strains isolated from both the rhizosphere and nodules was very high and in many cases the new strains could not be related to any of the currently described species. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Tubulin cytoskeleton during microsporogenesis in the male-sterile genotype of Allium sativum and fertile Allium ampeloprasum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchórzewska, Dorota; Deryło, Kamil; Błaszczyk, Lidia; Winiarczyk, Krystyna

    2015-12-01

    Microsporogenesis in garlic. The male-sterile Allium sativum (garlic) reproduces exclusively in the vegetative mode, and anthropogenic factors seem to be the cause of the loss of sexual reproduction capability. There are many different hypotheses concerning the causes of male sterility in A.sativum; however, the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon have not been comprehensively elucidated.Numerous attempts have been undertaken to understand the causes of male sterility, but the tubulin cytoskeleton in meiotically dividing cells during microsporogenesis has never been investigated in this species. Using sterile A.sativum genotype L13 and its fertile close relative A. ampeloprasum (leek), we have analysed the distribution of the tubulin cytoskeleton during microsporogenesis. We observed that during karyokinesis and cytokinesis, in both meiotic divisions I and II, the microtubular cytoskeleton in garlic L13 formed configurations that resembled tubulin arrangement typical of monocots. However, the tubulin cytoskeleton in garlic was distinctly poorer (composed of a few MT filaments) compared with that found in meiotically dividing cells in A. ampeloprasum. These differences did not affect the course of karyogenesis, chondriokinesis, and cytokinesis, which contributed to completion of microsporogenesis, but there was no further development of the male gametophyte. At the very beginning of the successive stage of development of fertile pollen grains, i.e. gametogenesis, there were disorders involving the absence of a normal cortical cytoskeleton and dramatically progressive degeneration of the cytoplasm in garlic. Therefore,we suggest that, due to disturbances in cortical cytoskeleton formation at the very beginning of gametogenesis, the intracellular transport governed by the cytoskeleton might be perturbed, leading to microspore decay in the male-sterile garlic genotype.

  3. Effects of simulated acid rain on leaf cuticular characteristics and surface properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Percy, K.E.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of simulated acid rain (SAR) on adaxial leaf cuticles were investigated for a group of plant species selected from commercially-important crops and trees which exhibited markedly different cuticular characteristics. Expanding leaves of controlled-environment grown plants were exposed from emergence to full expansion to pH 5.6, 4.6, 4.2, 3.8, 3.4, 3.0 or 2.6 simulated rain (SAR) applied at 2 mm/h on alternate days. The number of events, the amount, droplet size and velocity were representative of UK ambient rainfall characteristics. The non-acidic pH 5.6 simulated rain consisted of 14 inorganic ions in weight/volume concentrations equivalent to those measured at a site in Eastern Canada. The degree of foliar injury and size of lesions was greater on crop species with waxy leaves than those with non-waxy leaves. Injury was least on needles of Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.). The relative sensitivity of the species examined to foliar injury decreased in the order: field rap (Brassica napus L.) > Eucalyptus globulus L.) > pea (Pisum sativum L.) > dwarf bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) > field bean (Vicia faba L.) > Sitka spruce.

  4. Electrogenerated chemiluminescence biosensing for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells incorporating antibody as capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as signal probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Haiying [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Department of Chemistry, Yuncheng University, Yuncheng 044300 (China); Li, Zhejian; Shan, Meng; Li, Congcong; Qi, Honglan; Gao, Qiang [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China); Wang, Jinyi [College of Science and College of Veterinary Medicine, Northwest A& F University, Yangling 712100 (China); Zhang, Chengxiao, E-mail: cxzhang@snnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Applied Surface and Colloid Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi’an 710062 (China)

    2015-03-10

    Highlights: • A novel biosensor was developed for the detection of prostate cancer cells. • The selectivity of the biosensor was improved using antibody as capture probe. • The biosensor showed the low extremely detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. • The ruthenium complex-labelled WGA can be transported in the cell vesicles. - Abstract: A highly selective and sensitive electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of prostate PC-3 cancer cells was designed using a prostate specific antibody as a capture probe and ruthenium complex-labelled wheat germ agglutinin as a signal probe. The ECL biosensor was fabricated by covalently immobilising the capture probe on a graphene oxide-coated glassy carbon electrode. Target PC-3 cells were selectively captured on the surface of the biosensor, and then, the signal probe was bound with the captured PC-3 cells to form a sandwich. In the presence of tripropylamine, the ECL intensity of the sandwich biosensor was logarithmically directly proportion to the concentration of PC-3 cells over a range from 7.0 × 10{sup 2} to 3.0 × 10{sup 4} cells mL{sup −1}, with a detection limit of 2.6 × 10{sup 2} cells mL{sup −1}. The ECL biosensor was also applied to detect prostate specific antigen with a detection limit of 0.1 ng mL{sup −1}. The high selectivity of the biosensor was demonstrated in comparison with that of a lectin-based biosensor. The strategy developed in this study may be a promising approach and could be extended to the design of ECL biosensors for highly sensitive and selective detection of other cancer-related cells or cancer biomarkers using different probes.

  5. Novel Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of α-fetoprotein: a biomarker of hepatocellular carcinoma recurrence in patients with low α-fetoprotein concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Manabu; Numata, Kazushi; Nozaki, Akito; Kondo, Masaaki; Moriya, Satoshi; Taguri, Masataka; Morita, Satoshi; Konno, Miki; Sugo, Akie; Miyajima, Eiji; Maeda, Shin; Tanaka, Katsuaki

    2012-08-01

    Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of α-fetoprotein (AFP-L3) is a specific marker used to detect hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, its clinical utility is not sufficient in patients with low total AFP concentrations because of limitations in instrument sensitivity. Recent advances have led to the introduction of a highly sensitive AFP-L3% assay (sensitive AFP-L3%), provided by a novel on-chip, liquid-phase binding assay. This cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the clinical significance of the sensitive AFP-L3% in determining HCC recurrence in patients with low total AFP concentrations. A total of 370 consecutive patients with HCC were screened within 1-3 months of locoregional treatment, and 215 of the 370 patients showed serum AFP <20 ng/ml. Total AFP, sensitive AFP-L3%, and des-gamma-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) were measured in those 215 patients and HCC recurrence was evaluated by radiological findings. Optimal cutoff values of the markers for detecting HCC recurrence were obtained on the basis of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. The area under the ROC curve of the total AFP, sensitive AFP-L3%, and DCP in HCC patients with serum AFP <20 ng/ml were 0.638, 0.724, and 0.779, respectively. The diagnostic accuracies of the total AFP, sensitive AFP-L3%, and DCP were 60.9% (cutoff value 5 ng/ml), 67.7% (cutoff value 7%), and 64.6% (cutoff value 40 ng/ml), respectively. The new sensitive AFP-L3% assay provides great utility in determining HCC recurrence in patients with low AFP concentrations. Further studies focusing on the combinatorial use of the markers (total AFP, sensitive AFP-L3%, and DCP) are required.

  6. Highly sensitive alpha-fetoprotein, Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein and des-gamma-carboxyprothrombin for hepatocellular carcinoma detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caviglia, Gian Paolo; Abate, Maria Lorena; Petrini, Elisa; Gaia, Silvia; Rizzetto, Mario; Smedile, Antonina

    2016-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) develops with high incidence in patients with chronic liver disease (CLD), and particularly in those with cirrhosis. Currently, diagnosis and surveillance are mainly based on imaging methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of highly sensitive measurement of α-fetoprotein (AFP), Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of AFP (AFP-L3) and des-γ-carboxyprothrombin (DCP) alone and in combination, for HCC detection. In addition, a recently proposed statistical model, including these three biomarkers plus sex and age, the GALAD model, was applied. In a total of 98 patients (44 CLD patients without HCC [23 men, 21 women; mean age, 53.2 ± 13.4 years] and 54 patients with HCC [45 men, nine women; 69.5 ± 9.8 years]), AFP, AFP-L3 and DCP levels were determined using a highly sensitive assay on an μTASWako i30 immuno-analyzer. Areas under the curve (AUC), sensitivity and specificity were calculated and compared to assess diagnostic performance of the HCC biomarkers and of the GALAD model. AFP, AFP-L3 and DCP serum levels were significantly elevated in HCC compared with CLD patients (P < 0.0001). AUC values were 0.891, 0.867 and 0.870, respectively. The combination of the three biomarkers resulted in an AUC of 0.947, whereas the GALAD model showed an AUC of 0.976 with a difference between AUC values of 0.029 (P = 0.028). The combination of AFP, AFP-L3 and DCP is superior to a single biomarker in HCC detection. Furthermore, GALAD model performance is significantly higher than simple combination of these three biomarkers. © 2015 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  7. Prediction of recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after curative hepatectomy using preoperative Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Yu; Shimada, Mitsuo; Utsunomiya, Tohru; Morine, Yuji; Imura, Satoru; Ikemoto, Tetsuya; Mori, Hiroki; Hanaoka, Jun; Yamada, Shinichiro; Asanoma, Michihito

    2012-09-01

      Lens culinaris agglutinin A-reactive fraction of α-fetoprotein (AFP-L3) status has been reported to be an independent prognostic factor in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this study, we evaluated the clinical usefulness of measuring preoperative AFP-L3 to predict the recurrence and prognosis of HCC after curative hepatectomy.   One hundred and forty-two HCC patients who underwent curative hepatectomy were examined for the correlation between preoperative tumor marker, including AFP, des-γ-carboxy prothrombin (DCP) and AFP-L3, and clinicopathological variables. The prognostic factors of disease-free survival rates and overall survival rates were also determined using clinicopathological variables including these three tumor markers.   There were similar tendencies in the relationship between these three markers and malignant behaviors including lower grade tumor differentiation or vascular invasion. In multivariate analysis, increased AFP-L3 value (P = 0.019) was found to be an independent prognostic factor of disease-free survival after curative hepatectomy. In addition, elevated DCP (P = 0.013) and AFP-L3 values (P = 0.012) were found to be independent prognostic factors. Furthermore, the preoperative AFP-L3 value in the patients with early recurrence (within 1 year after hepatectomy) was significantly higher than that in those without early recurrence (26.9 ± 19.5 % vs 14.2 ± 19.8 %, P = 0.047).   Preoperative AFP-L3 value was strongly correlated to disease-free and overall survival rate and the timing of recurrence, so it appears that it would be useful to predict the recurrence and prognosis of HCC after curative hepatectomy. © 2012 The Japan Society of Hepatology.

  8. Comparative study of procedures for histological detection of lectin binding by use of Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I and gastrointestinal mucosa of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhlmann, W D; Peschke, P

    1984-01-01

    The histological localisation of alpha-D-galactopyranosyl residues in glycoconjugates of rat stomach and duodenal mucosae was studied by use of Griffonia simplicifolia agglutinin I, i.e. the isolectin mixture (A + B) and the isolectin B4 (B4). Cryostat sections which were either unfixed or acetone fixed and paraffin sections from both ethanol-acetic acid and formaldehyde fixed tissue blocks were compared. Cellular details were better preserved in paraffin than in cryostat sections. Reactivity of cells binding GS I was less sensitive after formaldehyde than after ethanol-acetic acid fixation inasmuch as higher concentrations of lectins were needed. This drawback could be overcome by trypsinisation of the sections. The binding pattern of GS I (A + B) corresponded with that of GS I (B4) in either cryostat or paraffin sections. GS I was detected in the cytoplasm of parietal cells and in Brunner's gland cells. In duodenal crypts and villi, lectin was bound to supranuclear regions in the cytoplasm of columnar and goblet cells. The staining efficiency of fluorescein (FITC), horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and colloidal gold particle (CGP) labels in both direct and indirect lectin stainings was compared. Under all experimental conditions, indirect methods required lower concentrations of lectins than direct ones; indirect procedures increased sensitivity about 5-10 fold. CGP labels were always of highest sensitivity when gold particles were further developed by a silver precipitation method. HRP was not as efficient in lectin localisation as CGP, but cytochemical staining was more convenient in routine work. Direct FITC labellings proved to be of lowest sensitivity.

  9. Crystal Structure of the C-terminal Region of Streptococcus mutans Antigen I/II and Characterization of Salivary Agglutinin Adherence Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Matthew R.; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Crowley, Paula J.; Kelly, Charles; Mitchell, Tim J.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Deivanayagam, Champion (King); (Cornell); (UAB); (Glasgow); (Florida)

    2012-05-29

    The Streptococcus mutans antigen I/II (AgI/II) is a cell surface-localized protein that adheres to salivary components and extracellular matrix molecules. Here we report the 2.5 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the complete C-terminal region of AgI/II. The C-terminal region is comprised of three major domains: C{sub 1}, C{sub 2}, and C{sub 3}. Each domain adopts a DE-variant IgG fold, with two {beta}-sheets whose A and F strands are linked through an intramolecular isopeptide bond. The adherence of the C-terminal AgI/II fragments to the putative tooth surface receptor salivary agglutinin (SAG), as monitored by surface plasmon resonance, indicated that the minimal region of binding was contained within the first and second DE-variant-IgG domains (C{sub 1} and C{sub 2}) of the C terminus. The minimal C-terminal region that could inhibit S. mutans adherence to SAG was also confirmed to be within the C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains. Competition experiments demonstrated that the C- and N-terminal regions of AgI/II adhere to distinct sites on SAG. A cleft formed at the intersection between these C{sub 1} and C{sub 2} domains bound glucose molecules from the cryo-protectant solution, revealing a putative binding site for its highly glycosylated receptor SAG. Finally, electron microscopy images confirmed the elongated structure of AgI/II and enabled building a composite tertiary model that encompasses its two distinct binding regions.

  10. Respuesta fisiológica de cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.) a la disponibilidad de agua en el suelo

    OpenAIRE

    María Sara Mejía de Tafur; Gilberto Eduardo Marín Pimentel; Juan Carlos Menjivar Flores

    2014-01-01

    En casa de malla de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia sede Palmira (3° 30' 45.6" N y 76° 18' 29.911" O, 1050 m.s.n.m., 23.5 °C y 77% de HR) se midieron los requerimientos hídricos del cilantro (Coriandrum sativum L.) variedad Unapal Precoso y se relacionaron con el rendimiento de follaje fresco y materia seca. Las plantas fueron sembradas en macetas con 6 kg de suelo y por ciclo de cultivo se aplicaron láminas de agua de 140, 160, 200 (testigo propuesta por Vallejo y Estrada, 2004), 240 y 2...

  11. Root and Nodule Growth in Pisum sativum L. in Relation to Photosynthesis: Analysis Using 13C‐labelling

    OpenAIRE

    VOISIN, A. S.; SALON, C.; JEUDY, C.; WAREMBOURG, F. R.

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the nitrogen source (gaseous nitrogen, N2, or nitrate ions, NO3–) on the use of carbon (C) for root and nodule growth of pea (Pisum sativum L.) was investigated using 13C‐labelling of assimilated CO2 at various stages of growth. Nitrate supply and growing conditions (sowing dates, air CO2 concentration) were varied to alter photosynthetic rates. Nodules are the sink with the highest demand for C in both the vegetative and flowering stages, growing at the expense of shoot and roo...

  12. Kadmio poveikis sėjamojo žirnio (Pisum sativum L.) augimui ir pašaknio mikroorganizmams

    OpenAIRE

    Juozaitytė, Rima; Ramaškevičienė, Asta; Sliesaravičius, Algirdas; Pranaitis, Pranciškus

    2006-01-01

    2005 m. Lietuvos žemės ūkio universiteto Genetikos ir biotechnologijos laboratorijoje atlikti kadmio poveikio sėjamojo žirnio (Pisum sativum L.) augimo parametrams ir pašaknio mikroorganizmams tyrimai. Tyrimų tikslas – nustatyti skirtingos koncentracijos kadmio įtaka žirnių augimui ir rizosferos bei rizoplanos mikroorganizmų kiekiui. Siekiant išaiškinti skirtingos koncentracijos kadmio jonų poveikį žirnių augimo patrametrams bei rizosferos ir rizoplanos mikroorganizmams, žirniai 10 dienų augi...

  13. Cell Wall Pectin and its Methyl-esterification in Transition Zone Determine Al Resistance in Cultivars of Pea (Pisum sativum)

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xuewen; Li, Yalin; Qu, Mei; Xiao, Hongdong; Feng, Yingming; Liu, Jiayou; Wu, Lishu; Yu, Min

    2016-01-01

    The initial response of plants to aluminum (Al) is the inhibition of root elongation, while the transition zone is the most Al sensitive zone in the root apex, which may sense the presence of Al and regulate the responses of root to Al toxicity. In the present study, the effect of Al treatment (30 μM, 24 h) on root growth, Al accumulation, and properties of cell wall of two pea (Pisum sativum L.) cultivars, cv Onward (Al-resistant) and cv Sima (Al-sensitive), were studied to disclose whether ...

  14. A new species of Phoma causes ascochyta blight symptoms on field peas (Pisum sativum) in South Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J A; Hartley, D; Priest, M; Herdina, M Krysinska-Kaczmarek; McKay, A; Scott, E S

    2009-01-01

    Phoma koolunga sp. nov. is described, having been isolated from ascochyta blight lesions on field pea (Pisum sativum) in South Australia. The species is described morphologically and sequences of the internal transcribed spacer region compared with those of the accepted pathogens causing ascochyta blight of field peas. P. koolunga was distinct from Mycosphaerella pinodes (anamorph: Ascochyta pinodes), Phoma medicaginis var. pinodella and Ascochyta pisi. Under controlled conditions the symptoms on pea seedlings caused by P. koolunga were indistinguishable from those caused by M. pinodes, other than a 24 h delay in disease development. Isolates of P. koolunga differed in the severity of disease caused on pea seedlings.

  15. Convergence in leaf size versus twig leaf area scaling: do plants optimize leaf area partitioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Duncan D; Sperry, John S; Adler, Frederick R

    2017-02-01

    Corner's rule states that thicker twigs bear larger leaves. The exact nature of this relationship and why it should occur has been the subject of numerous studies. It is obvious that thicker twigs should support greater total leaf area ([Formula: see text]) for hydraulical and mechanical reasons. But it is not obvious why mean leaf size ([Formula: see text]) should scale positively with [Formula: see text] We asked what this scaling relationship is within species and how variable it is across species. We then developed a model to explain why these relationships exist. To minimize potential sources of variability, we compared twig properties from six co-occurring and functionally similar species: Acer grandidentatum, Amelanchier alnifolia, Betula occidentalis, Cornus sericea, Populus fremontii and Symphoricarpos oreophilus We modelled the economics of leaf display, weighing the benefit from light absorption against the cost of leaf tissue, to predict the optimal [Formula: see text] combinations under different canopy openings. We observed a common [Formula: see text] by [Formula: see text] exponent of 0.6, meaning that [Formula: see text]and leaf number on twigs increased in a specific coordination. Common scaling exponents were not supported for relationships between any other measured twig properties. The model consistently predicted positive [Formula: see text] by [Formula: see text] scaling when twigs optimally filled canopy openings. The observed 0·6 exponent was predicted when self-shading decreased with larger canopy opening. Our results suggest Corner's rule may be better understood when recast as positive [Formula: see text] by [Formula: see text] scaling. Our model provides a tentative explanation of observed [Formula: see text] by [Formula: see text] scaling and suggests different scaling may exist in different environments. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For

  16. Stimulation of nodulation in field peas (Pisum sativum) by low concentrations of ammonium in hydroponic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterer, J. G.; Vessey, J. K.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Although the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of mineral N (> 1.0 mM) on nodule development and function have often been studied, the effects of low, static concentrations of NH4+ (experiments we examine the effects of static concentrations of NH4+ at 0, 0.1 and 0.5 mM in flowing, hydroponic culture on nodule establishment and nitrogenase activity in field peas [Pisum sativum L. cv. Express (Svalof AB)] for the initial 28 days after planting (DAP). Peas grown in the presence of low concentrations of NH4+ had significantly greater nodule numbers (up to 4-fold) than plants grown without NH4+. Nodule dry weight per plant was significantly higher at 14, 21 and 28 DAP in plants grown in the presence of NH4+, but individual nodule mass was lower than in plants grown without NH4+. The nodulation pattern of the plants supplied with NH4+ was similar to that often reported for supernodulating mutants, however the plants did not express other growth habits associated with supernodulation. Estimates of N2 fixation indicate that the plus-NH4+ peas fixed as much or more N2 than the plants supplied with minus-NH4+ nutrient solution. There were no significant differences in nodule numbers, nodule mass or NH4+ uptake between the plants grown at the two concentrations of NH4+. Nodulation appeared to autoregulate by 14 DAP in the minus-NH4+ treatment. Plant growth and N accumulation in the minus-NH4+ plants lagged behind those of the plus-NH4+ treatments prior to N2 fixation becoming well established in the final week of the experiment. The plus-NH4+ treatments appeared not to elicit autoregulation and plants continued to initiate nodules throughout the experiment.

  17. Increase in the permeability of tonoplast of garlic (Allium sativum) by monocarboxylic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Bing; Li, Lei; Hu, Xiaosong; Wang, Zhengfu; Zhao, Guanghua

    2006-10-18

    Immersion of intact aged garlic (Allium sativum) cloves in a series of 5% weak organic monocarboxylate solutions (pH 2.0) resulted in green color formation. No color was formed upon treatment with other weak organic acids, such as citric and malic acids, and the inorganic hydrochloric acid under the same conditions. To understand the significance of monocarboxylic acids and their differing function from that of other acids, acetic acid was compared with organic acids citric and malic and the inorganic hydrochloric acid. The effects of these acids on the permeability of plasma and intracellular membrane of garlic cells were measured by conductivity, light microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Except for hydrochloric acid, treatment of garlic with all three organic acids greatly increased the relative conductivity of their respective pickling solutions, indicating that all tested organic acids increased the permeability of plasma membrane. Moreover, a pickling solution containing acetic acid exhibited 1.5-fold higher relative conductivity (approximately 90%) as compared to those (approximately 60%) of both citric and malic acids, implying that exposure of garlic cloves to acetic acid not only changed the permeability of the plasma membrane but also increased the permeability of intracellular membrane. Exposure of garlic to acetic acid led to the production of precipitate along the tonoplast, but no precipitate was formed by citric and malic acids. This indicates that the structure of the tonoplast was damaged by this treatment. Further support for this conclusion comes from results showing that the concentration of thiosulfinates [which are produced only by catalytic conversion of S-alk(en)yl-l-cysteine sulfoxides in cytosol by alliinase located in the vacuole] in the acetic acid pickling solution is 1.3 mg/mL, but almost no thiosulfinates were detected in the pickling solution of citric and malic acids. Thus, all present results suggest that damage of

  18. Repellent activities of dichloromethane extract of Allium sativum (garlic (Liliaceae against Hyalomma rufipes (Acari

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Nchu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dichloromethane (DCM extract of garlic (Allium sativum Linn. bulbs was assessed for its repellent effect against the hard tick, Hyalomma rufipes (Acari: Ixodidae using two tick behavioural bioassays; Type A and Type B repellency bioassays, under laboratory conditions. These bioassays exploit the questing behaviour of H. rufipes, a tick that in nature displays ambush strategy, seeking its host by climbing up on vegetation and attaching to a passing host. One hundred microlitres (100 µL of the test solution containing DCM extract of garlic bulbs and DCM at concentrations of 0.35%, 0.7% or 1.4% w/v were evaluated. DCM only was used for control. Tick repellency increased significantly (R2 = 0.98 with increasing concentration (40.03% – 86.96% yielding an EC50 of 0.45% w/v in Type B repellency bioassay. At concentration of 1.4% w/v, the DCM extract of garlic bulbs produced high repellency index of 87% (male ticks and 87.5% (female ticks in the Type A repellency bioassay. Only 4% avoidance of male ticks or female ticks was recorded in the Type B repellency bioassay. In the corresponding controls, the mean numbers of non-repelled male or female ticks were 80% and 41 males or 38 females of 50 ticks in the Type A and Type B repellency bioassays, respectively. The variations in the results could be attributed to the difference in tick repellent behaviours that were assessed by the two repellency bioassays; the Type A repellency bioassay assessed repellent effect of garlic extracts without discriminating between deterrence and avoidance whereas the Type B repellency bioassay only assessed avoidance response. Generally, DCM extract of garlic was repellent against H. rufipes, albeit weak tick repellency was obtained in the Type B repellency bioassay. Furthermore, this study established that the tick repellent activity of garlic extracts is predominantly by deterrence.

  19. Characterization of Stowaway MITEs in pea (Pisum sativum L.) and identification of their potential master elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macas, Jirí; Koblízková, Andrea; Neumann, Pavel

    2005-10-01

    We have investigated miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) of the Stowaway family and corresponding Mariner-like master elements that could potentially facilitate their mobilization in the genome of the garden pea (Pisum sativum L.). The population of pea Stowaway MITEs consists of 103-104 copies dispersed in the genome. Judging from a sequence analysis of 17 isolated Stowaway elements and their flanking genomic regions, the elements are relatively uniform in size and sequence and occur in the vicinity of genes as well as within repetitive sequences. Insertional polymorphism of several elements was detected among various Pisum accessions, suggesting they were still transpositionally active during diversification of these taxa. The identification of several Mariner-like elements (MLEs) harboring intact open reading frames, capable of encoding a transposase, further supports a recent mobilization of the Stowaway elements. Using transposase-coding sequences as a hybridization probe, we estimated that there are about 50 MLE sequences in the pea genome. Among the 5 elements sequenced, 3 distinct subfamilies showing mutual similarities within their transposase-coding regions, but otherwise diverged in sequence, were distinguished and designated as Psmar-1 to Psmar-3. The terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of these MLE subfamilies differed in their homology to the TIRs of Stowaway MITEs. The homlogy ranged from 9 bp in Psmar-3 to 30 bp in Psmar-1, which corresponds to the complete Stowaway TIR sequence. Based on this feature, the Psmar-1 elements are believed to be the most likely candidates for the master elements of the Stowaway MITEs in pea.

  20. Radioprotective effect of novel disubstituted thioureas on pea (Pisum sativum L.) development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehandjiev, A; Kosturkova, G; Vassilev, G; Noveva, S

    2002-01-01

    The review presents our research on the influence of novel thiourea compounds on the biological and genetic effect of gamma-rays using in vivo and in vitro systems of pea. Some novel disubstituted thioureas: o-allylthioureidobenzoic acid (ATB); o-phenylthioureidobenzoic acid (PTB); N-allyl-N'-2-pyridylthiourea (A-2-PTU); N-phenyl-N'-2-pyridylthiourea (P-2-PTU) and 1,4-allylthioureidosalicylic acid (ATUS) were examined. Pea (Pisum sativum L.) seeds from five varieties were used. Experiments in vivo and in vitro were carried under laboratory, greenhouse and field conditions. The data revealed the PTB radioprotective effect demonstrated by: reduction of chromosome aberrations by 2 folds; 50% increase of germinating and surviving plants in M1; twice higher frequency of induced mutations in M2 generation relative to irradiation without PTB treatment; decreasing the level of induced radiation suppression leading to favorable effect on the initial stem and root development of pea. ATB radioprotective effect was demonstrated in vitro by: 25-35% stimulation of organogenesis; by 20-50% increase in bud formation; by 25% stimulation of growth. The effect of A-2-PTU and P-2-PTU depended on the irradiation dose. The protective effect of A-2-PTU is more pronounced at lower irradiation dose, while the effect of P-2-PTU is more pronounced at higher irradiation dose. ATUS, opposite to the other compounds, revealed radiosensibilizing effect by: 16-27% increase in lethality caused by gamma-rays leading to lower number of germinating and surviving plants in M1; 50% decrease in the number of induced mutations in M2 generation; limiting the types of induced mutations at the higher irradiation dose. As a result of the experiments useful mutation forms were obtained, characterized with: earliness, lodging and disease resistance; higher productivity.

  1. Stimulation of nodulation in field peas (Pisum sativum) by low concentrations of ammonium in hydroponic culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterer, J. G.; Vessey, J. K.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Although the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of mineral N (> 1.0 mM) on nodule development and function have often been studied, the effects of low, static concentrations of NH4+ (hydroponic culture on nodule establishment and nitrogenase activity in field peas [Pisum sativum L. cv. Express (Svalof AB)] for the initial 28 days after planting (DAP). Peas grown in the presence of low concentrations of NH4+ had significantly greater nodule numbers (up to 4-fold) than plants grown without NH4+. Nodule dry weight per plant was significantly higher at 14, 21 and 28 DAP in plants grown in the presence of NH4+, but individual nodule mass was lower than in plants grown without NH4+. The nodulation pattern of the plants supplied with NH4+ was similar to that often reported for supernodulating mutants, however the plants did not express other growth habits associated with supernodulation. Estimates of N2 fixation indicate that the plus-NH4+ peas fixed as much or more N2 than the plants supplied with minus-NH4+ nutrient solution. There were no significant differences in nodule numbers, nodule mass or NH4+ uptake between the plants grown at the two concentrations of NH4+. Nodulation appeared to autoregulate by 14 DAP in the minus-NH4+ treatment. Plant growth and N accumulation in the minus-NH4+ plants lagged behind those of the plus-NH4+ treatments prior to N2 fixation becoming well established in the final week of the experiment. The plus-NH4+ treatments appeared not to elicit autoregulation and plants continued to initiate nodules throughout the experiment.

  2. Long-Term Fungal Inhibition by Pisum sativum Flour Hydrolysate during Storage of Wheat Flour Bread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavecchia, Anna; Gramaglia, Valerio; Gobbetti, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In order to identify antifungal compounds from natural sources to be used as ingredients in the bakery industry, water/salt-soluble extracts (WSE) from different legume flour hydrolysates obtained by the use of a fungal protease were assayed against Penicillium roqueforti DPPMAF1. The agar diffusion assays allowed the selection of the pea (Pisum sativum) hydrolysate as the most active. As shown by the hyphal radial growth rate, the WSE had inhibitory activity towards several fungi isolated from bakeries. The MIC of the WSE was 9.0 mg/ml. Fungal inhibition was slightly affected by heating and variations in pH. The antifungal activity was attributed to three native proteins (pea defensins 1 and 2 and a nonspecific lipid transfer protein [nsLTP]) and a mixture of peptides released during hydrolysis. The three proteins have been reported previously as components of the defense system of the plant. Five peptides were purified from WSE and were identified as sequences encrypted in leginsulin A, vicilin, provicilin, and the nsLTP. To confirm antifungal activity, the peptides were chemically synthesized and tested. Freeze-dried WSE were used as ingredients in leavened baked goods. In particular, breads made by the addition of 1.6% (wt/wt) of the extract and fermented by baker's yeast or sourdough were characterized for their main chemical, structural, and sensory features, packed in polyethylene bags, stored at room temperature, and compared to controls prepared without pea hydrolysate. Artificially inoculated slices of a bread containing the WSE did not show contamination by fungi until at least 21 days of storage and behaved like the bread prepared with calcium propionate (0.3%, wt/wt). PMID:25862230

  3. Copper nanoparticles/compounds impact agronomic and physiological parameters in cilantro (Coriandrum sativum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuverza-Mena, Nubia; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Barrios, Ana C; Tan, Wenjuan; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2015-10-01

    The environmental impacts of Cu-based nanoparticles (NPs) are not well understood. In this study, cilantro (Coriandrum sativum) was germinated and grown in commercial potting mix soil amended with Cu(OH)2 (Kocide and CuPRO), nano-copper (nCu), micro-copper (μCu), nano-copper oxide (nCuO), micro-copper oxide (μCuO) and ionic Cu (CuCl2) at either 20 or 80 mg Cu per kg. In addition to seed germination and plant elongation, relative chlorophyll content and micro and macroelement concentrations were determined. At both concentrations, only nCuO, μCuO, and ionic Cu, showed statistically significant reductions in germination. Although compared with control, the relative germination was reduced by ∼50% with nCuO at both concentrations, and by ∼40% with μCuO, also at both concentrations, the difference among compounds was not statistically significant. Exposure to μCuO at both concentrations and nCu at 80 mg kg(-1) significantly reduced (p≤ 0.05) shoot elongation by 11% and 12.4%, respectively, compared with control. Only μCuO at 20 mg kg(-1) significantly reduced (26%) the relative chlorophyll content, compared with control. None of the treatments increased root Cu, but all of them, except μCuO at 20 mg kg(-1), significantly increased shoot Cu (p≤ 0.05). Micro and macro elements B, Zn, Mn, Ca, Mg, P, and S were significantly reduced in shoots (p≤ 0.05). Similar results were observed in roots. These results showed that Cu-based NPs/compounds depress nutrient element accumulation in cilantro, which could impact human nutrition.

  4. Uptake and phytotoxic effect of benzalkonium chlorides in Lepidium sativum and Lactuca sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Adnan Hossain; Libby, Mark; Winnick, Daniel; Palmer, John; Sumarah, Mark; Ray, Madhumita B; Macfie, Sheila M

    2018-01-15

    Cationic surfactants such as benzalkonium chlorides (BACs) are used extensively as biocides in hospitals, food processing industries, and personal care products. BACs have the potential to reach the rooting zone of crop plants and BACs might thereby enter the food chain. The two most commonly used BACs, benzyl dimethyl dodecyl ammonium chloride (BDDA) and benzyl dimethyl tetradecyl ammonium chloride (BDTA), were tested in a hydroponic system to assess the uptake by and phytotoxicity to lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) and garden cress (Lepidium sativum L.). Individually and in mixture, BACs at concentrations up to 100 mg L -1 did not affect germination; however, emergent seedlings were sensitive at 1 mg L -1 for lettuce and 5 mg L -1 for garden cress. After 12 d exposure to 0.25 mg L -1 BACs, plant dry weight was reduced by 68% for lettuce and 75% for garden cress, and symptoms of toxicity (necrosis, chlorosis, wilting, etc.) were visible. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis showed the presence of BACs in the roots and shoots of both plant species. Although no conclusive relationship was established between the concentrations of six macro- or six micro-nutrients, growth inhibition or BAC uptake, N and Mg concentrations in BAC-treated lettuce were 50% lower than that of control, indicating that BACs might induce nutrient deficiency. Although bioavailability of a compound in hydroponics is significantly higher than that in soil, these results confirm the potential of BACs to harm vascular plants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Weaned piglets display low gastrointestinal digestion of pea (Pisum sativum L.) lectin and pea albumin 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Gall, M; Quillien, L; Sève, B; Guéguen, J; Lallès, J P

    2007-11-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the biochemistry of digestion of field pea (Pisum sativum L.) albumins and globulins in the stomach and along the small intestine of weaned piglets with a particular emphasis on the respective roles of these compartments in pea protein digestion. Twenty-four piglets were weaned at 28 d of age. They were allocated to 2 diets (control and pea) and 3 slaughter times (3, 6, or 9 h after the last meal) in a 2 x3 factorial arrangement of treatments in a randomized complete block design. Pea flour provided 30% of total dietary protein in the pea diet. The diets were fed for 2 wk after weaning. After slaughter, gastrointestinal tract (GIT) compartments were weighed, digesta were collected, and pH was measured. Digesta from the stomach and cranial, middle, and caudal small intestine (SI) were extracted for soluble proteins and analyzed for specific pea proteins using SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. Tissue weight of the whole GIT (P = 0.015), cecum (P digested, whereas legumin was only partly digested. Legumin and vicilin were totally digested in the SI in less than 3 h. A resistant peptide of 15 kDa located at the N-terminus of pea albumin 2 was transiently detected at 3 h. A protein band at 20 kDa was consistently identified as lectin. It was present in high intensity in intestinal digesta of pea-fed piglets at all times after the meal compared with those fed the control diet (P digestion patterns between the control and the pea-fed piglets (Pdigestion between specific pea proteins were observed along the GIT of piglets. They could be partly explained by differences in protein digestion in the stomach.

  6. Effect of Allium sativum and Allium cepa oils on different stages of Boophilus annulatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelhadid, S M; Kamel, A A; Arafa, W M; Shokier, K A

    2013-05-01

    The study is aimed to investigate the acaricidal effect of Allium sativum (garlic) and Allium cepa (onion) oils on different stages of Boophilus annulatus hard tick. Engorged B. annulatus females were collected from naturally infected cattle. A number of engorged ticks were incubated at 28 °C and 85 % relative humidity to lay eggs, which were incubated to obtain larvae that were used in the study. The used garlic and onion oils were prepared by steam distillation and were analyzed by gas chromatography. These oils were dissolved in ethanol, methanol alcohols, and, partially, in water. The oils were tested in different concentrations; 1, 2, 5, 10, and 20 %. These concentrations were applied on adult ticks by adult immersion test; on larvae by larval immersion technique and on eggs. The 20, 10, and 5 % of garlic oil dilutions in ethanol and methanol killed all adult ticks and larvae within 24 h. Similar results were obtained for 10 and 20 % garlic oil dissolved in water. The effect of 10 % aqueous solution of garlic oil on embryonated eggs was clear as its addition to these eggs led to their in ability to hatch, deformity in shape, and change in color. The 10 and 20 % onion oil in ethanol and methanol alcohols killed 76-86 % of the adult ticks within 72 h post-application. While, all larvae died within 24 h postsubjected to these two concentrations. These concentrations (10 and 20 %) of onion oil in water killed 56-80 % of the treated ticks. Moreover, 10 % aqueous solution of onion oil prevented hatching of embyonated eggs. We concluded that garlic and onion oils have acaricidal effect on all stages of B. annulatus at concentrations higher than 5 %. Only garlic oil could kill 100 % of adult ticks at concentrations from 5 % in alcohols.

  7. Repellent activities of dichloromethane extract of Allium sativum (garlic) (Liliaceae) against Hyalomma rufipes (Acari).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchu, Felix; Magano, Solomon R; Eloff, Jacobus N

    2016-12-02

    Dichloromethane (DCM) extract of garlic (Allium sativum Linn.) bulbs was assessed for its repellent effect against the hard tick, Hyalomma rufipes (Acari: Ixodidae) using two tick behavioural bioassays; Type A and Type B repellency bioassays, under laboratory conditions. These bioassays exploit the questing behaviour of H. rufipes, a tick that in nature displays ambush strategy, seeking its host by climbing up on vegetation and attaching to a passing host. One hundred microlitres (100 µL) of the test solution containing DCM extract of garlic bulbs and DCM at concentrations of 0.35%, 0.7% or 1.4% w/v were evaluated. DCM only was used for control. Tick repellency increased significantly (R2 = 0.98) with increasing concentration (40.03% - 86.96%) yielding an EC50 of 0.45% w/v in Type B repellency bioassay. At concentration of 1.4% w/v, the DCM extract of garlic bulbs produced high repellency index of 87% (male ticks) and 87.5% (female ticks) in the Type A repellency bioassay. Only 4% avoidance of male ticks or female ticks was recorded in the Type B repellency bioassay. In the corresponding controls, the mean numbers of non-repelled male or female ticks were 80% and 41 males or 38 females of 50 ticks in the Type A and Type B repellency bioassays, respectively. The variations in the results could be attributed to the difference in tick repellent behaviours that were assessed by the two repellency bioassays; the Type A repellency bioassay assessed repellent effect of garlic extracts without discriminating between deterrence and avoidance whereas the Type B repellency bioassay only assessed avoidance response. Generally, DCM extract of garlic was repellent against H. rufipes, albeit weak tick repellency was obtained in the Type B repellency bioassay. Furthermore, this study established that the tick repellent activity of garlic extracts is predominantly by deterrence.

  8. Diallyl Polysulfides from Allium sativum as Immunomodulators, Hepatoprotectors, and Antimycobacterial Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosthuizen, Carel; Arbach, Miriam; Meyer, Debra; Hamilton, Chris; Lall, Namrita

    2017-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the world's deadliest killers, with an annual death rate of ∼1.5 million. The medicinal effects of garlic have been well documented, and natural products have been shown to have antimycobacterial activity. The current study evaluated the efficacy of six Allium sativum L. polysulfide mixtures as antimycobacterial agents together with their cytotoxic, immunomodulatory, and hepatoprotective activities. The microtitre PrestoBlue assay was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Cytotoxicity was evaluated by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Excreted cytokine levels were determined by utilizing an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), by exposing isolated PBMCs to varying concentrations of polysulfide mixtures. Human C3A liver cells were utilized in the hepatoprotective study, to assess the protective effect against the toxicity induced by acetaminophen. Samples with higher amounts of diallyl trisulfide (Sample G4) showed the highest antimycobacterial activity, exhibiting an MIC of 2.5 μg/mL against M. tuberculosis H37Rv. Five samples showed moderate toxicity in PBMC, with G1 showing no toxicity. The selective index of G4 was the highest, with a selectivity index close to one. Two samples, G3 and G6 containing higher amounts of diallyl tetrasulfide and lower amounts of diallyl trisulfide, showed >50% hepatoprotection. This is comparable to a hepatoprotective agent, Silymarin, which showed a hepatoprotective effect of 30% at the tested concentration. Diallyl tetrasulfide showed significant antimycobacterial activity. A combination of higher diallyl tetrasulfide and lower diallyl trisulfide was indicative of hepatoprotective activity.

  9. Differing mechanisms of simple nitrile formation on glucosinolate degradation in Lepidium sativum and Nasturtium officinale seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David J; Critchley, Christa; Pun, Sharon; Chaliha, Mridusmita; O'Hare, Timothy J

    2009-01-01

    Glucosinolates are sulphur-containing glycosides found in brassicaceous plants that can be hydrolysed enzymatically by plant myrosinase or non-enzymatically to form primarily isothiocyanates and/or simple nitriles. From a human health perspective, isothiocyanates are quite important because they are major inducers of carcinogen-detoxifying enzymes. Two of the most potent inducers are benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) present in garden cress (Lepidium sativum), and phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC) present in watercress (Nasturtium officinale). Previous studies on these salad crops have indicated that significant amounts of simple nitriles are produced at the expense of the isothiocyanates. These studies also suggested that nitrile formation may occur by different pathways: (1) under the control of specifier protein in garden cress and (2) by an unspecified, non-enzymatic path in watercress. In an effort to understand more about the mechanisms involved in simple nitrile formation in these species, we analysed their seeds for specifier protein and myrosinase activities, endogenous iron content and glucosinolate degradation products after addition of different iron species, specific chelators and various heat treatments. We confirmed that simple nitrile formation was predominantly under specifier protein control (thiocyanate-forming protein) in garden cress seeds. Limited thermal degradation of the major glucosinolate, glucotropaeolin (benzyl glucosinolate), occurred when seed material was heated to >120 degrees C. In the watercress seeds, however, we show for the first time that gluconasturtiin (phenylethyl glucosinolate) undergoes a non-enzymatic, iron-dependent degradation to a simple nitrile. On heating the seeds to 120 degrees C or greater, thermal degradation of this heat-labile glucosinolate increased simple nitrile levels many fold.

  10. Antihypertensive properties of Allium sativum (garlic) on normotensive and two kidney one clip hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwokocha, C R; Ozolua, R I; Owu, D U; Nwokocha, M I; Ugwu, A C

    2011-12-20

    Allium sativum (garlic) is reported to act as an antihypertensive amidst an inconsistency of evidence. In this study, we investigated the cardiovascular effects of aqueous garlic extracts (AGE) on normotensive and hypertensive rats using the two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) model. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) and heart rate (HR) were measured in normotensive and 2K1C rat models anesthetized with thiopentone sodium (50 mg/kg body weight i.p.) through the left common carotid artery connected to a recording apparatus. The jugular vein was cannulated for administration of drugs. Intravenous injection of AGE (5-20 mg/kg) caused a significant (p<0.05) decrease in both MAP and HR in a dose-dependent manner in both the normotensive and 2K1C models, with more effects on normotensive than 2K1C rat model. The dose of 20mg/kg of AGE significantly (p<0.05) reduced systolic (16.7 ± 2.0%), diastolic (26.7 ± 5.2%), MAP (23.1 ± 3.6%) and HR (38.4 ± 4.3%) in normotensive rats. In 2K1C group, it significantly reduced systolic (22.2 ± 2.1 %), diastolic (30.6 ± 3.2%), MAP (28.2 ± 3.1%) and HR (45.2 ± 3.5%) from basal levels. Pulse pressure was significantly elevated (33.3 ±5.1%) in the 2K1C group. Pretreatment of the animals with muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (2 mg/kg, i.v.), did not affect the hypotensive and the negative chronotropic activities of the extract. AGE caused a decrease in blood pressure and bradycardia by direct mechanism not involving the cholinergic pathway in both normotensive and 2K1C rats, suggesting a likely involvement of peripheral mechanism for hypotension.

  11. Inhibitory activity of garlic (Allium sativum extract on multidrug-resistant Streptococcus mutans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fani M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Garlic ( Allium sativum extract has been known to have inhibitory activity on various pathogenic bacteria, viruses and fungi. The objective of present investigation was to study in vitro inhibitory activity of garlic extract on multidrug-resistant (MDR strains of Streptococcus mutans isolated from human carious teeth. Filter sterilized aqueous extract of garlic was prepared and used in the present study. For isolation of S. mutans , extracted human carious teeth were cultured in Todd-Hewit broth and Mitis-Salivarius-Bacitracin agar. S. mutans was characterized by colony morphology, biochemical tests and other conventional bacteriological procedures. Disk sensitivity tests and broth dilution methods were used to determine antibiotic sensitivity profile and inhibitory activity of garlic extract on S. mutans isolated from carious teeth. Of 105 carious teeth tested, 92 (87.6% isolates of S. mutans were recovered, among which 28 (30.4% were MDR since they were resistant to four or more antibiotics. The highest rate of resistance was observed for tetracycline (30.4% and least resistance (0% to teichoplanin and vancomycin while 22.8% and 23.9% of the isolates were resistant to penicillin and amoxicillin, respectively. Chlorhexidine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for MDR and non-MDR S. mutans varied from 2 to 16 µg ml−1 and from 0.25 to 1 µg ml−1 , respectively ( P < 0.05. All isolates, MDR and non-MDR of S. mutans were sensitive to garlic extract with the MIC ranging from 4 to 32 mg ml−1 . Considering in vitro data obtained in the present study, mouthwashes or toothpaste containing optimum concentration of garlic extract could be used for prevention of dental caries.

  12. Mutagénesis inducida en microbulbos de Allium sativum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Pardo Roldán

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Se estableció un protocolo de mutagénesis en microbulbos de ajo (Allium sativum L. clon Boconó cultivado in vitro. Para el efecto se realizaron dos ensayos, uno de radiosensibilidad para establecer la dosimetría apropiada de radiación gamma y otro de mutagénesis para determinar el comportamiento de los materiales hasta la etapa de almacenamiento. En el primero los microbulbos fueron tratados con cuatros dosis de radiación gamma (6, 8, 10 y 12 Krad, más un control. Para establecer la dosis óptima se consideró la sobrevivencia del 50% de los microbulbos (DL50. Se empleó un diseño de bloques al azar con cinco tratamientos y 20 repeticiones por tratamiento. En el ensayo mutagénico los microbulbos fueron irradiados con 8 y 10 Krad y almacenados durante 45 días a 10 °C en condiciones de oscuridad En este caso se utilizó un diseño de bloques al azar con tres tratamientos (0, 8 y 10 Krad y 20 repeticiones por tratamiento. En ambos ensayos, los microbulbos irradiados con 8 y 10 Krad registraron los mayores promedios para peso y diámetro, lo cual permite concluir que estas dosis son adecuadas para favorecer la producción de mutantes con características agronómicas deseables en el clon Boconó

  13. Ultrapathological evaluation of the anticancer effect of blackseed (Nigella sativa and garlic (Allium sativum in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wael Gamal Nouh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this experimental work, 120 virgin female mice (body weight 40±10 gm were divided into 6 equal groups. Mice in Group 1 served as a control. Mice in Groups 2 and 3 were fed on a basal diet provided with 100 mg/kg b.wt from each of blackseed (Nigella sativa and garlic (Allium sativum, respectively, for one month. Mice in Group 4 were inoculated subcutanously (S/C with Ehrlich tumor cells after one month from the start of the experiment. Mice in Groups 5 and 6 were treated similarly to those in Groups 3 and 4, respectively, for one month and then immediately inoculated S/C with Ehrlich tumor cells (ETC, 0.1 mL/mouse. Blood samples were taken from mice of Groups 1, 2 and 3 at one month of experiment and tissue specimens were collected from mice in all groups two weeks after inoculation of Ehrlich tumor cells. Histopathologically, Groups 2 and 3 showed proliferation of mononuclear phagocytic system and mild degeneration of internal organs. In Group 4, histopathology revealed neoplastic mass with signs of malignancy, ultrastructurely exhibited pleomorphism, degenerated organelles with activated euo- and heterochromatin and cavitations of the cytoplasm. Groups 5 and 6 revealed much smaller neoplastic growth with necrosis and hemorrhage. The necrotic neoplastic cells replaced by empty cavities with congested blood vessels, the others showed pyknotic or karryolytic nuclei. In Groups 5 and 6, the electron microsopic appearance of the neoplastic growth exhibited degenerated and swollen cells with multiple cavitations. Most of the cytoplasmic organelles were degenerated with activation of lysozymes. It could be concluded that, both garlic and black seed minimize the histopathological and electron microscopic alterations of ETC in mice.

  14. Antioxidant activity of methanolic extracts from three coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. fruit varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Msaada

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, fruit methanolic extract of three coriander (Coriandrum sativum L. varieties (Tunisian, Syrian and Egyptian was assayed for their antioxidant activities. Obtained results showed that there are significant (P < 0.05 variations in total polyphenols (0.94 ± 0.05–1.09 ± 0.02 mg GAE/g DW, total flavonoids (2.03 ± 0.04–2.51 ± 0.08 mg EC/g DW and total condensed tannin (0.09 ± 0.01–0.17 ± 0.01 mg EC/g DW contents. The RP-HPLC analysis revealed the identification of phenolics in coriander fruits with chlorogenic and gallic acids as main compounds in Tunisian, Syrian and Egyptian varieties, respectively. Moreover, fruit methanolic extracts exhibited remarkable DPPH radical scavenging activity with IC50 values ranged from 27.00 ± 6.57 to 36.00 ± 3.22 μg/mL. EC50 values of reducing power activity varied significantly (P < 0.05 from 54.20 ± 6.22 to 122.01 ± 13.25 μg/mL. The IC50 values of β-carotene bleaching assay were between 160.00 ± 18.63 and 240.00 ± 26.35 μg/mL. Our results indicated that coriander fruit might constitute a rich and novel source of natural antioxidants and may be suggested as a new potential source of natural antioxidant and could be used as food additive.

  15. Growth, seed development and genetic analysis in wild type and Def mutant of Pisum sativum L

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The def mutant pea (Pisum sativum L) showed non-abscission of seeds from the funicule. Here we present data on seed development and growth pattern and their relationship in predicting this particular trait in wild type and mutant lines as well as the inheritance pattern of the def allele in F2 and F3 populations. Findings Pod length and seed fresh weight increase with fruit maturity and this may affect the abscission event in pea seeds. However, the seed position in either the distal and proximal ends of the pod did not show any difference. The growth factors of seed fresh weight (FW), width of funicles (WFN), seed width (SW) and seed height (SH) were highly correlated and their relationships were determined in both wild type and def mutant peas. The coefficient of determination R2 values for the relationship between WFN and FW, SW and SH and their various interactions were higher for the def dwarf type. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that variation of WFN was associated with SH and SW. Pearson's chi square analysis revealed that the inheritance and segregation of the Def locus in 3:1 ratio was significant in two F2 populations. Structural analysis of the F3 population was used to confirm the inheritance status of the Def locus in F2 heterozygote plants. Conclusions This study investigated the inheritance of the presence or absence of the Def allele, controlling the presence of an abscission zone (AZ) or an abscission-less zone (ALZ) forming in wild type and mutant lines respectively. The single major gene (Def) controlling this phenotype was monogenic and def mutants were characterized and controlled by the homozygous recessive def allele that showed no palisade layers in the hilum region of the seed coat. PMID:22078070

  16. Growth, seed development and genetic analysis in wild type and Def mutant of Pisum sativum L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayeh Kwadwo

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The def mutant pea (Pisum sativum L showed non-abscission of seeds from the funicule. Here we present data on seed development and growth pattern and their relationship in predicting this particular trait in wild type and mutant lines as well as the inheritance pattern of the def allele in F2 and F3 populations. Findings Pod length and seed fresh weight increase with fruit maturity and this may affect the abscission event in pea seeds. However, the seed position in either the distal and proximal ends of the pod did not show any difference. The growth factors of seed fresh weight (FW, width of funicles (WFN, seed width (SW and seed height (SH were highly correlated and their relationships were determined in both wild type and def mutant peas. The coefficient of determination R2 values for the relationship between WFN and FW, SW and SH and their various interactions were higher for the def dwarf type. Stepwise multiple regression analysis showed that variation of WFN was associated with SH and SW. Pearson's chi square analysis revealed that the inheritance and segregation of the Def locus in 3:1 ratio was significant in two F2 populations. Structural analysis of the F3 population was used to confirm the inheritance status of the Def locus in F2 heterozygote plants. Conclusions This study investigated the inheritance of the presence or absence of the Def allele, controlling the presence of an abscission zone (AZ or an abscission-less zone (ALZ forming in wild type and mutant lines respectively. The single major gene (Def controlling this phenotype was monogenic and def mutants were characterized and controlled by the homozygous recessive def allele that showed no palisade layers in the hilum region of the seed coat.

  17. Modulation by phytochrome of the blue light-induced extracellular acidification by leaf epidermal cells of pea (Pisum sativum L.) : a kinetic analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elzenga, JTM; Staal, M; Prins, HBA

    Blue light induces extracellular acidification, a prerequisite of cell expansion, in epidermis cells of young pea leaves, by stimulation of the proton pumping-ATPase activity in the plasma membrane. A transient acidification, reaching a maximum 2.5-5 min after the start of the pulse, could be

  18. Radiosensitivity study in the germination and growth of the pea Pisum sativum L, with seeds exposed to gamma radiation; Estudio de radiosensibilidad en la germinacion y crecimiento de la arveja Pisum sativum L, con semillas expuestas a radiacion gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilguan, J.; Carrasco, J.; Marquez, V., E-mail: ilguanjanneth@gmail.com [Escuela Superior Politecnica de Chimborazo, Facultad de Ciencias, Panamericana Sur Km 1 1/2, ECO60155 Riobamba (Ecuador)

    2016-10-15

    Seeds of Pisum sativum L. were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co irradiator belonging to the Subsecretaria de Control y Aplicaciones Nucleares del Ecuador (SCAN), the dose rate at the irradiation time was 4.86 Gy/min. The seeds were grouped in packs of 100 units and exposed at doses of 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 120, 140, 160, 180 and 200 Gy. The number of effective germinations, the days for germination, the main stem thickness, the number of branches and the size of the plant were evaluated. To validate the experimentation, the data were analyzed statistically by tests of homogeneity of variances, way ANOVA and Scheffe analysis to each variable. The number of effective germinations was given to 100% for 20 and 40 Gy then decreases to a higher dose reaching 20% to 200 Gy, being the average of the proof near to 90%. Increased germination stimulation at treatment at 20 Gy with an average of 5.0 days was evidenced. Treatment at doses of 20, 40 and 60 Gy generate a plant size greater than the proof whose mean is 68.30 cm. The mean number of branches of the proof is 5.3 with a standard deviation of 0.675, which is greater at doses of 20 and 40 Gy. In the study, is concluded that better results are obtained when irradiating seeds Pisum sativum L, between 20 and 60 Gy. (Author)

  19. Yeasts colonizing the leaf surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sláviková, Elena; Vadkertiová, Renata; Vránová, Dana

    2007-08-01

    The yeasts were isolated from the leaf surfaces of ten species of trees. The study site was a forest park (Zelezná Studnicka) of the Small Carpathians mountain range. One hundred and thirty seven yeast strains belonging to 13 genera were isolated from 320 samples of leaves and needles. Seventeen yeast species were isolated, but only seven occurred regularly: Aureobasidium pullulans, Cryptococcus laurentii, Pichia anomala, Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Saccharomyces sp., Lachancea thermotolerans, and Rhodotorula glutinis. The remaining species were isolated from the leaves and needles of three or less tree species. A. pullulans, Cr. laurentii, and P. anomala were the most frequently found species and they occurred on leaves and needles of all ten tree species. Saccharomyces sp. occurred in leaf samples collected from eight kinds of trees. M. pulcherrima and L. thermotolerans were found in samples collected from six species of trees. Both these species occurred almost always on the leaves of deciduous trees. Rh. glutinis was the most frequently isolated carotenoids producing species. We have found out that the ascomycetous and basidiomycetous species were present in the leaf samples in approximately equal frequency, contrary to the soil samples taken from this forest park, where the ascomycetous species were found rarely.

  20. Leaf Senescence by Magnesium Deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keitaro Tanoi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnesium ions (Mg2+ are the second most abundant cations in living plant cells, and they are involved in various functions, including photosynthesis, enzyme catalysis, and nucleic acid synthesis. Low availability of Mg2+ in an agricultural field leads to a decrease in yield, which follows the appearance of Mg-deficient symptoms such as chlorosis, necrotic spots on the leaves, and droop. During the last decade, a variety of physiological and molecular responses to Mg2+ deficiency that potentially link to leaf senescence have been recognized, allowing us to reconsider the mechanisms of Mg2+ deficiency. This review focuses on the current knowledge about the physiological responses to Mg2+ deficiency including a decline in transpiration, accumulation of sugars and starch in source leaves, change in redox states, increased oxidative stress, metabolite alterations, and a decline in photosynthetic activity. In addition, we refer to the molecular responses that are thought to be related to leaf senescence. With these current data, we give an overview of leaf senescence induced by Mg deficiency.

  1. The Influence of Leaf Angle and Leaf Surface Characteristics on the Process of Rainfall Interception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, C.; Ginebra, R.; Webb, R.

    2015-12-01

    Individual choice in plant selection for household landscaping influences differences in runoff from urban watersheds because the variation in plant canopy architecture results in rainfall interception differences. Understanding the variables that influence rainfall interception and understanding the mechanism of rainfall interception are important concepts for sustainable watershed management. The broad objective of this study was to explore the influence of leaf hydrophobicity, water droplet retention, and leaf angle on the mechanism and process of rainfall interception and raindrop impaction on leaf surfaces of common tree species from the semi-arid regions of the western United States. Leaf hydrophobicity is determined by the cohesive forces of the water molecules among themselves and the adhesive forces that result from the molecular interactions between the water droplet and the leaf surface. Water droplet retention is a measure of how easily a water droplet drains off a leaf surface. The specific hypotheses examined were 1) larger raindrops falling on leaf surfaces will deflect the leaf to an angle greater than the water droplet retention angle; 2) an increased leaf angle, whether from natural position or deflection due to droplet impact and retention, reduces interception from raindrop impaction on hydrophobic and hydrophilic leaf surfaces; and 3) increased droplet size and frequency decrease rainfall interception more significantly in the hydrophilic case. These hypotheses were addressed in a laboratory experiment by 1) measuring leaf hydrophobicity and water droplet retention using a goniometer with a tilting base; 2) measuring leaf traits such as leaf area, leaf surface roughness, trichome density, and specific storage capacity; 3) examining raindrop splash on leaf surfaces with varying leaf hydrophobicity, water droplet retention, and leaf angle with a raindrop generator and high-speed video camera; and 4) modeling the impact of raindrop splash on leaf

  2. Effect of phytohormones on seed germination and seedling growth of Coriandrum sativum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Mahender; Agnihotri, R K; Vamil, R; Sharma, R

    2014-04-01

    Coriander commonly known as Dhania or Chinese parsley is generally grown for its use in soups, salads, dressing vegetables, seasoning and chutney. Effect of two phytohormones viz. GA3 and 2,4-D on seed germination, seedling growth and various physiological and biochemical parameters were studied. The hormones were applied individually in different concentrations (10, 50 and 100 μM concentrations). Both the hormones enhanced the germination percentage, seedling growth (root and shoot length), leaf area, chlorophyll and carotenoid content. The application of these hormones also decreased the germination time. Maximum germination, shoot length, leaf area and carotenoid content was observed in 100 μm concentration of GA3. Root length, chl. a and chl. b was maximum in 50 μM of 2,4-D and 100 μm GA3, respectively. The application of two hormones exhibited a marked increase on all the parameters studied as compared to the control.

  3. Antifungal Activity, Toxicity and Chemical Composition of the Essential Oil of Coriandrum sativum L. Fruits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika H. S. Brito

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to test the antifungal activity, toxicity and chemical composition of essential oil from C. sativum L. fruits. The essential oil, obtained by hydro-distillation, was analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Linalool was the main constituent (58.22%. The oil was considered bioactive, showing an LC50 value of 23 µg/mL in the Artemia salina lethality test. The antifungal activity was evaluated against Microsporum canis and Candida spp. by the agar-well diffusion method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC and the minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC were established by the broth microdilution method. The essential oil induced growth inhibition zones of 28 ± 5.42 and 9.25 ± 0.5 for M. canis and Candida spp. respectively. The MICs and MFCs for M. canis strains ranged from 78 to 620 and 150 to 1,250 µg/mL, and the MICs and MFCs for Candida spp strains ranged from 310 to 620 and 620 to 1,250 µg/mL, respectively. C. sativum essential oil is active in vitro against M. canis and Candida spp. demonstrating good antifungal activity.

  4. Immunolocalization of dually phosphorylated MAPKs in dividing root meristem cells of Vicia faba, Pisum sativum, Lupinus luteus and Lycopersicon esculentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winnicki, Konrad; Żabka, Aneta; Bernasińska, Joanna; Matczak, Karolina; Maszewski, Janusz

    2015-06-01

    In plants, phosphorylated MAPKs display constitutive nuclear localization; however, not all studied plant species show co-localization of activated MAPKs to mitotic microtubules. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway is involved not only in the cellular response to biotic and abiotic stress but also in the regulation of cell cycle and plant development. The role of MAPKs in the formation of a mitotic spindle has been widely studied and the MAPK signaling pathway was found to be indispensable for the unperturbed course of cell division. Here we show cellular localization of activated MAPKs (dually phosphorylated at their TXY motifs) in both interphase and mitotic root meristem cells of Lupinus luteus, Pisum sativum, Vicia faba (Fabaceae) and Lycopersicon esculentum (Solanaceae). Nuclear localization of activated MAPKs has been found in all species. Co-localization of these kinases to mitotic microtubules was most evident in L. esculentum, while only about 50% of mitotic cells in the root meristems of P. sativum and V. faba displayed activated MAPKs localized to microtubules during mitosis. Unexpectedly, no evident immunofluorescence signals at spindle microtubules and phragmoplast were noted in L. luteus. Considering immunocytochemical analyses and studies on the impact of FR180204 (an inhibitor of animal ERK1/2) on mitotic cells, we hypothesize that MAPKs may not play prominent role in the regulation of microtubule dynamics in all plant species.

  5. Effect of heavy metals on growth and heavy metal content of Allium porrum L. and Pisum sativum L

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruenhage, L.; Jaeger, H.J.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of cadmium, lead, zinc and copper, singly and in combination, on yield, heavy metal content and the mineral composition of Allium porrum L. and Pisum sativum L. have been investigated. The Cd, Pb, Zn and Cu concentrations of shoots and roots of Allium porrum increased with increasing heavy metal contamination of soil. However, no visible symptoms of heavy metal toxicity were recognized. The dry matter production was reduced as a function of heavy metal concentration and combination. The mechanisms of combinations were mostly synergistic. The correlation between pollutant contents (nmol/shoot) and yield was higher than the correlation between heavy metal concentrations of soil or shoots (ppm) and yield. Results of regression analyses showed that the inhibition of copper translocation caused by Cd, Pb and Zn was responsible for the yield depressions. The antagonism between Cd and N-deficiency showed that the level of N-supply was without negative effects on yield depressions of Pisum sativum caused by Cd. In contrast to this, the N-form played an important role in Cd-toxicity as the synergism between Cd and NH4 illustrated. K-deficiency as well as acidic nutrient solution (pH=4) diminished the root/shoot-barrier for Cd and therefore Cd-translocation from roots to shoots increased. Concerning calcium, magnesium and iron the decrease of ion uptake caused by Cd was statistically significant higher than yield depression.

  6. The effect of the humic acid and garlic (Allium sativum L. on performance parameters and carcass characteristic of broiler chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika PISTOVÁ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effect of humic acids and humic acids and garlic powder (Allium sativum L. combination on performance parameters and carcass characteristic of broiler chickens were studied. A total of 120 Ross 308 broiler chickens were divided into 3 treatments (n=40. The control group of chickens was fed complete feed mixtures without any additives. Treatment T1 was fed complete feed mixtures containing 1% of humic acid. Treatment T2 was fed complete feed mixtures containing 1.8% of humic acid and 0.2% of garlic powder (Allium sativum L.. At the end of the experiment was average body weight (values in the order of the groups: 1796.4±188.1; 1999.1±355.8 and 1958.6±201.2 g±SD significantly higher (P≤0.05 in both treatments groups compared to control group. In T1 was weight of gizzard (values in the order of the groups: 34.9±5.2; 43.1±9.4 and 38.9±7.0 g±SD significantly higher (P≤0.05 compared to control group. Carcass weight, weight of heart weight of liver and carcass yield of treatments groups was higher, but differences in these indicators were not statistically significant (P≥0.05. The results of this experiment indicate that humic acids may by an alternative replacement of feed antibiotics.

  7. Determination of the Water Requirements of Garlic (Alium Sativum L. and Its Relationship With the Crop's Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Eduardo Castro Franco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of garlic (Allium sativum L., there is not enough information available about the water requirements for garlic crop in the country. The present study is to identify the crop water requirements for each phenological stage and set a watering schedule according to environmental conditions offered in Tunja-Boyacá. This research was conducted during the first half of 2013, on the farm called “La Maria", which is located in the Pedagogical and Technological University of Colombia. The assessment of the phenological stages in garlic was developed through a stratified sampling design and a destructive sampling design, which were carried out every 7 days after transplant. The value of Kc was determined through the FAO-56 methodology, in which the method was used to find the crop evapotranspiration. In order to establish crop water use, two lysimeters of 1 m3 of capacity were installed. The result of ETo was obtained through the weather station data, these data were analyzed with the Penman-Monteith equation, using the Cropwat software. Three phenological stages for growing garlic (Allium sativum L. were established, from the transplant to the harvest. These stages were: vegetative Growth and development, Bulb initiation and Maturation. Kc values for each phenological stage were 0.95, 0.97 and 0.68 respectively.

  8. Molecular detection and in vitro antioxidant activity of S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) extracted from Allium sativum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y-E; Wang, W-D

    2016-06-30

    It is well known that Allium sativum has potential applications to clinical treatment of various cancers due to its remarkable ability in eliminating free radicals and increasing metabolism. An allyl-substituted cysteine derivative - S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC) was separated and identified from Allium sativum. The extracted SAC was reacted with 1-pyrenemethanol to obtain pyrene-labelled SAC (Py-SAC) to give SAC fluorescence properties. Molecular detection of Py-SAC was conducted by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy and time-resolved fluorescence method to quantitatively measure concentrations of Py-SAC solutions. The ability of removing 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and hydroxyl radical using Py-SAC was determined through oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Results showed the activity of Py-SAC and Vitamin C (VC) with ORAC as index, the concentrations of Py-SAC and VC were 58.43 mg/L and 5.72 mg/L respectively to scavenge DPPH, and 8.16 mg/L and 1.67 mg/L to scavenge •OH respectively. Compared with VC, the clearance rates of Py-SAC to scavenge DPPH were much higher, Py-SAC could inhibit hydroxyl radical. The ability of removing radical showed a dose-dependent relationship within the scope of the drug concentration.

  9. Evaluation of the Antimicrobial Activity of Tribulus terrestris, Allium sativum, Salvia officinalis, and Allium hirtifolium Boiss Against Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Amir Razavi Satvati

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Enterococcus faecalis is a Gram-positive, commensal bacterium which can cause life-threatening infections in humans. E. faecalis has been frequently found in root canal-treated teeth and is resistant to many commonly used antimicrobial agents. Nowadays modern medicine recognizes herbalism as a form of alternative medicine. Tribulus terrestris, Allium sativum, Salvia officinalis and Allium hirtifolium Boiss are commonly found in Iran and used as antimicrobial agents in folklore medicine. Objectives: In this study, antimicrobial activities of aqueous extracts of some plants were examined in vitro against E. faecalis. Materials and Methods: Antibacterial activities of the extracts of T. terrestris, A. sativum, S. officinalis and A. hirtifolium Boiss were examined using disc and well diffusion methods, and the19 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of aqueous extracts were determined against E. faecalis using agar and broth dilution methods. Results: The obtained results showed that the extract of A. hirtifolium Boiss inhibited the growth of E. faecalis (MIC of 10 mg/mL. Other plants had no effect on the target bacterium. Conclusion: According to the best effect of A. hirtifolium extract on E. faecalis and stability of this extract in thermal condition, we may purify this extract and use it for treatment of infections.

  10. Effects of steam distillation and screw-pressing on extraction, composition and functional properties of protein in dehulled coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coriander (Coriandrum sativum L.) is a summer annual plant commonly used as fresh green herb, spice, or for its essential oil. An integrated process combined steam distillation, dehulling, and screw pressing to recover the essential oil and edible oil from coriander fruit. The current work determine...

  11. Observación de la actividad antimicrobiana del ajo (Allium sativum en el laboratorio de Educación Secundaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Pedro López Pérez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El ajo (Allium sativum ha sido utilizado desde tiempos inmemorables, tanto para uso culinario como por sus propiedades terapéuticas. En esta comunicación se ensaya (in vitro la propiedad antimicrobiana de este alimento frente a bacterias presentes en la superficie de la piel.

  12. Observación de la actividad antimicrobiana del ajo (Allium sativum) en el laboratorio de Educación Secundaria

    OpenAIRE

    López Pérez, José Pedro

    2011-01-01

    El ajo (Allium sativum) ha sido utilizado desde tiempos inmemorables, tanto para uso culinario como por sus propiedades terapéuticas. En esta comunicación se ensaya (in vitro) la propiedad antimicrobiana de este alimento frente a bacterias presentes en la superficie de la piel.

  13. The development of an efficient cultivar-independent plant regeneration system from callus derived from both apical and non-apical root segments of garlic (Allium sativum L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zheng, S.J.; Henken, G.; Krens, F.A.; Kik, C.

    2003-01-01

    Callus induction and later plant regeneration were studied in four widely grown garlic (Allium sativum L.) cultivars from Europe. Root segments from in vitro plantlets were used as starting material. In addition to cultivar effects, the effects of auxin and cytokinin levels and the position of the

  14. In vitro effect of essential oils from Cinnamomum aromaticum, Citrus limon and Allium sativum on two intestinal flagellates of poultry, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum and Histomonas meleagridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenner L.

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils may be effective preventive or curative treatments against several flagelated poultry parasites and may become primordial either to organic farms, or as more drugs are bannished. The anti-flagellate activity of essential oils obtained from fresh leaves of Cinnamomum aromaticum, Citrus limon pericarps and Allium sativum bulbs was investigated in vitro on Tetratrichomonas gallinarum and Histomonas meleagridis. On T. gallinarum, the minimal lethal concentration (MLC at 24 hours was 0.25 μl/ml for C. aromaticum oil, and 0.125 μl/ml for C. limon and A. sativum oils. On H. meleagridis, MLC was 0.5 μl/ml for C. aromaticum oil and 1 μl/m l for C. limon and A. sativum oils at 24 and 48 hours. Moreover, no synergistic effects were evidenced in vitro. The essential oil constituents, based on their GC retention times have been also identified. The major component is trans-cinnamaldehyde (79 % for C. aromaticum; limonene for C. limon (71 % and diallyl tri- and disulfide (79 % for A. sativum. Even if concentration and protocol adaptations are required for successful in vivo treatments, it appears that these oils may be useful as chemotherapeutic agents against several poultry parasites.

  15. Evaluation of acute toxicity of essential oil of garlic (Allium sativum) and its selected major constituent compounds against overwintering Cacopsylla chinensis (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Na Na; Zhang, Hang; Zhang, Xue Chang; Luan, Xiao Bing; Zhou, Cheng; Liu, Qi Zhi; Shi, Wang Peng; Liu, Zhi Long

    2013-06-01

    In our screening program for insecticidal activity of the essential oils/extracts derived from some Chinese medicinal herbs and spices, garlic (Allium sativum L.) essential oil was found to possess strong insecticidal activity against overwintering adults of Cacopsylla chinensis Yang et Li (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The commercial essential oil of A. sativum was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Sixteen compounds, accounting for 97.44% of the total oil, were identified, and the main components of the essential oil of A. sativum were diallyl trisulfide (50.43%), diallyl disulfide (25.30%), diallyl sulfide (6.25%), diallyl tetrasulfide (4.03%), 1,2-dithiolane (3.12%), allyl methyl disulfide (3.07%), 1,3-dithiane (2.12%), and allyl methyl trisulfide (2.08%). The essential oil of A. sativum possessed contact toxicity against overwintering C. chinensis, with an LC50 value of 1.42 microg per adult. The two main constituent compounds, diallyl trisulfide and diallyl disulfide, exhibited strong acute toxicity against the overwintering C. chinensis, with LC50 values of 0.64 and 11.04 /g per adult, respectively.

  16. The same allele of translation initiation factor 4E mediates resistance against two Potyvirus spp. in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, M.; Møller, I.S.; Tulinius, G.

    2007-01-01

    Pathogenicity of two sequenced isolates of Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) was established on genotypes of Pisum sativum L. reported to carry resistance genes to BYMV and other potyviruses. Resistance to the white lupin strain of BYMV (BYMV-W) is inherited as a recessive gene named wlv that maps...

  17. Phytochemical Profiles and Antimicrobial Activities of Allium cepa Red cv. and A. sativum Subjected to Different Drying Methods: A Comparative MS-Based Metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farag, Mohamed A; Ali, Sara E; Hodaya, Rashad H; El-Seedi, Hesham R; Sultani, Haider N; Laub, Annegret; Eissa, Tarek F; Abou-Zaid, Fouad O F; Wessjohann, Ludger A

    2017-05-08

    Plants of the Allium genus produce sulphur compounds that give them a characteristic (alliaceous) flavour and mediate for their medicinal use. In this study, the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of Allium cepa red cv. and A. sativum in the context of three different drying processes were assessed using metabolomics. Bulbs were dried using either microwave, air drying, or freeze drying and further subjected to chemical analysis of their composition of volatile and non-volatile metabolites. Volatiles were collected using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME) coupled to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with 42 identified volatiles including 30 sulphur compounds, four nitriles, three aromatics, and three esters. Profiling of the polar non-volatile metabolites via ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution MS (UPLC/MS) annotated 51 metabolites including dipeptides, flavonoids, phenolic acids, and fatty acids. Major peaks in GC/MS or UPLC/MS contributing to the discrimination between A. sativum and A. cepa red cv. were assigned to sulphur compounds and flavonoids. Whereas sulphur conjugates amounted to the major forms in A. sativum, flavonoids predominated in the chemical composition of A. cepa red cv. With regard to drying impact on Allium metabolites, notable and clear separations among specimens were revealed using principal component analysis (PCA). The PCA scores plot of the UPLC/MS dataset showed closer metabolite composition of microwave dried specimens to freeze dried ones, and distant from air dried bulbs, observed in both A. cepa and A. sativum. Compared to GC/MS, the UPLC/MS derived PCA model was more consistent and better in assessing the impact of drying on Allium metabolism. A phthalate derivative was found exclusively in a commercial garlic preparation via GC/MS, of yet unknown origin. The freeze dried samples of both Allium species exhibited stronger antimicrobial activities compared to dried specimens

  18. Phytochemical Profiles and Antimicrobial Activities of Allium cepa Red cv. and A. sativum Subjected to Different Drying Methods: A Comparative MS-Based Metabolomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Farag

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Plants of the Allium genus produce sulphur compounds that give them a characteristic (alliaceous flavour and mediate for their medicinal use. In this study, the chemical composition and antimicrobial properties of Allium cepa red cv. and A. sativum in the context of three different drying processes were assessed using metabolomics. Bulbs were dried using either microwave, air drying, or freeze drying and further subjected to chemical analysis of their composition of volatile and non-volatile metabolites. Volatiles were collected using solid phase micro-extraction (SPME coupled to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC/MS with 42 identified volatiles including 30 sulphur compounds, four nitriles, three aromatics, and three esters. Profiling of the polar non-volatile metabolites via ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution MS (UPLC/MS annotated 51 metabolites including dipeptides, flavonoids, phenolic acids, and fatty acids. Major peaks in GC/MS or UPLC/MS contributing to the discrimination between A. sativum and A. cepa red cv. were assigned to sulphur compounds and flavonoids. Whereas sulphur conjugates amounted to the major forms in A. sativum, flavonoids predominated in the chemical composition of A. cepa red cv. With regard to drying impact on Allium metabolites, notable and clear separations among specimens were revealed using principal component analysis (PCA. The PCA scores plot of the UPLC/MS dataset showed closer metabolite composition of microwave dried specimens to freeze dried ones, and distant from air dried bulbs, observed in both A. cepa and A. sativum. Compared to GC/MS, the UPLC/MS derived PCA model was more consistent and better in assessing the impact of drying on Allium metabolism. A phthalate derivative was found exclusively in a commercial garlic preparation via GC/MS, of yet unknown origin. The freeze dried samples of both Allium species exhibited stronger antimicrobial activities compared to

  19. Potential Value of Datura stramonium Agglutinin-recognized Glycopatterns in Urinary Protein on Differential Diagnosis of Diabetic Nephropathy and Nondiabetic Renal Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Li; Yu, Han-Jie; Zhu, Han-Yu; Zheng, Ying; Han, Qiu-Xia; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2018-01-01

    Background: Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common and serious microvascular complication of diabetes. To date, the gold standard for identifying DN and nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD) is a renal biopsy; however, there is currently no reliable diagnostic marker to identify DN and NDRD in a noninvasive manner. This study aimed to investigate the different glycopatterns in urine specimens of DN patients and NDRD patients for a differential diagnosis. Methods: In total, 19 DN patients and 18 NDRD patients who underwent renal biopsies between March 2015 and March 2016 at the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital were enrolled in this study. A lectin microarray was used to investigate the glycopatterns in the urinary protein of the 37 patients. Ratio analysis and one-way analysis of variance were used to screen altered glycopatterns. Then, the altered glycopatterns between the DN and NDRD groups were verified by a urinary protein microarray among another 32 patients (15 with DN and 17 with NDRD), and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic value of the altered glycopatterns in differentiating DN and NDRD. Finally, lectin blotting was used to evaluate the altered glycosylation in protein level. Results: The result of lectin microarrays revealed that the relative abundance of the (β-1,4)-linked N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) recognized by lectin Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) was significantly higher in urinary protein in DN patients than that in NDRD patients (fold change >1.50, P < 0.001). Subsequently, the results of urinary protein microarrays were consistent with lectin microarrays (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the ROC curve showed that glycopatterns could effectively distinguish DN from NDRD patients (area under the ROC curve = 0.94, P < 0.001). DSA lectin blotting showed that glycoproteins, with a molecular weight of approximately 50,000, demonstrated a difference in urine samples between DN

  20. Potential Value ofDatura stramoniumAgglutinin-recognized Glycopatterns in Urinary Protein on Differential Diagnosis of Diabetic Nephropathy and Nondiabetic Renal Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-Li; Yu, Han-Jie; Zhu, Han-Yu; Zheng, Ying; Han, Qiu-Xia; Cai, Guang-Yan; Chen, Xiang-Mei

    2018-01-20

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the most common and serious microvascular complication of diabetes. To date, the gold standard for identifying DN and nondiabetic renal disease (NDRD) is a renal biopsy; however, there is currently no reliable diagnostic marker to identify DN and NDRD in a noninvasive manner. This study aimed to investigate the different glycopatterns in urine specimens of DN patients and NDRD patients for a differential diagnosis. In total, 19 DN patients and 18 NDRD patients who underwent renal biopsies between March 2015 and March 2016 at the Chinese People's Liberation Army General Hospital were enrolled in this study. A lectin microarray was used to investigate the glycopatterns in the urinary protein of the 37 patients. Ratio analysis and one-way analysis of variance were used to screen altered glycopatterns. Then, the altered glycopatterns between the DN and NDRD groups were verified by a urinary protein microarray among another 32 patients (15 with DN and 17 with NDRD), and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to determine the diagnostic value of the altered glycopatterns in differentiating DN and NDRD. Finally, lectin blotting was used to evaluate the altered glycosylation in protein level. The result of lectin microarrays revealed that the relative abundance of the (β-1,4)-linked N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc) recognized by lectin Datura stramonium agglutinin (DSA) was significantly higher in urinary protein in DN patients than that in NDRD patients (fold change >1.50, P < 0.001). Subsequently, the results of urinary protein microarrays were consistent with lectin microarrays (P < 0.05). Furthermore, the ROC curve showed that glycopatterns could effectively distinguish DN from NDRD patients (area under the ROC curve = 0.94, P < 0.001). DSA lectin blotting showed that glycoproteins, with a molecular weight of approximately 50,000, demonstrated a difference in urine samples between DN patients and NDRD patients. The