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Sample records for satellite-measured auroral particle

  1. Auroral effects in the D region of the ionosphere. [interactions between auroral particles and electromagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasofu, S. I.

    1974-01-01

    Physical phenomena associated with the interaction between auroral particles and electromagnetic fields, auroral energy flow, and the propagation of auroral effects to low altitudes are discussed in detail. It is concluded that energy deposition of soft auroral X-rays would be negligible at stratospheric altitudes. New data from incoherent backscatter measurements of neutral winds in the auroral region indicate a lack of correlation between stratospheric winds and winds in the auroral ionosphere. Magnetograms are used to show that sector boundary crossings with a time scale of approximately one hour (as opposed to the sector structure itself with a time scale of several days) do not couple effectively with the magnetosphere and are not significant energy inputs to it.

  2. Equatorial magnetospheric particles and auroral precipitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlwain, C. E.

    The injection boundary beyond which fresh hot plasma appears each magnetospheric substorm is generalized and extended to circle the Earth. The concept of an auroral shell representing the inner limit of active auroral processes is introduced. It is proposed that at low altitudes, this shell marks the equatorward edge of the auroral ovals, and that at high altitudes, it marks the injection boundary. The auroral ring is defined as the intersection of the auroral shell with the magnetic equator. A simple equation for computing the expected location of the auroral ring as a function of local time and magnetic disturbance level is obtained. Tests indicate that the model is valid and reasonably accurate.

  3. Current-voltage relationship in the auroral particle acceleration region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Morooka

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The current-voltage relationship in the auroral particle acceleration region has been studied statistically by the Akebono (EXOS-D satellite in terms of the charge carriers of the upward field-aligned current. The Akebono satellite often observed field-aligned currents which were significantly larger than the model value predicted by Knight (1973. We compared the upward field-aligned current estimated by three different methods, and found that low-energy electrons often play an important role as additional current carriers, together with the high-energy primary electrons which are expected from Knight's relation. Such additional currents have been observed especially at high and middle altitudes of the particle acceleration region. Some particular features of electron distribution functions, such as "cylindrical distribution functions" and "electron conics", have often been observed coinciding with the additional currents. They indicated time variability of the particle acceleration region. Therefore, we have concluded that the low-energy electrons within the "forbidden" region of electron phase space in the stationary model often contribute to charge carriers of the current because of the rapid time variability of the particle acceleration region. "Cylindrical distribution functions" are expected to be found below the time-varying potential difference. We statistically examined the locations of "cylindrical distribution function", and found that their altitudes are related to the location where the additional currents have been observed. This result is consistent with the idea that the low-energy electrons can also carry significant current when the acceleration region changes in time.

  4. Forecasting of DST index from auroral electrojet indices using time-delay neural network + particle swarm optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzús, J. A.; López-Caraballo, C. H.; Rojas, P.; Salfate, I.; Rivera, M.; Palma-Chilla, L.

    2016-05-01

    In this study, an artificial neural network was optimized with particle swarm algorithm and trained to predict the geomagmetic DST index one hour ahead using the past values of DST and auroral electrojet indices. The results show that the proposed neural network model can be properly trained for predicting of DST(t + 1) with acceptable accuracy, and that the geomagnetic indices used have influential effects on the good training and predicting capabilities of the chosen network.

  5. Numerical study of the auroral particle transport in the polar upper atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the Boltzmann equation and with some reasonable assumptions, a one-dimensional transport equation of charged energetic particles is derived by taking account of major interactions with neutral species in the upper atmosphere, including the processes of elastic scattering, the excitation, the ionization and the secondary electron production. The transport equation is numerically solved, for a simplified atmosphere consisting only of nitrogen molecules (N2), to obtain the variations of incident electron fluxes as a function of altitude, energy and pitch angle. The model results can describe fairly the transport characteristics of pre-cipitating auroral electron spectra in the polar upper atmosphere; meanwhile the N2 ionization rates calculated from the modeled differential flux spectra also exhibit good agreements with existing empirical models in terms of several key parameters. Taking the energy flux spectra of precipitating electrons observed by FAST satellite flying over EISCAT site on May 15, 1997 as model inputs, the model-calculated ionization rate profile of neutral atmosphere consists reasonably with that recon-structed from electron density measurements by the radar.

  6. Ion acoustic instability of HPT particles, FAC density, anomalous resistivity and parallel electric field in the auroral region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Jayasree; G Renuka; C Venugopal

    2003-12-01

    During the magnetic storm of 21st March 1990, the DE-1 spacecraft encountered the auroral region at high invariant latitude at altitudes ranging from a few thousand kilometers in the ionosphere to many earth radii in the magnetosphere. The magnetic field perturbations interpretable as field aligned current (FAC) layers and the electrostatic turbulence possibly due to electrostatic ion acoustic instability driven by these currents are shown. The critical drift velocity of Hot Plasma Torus (HPT) electrons and the growth rate of ion acoustic wave as a function of electron to ion temperature ratio (/) for low and high current densities and energy of HPT electrons are found out. The intense FAC destabilizes the ion acoustic wave and the resultant electrostatic turbulence creates an anomalous resistivity. The current driven resistivity produces parallel electric field and high power dissipation. The anomalous resistivity , potential differnece along the auroral field lines ∥, intensity of electric field turbulence ∥ and power produced per unit volume are computed. It is found that the change in westward magnetic perturbation increases ∥; ; ∥ ;∥ and . Hence HPT electrons are heated and accelerated due to power dissipation during magnetically active periods in the auroral region. Concerning, applications, such HPT electrons can be used in particle accelerators like electron ring accelerator, smokatron etc.

  7. Localized Ionospheric Particle Acceleration and Wave Acceleration of Auroral Ions: Amicist Data Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Kristina A.

    1999-01-01

    Research supported by this grant covered two main topics: auroral ion acceleration from ELF-band wave activity, and from VLF-spikelet (lower hybrid solitary structure) wave activity. Recent auroral sounding rocket data illustrate the relative significance of various mechanisms for initiating auroral ion outflow. Two nightside mechanisms are shown in detail. The first mechanism is ion acceleration within lower hybrid solitary wave events. The new data from this two payload mission show clearly that: (1) these individual events are spatially localized to scales approximately 100 m wide perpendicular to B, in agreement with previous investigations of these structures, and (2) that the probability of occurrence of the events is greatest at times of maximum VLF wave intensity. The second mechanism is ion acceleration by broadband, low frequency electrostatic waves, observed in a 30 km wide region at the poleward edge of the arc. The ion fluxes from the two mechanisms are compared and it is shown that while lower hybrid solitary structures do indeed accelerate ions in regions of intense VLF waves, the outflow from the electrostatic ion wave acceleration region is dominant for the aurora investigated by this sounding rocket, AMICIST. The fluxes are shown to be consistent with DE-1 and Freja outflow measurements, indicating that the AMICIST observations show the low altitude, microphysical signatures of nightside auroral outflow. In this paper, we present a review of sounding rocket observations of the ion acceleration seen nightside auroral zone lower hybrid solitary structures. Observations from Topaz3, Amicist, and Phaze2 are presented on various spatial scales, including the two-point measurements of the Amicist mission. From this collection of observations, we will demonstrate the following characteristics of transverse ion acceleration (TAI) in LHSS. The ion acceleration process is narrowly confined to 90 degrees pitch angle, in spatially confined regions of up to a

  8. Auroral substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkila, Walter J.

    Many models of the substorm process assume a uniform current sheet before the auroral breakup and the onset of the expansion phase; in fact, a lower energy state for the cross-tail current is a set of filamentary currents. We hypothesize that such filaments are connected to auroral arcs during the growth phase. We must have an arc for it to break up, an essential part of the substorm. This means that we should look at instabilities of current filaments in the magnetotail. We have proposed that the appropriate instability is a simple meander of the current filament in the equatorial plane. An outward meander will be caused by the current carriers, undergoing curvature drift, becoming demagnetized. We take the inductive electric field as EIND = -∂A/∂t, using the Coulomb or transverse gauge. This inductive electric field will in general have a component parallel to the magnetic field. We take the response of the plasma to be reflected in a scalar potential, EES = - ∇ φ that response must be such as to diminish the actual (or net) E∥ Part of the response is the formation of field-aligned currents producing the well-known substorm current diversion. At the same time the plasma will enhance the transverse component of the induction electric field. Other work has indicated that a substorm reconnection X-line will form. The enhanced induction electric field near the emerging X-line will cause a discharge, again to decrease E∥ After subsequent betatron acceleration even zero energy particles can be energized to MeV energies in a matter of seconds in a two-step process. A plasmoid will be created which will move in the direction of least magnetic pressure, namely tailward.

  9. Particle Signatures Observed by Geotail at 9-30 Re and Mapping of Auroral Regions to the Magnetosphere Without Field-Line Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, H.; Hori, T.; Mukai, T.

    2004-12-01

    The Geotail spacecraft has often observed a rapid change of particle signatures at a geocentric distance around 10-15 Re. As the spacecraft approached the near-Earth region, particle spectra showing a low temperature, a small particle flux, and a large fluctuation in the magnetotail changed to those with a high temperature, a large flux, and a small fluctuation in the near-Earth region. This change often occurred rapidly as if there was a sharp boundary between the tail plasma sheet and the near-Earth plasma sheet. In the present paper, we call this boundary "near-Earth PS boundary (NEPS boundary)." As pointed out by recent studies, the region between the tail plasma sheet and the near-Earth plasma sheet may be a key to solving problems on dynamics of the magnetosphere [Shiokawa et al., 1998] and to studying chaotic behavior of magnetospheric particles [Zelenyi et al., 2000, 2002]. In this paper, we investigate the position of the NEPS boundary in detail and present a map showing its occurrence on the equatorial plane. We also examine characteristics of the NEPS boundary and indicate that they are very similar to characteristics of the equatorward boundary of the so-called "Wall Region" [Ashour-Abdalla et al, 1992] or "Ion Gap" [Bosqued et al, 1993; Delcourt et al., 1996], which has been observed at low altitudes. We compare the NEPS boundary with the equatorward boundary of the Wall Region (Ion Gap) identified by the low-altitude satellite Akebono. It is concluded that the boundary of the Wall Region (Ion Gap) is the field-aligned projection of the NEPS boundary detected by Geotail in the magnetosphere. This conclusion enables us to map the key region (10-15 Re) to the auroral altitudes. The result of the mapping demonstrates that the key region is projected on the latitudes of 65-70 degrees at auroral altitudes. Finally, we discuss a new method to map auroral regions to the magnetosphere without using field line models but using observed boundaries. It is

  10. Stream Gauges and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsdorf, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Satellite measurements should not be viewed as a replacement for stream gauges. However, occasionally it is suggested that because satellite-based measurements can provide river discharge, a motivation for satellite approaches is an increasing lack of stream gauges. This is an argument for more stream gauges, but not necessarily for satellite measurements. Rather, in-situ and spaceborne methods of estimating discharge are complementary. Stream gauges provide frequent measurements at one point in the river reach whereas satellites have the potential to measure throughout all reaches but at orbital repeat intervals of days to weeks. The Surface Water and Ocean Topography satellite mission (SWOT) is an opportunity to further develop these complements. The motivation for SWOT, and indeed for any satellite based method of estimating discharge, should not be as a replacement for stream gauges. Scientific and application uses should motivate the measurements. For example, understanding floods with their dynamic water surfaces are best sampled from remote platforms that provide water surface elevations throughout the floodwave. As another example, today’s water and energy balance models are giving outputs at increasing spatial resolution and are making use of water surface elevations throughout the modeled basin. These models require a similar resolution in the calibrating and validating observations. We should also be aware of practical limitations. In addition to providing spatially distributed hydrodynamic measurements on rivers, SWOT will be able to measure storage changes in the estimated 30 million lakes in the world that are larger than a hectare. Knowing the storage changes in these lakes is especially important in certain regions such as the Arctic but gauging even a small fraction of these is impractical. Another motivator for satellite methods is that even in the presence of stream gauges, discharge data is not always well shared throughout all countries

  11. The effects of magnetic storm phases on F-layer irregularities from auroral to equatorial latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Jules; Mendillo, Michael

    1990-12-01

    Some topics of discussion in this journal include the following: The effects of electric field and ring current energy increases on F-layer irregularities at auroral and sub-auroral latitudes; The role of the ring current in generating or inhibiting equatorial F-layer irregularities during magnetic storms; Auroral and sub-auroral F-layer irregularities and high plasma convection during the magnetically active periods of September 17-24, 1984; and Simultaneous All-Sky Optical Airglow Imaging Observations and San Marco Satellite Measurements in the Pacific Sector.

  12. Field-aligned particle acceleration on auroral field lines by interaction with transient density cavities stimulated by kinetic Alfvén waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Bespalov

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the field-aligned acceleration of energetic ions and electrons which takes place on auroral field lines due to their interaction with time-varying density cavities stimulated by the strong oscillating field-aligned currents of kinetic Alfvén waves. It is shown that when the field-aligned current density of these waves increases, such that the electron drift speed exceeds the electron thermal speed, ion acoustic perturbations cease to propagate along the field lines and instead form purely-growing density perturbations. The rarefactions in these perturbations are found to grow rapidly to form density cavities, limited by the pressure of the bipolar electric fields which occur within them. The time scale for growth and decay of the cavities is much shorter than the period of the kinetic Alfvén waves. Energetic particles traversing these growing and decaying cavities will be accelerated by their time-varying field-aligned electric fields in a process that is modelled as a series of discrete random perturbations. The evolution of the particle distribution function is thus determined by the Fokker-Planck equation, with an energy diffusion coefficient that is proportional to the square of the particle charge, but is independent of the mass and energy. Steady-state solutions for the distribution functions of the accelerated particles are obtained for the case of an arbitrary energetic particle population incident on a scattering layer of finite length along the field lines, showing how the reflected and transmitted distributions depend on the typical "random walk" energy change of the particles within the layer compared to their initial energy. When this typical energy change is large compared to the initial energy, the reflected population is broadly spread in energy about a mean which is comparable with the initial energy, while the transmitted population has the form of a strongly accelerated field-aligned beam. We suggest that these

  13. The enigma of auroral spirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, G.

    One of the most spectacular forms that the aurora borealis can assume is the large-scale spiral Spirals are dominantly observed along the poleward boundary of the auroral oval during active periods Two concepts have been pursued in explaining their origin and in particular the counterclockwise sense of rotation of the luminous structures when viewed along the magnetic field direction An essentially magnetostatic theory following Hallinan 1976 attributes the spiral pattern to the twisting of field-lines caused by a centrally located upward field-aligned current According to Oguti 1981 and followers a clockwise rotation of the plasma flow produces the anticlockwise structure There are observations seemingly confirming or contradicting either theory In this paper it is argued that both concepts are insufficient in that only parts of the underlying physics are considered Besides field-aligned currents and plasma flow one has to take into at least two further aspects The ionospheric conductivity modified by particle precipitation has an impact on the magnetospheric plasma dynamics Furthermore auroral arcs are not fixed entities subject to distortions by plasma flows or twisted field-lines but sites of transient releases of energy We suggest that auroral spirals are ports of entry or exit of plasma into or out of the auroral oval This way it can be understood why a clockwise plasma flow can create an anticlockwise luminous pattern

  14. Cassini UVIS Auroral Observations in 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Wayne R.; Jouchoux, Alain; Esposito, Larry W.; Radioti, Aikaterini; Grodent, Denis; Gustin, Jacques; Gerard, Jean-Claude; Lamy, Laurent; Badman, Sarah; Bunce, Emma; Cecconi, Baptiste; Clarke, John T.; Crary, Frank; Dougherty, Michele; Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Kurth, William; Mitchell, Don; Nichols, Jonathan; Prange, Renee; Schippers, Patricia; Zarka, Philippe; Cassini UVIS Team

    2016-10-01

    In June of 2016, the Cassini Saturn orbiter began a series of high inclination orbits that will continue until September 2017 when the mission ends as Cassini enters the Saturn atmosphere. These orbits present excellent views of Saturn's polar regions suitable for auroral imaging at the closest distances to date, with the additional prospect of simultaneous particle and fields measurements within the sources of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) associated with ultraviolet auroral emissions and/or acceleration regions likely coinciding with them. We will present new Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) auroral images, spectra and movies obtained during the summer and fall of 2016 and put them in the context of auroral data collected since Cassini orbit insertion in 2004. Included in the new data will be UVIS south polar observations obtained simultaneously with Hubble Space Telescope observations of the north polar region on June 29, 2016 and August 19, 2016.

  15. Efficient particle-in-cell simulation of auroral plasma phenomena using a CUDA enabled graphics processing unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewell, Stephen

    This thesis introduces a software framework that effectively utilizes low-cost commercially available Graphic Processing Units (GPUs) to simulate complex scientific plasma phenomena that are modeled using the Particle-In-Cell (PIC) paradigm. The software framework that was developed conforms to the Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA), a standard for general purpose graphic processing that was introduced by NVIDIA Corporation. This framework has been verified for correctness and applied to advance the state of understanding of the electromagnetic aspects of the development of the Aurora Borealis and Aurora Australis. For each phase of the PIC methodology, this research has identified one or more methods to exploit the problem's natural parallelism and effectively map it for execution on the graphic processing unit and its host processor. The sources of overhead that can reduce the effectiveness of parallelization for each of these methods have also been identified. One of the novel aspects of this research was the utilization of particle sorting during the grid interpolation phase. The final representation resulted in simulations that executed about 38 times faster than simulations that were run on a single-core general-purpose processing system. The scalability of this framework to larger problem sizes and future generation systems has also been investigated.

  16. A substorm in midnight auroral precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Vorobjev

    Full Text Available DMSP F7 spacecraft observations for the whole of 1986 were used to construct the empirical model of the midnight auroral precipitation during a substorm. The model includes the dynamics of different auroral precipitation boundaries and simultaneous changes in average electron precipitation energy and energy flux in different precipitation regions during all substorm phases, as well as the IMF and solar wind plasma signatures during a substorm. The analysis of the model shows a few important features of precipitation. (1 During the magnetic quietness and just before the beginning of the substorm expansive phase the latitudinal width of the auroral precipitation in the nightside sector is about 5 – 6° CGL, while that of the auroral oval is about 2 – 3° CGL during such periods. (2 For about 5 min before the substorm onset a decrease in the average precipitating electron energy in the equatorward part of auroral zone was observed simultaneously, with an increase in both the average electron energy and energy flux of electron precipitation in the poleward part of the auroral zone. (3 The isotropy boundary position in the beginning of the substorm expansive phase coincides well with the inner edge of the central plasma sheet. The analysis of interplanetary medium parameters shows that, on average, during the substorm development, the solar wind dynamic pressure was about 1.5 times that of the magnetic quietness period. Substorms occurred predominantly during the southward IMF orientation, suggesting that substorm onset often was not associated with the northern turn or decrease in the southward interplanetary Bz . The Northern Hemisphere’s substorms occurred generally during the positive interplanetary By in winter, and they were observed when the interplanetary By was negative in summer.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics

  17. Danish auroral science history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauning, P.

    2011-01-01

    Danish auroral science history begins with the early auroral observations made by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe during the years from 1582 to 1601 preceding the Maunder minimum in solar activity. Included are also the brilliant observations made by another astronomer, Ole Rømer, from Copenhagen in 1707, as well as the early auroral observations made from Greenland by missionaries during the 18th and 19th centuries. The relations between auroras and geomagnetic variations were analysed by H. C. Ørsted, who also played a vital role in the development of Danish meteorology that came to include comprehensive auroral observations from Denmark, Iceland and Greenland as well as auroral and geomagnetic research. The very important auroral investigations made by Sophus Tromholt are outlined. His analysis from 1880 of auroral observations from Greenland prepared for the significant contributions from the Danish Meteorological Institute, DMI, (founded in 1872) to the first International Polar Year 1882/83, where an expedition headed by Adam Paulsen was sent to Greenland to conduct auroral and geomagnetic observations. Paulsen's analyses of the collected data gave many important results but also raised many new questions that gave rise to auroral expeditions to Iceland in 1899 to 1900 and to Finland in 1900 to 1901. Among the results from these expeditions were 26 unique paintings of the auroras made by the artist painter, Harald Moltke. The expedition to Finland was headed by Dan la Cour, who later as director of the DMI came to be in charge of the comprehensive international geomagnetic and auroral observations made during the Second International Polar Year in 1932/33. Finally, the article describes the important investigations made by Knud Lassen during, among others, the International Geophysical Year 1957/58 and during the International Quiet Sun Year (IQSY) in 1964/65. With his leadership the auroral and geomagnetic research at DMI reached a high international

  18. Danish auroral science history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stauning

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Danish auroral science history begins with the early auroral observations made by the Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe during the years from 1582 to 1601 preceding the Maunder minimum in solar activity. Included are also the brilliant observations made by another astronomer, Ole Rømer, from Copenhagen in 1707, as well as the early auroral observations made from Greenland by missionaries during the 18th and 19th centuries. The relations between auroras and geomagnetic variations were analysed by H. C. Ørsted, who also played a vital role in the development of Danish meteorology that came to include comprehensive auroral observations from Denmark, Iceland and Greenland as well as auroral and geomagnetic research. The very important auroral investigations made by Sophus Tromholt are outlined. His analysis from 1880 of auroral observations from Greenland prepared for the significant contributions from the Danish Meteorological Institute, DMI, (founded in 1872 to the first International Polar Year 1882/83, where an expedition headed by Adam Paulsen was sent to Greenland to conduct auroral and geomagnetic observations. Paulsen's analyses of the collected data gave many important results but also raised many new questions that gave rise to auroral expeditions to Iceland in 1899 to 1900 and to Finland in 1900 to 1901. Among the results from these expeditions were 26 unique paintings of the auroras made by the artist painter, Harald Moltke. The expedition to Finland was headed by Dan la Cour, who later as director of the DMI came to be in charge of the comprehensive international geomagnetic and auroral observations made during the Second International Polar Year in 1932/33. Finally, the article describes the important investigations made by Knud Lassen during, among others, the International Geophysical Year 1957/58 and during the International Quiet Sun Year (IQSY in 1964/65. With his leadership the auroral and geomagnetic research at DMI reached a high

  19. Effect of Energetic Electrons on Quiet Auroral Arc Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroki; Ohno, Nobuaki; Sato, Tetsuya

    2010-11-01

    The theory of feedback instability between the magnetosphere and ionosphere is believed as one of the candidate to explain the formation of quiet auroral arc. Then, some magneto-hydro- dynamics simulations showed the arc formation by this macroscopic instability, while the effect of auroral energetic electrons on the arc formation was neglected or given as a macroscopic parameter in these simulations. On the other hand, because of the recent development of particle simulations, auroral energetic electrons are thought to be produced by the super ion-acoustic double layer that should be created by microscopic instability. To make close investigation of auroral arc formation, it is necessary to consider the interaction with microscopic instability. In this paper, we numerically study the effect of energetic electrons on quiet auroral arc formation by means of the Macro-Micro Interlocked simulation.

  20. Fast-moving diffuse auroral patches: A new aspect of daytime Pc3 auroral pulsations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoba, Tetsuo; Ebihara, Yusuke; Kadokura, Akira; Engebretson, Mark J.; Lessard, Marc R.; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Gerrard, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    Auroral pulsations are a convenient diagnostic of wave-particle interactions in the magnetosphere. A case study of a daytime Pc3 (22-100 mHz) auroral pulsation event, measured with a 2 Hz sampling all-sky camera at South Pole Station (74.4°S magnetic latitude) on 17 May 2012, is presented. The daytime Pc3 auroral pulsations were most active in a closed field line region where the aurora was dominated by diffuse green-line emissions and within ±2 h of magnetic local noon. Usually, but not always, the corresponding periodic variations were recorded with a colocated search coil magnetometer. Of particular interest is the two-dimensional auroral signature, indicating that the temporal luminosity variations at a given point were due to repeated formation and horizontal motion of faint, nonpulsating auroral patches with scale sizes of 100 km. The individual patches propagated equatorward with speeds of 15 km s-1 up to 20-25 km s-1 one after another along the magnetic meridian through local magnetic zenith. These properties differ considerably from typical pulsating aurorae, being periodic on-off luminosity variations in a particular auroral patch and drifting in accordance with the convection electric field in the magnetosphere. We speculate that such repetitive patterns of the fast-moving auroral patches, being another aspect of the daytime Pc3 auroral pulsations, may be a visible manifestation of compressional Pc3 waves which propagate earthward and cause modulation of precipitating keV electron fluxes in the dayside outer magnetosphere.

  1. Satellite measurements of formaldehyde from shipping emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marbach

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available International shipping is recognized as a pollution source of growing importance, in particular in the remote marine boundary layer. Nitrogen dioxide originating from ship emissions has previously been detected in satellite measurements. This study presents the first satellite measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO linked to shipping emissions as derived from observations made by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME instrument.

    We analyzed enhanced HCHO tropospheric columns from shipping emissions over the Indian Ocean between Sri Lanka and Sumatra. This region offers good conditions in term of plume detection with the GOME instrument as all ship tracks follow a single narrow track in the same east-west direction as used for the GOME pixel scanning. The HCHO signal alone is weak but could be clearly seen in the high-pass filtered data. The line of enhanced HCHO in the Indian Ocean as seen in the 7-year composite of cloud free GOME observations clearly coincides with the distinct ship track corridor from Sri Lanka to Indonesia. The observed mean HCHO column enhancement over this shipping route is about 2.0×1015 molec/cm2.

    The observed HCHO pattern also agrees qualitatively well with results from the coupled earth system model ECHAM5/MESSy applied to atmospheric chemistry (EMAC. However, the modelled HCHO values over the ship corridor are two times lower than in the GOME high-pass filtered data. This might indicate that the used emission inventories are too low and/or that the in-plume chemistry taking place in the narrow path of the shipping lanes are not well represented at the rather coarse model resolution.

  2. A parameter model of auroral emissions and particle precipitation near magnetic noon%磁正午附近极光强度与沉降粒子能量关系的参数模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邢赞扬; 杨惠根; 吴振森; 胡泽骏; 刘俊明; 张清和; 胡红桥

    2013-01-01

    极光是日地能量耦合过程中粒子沉降到极区电离层的最直观表现,对于理解地球空间环境及预测空间天气具有重要作用.本文利用2003-2009年的北极黄河站的多波段地面极光观测,结合DMSP卫星粒子沉降探测,对磁正午附近的极光强度与沉降粒子沉降能量之间的关系进行了定量研究.统计结果表明,在10-13磁地方时(MLT)630.0 nm的极光发光占主导,以低能粒子沉降为主;而在13-14MLT,630.0 nm/427.8 nm极光强度比值降低,沉降粒子能量较高.另外,利用极光强度与沉降电子的能通量以及极光强度比值与平均能量之间的函数关系,初步建立了北极黄河站磁正午附近极光强度与沉降粒子能量关系的反演参数模型,为将来空间天气的监测服务.%The aurora is one of the most significant visible manifestations of the dynamic processes associated with the precipitation of particles into the polar ionosphere generated by the solar-terrestrial interactions,which has played an important role in understanding our Earth's environment and predicting the space weather.Using high temporal resolution optical data obtained from the three-wavelength all-sky imagers at Yellow River Station (YRS) in the Arctic,together with the particle precipitation data measured by the DMSP satellites,we investigated the quantitative relationship between the auroral intensities and the energy features of the precipitated particles near magnetic noon.The statistical results indicated that the soft auroral electron precipitation was dominated near magnetic noon during 10-13MLT with 630.0 nm auroral emissions.The I(630.0 nm)/I(427.8 nm) ratio decreased as the intensity of 427.8 nm increasedin the 13-14MLT sector,suggesting the energy of the precipitated particles was getting higher.In addition,the intensity of 427.8 nm was dependent on the total energy flux of the precipitating electrons and the I(630.0 nm)/I(427.8 nm) ratio was related to the

  3. Numerical and laboratory simulations of auroral acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunell, H.; De Keyser, J. [1Belgian Institute for Space Aeronomy, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Mann, I. [EISCAT Scientific Association, P.O. Box 812, SE-981 28 Kiruna, Sweden and Department of Physics, Umeå University, SE-901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2013-10-15

    The existence of parallel electric fields is an essential ingredient of auroral physics, leading to the acceleration of particles that give rise to the auroral displays. An auroral flux tube is modelled using electrostatic Vlasov simulations, and the results are compared to simulations of a proposed laboratory device that is meant for studies of the plasma physical processes that occur on auroral field lines. The hot magnetospheric plasma is represented by a gas discharge plasma source in the laboratory device, and the cold plasma mimicking the ionospheric plasma is generated by a Q-machine source. In both systems, double layers form with plasma density gradients concentrated on their high potential sides. The systems differ regarding the properties of ion acoustic waves that are heavily damped in the magnetosphere, where the ion population is hot, but weakly damped in the laboratory, where the discharge ions are cold. Ion waves are excited by the ion beam that is created by acceleration in the double layer in both systems. The efficiency of this beam-plasma interaction depends on the acceleration voltage. For voltages where the interaction is less efficient, the laboratory experiment is more space-like.

  4. Magnetosheath density fluctuations from a simulation of auroral kilometric radiation radio propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, J.L.; Hoang, S. [Observatoire de Paris, Meudon (France)

    1993-08-01

    Here the authors use a ray tracing technique to map the appearance of the image of auroral kilometric radiation (AKR), originating above the auroral zone, as seen by a distant observer between 0200 and 0800 LT, at distances of 50 to 250 R{sub E}. It has been suggested that distant imaging of AKR may provide a way of imaging structures in the earths magnetosphere. They use satellite measurements to constrain the size and characteristics of the AKR source region, and their projections provide results consistent with data recorded by the ISEE-3 satellite.

  5. Comparative Statistical Analysis of Auroral Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    heated and compressed but maintain a nearly Maxwellian energy distribution (Paschmann, 2003). Second, they encounter a region, as is shown in Figure 5...auroral oval. This occurs because the particle energies found within the main plasma sheet have a much more Maxwellian distribution that those that have...average. An example of this is shown in Figure 17. These occurrences were also deemed non -physical, and the boundary coordinate was excluded from

  6. A satellite study of dayside auroral conjugacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. B. Vo

    Full Text Available A study of dayside auroral conjugacy has been done using the cleft/boundary layer auroral particle boundaries observed by the DMSP-F7 satellite in the southern hemisphere and the global UV auroral images taken by the Viking spacecraft in the northern hemisphere. The 22 events have been studied on the basis of an internal IGRF 1985 magnetic field; it is shown that there is a displacement of up to 4° in latitude from the conjugate points with the northern aurora appearing to be located poleward of the conjugate point. No local time dependence of the north-south auroral location difference was seen. The use of a more realistic magnetic field model for tracing field lines which incorporates the dipole tilt angle and Kp index, the Tsyganenko 1987 long model plus the IGRF 1985 internal magnetic field model, appears to organize the data better. Although with this external plus internal model some tracings did not close in the opposite hemisphere, 70% of those that did indicated satisfactory conjugacy. The study shows that the degree of auroral conjugacy is dependent upon the accuracy of the magnetic field model used to trace to the conjugate point, especially in the dayside region where the field lines can either go to the dayside magnetopause near the subsolar point or sweep all the way back to the flanks of the magnetotail. Also the discrepancy in the latitude of northern and southern aurora can be partially explained by the displacement of the neutral sheet (source region of the aurora by the dipole tilt effect.

  7. Astrid-2, an advanced microsatellite for auroral research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Marklund

    Full Text Available The successful launch of the Swedish microsatellite Astrid-2 in December 1998 began a new era of auroral research, with advanced microprobes of 30 kg or less used as research tools. Innovative technologies and low-mass solutions were used for the sensors and deployment systems to allow a fairly complete set of scientific instruments within the 10 kg allocated for the scientific payload. A newly developed wire boom deployment system proved to function excellently. During its seven month lifetime Astrid-2 collected more than 26 Gbytes of high-quality data of auroral electric and magnetic fields, and auroral particle and plasma characteristics from approximately 3000 orbits at an inclination of 83° and an altitude of about 1000 km. Scientific results cover a broad range of topics, from the physics of energization of auroral particles to how the magnetosphere responds to the energy input from the solar wind and global magnetic field modelling. The fulfilment of both the technological and the scientific mission objectives has opened entirely new possibilities to carry out low-budget multipoint measurements in near-Earth space.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; instruments and techniques – Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena

  8. DISCOVERY OF A DARK AURORAL OVAL ON SATURN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The ultraviolet image was obtained by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope with the European Faint Object Camera (FOC) on June 1992. It represents the sunlight reflected by the planet in the near UV (220 nm). * The image reveals a dark oval encircling the north magnetic pole of Saturn. This auroral oval is the first ever observed for Saturn, and its darkness is unique in the solar system (L. Ben-Jaffel, V. Leers, B. Sandel, Science, Vol. 269, p. 951, August 18, 1995). The structure represents an excess of absorption of the sunlight at 220 nm by atmospheric particles that are the product of the auroral activity itself. The large tilt of the northern pole of Saturn at the time of observation, and the almost perfect symmetry of the planet's magnetic field, made this observation unique as even the far side of the dark oval across the pole is visible! * Auroral activity is usually characterized by light emitted around the poles. The dark oval observed for Saturn is a STUNNING VISUAL PROOF that transport of energy and charged particles from the magnetosphere to the atmosphere of the planet at high latitudes induces an auroral activity that not only produces auroral LIGHT but also UV-DARK material near the poles: auroral electrons are probably initiating hydrocarbon polymer formation in these regions. Credits: L. Ben Jaffel, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris-CNRS, France, B. Sandel (Univ. of Arizona), NASA/ESA, and Science (magazine).

  9. Far ultraviolet auroral imager

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Reviewing the technology development of imaging the global FUV auroral morphology,we introduce a space-based FUV auroral imager prototype developed by the Center for Space Science and Applied Research(CSSAR).It is designed to obtain continuous observations on the temporal and spatial morphology of the aurora which occupies highly elliptical high-altitude near-polar orbits.Primarily composed of a telescope system,image intensifier system,CCD,and collection and control system,the instrument works in the spectral region from 140―190 nm in the field of view 25°×25°,and the spatial resolution is better than 0.1°.

  10. Far ultraviolet auroral imager

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU LiPing; WANG YongMei; WANG YingJian; ZHANG ZhongMou; LU JianGong

    2009-01-01

    Reviewing the technology development of imaging the global FUV auroral morphology,we introduce a space-based FUV auroral imager prototype developed by the Center for Space Science and Applied Research(CSSAR).It is designed to obtain continuous observations on the temporal and spatial morphology of the aurora which occupies highly elliptical high-altitude near-polar orbits.Primarily composed of a telescope system,image intensifier system,CCD,and collection and control system,the instrument works in the spectral region from 140-190 nm in the field of view 25°×25°,and the spatial resolution is better than 0.1°.

  11. Structure of the auroral precipitation region in the dawn sector: relationship to convection reversal boundaries and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    Full Text Available

    Abstract. Simultaneous DMSP F7 and Viking satellite measurements of the dawnside high-latitude auroral energy electron and ion precipitation show that the region of the low and middle altitude auroral precipitation consists of three characteristic plasma regimes. The recommendation of the IAGA Working Group IIF/III4 at the IAGA Assembly in Boulder, July 1995 to decouple the nomenclature of ionospheric populations from magnetospheric population is used for their notation. The most equatorial regime is the Diffuse Auroral Zone (DAZ of diffuse spatially unstructured precipitating electrons. It is generated by the plasma injection to the inner magnetosphere in the nightside and the subsequent drift plasma to the dawnside around the Earth. Precipitating particles have a hard spectrum with typical energies of electrons and ions of more than 3 keV. In the DAZ, the ion pitch-angle distribution is anisotropic, with the peak near 90°. The next part is the Auroral Oval (AO, a structured electron regime which closely resembles the poleward portion of the night-side auroral oval. The typical electron energy is several keV, and the ion energy is up to 10 keV. Ion distributions are pre-dominantly isotropic. In some cases, this plasma regime may be absent in the pre-noon sector. Poleward of the Auroral Oval, there is the Soft Small Scale Luminosity (SSSL regime. It is caused by structured electron and ion precipitation with typical electron energy of about 0.3 keV and ion energy of about 1 keV. The connection of these low-altitude regimes with plasma domains of the distant magnetosphere is discussed. For mapping of the plasma regimes to the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere, the empirical model by Tsyganenko (1995 and the conceptual model by Alexeev et al. (1996 are used. The DAZ is mapped along the magnetic field lines to the Remnant Layer (RL, which is located in the outer radiation belt region; the zone of structured

  12. Landau damping of auroral hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Winningham, J. D.; Burch, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    Auroral hiss is observed to propagate over distances comparable to an Earth radius from its source in the auroral oval. The role of Landau damping is investigated for upward propagating auroral hiss. By using a ray tracing code and a simplified model of the distribution function, the effect of Landau damping is calculated for auroral hiss propagation through the environment around the auroral oval. Landau damping is found to be the likely mechanism for explaining some of the one-sided auroral hiss funnels observed by Dynamics Explorer 1. It is also found that Landau damping puts a lower limit on the wavelength of auroral hiss. Poleward of the auroral oval, Landau damping is found in a typical case to limit omega/k(sub parallel) to values of 3.4 x 10(exp 4) km/s or greater, corresponding to resonance energies of 3.2 keV or greater and wavelengths of 2 km or greater. For equatorward propagation, omega/k(sub parallel) is limited to values greater than 6.8 x 10(exp 4) km/s, corresponding to resonance energies greater than 13 keV and wavelengths greater than 3 km. Independent estimates based on measured ratios of the magnetic to electric field intensity also show that omega/k(sub parallel) corresponds to resonance energies greater than 1 keV and wavelengths greater than 1 km. These results lead to the difficulty that upgoing electron beams sufficiently energetic to directly generate auroral hiss of the inferred wavelength are not usually observed. A partial transmission mechanism utilizing density discontinuities oblique to the magnetic field is proposed for converting auroral hiss to wavelengths long enough to avoid damping of the wave over long distances. Numerous reflections of the wave in an upwardly flared density cavity could convert waves to significantly increased wavelengths and resonance velocities.

  13. Integration Of GPS And GLONASS Systems In Geodetic Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciuk, Kamil

    2015-12-01

    The article shows the results of satellites measurements elaborations using GPS & GLONASS signals. The aim of this article is to define the influence of adding GLONASS signals on position determination accuracy. It especially concerns areas with big horizon coverages. Object of the study were analysis of DOP coefficients, code and RTK solutions, and usage of satellite techniques in levelling. The performed studies and analysis show that integrated GPS-GLONASS satellite measurements provide possibility to achieve better results than measurements using single navigation satellite system (GPS).

  14. The Wave-Like Auroral Structure around Auroral Expansion Onset

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chao-Ling

    2011-01-01

    We present the direct connection between the wave-like auroral structure around the time of auroral expansion onset and the ballooning mode waves in the near-Earth magnetotail. Based on the NASA mission time history of events and macroscale interactions during substorms (THEMIS) ground-based all-sky imagers, we show that around the time of auroral expansion onset, a wave-like auroral structure first has four luminosity peaks separated by 2-3° magnetic longitude (MLON). Subsequently, the wave-like structure propagates in the azimuthal direction and an overall bright arc spans approximately 1 h magnetic local time. The wavelength is estimated to be 120-180 km. Finally, a noticeable poleward auroral expansion is observed. The ballooning mode waves are identified by two THEMIS probes in the near-Earth magnetotail. The observed wavelength of the ballooning mode waves is approximately equal to the order of the ion Larmor radius. The wavelength of 1500 3000 km in the near-Earth magnetotail is comparable with the wave-like auroral structure estimate. This study suggests that the ballooning mode waves might play a crucial role in auroral expansion onset, corresponding to the wave-like auroral structure in this study.%We present the direct connection between the wave-like auroral structure around the time of auroral expansion onset and the ballooning mode waves in the near-Earth magnetotail.Based on the NASA mission time history of events and macroscale interactions during substorms (THEMIS) ground-based all-sky imagers,we show that around the tirne of auroral expansion onset,a wave-like auroral structure first has four luminosity peaks separated by 2-3° magnetic longitude (MLON).Subsequently,the wave-like structure propagates in the azimuthal direction and an overall bright arc spans approximately 1 h magnetic local time.The wavelength is estimated to be 120-180 km.Finally,a noticeable poleward auroral expansion is observed.The ballooning mode waves are identified by two

  15. Auroral-Region Dynamics Determined with the Chatanika Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-01

    low-latitudes originate in the auroral region [Davis and Da Rosa, 1969; Testud , 1970; Chandra et al., 1979). They may be generated by particle...Ion Composition and Nitric Oxide," Planet. Sp. Sci., 25, 103-116 (1977). Testud , J., "Gravity Waves Generated During Magnetic Substorms," J. Atmos. and

  16. Auroral interactions with ISSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, Carolyn K.; Snyder, David B.; Jongeward, Gary A.

    1994-01-01

    Due to its high inclination orbit, International Space Station Alpha (ISSA) will occasionally experience surface charging by the high energy electrons of the auroral environment. This study looks at the frequency of these occurrences and recapitulates a charging model. ISSA should expect about 80 auoral encounters annually. If the plasma contactor is not run continuously, the vehicle may charge several hundred volts. Charge storage on standard space station coatings should not be a problem, but care must be taken that materials are not introduced inadvertently that cannot bleed off accumulated charge in a reasonable time. A conductivity requirement may be used to ensure surface materials do not charge to high voltages, or store charge for long periods of time.

  17. Auroral Spatial Structures Probe Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration —    Methodology Fly a high altitude sounding rocket with multiple sub-payloads to measure electric and magnetic fields during an auroral event. Use...

  18. Determination of atmospheric aerosol properties over land using satellite measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Leeuw, G. de

    2009-01-01

    Mostly, aerosol properties are poorly understood because the aerosol properties are very sparse. The first workshop on the determination of atmospheric aerosol properties over land using satellite measurements is convened in Bremen, Germany. In this workshop, the topics of discussions included a var

  19. Relationship between large horizontal electric fields and auroral arc elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanchester, B.S. [Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom); Kaila, K. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland); McCrea, I.W. [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    1996-03-01

    The authors report on data which correlates high time resolution optical measurements of auroral features with EISCAT radar measurements of electron density, with 0.2 sec time resolution and horizontal electric field, with time resolution near 9 sec. The associations between such electric fields and auroral arc features have been a subject of interest for years. They report on one event where following an auroral breakup, an arc moved southward. During 30 seconds of this event a section of the arc was close to the radar beam, and better resolution was available for the electric field measurements. The results indicate that the electric field pointed towards the point of brightest emission in the arc, indicating that the fields might be associated with the charged-particle precipitation causing the bright features in the arc.

  20. Intermittency of riometer auroral absorption observed at South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanova, M. V.; Antonova, E. E.; Foppiano, A. J.; Rosenberg, T. J.; Ovalle, E. M.

    2005-12-01

    Auroral radio-wave absorption values measured at South Pole for 3 years using a riometer are analyzed in order to test whether they show evidence of intermittency. The properties of the parameters of the probability density functions determined for several magnetic local time sectors are found to be significantly different. The probability density functions for the pre-midnight sector show the typical shape associated to intermittency. No results are given for the afternoon sector because few auroral absorption events meet the selection criteria to give statistically significant results. It is suggested that if the precipitating particle population responsible for the riometer auroral absorption shared the intermittency features of the absorption then the present results would allow the study of the properties of the induction component of magnetospheric turbulence.

  1. Saturn's Auroral Response to the Solar Wind: Centrifugal Instability Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sittler, Edward C.; Blanc, Michel F.; Richardson, J. D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a model initially presented by Sittler et al. [2006] which attempts to explain the global response of Saturn's magnetosphere and its corresponding auroral behavior to variations in the solar wind. The model was derived from published simultaneous Hubble Space Telescope (HST) auroral images and Cassini upstream measurements taken during the month of January 2004. These observations show a direct correlation between solar wind dynamic pressure and (1) auroral brightening toward dawn local time, (2) an increase of rotational movement of auroral features to as much as 75% of the corotation speed, (3) the movement of the auroral oval to higher latitudes and (4) an increase in the intensity of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR). This model is an alternative to the reconnection model of Cowley et al. [2004a,b; 2005] which is more Earth-like while ours stresses rotation. If angular momentum is conserved in a global sense, then when compressed the magnetosphere will tend to spin up and when it expands will tend to spin down. With the plasma sheet outer boundary at L approximates 15 we argue this region to be the dominant source region for the precipitating particles. If radial transport is dominated by centrifugal driven flux tube interchange motions, then when the magnetosphere spins up, outward transport will increase, the precipitating particles will move radially outward and cause the auroral oval to move to higher latitudes as observed. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability may contribute to the enhanced emission along the dawn meridian as observed by HST. We present this model in the context of presently published observations by Cassini.

  2. Characteristics of Extreme Auroral Charging Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Willis, Emily; Parker, Linda Neergaard

    2014-01-01

    Today’s presentation describes preliminary results from a study of extreme auroral charging in low Earth orbit. Goal of study is to document characteristics of auroral charging events of importance to spacecraft design, operations, and anomaly investigations.

  3. Carl Størmer Auroral Pioneer

    CERN Document Server

    Egeland, Alv

    2013-01-01

    This biography summarizes the seminal contributions to auroral and space science of Carl Størmer (1874 - 1957). He was the first to develop precise photographic methods to calculate heights and morphologies of diverse auroral forms during four solar cycles. Størmer independently devised numerical techniques to determine the trajectories of high-energy charged particles allowed and forbidden in the Earth’s magnetic field. His theoretical analyses explained cosmic ray access to the upper atmosphere, 20 years before they were identified by other scientists. Størmer’s crowning achievement, “The Polar Aurora,” published when he was 81 years old, stands to this day as a regularly cited guide in graduate-level courses on space physics.   The authors present the life of this prodigious scientist in relation to the cultural life of early 20th century in Norway and to the development of the space sciences in the post-Sputnik era.

  4. NOx emission trends in megacities derived from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor; Beekmann, Matthias; Richter, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    The effects of air pollutant emissions on both local air quality in megacities and composition of the atmosphere on regional and global scales are currently an important issue of atmospheric researches. In order to properly evaluate these effects, atmospheric models should be provided with accurate information on emissions of major air pollutants. However, such information is frequently very uncertain, as it is documented in literature. The quantification of emissions and related effects is an especially difficult task in the case of developing countries. Recently, it has been demonstrated that satellite measurements of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) can be used as a source of independent information on NOx emissions. In particular, the satellite measurements were used in our earlier studies to improve spatial allocation of NOx emissions, to estimate multi-annual changes of NOx emissions on regional scales and to validate data of traditional emission inventories (see Ref. 1, 2). The goals of the present study are (1) developing an efficient method for estimation of NOx emissions trend in megacity regions by using satellite measurements and an inverse modeling technique and (2) obtaining independent estimates of NOx emission trends in several megacities in Europe and the Middle East in the period from 1996 to 2008. The study is based on the synergetic use of the data for tropospheric NO2 column amounts derived from the long-term GOME and SCIAMACHY measurements and simulations performed by the CHIMERE chemistry transport model. We performed the analysis involving methods of different complexity ranging from estimation of linear trends in the tropospheric NO2 columns retrieved from satellite measurements to evaluation of nonlinear trends in NOx emission estimates obtained with the inverse modeling approach, which, in the given case, involves only very simple and transparent formulations. The most challenging part of the study is the nonlinear trend estimation, which is

  5. Evaluation of Aerosol Properties in GCMs using Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Jiang, J. H.; Su, H.; Zhang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols from natural or anthropogenic sources have profound impacts on the regional and global climate. Currently the radiative forcing of aerosols predicted by global climate models remains highly uncertain, representing the largest uncertainty in climate predictions. The uncertainty mainly arises from the complicated aerosol chemical and physical properties, coarse emission inventories for pre-cursor gases as well as unrealistic representations of aerosol activation and cloud processing in global climate models. In this study, we will utilize multiple satellite measurements including MODIS, MISR and CALIPSO to quantitatively evaluate aerosol simulations from climate models. Our analyses show that the global means in AOD climatology from NCAR CAM5 and GFDL AM3 simulations are comparable with satellite measurements. However, the overall correlation coefficient between the AOD spatial patterns from CAM5 and satellite is only 0.4. Moreover, at finer scales, the magnitude of AOD in CAM5 is much lower than satellite measurements for most of the non-dust regions, especially over East Asia. GFDL AM3 shows better AOD simulations over East Asia. The underestimated AOD over remote maritime areas in CAM5 was attributed to the unrealistic wet removal processes in convective clouds of CAM5. Over continents, biases on AOD could stem from underestimations in the emissions inventory and unresolved sub-grid variations of relative humidity due to the model's coarse resolution. Uncertainty from emission inventory over developing countries in East Asia will be assessed using the newly updated Regional Emission inventory in Asia (REAS) and Multi-resolution Emission Inventory in China (MEIC) in the model simulations.

  6. Satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetzler, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    The literature associated with the Magsat mission has evaluated the capabilities and limitations of satellite measurements of the earth's crustal magnetic field, and demonstrated that there exists a 300-3000 km magnetic field, related to major features in the earth's crust, which is primarily caused by induction. Due to its scale and sensitivity, satellite data have been useful in the development of models for such large crustal features as subduction zones, submarine platforms, continental accretion boundaries, and rifts. Attention is presently given to the lack of agreement between laboratory and satellite estimates of lower crustal magnetization.

  7. Asymmetric auroral intensities in the Earth's Northern and Southern hemispheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laundal, K. M.; Østgaard, N.

    2009-07-01

    It is commonly assumed that the aurora borealis (Northern Hemisphere) and aurora australis (Southern Hemisphere) are mirror images of each other because the charged particles causing the aurora follow the magnetic field lines connecting the two hemispheres. The particles are believed to be evenly distributed between the two hemispheres, from the source region in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere. Although it has been shown that similar auroral features in the opposite hemispheres can be displaced tens of degree in longitude and that seasonal effects can cause differences in global intensity, the overall auroral patterns were still similar. Here we report observations that clearly contradict the common assumption about symmetric aurora: intense spots are seen at dawn in the Northern summer Hemisphere, and at dusk in the Southern winter Hemisphere. The asymmetry is interpreted in terms of inter-hemispheric currents related to seasons, which have been predicted but hitherto had not been seen.

  8. Ion cyclotron harmonics in the Saturn downward current auroral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.; Schippers, P.; Santolík, O.; Gurnett, D. A.; Crary, F.; Coates, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Observations of intense upgoing electron beams and diffuse ion beams have been reported during a pass by Cassini in a downward current auroral region, nearby a source region of Saturn kilometric radiation. Using the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument low frequency waveform receiver and the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer Investigation (CAPS) instrument we have been able to identify ion cyclotron harmonic waves associated with the particle beams. These observations indicate similarities with terrestrial auroral emissions, and may be a source of wave-particle interactions. We fit the observed plasma electron distribution with drifting Maxwellians and perform a linear numerical analysis of plasma wave growth. The results are relevant to ion heating and possibly to electron acceleration.

  9. The Third General Scientific Assembly of the International Association of Geomagnetism and Aeronomy - Special sessions of auroral processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of timing magnetic substorms, the rapid fluctuations of aurorae, electromagnetic and electrostatic instabilities observed on the field lines of aurorae, the auroral microstructure, and the relationship of currents, electric field and particle precipitation to auroral form are discussed. Attention is given to such topics as D-perturbations as an indicator of substorm onset, the role of the magnetotail in substorms, spectral information derived from imaging data on aurorae, terrestrial kilometric radiation, and the importance of the mirror force in self-consistent models of particle fluxes, currents and potentials on auroral field lines.

  10. Auroral counterpart of magnetic field dipolarizations in Saturn's tail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, C. M.; Badman, S. V.; Achilleos, N.; Bunce, E. J.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Radioti, A.; Grodent, D.; Dougherty, M. K.; Pryor, W.

    2012-04-01

    Following magnetic reconnection in a planetary magnetotail, newly closed field lines can be rapidly accelerated back towards the planet, becoming "dipolarized" in the process. At Saturn, dipolarizations can be initially identified in magnetometer data by looking for a southward turning of the magnetic field, indicating the transition from a radially stretched configuration to a more dipolar field topology. The highly stretched geometry of the kronian magnetotail lobes gives rise to a tail current which flows eastward (dusk to dawn) in the near equatorial plane across the centre of the tail. During reconnection and associated dipolarization of the field, the inner edge of this tail current can be diverted through the ionosphere, in a situation analogous to the substorm current wedge picture at Earth. We present a picture of the current circuit arising from this tail reconfiguration, and outline the equations which govern the field-current relationship. We show an example of a dipolarization identified in the Cassini magnetometer data and use this formalism to constrain the ionospheric current density that would arise for this example and the implications for auroral electron acceleration in regions of upward directed field-aligned current. We then present a separate example of data from the Cassini UVIS instrument where we observe small 'spots' of auroral emission lying near the main oval; features thought to be associated with dipolarizations in the tail. In the example shown, such auroral spots are the precursor to more intense activity associated with recurrent energisation via particle injections from the tail following reconnection. We conclude that dipolarizations in Saturn's magnetotail have an observable auroral counterpart, opening up the possibility to search for further examples and to use this auroral property as a remote proxy for tail reconnection.

  11. Characterization and diagnostic methods for geomagnetic auroral infrasound waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Justin J.

    Infrasonic perturbations resulting from auroral activity have been observed since the 1950's. In the last decade advances in infrasonic microphone sensitivity, high latitude sensor coverage, time series analysis methods and computational efficiency have elucidated new types of auroral infrasound. Persistent periods of infrasonic activity associated with geomagnetic sub-storms have been termed geomagnetic auroral infrasound waves [GAIW]. We consider 63 GAIW events recorded by the Fairbanks, AK infrasonic array I53US ranging from 2003 to 2014 and encompassing a complete solar cycle. We make observations of the acoustic features of these events alongside magnetometer, riometer, and all-sky camera data in an effort to quantify the ionospheric conditions suitable for infrasound generation. We find that, on average, the generation mechanism for GAIW is confined to a region centered about ~60 0 longitude east of the anti-Sun-Earth line and at ~770 North latitude. We note furthermore that in all cases considered wherein imaging riometer data are available, that dynamic regions of heightened ionospheric conductivity periodically cross the overhead zenith. Consistent features in concurrent magnetometer conditions are also noted, with irregular oscillations in the horizontal component of the field ubiquitous in all cases. In an effort to produce ionosphere based infrasound free from the clutter and unknowns typical of geophysical observations, an experiment was undertaken at the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program [HAARP] facility in 2012. Infrasonic signals appearing to originate from a source region overhead were observed briefly on 9 August 2012. The signals were observed during a period when an electrojet current was presumed to have passed overhead and while the facilities radio transmitter was periodically heating the lower ionosphere. Our results suggest dynamic auroral electrojet currents as primary sources of much of the observed infrasound, with

  12. Evolution of Jupiter's auroral-related stratospheric heating and chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn S.; Greathouse, Thomas K.; Fletcher, Leigh N.; Moses, Julianne I.; Hue, Vincent; Irwin, Patrick Gerard Joseph; Melin, Henrik; Giles, Rohini Sara

    2016-10-01

    Auroral processes on Jupiter are evident over a large range of wavelengths. Emission at X-ray, UV and near-infrared wavelengths highlights the precipitation of charged particles in Jupiter's ionosphere. Jupiter's auroral regions also exhibit enhanced mid-infrared emission of CH4 (7.8-μm), C2H2 (13-μm), C2H4 (10.5-μm) and C2H6 (12.2-μm), which indicates auroral processes modify the thermal structure and chemistry of the neutral stratosphere at pressures from 10 mbar to 10 μbar. In Sinclair et al., 2016a (submitted), 2016b (in preparation), we investigated these processes further by performing a retrieval analysis of Voyager-IRIS (Infrared Interferometer Spectrometer) observations measured in November 1979, Cassini-CIRS (Composite Infrared Spectrometer) observations measured in January 2001 and IRTF-TEXES (Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph on NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility) spectra measured in December 2014. These datasets however captured Jupiter at significantly different epochs and thus the overall global evolution of atmospheric conditions as well as differences in spatial sampling, spectral resolution (and therefore vertical resolution in the atmosphere) have made inferences of the temporal evolution in auroral regions a challenge. However, in April 2016, we acquired IRTF-TEXES observations of Jupiter's high latitudes, using observing parameters very similar to those in December 2014. By performing a similar analysis of these observations and comparing results between December 2014 and April 2016, we can investigate the evolution of the thermal structure and chemistry in Jupiter's auroral regions over a 15 month timescale. The magnitude of temperature/composition changes and the altitudes at which they occur will provide insights into how auroral processes in the ionosphere propagate to the stratosphere. In particular, we can assess whether the evolution of stratospheric conditions in auroral regions is related to the decrease in solar activity

  13. Auroral Electrojet Index Designed to Provide a Global Measure, Hourly Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet (AE) index is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  14. Calculating Auroral Oval Pattern by AE Index

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Anqin; LI Jiawei; YANG Guanglin; WANG Jingsong

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between the auroral oval pattern, i.e., location, size, shape, and intensity, and the auroral electrojet activity index (AE index) is studied. It is found that the maximal auroral intensity is elliptically distributed, and the lengths of semimajor and semiminor axes are positively correlated to AE.The intensity along the normal of the auroral oval can be satisfyingly described by a Gaussian distribution,and the maximum and the full width at half maximum of the Gaussian distribution are both positively correlated to AE. Based on these statistical results, a series of experimental formulas as a function of AE are developed to calculate the location, size, shape, and intensity of the auroral oval. These formulas are validated by the auroral images released by SWPC/NOAA.

  15. Mapping auroral activity with Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, N. A.; MacDonald, E. A.; Heavner, M.; Tapia, A. H.; Lalone, N.

    2015-05-01

    Twitter is a popular, publicly accessible, social media service that has proven useful in mapping large-scale events in real time. In this study, for the first time, the use of Twitter as a measure of auroral activity is investigated. Peaks in the number of aurora-related tweets are found to frequently coincide with geomagnetic disturbances (detection rate of 91%). Additionally, the number of daily aurora-related tweets is found to strongly correlate with several auroral strength proxies (ravg≈0.7). An examination is made of the bias for location and time of day within Twitter data, and a first-order correction of these effects is presented. Overall, the results suggest that Twitter can provide both specific details about an individual aurora and accurate real-time indication of when, and even from where, an aurora is visible.

  16. Latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion of energetic auroral protons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lorentzen

    Full Text Available Using a collision by collision model from Lorentzen et al., the latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion of single auroral protons are calculated. The proton energies varies from 1 to 50 keV, and are released into the atmosphere at 700 km altitude. The dipole magnetic field has a dip-angle of 8 degrees. Results show that the main dispersion region is at high altitudes (300-350 km and occurs during the first few charge exchange collisions. As the proton travels further down the atmosphere the mean free path becomes smaller, and as a result the spreading effect will not be as pronounced. This means that the first few charge exchange collisions fully determines the width of both the latitudinal and longitudinal dispersion. The volume emission rate was calculated for energies between 1 and 50 keV, and it was found that dayside auroral hydrogen emissions rates were approximately 10 times weaker than nightside emission rates. Simulations were also performed to obtain the dependence of the particle dispersion as a function of initial pitch-angle. It was found that the dispersion varies greatly with initial pitch-angle, and the results are summarized in two tables; a main and an extreme dispersion region.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; · particle precipitation · Space plasma physics · (transport processes

  17. Satellite measurements of formaldehyde linked to shipping emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Wagner

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available International shipping is recognized as a pollution source of growing importance, in particular in the remote marine boundary layer. Nitrogen dioxide originating from ship emissions has previously been detected in satellite measurements. This study presents the first satellite measurements of formaldehyde (HCHO linked to shipping emissions as derived from observations made by the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME instrument.

    We analyzed enhanced HCHO tropospheric columns from shipping emissions over the Indian Ocean between Sri Lanka and Sumatra. This region offers good conditions in term of plume detection with the GOME instrument as all ship tracks follow a single narrow track in the same east-west direction as used for the GOME pixel scanning. The HCHO signal alone is weak but could be clearly seen in the high-pass filtered data. The line of enhanced HCHO in the Indian Ocean as seen in the 7-year composite of cloud free GOME observations clearly coincides with the distinct ship track corridor from Sri Lanka to Indonesia. The observed mean HCHO column enhancement over this shipping route is about 2.0×1015 molec/cm2.

    Compared to the simultaneously observed NO2 values over the shipping route, those of HCHO are substantially higher; also the HCHO peaks are found at larger distance from the ship routes. These findings indicate that direct emissions of HCHO or degradation of emitted NMHC cannot explain the observed enhanced HCHO values. One possible reason might be increased CH4 degradation due to enhanced OH concentrations related to the ship emissions, but this source is probably too weak to fully explain the observed values.

    The observed HCHO pattern also agrees qualitatively well with results from the coupled earth system model ECHAM5/MESSy applied to atmospheric chemistry (EMAC. However, the modelled HCHO values over the ship corridor are two times lower than in the

  18. Features of Pc5 pulsations in the geomagnetic field, auroral luminosity, and Riometer absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belakhovsky, V. B.; Pilipenko, V. A.; Samsonov, S. N.; Lorentsen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous morning Pc5 pulsations ( f ~ 3-5 mHz) in the geomagnetic field, aurora intensities (in the 557.7 and 630.0 nm oxygen emissions and the 471.0 nm nitrogen emission), and riometer absorption, were studied based on the CARISMA, CANMOS, and NORSTAR network data for the event of January 1, 2000. According to the GOES-8 satellite observations, these Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations are observed as incompressible Alfvén waves with toroidal polarization in the magnetosphere. Although the Pc5 pulsation frequencies in auroras, the geomagnetic field, and riometer absorption are close to one another, stable phase relationships are not observed between them. Far from all trains of geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations are accompanied by corresponding auroral pulsations; consequently, geomagnetic pulsations are primary with respect to auroral pulsations. Both geomagnetic and auroral pulsations propagate poleward, and the frequency decreases with increasing geomagnetic latitude. When auroral Pc5 pulsations appear, the ratio of the 557.7/630.0 nm emission intensity sharply increases, which indicates that auroral pulsations result from not simply modulated particle precipitation but also an additional periodic acceleration of auroral electrons by the wave field. A high correlation is not observed between Pc5 pulsations in auroras and the riometer absorption, which indicates that these pulsations have a common source but different generation mechanisms. Auroral luminosity modulation is supposedly related to the interaction between Alfvén waves and the region with the field-aligned potential drop above the auroral ionosphere, and riometer absorption modulation is caused by the scattering of energetic electrons by VLF noise pulsations.

  19. Global distribution of pauses observed with satellite measurements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Venkat Ratnam; P Kishore; Isabella Velicogna

    2013-04-01

    Several studies have been carried out on the tropopause, stratopause, and mesopause (collectively termed as ‘pauses’) independently; however, all the pauses have not been studied together. We present global distribution of altitudes and temperatures of these pauses observed with long-term space borne high resolution measurements of Global Positioning System (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) and Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) aboard Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite. Here we study the commonality and differences observed in the variability of all the pauses. We also examined how good other datasets will represent these features among (and in between) different satellite measurements, re-analysis, and model data. Hemispheric differences observed in all the pauses are also reported. In addition, we show that asymmetries between northern and southern hemispheres continue up to the mesopause. We analyze inter and intra-seasonal variations and long-term trends of these pauses at different latitudes. Finally, a new reference temperature profile is shown from the ground to 110 km for tropical, mid-latitudes, and polar latitudes for both northern and southern hemispheres.

  20. Air quality performed with satellite measurement within the QUITSAT project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masieri, Samuele; Petritoli, Andrea; Premuda, Margarita; Kostadinov, Ivan; Bortoli, Daniele; Ravegnani, Fabrizio; Giovanelli, Giorgio

    Ground pollutants monitoring, using satellite observation, represents an interesting and high potential approach to air quality that could be inserted into Global monitoring systems. The QUITSAT Italian pilot project (air QUality with Integration of ground based and SAtellite measurements and chemical Transport and multiphase model), funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI), proposes a new approach producing some interesting results in this frame. The approach focuses in the integration of the satellite observations (ENVISAT/SCIAMACHY and AURA/OMI) with the outputs of the GAMES (Gas Aerosol Modelling Evaluation System) chemical transport model, to provide the evaluation of the tropospheric profiles of some atmo-spheric compounds such as NO2 , O3 , HCHO and SO2 . This activity appears to be very useful to retrieve the surface concentration of trace gases from tropospheric columns of atmospheric compounds obtained with satellite instrumentation. The comparison with the in situ analyzer network over the Po' Valley shows a good correlation between the two data set. The corre-spondence can be improved taking into account also concentration gradients between different stations, classifying the ground base stations according to their rural or urban characteristics and considering the general orography of the ground. Results and methodology are presented and discussed.

  1. Observation operator for the assimilation of aerosol type resolving satellite measurements into a chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schroedter-Homscheidt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Modelling of aerosol particles with chemical transport models is still based mainly on static emission databases while episodic emissions cannot be treated sufficiently. To overcome this situation, a coupling of chemical mass concentration modelling with satellite-based measurements relying on physical and optical principles has been developed. This study deals with the observation operator for a component-wise assimilation of satellite measurements. It treats aerosol particles classified into water soluble, water insoluble, soot, sea salt and mineral dust containing aerosol particles in the atmospheric boundary layer as separately assimilated aerosol components. It builds on a mapping of aerosol classes used both in observation and model space taking their optical and chemical properties into account. Refractive indices for primary organic carbon particles, anthropogenic particles, and secondary organic species have been defined based on a literature review. Together with a treatment of different size distributions in observations and model state, this allows transforming the background from mass concentrations into aerosol optical depths. A two-dimensional, variational assimilation is applied for component-wise aerosol optical depths. Error covariance matrices are defined based on a validation against AERONET sun photometer measurements. Analysis fields are assessed threefold: (1 through validation against AERONET especially in Saharan dust outbreak situations, (2 through comparison with the British Black Smoke and Sulphur Dioxide Network for soot-containing particles, and (3 through comparison with measurements of the water soluble components SO4, NH4, and NO3 conducted by the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme network. Separately, for the water soluble, the soot and the mineral dust aerosol components a bias reduction and subsequent a root mean square error reduction is observed in the

  2. Reconstruction of Fine Scale Auroral Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, Michael; Zettergren, Matthew; Dahlgren, Hanna; Goenka, Chhavi; Akbari, Hassanali

    2015-01-01

    We present a feasibility study for a high frame rate, short baseline auroral tomographic imaging system useful for estimating parametric variations in the precipitating electron number flux spectrum of dynamic auroral events. Of particular interest are auroral substorms, characterized by spatial variations of order 100 m and temporal variations of order 10 ms. These scales are thought to be produced by dispersive Alfv\\'en waves in the near-Earth magnetosphere. The auroral tomography system characterized in this paper reconstructs the auroral volume emission rate to estimate the characteristic energy and location in the direction perpendicular to the geomagnetic field of peak electron precipitation flux using a distributed network of precisely synchronized ground-based cameras. As the observing baseline decreases, the tomographic inverse problem becomes highly ill-conditioned; as the sampling rate increases, the signal-to-noise ratio degrades and synchronization requirements become increasingly critical. Our a...

  3. A hybrid simulation model for a stable auroral arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    Full Text Available We present a new type of hybrid simulation model, intended to simulate a single stable auroral arc in the latitude/altitude plane. The ionospheric ions are treated as particles, the electrons are assumed to follow a Boltzmann response and the magnetospheric ions are assumed to be so hot that they form a background population unaffected by the electric fields that arise. The system is driven by assumed parallel electron energisation causing a primary negative charge cloud and an associated potential structure to build up. The results show how a closed potential structure and density depletion of an auroral arc build up and how they decay after the driver is turned off. The model also produces upgoing energetic ion beams and predicts strong static perpendicular electric fields to be found in a relatively narrow altitude range (~ 5000–11 000 km.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; auroral phenomena – Space plasma physics (numerical simulation studies

  4. The auroral and ionospheric flow signatures of dual lobe reconnection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Imber

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We present the first substantial evidence for the occurrence of dual lobe reconnection from ionospheric flows and auroral signatures. The process of dual lobe reconnection refers to an interplanetary magnetic field line reconnecting with lobe field lines in both the northern and southern hemispheres. Two bursts of sunward plasma flow across the noon portion of the open/closed field line boundary (OCB, indicating magnetic flux closure at the dayside, were observed in SuperDARN radar data during a period of strongly northward IMF. The OCB is identified from spacecraft, radar backscatter, and auroral observations. In order for dual lobe reconnection to take place, we estimate that the interplanetary magnetic field clock angle must be within ±10° of zero (North. The total flux crossing the OCB during each burst is small (1.8% and 0.6% of the flux contained within the polar cap for the two flows. A brightening of the noon portion of the northern auroral oval was observed as the clock angle passed through zero, and is thought to be due to enhanced precipitating particle fluxes due to the occurrence of reconnection at two locations along the field line. The number of solar wind protons captured by the flux closure process was estimated to be ~2.5×1030 (4 tonnes by mass, sufficient to populate the cold, dense plasma sheet observed following this interval.

  5. ESA's Cluster solved an auroral puzzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-05-01

    These aurorae - seen as bright spots in Earth’s atmosphere and called ‘dayside proton auroral spots’ - occur when fractures appear in the Earth’s magnetic field, allowing particles given out from the Sun to squirt through and collide with the molecules in our atmosphere. This is the first time that a precise and direct connection between the two events has been made. The Earth’s magnetic field acts like a shield, protecting Earth from the constant stream of tiny particles ejected by the Sun and known as the ‘solar wind’. The solar wind itself is made of hydrogen atoms, broken into their constituent pieces: protons and electrons. When electrons find routes into our atmosphere, they collide with and excite the atoms in the air. When these excited atoms release their energy, it is given out as light, creating the glowing ‘curtains’ we see as the aurora borealis (or the aurora australis in the southern hemisphere). Dayside proton auroral spots are caused by protons ‘stealing’ electrons from the atoms in our atmosphere. On 18 March last year, a jet of energetic solar protons collided with the Earth’s atmosphere and created a bright ‘spot’ seen by NASA’s IMAGE spacecraft, just as Cluster passed overhead and straight through the region where the proton jet was emanating. An extensive analysis of the Cluster results has now shown that the region was experiencing a turbulent event known as ‘magnetic reconnection’. Such a phenomenon takes place when the Earth’s usually impenetrable magnetic field fractures and has to find a new stable configuration. Until the field mends itself, solar protons leak through the gap and jet into Earth’s atmosphere creating the dayside proton aurora. Philippe Escoubet, ESA’s Cluster Project Scientist, comments, “Thanks to Cluster’s observations scientists can directly and firmly link for the first time a dayside proton auroral spot and a magnetic reconnection event.” Tai Phan, leading the

  6. Advanced Stellar Compass Summary for the Auroral Lites mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, John Leif

    1998-01-01

    This document provides technical and managerial information about the Advanced Stellar Compass and its possible use in the Auroral Lites Project.The Auroral Lites is a NASA project.......This document provides technical and managerial information about the Advanced Stellar Compass and its possible use in the Auroral Lites Project.The Auroral Lites is a NASA project....

  7. Temporal and spatial evolution of discrete auroral arcs as seen by Cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, S.; Marklund, G. T.; Karlsson, T.; Johansson, T.; Ebihara, Y.; Ejiri, M.; Ivchenko, N.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Nilsson, H.; Fazakerley, A.

    2005-10-01

    mapped densities of up to 20 µA/m2. The surge horn consists of multiple arc structures which later merge into one structure and intensify at the PS poleward boundary. The surge horn and the associated PS region moved poleward with a velocity at the ionospheric level of 0.5 km/s, following the large-scale poleward expansion of the auroral oval associated with the substorm expansion phase. Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionosphere-magnetosphere interacctions; Electric fields and currents; Particle acceleration)

  8. Solar and auroral evidence for an intense recurrent geomagnetic storm during December in AD 1128

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willis, D.M. [Warwick Univ., Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Stephenson, F.R. [Durham Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics

    2001-03-01

    The earliest known drawing of sunspots appears in The Chronicle of John of Worcester, which was compiled in the first half of the twelfth century. In this medieval chronicle, the Latin text describing the sunspots is accompanied by a colourful drawing, albeit idealised, which shows the apparent positions and sizes of two sunspots on the solar disk. The date of this observation of sunspots from Worcester, England is firmly established as AD 1128 December 8. Assuming that the drawing was prepared fairly carefully, the angular diameters of the two sunspots are at least about 3 arcmin and 2 arcmin in the northern and southern hemispheres, respectively. Similarly, the heliographic latitudes of both sunspots are within the approximate range of 25 -35 . About five days after this observation of sunspots on the solar disk, on the night of AD 1128 December 13, a red auroral display was observed from Songdo, Korea (the modern city of Kaesong). This auroral observation was recorded in the Koryo-sa, the official Korean chronicle of the period. In addition, five Chinese and five Korean descriptions of auroral displays were recorded in various East-Asian histories between the middle of AD 1127 and the middle of AD 1129. The ten oriental auroral records in this particular interval correspond to six distinct auroral events, which provide evidence for recurrent, though possibly intermittent, auroral activity on a timescale almost exactly equal to the synodic-solar-rotation period (approximately 27 days). The six distinct auroral events were apparently associated with two series of recurrent geomagnetic storms, both of which were sufficiently intense to produce mid-latitude auroral displays in East Asia. These ancient solar and auroral observations are interpreted in terms of present-day understanding of solar-terrestrial physics. Contemporary ground-based and satellite measurements during the last few decades have indicated that recurrent geomagnetic storms are usually a feature of

  9. First Satellite Imaging of Auroral Pulsations by the Fast Auroral Imager on e-POP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, A.; Cogger, L.; Howarth, A. D.; Yau, A. W.

    2015-12-01

    We report the first satellite imaging of auroral pulsations by the Fast Auroral Imager (FAI) onboard the Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP) satellite. The near-infrared camera of FAI is capable of providing up to two auroral images per second, ideal for investigation of pulsating auroras. The auroral pulsations were observed within the auroral bulge formed during a substorm interval on 2014 February 19. This first satellite view of these pulsations from FAI reveals that (1) several pulsating auroral channels (PACs) occur within the auroral bulge, (2) periods of the intensity pulsations span over one decade within the auroral bulge, and (3) there is no apparent trend of longer pulsation periods associated with higher latitudes for these PACs. Although PACs resemble in some respect stable pulsating auroras reported previously but they have several important differences in characteristics.PACs are not embedded in or emerging from omega bands or torches and are located at significant distances from the equatorward boundary of the auroral oval, unlike the characteristics of stable pulsating auroras.

  10. Reformed Solitary Kinetic Alfvén Waves due to Dissipations and Auroral Electron Acceleration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU De-Jin; CHAO Jih-Kwin; LEE Luo-Chuan; FENG Xue-Shang

    2001-01-01

    The physical nature of the auroral electron acceleration has been an outstanding problem in space physics for decades.Some recent observations from the auroral orbit satellites,FREJA and FAST,showed that large amplitude solitary kinetic Alfvén waves (SKAWs) are a common electromagnetic active phenomenon in the auroral magnetosphere. In a Iow-ββ/2 (i.e.,β/2 < me/mi < 1) plasma,the drift velocity of electrons relative to ions within SKAWs is much larger than thermal velocities of both electrons and ions.This leads to instabilities and causes dissipations of SKAWs.In the present work,based on the analogy of classical particle motion in a potential well,it is shown that a shock-like structure can be formed from SKAWs if dissipation effects are included.The reformed SKAWs with a shock-like structure have a local density jump and a net field-aligned electric potential drop of order of mev2A/e over a characteristic width of several )e.As a consequence,the reformed SKAWs can efficiently accelerate electrons field-aligned to the order of the local Alfvén velocity.In particular,we argue that this electron acceleration mechanism by reformed SKAWs can play an important role in the auroral electron acceleration problem.The result shows that not only the location of acceleration regions predicted by this model is well consistent with the observed auroral electron acceleration region of I 2 RE above the auroral ionosphere,but also the accelerated electrons from this region can obtain an energy of several keV and carry a field-aligned current of several/A/m2 which are comparable to the observations of auroral electrons.

  11. Comment: An Apparent Controversy in Auroral Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haerendel, Gerhard

    2007-03-01

    In his article ``A turning point in auroral physics,'' Bryant argued against what he called the `standard' theory of auroral acceleration, according to which the electrons ``gain their energy from static electric fields,'' and offered wave acceleration as an alternative. Because of the importance of the process, not only for the aurora borealis but also for other cosmic plasmas, a clarification of this apparent controversy seems to be in place.

  12. Statistical study of the GNSS phase scintillation associated with two types of auroral blobs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yaqi; Moen, Jøran I.; Miloch, Wojciech J.; Clausen, Lasse B. N.; Oksavik, Kjellmar

    2016-05-01

    This study surveys space weather effects on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) signals in the nighttime auroral and polar cap ionosphere using scintillation receivers, all-sky imagers, and the European Incoherent Scatter Svalbard radar. We differentiate between two types of auroral blobs: blob type 1 (BT 1) which is formed when islands of high-density F region plasma (polar cap patches) enter the nightside auroral oval, and blob type 2 (BT 2) which are generated locally in the auroral oval by intense particle precipitation. For BT 1 blobs we have studied 41.4 h of data between November 2010 and February 2014. We find that BT 1 blobs have significantly higher scintillation levels than their corresponding polar cap patch; however, there is no clear relationship between the scintillation levels of the preexisting polar cap patch and the resulting BT 1 blob. For BT 2 blobs we find that they are associated with much weaker scintillations than BT 1 blobs, based on 20 h of data. Compared to patches and BT 2 blobs, the significantly higher scintillation level for BT 1 blobs implies that auroral dynamics plays an important role in structuring of BT 1 blobs.

  13. Statistical study of auroral fragmentation into patches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Ayumi; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Otsuka, Yuichi; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Nozawa, Satonori; Hori, Tomoaki; Lester, Mark; Johnsen, Magnar Gullikstad

    2015-08-01

    The study of auroral dynamics is important when considering disturbances of the magnetosphere. Shiokawa et al. (2010, 2014) reported observations of finger-like auroral structures that cause auroral fragmentation. Those structures are probably produced by macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere, mainly of the Rayleigh-Taylor type. However, the statistical characteristics of these structures have not yet been investigated. Here based on observations by an all-sky imager at Tromsø (magnetic latitude = 67.1°N), Norway, over three winter seasons, we statistically analyzed the occurrence conditions of 14 large-scale finger-like structures that developed from large-scale auroral regions including arcs and 6 small-scale finger-like structures that developed in auroral patches. The large-scale structures were seen from midnight to dawn local time and usually appeared at the beginning of the substorm recovery phase, near the low-latitude boundary of the auroral region. The small-scale structures were primarily seen at dawn and mainly occurred in the late recovery phase of substorms. The sizes of these large- and small-scale structures mapped in the magnetospheric equatorial plane are usually larger than the gyroradius of 10 keV protons, indicating that the finger-like structures could be caused by magnetohydrodynamic instabilities. However, the scale of small structures is only twice the gyroradius of 10 keV protons, suggesting that finite Larmor radius effects may contribute to the formation of small-scale structures. The eastward propagation velocities of the structures are -40 to +200 m/s and are comparable with those of plasma drift velocities measured by the colocating Super Dual Auroral Radar Network radar.

  14. Multi-Camera Reconstruction of Fine Scale High Speed Auroral Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, M.; Semeter, J. L.; Zettergren, M. D.; Dahlgren, H.; Goenka, C.; Akbari, H.

    2014-12-01

    The fine spatial structure of dispersive aurora is known to have ground-observable scales of less than 100 meters. The lifetime of prompt emissions is much less than 1 millisecond, and high-speed cameras have observed auroral forms with millisecond scale morphology. Satellite observations have corroborated these spatial and temporal findings. Satellite observation platforms give a very valuable yet passing glance at the auroral region and the precipitation driving the aurora. To gain further insight into the fine structure of accelerated particles driven into the ionosphere, ground-based optical instruments staring at the same region of sky can capture the evolution of processes evolving on time scales from milliseconds to many hours, with continuous sample rates of 100Hz or more. Legacy auroral tomography systems have used baselines of hundreds of kilometers, capturing a "side view" of the field-aligned auroral structure. We show that short baseline (less than 10 km), high speed optical observations fill a measurement gap between legacy long baseline optical observations and incoherent scatter radar. The ill-conditioned inverse problem typical of auroral tomography, accentuated by short baseline optical ground stations is tackled with contemporary data inversion algorithms. We leverage the disruptive electron multiplying charge coupled device (EMCCD) imaging technology and solve the inverse problem via eigenfunctions obtained from a first-principles 1-D electron penetration ionospheric model. We present the latest analysis of observed auroral events from the Poker Flat Research Range near Fairbanks, Alaska. We discuss the system-level design and performance verification measures needed to ensure consistent performance for nightly multi-terabyte data acquisition synchronized between stations to better than 1 millisecond.

  15. Auroral Electrojet Index Designed to Provide a Global Measure, l-minute Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet index (AE) is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  16. Auroral Electrojet Indices Designed to Provide a Global Measure, 2.5-Minute Intervals, of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Auroral Electrojet index (AE) is designed to provide a global quantitative measure of auroral zone magnetic activity produced by enhanced ionospheric currents...

  17. On the proper motion of auroral arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerendel, G.; Raaf, B.; Rieger, E. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Garching (Germany)); Buchert, S. (EISCAT Scientific Association, Kiruna (Sweden)); Hoz, C. la (Univ. of Tromso (Norway))

    1993-04-01

    The authors report on a series of measurements of the proper motion of auroral arcs, made using the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar. Radar measurements are correlated with auroral imaging from the ground to observe the arcs and sense their motion. The authors look at one to two broad classes of auroral arcs, namely the slow (approximately 100 m/s) class which are observed to move either poleward or equatorward. The other class is typically much faster, and observed to move poleward, and represents the class of events most studied in the past. They fit their observations to a previous model which provides a potential energy source for these events. The observations are consistent with the model, though no clear explanation for the actual cause of the motion can be reached from these limited measurements.

  18. Two methods to forecast auroral displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigernes, Fred; Dyrland, Margit; Brekke, Pål; Chernouss, Sergey; Lorentzen, Dag Arne; Oksavik, Kjellmar; Sterling Deehr, Charles

    2011-10-01

    This work compares the methods by Starkov (1994a) and Zhang & Paxton (2008), that calculate the size and location of the auroral ovals as a function of planetary Kp index. The ovals are mapped in position and time onto a solar illuminated surface model of the Earth. It displays both the night- and dayside together with the location of the twilight zone as Earth rotates under the ovals. The graphical display serves as a tool to forecast auroral activity based on the predicted value of the Kp index. The forecast is installed as a service at http://kho.unis.no/. The Zhang & Paxton (2008) ovals are wider in latitude than the Starkov (1994a) ovals. The nightside model ovals coincide fairly well in shape for low to normal auroral conditions. The equatorward border of the diffuse aurora is well defined by both methods on the nightside for Kp ≤ 7. The dayside needs further studies in order to conclude.

  19. Two methods to forecast auroral displays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksavik Kjellmar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the methods by Starkov (1994a and Zhang & Paxton (2008, that calculate the size and location of the auroral ovals as a function of planetary Kp index. The ovals are mapped in position and time onto a solar illuminated surface model of the Earth. It displays both the night- and dayside together with the location of the twilight zone as Earth rotates under the ovals. The graphical display serves as a tool to forecast auroral activity based on the predicted value of the Kp index. The forecast is installed as a service at http://kho.unis.no/. The Zhang & Paxton (2008 ovals are wider in latitude than the Starkov (1994a ovals. The nightside model ovals coincide fairly well in shape for low to normal auroral conditions. The equatorward border of the diffuse aurora is well defined by both methods on the nightside for Kp ≤ 7. The dayside needs further studies in order to conclude.

  20. Auroral displays near the 'foot' of the field line of the ATS-5 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasofu, S.-I.; Deforest, S.; Mcilwain, C.

    1974-01-01

    Summary of an extensive correlative study of ATS-5 particle and magnetic field data with all-sky photographs from Great Whale River which is near the 'foot' of the field lines passing through the ATS-5 satellite. In particular, an effort is made to identify specific particle features with specific auroral displays during substorms, such as a westward traveling surge, poleward expansive motion, and drifting patches. It is found that, in early evening hours, the first encounter of ATS-5 with hot plasma is associated with the equatorward shift of the diffuse aurora, but not necessarily with westward traveling surges (even when the satellite is embedded in the plasma sheet). In the midnight sector, an injection corresponds very well to the initial brightening of an auroral arc. Specific features of morning sector auroras are difficult to correlate with specific particle features.

  1. The convection electric field in auroral substorms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2001-01-01

    Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) electric field and ion drift data are used in a statistical study of the ionospheric convection electric field in bulge-type auroral substorms. Thirty-one individual DE 2 substorm crossings were carefully selected and organized by the use of global auroral images obtained...... by DE 1. The selected passes, which occurred during substorm expansion phase, maximum, or early recovery phase, cover the entire nighttime substorm. The organization of the data used the method developed by Fujii et al. [1994], which divided the data into six local time sectors covering the nighttime...

  2. Jupiter's auroral-related stratospheric heating and chemistry I: Analysis of Voyager-IRIS and Cassini-CIRS spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, J. A.; Orton, G. S.; Greathouse, T. K.; Fletcher, L. N.; Moses, J. I.; Hue, V.; Irwin, P. G. J.

    2017-08-01

    Auroral processes are evident in Jupiter's polar atmosphere over a large range in wavelength (X-ray to radio). In particular, previous observations in the mid-infrared (5-15 μm) have shown enhanced emission from CH4, C2H2 and C2H4 and further stratospheric hydrocarbon species in spatial regions coincident with auroral processes observed at other wavelengths. These regions, described as auroral-related hotspots, observed at approximately 160°W to 200°W (System III) at high-northern latitudes and 330°W to 80°W at high-southern latitudes, indicate that auroral processes modify the thermal structure and composition of the neutral atmosphere. However, previous studies have struggled to differentiate whether the aforementioned enhanced emission is a result of either temperature changes and/or changes in the concentration of the emitting species. We attempt to address this degeneracy in this work by performing a retrieval analysis of Voyager 1-IRIS spectra (acquired in 1979) and Cassini-CIRS spectra (acquired in 2000/2001) of Jupiter. Retrievals of the vertical temperature profile in Cassini-CIRS spectra covering the auroral-related hotspots indicate the presence of two discrete vertical regions of heating at the 1-mbar level and at pressures of 10-μbar and lower. For example, in Cassini-CIRS 2.5 cm-1 'MIRMAP' spectra at 70°N (planetographic) 180°W (centred on the auroral oval), we find temperatures at the 1-mbar level and 10-μbar levels are enhanced by 15.3 ± 5.2 K and 29.6 ± 15.0 K respectively, in comparison to results at 70°N, 60°W in the same dataset. High temperatures at 10 μbar and lower pressures were considered indicative of joule heating, ion and/or electron precipitation, ion-drag and energy released form exothermic ion-chemistry. However, we conclude that the heating at the 1-mbar level is the result of either a layer of aurorally-produced haze particles, which are heated by incident sunlight and/or adiabatic heating by downwelling within the

  3. Auroral motions and magnetic variations associated with the onset of auroral substorms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, K.; Rostoker, G.

    1979-12-01

    Observations of the aurora borealis were undertaken during the period August 10--20, 1976, from Fort Smith, Northwest Territories, Canada. Two auroral substorm 'breakup' events which occurred in the Alberta sector during this period were photographically documented and have been studied together with the associated polar magnetic substorm events. It is found that significant westward-directed ionospheric current flow occurs for perhaps 2 or 3 minutes prior to the appearance of the auroral breakup surge form. This current appears to lie parallel to the bright arc which forms before onset of the breakup phase. Such an observation is important relative to the timing of the onsets both of auroral and polar magnetic substorms, and also may have critical implications relative to a theoretical understanding of the sequence of events leading to the auroral substorm breakup.

  4. Auroral Electrojet (AE, AL, AO, AU) - A Global Measure of Auroral Zone Magnetic Activity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The AE index is derived from geomagnetic variations in the horizontal component observed at selected (10-13) observatories along the auroral zone in the northern...

  5. Morphology of Southern Hemisphere Riometer Auroral Absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    range of frequencies used an inverse -square frequency dependence approximately holds. Morphology of Southern Hemisphere Riometer Auroral Absorption...Tecnológico under Proyecto No 1940934. Annex The percentage probability, QA, that an absorption A dB is exceed, is given as: Where Am is

  6. An Empirical Model of FUV Auroral Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-02-25

    intensity [Feldstein and Starkov , 1970; Sandford, 1968; Shepherd, 1979] is the large field-of-view of the space-borne imaging instrument, the automatic...BEAR, Ultraviolet Technology, Proc. SPIE, 1988. Feldstein, Y. I., and Starkov , G. V., The auroral oval and the boundary of closed field lines of

  7. Efficient diffuse auroral electron scattering by electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves in the outer magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, B.; Liang, J.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.; Horne, R. B.; Kubyshkina, M.; Spanswick, E. L.; Donovan, E.; Lummerzheim, D.

    2011-12-01

    We report a causal connection between the intensification of electrostatic ECH waves and the postmidnight diffuse auroral activity in the absence of whistler-mode chorus waves at L = 11.5 on the basis of simultaneous observations from THEMIS spacecraft and NORSTAR optical instruments during 8 - 9 UT on February 5, 2009. We use the THEMIS particle and wave measurements together with the magnetically conjugate auroral observations for this event to illustrate an example where electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves are the main contributor to the diffuse auroral precipitation. We use the wave and particle data to perform a comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis of ECH wave driven resonant scattering rates. We find that the observed ECH wave activity can cause intense pitch angle scattering of plasma sheet electrons between 100 eV and 5 keV at a rate of > 10-4 s-1 for equatorial pitch angles < 30°. The scattering approaches the strong diffusion limit in the realistic ambient magnetic field to produce efficient precipitation loss of < ~ 5 keV electrons on a timescale of a few hours or less. Using the electron differential energy flux inside the loss cone estimated based upon the energy-dependent efficiency of ECH wave scattering for an 8-second interval with high resolution wave data available, the auroral electron transport model developed by Lummerzheim [1987] produced an intensity of ~ 2.3 kR for the green-line diffuse aurora. Separately, Maxwellian fitting to the electron differential flux spectrum produced a green-line auroral intensity of ~ 2.6 kR. This is in good agreement with the ~2.4 kR green-line auroral intensity observed simultaneously at the magnetic footpoint (as inferred using the event-adaptive model of Kubyshkina et al. [2009, 2011]) of the location where the in situ observations were obtained. Our results support the scenario that enhanced ECH emissions in the central plasma sheet (CPS) can be an important or even dominant

  8. Comparison of techniques to determine intermittency of riometer auroral absorption at South Pole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovalle, E. M.; Stepanova, M.; Foppiano, A. J.

    2008-05-01

    It is well known that auroral radio wave absorption, as measured by riometers, consists of periods of relative quiescence which are interrupted by short bursts of activity. Such patterns in activity are observed in systems ranging from the stock market to turbulence, i.e. they exhibit intermittency. In the case of the auroral absorption it has also been found that intermittency strongly depends on the magnetic local time, being largest in the nighttime sector. This can be interpreted as indicating that the precipitating particles responsible of the absorption exhibit intermittency, especially near the substorm eye, where the level of turbulence increases. Here, different techniques to determine intermittency of auroral absorption measured by a riometer at South Pole (-90°S) are compared. The techniques are (i) the standard Castings formulation, (ii) the Local Intermittency Measure, (iii) the superstatistic, and (iv) the non-extensive statistics. It is shown that results obtained using the superstatistic and non-extensive statistic techniques confirm previously published results for auroral absorption at South Pole using the Castings and the Local Intermittency Measure techniques. Furthermore, a preliminary comparison between techniques indicates technique differences seem to be more related to the conceptual approach of each one rather than to the numerical results given by them.

  9. Investigating the auroral electrojets using Swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ashley; Macmillan, Susan; Beggan, Ciaran; Whaler, Kathy

    2016-04-01

    The auroral electrojets are large horizontal currents that flow within the ionosphere in ovals around the polar regions. They are an important aspect of space weather and their position and intensity vary with solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activity. The electrojet positions are also governed by the Earth's main magnetic field. During more active periods, the auroral electrojets typically move equatorward and become more intense. This causes a range of effects on Earth and in space, including geomagnetically induced currents in power transmission networks, disturbance to radio communications and increased drag on satellites due to expansion of the atmosphere. They are also indicative of where the aurora are visible. Monitoring of the auroral electrojets in the pre-satellite era was limited to the network of ground-based magnetic observatories, from which the traditional AE activity indices are produced. These suffer in particular from the stations' poor distribution in position and so this motivates the use of satellite-based measurements. With polar low-Earth orbit satellites carrying magnetometers, all latitudes can be sampled with excellent resolution. This poster presents an investigation using Swarm's magnetometer data to detect the electrojets as the spacecraft move above them. We compare and contrast two approaches, one which uses vector data and the other which uses scalar data (Hamilton and Macmillan 2013, Vennerstrom and Moretto, 2013). Using ideas from both approaches we determine the oval positions and intensities from Swarm and earlier satellites. The variation in latitude and intensity with solar wind conditions, geomagnetic activity and secular variation of the main field is investigated. We aim to elucidate the relative importance of these factors. Hamilton, B. and Macmillan, S., 2013. Investigation of decadal scale changes in the auroral oval positions using Magsat and CHAMP data. Poster at IAGA 12th Scientific Assembly, 2013. http

  10. Stochastic estimation of dynamically changing object orientation parameters using satellite measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Lukasevich, V. I.; Kramarov, S. O.; Sokolov, Sergey V.

    2015-01-01

    It is solved a problem of a posteriori estimation of dynamically modified parameters of angular movement of the object by satellite measurements. There are shown advantages of application of the methods of stochastic non-linear dynamic filtration before single-stage measurements. It is represented an example, showing efficiency of proposed approach.

  11. Statistics of auroral hiss and relationship to auroral boundaries and upward current regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasojevic, M.

    2016-08-01

    An 8 year database of VLF auroral hiss observations from South Pole station (invariant latitude of -74° with magnetic local time (MLT) = UT -3.5 h) is analyzed. There are three peaks in hiss occurrence as a function of MLT in the evening sector (19-23 MLT), afternoon sector (13-17 MLT), and morning sector (7-11 MLT). The geomagnetic and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) drivers of hiss are examined in the three MLT sectors, and the results are interpreted using an empirical model of auroral boundaries and an empirical model of field-aligned current patterns. Auroral hiss on the dayside occurs when the auroral oval is centered near the latitude of the station, and in the afternoon sector higher disturbance levels are required. The afternoon sector favors positive By when Bz is positive and negative By when Bz is strongly negative, while the morning sector favors the complementary conditions. In each case the preference for hiss occurrence follows the pattern of upward field-aligned currents, and hiss is more likely in the configuration where the peak in the upward current is closer to the latitude of the station. IMF By does not play a role on the nightside where hiss is most likely to occur during moderately weak driving conditions as higher disturbance levels are expected to move the auroral oval and upward current systems to latitudes well equatorward of South Pole.

  12. Harmonic H sup + gyrofrequency structures in auroral hiss observed by high-altitude auroral sounding rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kintner, P.M.; Vago, J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA)); Scales, W. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (USA)); Yau, A.; Whalen, B. (National Research Council of Canada, Ottwawa, Ontario (Canada)); Arnoldy, R. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham (USA)); Moore, T. (Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (USA))

    1991-06-01

    Two recent sounding rocket experiments have yielded VLF wave data with spectral structures ordered by the hydrogen gyrofrequency. The spectral structures occur near and above the lower hybrid frequency in association with auroral hiss. These structures are observed within and near regions of auroral electron precipitation and transverse ion acceleration. They are accompanied by auroral hiss but are anticorrelated with spectral peaks at the lower hybrid frequency. They are typically found above 500 km altitude, have no measureable magnetic component, and are at least occasionally short wavelength (k{rho}{sub i}{ge}1). Because the spectral structures appear to be electrostatic, are ordered by the hydrogen gyrofrequency, and are short wavelength, the authors interpret the structures as modes which connect the lower hybrid mode with the hydrogen Bernstein modes. A study of the plasma wave mode structure in the vicinity of the lower hybrid frequency is presented to substantiate this interpretation. The results imply that these waves are a common feature of the auroral zone ionosphere above 500 km altitude and exist any time that auroral hiss exists. The absence of previous satellite abservations of this phenomenon can be explained by Doppler broadening.

  13. Auroral meridian scanning photometer calibration using Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackel, Brian J.; Unick, Craig; Creutzberg, Fokke; Baker, Greg; Davis, Eric; Donovan, Eric F.; Connors, Martin; Wilson, Cody; Little, Jarrett; Greffen, M.; McGuffin, Neil

    2016-10-01

    Observations of astronomical sources provide information that can significantly enhance the utility of auroral data for scientific studies. This report presents results obtained by using Jupiter for field cross calibration of four multispectral auroral meridian scanning photometers during the 2011-2015 Northern Hemisphere winters. Seasonal average optical field-of-view and local orientation estimates are obtained with uncertainties of 0.01 and 0.1°, respectively. Estimates of absolute sensitivity are repeatable to roughly 5 % from one month to the next, while the relative response between different wavelength channels is stable to better than 1 %. Astronomical field calibrations and darkroom calibration differences are on the order of 10 %. Atmospheric variability is the primary source of uncertainty; this may be reduced with complementary data from co-located instruments.

  14. The Auroral Station in Adventdalen, Svalbard

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the Auroral Station in Adventdalen near Longyearbyen, Svalbard (78°N, 15°E). The main instruments at the site are for optical observation of aurora and airglow, but magnetic and radar observations are also carried out. Emission spectra show the difference between the dayside and nightside optical aurora. A newly compiled mesospheric temperature series from the station is also presented, derived through 20 years of spectral measurements of the hydroxyl airglow layer.

  15. Statistical study of auroral omega bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Partamies

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of very few statistical studies on auroral omega bands motivated us to test-use a semi-automatic method for identifying large-scale undulations of the diffuse aurora boundary and to investigate their occurrence. Five identical all-sky cameras with overlapping fields of view provided data for 438 auroral omega-like structures over Fennoscandian Lapland from 1996 to 2007. The results from this set of omega band events agree remarkably well with previous observations of omega band occurrence in magnetic local time (MLT, lifetime, location between the region 1 and 2 field-aligned currents, as well as current density estimates. The average peak emission height of omega forms corresponds to the estimated precipitation energies of a few keV, which experienced no significant change during the events. Analysis of both local and global magnetic indices demonstrates that omega bands are observed during substorm expansion and recovery phases that are more intense than average substorm expansion and recovery phases in the same region. The omega occurrence with respect to the substorm expansion and recovery phases is in a very good agreement with an earlier observed distribution of fast earthward flows in the plasma sheet during expansion and recovery phases. These findings support the theory that omegas are produced by fast earthward flows and auroral streamers, despite the rarity of good conjugate observations.

  16. Temporal and spatial evolution of discrete auroral arcs as seen by Cluster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Figueiredo

    2005-10-01

    density gradient at the PS poleward boundary, and coupled to intense upflowing field-aligned currents with mapped densities of up to 20 µA/m2. The surge horn consists of multiple arc structures which later merge into one structure and intensify at the PS poleward boundary. The surge horn and the associated PS region moved poleward with a velocity at the ionospheric level of 0.5 km/s, following the large-scale poleward expansion of the auroral oval associated with the substorm expansion phase.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Ionosphere-magnetosphere interacctions; Electric fields and currents; Particle acceleration

  17. Tail reconnection region versus auroral activity inferred from conjugate ARTEMIS plasma sheet flow and auroral observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyons, L. R.; Xing, X.; Angelopoulos, V.; Donovan, E. F.; Mende, S. B.; Bonnell, J. W.; Auster, U.

    2013-09-01

    sheet flow bursts have been suggested to correspond to different types of auroral activity, such as poleward boundary intensifications (PBIs), ensuing auroral streamers, and substorms. The flow-aurora association leads to the important question of identifying the magnetotail source region for the flow bursts and how this region depends on magnetic activity. The present study uses the ARTEMIS spacecraft coordinated with conjugate ground-based auroral imager observations to identify flow bursts beyond 45 RE downtail and corresponding auroral forms. We find that quiet-time flows are directed dominantly earthward with a one-to-one correspondence with PBIs. Flow bursts during the substorm recovery phase and during steady magnetospheric convection (SMC) periods are also directed earthward, and these flows are associated with a series of PBIs/streamers lasting for tens of minutes with similar durations to that of the series of earthward flows. Presubstorm onset flows are also earthward and associated with PBIs/streamers. The earthward flows during those magnetic conditions suggest that the flow bursts, which lead to PBIs and streamers, originate from further downtail of ARTEMIS, possibly from the distant-tail neutral line (DNL) or tailward-retreated near-Earth neutral line (NENL) rather than from the nominal NENL location in the midtail. We find that tailward flows are limited primarily to the substorm expansion phase. They continue throughout the period of auroral poleward expansion, indicating that the expansion-phase flows originate from the NENL and that NENL activity is closely related to the auroral expansion of the substorm expansion phase.

  18. Whistler-Langmuir oscillitons and their relation to auroral hiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sauer

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A new type of oscilliton (soliton with superimposed spatial oscillations is described which arises in plasmas if the electron cyclotron frequency Ωe is larger than the electron plasma frequency ωe, which is a typical situation for auroral regions in planetary magnetospheres. Both high-frequency modes of concern, the Langmuir and the whistler wave, are completely decoupled if they propagate parallel to the magnetic field. However, for oblique propagation two mixed modes are created with longitudinal and transverse electric field components. The lower mode (in the literature commonly called the whistler mode, e.g. Gurnett et al., 1983 has whistler wave characteristics at small wave numbers and asymptotically transforms into the Langmuir mode. As a consequence of the coupling between these two modes, with different phase velocity dependence, a maximum in phase velocity appears at finite wave number. The occurrence of such a particular point where phase and group velocity coincide creates the condition for the existence of a new type of oscillating nonlinear stationary structure, which we call the whistler-Langmuir (WL oscilliton. After determining, by means of stationary dispersion theory, the parameter regime in which WL oscillitons exist, their spatial profiles are calculated within the framework of cold (non-relativistic fluid theory. Particle-in-cell (PIC simulations are used to demonstrate the formation of WL oscillitons which seem to play an important role in understanding electron beam-excited plasma radiation that is observed as auroral hiss in planetary magnetospheres far away from the source region.

  19. Resistivity due to weak double layers - A model for auroral arc thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Manju; Lysak, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    We have calculated the resistivity due to a sequence of fluctuating weak double layers aligned parallel to the ambient magnetic field line. The average response of an electron drifting through a 1D randomly oriented array of WDLs is studied using a test particle approach. The average is taken over the randomly fluctuating values of the electric field associated with the double layers. Based on our calculations, we estimate that a 350 eV electron energy the thickness of the visual auroral arc is about 2.5 km and that of the auroral fine structure as about 250 m when mapped down to the ionosphere. The significance of our calculations is discussed in the context of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  20. Global Auroral Energy Deposition during Substorm Onset Compared with Local Time and Solar Wind IMF Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M.; Fillingim, M. O.; Germany, G. A.; Parks, G. K.

    1998-01-01

    The global images made by the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) aboard the IASTP/Polar Satellite are used to derive the global auroral energy deposited in the ionosphere resulting from electron precipitation. During a substorm onset, the energy deposited and its location in local time are compared to the solar wind IMF conditions. Previously, insitu measurements of low orbiting satellites have made precipitating particle measurements along the spacecraft track and global images of the auroral zone, without the ability to quantify energy parameters, have been available. However, usage of the high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution of consecutive UVI images enables quantitative measurement of the energy deposited in the ionosphere not previously available on a global scale. Data over an extended period beginning in January 1997 will be presented.

  1. Comparing clouds and their seasonal variations in 10 atmospheric general circulation models with satellite measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, M.; Lin, W.; Klein, S.; J. Bacmeister; Bony, S.; Cederwall, R.; Del Genio, A; Hack, J.; Loeb, N.; Lohmann, U.; P. Minnis; Musat, I.; Pincus, R; Stier, P.; Suarez, M.

    2005-01-01

    To assess the current status of climate models in simulating clouds, basic cloud climatologies from ten atmospheric general circulation models are compared with satellite measurements from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) program. An ISCCP simulator is employed in all models to facilitate the comparison. Models simulated a four-fold difference in high-top clouds. There are also, however, large uncertainties ...

  2. Investigations of the auroral luminosity distribution and the dynamics of discrete auroral forms in a historical retrospective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldstein, Y. I.; Vorobjev, V. G.; Zverev, V. L.; Förster, M.

    2014-05-01

    Research results about planetary-scale auroral distributions are presented in a historical retrospective, beginning with the first "maps of isochasms" - lines of equal visibility of auroras in the firmament (Fig. 2) - up to "isoaurora maps" - lines of equal occurrence frequency of auroras in the zenith (Fig. 4). The exploration of auroras in Russia from Lomonosov in the 18th century (Fig. 1) until the start of the International Geophysical Year (IGY) in 1957 is shortly summed up. A generalised pattern of discrete auroral forms along the auroral oval during geomagnetically very quiet intervals is presented in Fig. 5. The changes of discrete auroral forms versus local time exhibit a fixed pattern with respect to the sun. The auroral forms comprise rays near noon, homogeneous arcs during the evening, and rayed arcs and bands during the night and in the morning. This fixed auroral pattern is unsettled during disturbances, which occur sometimes even during very quiet intervals. The azimuths of extended auroral forms vary with local time. Such variations in the orientation of extended forms above stations in the auroral zone have been used by various investigators to determine the position of the auroral oval (Fig. 9). Auroral luminosity of the daytime and nighttime sectors differ owing to different luminosity forms, directions of motion of the discrete forms, the height of the luminescent layers, and the spectral composition (predominant red emissions during daytime and green emissions during the night). Schemes that summarise principal peculiarities of daytime luminosity, its structure in MLT (magnetic local time) and MLat (magnetic latitude) coordinates, and the spectral composition of the luminosity are presented in Figs. 15 and 19. We discuss in detail the daytime sector dynamics of individual discrete forms for both quiet conditions and auroral substorms. The most important auroral changes during substorms occur in the nighttime sector. We present the evolution of

  3. Spacecraft Charging and Auroral Boundary Predictions in Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.

    2016-01-01

    Auroral charging of spacecraft is an important class of space weather impacts on technological systems in low Earth orbit. In order for space weather models to accurately specify auroral charging environments, they must provide the appropriate plasma environment characteristics responsible for charging. Improvements in operational space weather prediction capabilities relevant to charging must be tested against charging observations.

  4. Cassini Observations During the Saturn Auroral Campaign of Spring 2013 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Lamy, L.; Gurnett, D. A.; Mitchell, D. G.; Dougherty, M. K.; Bunce, E. J.; Badman, S. V.; Burton, M. E.; Crary, F. J.; Pryor, W. R.; Baines, K. H.; Dyudina, U.; Nichols, J. D.; Stallard, T.; Luhmann, J. G.; Zheng, Y.; Hansen, K. C.

    2013-12-01

    During April and May 2013, a concerted effort to study Saturn's auroras was mounted using multi-wavelength observations from Cassini and a number of Earth-based observations. This paper will focus on the Cassini observations acquired during the campaign with an emphasis on the fields and particle observations and Saturn Kilometric Radiation, in particular. It has been shown that the integrated power of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) provides a good proxy for auroral activity and there is at least a qualitative correlation between auroral brightness and SKR intensity. While the SKR observations can be complicated by beaming issues, they provide a reasonable, continuous context within which to place other observations. We compare the time history of SKR intensity with models of the solar wind input based on models which propagate 1 AU observations to the distance of Saturn. Further, direction-finding measurements of the SKR reveal the source of the SKR and these can be related to Earth-based and Cassini-based observations of the auroras. In this paper we will use the SKR observations to construct the evolution of auroral activity and place other in situ and remote sensing observations within this context.

  5. Observations of meso-scale neutral wind interaction with auroral precipitation in the thermosphere at EISCAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosch, Michael; Nozawa, Satonori; Yiu, Ho-Ching Iris; Anderson, Callum; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Howells, Vikki; Baddeley, Lisa; Aruliah, Anasuya; McWhirter, Ian; McCrea, I. W.; Fujii, Ryoichi

    We report on observations of E-region neutral wind fields and their interaction with auroral precipitation at meso-scale spatial resolution. The EISCAT Svalbard radar was used to observe the ionospheric line-of-sight ion flows and temperatures in the E-and F-regions whilst scan-ning its beam. An all-sky optical Scanning Doppler Imager was used at 557.7 nm to observe thermospheric neutral line-of-sight winds and temperatures. High-latitude data from February 2010 are presented. In the case of an auroral arc, strong acceleration of the E-region neutral wind occurs within 10s of km to the arc on a time scale of 10s of minutes. We demonstrate through modelling that this effect cannot be explained by height changes in the 557.7 nm emis-sion layer. The most likely explanation seems to be greatly enhanced ion drag associated with the increased plasma density caused by the particle precipitation, and the localised ionospheric electric field associated with the Pedersen closure current of auroral arcs. Since Joule heat-ing occurs predominantly in the E-region, meso-scale variability in the thermosphere probably accounts for a significant under-estimation in the total energy dissipation.

  6. Magnetotail energy dissipation during an auroral substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, E. V.; Baumjohann, W.; Wolf, R. A.; Nakamura, R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Weygand, J. M.; Kubyshkina, M. V.

    2016-12-01

    Violent releases of space plasma energy from the Earth's magnetotail during substorms produce strong electric currents and bright aurora. But what modulates these currents and aurora and controls dissipation of the energy released in the ionosphere? Using data from the THEMIS fleet of satellites and ground-based imagers and magnetometers, we show that plasma energy dissipation is controlled by field-aligned currents (FACs) produced and modulated during magnetotail topology change and oscillatory braking of fast plasma jets at 10-14 Earth radii in the nightside magnetosphere. FACs appear in regions where plasma sheet pressure and flux tube volume gradients are non-collinear. Faster tailward expansion of magnetotail dipolarization and subsequent slower inner plasma sheet restretching during substorm expansion and recovery phases cause faster poleward then slower equatorward movement of the substorm aurora. Anharmonic radial plasma oscillations build up displaced current filaments and are responsible for discrete longitudinal auroral arcs that move equatorward at a velocity of about 1 km s-1. This observed auroral activity appears sufficient to dissipate the released energy.

  7. The auroral footprint of Enceladus on Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pryor, Wayne R; Rymer, Abigail M; Mitchell, Donald G; Hill, Thomas W; Young, David T; Saur, Joachim; Jones, Geraint H; Jacobsen, Sven; Cowley, Stan W H; Mauk, Barry H; Coates, Andrew J; Gustin, Jacques; Grodent, Denis; Gérard, Jean-Claude; Lamy, Laurent; Nichols, Jonathan D; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Esposito, Larry W; Dougherty, Michele K; Jouchoux, Alain J; Stewart, A Ian F; McClintock, William E; Holsclaw, Gregory M; Ajello, Joseph M; Colwell, Joshua E; Hendrix, Amanda R; Crary, Frank J; Clarke, John T; Zhou, Xiaoyan

    2011-04-21

    Although there are substantial differences between the magnetospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, it has been suggested that cryovolcanic activity at Enceladus could lead to electrodynamic coupling between Enceladus and Saturn like that which links Jupiter with Io, Europa and Ganymede. Powerful field-aligned electron beams associated with the Io-Jupiter coupling, for example, create an auroral footprint in Jupiter's ionosphere. Auroral ultraviolet emission associated with Enceladus-Saturn coupling is anticipated to be just a few tenths of a kilorayleigh (ref. 12), about an order of magnitude dimmer than Io's footprint and below the observable threshold, consistent with its non-detection. Here we report the detection of magnetic-field-aligned ion and electron beams (offset several moon radii downstream from Enceladus) with sufficient power to stimulate detectable aurora, and the subsequent discovery of Enceladus-associated aurora in a few per cent of the scans of the moon's footprint. The footprint varies in emission magnitude more than can plausibly be explained by changes in magnetospheric parameters--and as such is probably indicative of variable plume activity.

  8. Mapping thermospheric winds in the auroral zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conde, M.; Smith, R. W.

    A new all-sky imaging Fabry-Perot (ASIFP) spectrometer has been developed for ground-based mapping of upper atmospheric wind and temperature fields in the auroral zone. Although several other ASIFP spectrometers exist for atmospheric studies [Rees et al., 1984; Sekar et al., 1993; Biondi et al., 1995] these instruments have all operated with etalons of fixed optical gap, a method potentially subject to errors in the presence of auroral intensity gradients. In this instrument the etalon plate spacing is scanned periodically over one order of interference and each photon detected is assigned to a wavelength interval which is determined from both its arrival location on the detector and the etalon plate spacing prevailing at the detection time. Spectra accumulated this way are not distorted by spatial intensity gradients. Preliminary λ630 nm observations were made during the winter of 1994/95 from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska. To illustrate some of the features we have observed in this study we present line-of-sight wind estimates derived for the night of December 7, 1994. The background wind matches averages presented previously by Sica et al. [1986] and is consistent with winds driven principally by momentum deposition from ionospheric plasma convection through ion-drag. Smaller scale curvature and divergence features are also discernable and are discussed.

  9. Efficient diffuse auroral electron scattering by electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves in the outer magnetosphere: A detailed case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Liang, Jun; Thorne, Richard M.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Horne, Richard B.; Kubyshkina, Marina; Spanswick, Emma; Donovan, Eric F.; Lummerzheim, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a companion to a paper by Liang et al. (2011) which reports a causal connection between the intensification of electrostatic ECH waves and the postmidnight diffuse auroral activity in the absence of whistler mode chorus waves at L = 11.5 on the basis of simultaneous observations from THEMIS spacecraft and NORSTAR optical instruments during 8-9 UT on February 5, 2009. In this paper, we use the THEMIS particle and wave measurements together with the magnetically conjugate auroral observations for this event to illustrate an example where electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves are the main contributor to the diffuse auroral precipitation. We use the wave and particle data to perform a comprehensive theoretical and numerical analysis of ECH wave driven resonant scattering rates. We find that the observed ECH wave activity can cause intense pitch angle scattering of plasma sheet electrons between 100 eV and 5 keV at a rate of >10-4 s-1 for equatorial pitch angles αeq < 30°. The scattering approaches the strong diffusion limit in the realistic ambient magnetic field to produce efficient precipitation loss of <˜5 keV electrons on a timescale of a few hours or less. Using the electron differential energy flux inside the loss cone estimated based upon the energy-dependent efficiency of ECH wave scattering for an 8-s interval with high resolution wave data available, the auroral electron transport model developed by Lummerzheim (1987) produced an intensity of ˜2.3 kR for the green-line diffuse aurora. Separately, Maxwellian fitting to the electron differential flux spectrum produced a green-line auroral intensity of ˜2.6 kR. This is in good agreement with the ˜2.4 kR green-line auroral intensity observed simultaneously at the magnetic foot point (as inferred using the event-adaptive model of Kubyshkina et al. (2009, 2011)) of the location where the in situ observations were obtained. Our results support the scenario that enhanced ECH

  10. Combined ESR and EISCAT observations of the dayside polar cap and auroral oval during the May 15, 1997 storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Liu

    Full Text Available The high-latitude ionospheric response to a major magnetic storm on May 15, 1997 is studied and different responses in the polar cap and the auroral oval are highlighted. Depletion of the F2 region electron density occurred in both the polar cap and the auroral zone, but due to different physical processes. The increased recombination rate of O+ ions caused by a strong electric field played a crucial role in the auroral zone. The transport effect, however, especially the strong upward ion flow was also of great importance in the dayside polar cap. During the main phase and the beginning of the recovery phase soft particle precipitation in the polar cap showed a clear relation to the dynamic pressure of the solar wind, with a maximum cross-correlation coefficient of 0.63 at a time lag of 5 min.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (storms and substorms

  11. Sophus Peter Tromholt: an outstanding pioneer in auroral research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Moss

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Danish school teacher Sophus Peter Tromholt (1851–1896 was self-taught in physics, astronomy, and auroral sciences. Still, he was one of the brightest auroral researchers of the 19th century. He was the first scientist ever to organize and analyse correlated auroral observations over a wide area (entire Scandinavia moving away from incomplete localized observations. Tromholt documented the relation between auroras and sunspots and demonstrated the daily, seasonal and solar cycle-related variations in high-latitude auroral occurrence frequencies. Thus, Tromholt was the first ever to deduce from auroral observations the variations associated with what is now known as the auroral oval termed so by Khorosheva (1962 and Feldstein (1963 more than 80 yr later. He made reliable and accurate estimates of the heights of auroras several decades before this important issue was finally settled through Størmer's brilliant photographic technique. In addition to his three major scientific works (Tromholt, 1880a, 1882a, and 1885a, he wrote numerous short science notes and made huge efforts to collect historical auroral observations (Tromholt, 1898. Furthermore, Tromholt wrote a large number of popular science articles in newspapers and journals and made lecture tours all over Scandinavia and Germany, contributing to enhance the public educational level and awareness. He devoted most of his life to auroral research but as a self-taught scientist, he received little acclaim within the contemporary academic scientific society. With his non-academic background, trained at a college of education – not a university – he was never offered a position at a university or a research institution. However, Sophus Tromholt was an outstanding pioneer in auroral research.

  12. Potential Structures and Particle Acceleration on Auroral Field Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-26

    90245 It. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Space Division 1 May 1985 Los Angeles Air Force Station 13. NUMBEROpt PAGES Los ,~glesCali...communications, lid&r, and electro- optics; cmmuniction sciences, applied electronics, semiconductor crystal and device physics, radiometric tmating

  13. Generation of auroral kilometric radiation in inhomogeneous magnetospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burinskaya, T. M.; Shevelev, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    The generation of auroral kilometric radiation in a narrow 3D plasma cavity, in which a weakly relativistic electron flow is propagated along the magnetic field against a low-density cold background plasma, is studied. The time dynamics of the propagation and intensification of waves are analyzed using geometric optics equations. The waves have different wave vector components and start from the cavity center at an altitude of about the Earth's radius at plasma parameters typical for the auroral zone at this altitude. It is shown that the global inhomogeneity of the Earth's magnetic field is of key importance in shaping the auroral kilometric radiation spectra.

  14. Analysis of the role of urban vegetation in local climate of Budapest using satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongracz, Rita; Bartholy, Judit; Dezso, Zsuzsanna; Fricke, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    Urban areas significantly modify the natural environment due to the concentrated presence of humans and the associated anthropogenic activities. In order to assess this effect, it is essential to evaluate the relationship between urban and vegetated surface covers. In our study we focused on the Hungarian capital, Budapest, in which about 1.7 million inhabitants are living nowadays. The entire city is divided by the river Danube into the hilly, greener Buda side on the west, and the flat, more densely built-up Pest side on the east. Most of the extended urban vegetation, i.e., forests are located in the western Buda side. The effects of the past changing of these green areas are analyzed using surface temperature data calculated from satellite measurements in the infrared channels, and NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) derived from visible and near-infrared satellite measurements. For this purpose, data available from sensor MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) of NASA satellites (i.e., Terra and Aqua) are used. First, the climatological effects of forests on the urban heat island intensity are evaluated. Then, we also aim to evaluate the relationship of surface temperature and NDVI in this urban environment with special focus on vegetation-related sections of the city where the vegetation cover either increased or decreased remarkably.

  15. A pathway to generating Climate Data Records of sea-surface temperature from satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnett, Peter J.; Corlett, Gary K.

    2012-11-01

    In addition to having known uncertainty characteristics, Climate Data Records (CDRs) of geophysical variables derived from satellite measurements must be of sufficient length to resolve signals that might reveal the signatures of climate change against a background of larger, unrelated variability. The length of the record requires using satellite measurements from many instruments over several decades, and the uncertainty requirement implies that a consistent approach be used to establish the errors in the satellite retrievals over the entire period. Retrieving sea-surface temperature (SST) from satellite is a relatively mature topic, and the uncertainties of satellite retrievals are determined by comparison with collocated independent measurements. To avoid the complicating effects of near-surface temperature gradients in the upper ocean, the best validating measurements are from ship-board radiometers that measure, at source, the surface emission that is measured in space, after modification by its propagation through the atmosphere. To attain sufficient accuracy, such ship-based radiometers must use internal blackbody calibration targets, but to determine the uncertainties in these radiometric measurements, i.e. to confirm that the internal calibration is effective, it is necessary to conduct verification of the field calibration using independent blackbodies with accurately known emissivity and at very accurately measured temperatures. This is a well-justifiable approach to providing the necessary underpinning of a Climate Data Record of SST.

  16. GPS phase scintillation during the geomagnetic storm of March 17, 2015: The relation to auroral electrojet currents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prikryl, Paul; Ghoddousi-Fard, Reza; Connors, Martin

    and magnetometers. GPS phase scintillation index is computed for L1 signal sampled at the rate of 50 Hz by specialized GPS scintillation receivers of the Expanded Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (ECHAIN). To further extend the geographic coverage, the phasescintillation proxy index is obtained from......-enhanced plasma density (SED) and in the auroral oval during energetic particle precipitation events, substorms and pseudo-breakups in particular. In this paper we examine the relation to auroral electrojet currents observed by arrays of ground-based magnetometers and energetic particle precipitation observed......Ionospheric irregularities cause rapid fluctuations of radio wave amplitude and phase that candegrade GPS positional accuracy and affect performance of radio communication and navigation systems. The ionosphere becomes particularly disturbed during geomagnetic storms caused by impacts of coronal...

  17. A Wide Field Auroral Imager (WFAI for low Earth orbit missions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. P. Bannister

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive understanding of the solar wind interaction with Earth's coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system requires an ability to observe the charged particle environment and auroral activity from the same platform, generating particle and photon image data which are matched in time and location. While unambiguous identification of the particles giving rise to the aurora requires a Low Earth Orbit satellite, obtaining adequate spatial coverage of aurorae with the relatively limited field of view of current space bourne auroral imaging systems requires much higher orbits. A goal for future satellite missions, therefore, is the development of compact, wide field-of-view optics permitting high spatial and temporal resolution ultraviolet imaging of the aurora from small spacecraft in low polar orbit. Microchannel plate optics offer a method of achieving the required performance. We describe a new, compact instrument design which can observe a wide field-of-view with the required spatial resolution. We report the focusing of 121.6 nm radiation using a spherically-slumped, square-pore microchannel plate with a focal length of 32 mm and an F number of 0.7. Measurements are compared with detailed ray-trace simulations of imaging performance. The angular resolution is 2.7±0.2° for the prototype, corresponding to a footprint ~33 km in diameter for an aurora altitude of 110 km and a spacecraft altitude of 800 km. In preliminary analysis, a more recent optic has demonstrated a full width at half maximum of 5.0±0.3 arcminutes, corresponding to a footprint of ~1 km from the same spacecraft altitude. We further report the imaging properties of a convex microchannel plate detector with planar resistive anode readout; this detector, whose active surface has a radius of curvature of only 100 mm, is shown to meet the spatial resolution and sensitivity requirements of the new wide field auroral imager (WFAI.

  18. Mesoscale ionospheric tomography at the Auroral region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luntama, J.; Kokkatil, G. V.

    2008-12-01

    FMI (Finnish Meteorological Institute) has used observations from the dense GNSS network in Finland for high resolution regional ionospheric tomography. The observation system used in this work is the VRS (Virtual Reference Station) network in Finland operated by Geotrim Ltd. This network contains 86 GNSS ground stations providing two frequency GPS and GLONASS observations with the sampling rate of 1 Hz. The network covers the whole Finland and the sampling of the ionosphere is very good for observing mesoscale ionospheric structures at the Auroral region. The ionospheric tomography software used by FMI is the MIDAS (Multi-Instrument Data Analysis System) algorithm developed and implemented by the University of Bath (Mitchell and Spencer, 2003). MIDAS is a 3-D extension of the 2-D tomography algorithm originally presented by Fremouw et al. (1992). The research at FMI is based on ground based GNSS data collected in December 2006. The impacts of the two geomagnetic storms during the month are clearly visible in the retrieved electron density and TEC maps and they can be correlated with the magnetic field disturbances measured by the IMAGE magnetometer network. This is the first time that mesoscale structures in the ionospheric plasma can be detected from ground based GNSS observations at the Auroral region. The continuous high rate observation data from the Geotrim network allows monitoring of the temporal evolution of these structures throughout the storms. Validation of the high resolution electron density and TEC maps is a challenge as independent reference observations with a similar resolution are not available. FMI has compared the 3-D electron density maps against the 2-D electron density plots retrieved from the observations from the Ionospheric Tomography Chain operated by the Sodankylä Geophysical Observatory (SGO). Additional validation has been performed with intercomparisons with observations from the ground based magnetometer and auroral camera network

  19. Auroral omens of the American Civil War

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Aurorae are a splendid night-time sight: coruscations of green, purple, and red fluorescent light in the form of gently wafting ribbons, billowing curtains, and flashing rays. Mostly seen at high latitudes, in the north aurorae are often called the northern lights or aurora borealis, and, in the south, the southern lights or aurora australis. The mystery of their cause has historically been the subject of wonder. The folklore and mythology of some far-northern civilizations attributed auroral light to celestial deities. And, in ironic contrast with their heavenly beauty, unusual auroral displays, such as those seen on rare occasions at lower southern latitudes, have sometimes been interpreted as portending unfavorable future events. Today we understand aurorae to be a visual manifestation of the dynamic conditions in the space environment surrounding the earth. Important direct evidence in support of this theory came on September 1, 1859. On that day, an English astronomer named Richard Carrington was situated at his telescope, which was pointed at the sun. While observing and sketching a large group of sunspots, he saw a solar flare—intense patches of white light that were superimposed upon the darker sunspot group and which were illuminated for about a minute. One day later, a magnetic storm was recorded at specially designed observatories in Europe, across Russia, and in India. By many measures, the amplitude of magnetic disturbance was the greatest ever recorded. In the United States, the effects of the Carrington storm could be seen as irregular backand-forth deflections of a few degrees in the magnetized needle of a compass. Rapid magnetic variation also induced electric fields in the earth’s conducting lithosphere, and interfered with the operation of telegraph systems. The Carrington magnetic storm, and an earlier storm that had occurred on August 28, 1859, caused spectacular displays of aurora borealis in the night-time sky over the entire United

  20. Monitoring auroral electrojets with satellite data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vennerstrøm, Susanne; Moretto, T.

    2013-01-01

    satellites. The method is simple enough to be implemented for real-time monitoring, especially since it does not require the full vector field measurement. We demonstrate the method on 5 years of Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) data and show how the monitoring depends on the local time...... of the satellite orbit and how it varies with local time and season in both hemispheres. Statistically, the strongest currents are observed in the predawn and predusk local time quadrants at latitudes that depend on the general magnetic activity level. We also show how the satellite-derived parameters relate...... to and complement existing ground-based indices. The CHAMP magnetometer in 350–450km altitude easily measures an electrojet which on the ground would produce an Auroral Electrojet (AE)-type signal as small as 20 nT. Thus, while the signal decreases roughly proportionally to the square of the distance to the current...

  1. Automatic Georeferencing of Astronaut Auroral Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, A. P.; Riechert, M.; Taylor, M. G.

    2014-12-01

    Astronauts on board the International Space Station have taken thousands of high quality photographs of the aurorae borealis and australis with a high temporal and spatial resolution. A barrier to these photographs being used in research is that the cameras do not have a fixed orientation and the images therefore do not have any pointing information associated with them. Using astrometry.net and other open source libraries we have developed a software toolkit to automatically reconstruct the pointing of the images from the visible starfield and hence project the auroral images in geographic and geomagnetic coordinates. Here we explain the technique and the resulting data products, which will soon be publically available through the project website.

  2. Generation of auroral turbulence through the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomo-Hiko; Kurata, Hiroaki; Maeyama, Shinya

    2016-12-01

    The shear Alfvén waves coupled with the ionospheric density fluctuations in auroral regions of a planetary magnetosphere are modeled by a set of the reduced magnetohydrodynamic and two-fluid equations. When the drift velocity of the magnetized plasma due to the background electric field exceeds a critical value, the magnetosphere-ionosphere (M-I) coupling system is unstable to the feedback instability which leads to formation of auroral arc structures with ionospheric density and current enhancements. As the feedback (primary) instability grows, a secondary mode appears and deforms the auroral structures. A perturbative (quasilinear) analysis clarifies the secondary growth of the Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability driven by the primary instability growth in the feedback M-I coupling. In the nonlinear stage of the feedback instability, furthermore, auroral turbulence is spontaneously generated, where the equipartition of kinetic and magnetic energy is confirmed in the quasi-steady turbulence.

  3. 29__154 -158_ _Galadanci_ANALYSIS OF AURORAL

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    monthly averaged data using SPSS version 16.0 with expert modeler, to determine the level, trend and seasonal ... Keywords: Magnetic indices, World Data Center, Auroral, Level, Trend, Season, Expert modeler. ..... Simulation studies of ...

  4. Analysis of electron distributions associated with the source of auroral roar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Labelle, J.; Samara, M.

    2004-12-01

    In January of 2003, the HIgh Bandwidth Auroral Rocket (HIBAR) passed through two separate regions of strong upper hybrid emission in which the upper hybrid frequency was twice the electron cyclotron frequency (fuh = 2 fce) [\\textit{Samara et~al},2004]. These emissions are believed to be the source of HF auroral roar wave emission often observed on ground based receivers. The current theoretical model implies that the electro-magnetic waves observed on the ground are produced through mode conversion of strong emission of upper hybrid waves near 2 and 3 times the cyclotron frequency. The cyclotron maser theory predicts that the Z mode wave undergoes significant growth when the local upper hybrid frequency is just below ( ˜1%) twice the electron cyclotron frequency and with the appropriately unstable distribution of energetic electrons [\\textit{Yoon et~al.}, 1996,1998,2000]. Though roar is frequently observed from the ground, the source region has rarely been identified in-situ. Analysis of the in-situ electron distributions from HIBAR show qualitative agreement with the theoretical distributions used by \\textit{Yoon et~al.},1998. HIBAR encountered three distinctly separate regions where fuh ˜ 2 fce, two of these regions include strong upper hybrid emission, while the third is void of upper hybrid wave activity. The measured particle distributions demonstrate that, in the two regions with wave emission, the electron cyclotron maser instability condition is achieved and that, in the third region without wave emission, the instability condition fails. \\begin{thebibliography}{} \\bibitem{samara:04} Samara, M., J.~LaBelle, C.~A. Kletzing, and S.~R. Bounds, Rocket observations of structured upper hybrid wave at fuh}=2f{ce, \\textit{Geophys. Res. Lett.}, submitted August 2004. \\bibitem{yoon:96} Yoon, P.~H., A.~T. Weatherwax, and T.~J. Rosenberg, Lower ionospheric cyclotron maser theory: A possible source of 2fce and 3fce auroral radio emissions, \\textit{J. Geophys

  5. A Survey of Known Indicators of Auroral Substorm Onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-29

    the earliest attempts to classify the equatorward boundary was by Feldstein and Starkov . 13 Using a broad network of all sky cameras from 61.6 to 75...characterization. 53. Feldstein. Y.I. , and Starkov , G.V. (1967) Dynamics of auroral belt and polar geomagnetic disturbances. Planet. Space Science, 15:209. 54...Y.i. , and Starkov . G.V. (1967) Dynamics of auroral belt and polar geomagnetic disturbances, Planet. Space Science. 15:209. 54. Eather. R. H. (1984

  6. RFP for the Auroral Multiscale Midex (AMM) Mission star tracker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riis, Troels; Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif;

    1999-01-01

    This document is in response to the John Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory RFP for the Auroral Multiscale Midex Mission star tracker.It describes the functionality, the requirements and the performance of the ASC Star Tracker.......This document is in response to the John Hopkins University - Applied Physics Laboratory RFP for the Auroral Multiscale Midex Mission star tracker.It describes the functionality, the requirements and the performance of the ASC Star Tracker....

  7. Vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties over central Illinois and comparison with surface and satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. Sheridan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1 measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2 relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. The primary profile location was within 15 km of the NOAA/ESRL surface aerosol monitoring station near Bondville, Illinois. Identical instruments at the surface and on the aircraft ensured that the data from both platforms would be directly comparable and permitted a determination of how representative surface aerosol properties were of the lower column. Aircraft profiles were also conducted occasionally at two other nearby locations to increase the frequency of A-Train satellite underflights for the purpose of comparing in situ and satellite-retrieved aerosol data. Measurements of aerosol properties conducted at low relative humidity over the Bondville site compare well with the analogous surface aerosol data and do not indicate any major sampling issues or that the aerosol is radically different at the surface compared with the lowest flyby altitude of ~ 240 m above ground level. Statistical analyses of the in situ vertical profile data indicate that aerosol light scattering and absorption (related to aerosol amount decreases substantially with increasing altitude. Parameters related to the nature of the aerosol (e.g., single-scattering albedo, Ångström exponent, etc., however, are relatively constant throughout the mixed layer, and do not vary as much as the aerosol amount throughout the profile. While individual profiles often showed more variability, the median in situ single-scattering albedo was 0.93–0.95 for all sampled altitudes. Several parameters (e.g., submicrometer scattering fraction, hemispheric backscattering fraction, and

  8. Night sky brightness at sites from DMSP-OLS satellite measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Cinzano, P

    2004-01-01

    We apply the sky brightness modelling technique introduced and developed by Roy Garstang to high-resolution DMSP-OLS satellite measurements of upward artificial light flux and to GTOPO30 digital elevation data in order to predict the brightness distribution of the night sky at a given site in the primary astronomical photometric bands for a range of atmospheric aerosol contents. This method, based on global data and accounting for elevation, Earth curvature and mountain screening, allows the evaluation of sky glow conditions over the entire sky for any site in the World, to evaluate its evolution, to disentangle the contribution of individual sources in the surrounding territory, and to identify main contributing sources. Sky brightness, naked eye stellar visibility and telescope limiting magnitude are produced as 3-dimensional arrays whose axes are the position on the sky and the atmospheric clarity. We compared our results to available measurements.

  9. An Ad-hoc Satellite Network to Measure Filamentary Current Structures in the Auroral Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabong, C.; Fritz, T. A.; Semeter, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    An ad-hoc cubesat-based satellite network project known as ANDESITE is under development at Boston University. It aims to develop a dense constellation of easy-to-use, rapidly-deployable low-cost wireless sensor nodes in space. The objectives of the project are threefold: 1) Demonstrate viability of satellite based sensor networks by deploying an 8-node miniature sensor network to study the filamentation of the field aligned currents in the auroral zones of the Earth's magnetosphere. 2) Test the scalability of proposed protocols, including localization techniques, tracking, data aggregation, and routing, for a 3 dimensional wireless sensor network using a "flock" of nodes. 3) Construct a 6U Cube-sat running the Android OS as an integrated constellation manager, data mule and sensor node deplorer. This small network of sensor nodes will resolve current densities at different spatial resolutions in the near-Earth magnetosphere using measurements from magnetometers with 1-nT sensitivities and 0.2 nT/√Hz self-noise. Mapping of these currents will provide new constraints for models of auroral particle acceleration, wave-particle interactions, ionospheric destabilization, and other kinetic processes operating in the low-beta plasma of the near Earth magnetosphere.

  10. Generation of auroral kilometric and Z mode radiation by the cyclotron maser mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidi, N.; Gurnett, D. A.; Wu, C. S.

    1984-01-01

    The relativistic Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance condition for EM wave interactions with a plasma defines an ellipse in velocity space when the product of the index of refraction and cosine of the wave normal angle is less than or equal to unity, and defines a partial ellipse when the product is greater than unity. It is also noted that waves with frequencies greater than the gyrofrequency can only resonate with particles moving in the same direction along the magnetic field, while waves with lower frequencies than these resonate with particles moving in both directions along the magnetic field. It is found, in the case of auroral kilometric radiation, that both the upgoing and the downgoing electrons are unstable and can give rise to this radiation's growth. The magnitudes of the growth rates for both the upgoing and downgoing auroral kilometric radiation are comparable, and indicate that the path lengths needed to account for the observed intensities of this radiation are of the order of a few hundred km, which is probably too large. Growth rate calculations for the Z mode radiation show that, for wave frequencies just below the gyrofrequency and wave normal angles at or near 90 deg, the electron distribution is unstable and the growth rates are large enough to account for the observed intensities.

  11. The effects of auroral precipitation on atmospheric nitric oxide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, S.; Lessard, M.; Fritz, B.

    2016-12-01

    The Pulsating Auroral Nitric Oxide Production in the Lower Ionosphere (PANOPLI) project addresses a science problem that has strong implications regarding the question of how solar variability may be related to climate change and terrestrial weather. Pulsating aurora is the ideal choice for studying auroral NO production since this type of aurora is caused by tens of keV electron precipitation (which is known to produce enhancements in thermospheric NO) and is a frequently occurring and long lasting phenomenon resulting in widespread auroral luminosity. The pulsating auroral precipitation results in a large transfer of power from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere-thermosphere and may be a significant contributor to thermospheric NO production, which is dependent on the energy flux and duration of the auroral precipitation. PANOPLI makes use of ground-based riometer measurements to characterize the electron precipitation causing pulsating aurora and determine the effects of pulsating aurora on the theremosphere-mesosphere NO reservoir. The inferred precipitating electron distribution function is input to a model to calculate the expected NO enhancement for comparison with NO enhancements inferred from ground-based Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements. This problem is particularly important because NO produced at low enough altitudes can transport downward to the stratosphere and chemically react with ozone causing depletion. Therefore, this work is a vital first step in quantifying the auroral contribution to ozone depletion. Previous studies have shown that the auroral contribution to atmospheric chemistry can be significant, with up to 60% of ozone depletion enhancements (above background levels) at 35-40 km altitude due to energetic electron precipitation (Randall et al., 2005).

  12. Influence of auroral streamers on rapid evolution of SAPS flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo-Lacourt, B.; Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Donovan, E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Nishitani, N.

    2015-12-01

    An important manifestation of plasma transport in the ionosphere is Subauroral Polarization Streams or SAPS, which are strong westward flow lying just equatorward of the electron auroral oval and thus of enhanced ionospheric conductivities of the auroral oval. While SAPS are known to intensify due to substorm injections, recent studies showed that large variability of SAPS flow can occur well after substorm onset and even during non-substorm times. These SAPS enhancements have been suggested to occur in association with auroral streamers that propagate equatorward, a suggestion that would indicate that plasma sheet fast flows propagate into the inner magnetosphere and increase subauroral flows. We present auroral images from the THEMIS ground-based all-sky-imager array and 2-d line-of-sight flow observations from the SuperDARN radars that share fields of view with the imagers to investigate systematically the association between SAPS and auroral streamers. We surveyed events from December 2007 to April 2013 for which high or mid-latitude SuperDARN radars were available to measure the SAPS flows, and identified 60 events. For streamers observed near the equatorward boundary of the auroral oval, we find westward flow enhancements of ~200 m/s slightly equatorward of the streamers. A preliminary survey suggests that >90% of the streamers that reach close to the equatorward boundary lead to westward flow enhancements. We also characterize the SAPS flow channel width and timing relative to streamers reaching radar echo meridians. The strong influence of auroral streamers on rapid SAPS flow evolution suggests that transient fast earthward plasma sheet flows can lead to westward SAPS flow enhancements in the subauroral region, and that such enhancements are far more common than only during substorms because of the frequent occurrences of streamers under various geomagnetic conditions.

  13. Jupiter's auroral-related thermal infrared emission from IRTF-TEXES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, James; Orton, Glenn; Greathouse, Thomas; Fletcher, Leigh; Irwin, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Auroral processes on Jupiter can be observed at a large range of wavelengths. Charged particles of the solar wind are deflected by Jupiter’s magnetic field and penetrate the atmosphere at high latitudes. This results in ion and/or electron precipitation, which produces emission at X-ray, UV, visible, near-infrared and even radio wavelengths. These observations indicate three distinct features of the aurora: 1) filament-like oval structures fixed at the magnetic poles (~80°W (System III) in the south, ~180°W in the north), 2) spatially-continuous but transient aurora that fill these oval regions and 3) discrete spots associated with the magnetic footprints of Io and other Galilean satellites. However, observations in the thermal infrared indicate the aurora also modify the neutral atmosphere. Enhanced emission of CH4 is observed coincident with the auroral ovals and indicates heightened stratospheric temperatures possibly as a result of joule heating by the influx of charged particles. Stronger emission is also observed of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6 and even C6H6 though previous work has struggled to determine whether this is a temperature or compositional effect. In order to quantify the auroral effects on the neutral atmosphere and to support the 2016 Juno mission (which has no thermal infrared instrument) we have performed a retrieval analysis of IRTF-TEXES (Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph, 5- to 25-μm) spectra obtained on Dec 11th 2014 near solar maximum. The instrument slit was scanned east-west across high latitudes in each hemisphere and Jupiter’s rotation was used to obtain ~360° longitudinal coverage. Spectra of H2 S(1), CH4, C2H2, C2H4 and C2H6 emission were measured at a resolving power of R = 85000, allowing a large vertical range in the atmosphere (100 - 0.001 mbar) to be sounded. Preliminary retrievals of the vertical temperature profile from H2 S(1) and CH4 measurements at 60°N, 180°W (on aurora), in comparison to 60°N, 60°W (quiescent

  14. Data book for Auroral Electrojet indices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-12-01

    The auroral electrojet (AE) indices for the period after 1978 have been published by the World Data Center C2 for Geomagnetism which is operated by the Data Analysis Center for Geomagnetism and Space Magnetism, Faculty of Science, Kyoto University. The Center in publishing the AE indices for every half year on a WDC-C2 for Geomagnetism Data Book. So far the Center has published 7 Data Books for the indices. The AE indices from 1978 to 1981 are published on the Data Book No. 3 to 10 and No. 11 involves the indices for the first half of 1983. The reason why the indices for 1983 has been published prior to that for 1982 is that the analysis group of the ISEE-3 satellite data requested the advanced derivation of the AE indices during magnetotail crossing by the satellite, and the WDC-A for STP (boulder, Colorado) digitized magnetograms necessary for derivation of the indices for the period (October 1982 to December 1983). The Center is now deriving the provisional AE indices during the ISEE-3 tail crossing period. The same data were used for the Data Book No. 11 after usual quality check which was neglected in derivation of the provisional indices. After No. 8 printing and distribution of the Data Book for AE indices are made by National Institute of Polar Research, Tokyo.

  15. Rotational modulation of Saturn's auroral radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, L.

    2011-10-01

    Among the persistent questions raised by the existence of a rotational modulation of the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR), the origin of the variability of the 10.8 hours SKR period at a 1% level over weeks to years remains intriguing. While its short-term fluctuations (20-30 days) have been related to the variations of the solar wind speed, its long-term fluctuations (months to years) were proposed to be triggered by Enceladus mass-loading and/or seasonal variations. This situation has become even more complicated since the recent identification of two separated periods at 10.8h and 10.6h, each varying with time, corresponding to SKR sources located in the southern (S) and the northern (N) hemispheres, respectively. Here, six years of Cassini continuous radio measurements have been used to derive long-term radio periods and phase systems separately for each hemisphere 1. The S phase has then been used to investigate the S SKR rotational modulation (see Figure 1), shown to be consistent with an intrinsically rotating phenomenon, in contrast with the early Voyager picture, but in agreement with the diurnal modulation observed in other kronian auroral phenomena.

  16. Estimation of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions using satellite measurements of "proxy" species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Ciais, Philippe; Broquet, Grégoire; Zhuravlev, Ruslan V.; Janssens-Maenhout, Greet

    2016-11-01

    Fossil-fuel (FF) burning releases carbon dioxide (CO2) together with many other chemical species, some of which, such as nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and carbon monoxide (CO), are routinely monitored from space. This study examines the feasibility of estimation of FF CO2 emissions from large industrial regions by using NO2 and CO column retrievals from satellite measurements in combination with simulations by a mesoscale chemistry transport model (CTM). To this end, an inverse modeling method is developed that allows estimating FF CO2 emissions from different sectors of the economy, as well as the total CO2 emissions, in a given region. The key steps of the method are (1) inferring "top-down" estimates of the regional budget of anthropogenic NOx and CO emissions from satellite measurements of proxy species (NO2 and CO in the case considered) without using formal a priori constraints on these budgets, (2) the application of emission factors (the NOx-to-CO2 and CO-to-CO2 emission ratios in each sector) that relate FF CO2 emissions to the proxy species emissions and are evaluated by using data of "bottom-up" emission inventories, and (3) cross-validation and optimal combination of the estimates of CO2 emission budgets derived from measurements of the different proxy species. Uncertainties in the top-down estimates of the NOx and CO emissions are evaluated and systematic differences between the measured and simulated data are taken into account by using original robust techniques validated with synthetic data. To examine the potential of the method, it was applied to the budget of emissions for a western European region including 12 countries by using NO2 and CO column amounts retrieved from, respectively, the OMI and IASI satellite measurements and simulated by the CHIMERE mesoscale CTM, along with the emission conversion factors based on the EDGAR v4.2 emission inventory. The analysis was focused on evaluation of the uncertainty levels for the top-down NOx and CO emission

  17. Altitude dependence of plasma density in the auroral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    Full Text Available We study the altitude dependence of plasma depletions above the auroral region in the 5000–30 000 km altitude range using five years of Polar spacecraft potential data. We find that besides a general decrease of plasma density with altitude, there frequently exist additional density depletions at 2–4 RE radial distance, where RE is the Earth radius. The position of the depletions tends to move to higher altitude when the ionospheric footpoint is sunlit as compared to darkness. Apart from these cavities at 2–4 RE radial distance, separate cavities above 4 RE occur in the midnight sector for all Kp and also in the morning sector for high Kp. In the evening sector our data remain inconclusive in this respect. This holds for the ILAT range 68–74. These additional depletions may be substorm-related. Our study shows that auroral phenomena modify the plasma density in the auroral region in such a way that a nontrivial and interesting altitude variation results, which reflects the nature of the auroral acceleration processes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere–ionosphere interactions

  18. A linear auroral current-voltage relation in fluid theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Vedin

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Progress in our understanding of auroral currents and auroral electron acceleration has for decades been hampered by an apparent incompatibility between kinetic and fluid models of the physics involved. A well established kinetic model predicts that steady upward field-aligned currents should be linearly related to the potential drop along the field line, but collisionless fluid models that reproduce this linear current-voltage relation have not been found. Using temperatures calculated from the kinetic model in the presence of an upward auroral current, we construct here approximants for the parallel and perpendicular temperatures. Although our model is rather simplified, we find that the fluid equations predict a realistic large-scale parallel electric field and a linear current-voltage relation when these approximants are employed as nonlocal equations of state. This suggests that the concepts we introduce can be applied to the development of accurate equations of state for fluid simulations of auroral flux tubes.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory

  19. Summary of Quantitative Interpretation of Image Far Ultraviolet Auroral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, H. U.; Immel, T. J.; Mende, S. B.; Gerard, J.-C.; Hubert, B.; Habraken, S.; Span, J.; Gladstone, G. R.; Bisikalo, D. V.; Shematovich, V. I.; hide

    2002-01-01

    Direct imaging of the magnetosphere by instruments on the IMAGE spacecraft is supplemented by simultaneous observations of the global aurora in three far ultraviolet (FUV) wavelength bands. The purpose of the multi-wavelength imaging is to study the global auroral particle and energy input from thc magnetosphere into the atmosphere. This paper describes provides the method for quantitative interpretation of FUV measurements. The Wide-Band Imaging Camera (WIC) provides broad band ultraviolet images of the aurora with maximum spatial and temporal resolution by imaging the nitrogen lines and bands between 140 and 180 nm wavelength. The Spectrographic Imager (SI), a dual wavelength monochromatic instrument, images both Doppler-shifted Lyman alpha emissions produced by precipitating protons, in the SI-12 channel and OI 135.6 nm emissions in the SI-13 channel. From the SI-12 Doppler shifted Lyman alpha images it is possible to obtain the precipitating proton flux provided assumptions are made regarding the mean energy of the protons. Knowledge of the proton (flux and energy) component allows the calculation of the contribution produced by protons in the WIC and SI-13 instruments. Comparison of the corrected WIC and SI-13 signals provides a measure of the electron mean energy, which can then be used to determine the electron energy fluxun-. To accomplish this reliable modeling emission modeling and instrument calibrations are required. In-flight calibration using early-type stars was used to validate the pre-flight laboratory calibrations and determine long-term trends in sensitivity. In general, very reasonable agreement is found between in-situ measurements and remote quantitative determinations.

  20. Nonlinear interactions of electromagnetic waves with the auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Alfred Y.

    1999-09-01

    The ionosphere provides us with an opportunity to perform plasma experiments in an environment with long confinement times, very large-scale lengths, and no confining walls. The auroral ionosphere with its nearly vertical magnetic field geometry is uniquely endowed with large amount of free energy from electron and ion precipitation along the magnetic field and mega-ampere current across the magnetic field. To take advantage of this giant outdoor laboratory, two facilities HAARP and HIPAS, with frequencies ranging from the radio to optical bands, are now available for active probing of and interaction with this interesting region. The ponderomotive pressures from the self-consistent wave fields have produced significant local perturbations of density and particle distributions at heights where the incident EM frequency matches a plasma resonance. This paper will review theory and experiments covering the nonlinear phenomena of parametric decay instability to wave collapse processes. At HF frequencies plasma lenses can be created by preconditioning pulses to focus what is a normally divergent beam into a high-intensity spot to further enhance nonlinear phenomena. At optical wavelengths a large rotating liquid metal mirror is used to focus laser pulses up to a given height. Such laser pulses are tuned to the same wavelengths of selected atomic and molecular resonances, with resulting large scattering cross sections. Ongoing experiments on dual-site experiments and excitation of ELF waves will be presented. The connection of such basic studies to environmental applications will be discussed. Such applications include the global communication using ELF waves, the ozone depletion and remediation and the control of atmospheric CO2 through the use of ion cyclotron resonant heating.

  1. Space Weather Monitoring for ISS Space Environments Engineering and Crew Auroral Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph; Pettit, Donald R.; Hartman, William A.

    2012-01-01

    Today s presentation describes how real time space weather data is used by the International Space Station (ISS) space environments team to obtain data on auroral charging of the ISS vehicle and support ISS crew efforts to obtain auroral images from orbit. Topics covered include: Floating Potential Measurement Unit (FPMU), . Auroral charging of ISS, . Real ]time space weather monitoring resources, . Examples of ISS auroral charging captured from space weather events, . ISS crew observations of aurora.

  2. Auroral electrojets and boundaries of plasma domains in the magnetosphere during magnetically disturbed intervals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Feldstein

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate variations in the location and intensity of the auroral electrojets during magnetic storms and substorms using a numerical method for estimating the equivalent ionospheric currents based on data from meridian chains of magnetic observatories. Special attention was paid to the complex structure of the electrojets and their interrelationship with diffuse and discrete particle precipitation and field-aligned currents in the dusk sector. During magnetospheric substorms the eastward electrojet (EE location in the evening sector changes with local time from cusp latitudes (Φ~77° during early afternoon to latitudes of diffuse auroral precipitation (Φ~65° equatorward of the auroral oval before midnight. During the main phase of an intense magnetic storm the eastward currents in the noon-early evening sector adjoin to the cusp at Φ~65° and in the pre-midnight sector are located at subauroral latitude Φ~57°. The westward electrojet (WE is located along the auroral oval from evening through night to the morning sector and adjoins to the polar electrojet (PE located at cusp latitudes in the dayside sector. The integrated values of the eastward (westward equivalent ionospheric current during the intense substorm are ~0.5 MA (~1.5 MA, whereas they are 0.7 MA (3.0 MA during the storm main phase maximum. The latitudes of auroral particle precipitation in the dusk sector are identical with those of both electrojets. The EE in the evening sector is accompanied by particle precipitation mainly from the Alfvén layer but also from the near-Earth part of the central plasma sheet. In the lower-latitude part of the EE the field-aligned currents (FACs flow into the ionosphere (Region 2 FAC, and at its higher-latitude part the FACs flow out of the ionosphere (Region 1 FAC. During intense disturbances, in addition to the Region 2 FAC and the Region 1 FAC, a Region 3 FAC with the downward current was identified. This FAC is accompanied by diffuse

  3. Surface energy balance and actual evapotranspiration of the transboundary Indus Basin estimated from satellite measurements and the ETLook model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastiaansen, W.G.M.; Cheema, M.J.M.; Immerzeel, W.W.; Miltenburg, I.J.; Pelgrum, H.

    2012-01-01

    The surface energy fluxes and related evapotranspiration processes across the Indus Basin were estimated for the hydrological year 2007 using satellite measurements. The new ETLook remote sensing model (version 1) infers information on actual Evaporation (E) and actual Transpiration (T) from combine

  4. Calculation of smoke plume mass from passive UV satellite measurements by GOME-2 polarization measurement devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning de Vries, M. J. M.; Tuinder, O. N. E.; Wagner, T.; Fromm, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Wallow wildfire of 2011 was one of the most devastating fires ever in Arizona, burning over 2,000 km2 in the states of Arizona and New Mexico. The fire originated in the Bear Wallow Wilderness area in June, 2011, and raged for more than a month. The intense heat of the fire caused the formation of a pyro-convective cloud. The resulting smoke plume, partially located above low-lying clouds, was detected by several satellite instruments, including GOME-2 on June 2. The UV Aerosol Index, indicative of aerosol absorption, reached a maximum of 12 on that day, pointing to an elevated plume with moderately absorbing aerosols. We have performed extensive model calculations assuming different aerosol optical properties to determine the total aerosol optical depth of the plume. The plume altitude, needed to constrain the aerosol optical depth, was obtained from independent satellite measurements. The model results were compared with UV Aerosol Index and UV reflectances measured by the GOME-2 polarization measurement devices, which have a spatial resolution of roughly 10x40 km2. Although neither the exact aerosol optical properties nor optical depth can be obtained with this method, the range in aerosol optical depth values that we calculate, combined with the assumed specific extinction mass factor of 5 m2/kg lead us to a rough estimate of the smoke plume mass that cannot, at present, be assessed in another way.

  5. Computer-aided evaluation of the railway track geometry on the basis of satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Cezary; Koc, Władysław; Chrostowski, Piotr

    2016-05-01

    In recent years, all over the world there has been a period of intensive development of GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) measurement techniques and their extension for the purpose of their applications in the field of surveying and navigation. Moreover, in many countries a rising trend in the development of rail transportation systems has been noticed. In this paper, a method of railway track geometry assessment based on mobile satellite measurements is presented. The paper shows the implementation effects of satellite surveying railway geometry. The investigation process described in the paper is divided on two phases. The first phase is the GNSS mobile surveying and the analysis obtained data. The second phase is the analysis of the track geometry using the flat coordinates from the surveying. The visualization of the measured route, separation and quality assessment of the uniform geometric elements (straight sections, arcs), identification of the track polygon (main directions and intersection angles) are discussed and illustrated by the calculation example within the article.

  6. A New Satellite Measurement Capability for Assessing Damage to Crops from Regional Scale Ozone Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, J. J.; Creilson, J. K.; Parker, P. A.; Ainsworth, E. A.; Vining, G. G.; Szarka, J. L.

    2009-05-01

    High concentrations of ground-level ozone are frequently measured over farmland regions in many parts of the world. Since laboratory data show that ozone can significantly impact crop productivity if levels above a threshold concentration are reached, there is a consensus that crop yield should be impacted now and that the effects will become even more detrimental as global background concentrations continue to rise, as suggested by the latest IPCC report. Using the long-term record of tropospheric ozone derived from satellite measurements (http://asd-www.larc.nasa.gov/TOR/data.html), we present a methodology that can be used to assess the impact of regional ozone pollution on crop productivity. In this study, we use soybean crop yield data during a 5-year period over the Midwest of the United States and analyze the results using multiple linear regression statistical models. The results are consistent with findings using conventional ground-based measurements and with results obtained from an open-air experimental facility SoyFACE (Soybean Free Air Concentration Enrichment) in central Illinois. Our analysis suggests that the cost to the farmers globally is substantial, and supports other studies that calculate an economic loss to the farming community of more than 10 billion dollars annually.

  7. Spatial variability of the Black Sea surface temperature from high resolution modeling and satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizyuk, Artem; Senderov, Maxim; Korotaev, Gennady

    2016-04-01

    Large number of numerical ocean models were implemented for the Black Sea basin during last two decades. They reproduce rather similar structure of synoptical variability of the circulation. Since 00-s numerical studies of the mesoscale structure are carried out using high performance computing (HPC). With the growing capacity of computing resources it is now possible to reconstruct the Black Sea currents with spatial resolution of several hundreds meters. However, how realistic these results can be? In the proposed study an attempt is made to understand which spatial scales are reproduced by ocean model in the Black Sea. Simulations are made using parallel version of NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean). A two regional configurations with spatial resolutions 5 km and 2.5 km are described. Comparison of the SST from simulations with two spatial resolutions shows rather qualitative difference of the spatial structures. Results of high resolution simulation are compared also with satellite observations and observation-based products from Copernicus using spatial correlation and spectral analysis. Spatial scales of correlations functions for simulated and observed SST are rather close and differs much from satellite SST reanalysis. Evolution of spectral density for modelled SST and reanalysis showed agreed time periods of small scales intensification. Using of the spectral analysis for satellite measurements is complicated due to gaps. The research leading to this results has received funding from Russian Science Foundation (project № 15-17-20020)

  8. Surface net solar radiation estimated from satellite measurements - Comparisons with tower observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, H. G.; Cess, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    A parameterization that relates the reflected solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the net solar flux at the surface in terms of only the column water vapor amount and the solar zenith angle was tested against surface observations. Net surface fluxes deduced from coincidental collocated satellite-measured radiances and from measurements from towers in Boulder during summer and near Saskatoon in winter have mean differences of about 2 W/sq m, regardless of whether the sky is clear or cloudy. Furthermore, comparisons between the net fluxes deduced from the parameterization and from surface measurements showed equally good agreement when the data were partitioned into morning and afternoon observations. This is in contrast to results from an empirical clear-sky algorithm that is unable to account adequately for the effects of clouds and that shows, at Boulder, a distinct morning to afternoon variation. It is also demonstrated that the parameterization may be applied to irradiances at the top of the atmosphere that have been temporally averaged. The good agreement between the results of the parameterization and surface measurements suggests that the algorithm is a useful tool for a variety of climate studies.

  9. Vertical Profiles of Aerosol Optical Properties Over Central Illinois and Comparison with Surface and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan P. J.; Andrews, E.; Ogren, J A.; Tackett, J. L.; Winker, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Between June 2006 and September 2009, an instrumented light aircraft measured over 400 vertical profiles of aerosol and trace gas properties over eastern and central Illinois. The primary objectives of this program were to (1) measure the in situ aerosol properties and determine their vertical and temporal variability and (2) relate these aircraft measurements to concurrent surface and satellite measurements. Underflights of the CALIPSO satellite show reasonable agreement in a majority of retrieved profiles between aircraft-measured extinction at 532 nm (adjusted to ambient relative humidity) and CALIPSO-retrieved extinction, and suggest that routine aircraft profiling programs can be used to better understand and validate satellite retrieval algorithms. CALIPSO tended to overestimate the aerosol extinction at this location in some boundary layer flight segments when scattered or broken clouds were present, which could be related to problems with CALIPSO cloud screening methods. The in situ aircraft-collected aerosol data suggest extinction thresholds for the likelihood of aerosol layers being detected by the CALIOP lidar. These statistical data offer guidance as to the likelihood of CALIPSO's ability to retrieve aerosol extinction at various locations around the globe.

  10. Surface Net Solar Radiation Estimated from Satellite Measurements: Comparisons with Tower Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, H. G.; Cess, Robert D.

    1993-01-01

    A parameterization that relates the reflected solar flux at the top of the atmosphere to the net solar flux at the surface in terms of only the column water vapor amount and the solar zenith angle was tested against surface observations. Net surface fluxes deduced from coincidental collocated satellite-measured radiances and from measurements from towers in Boulder during summer and near Saskatoon in winter have mean differences of about 2 W/sq m, regardless of whether the sky is clear or cloudy. Furthermore, comparisons between the net fluxes deduced from the parameterization and from surface measurements showed equally good agreement when the data were partitioned into morning and afternoon observations. This is in contrast to results from an empirical clear-sky algorithm that is unable to account adequately for the effects of clouds and that shows, at Boulder, a distinct morning to afternoon variation, which is presumably due to the predominance of different cloud types throughout the day. It is also demonstrated that the parameterization may be applied to irradiances at the top of the atmosphere that have been temporally averaged by using the temporally averaged column water vapor amount and the temporally averaged cosine of the solar zenith angle. The good agreement between the results of the parameterization and surface measurements suggests that the algorithm is a useful tool for a variety of climate studies.

  11. An Analysis of the Composition of Auroral Emissions in the Near Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    and (c) are for Q=O,3, and 7 respectively. The mean auroral oval is similar to (b). (after Starkov and Feldstein, 1968). The reason for the auroral...Solar Spectrum, But. Astr. Inst. Neth., 17, 325, 1964. Starkov , G. V., and Y. I. Feldstein, Auroral Oval and it’s Dependence on Magnetic Disturbance

  12. The Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy (APIS) service

    CERN Document Server

    Lamy, Laurent; Henry, Florence; Sidaner, Pierre Le

    2015-01-01

    The Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy (APIS) service, accessible online, provides an open and interactive access to processed auroral observations of the outer planets and their satellites. Such observations are of interest for a wide community at the interface between planetology and magnetospheric and heliospheric physics. APIS consists of (i) a high level database, built from planetary auroral observations acquired by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since 1997 with its mostly used Far-UltraViolet spectro-imagers, (ii) a dedicated search interface aimed at browsing efficiently this database through relevant conditional search criteria and (iii) the ability to interactively work with the data online through plotting tools developed by the Virtual Observatory (VO) community, such as Aladin and Specview. This service is VO compliant and can therefore also been queried by external search tools of the VO community. The diversity of available data and the capability to sort them out by relevant physical...

  13. Auroral Kilometric Radiation and Type III Solar Radio Bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romantsova, T. V.; Mogilevsky, M. M.; Skalsky, A. A.; Hanasz, J.

    2009-04-01

    Simultaneous wave observations onboard the ISEE-1 and ISEE-3 spacecraft show that onsets of the Auroral Kilometric Radiation frequently coincide with an arrival of type III solar burst (Calvert, 1981). It was supposed that solar burst stimulates maser instability in auroral region and AKR consequently . We present statistical and case studies of events when both type III solar radio bursts and Auroral Kilometric Radiation are recorded simultaneously. AKR was observed onboard the INTERBALL-2 spacecraft orbiting around the Earth by the POLRAD experiment. Wave measurements carried out onboard the Wind, INTEBALL-TAIL and Geotail spacecraft are used to identify unambiguously the type III solar radio bursts. The origin of close relation between onsets of both solar radiation and AKR is discussed and interpreted. Acknowledgements. This work is supported by grant RFBR 06-02-72560.

  14. Analysis of Upper Hybrid Wave Growth Rates From Measured Electron Distributions; An Encounter With the Source of Auroral Roar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bounds, S. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Labelle, J. W.; Samara, M.; Yoon, P. H.

    2005-12-01

    In January of 2003, the High Bandwidth Auroral Rocket (HIBAR) passed through two regions of strong upper hybrid wave emission associated with the approximate matching of the upper hybrid frequency to twice the electron cyclotron frequency (fuh = 2 fce) (Samara 2004) These types of emission are believed to be the source of the HF auroral roar often observed by ground based receivers. The current model theorizes that the free space 0-mode waves observed on the ground are produced through mode conversion of strong emission of Z-mode, or upper hybrid waves. The relativistic electron cyclotron maser exhibits significant growth rates for the Z-mode when the local upper hybrid frequency is just below (~1%) twice the electron cyclotron frequency and with the appropriately unstable electron distribution (Yoon 1996, Yoon 1998, Yoon 2000). Though auroral roar is frequently observed from the ground, the source region has rarely been identified in-situ and even more rarely with sufficient bandwidth to analyze the underlying physical processes. Analysis of the electron distributions from HIBAR show good agreement with the theoretical distributions used by Yoon:98. HIBAR encountered three separate regions where fuh ≍ 2 fce, two of these regions include strong upper hybrid emission, while the third is void of upper hybrid wave activity. The measured particle distributions demonstrate that, in the two regions with wave emission, the relativistic electron cyclotron maser instability produces Z mode wave growth rates at least an order of magnitude greater than the electron collision frequency. In the third region without wave emission, the growth rates are much smaller in both amplitude and the extent of occurance. Samara, M., J. LaBelle, C. A. Kletzing, and S. R. Bounds, Rocket observations of structured upper hybrid wave at fuh=2fce, Geophys. Res. Lett., 31, L22804, doi:10.1029/2004GL021043. Yoon, P. H., A. T. Weatherwax, and T. J. Rosenberg, Lower ionospheric cyclotron maser

  15. Analysis of auroral infrared emissions observed during the ELIAS experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Caledonia

    Full Text Available The ELIAS (Earth Limb Infrared Atmospheric Structure experiment was flown from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska in 1983 and successfully monitored visible and infrared emissions from an IBC III+ aurora. Measurements were performed in both staring and scanning modes over several hundred seconds. The data for short- and mid-wave infrared regions have been analyzed in terms of auroral excitation of the NO and NO+ vibrational bands. Auroral excitation efficiencies and kinetic implications are presented.

  16. Fine Scale Structure observed in the Total Electron Content above the Sub-Auroral, Auroral, and Polar Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, A. J.; Thomas, E. G.; Vierinen, J.; Rideout, W. E.

    2015-12-01

    This paper details recent improvements in TEC observations made in the sub-auroral, auroral, and polar regions. The goal is high-resolution measurements of both medium and fine-scale TEC-gradients. To achieve this, the number of GNSS receivers processed was more than doubled, due to agreements made with multiple government and commercial agencies, such as those involved with highway transportation and precision farming. Following the increase in GNSS observations, additional improvements were made in the MIT Haystack GNSS data processing algorithms, allowing for finer grid spacing of the output TEC data. Merging data sets also increased sensitivity. Scintillation data from several GNSS receivers have been overlaid on top of all-sky camera images showing evidence of aurora. These data sets have been merged with the measured background TEC to monitor the development both medium and fine-scale TEC gradients. Data from multiple geomagnetic storms and auroral events in this solar cycle will be presented.

  17. EISCAT observations of plasma patches at sub-auroral cusp latitudes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A sequence of 3 patches of high-density (1012 m−3 cold plasma on a horizontal scale-size of 300–700 km was observed near magnetic noon by the EISCAT VHF radar above Svalbard on 17 December 2001. The patches followed a trajectory towards the cusp inflow region. The combination of radar and all-sky observations demonstrates that the patches must have been segmented equatorward of the cusp/cleft auroral display, and hence their properties had not yet been influenced by cusp particle showers and electrodynamics on open flux tubes. The last patch in the sequence was intersected by radio tomography observations, and was found to be located adjacent to a broader region of the same high electron density further south. The patches occurred under moderately active conditions (Kp=3 and the total electron content (TEC of the high-density plasma was 45 TEC units. The train of patches appeared as a segmentation of the tongue of ionization. The sequence of patches occurred in association with a sequence of flow bursts in the dusk cell return flow. It is proposed that reconnection driven pulsed convection is able to create sub-auroral patches in the region where high density mid-latitude plasma is diverted poleward toward the cusp. It is the downward Birkeland current sheet located at the equatorward boundary of the flow disturbance that represents the actual cutting mechanism.

  18. Seasonal variations of Saturn's auroral acceleration region deduced from spectra of auroral radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, T.; Lamy, L.; Tao, C.; Badman, S. V.; Cecconi, B.; Zarka, P.; Morioka, A.; Miyoshi, Y.; Kasaba, Y.; Maruno, D.; Fujimoto, M.

    2012-09-01

    Multi-instrumental surveys of Saturn's magnetosphere by Cassini have indicated that auroral radio emissions (Saturnian Kilometric Radiation, SKR), aurorae at UV and IR wavelengths and Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) from the inner magnetosphere exhibit periodic behavior at around Saturn's rotational period with the north-south asymmetry and seasonal variations [e.g., Gurnett et al., 2010; Mitchell et al., 2009; Nichols et al., 2010]. These rotationally periodic phenomena are suggestive of distinct magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling current systems, rotating at different periods in the northern and southern hemispheres [e.g., Andrews et al., 2010]. These phenomena suggest that the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling process and associated energy dissipation process (aurora & SKR) are dynamically dependent on both magnetospheric rotations and long-term conditions of the magnetosphere/ionosphere.

  19. Bowie Lecture: The Record of Sea Level Change from Satellite Measurements: What Have We Learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerem, R. S.

    2005-12-01

    Over the last decade, satellite geodetic measurements together with in situ measurements, have revolutionized our understanding of present-day sea level change. This is important because sea level change can be used as one barometer of climate variations and because of the implications sea level change has for coastal populations. With measurements from satellite altimeter missions (TOPEX/Posiedon and Jason), satellite gravity missions (GRACE), and the Global Positioning System (GPS), we are now able to start asking some important questions with regards to global sea level change and its regional variations. What has been the rate of global mean sea level change over the last dozen years? Is this rate different from the historical rate observed by the tide gauges over the last century? What are the principal causes of the observed sea level change, and are they related to anthropogenic climate variations? The record of sea level change from satellite altimetry will be reviewed, its error sources and limitations discussed, and the results placed in context with other estimates of sea level change from tide gauges, in situ measurements, and global climate models. The much shorter, but just as important, record of ocean mass variations from satellite gravity measurements will be similarly reviewed. In addition, GPS measurements of the deformation of the solid Earth due to the melting of continental ice and what they tell us about sea level change will be discussed. A sea level change budget will be presented, both for the altimetric era and the last century, containing estimates of contributions from thermal expansion, ocean mass changes (melting ice, runoff, etc.), and other contributions to sea level change. Finally, the need for continuing the satellite measurements of sea level change will be discussed in the context of future missions and the scientific gain that would result.

  20. Improving knowledge of the surface salinity annual cycle with Aquarius satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerloef, G. S. E.

    2016-12-01

    To improve knowledge of the ocean surface salinity annual cycle, and its link to global precipitation patterns, remains a key science measurement objective for satellites. The Aquarius satellite data are applied here to address this, and the analysis is not as straightforward as it may seem. Sensor calibration is considered carefully to ensure that seasonality in external calibration data sources do not alias the satellite measurements. For example, quasi-monthly calibration error signals were identified early in the Aquarius mission. Subsequently, Aquarius data processing has relied primarily on an ocean target calibration method, whereby the satellite observations were co-located with output from the US Navy operational HYCOM model to adjust for these quasi-monthly calibration drifts. It was later determined that HYCOM salinity fields are themselves adjusted with a climatological restoring term, that imprints the seasonal climatology signal on the sensor calibration. When that output is compared with a parallel Aquarius data processing that bypasses the HYCOM ocean target calibration, and substitutes a simulation of the sensor electronics, the globally averaged output show very different annual signals between these trials. A modified ocean-target calibration, that employs satellite data matched directly with the in situ observations, is presently being investigated. The methodology uses signal processing to separate the satellite-in situ differences related to the sensor calibration from geophysical error sources. This remains a work-in-progress, and the results, with any unresolved issues, will be discussed. The presentation will also provide a very brief summary of Aquarius scientific accomplishments, the final "legacy" data set production, and the program to continue salinity data processing from other satellites.

  1. Resonant scattering of plasma sheet electrons leading to diffuse auroral precipitation: 1. Evaluation for electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Binbin; Thorne, Richard M.; Horne, Richard B.; Meredith, Nigel P.; Shprits, Yuri Y.; Chen, Lunjin; Li, Wen

    2011-04-01

    Using statistical wave power spectral profiles obtained from CRRES and the latitudinal distributions of wave propagation modeled by the HOTRAY code, a quantitative analysis has been performed on the scattering of plasma sheet electrons into the diffuse auroral zone by multiband electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) emissions near L = 6 within the 0000-0600 MLT sector. The results show that ECH wave scattering of plasma sheet electrons varies from near the strong diffusion rate (timescale of an hour or less) during active times with peak wave amplitudes of an order of 1 mV/m to very weak scattering (on the timescale of >1 day) during quiet conditions with typical wave amplitudes of tenths of mV/m. However, for the low-energy (˜100 eV to below 2 keV) electron population mainly associated with the diffuse auroral emission, ECH waves are only responsible for rapid pitch angle diffusion (occasionally near the limit of strong diffusion) for a small portion of the electron population with pitch angles αeq 70°. Computations of the bounce-averaged coefficients of momentum diffusion and (pitch angle, momentum) mixed diffusion indicate that both mixed diffusion and energy diffusion of plasma sheet electrons due to ECH waves are very small compared to pitch angle diffusion and that ECH waves have little effect on local electron acceleration. Consequently, the multiple harmonic ECH emissions cannot play a dominant role in the occurrence of diffuse auroral precipitation near L = 6, and other wave-particle interaction mechanisms, such as whistler mode chorus-driven resonant scattering, are required to explain the global distribution of diffuse auroral precipitation and the formation of the pancake distribution in the inner magnetosphere.

  2. First results of the Auroral Turbulance II rocket experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielides, M.A.; Ranta, A.; Ivchenco, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Auroral Turbulance II sounding rocket was launched on February 11, 1997 into moderately active nightside aurora from the Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska, US. The experiment consisted of three independent, completely instrumented payloads launched by a single vehicle. The aim of the experiment...

  3. Atmospheric Pressure and Velocity Fluctuations Near the Auroral Electrojet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-15

    various aspects of the atmosphere’s dynamical response to auroral activity have been carried out by Blumen and Hendl (1969), Testud (1970), Francis...Geophys. Res. 80, 2839, 1975. Testud , 3., Gravity waves generated during magnetic substorms, 3. Atmos. Terr. Phys. 32, 1793, 1970. Waco, D. E., A

  4. Relation of the auroral substorm to the substorm current wedge

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherron, Robert L.; Chu, Xiangning

    2016-12-01

    The auroral substorm is an organized sequence of events seen in the aurora near midnight. It is a manifestation of the magnetospheric substorm which is a disturbance of the magnetosphere brought about by the solar wind transfer of magnetic flux from the dayside to the tail lobes and its return through the plasma sheet to the dayside. The most dramatic feature of the auroral substorm is the sudden brightening and poleward expansion of the aurora. Intimately associated with this expansion is a westward electrical current flowing across the bulge of expanding aurora. This current is fed by a downward field-aligned current (FAC) at its eastern edge and an upward current at its western edge. This current system is called the substorm current wedge (SCW). The SCW forms within a minute of auroral expansion. FAC are created by pressure gradients and field line bending from shears in plasma flow. Both of these are the result of pileup and diversion of plasma flows in the near-earth plasma sheet. The origins of these flows are reconnection sites further back in the tail. The auroral expansion can be explained by a combination of a change in field line mapping caused by the substorm current wedge and a tailward growth of the outer edge of the pileup region. We illustrate this scenario with a complex substorm and discuss some of the problems associated with this interpretation.

  5. Eyewitness Reports of the Great Auroral Storm of 1859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.; Boardsen, Scott; Odenwald, Sten; Humble, John; Pazamickas, Katherine A.

    2005-01-01

    The great geomagnetic storm of 1859 is really composed of two closely spaced massive worldwide auroral events. The first event began on August 28th and the second began on September 2nd. It is the storm on September 2nd that results from the Carrington-Hodgson white light flare that occurred on the sun September l&. In addition to published scientific measurements; newspapers, ship logs and other records of that era provide an untapped wealth of first hand observations giving time and location along with reports of the auroral forms and colors. At its height, the aurora was described as a blood or deep crimson red that was so bright that one "could read a newspaper by." Several important aspects of this great geomagnetic storm are simply phenomenal. Auroral forms of all types and colors were observed to latitudes of 25deg and lower. A significant portion of the world's 125,000 miles of telegraph lines were also adversely affected. Many of - which were unusable for 8 hours or more and had a small but notable economic impact. T h s paper presents only a select few available first hand accounts of the Great Auroral Event of 1859 in an attempt to give the modern reader a sense of how this spectacular display was received by the public from many places around the globe and present some other important historical aspects of the storm.

  6. Interhemispheric asymmetries in the occurrence of magnetically conjugate sub-auroral polarisation streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Earthward injections of energetic ions and electrons mark the onset of magnetospheric substorms. In the inner magnetosphere (L${sim}$4, the energetic ions drift westward and the electrons eastward, thereby enhancing the equatorial ring current. Wave-particle interactions can accelerate these particles to radiation belt energies. The ions are injected slightly closer to Earth in the pre-midnight sector, leading to the formation of a radial polarisation field in the inner magnetosphere. This maps to a poleward electric field just equatorward of the auroral oval in the ionosphere. The poleward electric field is subsequently amplified by ionospheric feedback, thereby producing auroral westward flow channels (AWFCs. In terms of electric field strength, AWFCs are the strongest manifestation of substorms in the ionosphere. Because geomagnetic flux tubes are essentially equi-potentials, similar AWFC signatures should be observed simultaneously in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Here we present magnetically conjugate SuperDARN radar observations of AWFC activity observed in the pre-midnight sector during two substorm intervals including multiple onsets during the evening of 30 November 2002. The Northern Hemisphere observations were made with the Japanese radar located at King Salmon, Alaska (57$^{circ}$$Lambda $, and the Southern Hemisphere observations with the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER located at Bruny Island, Tasmania (

  7. Observations of transverse ion acceleration in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garbe, G.P.; Arnoldy, R.L. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham (United States)); Moore, T.E. (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States)); Kintner, P.M.; Vago, J.L. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States))

    1992-02-01

    Data obtained from a sounding rocket flight which reached an apogee of 927 km and passed through several auroral arcs are reported. During portions of the flight when the rocket was not in an energetic auroral structure, the ion data are fit to a Maxwellian function which yields the plasma parameters. Throughout the middle portion of the flight when above 700 km altitude, ion distributions having a superthermal tail were measured. These ion distributions generally coexisted with a cold thermal core distribution and peaked at pitch angles slightly greater than 90{degree}, which identifies them as conic distributions. These ions can be modeled using a bi-Maxwellian distribution function with a perpendicular (to B) temperature about 10 times greater than the parallel temperature of 0.15 eV. When the rocket was immersed in energetic auroral electron precipitation, two other ion distributions were observed. Transversely accelerated ions which represented bulk heating of the ambient population were observed. Transversely accelerated ions which represented bulk heating of the ambient population were observed continuously in these arcs. The characteristic perpendicular energy of the transversely bulk heated ions reached as high as 3 eV compared to typically less than 0.4 eV during nonauroral times. Cold ions flowing down the magnetic field were also continuously observed when the rocket was immersed in auroral electron precipitation and had downward speeds between 3 and 5 km/s. If one balances electric and collisional forces, these speeds translate to an electric field pointing into the atmosphere of magnitude 0.01 mV/m. A close correlation between auroral electron precipitation, measured electrostatic oxygen cyclotron waves, cold downflowing ions and transversely bulk heated ions will be shown.

  8. Global Characterization of Biomass-Burning Patterns using Satellite Measurements of Fire Radiative Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichoku, Charles; Giglio, Louis; Wooster, Martin J.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2008-01-01

    Remote sensing is the most practical means of measuring energy release from large open-air biomass burning. Satellite measurement of fire radiative energy (FRE) release rate or power (FRP) enables distinction between fires of different strengths. Based on a 1-km resolution fire data acquired globally by the MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensor aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites from 2000 to 2006, instanteaneous FRP values ranged between 0.02 MW and 1866 MW, with global daily means ranging between 20 and 40 MW. Regionally, at the Aqua-MODIS afternoon overpass, the mean FRP values for Alaska, Western US, Western Australia, Quebec and the rest of Canada are significantly higher than these global means, with Quebec having the overall highest value of 85 MW. Analysis of regional mean FRP per unit area of land (FRP flux) shows that a peak fire season in certain regions, fires can be responsible for up to 0.2 W/m(sup 2) at peak time of day. Zambia has the highest regional monthly mean FRP flux of approximately 0.045 W/m(sup 2) at peak time of day and season, while the Middle East has the lowest value of approximately 0.0005 W/m(sup 2). A simple scheme based on FRP has been devised to classify fires into five categories, to facilitate fire rating by strength, similar to earthquakes and hurricanes. The scheme uses MODIS measurements of FRP at 1-km resolution as follows: catagory 1 (less than 100 MW), category 2 (100 to less than 500 MW), category 3 (500 to less than 1000 MW), category 4 (1000 to less than 1500 MW), catagory 5 (greater than or equal to 1500 MW). In most regions of the world, over 90% of fires fall into category 1, while only less than 1% fall into each of categories 3 to 5, although these proportions may differ significantly from day to day and by season. The frequency of occurence of the larger fires is region specific, and could not be explained by ecosystem type alone. Time-series analysis of the propertions of higher category

  9. Auroral oval during a slightly disturbed period: electrodynamics of the midnight sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinin, E.M.; Izrailevich, P.L.; Kuz' min, A.K.; Nikolaeva, N.S.; Podgornyi, I.M.; Zaitsev, A.N.; Petrov, V.G.

    1987-09-01

    The authors present the results of measurements made on the satellite Interkosmos Bolgariya-1300: the measurements were of magnetic and electric fields, luminescence of the upper atmosphere, and the flux of precipitating particles near the midnight meridian. They compare the satellite data with magnetograms obtained simultaneously with ground stations. In the auroral zone, there exists a system of parallel plane sheets of field-aligned current. The sheets are elongated along bands of luminescence which coincide with them. Inside the current system, the plasma drifts eastward along the current sheets with a speed of several kilometers per second. The drift direction is in good agreement with the direction of the equivalent currents determined on the basis of the groundbased magnetograms. The position of the westward ionospheric Hall current agrees well with the position of the system of field-aligned currents. The maximum Hall current is situated between the major field-aligned currents.

  10. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vago, J.L.

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this thesis, the author demonstrates that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements discussed were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at altitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. The results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse.

  11. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vago, J.L.; Kintner, P.M.; Chesney, S.W.; Arnoldy, R.L.; Lynch, K.A.; Moore, T.E.; Pollock, C.J. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States) New Hampshire Univ., Durham (United States) NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL (United States))

    1992-11-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this paper we demonstrate that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements we discuss were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at latitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. Our results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse. 50 refs.

  12. Transverse ion acceleration by localized lower hybrid waves in the topside auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, J. L.; Kintner, P. M.; Chesney, S. W.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lynch, K. A.; Moore, T. E.; Pollock, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    Up to now, observations had been unable to show conclusively a one-to-one correspondence between perpendicular ion acceleration and a particular type of plasma wave within the O(+) source region below 2000 km. In this paper we demonstrate that intense (100-300 mV/m) lower hybrid waves are responsible for transversely accelerating H(+) and O(+) ions to characteristic energies of up to 6 eV. This wave-particle interaction takes place in thin filamentary density cavities oriented along geomagnetic field lines. The measurements we discuss were conducted in the nightside auroral zone at latitudes between 500 km and 1100 km. Our results are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave condensation and collapse.

  13. Diffuse auroral electron scattering by electron cyclotron harmonic and whistler mode waves during an isolated substorm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, R. B.; Thorne, R. M.; Meredith, N. P.; Anderson, R. R.

    2003-07-01

    There are two main theories for the origin of diffuse auroral electron precipitation: precipitation by electrostatic ECH waves and precipitation by whistler mode waves. Here we analyze a case event where whistler mode hiss, chorus, and ECH waves are intensified during a weak substorm injection event to identify the source of particle precipitation. Examination of the particle data shows that there are three sources of free energy: a temperature anisotropy, a loss cone, and a pancake distribution. Instability analysis shows that the temperature anisotropy excites whistler mode hiss whereas both the temperature anisotropy and the pancake distribution contribute to the excitation of chorus. ECH waves are driven unstable by the loss cone. Wave propagation studies show that the path integrated gain of hiss and chorus is almost unaffected by changes in the depth of the loss cone, whereas ECH waves are very sensitive. Analysis of the changes in the resonant energy during propagation shows that the hiss resonates with electrons above a few keV while chorus resonates below a few hundred eV. As a result, neither hiss nor chorus are likely to cause significant electron precipitation from a few hundred eV to a few keV for this event. On the other hand, ECH waves resonate with electrons in the energy range between that for chorus and hiss. ECH waves can scatter electrons with pitch angles of up to 80° into the loss cone. We conclude that ECH waves are responsible for the formation of the pancake distribution and are probably the main component of diffuse auroral precipitation during this event. We suggest that substorm-injected electrons are responsible for the intensification of hiss and ECH waves and that rapid scattering of electrons by ECH waves forms the pancake distribution which then excites chorus. We also suggest that rapid pitch angle scattering by ECH waves could be responsible for double frequency banded chorus emissions.

  14. The first estimates of global nucleation mode aerosol concentrations based on satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kulmala

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric aerosols play a key role in the Earth's climate system by scattering and absorbing solar radiation and by acting as cloud condensation nuclei. Satellites are increasingly used to obtain information on properties of aerosol particles with a diameter larger than about 100 nm. However, new aerosol particles formed by nucleation are initially much smaller and grow into the optically active size range on time scales of many hours. In this paper we derive proxies, based on process understanding and ground-based observations, to determine the concentrations of these new particles and their spatial distribution using satellite data. The results are applied to provide seasonal variation of nucleation mode concentration. The proxies describe the concentration of nucleation mode particles over continents. The source rates are related to both regional nucleation and nucleation associated with more restricted sources. The global pattern of nucleation mode particle number concentration predicted by satellite data using our proxies is compared qualitatively against both observations and global model simulations.

  15. Upward high-energy field-aligned electron beams above the polar edge of auroral oval: observations from the SKA-3 instruments onboard the Auroral Probe (Interball-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Stepanov

    Full Text Available A new phenomenon was found at the polar edge of the auroral oval in the postmidnight-morning sectors: field-aligned (FA high-energy upward electron beams in the energy range 20–40 keV at altitudes about 3RE, accompanied by bidirectional electron FA beams of keV energy. The beam intensity often reaches more than 0.5·103 electrons/s·sr·keV·cm2, and the beams are observed for a relatively long time (~3·102–103s, when the satellite at the apogee moves slowly in the ILAT-MLT frame. A qualitative scenario of the acceleration mechanism is proposed, according to which the satellite is within a region of bidirectional acceleration where a stochastic FA acceleration is accomplished by waves with fluctuating FA electric field components in both directions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (particle acceleration; wave-particle interactions · Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions

  16. Surveying for Exoplanetary Auroral Radio Emission with HERA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter K. G.; Berger, Edo

    2017-05-01

    HERA, the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array, is a long wavelength radio telescope under construction in South Africa. Although HERA's primary science driver is the search for radio signatures of the Epoch of Reionization, its large collecting area, excellent calibratability, and methodical observing scheme make it a world-class tool for time-domain radio astronomy as well. In particlar, the completed HERA array will be sensitive to auroral radio bursts from planets with auroral powers and magnetic field strengths comparable to (factors of a few larger than) those of Jupiter, assuming a fiducial distance of 10 pc. HERA will log thousands of hours monitoring the stellar systems in its sky footprint, including the 40 systems found within this fiducial horizon. In this talk I will describe the current status of HERA and its future prospects for directly detecting exoplanetary magnetospheres.

  17. Threshold of auroral intensification reduced by electron precipitation effect

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that discrete aurora suddenly intensifies and deforms from an arc-like to a variety of wavy/vortex structures, especially during a substorm period. The instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves reflected from the ionosphere has been analyzed in order to comprehend the ignition process of auroral intensification. It was presented that the prime key is an enhancement of plasma convection, and the convection electric field has a threshold. This study examined effects of auroral electron precipitation, causing the ionization of neutral atmosphere, on the linear instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves. It was found that the threshold of convection electric fields is significantly reduced by increasing the ionization rate, the realistic range of which could be estimated from observed electron energy spectra.

  18. Energy flux and characteristic energy of an elemental auroral structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lanchester, B.S.; Palmer, J.R. [Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom); Rees, M.H. [Univ. of Southampton (United Kingdom)]|[Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Lummerzheim, D. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Kaila, K. [Univ. of Oulu (Finland); Turunen, T. [Geophysical Observatory, Sodankylae (Finland)

    1994-12-15

    Electron density profiles acquired with the EISCAT radar at 0.2 s time resolution, together with TV images and photometric intensities, were used to study the characteristics of thin (< 1 km) auroral arc structures that drifted through the field of view of the instruments. It is demonstrated that both high time and space resolution are essential for deriving the input parameters of the electron flux responsible for the elemental auroral structures. One such structure required a 400 mW m{sup {minus}2} (erg cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}) downward energy flux carried by an 8 keV monochromatic electron flux equivalent to a current density of 50 {mu}A m{sup {minus}2}. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Auroral Substorm Time Scales: Seasonal and IMF Variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, D.; Parks, G. K.; Brittnacher, M.; Germany, G. A.; Spann, J. F.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The time scales and phases of auroral substorm, activity are quantied in this study using the hemispheric power computed from Polar Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) images. We have applied this technique to several hundred substorm events and we are able to quantify how the characterist act, of substorms vary with season and IMF Bz orientation. We show that substorm time scales vary more strongly with season than with IMF Bz orientation. The recovery time for substorm. activity is well ordered by whether or not the nightside oral zone is sunlit. The recovery time scales for substorms occurring in the winter and equinox periods are similar and are both roughly a factor of two longer than in summer when the auroral oval is sunlit. Our results support the hypothesis that the ionosphere plays an active role in governing the dynamics of the aurora.

  20. Height-integrated conductivity in auroral substorms - 2. Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    Calculations of height-integrated conductivity from 31 individual Dynamics Explorer (DE 2) substorm crossings presented by Gjerloev and Hoffman [this issue] are used to compile empirical models of the height-integrated Pedersen and Hall conductivities (conductances) in a bulge-type auroral substorm....... Global auroral images obtained by Dynamics Explorer 1 (DE 1) were used to select substorms displaying a typical bulge-type emission pattern and each individual DE 2 pass was positioned with respect to key features in the observed emission pattern. The conductances were calculated for each DE 2 pass using...... electron precipitation data and a monoenergetic conductance model. All passes were divided into six different sectors, and average conductance profiles were carefully deduced for each of these sectors. Using a simple boxcar filter, smoothed average sector passes were calculated and from linear...

  1. Theory of the fine structure of auroral kilometric radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabbe, C. L.

    1982-01-01

    Recent data from ISEE 1 show auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) with finely separated bands in frequency. The observation that the AKR fine structure frequency separation is about equal to the ion cyclotron frequency at the AKR source is strong evidence for the interaction of AKR and electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves in the source, as proposed by Grabbe et al. (1980) to explain the origin of AKR. It is pointed out that no other wave of frequency close to the band separation is known to exist in the auroral source region. The fine structure observed in the source region AKR is the first evidence for EIC waves in the lower source region (3000 - 5000 km attitude), as required in the theory of Grabbe et al.

  2. 3D-modelling of the stellar auroral radio emission

    CERN Document Server

    Leto, P; Buemi, C S; Umana, G; Ingallinera, A; Cerrigone, L

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron maser is the coherent emission process that gives rise to the radio lighthouse effect observed in the hot magnetic chemically peculiar star CU Virginis. It has also been proposed to explain the highly circularly polarized radio pulses observed on some ultra cool dwarfs, with spectral type earlier than M7. Such kind of coherent events resemble the auroral radio emission from the magnetized planets of the solar system. In this paper, we present a tridimensional model able to simulate the timing and profile of the pulses emitted by those stars characterized by a dipolar magnetic field by following the hypothesis of the laminar source model, used to explain the beaming of the terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation. This model proves to be a powerful tool to understand the auroral radio-emission phenomenon, allowing us to derive some general conclusions about the effects of the model's free parameters on the features of the coherent pulses, and to learn more about the detectability of such...

  3. E-region echo characteristics governed by auroral arc electrodynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of a pair of auroral arc features by two imagers, one ground- and one space-based, allows the associated field-aligned current (FAC and electric field structure to be inferred. Simultaneous observations of HF radar echoes provide an insight into the irregularity-generating mechanisms. This is especially interesting for the E-region echoes observed, which form the focus of our analysis, and from which several conclusions can be drawn, summarized as follows. Latitudinal variations in echo characteristics are governed by the FAC and electric field background. Particularly sharp boundaries are found at the edges of auroral arcs. Within regions of auroral luminosity, echoes have Doppler shifts below the ion-acoustic speed and are proportional to the electric field, suggesting scatter from gradient drift waves. Regions of downward FAC are associated with mixed high and low Doppler shift echoes. The high Doppler shift component is greatly in excess of the ion-acoustic speed, but seems to be commensurate with the driving electric field. The low Doppler shift component appears to be much depressed below expectations.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; electric fields and currents

  4. Imaging and EISCAT radar measurements of an auroral prebreakup event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    Full Text Available The results of coordinated EISCAT and TV-camera observations of a prebreakup event on 15 November 1993 have been considered. The variations of the luminosity of two parallel auroral arcs, plasma depletion on the poleward edge of one of these arcs as well as electron and ion temperatures in front of a westward travelling surge were studied. It was found that a short-lived brightening of a weak zenith arc before an auroral breakup was accompanied by fading of an equatorial arc and, vice versa. A plasma depletion in the E region was detected by the EISCAT radar on the poleward edge of the zenith arc just before the auroral breakup. The plasma depletion was associated with an enhancement of ion (at the altitudes of 150–200 km and electron (in E region temperatures. During its occurrence, the electric field in the E-region was extremely large (~150 mV/m. A significant increase in ion temperature was also observed 1 min before the arrival of a westward travelling surge (WTS at the radar zenith. This was interpreted as the existence of an extended area of enhanced electric field ahead of the WTS.

  5. 3D modelling of stellar auroral radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Cerrigone, L.

    2016-06-01

    The electron cyclotron maser is the coherent emission process that gives rise to the radio lighthouse effect observed in the hot magnetic chemically peculiar star CU Virginis. It has also been proposed to explain the highly circularly polarized radio pulses observed in some ultracool dwarfs with spectral type earlier than M7. Coherent events of this kind resemble auroral radio emission from the magnetized planets of the Solar system. In this article, we present a three-dimensional model able to simulate the timing and profile of the pulses emitted by those stars characterized by a dipolar magnetic field by following the hypothesis of the laminar source model, used to explain the beaming of terrestrial auroral kilometric radiation. This model proves to be a powerful tool with which to understand the auroral radio emission phenomenon, allowing us to derive some general conclusions about the effects of the model's free parameters on the features of coherent pulses and to learn more about the detectability of such pulsed radio emission.

  6. Effects of interplanetary shock inclinations on auroral power intensity

    CERN Document Server

    Oliveira, D M; Tsurutani, B T; Gjerloev, J W

    2015-01-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectivness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and WIND spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earths magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some...

  7. The Global Auroral Imaging Access (GAIA) VxO Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanswick, E.; Donovan, E.; Syrjaesuo, M.; Kauristie, K.; Mende, S.; Frey, H.; Germany, G.; Roberts, A.; Lummerzheim, D.; Marple, S.; Honary, F.; Weatherwax, A.; Moen, J.; Manuel, J.; Sandahl, I.

    2006-12-01

    The Global Auroral Imaging Access virtual observatory (herein GAIA-VxO) is being developed as a clearing house for data related to remote sensing of auroral precipitation. GAIA-VxO is a truly international program. Researchers in Finland, the UK, Canada, and the US have agreed to contribute work on different modules of the overall GAIA system. These include summary browsers, mirror sites, and a data distribution system. GAIA will stage summary and full-resolution data from satellite-borne and ground-based auroral imagers, as well as meridian scanning photometers, and imaging and single-beam riometers. GAIA will provide ready access to data from the THEMIS, NORSTAR, and MIRACLE ASIs, as well, numerous other programs. GAIA has at its heart a relational data base, and protocols for production of summary data (we currently have more than 7,000,000 summary images on our prototype web page http://gaia-vxo.org). In this talk, we present an overview of the GAIA concept and architecture. We discuss how GAIA will draw on the efforts of researchers from different countries, with different programmatic constraints and scientific and operational objectives. Finally, we provide some insights into how GAIA will form an integral part of the evolving Living With a Star Data Environment.

  8. Effects of Interplanetary Shock Inclinations on Nightside Auroral Power Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Gjerloev, J. W.

    2016-02-01

    We derive fast forward interplanetary (IP) shock speeds and impact angles to study the geoeffectiveness of 461 IP shocks that occurred from January 1995 to December 2013 using ACE and Wind spacecraft data. The geomagnetic activity is inferred from the SuperMAG project data. SuperMAG is a large chain which employs more than 300 ground stations to compute enhanced versions of the traditional geomagnetic indices. The SuperMAG auroral electroject SME index, an enhanced version of the traditional AE index, is used as an auroral power (AP) indicator. AP intensity jumps triggered by shock impacts are correlated with both shock speed and impact angle. It is found that high AP intensity events typically occur when high speed IP shocks impact the Earth's magnetosphere with the shock normal almost parallel to the Sun-Earth line. This result suggests that symmetric and strong magnetospheric compression leads to favorable conditions for intense auroral power release, as shown previously by simulations and observations. Some potential mechanisms will be discussed.

  9. Auroral Workshop generates U.S.-Finnish teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldwin, Mark

    Forty scientists from the United States and Finland met last spring at a workshop to develop collaborative studies of magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling and to synthesize multiple ground-based and space-based data sets. The workshop also provided an opportunity to compare the output of new U.S. and Finnish Global Magnetohydrodynamic models with ground-based and satellite observations. Some of the missions and facilities that are providing new data within the United States and Finland include the Global Geospace Science/national Solar-Terrestrial Program Polar and Wind satellites, Interball, the Fast Auroral Snapshot Explorer, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, Ulysses, the Svalbard Radar, the new Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) station, digital all sky cameras, and the Magnetosphere Imager (MI) array in Finland. The workshop began with a discussion of dayside magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling. Dayside ionospheric transient signatures were divided into three types: auroral forms and convection velocity spikes, magnetic and convection events, and twin convection vortices. The three classes differ in size, location, repetition rates, and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) dependencies. Scientists are addressing whether the transient classes are related, what the transients' role is compared to that of permanent cusp features, and how transients affect mag-netospheric energetics.

  10. Solitary waves observed in the auroral zone: the Cluster multi-spacecraft perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Pickett

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on recent measurements of solitary waves made by the Wideband Plasma Wave Receiver located on each of the four Cluster spacecraft at 4.5-6.5RE (well above the auroral acceleration region as they cross field lines that map to the auroral zones. These solitary waves are observed in the Wideband data as isolated bipolar and tripolar waveforms. Examples of the two types of pulses are provided. The time durations of the majority of both types of solitary waves observed in this region range from about 0.3 up to 5ms. Their peak-to-peak amplitudes range from about 0.05 up to 20mV/m, with a few reaching up to almost 70mV/m. There is essentially no potential change across the bipolar pulses. There appears to be a small, measurable potential change, up to 0.5V, across the tripolar pulses, which is consistent with weak or hybrid double layers. A limited cross-spacecraft correlation study was carried out in order to identify the same solitary wave on more than one spacecraft. We found no convincing correlations of the bipolar solitary waves. In the two cases of possible correlation of the tripolar pulses, we found that the solitary waves are propagating at several hundred to a few thousand km/s and that they are possibly evolving (growing, decaying as they propagate from one spacecraft to the next. Further, they have a perpendicular (to the magnetic field width of 50km or greater and a parallel width of about 2-5km. We conclude, in general, however, that the Cluster spacecraft at separations along and perpendicular to the local magnetic field direction of tens of km and greater are too large to obtain positive correlations in this region. Looking at the macroscale of the auroral zone at 4.5-6.5RE, we find that the onsets of the broadband electrostatic noise associated with the solitary waves observed in the spectrograms of the WBD data are generally consistent with propagation of the solitary waves up the field lines (away from Earth, or with

  11. Thermal ion measurements on board Interball Auroral Probe by the Hyperboloid experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Dubouloz

    identified associated to the polar edge of the auroral oval. Detailed distribution functions of injected magnetosheath ions and ouflowing cleft fountain ions are measured down to a few eVs in the dayside.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle acceleration; ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions

     

  12. Retrieval of Black Carbon Absorption from Proposed Satellite Measurements Over the Ocean Glint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Matins, J. V.; Remer, L. A.; Schoeberl, M. R.; Yamasoe, M. A.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Haze and air pollution includes many chemicals that together form small particles suspended in the air called aerosols. One of the main ingredients found to affect climate and human health is Black Carbon. Black particles emitted from engines that do not burn the fuel completely, e.g. old trucks. Black carbon absorption of sunlight emerges as one of the key components of man-made forcing of climate. However, global characterization of black carbon emissions, distribution and pathways in which it can affect the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the atmosphere is very uncertain. A new method is proposed to measure sunlight absorption by fine aerosol particles containing black carbon over the ocean glint from a satellite mission designed for this purpose. The satellite will scan the same spot over the ocean in the glint plane and a plane 40 degrees off-glint a minute apart, collecting measurements of the reflected light across the solar spectrum. First the dark ocean off the glint is used to derive aerosol properties. Then the black carbon absorption is derived prop the attenuation of the bright glint by the aerosol layer. Such measurements if realized in a proposed future mission - COBRA are expected to produce global monthly climatology of black carbon absorption with high accuracy (110 to 15%) that can show their effect on climate.

  13. Observations of nightside auroral plasma upflows in the F-region and topside ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Foster

    Full Text Available Observations from the special UK EISCAT program UFIS are presented. UFIS is a joint UHF-VHF experiment, designed to make simultaneous measurements of enhanced vertical plasma flows in the F-region and topside ionospheres. Three distinct intervals of upward ion flow were observed. During the first event, upward ion fluxes in excess of 1013 m–2 s–1 were detected, with vertical ion velocities reaching 300 m s–1 at 800 km. The upflow was associated with the passage of an auroral arc through the radar field of view. In the F-region, an enhanced and sheared convection electric field on the leading edge of the arc resulted in heating of the ions, whilst at higher altitudes, above the precipitation region, strongly enhanced electron temperatures were observed; such features are commonly associated with the generation of plasma upflows. These observations demonstrate some of the acceleration mechanisms which can exist within the small-scale structure of an auroral arc. A later upflow event was associated with enhanced electron temperatures and only a moderate convection electric field, with no indication of significantly elevated ion tem- peratures. There was again some evidence of F-region particle precipitation at the time of the upflow, which exhibited vertical ion velocities of similar magnitude to the earlier upflow, suggesting that the behaviour of the electrons might be the dominant factor in this type of event. A third upflow was detected at altitudes above the observing range of the UHF radar, but which was evident in the VHF data from 600 km upwards. Smaller vertical velocities were observed in this event, which was apparently uncorrelated with any features observed at lower altitudes. Limitations imposed by the experimental conditions inhibit the interpretation of this event, although the upflow was again likely related to topside plasma heating.

  14. Auroral streamers: characteristics of associated precipitation,convection and field-aligned currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Sergeev

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available During the long-duration steady convection activity on 11 December 1998, the development of a few dozen auroral streamers was monitored by Polar UVI instrument in the dark northern nightside ionosphere. On many occasions the DMSP spacecraft crossed the streamer-conjugate regions over the sunlit southern auroral oval, permitting the investigation of the characteristics of ion and electron precipitation, ionospheric convection and field-aligned currents associated with the streamers. We confirm the conjugacy of streamer-associated precipitation, as well as their association with ionospheric plasma streams having a substantial equatorward convection component. The observations display two basic types of streamer-associated precipitation. In its polewardmost half, the streamer-associated (field-aligned accelerated electron precipitation coincides with the strong (≥2–7μA/m2 upward field-aligned currents on the westward flank of the convection stream, sometimes accompanied by enhanced proton precipitation in the adjacent region. In the equatorward portion of the streamer, the enhanced precipitation includes both electrons and protons, often without indication of field-aligned acceleration. Most of these characteristics are consistent with the model describing the generation of the streamer by the narrow plasma bubbles (bursty bulk flows which are contained on dipolarized field lines in the plasma sheet, although the mapping is strongly distorted which makes it difficult to quantitatively interprete the ionospheric image. The convective streams in the ionosphere, when well-resolved, had the maximal convection speeds ∼0.5–1km/s, total field-aligned currents of a few tenths of MA, thicknesses of a few hundreds km and a potential drop of a few kV across the stream. However, this might represent only a small part of the associated flux transport in the equatorial plasma sheet.

    Key words. Ionosphere (electric fiels and

  15. A statistical study of the THEMIS satellite data for plasma sheet electrons carrying auroral upward field-aligned currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Shiokawa, K.; McFadden, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    -aligned potential difference, particularly during active time (AE > 100 nT). On the other hand, in the dusk side outer magnetosphere (source of the region 1), electron density and temperature are small, thus the thermal current is much smaller than the typical auroral current suggested by Iijima and Potemra (JGR, 1976). From this result, we suppose that electron acceleration is necessary on the dusk side region 1 upward field-aligned current. Our preliminary result, however, does not consider contamination of the radiation belt particles into the ESA data that is apparent inside 9 Re. In the presentation, we show the results with removal of the radiation belt particle contamination.

  16. Comparative Analysis of Satellite Measurements Calculation Results Using the Postprocessing Services: Asg-Eupos (Poland), Apps (USA) and CSRS (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mika, Monika; Kudach, Jakub

    2014-06-01

    The publication has a cognitive research character. It presents a comparative analysis of free Internet services in Poland and abroad, used to adjust the data obtained using satellite measurement techniques. The main aim of this work is to describe and compare free tools for satellite data processing and to examine them for possible use in the surveying works in Poland. Among the many European and global services three of them dedicated to satellite measurements were selected: ASG-EUPOS (Poland), APPS (USA) and CSRS (Canada). The publication contains the results of calculations using these systems. Calculations were based on RINEX files obtained via postprocessing service (ASG-EUPOS network) POZGEO D for 12 reference stations in the South Poland. In order to examine differences in results between the ASG-EUPOS, APPS and CSRS the transformation points coordinate to a single coordinate system ETRF 2000 (in force in Poland) was made. Studies have shown the possibility of the calculation in Poland (in postprocessing mode) using the analyzed applications with global coverage.

  17. Phenomena in the ionosphere-magnetosphere system induced by injection of powerful HF radio waves into nightside auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Blagoveshchenskaya

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results from three ionospheric HF pumping experiments in overdense E or F regions are summarized. The experiments were conducted by the use of the EISCAT HF Heating facility located near Tromsø, Norway, allowing HF pumping the ionosphere in a near geomagnetic field-aligned direction. Distinctive features related to auroral activations in the course of the experiments are identified. Typical features observed in all experiments are the following: generation of scattered components in dynamic HF radio scatter Doppler spectra; strong increase of ion temperatures Ti and local ionospheric electric field E0; modification of the auroral arc and local spiral-like formation. However, some effects were observed only when the HF pump wave was reflected from the F2 layer. Among them are the generation of intense field-aligned ion outflows, and a strong increase in the electron temperature Te with altitude. A possible scenario for the substorm triggering due to HF pumping into an auroral ionosphere is discussed. The authors present their interpretation of the data as follows. It is suggested that two populations of charged particles are at play. One of them is the runaway population of electrons and ions from the ionosphere caused by the effects of the powerful HF radio wave. The other is the population of electrons that precipitate from the magnetosphere. It is shown that the hydrodynamical equilibrium was disrupted due to the effects of the HF pumping. We estimate that the parallel electric field can reach values of the order of 30mV/m during substorm triggering.

  18. Planetary and stellar auroral magnetospheric radio emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speirs, David; Cairns, Robert A.; Bingham, Robert; Kellett, Barry J.; McConville, Sandra L.; Gillespie, Karen M.; Vorgul, Irena; Phelps, Alan D. R.; Cross, Adrian W.; Ronald, Kevin

    2012-10-01

    A variety of astrophysical radio emissions have been identified to date in association with non-uniform magnetic fields and accelerated particle streams [1]. Such sources are spectrally well defined and for the planetary cases [1,2] show a high degree of extraordinary (X-mode) polarisation within the source region. It is now widely accepted that these emissions are generated by an electron cyclotron-maser instability driven by a horseshoe shaped electron velocity distribution. Although the generation mechanism is well established, a satisfactory explanation does not yet exist for the observed field aligned beaming of the radiation out-with the source region [2]. In the current context, the results of PiC simulations will be presented investigating the spatial growth of the horseshoe-maser instability in an unbounded interaction geometry, with a view to studying the wave vector of emission, spectral properties and RF conversion efficiency. In particular, the potential for backward-wave coupling is investigated as a viable precursor to a model of upward refraction and field-aligned beaming of the radiation [3].[4pt] [1] A.P. Zarka, Advances in Space Research, 12, pp. 99 (1992).[0pt] [2] R.E. Ergun et al., Astrophys. J., 538, pp. 456 (2000)[0pt] [3] J.D. Menietti et al., J. Geophys. Res., 116, A12219 (2011).

  19. Sounding-Rocket Studies of Langmuir-Wave Microphysics in the Auroral Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrowski, Micah P.

    Since their discovery in laboratory plasmas in the 1920s, Langmuir waves have been observed to be ubiquitous in plasma environments, particularly in space plasmas. From the greater solar wind to planetary foreshocks and the auroral ionosphere, Langmuir waves are a key factor mediating electron temperature, and controlling electron beam propagation and beam-plasma energy transfer. Because they are so important, Langmuir waves in the space environment have been intensively investigated; however, there remain two challenging types of experiments that are relatively lacking: three-dimensional measurements of Langmuir-wave fields, and measurements of Langmuir wave-electron correlations. This thesis works on filling these two gaps, plus development of new Langmuir-wave instrumentation. The CHARM-II wave-particle Correlator instrument was designed to study the energy transfer between electron beams and plasmas via the sorting of incoming particles by concurrent Langmuir-wave phase, allowing for direct observation of electron bunching. Data from the CHARM-II sounding rocket comprises the first such observations with statistical levels of events, revealing an association between the polarity of the resistive component of the electron phase-bunching and changes in the electron flux at the associated energy, such that a negative resistive component goes with an increase in electron flux, and vice versa, effectively showing energy flow from the beam to the waves, and subsequent enhancements of wave damping. Surprisingly, the results also show comparable amounts of resistive and reactive activity. A test-particle simulation was developed to confirm the details of the theoretical explanation for the observed effect. A three-dimensional Langmuir-wave receiver flown on the TRICE sounding rocket mission reveals the beat signature of the amplitude-modulated 'bursty' form of Langmuir waves which has been observed in many environments. An analysis of the three-dimensional data shows

  20. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kylling; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; T. Nousiainen

    2013-01-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furtherm...

  1. Probing into the aging dynamics of biomass burning aerosol by using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth and carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, Igor B.; Beekmann, Matthias; Berezin, Evgeny V.; Formenti, Paola; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2017-04-01

    Carbonaceous aerosol released into the atmosphere from open biomass burning (BB) is known to undergo considerable chemical and physical transformations (aging). However, there is substantial controversy about the nature and observable effects of these transformations. A shortage of consistent observational evidence on BB aerosol aging processes under different environmental conditions and at various temporal scales hinders development of their adequate representations in chemistry transport models (CTMs). In this study, we obtain insights into the BB aerosol dynamics by using available satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and carbon monoxide (CO). The basic concept of our method is to consider AOD as a function of the BB aerosol photochemical age (that is, the time period characterizing the exposure of BB aerosol emissions to atmospheric oxidation reactions) predicted by means of model tracers. We evaluate the AOD enhancement ratio (ER) defined as the ratio of optical depth of actual BB aerosol with respect to that of a modeled aerosol tracer that is assumed to originate from the same fires as the real BB aerosol but that is not affected by any aging processes. To limit possible effects of model transport errors, the AOD measurements are normalized to CO column amounts that are also retrieved from satellite measurements. The method is applied to the analysis of the meso- and synoptic-scale evolution of aerosol in smoke plumes from major wildfires that occurred in Siberia in summer 2012. AOD and CO retrievals from MODIS and IASI measurements, respectively, are used in combination with simulations performed with the CHIMERE CTM. The analysis indicates that aging processes strongly affected the evolution of BB aerosol in the situation considered, especially in dense plumes (with spatial average PM2. 5 concentration exceeding 100 µg m-3). For such plumes, the ER is found to increase almost 2-fold on the scale of ˜ 10 h of daytime aerosol evolution

  2. The sunspot cycle and ``auroral'' F layer irregularities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, J.; Kersley, L.; Rodger, A. S.

    The use of the word ``aurora'' for many different observations at high latitudes has limited the concepts involved; this is particularly true for F region irregularities. Observations setting the position of the auroral oval (Starkov and Fel'dshtein, 1970) were made using primarily the 555.7-nm green line, which is emitted predominantly at E layer heights. These observations have shown that the change in position of the auroral oval for low values of Kp as a function of sunspot cycle is of the order of 1° to 2° between sunspot maximum and sunspot minimum. However, irregularities in the F region show much larger solar cycle variations in the locations of the equatorward boundary, typically 10°. A review of scintillation data indicates that at a given auroral latitude, the scintillation activity increases with sunspot number. In addition, for a constant scintillation intensity, the equatorward boundary moves to lower latitudes as sunspot maximum is approached. We review existing spread F studies and show that for quiet geomagnetic conductions, there is lower occurrence during years of low sunspot numbers than during years of high sunspot numbers. However, the spread F index, related to Δ f/f0F2, is higher during years of low sunspot number than during years of high sunspot number. We demonstrate that this apparent dichotomy can be reconciled by using a new method of normalizing the spread F index by the maximum electron concentration of the F layer. We briefly discuss the possible explanations for the observed solar cycle variations of irregularity occurrence in terms of the absolute values and gradients of electron concentration and the E region conductivity.

  3. Dynamic auroral storms on Saturn as observed by the Hubble Space Telescope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J D; Badman, S V; Baines, K H; Brown, R H; Bunce, E J; Clarke, J T; Cowley, S W H; Crary, F J; Dougherty, M K; Gérard, J-C; Grocott, A; Grodent, D; Kurth, W S; Melin, H; Mitchell, D G; Pryor, W R; Stallard, T S

    2014-05-28

    We present observations of significant dynamics within two UV auroral storms observed on Saturn using the Hubble Space Telescope in April/May 2013. Specifically, we discuss bursts of auroral emission observed at the poleward boundary of a solar wind-induced auroral storm, propagating at ∼330% rigid corotation from near ∼01 h LT toward ∼08 h LT. We suggest that these are indicative of ongoing, bursty reconnection of lobe flux in the magnetotail, providing strong evidence that Saturn's auroral storms are caused by large-scale flux closure. We also discuss the later evolution of a similar storm and show that the emission maps to the trailing region of an energetic neutral atom enhancement. We thus identify the auroral form with the upward field-aligned continuity currents flowing into the associated partial ring current.

  4. Auroral phenomenology and magnetospheric processes earth and other planets

    CERN Document Server

    Keiling, Andreas; Bagenal, Fran; Karlsson, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Geophysical Monograph Series. Many of the most basic aspects of the aurora remain unexplained. While in the past terrestrial and planetary auroras have been largely treated in separate books, Auroral Phenomenology and Magnetospheric Processes: Earth and Other Planets takes a holistic approach, treating the aurora as a fundamental process and discussing the phenomenology, physics, and relationship with the respective planetary magnetospheres in one volume. While there are some behaviors common in auroras of the diffe

  5. Altitude variations of ionospheric currents at auroral latitudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamide, Y. (Nagoya Univ. (Japan)); Brekke, A. (Univ. of Tromso (Netherlands))

    1993-02-19

    On the basis of updated EISCAT experiments, the first full derivation of the ionospheric current density of the auroral electrojets at six different altitudes are presented. It is found that current vectors at different altitudes are quite different, although the eastward and westward currents prevail in the evening and morning sectors, respectively, once the currents are integrated over altitude. The eastward electrojet becomes almost northward whilst the westward electrojet becomes almost southward, at the highest altitude, 125 km, in this study. The physical implications of these characteristics are discussed.

  6. Height-integrated conductivity in auroral substorms. 1. Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerløv, Jesper Wittendorff; Hoffman, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    to select substorms which display a typical bulge-type auroral emission pattern and to organize the position of individual DE 2 passes with respect to key features in the emission pattern. The Hall and Pedersen conductances are calculated from electron precipitation data obtained by the low altitude plasma...... instrument (LAPI) carried on DE 2 and the monoenergetic conductance model by Reiff [1984]. This method is shown to effectively minimize undesirable smearing of parameters in statistical substorm studies. Large spatial gradients in the conductance profiles are common in high-latitude part of the premidnight...

  7. Auroral radio absorption and the westward travelling surge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N.; Korth, A.

    1983-11-01

    Measurements from a network of riometers during the passage of an auroral westward traveling surge are presented. These show that the energetic precipitation producing the radio absorption expands in an almost identical fashion to the softer precipitation associated with the visible surge; but it is delayed by about two minutes with respect to the surge. The delay is interpreted as a hardening of the precipitating electron spectrum as the surge goes by. Simultaneous observations of electrons at synchronous orbit are shown to support this conclusion. 24 references.

  8. Energy of auroral electrons and Z mode generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss-Varban, D.; Wong, H. K.

    1990-01-01

    The present consideration of Z-mode radiation generation, in light of observational results indicating that the O mode and second-harmonic X-mode emissions can prevail over the X-mode fundamental radiation when suprathermal electron energy is low, gives attention to whether the thermal effect on the Z-mode dispersion can be equally important, and whether the Z-mode can compete for the available free-energy source. It is found that, under suitable circumstances, the growth rate of the Z-mode can be substantial even for low suprathermal auroral electron energies. Growth is generally maximized for propagation perpendicular to the magnetic field.

  9. Magnetic Storm Effects in the Auroral Ionosphere Observed with EISCAT Radar -Two Case Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Storm-time changes of main plasma parameters in the auroral ionosphere are analyzed for two intense storms occurring on May 15, 1997 and Sept. 25, 1998, with emphasis on their relationship to the solar wind dynamic pressure and the IMF Bz component. Strong hard particle precipitation occurred in the initial phase for both storma,associated with high solar wind dynamical pressure. During the recovery phase of the storms, some strong particle precipitation was neither concerned with high solar wind pressure nor southward IMF Bz. Severe negative storm effects depicted by electron density depletion appeared in theF-region during the main and recovery phase of both storms, caused by intensive electric field-related strong Joule/frictional heating when IMF was largely southward. The ion temperature behaved similarly in E- and F-region, but the electron temperature did quite different, with a strong increase in the lower E-region relating to plasma instability excited by strong electric field and a slight decrease in the F-region probably concerning with a cooling process. The field-aligned ion velocity was high and apparently anticorrelated with the northward component of the ion convection velocity.

  10. Ion conics and electron beams associated with auroral processes on Saturn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, D. G.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Krupp, N.; Saur, J.; Mauk, B. H.; Carbary, J. F.; Krimigis, S. M.; Dougherty, M. K.; Hamilton, D. C.

    2009-02-01

    Ion conics accompanied by electron beams are observed regularly in Saturn's magnetosphere. The beams and conics are seen throughout the outer magnetosphere, on field lines that nominally map from well into the polar cap (Ldipole > 50) to well into the closed field region (Ldipole bidirectional; the ions are exclusively unidirectional upward. The ion conics are usually seen in conjunction with enhanced broadband electromagnetic noise in the 10 Hz to few kHz frequency range. Most of the wave energy appears below the local electron cyclotron frequency, hence, is propagating in the whistler mode, although some extension to higher frequencies is sometimes observed, suggesting an electrostatic mode. Sometimes the particle phenomena and the broadband noise occur in pulses of roughly 5 min duration, separated by tens of minutes. At other times they are relatively steady over an hour or more. Magnetic signatures associated with some of the pulsed events are consistent with field aligned current structures. The ions are almost exclusively light ions (H, H2, H3, and/or He) with only occasional hints of oxygen or other heavier species, suggesting an ionospheric source. Taken together, the observations are strikingly similar to those made at Earth in association with auroral zone downward sheet currents, except that in the case of Saturn the particle energies are 20 to 100 times higher.

  11. Ionospheric feedback effects on the quasi-stationary coupling between LLBL and postnoon/evening discrete auroral arcs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Echim

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a model for the quasi-stationary coupling between magnetospheric sheared flows in the dusk sector and discrete auroral arcs, previously analyzed for the case of a uniform height-integrated Pedersen conductivity (ΣP. Here we introduce an ionospheric feedback as the variation of ΣP with the energy flux of precipitating magnetospheric electrons (εem. One key-component of the model is the kinetic description of the interface between the duskward LLBL and the plasma sheet that gives the profile of Φm, the magnetospheric electrostatic potential. The velocity shear in the dusk LLBL plays the role of a generator for the auroral circuit closing through Pedersen currents in the auroral ionosphere. The field-aligned current density, j||, and the energy flux of precipitating electrons are given by analytic functions of the field-aligned potential drop, ΔΦ, derived from standard kinetic models of the adiabatic motion of particles. The ionospheric electrostatic potential, Φi (and implicitely ΔΦ is determined from the current continuity equation in the ionosphere. We obtain values of ΔΦ of the order of kilovolt and of j|| of the order of tens of μA/m2 in thin regions of the order of several kilometers at 200 km altitude. The spatial scale is significantly smaller and the peak values of ΔΦ, j|| and εem are higher than in the case of a uniform ΣP. Effects on the postnoon/evening auroral arc electrodynamics due to variations of dusk LLBL and solar wind dynamic and kinetic pressure are discussed. In thin regions (of the order of kilometer embedding the maximum of ΔΦ we evidence a non-linear regime of the current-voltage relationship. The model predicts also that visible arcs form when the velocity shear in LLBL is above a threshold value depending on the generator and

  12. The location of the open-closed magnetic field line boundary in the dawn sector auroral ionosphere

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    J. A. Wild

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available As a measure of the degree of coupling between the solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere systems, the rate at which the size of the polar cap (the region corresponding to ionospheric termini of open magnetic flux tubes varies is of prime importance. However, a reliable technique by which the extent of the polar cap might be routinely monitored has yet to be developed. Current techniques provide particularly ambiguous indications of the polar cap boundary in the dawn sector. We present a case study of space- and ground-based observations of the dawn-sector auroral zone and attempt to determine the location of the polar cap boundary using multi-wavelength observations of the ultraviolet aurora (made by the IMAGE FUV imager, precipitating particle measurements (recorded by the FAST, DMSP, and Cluster 1 and 3 satellites, and SuperDARN HF radar observations of the ionospheric Doppler spectral width boundary. We conclude that in the dawn sector, during the interval presented, neither the poleward edge of the wideband auroral UV emission (140-180nm nor the Doppler spectral width boundary were trustworthy indicators of the polar cap boundary location, while narrow band UV emissions in the range 130-140nm appear to be much more reliable.

  13. Response of northern winter polar cap to auroral substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Kan; Sotirelis, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    The three-phase substorm sequence has been generally accepted and is often tied to the Dungey cycle. Although previous studies have mostly agreed on the increase and decrease in the polar cap area during an episode of substorm, there are disparate views on when the polar cap starts to contract relative to substorm onset. Here we address this conflict using high-resolution (~1-3 min) snapshot global auroral images from the ultraviolet imager on board the Polar spacecraft. On the basis of 28 auroral substorm events, all observed in the Northern Hemispheric winter, it is found that the polar cap inflated prior to onset in all events and it attained the largest area ~6 min prior to the substorm expansion phase onset, while the dayside polar cap area remained steady around the onset. The onset of nightside polar cap deflation is found to be attributed to intensifications of aurora on the poleward edge of the nightside oval, mostly in the midnight sector. Although this result supports the loading-unloading and reconnection substorm models, it is not clear if the initial polar cap deflation and the substorm expansion are parts of the same process.

  14. Duration and extent of the great auroral storm of 1859

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, James L.; Boardsen, Scott

    2016-01-01

    The great geomagnetic storm of August 28 through September 3, 1859 is, arguably, the greatest and most famous space weather event in the last two hundred years. For the first time observations showed that the sun and aurora were connected and that auroras generated strong ionospheric currents. A significant portion of the world’s 200,000 km of telegraph lines were adversely affected, many of which were unusable for 8 h or more which had a real economic impact. In addition to published scientific measurements, newspapers, ship logs, and other records of that era provide an untapped wealth of first hand observations giving time and location along with reports of the auroral forms and colors. At its height, the aurora was described as a blood or deep crimson red that was so bright that one “could read a newspaper by.” At its peak, the Type A red aurora lasted for several hours and was observed to reach extremely low geomagnetic latitudes on August 28–29 (~25°) and on September 2–3 (~18°). Auroral forms of all types and colors were observed below 50° latitude for ~24 h on August 28–29 and ~42 h on September 2–3. From a large database of ground-based observations the extent of the aurora in corrected geomagnetic coordinates is presented over the duration of the storm event. PMID:28066122

  15. Simultaneous ground- and satellite-based observation of MF/HF auroral radio emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yuka; Kumamoto, Atsushi; Katoh, Yuto; Shinbori, Atsuki; Kadokura, Akira; Ogawa, Yasunobu

    2016-05-01

    We report on the first simultaneous measurements of medium-high frequency (MF/HF) auroral radio emissions (above 1 MHz) by ground- and satellite-based instruments. Observational data were obtained by the ground-based passive receivers in Iceland and Svalbard, and by the Plasma Waves and Sounder experiment (PWS) mounted on the Akebono satellite. We observed two simultaneous appearance events, during which the frequencies of the auroral roar and MF bursts detected at ground level were different from those of the terrestrial hectometric radiation (THR) observed by the Akebono satellite passing over the ground-based stations. This frequency difference confirms that auroral roar and THR are generated at different altitudes across the F peak. We did not observe any simultaneous observations that indicated an identical generation region of auroral roar and THR. In most cases, MF/HF auroral radio emissions were observed only by the ground-based detector, or by the satellite-based detector, even when the satellite was passing directly over the ground-based stations. A higher detection rate was observed from space than from ground level. This can primarily be explained in terms of the idea that the Akebono satellite can detect THR emissions coming from a wider region, and because a considerable portion of auroral radio emissions generated in the bottomside F region are masked by ionospheric absorption and screening in the D/E regions associated with ionization which results from auroral electrons and solar UV radiation.

  16. Saturn kilometric radiation intensities during the Saturn auroral campaign of 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Lamy, L.; Dougherty, M. K.; Nichols, J.; Bunce, E. J.; Pryor, W.; Baines, K.; Stallard, T.; Melin, H.; Crary, F. J.

    2016-01-01

    The Saturn auroral campaign carried out in the spring of 2013 used multiple Earth-based observations, remote-sensing observations from Cassini, and in situ-observations from Cassini to further our understanding of auroras at Saturn. Most of the remote sensing and Earth-based measurements are, by nature, not continuous. And, even the in situ measurements, while continuously obtained, are not always obtained in regions relevant to the study of the aurora. Saturn kilometric radiation, however, is remotely monitored nearly continuously by the Radio and Plasma Wave Science instrument on Cassini. This radio emission, produced by the cyclotron maser instability, is tightly tied to auroral processes at Saturn as are auroral radio emissions at other planets, most notably Jupiter and Earth. This paper provides the time history of the intensity of the radio emissions through the auroral campaign as a means of understanding the temporal relationships between the sometimes widely spaced observations of the auroral activity. While beaming characteristics of the radio emissions are known to prevent single spacecraft observations of this emission from being a perfect auroral activity indicator, we demonstrate a good correlation between the radio emission intensity and the level of UV auroral activity, when both measurements are available.

  17. The effect of multiple scattering on the aspect sensitivity and polarization of radio auroral echoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, E.F.; Moorcroft, D.R. (Western Ontario, University, London (Canada))

    1992-04-01

    A Monte Carlo model of radio wave scattering in the auroral electrojet has been developed to investigate multiple scattering of radio auroral echoes. Using this model, predictions of the aspect angle behavior of first-, second-, and third-order scattered power have been made. The results indicate that multiple scattering may be an important effect for VHF radars which observe the auroral E region at large magnetic aspect angles. The model shows that linearly polarized radio waves can become depolarized because of multiple scattering if the radio transmitter is horizontally polarized but not if the radio transmitter is vertically polarized. 52 refs.

  18. Magnetospheric source region of discrete auroras inferred from their relationship with isotropy boundaries of energetic particles

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    A. G. Yahnin

    Full Text Available According to observations, the discrete auroral arcs can sometimes be found, either deep inside the auroral oval or at the poleward border of the wide (so-called double auroral oval, which map to very different regions of the magnetotail. To find common physical conditions for the auroral-arc generation in these magnetotail regions, we study the spatial relationship between the diffuse and discrete auroras and the isotropic boundaries (IBs of the precipitating energetic particles which can be used to characterise locally the equatorial magnetic field in the tail. From comparison of ground observation of auroral forms with meridional profiles of particle flux measured simultaneously by the low-altitude NOAA satellites above the ground observation region, we found that (1 discrete auroral arcs are always situated polewards from (or very close to the IB of >30-keV electrons, whereas (2 the IB of the >30-keV protons is often seen inside the diffuse aurora. These relationships hold true for both quiet and active (substorm conditions in the premidnight-nightside (18-01-h MLT sector considered. In some events the auroral arcs occupy a wide latitudinal range. The most equatorial of these arcs was found at the poleward edge of the diffuse auroras (but anyway in the vicinity of the electron IB, the most poleward arcs were simultaneously observed on the closed field lines near the polar-cap boundary. These observations disagree with the notion that the discrete aurora originate exclusively in the near-Earth portion of plasma sheet or exclusively on the PSBL field lines. Result (1 may imply a fundamental feature of auroral-arc formation: they originate in the current-sheet regions having very curved and tailward-stretched magnetic field lines.

  19. Multiannual changes of CO2 emissions in China: indirect estimates derived from satellite measurements of tropospheric NO2 columns

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    M. Beekmann

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-annual satellite measurements of tropospheric NO2 columns are used for evaluation of CO2 emission changes in China in the period from 1996 to 2008. Indirect annual top-down estimates of CO2 emissions are derived from the satellite NO2 columns measurements by means of a simple inverse modeling procedure involving simulations performed with the CHIMERE mesoscale chemistry transport model and the CO2 to NOx emission ratios from the Emission Database for Global Atmospheric Research version 4.2 (EDGAR v4.2 global anthropogenic emission inventory. Exponential trends in the normalized time series of annual emission are evaluated separately for the periods from 1996 to 2001 and from 2001 to 2008. The results indicate that the both periods manifest strong positive trends in the CO2 emissions, and that the trend in the second period was significantly larger than the trend in the first period. Specifically, the trends in the first and second periods are estimated to be in the range from 3.7 to 8.0 and from 9.5 to 13.0 percent per year, respectively, taking into account both statistical and probable systematic uncertainties. Comparison of our top-down estimates of the CO2 emission changes with the corresponding bottom-up estimates provided by EDGAR v4.2 and Global Carbon Project (GCP emission inventories reveals that while acceleration of the CO2 emission growth in the considered period is a common feature of the both kinds of estimates, nonlinearity in the CO2 emission changes may be strongly exaggerated in the emission inventories. Specifically, the atmospheric NO2 observations do not confirm the existence of a sharp bend in the emission inventory data time series in the period from 2000 to 2002. A significant quantitative difference is revealed between the bottom-up and top-down estimates of the CO2 emission trend in the period from 1996 to 2001 (specifically, the trend was not positive according to the emission inventories, but is strongly

  20. Ponderomotive effects on distributions of O(+) ions in the auroral zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, E.; Hudson, M. K.; Li, X.; Roth, I.; Temerin, M.

    1995-01-01

    Test particle calculations are used to compute the effects of gravity and ponderomotive acceleration by shear Alfven wave oscillations on the distribution function of O(+) ions along auroral field lines, assuming an ionospheric Maxwellian source of the ions at 2000 km altitude with approximately 0.5 eV of thermal energy in the parallel component of velocity. The electric field model corresponds to a standing wave oscillation with a frequency approximately 1 Hz in the azimuthal direction superimposed on the background dipole field, in which the wave amplitude is either increasing or decreasing in time. The electric field is taken to be primarily in the perpendicular direction. The time varying wave produces broad distributions with widths of 2 to 10 times the initial 0.5-eV thermal energy of the Maxwellian source, and the density and flux of upward going O(+) ions at one Earth radius are both enhanced in this model. The oxygen ion distribution functions at 1 R(sub E) altitude resulting from interaction with waves whose amplitudes are increasing in time have a more gradual lower energy cutoff than do the distribution functions resulting from decaying waves. The high-energy part of the distribution functions in growing waves reflects the temperature of the Maxwellian source, while the high-energy part of the distributions resulting from decaying waves steepens with time, independent of the source temperature.

  1. Negative ions in the auroral mesosphere during a PCA event around sunset

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    C. F. del Pozo

    Full Text Available This is a study of the negative ion chemistry in the mesosphere above Tromsø using a number of EISCAT observations of high energy proton precipitation events during the last solar maximum, and in particular around sunset on 23 October, 1989. In these conditions it is possible to look at the relative importance of the various photodetachment and photodissociation processes controlling the concentration of negative ions. The data analysed are from several UHF GEN11 determinations of the ion-plasma ACF together with the pseudo zero-lag estimate of the `raw' electron density, at heights between 55 km and 85 km, at less than 1 km resolution. The power profiles from the UHF are combined with the 55-ion Sodankylä model to obtain consistent estimates of the electron density, the negative ion concentrations, and the average ion mass with height. The neutral concentrations and ion temperature are given by the MSIS90 model. These parameters are then used to compare the calculated widths of the ion-line with the GEN11 determinations. The ion-line spectrum gives information on the effects of negative ions below 70 km where they are dominant; the spectral width is almost a direct measure of the relative abundance of negative ions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ion chemistry and composition; particle precipitation.

  2. GEOS-2 observations of energetic electrons in the morning sector during auroral radio absorption events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N.; Korth, A.

    1985-04-01

    The temporal development of two auroral absorption events in the morning sector is compared with simultaneous observations of electrons from the satellite GEOS-2, utilizing the good energy resolution over the range 15-300 keV to show that the electrons effective in contributing to the observed radio absorption are confined to the range 30-130 keV. By far the most important are those below 80 keV, and as a geophysical monitor the riometer may be considered an efficient indicator of electron fluxes of energy typically of 60-70 keV. The ionospheric effects of the precipitated fluxes are predicted, and the results used to discuss the validity of the model atmosphere and of the profiles of effective recombination coefficient and specific absorption. Integration of the calculated profiles of incremental radio absorption yields total estimates within 30 percent of the observed intensities. The absorbing layer maximizes at altitudes of 85-90 km and has a typical half-height of 25 km. It is shown further that the electron-flux characteristics are consistent with gradient-curvature drift from a particle source in the midnight sector. 33 references.

  3. Loss cone fluxes and pitch angle diffusion at the equatorial plane during auroral radio absorption events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N.; Hargreaves, J.K.

    1983-04-01

    Flux and pitch angle distributions of energetic electrons at geostationary altitude in the vicinity of the atmospheric loss cone associated with an auroral radio absorption event are investigated. Measurements were made in the energy range 15-300 keV by the medium energy charged particle spectrometer on board the GEOS-2 satellite at the times of absorption events detected near the predicted foot of the geomagnetic field line passing through the satellite. Comparisons with theoretical pitch angle distributions and recombination rates indicate pitch angle diffusion coefficients to be 0.001/sec for a 2-dB event and 0.0001/sec for a 1-dB event. Further comparisons of the average electron measurements in the pitch angle range 0-5 deg with observations of the radio absorption by the portion of this flux which is actually precipitated are used to deduce the degree of departure of the electron pitch angle distribution from isotropy, and to place limits upon the ranges of effective recombination rate profiles. An empirical relation is derived which allows radio absorption to be predicted from measured electron fluxes.

  4. Constraining Substellar Magnetic Dynamos using Auroral Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Melodie; Hallinan, Gregg; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam J.; Stevenson, David J.

    2017-01-01

    An important outstanding problem in dynamo theory is understanding how magnetic fields are generated and sustained in fully convective stellar objects. A number of models for possible dynamo mechanisms in this regime have been proposed but constraining data on magnetic field strengths and topologies across a wide range of mass, age, rotation rate, and temperature are sorely lacking, particularly in the brown dwarf regime. Detections of highly circularly polarized pulsed radio emission provide our only window into magnetic field measurements for objects in the ultracool brown dwarf regime. However, these detections are very rare; previous radio surveys encompassing ˜60 L6 or later targets have yielded only one detection. We have developed a selection strategy for biasing survey targets based on possible optical and infrared tracers of auroral activity. Using our selection strategy, we previously observed six late L and T dwarfs with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and detected the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission for five targets. Our initial detections at 4-8 GHz provided the most robust constraints on dynamo theory in this regime, confirming magnetic fields >2.5 kG. To further develop our understanding of magnetic fields in the ultracool brown dwarf mass regime bridging planets and stars, we present constraints on surface magnetic field strengths for two Y-dwarfs as well as higher frequency observations of the previously detected L/T dwarfs corresponding ~3.6 kG fields. By carefully comparing magnetic field measurements derived from auroral radio emission to measurements derived from Zeeman broadening and Zeeman Doppler imaging, we provide tentative evidence that the dynamo operating in this mass regime may be inconsistent with predicted values from currently in vogue models. This suggests that parameters beyond convective flux may influence magnetic field generation in brown dwarfs.

  5. Simultaneous auroral observations described in the historical records of China, Japan and Korea from ancient times to AD 1700

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    D. M. Willis

    Full Text Available Early auroral observations recorded in various oriental histories are examined in order to search for examples of strictly simultaneous and indisputably independent observations of the aurora borealis from spatially separated sites in East Asia. In the period up to ad 1700, only five examples have been found of two or more oriental auroral observations from separate sites on the same night. These occurred during the nights of ad 1101 January 31, ad 1138 October 6, ad 1363 July 30, ad 1582 March 8 and ad 1653 March 2. The independent historical evidence describing observations of mid-latitude auroral displays at more than one site in East Asia on the same night provides virtually incontrovertible proof that auroral displays actually occurred on these five special occasions. This conclusion is corroborated by the good level of agreement between the detailed auroral descriptions recorded in the different oriental histories, which furnish essentially compatible information on both the colour (or colours of each auroral display and its approximate position in the sky. In addition, the occurrence of auroral displays in Europe within two days of auroral displays in East Asia, on two (possibly three out of these five special occasions, suggests that a substantial number of the mid-latitude auroral displays recorded in the oriental histories are associated with intense geomagnetic storms.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; storms and substorms

  6. Tidally induced velocity variations of the Beardmore Glacier, Antarctica, and their representation in satellite measurements of ice velocity

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    O. J. Marsh

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ocean tides close to the grounding line of outlet glaciers around Antarctica have been shown to directly influence ice velocity, both linearly and non-linearly. These fluctuations can be significant and have the potential to affect satellite measurements of ice discharge, which assume displacement between satellite passes to be consistent and representative of annual means. Satellite observations of horizontal velocity variation in the grounding zone are also contaminated by vertical tidal effects, the importance of which is highlighted here in speckle tracking measurements. Eight TerraSAR-X scenes from the grounding zone of the Beardmore Glacier are analysed in conjunction with GPS measurements to determine short-term and decadal trends in ice velocity. Diurnal tides produce horizontal velocity fluctuations of >50% on the ice shelf, recorded in the GPS data 4 km downstream of the grounding line. This variability decreases rapidly to <5% only 15 km upstream of the grounding line. Daily fluctuations are smoothed to <1% in the 11-day repeat pass TerraSAR-X imagery, but fortnightly variations over this period are still visible and show that satellite-velocity measurements can be affected by tides over longer periods. The measured tidal displacement observed in radar look direction over floating ice also allows the grounding line to be identified, using differential speckle tracking where phase information cannot be easily unwrapped.

  7. Characterization of high-intensity, long-duration continuous auroral activity (HILDCAA) events using recurrence quantification analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Odim; Oliveira Domingues, Margarete; Echer, Ezequiel; Hajra, Rajkumar; Everton Menconi, Varlei

    2017-08-01

    Considering the magnetic reconnection and the viscous interaction as the fundamental mechanisms for transfer particles and energy into the magnetosphere, we study the dynamical characteristics of auroral electrojet (AE) index during high-intensity, long-duration continuous auroral activity (HILDCAA) events, using a long-term geomagnetic database (1975-2012), and other distinct interplanetary conditions (geomagnetically quiet intervals, co-rotating interaction regions (CIRs)/high-speed streams (HSSs) not followed by HILDCAAs, and events of AE comprised in global intense geomagnetic disturbances). It is worth noting that we also study active but non-HILDCAA intervals. Examining the geomagnetic AE index, we apply a dynamics analysis composed of the phase space, the recurrence plot (RP), and the recurrence quantification analysis (RQA) methods. As a result, the quantification finds two distinct clusterings of the dynamical behaviours occurring in the interplanetary medium: one regarding a geomagnetically quiet condition regime and the other regarding an interplanetary activity regime. Furthermore, the HILDCAAs seem unique events regarding a visible, intense manifestations of interplanetary Alfvénic waves; however, they are similar to the other kinds of conditions regarding a dynamical signature (based on RQA), because it is involved in the same complex mechanism of generating geomagnetic disturbances. Also, by characterizing the proper conditions of transitions from quiescent conditions to weaker geomagnetic disturbances inside the magnetosphere and ionosphere system, the RQA method indicates clearly the two fundamental dynamics (geomagnetically quiet intervals and HILDCAA events) to be evaluated with magneto-hydrodynamics simulations to understand better the critical processes related to energy and particle transfer into the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Finally, with this work, we have also reinforced the potential applicability of the RQA method for

  8. Measuring the seeds of ion outflow: Auroral sounding rocket observations of low-altitude ion heating and circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, P. A.; Lynch, K. A.; Zettergren, M.; Hampton, D. L.; Bekkeng, T. A.; Cohen, I. J.; Conde, M.; Fisher, L. E.; Horak, P.; Lessard, M. R.; Miceli, R. J.; Michell, R. G.; Moen, J.; Powell, S. P.

    2016-02-01

    We present an analysis of in situ measurements from the MICA (Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling in the Alfvén Resonator) nightside auroral sounding rocket with comparisons to a multifluid ionospheric model. MICA made observations at altitudes below 325 km of the thermal ion kinetic particle distributions that are the origins of ion outflow. Late flight, in the vicinity of an auroral arc, we observe frictional processes controlling the ion temperature. Upflow of these cold ions is attributed to either the ambipolar field resulting from the heated electrons or possibly to ion-neutral collisions. We measure E→×B→ convection away from the arc (poleward) and downflows of hundreds of m s-1 poleward of this arc, indicating small-scale low-altitude plasma circulation. In the early flight we observe DC electromagnetic Poynting flux and associated ELF wave activity influencing the thermal ion temperature in regions of Alfvénic aurora. We observe enhanced, anisotropic ion temperatures which we conjecture are caused by transverse heating by wave-particle interactions (WPI) even at these low altitudes. Throughout this region we observe several hundred m s-1 upflow of the bulk thermal ions colocated with WPI; however, the mirror force is negligible at these low energies; thus, the upflow is attributed to ambipolar fields (or possibly neutral upwelling drivers). The low-altitude MICA observations serve to inform future ionospheric modeling and simulations of (a) the need to consider the effects of heating by WPI at altitudes lower than previously considered viable and (b) the occurrence of structured and localized upflows/downflows below where higher-altitude heating rocesses are expected.

  9. M and X Class Flares During 2011 to 2013 and their Connection to Auroral Electrojet Indices

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    Debojyoti Halder

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar bursts recorded in the frequency range 50 to 300 MHz by using log periodic dipole array over Kalyani (22°58´N, 88°46´E have been statistically analyzed for the years 2011-2013. Scatter plots of flare intensity for both M- and X-class flares as well as the number of occurrences of the two categories have been examined. The characteristics of the auroral electrojet indices are correlated directly to the solar flare activity. The auroral indices data obtained from various sources are sorted accordingly. The daily averaged data of the auroral indices are plotted for a period of 5 years, 2009 to 2013. Regression analysis of the indices data has been done meticulously. The regression analysis data are also plotted as residual plots and line fit plots. We have tried to discuss the possible connection between the occurrences of solar flares and the auroral electrojet indices

  10. Numerical Modeling of Auroral and Equatorial Electrojet Behavior during Geomagnetic Storm Sequence on September 9-14, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, Maxim; Klimenko, Vladimir

    In Klimenko et al., 2006 the model of electric field and zonal current in the Earth's ionosphere has been presented. This model has been included into the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) developed in WD IZMIRAN (Namgaladze et al., 1988). The modified GSM TIP model has allowed to describe more correctly the behavior of electric field and different ionospheric parameters at low latitudes, and also to investigate the behavior of auroral and equatorial electrojets. In the given research we present the calculation results of behavior of auroral and equatorial electrojets during geomagnetic storm sequence on September 9-14, 2005. The calculations have been executed with use of the modified GSM TIP model. At that the model input parameters, such as the potential difference through polar caps, field-aligned currents of second region and particle precipitation fluxes and energy were set as function of AE-and Kp-indices of geomagnetic activity according to different empirical models Feshchenko and Maltsev, 2003; Zhang and Paxton, 2008 and morphological representations Cheng et al., 2008. Furthermore, at the storm sudden commencement phase we taken into account the shift of field-aligned currents of the second region into the lower latitudes as by Sojka et al., 1994 and 30 min. time delay of variations of the field-aligned currents of the second region relative to the variations of the potential drop through polar caps. Also, we taken into account the ionospheric effects of solar flares, which were taken place during the considered period. The calculation results are analyzed according to known morphological representations about auroral and equatorial electrojet behavior during geomagnetic storms. This study is supported by RFBR grant 08-05-00274. References Cheng Z.W., Shi J.K., Zhang T.L., Dunlop M. and Liu Z.X. Relationship between FAC at plasma sheet boundary layers and AE index during storms from August to October

  11. Identification of possible intense historical geomagnetic storms using combined sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia

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    D. M. Willis

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive catalogues of ancient sunspot and auroral observations from East Asia are used to identify possible intense historical geomagnetic storms in the interval 210 BC-AD 1918. There are about 270 entries in the sunspot catalogue and about 1150 entries in the auroral catalogue. Special databases have been constructed in which the scientific information in these two catalogues is placed in specified fields. For the purposes of this study, an historical geomagnetic storm is defined in terms of an auroral observation that is apparently associated with a particular sunspot observation, in the sense that the auroral observation occurred within several days of the sunspot observation. More precisely, a selection criterion is formulated for the automatic identification of such geomagnetic storms, using the oriental records stored in the sunspot and auroral databases. The selection criterion is based on specific assumptions about the duration of sunspot visibility with the unaided eye, the likely range of heliographic longitudes of an energetic solar feature, and the likely range of transit times for ejected solar plasma to travel from the Sun to the Earth. This selection criterion results in the identification of nineteen putative historical geomagnetic storms, although two of these storms are spurious in the sense that there are two examples of a single sunspot observation being associated with two different auroral observations separated by more than half a (synodic solar rotation period. The literary and scientific reliabilities of the East Asian sunspot and auroral records that define the nineteen historical geomagnetic storms are discussed in detail in a set of appendices. A possible time sequence of events is presented for each geomagnetic storm, including possible dates for both the central meridian passage of the sunspot and the occurrence of the energetic solar feature, as well as likely transit times for the ejected solar plasma

  12. Rocket-borne investigation of auroral patches in the evening sector during substorm recovery

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    M. A. Danielides

    Full Text Available On 11 February 1997 at 08:36 UT after a substorm onset the Auroral Turbulence 2 sounding rocket was launched from Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska into a moderately active auroral region. This experiment has allowed us to investigate evening (21:00 MLT auroral forms at the substorm recovery, which were discrete multiple auroral arcs stretched to, the east and southeast from the breakup region, and bright auroral patches propagating westward along the arcs like a luminosity wave, which is a typical feature of the disturbed arc. The rocket crossed an auroral arc of about 40 km width, stretched along southeast direction. Auroral patches and associated electric fields formed a 200 km long periodical structure, which propagated along the arc westward at a velocity of 3 km/s, whereas the ionospheric plasma velocity inside the arc was 300 m/s westward. The spatial periodicity in the rocket data was found from optical ground-based observations, from electric field in situ measurements, as well as from ground-based magnetic observations. The bright patches were co-located with equatorward plasma flow across the arc of the order of 200 m/s in magnitude, whereas the plasma flow tended to be poleward at the intervals between the patches, where the electric field reached the magnitude of up to 20 mV/m, and these maxima were co-located with the peaks in electron precipitations indicated by the electron counter on board the rocket. Pulsations of a 70-s period were observed on the ground in the eastern component of the magnetic field and this is consistent with the moving auroral patches and the north-south plasma flows associated with them. The enhanced patch-associated electric field and fast westward propagation suggest essential differences between evening auroral patches and those occurring in the morning ionosphere. We propose the wave that propagates along the plasma sheet boundary to be a promising mechanism for the evening auroral patches

  13. Plasma physics on auroral field lines - The formation of ion conic distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Okuda, H.

    1983-01-01

    The formation of the conical distribution function and the acceleration of ions on aurora field lines are considered. Ion cyclotron waves were assumed to be excited by drifting electrons associated with the return current in the auroral zone. A theoretical analysis of ion cyclotron waves is given, and a simulation model is described. Simulation results are presented. The heating of ions and the evolution of ion cyclotron waves on auroral field lines and in the magnetosphere are discussed.

  14. Self-excitation of auroral arcs in a three-dimensionally coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kunihiko; Sato, Tetsuya

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the first full three-dimensional dynamic simulation of auroral arc formation. The magnetospheric and ionospheric dynamics are represented by one-fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations and two-fluid weakly ionized plasma equations, respectively. The feedback coupling between magnetospheric Alfven waves and ionospheric density waves results in a spontaneous generation of longitudinally elongated striations of field-aligned currents and ionospheric electron densities, which compare very well with many features of quiet auroral arcs.

  15. Saturn's auroral morphology and field-aligned currents during a solar wind compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badman, S. V.; Provan, G.; Bunce, E. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Melin, H.; Cowley, S. W. H.; Radioti, A.; Kurth, W. S.; Pryor, W. R.; Nichols, J. D.; Jinks, S. L.; Stallard, T. S.; Brown, R. H.; Baines, K. H.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2016-01-01

    On 21-22 April 2013, during a coordinated auroral observing campaign, instruments onboard Cassini and the Hubble Space Telescope observed Saturn's aurora while Cassini traversed Saturn's high latitude auroral field lines. Signatures of upward and downward field-aligned currents were detected in the nightside magnetosphere in the magnetic field and plasma measurements. The location of the upward current corresponded to the bright ultraviolet auroral arc seen in the auroral images, and the downward current region was located poleward of the upward current in an aurorally dark region. Within the polar cap magnetic field and plasma fluctuations were identified with periods of ∼20 and ∼60 min. The northern and southern auroral ovals were observed to rock in latitude in phase with the respective northern and southern planetary period oscillations. A solar wind compression impacted Saturn's magnetosphere at the start of 22 April 2013, identified by an intensification and extension to lower frequencies of the Saturn kilometric radiation, with the following sequence of effects: (1) intensification of the auroral field-aligned currents; (2) appearance of a localised, intense bulge in the dawnside (04-06 LT) aurora while the midnight sector aurora remained fainter and narrow; and (3) latitudinal broadening and poleward contraction of the nightside aurora, where the poleward motion in this sector is opposite to that expected from a model of the auroral oval's usual oscillation. These observations are interpreted as the response to tail reconnection events, initially involving Vasyliunas-type reconnection of closed mass-loaded magnetotail field lines, and then proceeding onto open lobe field lines, causing the contraction of the polar cap region on the night side.

  16. Volcanic ash infrared signature: porous non-spherical ash particle shapes compared to homogeneous spherical ash particles

    OpenAIRE

    A. Kylling; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; T. Nousiainen

    2014-01-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic ash clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements effective particle radius and mass loading may be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculated thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compared these with mass- and volume-equivalent sp...

  17. Accaleration of Electrons of the Outer Electron Radiation Belt and Auroral Oval Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, Elizaveta; Ovchinnikov, Ilya; Riazantseva, Maria; Znatkova, Svetlana; Pulinets, Maria; Vorobjev, Viachislav; Yagodkina, Oksana; Stepanova, Marina

    2016-07-01

    We summarize the results of experimental observations demonstrating the role of auroral processes in the formation of the outer electron radiation belt and magnetic field distortion during magnetic storms. We show that the auroral oval does not mapped to the plasma sheet proper (region with magnetic field lines stretched in the tailward direction). It is mapped to the surrounding the Earth plasma ring in which transverse currents are closed inside the magnetosphere. Such currents constitute the high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current. Mapping of the auroral oval to the region of high latitude continuation of the ordinary ring current explains the ring like shape of the auroral oval with finite thickness near noon and auroral oval dynamics during magnetic storms. The auroral oval shift to low latitudes during storms. The development of the ring current produce great distortion of the Earth's magnetic field and corresponding adiabatic variations of relativistic electron fluxes. Development of the asymmetric ring current produce the dawn-dusk asymmetry of such fluxes. We analyze main features of the observed processes including formation of sharp plasma pressure profiles during storms. The nature of observed pressure peak is analyzed. It is shown that the observed sharp pressure peak is directly connected with the creation of the seed population of relativistic electrons. The possibility to predict the position of new radiation belt during recovery phase of the magnetic storm using data of low orbiting and ground based observations is demonstrated.

  18. On a theory of temporal fluctuations in the electrostatic potential structures associated with auroral arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silevitch, M. B.

    1981-01-01

    A possible mechanism is presented for the generation of large-amplitude temporal fluctuations in the structure of the electron energization region associated with auroral arcs. The mechanism is based on the observation that the auroral arc system resembles a laboratory circuit consisting of the series connection of battery, resistance and a forward biased diode containing collisionless plasma in which large-amplitude relaxation oscillations are sometimes observed to be superimposed on the steady-state current. It is shown that in both the laboratory and auroral systems, in which a localized auroral arc dynamo, the ionosphere and the electron energization region are involved, the oscillations are controlled by the times for ions and electrons to traverse the acceleration region, which also characterize the low- and high-frequency structure of the fluctuating waveform. It is demonstrated that a plausible one-dimensional double-layer model of the auroral arc acceleration region exhibits the dynamic negative resistance necessary for the generation of oscillations by the present mechanism. Finally, consideration is given to two kinds of auroral phenomena which might be associated with the mechanism: the 10-Hz quasi-periodic flickering aurora and 10-Hz modulations in the intensity of electrostatic hydrogen cyclotron waves.

  19. Radar detection of a localized 1.4 Hz pulsation in auroral plasma, simultaneous with pulsating optical emissions, during a substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Cosgrove

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many pulsating phenomena are associated with the auroral substorm. It has been considered that some of these phenomena involve kilometer-scale Alfvén waves coupling the magnetosphere and ionosphere. Electric field oscillations at the altitude of the ionosphere are a signature of such wave activity that could distinguish it from other sources of auroral particle precipitation, which may be simply tracers of magnetospheric activity. Therefore, a ground based diagnostic of kilometer-scale oscillating electric fields would be a valuable tool in the study of pulsations and the auroral substorm. In this study we attempt to develop such a tool in the Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar (PFISR. The central result is a statistically significant detection of a 1.4 Hz electric field oscillation associated with a similar oscillating optical emission, during the recovery phase of a substorm. The optical emissions also contain a bright, lower frequency (0.2 Hz pulsation that does not show up in the radar backscatter. The fact that higher frequency oscillations are detected by the radar, whereas the bright, lower frequency optical pulsation is not detected by the radar, serves to strengthen a theoretical argument that the radar is sensitive to oscillating electric fields, but not to oscillating particle precipitation. Although it is difficult to make conclusions as to the physical mechanism, we do not find evidence for a plane-wave-like Alfvén wave; the detected structure is evident in only two of five adjacent beams. We emphasize that this is a new application for ISR, and that corroborating results are needed.

  20. Severe and localized GNSS scintillation at the poleward edge of the nightside auroral oval during intense substorm aurora

    CERN Document Server

    van der Meeren, Christer; Lorentzen, Dag A; Rietveld, Michael T; Clausen, Lasse B N

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study how GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo navigation signals are compromised by strong irregularities causing severe phase scintillation ($\\mathit{\\sigma }_{\\phi }$ > 1) in the nightside high-latitude ionosphere during a substorm on 3 November 2013. Substorm onset and a later intensification coincided with polar cap patches entering the auroral oval to become auroral blobs. Using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers and optical data, we show severe scintillation driven by intense auroral emissions in the line of sight between the receiver and the satellites. During substorm expansion, the area of scintillation followed the intense poleward edge of the auroral oval. The intense auroral emissions were colocated with polar cap patches (blobs). The patches did not contain strong irregularities, neither before entering the auroral oval nor after the aurora had faded. Signals from all three GNSS constellations were similarly affected by the irregularities. Furthermore, two receivers space...

  1. Water Accounting Plus (WA+ – a water accounting procedure for complex river basins based on satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Molden

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Coping with the issue of water scarcity and growing competition for water among different sectors requires proper water management strategies and decision processes. A pre-requisite is a clear understanding of the basin hydrological processes, manageable and unmanageable water flows, the interaction with land use and opportunities to mitigate the negative effects and increase the benefits of water depletion on society. Currently, water professionals do not have a common framework that links hydrological flows to user groups of water and their benefits. The absence of a standard hydrological and water management summary is causing confusion and wrong decisions. The non-availability of water flow data is one of the underpinning reasons for not having operational water accounting systems for river basins in place. In this paper we introduce Water Accounting Plus (WA+, which is a new framework designed to provide explicit spatial information on water depletion and net withdrawal processes in complex river basins. The influence of land use on the water cycle is described explicitly by defining land use groups with common characteristics. Analogous to financial accounting, WA+ presents four sheets including (i a resource base sheet, (ii a consumption sheet, (iii a productivity sheet, and (iv a withdrawal sheet. Every sheet encompasses a set of indicators that summarize the overall water resources situation. The impact of external (e.g. climate change and internal influences (e.g. infrastructure building can be estimated by studying the changes in these WA+ indicators. Satellite measurements can be used for 3 out of the 4 sheets, but is not a precondition for implementing WA+ framework. Data from hydrological models and water allocation models can also be used as inputs to WA+.

  2. Water Accounting Plus (WA+ – a water accounting procedure for complex river basins based on satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Karimi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Coping with water scarcity and growing competition for water among different sectors requires proper water management strategies and decision processes. A pre-requisite is a clear understanding of the basin hydrological processes, manageable and unmanageable water flows, the interaction with land use and opportunities to mitigate the negative effects and increase the benefits of water depletion on society. Currently, water professionals do not have a common framework that links depletion to user groups of water and their benefits. The absence of a standard hydrological and water management summary is causing confusion and wrong decisions. The non-availability of water flow data is one of the underpinning reasons for not having operational water accounting systems for river basins in place. In this paper, we introduce Water Accounting Plus (WA+, which is a new framework designed to provide explicit spatial information on water depletion and net withdrawal processes in complex river basins. The influence of land use and landscape evapotranspiration on the water cycle is described explicitly by defining land use groups with common characteristics. WA+ presents four sheets including (i a resource base sheet, (ii an evapotranspiration sheet, (iii a productivity sheet, and (iv a withdrawal sheet. Every sheet encompasses a set of indicators that summarise the overall water resources situation. The impact of external (e.g., climate change and internal influences (e.g., infrastructure building can be estimated by studying the changes in these WA+ indicators. Satellite measurements can be used to acquire a vast amount of required data but is not a precondition for implementing WA+ framework. Data from hydrological models and water allocation models can also be used as inputs to WA+.

  3. Multi-annual changes of NOx emissions in megacity regions: nonlinear trend analysis of satellite measurement based estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Burrows

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Hazardous impact of air pollutant emissions from megacities on atmospheric composition on regional and global scales is currently an important issue in atmospheric research. However, the quantification of emissions and related effects is frequently a difficult task, especially in the case of developing countries, due to the lack of reliable data and information. This study examines possibilities to retrieve multi-annual NOx emissions changes in megacity regions from satellite measurements of nitrogen dioxide and to quantify them in terms of linear and nonlinear trends. By combining the retrievals of the GOME and SCIAMACHY satellite instrument data with simulations performed by the CHIMERE chemistry transport model, we obtain the time series of NOx emission estimates for the 12 largest urban agglomerations in Europe and the Middle East in the period from 1996 to 2008. We employ then a novel method allowing estimation of a nonlinear trend in a noisy time series of an observed variable. The method is based on the probabilistic approach and the use of artificial neural networks; it does not involve any quantitative a priori assumptions. As a result, statistically significant nonlinearities in the estimated NOx emission trends are detected in 5 megacities (Bagdad, Madrid, Milan, Moscow and Paris. Statistically significant upward linear trends are detected in Istanbul and Tehran, while downward linear trends are revealed in Berlin, London and the Ruhr agglomeration. The presence of nonlinearities in NOx emission changes in Milan, Paris and Madrid is confirmed by comparison of simulated NOx concentrations with independent air quality monitoring data. A good quantitative agreement between the linear trends in the simulated and measured near surface NOx concentrations is found in London.

  4. Interactive Auroral Science for Hearing-Impaired Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samara, M.; Michell, R. G.; Jahn, J.; Pfeifer, M.; Ibarra, S.; Hampton, D. L.; Powell, D.

    2012-12-01

    Under a NASA E/PO grant, we have partnered with San Antonio's Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children to develop a science class experience where students directly interact with scientists and participate in a research-grade space science measurement campaign. The unique aspect of partnering with Sunshine Cottage lies in Sunshine's approach of auditory-verbal communication. Aided by technology (hearing aids, cochlear implants), a diverse student body with students of all levels of hearing loss (moderate through profound) is taught in an entirely auditory-verbal environment at Sunshine Cottage. Bringing these students into early contact with research work can lay the foundation for future careers in the STEM field that normally they might not consider as indicated by the first year of this collaboration where the student response was distinctly positive. Here we report on the first year of those activities, as they related to a ground based imaging approach to exploring the northern lights and from the point of view of the scientists that participated. The major components of that activity included a site visit to SwRI by the students and their teachers, a semester long lab at school utilizing current research tools and a real-time campaign night. The students used a number of diagnostics to first predict and then verify auroral activity. One of the tools used was the MOOSE observatory which is a community resource state of the art observatory comprised of 5 EMCCD imagers in Alaska, established through an NSF MRI grant. We will discuss the approach and lessons learned during the first year of the project and the directions that we will likely take in the second year. Lessons learned from teaching these students space science related topic can be flowed right back into mainstream classroom settings. One other significant and unexpected aspect of this first year was that we were able to connect two groups of students through skype (in the 4th to 5th grades) that

  5. Substorm correlated absorption on a 3200 km trans-auroral HF propagation path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available A high-frequency transmitter located at Clyde River, NWT, Canada, and a receiver located near Boston, USA, provide a 3200 km trans-auroral, near-meridional propagation path over which the propagation characteristics have been measured. Out of the fourteen frequencies in the HF band sampled every hour for the duration of the experimental campaign (16 January–8 February 1989, the signal level measurements of 6.800 MHz transmissions were selected in order to determine the extent and occurrence of auroral absorption. The median level of auroral absorption along the path is found to increase with geomagnetic activity, quantified by the index Kp, with the increase being greater in the post-midnight sector than in the pre-midnight sector. This asymmetric behaviour is attributed to the precipitation of high energy electrons into the midnight and morning sector auroral D region. The measured diurnal variation in the median level of absorption is consistent with previous models describing the extent and magnitude of auroral absorption and electron precipitation. Individual substorms, identified from geosynchronous satellite data, are found to cause short-lived absorption events in the HF signal level of ~30 dB at 6.800 MHz. The occurrence of substorm correlated auroral absorption events is confined to the midnight and morning sectors, consistent with the location of the electron precipitation. The magnitude of absorption is related to the magnetotail stress during the substorm growth phase and the magnetotail relaxation during the substorm expansion phase onset. The absorption magnitude and the occurrence of substorms during the period of the campaign increase at times of high Kp , leading to an increase in median auroral absorption during disturbed periods.

  6. Ionospheric current system accompanied by auroral vortex streets

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2016-01-01

    High resolution optical measurements have revealed that a sudden brightening of aurora and its deformation from an arc-like to a vortex street structure appear just at the onset of substorm. The instability of Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves reflected from the ionosphere has been studied by means of magnetohydrodynamic simulations in order to comprehend the formation of auroral vortex streets. Our previous work reported that an initially placed arc intensifies, splits, and deforms into a vortex street during a couple of minutes, and the prime key is an enhancement of the convection electric field. This study elaborated physics of the ionospheric horizontal currents related to the vortex street in the context of so-called Cowling polarization. One component is due to the perturbed electric field by Alfv$\\acute{\\rm e}$n waves, and the other is due to the perturbed electron density (or polarization) in the ionosphere. It was found that, when a vortex street develops, upward/downward pair currents in its leading/trail...

  7. Effects of auroral potential drops on plasma sheet dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Sheng; Lotko, William; Zhang, Binzheng; Wiltberger, Michael; Lyon, John

    2016-11-01

    The reaction of the magnetosphere-ionosphere system to dynamic auroral potential drops is investigated using the Lyon-Fedder-Mobarry global model including, for the first time in a global simulation, the dissipative load of field-aligned potential drops in the low-altitude boundary condition. This extra load reduces the field-aligned current (j||) supplied by nightside reconnection dynamos. The system adapts by forcing the nightside X line closer to Earth, with a corresponding reduction in current lensing (j||/B = constant) at the ionosphere and additional contraction of the plasma sheet during substorm recovery and steady magnetospheric convection. For steady and moderate solar wind driving and with constant ionospheric conductance, the cross polar cap potential and hemispheric field-aligned current are lower by approximately the ratio of the peak field-aligned potential drop to the cross polar cap potential (10-15%) when potential drops are included. Hemispheric ionospheric Joule dissipation is less by 8%, while the area-integrated, average work done on the fluid by the reconnecting magnetotail field increases by 50% within |y| < 8 RE. Effects on the nightside plasma sheet include (1) an average X line 4 RE closer to Earth; (2) a 12% higher mean reconnection rate; and (3) dawn-dusk asymmetry in reconnection with a 17% higher rate in the premidnight sector.

  8. Multi-Periodic Auroral and Thermospheric Variations in 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongliang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A data survey reveals multiple periodic variations in auroral hemispheric power (HP and thermospheric composition (O/N2 in 2006. The periods include 27, 13 - 14, 9, and 6.7 days. These periods of 13 - 14, 9 and 6.7 days are essentially the harmonics of the 27-day solar rotation. Similar multi-periodicities were found in the dayside magnetic merging rate (MMR (Newell et al. 2007 which depends upon solar wind speed (V, magnitude (BT and clock angle (θc of interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. A high correlation coefficient (0.93 between MMR and HP indicates MMR is the driver of the periodic variations. While high solar wind speed associated with coronal holes plays an important role in the HP variations, IMF BT is equally important. The term [BT2/3sin8/3(θc/2] is even more important as its correlation coefficient with HP is higher than that for BT or solar wind speed. Nevertheless, MMR has the highest correlation with HP. Similar results were seen in the 2005 data where the 9-day variation is dominant. These results indicate that both solar wind speed and IMF conditions are required for accurate specification of periodic variations in aurora hemispheric power and thermosphere composition.

  9. Langmuir turbulence in the auroral ionosphere 1: Linear theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Ergun, R. E.; Boehm, M. H.

    1994-01-01

    Intense bursts of Langmuir waves with electric fields of 50 to 500 mV / m have been frequently observed at altitudes greater than 500 km in the auroral ionosphere. These bursts are driven by 20 eV to 4 keV field-aligned electrons, which are embedded in an approximately isotropic nonthermal tail of scattered electrons. The Langmuir bursts are often observed at altitudes where the ionosphere is moderately magnetized (OMEGA (sub e) approximately equals omega (sub pe)). Both the moderate magnetization and the scattered electrons have a major influence on the linear dispersion and damping of Langmuir waves. In particular, the linear dispersion is topologically different depending on whether the magnetic field is subcritical (OMEGA (sub e) less than omega (sub pe)) or supercritical (OMEGA (sub e) greater than omega (sub pe)). The correct dispersion and damping can account for the observed polarization of the Langmuir waves, which is very nearly parallel to the geomagnetic field. Inferred properties of the linear instability driven by the field-aligned electrons are discussed. The linear dispersion and damping derived here provide the basis for a nonlinear turbulence study described in a companion paper (Newman et al., this issue).

  10. Generation of Z mode radiation by diffuse auroral electron precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Lyons, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    The generation of Z mode waves by diffuse auroral electron precipitation is investigated assuming that a loss cone exists in the upgoing portion of the distribution due to electron interactions with the atmosphere. The waves are generated at frequencies above, but very near, the local electron cyclotron frequency omega(e) and at wave normal angles larger than 90 deg. In agreement with Hewitt et al. (1983), the group velocity is directed downward in regions where the ratio of the upper hybrid frequency omega(pe) to Omega(e) is less than 0.5, so that Z mode waves excited above a satellite propagate toward it and away from the upper hybrid resonance. Z mode waves are excited in a frequency band between Omega(e) and about 1.02 Omega(e), and with maximum growth rates of about 0.001 Omega(e). The amplification length is about 100 km, which allows Z mode waves to grow to the intensities observed by high-altitude satellites.

  11. Juno's Earth flyby: the Jovian infrared Auroral Mapper preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriani, A.; Moriconi, M. L.; Mura, A.; Tosi, F.; Sindoni, G.; Noschese, R.; Cicchetti, A.; Filacchione, G.

    2016-08-01

    The Jovian InfraRed Auroral Mapper, JIRAM, is an image-spectrometer onboard the NASA Juno spacecraft flying to Jupiter. The instrument has been designed to study the aurora and the atmosphere of the planet in the spectral range 2-5 μm. The very first scientific observation taken with the instrument was at the Moon just before Juno's Earth fly-by occurred on October 9, 2013. The purpose was to check the instrument regular operation modes and to optimize the instrumental performances. The testing activity will be completed with pointing and a radiometric/spectral calibrations shortly after Jupiter Orbit Insertion. Then the reconstruction of some Moon infrared images, together with co-located spectra used to retrieve the lunar surface temperature, is a fundamental step in the instrument operation tuning. The main scope of this article is to serve as a reference to future users of the JIRAM datasets after public release with the NASA Planetary Data System.

  12. Surface energy balance and actual evapotranspiration of the transboundary Indus Basin estimated from satellite measurements and the ETLook model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaanssen, W. G. M.; Cheema, M. J. M.; Immerzeel, W. W.; Miltenburg, I. J.; Pelgrum, H.

    2012-11-01

    The surface energy fluxes and related evapotranspiration processes across the Indus Basin were estimated for the hydrological year 2007 using satellite measurements. The new ETLook remote sensing model (version 1) infers information on actual Evaporation (E) and actual Transpiration (T) from combined optical and passive microwave sensors, which can observe the land-surface even under persistent overcast conditions. A two-layer Penman-Monteith equation was applied for quantifying soil and canopy evaporation. The novelty of the paper is the computation of E and T across a vast area (116.2 million ha) by using public domain microwave data that can be applied under all weather conditions, and for which no advanced input data are required. The average net radiation for the basin was estimated as being 112 Wm-2. The basin average sensible, latent and soil heat fluxes were estimated to be 80, 32, and 0 Wm-2, respectively. The average evapotranspiration (ET) and evaporative fraction were 1.2 mm d-1 and 0.28, respectively. The basin wide ET was 496 ± 16.8 km3 yr-1. Monte Carlo analysis have indicated 3.4% error at 95% confidence interval for a dominant land use class. Results compared well with previously conducted soil moisture, lysimeter and Bowen ratio measurements at field scale (R2 = 0.70; RMSE = 0.45 mm d-1; RE = -11.5% for annual ET). ET results were also compared against earlier remote sensing and modeling studies for various regions and provinces in Pakistan (R2 = 0.76; RMSE = 0.29 mmd-1; RE = 6.5% for annual ET). The water balance for all irrigated areas together as one total system in Pakistan and India (26.02 million ha) show a total ET value that is congruent with the ET value from the ETLook surface energy balance computations. An unpublished validation of the same ETLook model for 23 jurisdictional areas covering the entire Australian continent showed satisfactory results given the quality of the watershed data and the diverging physiographic and climatic

  13. Real-time determination and monitoring of the auroral electrojet boundaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnsen Magnar Gullikstad

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A method for nowcasting of the auroral electrojet location from real-time geomagnetic data in the European sector is presented. Along the auroral ovals strong electrojet currents are flowing. The variation in the geomagnetic field caused by these auroral electrojets is observed on a routine basis at high latitudes using ground-based magnetometers. From latitude profiles of the vertical component of these variations it is possible to identify the boundaries of the electrojets. Using realtime data from ground magnetometer chains is the only existing method for continuous monitoring and nowcasting of the location and strength of the auroral electrojets in a given sector. This is an important aspect of any space weather programme. The method for obtaining the electrojet boundaries is described and assessed in a controlled environment using modelling. Furthermore a provisional, real-time electrojet tracker for the European sector based on data from the Tromsø Geophyiscal Observatory magnetometer chain is presented. The relationship between the electrojet and the diffuse auroral oval is discussed, and it is concluded that although there may exist time-dependent differences in boundary locations, there exists a general coincidence. Furthermore, it is pointed out that knowledge about the latitudinal location of the geomagnetic activity, that is the electrojets, is more critical for space weather sensitive, ground-based technology than the location of the aurora.

  14. GPS scintillation effects associated with polar cap patches and substorm auroral activity: direct comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Yaqi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We directly compare the relative GPS scintillation levels associated with regions of enhanced plasma irregularities called auroral arcs, polar cap patches, and auroral blobs that frequently occur in the polar ionosphere. On January 13, 2013 from Ny-Ålesund, several polar cap patches were observed to exit the polar cap into the auroral oval, and were then termed auroral blobs. This gave us an unprecedented opportunity to compare the relative scintillation levels associated with these three phenomena. The blobs were associated with the strongest phase scintillation (σϕ, followed by patches and arcs, with σϕ up to 0.6, 0.5, and 0.1 rad, respectively. Our observations indicate that most patches in the nightside polar cap have produced significant scintillations, but not all of them. Since the blobs are formed after patches merged into auroral regions, in space weather predictions of GPS scintillations, it will be important to enable predictions of patches exiting the polar cap.

  15. Auroral radio absorption as an indicator of magnetospheric electrons and of conditions in the disturbed auroral D-region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collis, P.N.; Hargreaves, J.K. (Lancaster Univ. (UK)); Korth, A. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Aeronomie, Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany, F.R.))

    1984-01-01

    In a previous paper we demonstrated a method by which the auroral radio absorption measured with a riometer can be predicted from energetic electron measurements at geosynchronous orbit. The present paper enquires to what extent the process can be inverted: what levels of magnetospheric electron flux, and of D-region production rate, electron density and incremental absorption, are predicted by a given measurement of radio absorption and what reliance can be placed on such predictions. Using data from 45 precipitation features recorded with riometers in Scandinavia and at geosynchronous orbit with GEOS-2, it is shown that electron fluxes in the ranges 20 to 40, 40 to 80 and 80 to 160 keV increase with increasing absorption and can be predicted to better than 50% for absorption events of 2 dB or greater. Electrons above 160 keV show little or no correlation with absorption. D-region production rates and electron densities can be predicted to within factors of 2 and square root of 2, respectively. It is more difficult to specify the height of the absorbing region because of uncertainty in the profile of the effective recombination coefficient. Having regard to other data, an ..cap alpha..sub(eff) profile is proposed which satisfies rocket and incoherent scatter data as well as the present calculations.

  16. Intensification of dayside diffuse auroral precipitation: contribution of dayside Whistler-mode chorus waves in realistic magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Shi

    2012-09-01

    dayside. Therefore, dayside chorus scattering in the realistic magnetic field can greatly contribute to the YRS ASI observed intensification of dayside green-line aurora. Besides wave induced scattering and changes in the ambient magnetic field, variations in associated electron flux can also contribute to enhanced diffuse aurora emissions, the possibility of which we cannot exactly rule out due to lack of simultaneous observations of magnetospheric particles. Since the geomagnetic activity level was rather low during the period of interest, it is reasonable to infer that changes in the associated electron flux in the magnetosphere should be small, and consequently its contribution to the observed enhanced diffuse auroral activity should be small as well. Our results support the scenario that dayside chorus could play a major role in the production of dayside diffuse aurora, and also demonstrate that changes in magnetospheric magnetic field should be considered to reasonably interpret observations of dayside diffuse aurora.

  17. Acceleration of hydrogen ions and conic formation along auroral field lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okuda, H.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.

    1982-05-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron turbulence and the formation of ion conics at low altitudes (approx. = 1500 km) along auroral field lines have been investigated analytically and by plasma numerical simulations. Ion cyclotron waves are assumed to be driven unstable by the up-going cold ionospheric electrons associated with the downward auroral current. When the electron drift speed is comparable to the electron thermal speed, it is found that the large amplitude, e phi/T/sub e/ approx. = 1, coherent, ..omega.. = ..cap omega../sub i/, ion cyclotron waves shoudl exist along auroral field lines at low altitudes extending approx. = 500 to 1000 km. Ion conics are associated with the cyclotron turbulence and the ion bulk temperature is found to increase a factor of 10 of the initial ionospheric temperature, while the temperature of the high energy tail can be as much as a factor of 100 of the ionospheric temperature. Theory and simulations agree well.

  18. Use of the Auroral Boundary Index for potential forecasting of ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, James M.; Connor, Thomas C.; Snell, Hilary E.

    2012-01-01

    The Hardy-Gussenhoven Auroral Dosing Model (HGADM) was developed to compute electron characteristic energy and energy flux values onto the global grid and is often used to generate the inputs for other phenomenological models. Forecasting auroral conditions is limited by rapid changes in the ionosphere due to variable solar conditions. However, through a statistical analysis of Auroral Boundary Index data we have developed a technique which allows us to forecast/predict the appropriate inputs to the HGADM, thereby providing a means of forecasting the characteristic energy and energy flux values. This paper will initially discuss the statistical analysis and the development of the forecast mode for the HGADM. We then discuss the possibility that aurora-based indices along with other environmental indicators can be correlated to ionospheric disturbances.

  19. Auroral radio emission from ultracool dwarfs: a Jovian model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnpenney, S.; Nichols, J. D.; Wynn, G. A.; Casewell, S. L.

    2017-10-01

    A number of fast-rotating ultracool dwarfs (UCDs) emit pulsed coherent radiation, attributed to the electron-cyclotron maser instability, a phenomenon that occurs in the Solar system at planets with strong auroral emission. In this paper, we examine magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents in UCDs, adopting processes used in models of Jovian emission. We consider the angular velocity gradient arising from a steady outward flux of angular momentum from an internal plasma source, as analogous to the Jovian main oval current system, as well as the interaction of a rotating magnetosphere with the external medium. Both of these mechanisms are seen in the Solar system to be responsible for the production of radio emission. We present the results of an investigation over a range of relevant plasma and magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling parameters to determine regimes consistent with observed UCD radio luminosities. Both processes are able to explain observed UCD luminosities with ionospheric Pedersen conductances of ˜1-2 mho, either for a closed magnetosphere with a plasma mass outflow rate of ˜105 kg s-1, i.e. a factor of ˜100 larger than that observed at Jupiter's moon Io, or for a dwarf with an open magnetosphere moving through the interstellar medium at ˜50 km s-1 and a plasma mass outflow rate of ˜1000 kg s-1. The radio luminosity resulting from these mechanisms has opposing dependencies on the magnetic field strength, a point that may be used to discriminate between the two models as more data become available.

  20. Synoptical Auroral Ovals: A Comparison study with TIMED/GUVI Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, K.; Paxton, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Whether the aurora Australis is a mirror image of its northern hemispheric counterpart is a question that auroral physicists have been wanting to answer. Owing to geophysical constraints, especially the large offset between the location of the southern magnetic and southern geographic poles, there is a paucity of information about the aurora Australis. Comparisons of some instantansous global-scale northern and southern auroras acquired conjugately by Polar and IMAGE spacecraft recently have shown mixed results. In this study, we present data from a different source to provide insight into the global morphology and behavior of the auroral oval. Approximately 20,000 Earth's disk FUV images acquired from the Global Ultraviolet Imager (GUVI) on-board NASA's Thermosphere, Ionosphere, Mesosphere, Energetics and Dynamics (TIMED) satellite between February 2002 and February 2006 are processed and analyzed. Synoptic auroral distributions for the northern and southern ovals are derived. Our study result reveals that the statistical oval is nearly hemispherically symmetric (within ±80%). Several known features in the morphology of the aurora Borealis are also observed in the Southern Hemisphere: For instance, the auroral midday gap and the premidnight maximum. The hemispherical symmetry of the auroras deteriorates as the partition of solar illumination in the two hemisphere polar region becomes asymmetric. It is estimated that the solar illumination effect accounts for up to ~50% of the hemispheric asymmetry. We found evidence that suggests that the aurora is suppressed under sunlit conditions in the South just as it is in the North. We also found that the auroral energy flux increases monotonically with the increase of the solar zenith angle. These results suggest that ionospheric conductivity plays an active role in regulating magnetospheric energy deposition in the auroral zone.

  1. THEMIS ground-space observations during the development of auroral spirals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keiling

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A simultaneous observation of an auroral spiral and its generator region in the near-Earth plasma sheet is rather unlikely. Here we present such observations using the THEMIS spacecraft as well as the THEMIS ground network of all-sky imagers and magnetometers. Two consecutive auroral spirals separated by approximately 14 min occurred during a substorm on 19 February 2008. The spirals formed during the expansion phase and a subsequent intensification, and were among the brightest features in the aurora with diameters of 200–300 km. The duration for the formation and decay of each spiral was less than 60 s. Both spirals occurred shortly after the formation of two oppositely rotating plasma flow vortices in space, which were also accompanied by dipolarizations and ion injections, at ~11 RE geocentric distance. Observations and model calculations also give evidence for a magnetic-field-aligned current generation of approximately 0.1 MA via the flow vortices, connecting the generator region of the spirals with the ionosphere, during the formation of both spirals. In the ionosphere, a pair of equivalent ionospheric current (EIC vortices with opposite rotations (corresponding to upward and downward currents was present during both auroral spirals with enhanced EICs and ionospheric flows at the locations of the auroral spirals and along the auroral arcs. The combined ground and space observations suggest that each auroral spiral was powered by two oppositely rotating plasma flow vortices that caused a current enhancement in the substorm current wedge.

  2. Velocity of small-scale auroral ionospheric current systems over Indian Antarctic station Maitri

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Girija Rajaram; A N Hanchinal; R Kalra; K Unnikrishnan; K Jeeva; M Sridharan; A Dhar

    2002-03-01

    The Indian Antarctic station Maitri (geog. 70° 45/S, 11° 45/E, geom. 66° .03S, 53°.21E) occupies a sub-auroral location during magnetically quiet conditions ( Kp < 10), but attains an auroral position when the auroral oval shifts equatorwards with increasing strength of magnetic disturbance. At the latter times, triangulation with 3 uxgate magnetometers located at the vertices of a suitable triangle provides a means of monitoring mobile auroral ionospheric current systems over Maitri. The spacing between the magnetometers is typically kept at 75-200 km, keeping in mind the scale-sizes of ∼100 km for these mobile current systems. This work reports the results of two triangulation experiments carried out around Maitri in January 1992 and January 1995, both during Antarctic summer. The velocities estimated for pulsations of the Pc4 and Pc5 type were about 0.59 km/sec in the direction 102°.7 east of due north, in the first case, and about 1-3 km/sec in the second case in the east-west direction. While several magnetometer arrays exist in the northern auroral regions (e.g., the Alberta array in Canada, the Alaskan array in the U.S. and the IMS Scandinavian array), there is no report in literature of triangulation through arrays in Antarctica, except for a one-day study by Neudegg et al 1995 for ULF pulsations of the Pc1 and Pc2 type. The velocities obtained for the Pi3 type of irregular pulsations over Antarctica in the present study tally well with those obtained for northern auroral locations.

  3. D- and E-region effects in the auroral zone during a moderately active 24-h period in July 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. K. Hargreaves

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of energetic electron precipitation into the auroral region at a time of enhanced solar wind have been investigated during a continuous period of 24 h, using the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT radar, an imaging riometer, and particle measurements on an orbiting satellite. The relative effects in the E region (120 km and D region (90 km are found to vary during the day, consistent with a gradual hardening of the incoming electron spectrum from pre-midnight to morning. Whereas the night spectra are single peaked, the daytime spectra are found to be double peaked, suggesting the presence of two distinct populations.

    A comparison between the radiowave absorption observed with the riometer and values estimated from the radar data shows generally good agreement, but with some discrepancies suggesting the occurrence of some small-scale features. The height and thickness of the absorbing region are estimated. Two periods of enhanced precipitation and the related radio absorption, one near magnetic midnight and one in the early morning, are studied in detail, including their horizontal structure and movement of the absorption patches.

    A sharp reduction of electron flux recorded on a POES satellite is related to the edge of an absorption region delineated by the imaging riometer. The observed particle flux is compared with a value deduced from the radar data during the overpass, and found to be in general agreement.

  4. Prospect of China's Auroral Fine-structure Imaging System (CAFIS) at Zhongshan station in Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shun-lin; HAN De-sheng; HU Hong-qiao; HUANG De-hong; ZHANG Bei-chen; YANG Hui-gen

    2008-01-01

    A new auroral imaging system is reported which is planned to be deployed at Zhongshan Station in Antarctica in the end of 2009. The system will focus on study of optical auroras in small scales and be called China' s Auroral Fine-structure Imaging System (CAFIS). The project of CAFIS is carried out by support of 'the tenth five-year plan for capacity building' of China. CAFIS will be a powerful groundbased platform for aurora observational experiments. Composing and advantages of CAFIS are introduced in this brief report. Some potential study topics involved CAFIS are also considered.

  5. Auroral spectrograph data annals of the international geophysical year, v.25

    CERN Document Server

    Carrigan, Anne; Norman, S J

    1964-01-01

    Annals of the International Geophysical Year, Volume 25: Auroral Spectrograph Data is a five-chapter text that contains tabulations of auroral spectrograph data. The patrol spectrograph built by the Perkin-Elmer Corporation for the Aurora and Airglow Program of the IGY is a high-speed, low-dispersion, automatic instrument designed to photograph spectra of aurora occurring along a given magnetic meridian of the sky. Data from each spectral frame were recorded on an IBM punched card. The data recorded on the cards are printed onto the tabulations in this volume. These tabulations are available

  6. Resonant electron diffusion as a saturation process of the synchrotron maser instability. [of auroral kilometric radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, M. C.; Kuo, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of resonant electron diffusion as an effective saturation process of the auroral kilometric radiation has been formulated. The auroral kilometric radiation is assumed to be amplified by the synchrotron maser instability that is driven by an electron distribution of the loss-cone type. The calculated intensity of the saturated radiation is found to have a significantly lower value in comparison with that caused by the quasi-linear diffusion process as an alternative saturation process. This indicates that resonant electron diffusion dominates over quasi-linear diffusion in saturating the synchrotron maser instability.

  7. Global effect of auroral particle and Joule heating in the undisturbed thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, B. B.

    1978-01-01

    From the compositional variations observed with the neutral atmosphere composition experiment on OGO 6 and a simplified model of thermospheric dynamics, global average values of non-EUV heating are deduced. These are 0.19-0.25 mW/sq m for quiet days and 0.44-0.58 mW/sq m for ordinary days.

  8. The ion experiment onboard the Interball-Aurora satellite; initial results on velocity-dispersed structures in the cleft and inside the auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Sauvaud

    Full Text Available The Toulouse ION experiment flown on the Russian Interball-Aurora mission performs simultaneous ion and electron measurements. Two mass spectrometers looking in opposing directions perpendicular to the satellite spin axis, which points toward the sun, measure ions in the mass and energy ranges 1–32 amu and ~0–14 000 eV. Two electron spectrometers also looking in opposing directions perform measurements in the energy range ~10 eV–20 000 eV. The Interball-Aurora spacecraft was launched on 29 August 1996 into a 62.8° inclination orbit with an apogee of ~3 RE. The satellite orbital period is 6 h, so that every four orbits the satellite sweeps about the same region of the auroral zone; the orbit plane drifts around the pole in ~9 months. We present a description of the ION experiment and discuss initial measurements performed in the cusp near noon, in the polar cleft at dusk, and inside the proton aurora at dawn. Ion-dispersed energy structures resulting from time-of-flight effects are observed both in the polar cleft at ~16 hours MLT and in the dawnside proton aurora close to 06 hours MLT. Magnetosheath plasma injections in the polar cleft, which appear as overlapping energy bands in particle energy-time spectrograms, are traced backwards in time using a particle trajectory model using 3D electric and magnetic field models. We found that the cleft ion source is located at distances of the order of 18 RE from the earth at about 19 MLT, i.e., on the flank of the magnetopause. These observations are in agreement with flux transfer events (FTE occurring not only on the front part of the magnetopause but also in a region extending at least to dusk. We also show that, during quiet magnetic conditions, time-of-flight ion dispersions can also be measured inside the dawn proton aurora. A method similar to that used for the cleft is applied to these auroral energy dispersion signatures. Unexpectedly, the ion source is found to be

  9. Space Weather Impacts on Spacecraft Design and Operations in Auroral Charging Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minow, Joseph I.; Parker, Linda N.

    2012-01-01

    Spacecraft in low altitude, high inclination (including sun-synchronous) orbits are widely used for remote sensing of the Earth s land surface and oceans, monitoring weather and climate, communications, scientific studies of the upper atmosphere and ionosphere, and a variety of other scientific, commercial, and military applications. These systems are episodically exposed to environments characterized by a high flux of energetic (approx.1 to 10 s kilovolt) electrons in regions of very low background plasma density which is similar in some ways to the space weather conditions in geostationary orbit responsible for spacecraft charging to kilovolt levels. While it is well established that charging conditions in geostationary orbit are responsible for many anomalies and even spacecraft failures, to date there have been relatively few such reports due to charging in auroral environments. This presentation first reviews the physics of the space environment and its interactions with spacecraft materials that control auroral charging rates and the anticipated maximum potentials that should be observed on spacecraft surfaces during disturbed space weather conditions. We then describe how the theoretical values compare to the observational history of extreme charging in auroral environments and discuss how space weather impacts both spacecraft design and operations for vehicles on orbital trajectories that traverse auroral charging environments.

  10. Auroral arc as an electric discharge between the ionosphere and magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyatskij, V.B. (AN SSSR, Kol' skij Filial. Polyarnyj Geofizicheskij Inst.)

    A new method of generation of arcs of aurora borealis is suggested. The potential difference, applied across the magnetosphere in the region of longtitudinal currents flowing from the ionosphere, brings about the periodic dependence of the electric field on the distance. Longtitudinal currents, in this case, are split into several parallel layers, which can be identical to auroral arcs.

  11. The color ratio-intensity relation in the Jovian aurora: Hubble observations of auroral components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, J.-C.; Bonfond, B.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.

    2016-10-01

    Spectral observations made with the long slit of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on board Hubble have been used to construct spectral maps of the FUV Jovian aurora. They reveal that the amount of absorption by overlying methane shows significant spatial variations. In this report, we examine the relationship between the auroral brightness of the unabsorbed H2 emission that is proportional to the precipitated electron energy flux, and the ultraviolet color ratio, a proxy of the mean electron energy. We find that it varies significantly between the different components of the aurora and in the polar region. Although no global dependence can be found, we show that the two quantities are better organized in some auroral components such as regions of the main aurororal emission. By contrast, the dependence of the electron characteristic energy in high-latitude and diffuse aurora regions on the auroral energy input is generally more scattered. We conclude that the various auroral components are associated with different electron acceleration processes, some of which are not governed by a simple relation linking the value of a field-aligned acceleration potential with the parallel currents flowing from the ionosphere.

  12. A Study of the Different classes of Poleward-Moving Auroral Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononenko, K.; Fasel, G. J.; Rothballer, A.; Angelo, A.; Alyami, M.; Brandt, T. G.; Fox, B.; Grissom, A. G.; Gribble, M.; Lysenstoen, K.; Sigernes, F.; Lorentzen, D. A.; Green, D.; Freeman, M. P. P.

    2015-12-01

    During periods when the z-component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) becomes negative, the dayside auroral oval moves equatorward [Feldstein and Starkov, 1967; Horrwitz and Akasofu, 1977]. During these expansion periods poleward-auroral moving forms (PMAFs) are observed. PMAFs are also observed during periods when the auroral oval is expanded. PMAFs are not observed when the dayside auroral oval moves poleward of 79° [Lockwood et al., 1989]. Past studies of PMAFs show that they drift poleward and fade [Vorobjev et al., 1975; Horwitz and Akasofu, 1977; Sandholt et al., 1986, 1989, 1990; Rairden and Mende, 1989; Lockwood, 1991], rebrighten as they drift into the polar cap [Fasel et al., 1992, 1994; Fasel, 1995], or rebrighten and slow down while moving into the polar cap, eventually stopping while maintaining their luminosity at least 10 minutes [Fasel, 1995; Fasel et al., 1995]. Fasel [1995] classified these three types of PMAFs as PMAF1, PMAF2, PMAF3 events, respectively. This study looks at the three classes of PMAF events. The study will show the brightening histories of the PMAF events and their evolution as they move into the polar cap. PMAF1 events usually do not drift as far poleward as PMAF2 and PMAF3 events. The lifetime of PMAF1 events are shorter than those of PMAF2 and PMAF3 events. At least two rebrightenings are observed in PMAF2 and PMAF3 events as they drift into the polar cap.

  13. Observations of Saturn Kilometric Radiation during the Saturn Auroral Campaign of Spring 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Gurnett, D. A.; Lamy, L.; Mitchell, D. G.; Dougherty, M. K.; Nichols, J.; Pryor, W.; Baines, K. H.; Dyudina, U.; Stallard, T.; O'Donoghue, J.; Melin, H.; Crary, F. J.; Miller, S.

    2013-09-01

    During April and May 2013, a concerted effort to study Saturn's auroras was mounted using multi-wavelength observations from Cassini and a number of Earth-based observations. It has been shown that the integrated power of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) provides a good proxy for auroral activity and there is at least a qualitative correlation between auroral brightness and SKR intensity. While the SKR observations can be complicated by beaming issues, they provide a reasonable, continuous context within which to place other observations. For example, during the first Hubble Space Telescope visit on 5 April 2013, a brightened poleward expansion of the UV aurora was observed while the SKR intensity was elevated during most of the day as shown in Figure 1. In the following, more extended interval of the campaign over 19 - 23 April 2013, the SKR intensity is low for the first few days but intensifies later in the interval, reflecting increasing UV auroral activity as seen by Hubble. In this paper we will present the SKR intensities over time intervals of the auroral campaign along with other Cassini and Earth-based observations for selected events.

  14. Auroral research at the Tromsø Northern Lights Observatory: the Harang directorship, 1928-1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egeland, Alv; Burke, William J.

    2016-03-01

    The Northern Lights Observatory in Tromsø began as Professor Lars Vegard's dream for a permanent facility in northern Norway, dedicated to the continuous study of auroral phenomenology and dynamics. Fortunately, not only was Vegard an internationally recognized spectroscopist, he was a great salesman and persuaded the Rockefeller Foundation that such an observatory represented an important long-term investment. A shrewd judge of talent, Vegard recognized the scientific and managerial skills of Leiv Harang, a recent graduate from the University of Oslo, and recommended that he become the observatory's first director. In 1929, subsequent to receiving the Rockefeller Foundation grant, the University of Oslo established a low temperature laboratory to support Vegard's spectroscopic investigations. This paper follows the scientific accomplishments of observatory personnel during the 18 years of Harang's directorship. These include: identifying the chemical sources of auroral emissions, discovering the Vegard-Kaplan bands, quantifying height distributions of different auroral forms, interpreting patterns of magnetic field variations, remotely probing auroral electron distribution profiles in the polar ionosphere, and monitoring the evolving states of the ozone layer. The Rockefeller Foundation judges got it right: the Tromsø Nordlysobservatoriet was, and for decades remained, an outstanding scientific investment.

  15. Substorm associated radar auroral surges: a statistical study and possible generation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available Substorm-associated radar auroral surges (SARAS are a short lived (15–90 minutes and spatially localised (~5° of latitude perturbation of the plasma convection pattern observed within the auroral E-region. The understanding of such phenomena has important ramifications for the investigation of the larger scale plasma convection and ultimately the coupling of the solar wind, magnetosphere and ionosphere system. A statistical investigation is undertaken of SARAS, observed by the Sweden And Britain Radar Experiment (SABRE, in order to provide a more extensive examination of the local time occurrence and propagation characteristics of the events. The statistical analysis has determined a local time occurrence of observations between 1420 MLT and 2200 MLT with a maximum occurrence centred around 1700 MLT. The propagation velocity of the SARAS feature through the SABRE field of view was found to be predominately L-shell aligned with a velocity centred around 1750 m s–1 and within the range 500 m s–1 and 3500 m s–1. This comprehensive examination of the SARAS provides the opportunity to discuss, qualitatively, a possible generation mechanism for SARAS based on a proposed model for the production of a similar phenomenon referred to as sub-auroral ion drifts (SAIDs. The results of the comparison suggests that SARAS may result from a similar geophysical mechanism to that which produces SAID events, but probably occurs at a different time in the evolution of the event.

    Key words. Substorms · Auroral surges · Plasma con-vection · Sub-auroral ion drifts

  16. Space Weather Products and Tools Used in Auroral Monitoring and Forecasting at CCMC/SWRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yihua; Rastaetter, Lutz

    2015-01-01

    Key points discussed in this chapter are (1) the importance of aurora research to scientific advances and space weather applications, (2) space weather products at CCMC that are relevant to aurora monitoring and forecasting, and (3) the need for more effort from the whole community to achieve a better and long-lead-time forecast of auroral activity. Aurora, as manifestations of solar wind-magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling that occurs in a region of space that is relatively easy to access for sounding rockets, satellites, and other types of observational platforms, serves as a natural laboratory for studying the underlying physics of the complex system. From a space weather application perspective, auroras can cause surface charging of technological assets passing through the region, result in scintillation effects affecting communication and navigation, and cause radar cluttering that hinders military and civilian applications. Indirectly, an aurora and its currents can induce geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on the ground, which poses major concerns for the wellbeing and operation of power grids, particularly during periods of intense geomagnetic activity. In addition, accurate auroral forecasting is desired for auroral tourism. In this chapter, we first review some of the existing auroral models and discuss past validation efforts. Such efforts are crucial in transitioning a model(s) from research to operations and for further model improvement and development that also benefits scientific endeavors. Then we will focus on products and tools that are used for auroral monitoring and forecasting at the Space Weather Research Center (SWRC). As part of the CCMC (Community Coordinated Modeling Center), SWRC has been providing space weather services since 2010.

  17. Nonlinear model of short-scale electrodynamics in the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. A. Noël

    Full Text Available The optical detection of auroral subarcs a few tens of m wide as well as the direct observation of shears several m/s per m over km to sub km scales by rocket instrumentation both indicate that violent and highly localized electrodynamics can occur at times in the auroral ionosphere over scales 100 m or less in width. These observations as well as the detection of unstable ion-acoustic waves observed by incoherent radars along the geomagnetic field lines has motivated us to develop a detailed time-dependent two-dimensional model of short-scale auroral electrodynamics that uses current continuity, Ohm's law, and 8-moment transport equations for the ions and electrons in the presence of large ambient electric fields to describe wide auroral arcs with sharp edges in response to sharp cut-offs in precipitation (even though it may be possible to describe thin arcs and ultra-thin arcs with our model, we have left such a study for future work. We present the essential elements of this new model and illustrate the model's usefulness with a sample run for which the ambient electric field is 100 mV/m away from the arc and for which electron precipitation cuts off over a region 100 m wide. The sample run demonstrates that parallel current densities of the order of several hundred µA m-2 can be triggered in these circumstances, together with shears several m/s per m in magnitude and parallel electric fields of the order of 0.1 mV/m around 130 km altitude. It also illustrates that the local ionospheric properties like densities, temperature and composition can strongly be affected by the violent localized electrodynamics and vice-versa.

    Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere, electric fields and currents, ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions

  18. Lower thermospheric wind variations in auroral patches during the substorm recovery phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Hosokawa, Keisuke; Watkins, Brenton J.; Kurihara, Junichi; Tsuda, Takuo T.; Fallen, Christopher T.

    2016-04-01

    Measurements of the lower thermospheric wind with a Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) at Tromsø, Norway, found the largest wind variations in a night during the appearance of auroral patches at the substorm recovery phase. Taking into account magnetospheric substorm evolution of plasma energy accumulation and release, the largest wind amplitude at the recovery phase is a fascinating result. The results are the first detailed investigation of the magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere coupled system at the substorm recovery phase using comprehensive data sets of solar wind, geomagnetic field, auroral pattern, and FPI-derived wind. This study used three events in November 2010 and January 2012, particularly focusing on the wind signatures associated with the auroral morphology, and found three specific features: (1) wind fluctuations that were isolated at the edge and/or in the darker area of an auroral patch with the largest vertical amplitude up to about 20 m/s and with the longest oscillation period about 10 min, (2) when the convection electric field was smaller than 15 mV/m, and (3) wind fluctuations that were accompanied by pulsating aurora. This approach suggests that the energy dissipation to produce the wind fluctuations is localized in the auroral pattern. Effects of the altitudinal variation in the volume emission rate were investigated to evaluate the instrumental artifact due to vertical wind shear. The small electric field values suggest weak contributions of the Joule heating and Lorentz force processes in wind fluctuations. Other unknown mechanisms may play a principal role at the recovery phase.

  19. Nightside auroral zone and polar cap ion outflow as a function of substorm size and phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, G. R.; Ober, D. M.; Germany, G. A.; Lund, E. J.

    2004-02-01

    Because the high latitude ionosphere is an important source of plasma for the magnetosphere under active conditions, we have undertaken a study of the way ion outflow from the nightside auroral zone and polar cap respond to substorm activity. We have combined data from the Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) on Polar with ion upflow measurements from the TEAMS instrument on the FAST spacecraft to construct a picture of ion upflow from these regions as a function of substorm size and as a function of time relative to substorm onset. We use data taken during solar minimum in the northern hemisphere between December 1996 and February 1997. We find that the total nightside auroral zone ion outflow rate (averaged over substorm phase) depends on the size of the substorm, increasing by about a factor of 10 for both O+ and H+ from the smallest to the largest substorms in our study. The combined outflow rate from both the polar cap and the nightside auroral zone goes up by a factor of 7 for both ions for the same change in conditions. Regardless of storm size, the nightside auroral zone outflow rate increases by about a factor of 2 after onset, reaching its peak level after about 20 min. These results indicate that the change in the nightside auroral zone ion outflow rate that accompanies substorm onset is not as significant as the change from low to high magnetic activity. As a consequence, the prompt increase in the near earth plasma sheet energy density of O+ and H+ ions that accompanies onset [, 1996] is likely due to local energization of ions already present rather than to the sudden arrival and energization of fresh ionospheric plasma.

  20. Energy deposition and non-equilibrium infared radiation of energetic auroral electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yadong; Gao, Bo; Zhu, Guangsheng; Li, Ziguang

    2016-07-01

    Infrared radiation caused by energetic auroral electrons plays an important role in the thermospheric hear budget, and may be seen as background by infrared surveillance sensors. The auroral electron deposition leads to the ionization, excitation, and dissociation of neutral species(N2,O2,and O), and initiates a series of chemical reaction in the upper atmosphere, finally causes the optical emission of infared excited emitters. In this study, the whole progress from the initial auroral electrons energy deposition to the final infrared emissions has been modeled, which including space plasma, atmospheric physical chemistry, and radiative transfer. The initial atmosphere parameters before auroral disturbing are given by MSIS00 model. The primary electron flux at the top of atmosphere is given by a statistical fitting with the sum of three distribution terms, a power law, a Maxwellian and a Guassian. A semi-emprical model is used in the calculation of energy depositon of single primary electron. The total integral ion pairs production rate is obtained after combining with the initial primary electron flux. The production rate and flux of secondary electrons are modeled with a continuous slow down approximation, using different excitation, ionization, dissociation cross sections of N2, O2, and O to electrons. The photochemical reactions with auroral disturbance is analysed, and its calculation model is established. A "three-step" calculation method is created to obtain number densities of eleven species in the hight between 90-160 km, which containing N2+, O2+, O+, O2+(a4Π), O+(2D), O+(2P), N2(A3Σ), N(2D), N(4S), NO+, and N+. Number densities of different vibraional levels of NO and NO+ are got with steady state assumption, considering 1-12 vibrational levels of NO and 1-14 vibrational levels of NO+. The infared emissions and the spectral lines of the two radiating bodies are calculated with a fuzzy model of spectral band.

  1. On the relationship between auroral absorption, electrojet currents and plasma convection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. C. Kellerman

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the relationship between auroral absorption, electrojet currents, and ionospheric plasma convection velocity is investigated using a series of new methods where temporal correlations are calculated and analysed for different events and MLT sectors. We employ cosmic noise absorption (CNA observations obtained by the Imaging Riometer for Ionospheric Studies (IRIS system in Kilpisjärvi, Finland, plasma convection measurements by the European Incoherent Scatter (EISCAT radar, and estimates of the electrojet currents derived from the Tromsø magnetometer data. The IRIS absorption and EISCAT plasma convection measurements are used as a proxy for the particle precipitation component of the Hall conductance and ionospheric electric field, respectively. It is shown that the electrojet currents are affected by both enhanced conductance and electric field but with the relative importance of these two factors varying with magnetic local time (MLT. The correlation between the current and electric field (absorption is the highest at 12:00–15:00 MLT (00:00–03:00 MLT. It is demonstrated that the electric-field-dominant region is asymmetric with respect to magnetic-noon-midnight meridian extending from 09:00 to 21:00 MLT. This may be related to the recently reported absence of mirror-symmetry between the effects of positive and negative IMF By on the high-latitude plasma convection pattern. The conductivity-dominant region is somewhat wider than previously thought extending from 21:00 to 09:00 MLT with correlation slowly declining from midnight towards the morning, which is interpreted as being in part due to high-energy electron clouds gradually depleting and drifting from midnight towards the morning sector. The conductivity-dominant region is further investigated using the extensive IRIS riometer and Tromsø magnetometer datasets with results showing a distinct seasonal dependence. The region of high current

  2. The dynamics and relationships of precipitation, temperature and convection boundaries in the dayside auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A continuous band of high ion temperature, which persisted for about 8h and zigzagged north-south across more than five degrees in latitude in the dayside (07:00-15:00MLT auroral ionosphere, was observed by the EISCAT VHF radar on 23 November 1999. Latitudinal gradients in the temperature of the F-region electron and ion gases (Te and Ti, respectively have been compared with concurrent observations of particle precipitation and field-perpendicular convection by DMSP satellites, in order to reveal a physical explanation for the persistent band of high Ti, and to test the potential role of Ti and Te gradients as possible markers for the open-closed field line boundary. The north/south movement of the equatorward Ti boundary was found to be consistent with the contraction/expansion of the polar cap due to an unbalanced dayside and nightside reconnection. Sporadic intensifications in Ti, recurring on ~10-min time scales, indicate that frictional heating was modulated by time-varying reconnection, and the band of high Ti was located on open flux. However, the equatorward Ti boundary was not found to be a close proxy of the open-closed boundary. The closest definable proxy of the open-closed boundary is the magnetosheath electron edge observed by DMSP. Although Te appears to be sensitive to magnetosheath electron fluxes, it is not found to be a suitable parameter for routine tracking of the open-closed boundary, as it involves case dependent analysis of the thermal balance. Finally, we have documented a region of newly-opened sunward convecting flux. This region is situated between the convection reversal boundary and the magnetosheath electron edge defining the open-closed boundary. This is consistent with a delay of several minutes between the arrival of the first (super-Alfvénic magnetosheath electrons and the response in the ionospheric

  3. Observations of a gradual transition between Ps 6 activity with auroral torches and surgelike pulsations during strong geomagnetic disturbances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steen, A.; Collis, P.N.; Evans, D.; Kremser, G.; Capelle, S.; Rees, D.; Tsurutani, B.T.

    1988-08-01

    A long-lasting large-amplitude pulsation event was observed on January 10, 1983, 0200--0600 UT (0411--0745 MLT) in the ionosphere and in the magnetosphere. In the ionosphere the characteristics of the pulsations changed from being Ps 6/auroral torches toward substorms and back to Ps 6 over the 4-hour period. At the geostationary orbit (6.6 Re) the corresponding characteristics were a modulation of the high-energy (greater than or equal to20 keV) particle intensity and plasma dropouts. Following the work by Rostoker and Samson (1984), we propose an interpretation of the event in which the pulsations are caused by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, during an interval of strong magnetospheric convection. The gradual transition between Ps 6 pulsations and substorm structures is interpreted as being different results of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, caused by different states of the magnetospheric convection. The proposed explanation forms the basis for a discussion on a simplified scheme of the substorm sequence. copyright American Geophysical Union 1988

  4. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Kylling

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry are calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres are found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates will underestimate the mass loading by several tens of percent compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles.

  5. Volcanic ash infrared signature: realistic ash particle shapes compared to spherical ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylling, A.; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.

    2013-10-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements particle size and mass loading may also be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculate thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compare these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry are calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres are found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates will underestimate the mass loading by several tens of percent compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles.

  6. The variation of Io's auroral footprint brightness with the location of Io in the plasma torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serio, Andrew W.; Clarke, John T.

    2008-09-01

    Ultraviolet and near-infrared observations of auroral emissions from the footprint of Io's magnetic Flux Tube (IFT) mapping to Jupiter's ionosphere have been interpreted via a combination of the unipolar inductor model [Goldreich, P., Lynden-Bell, D., 1969. Astrophys. J. 156, 59-78] and the multiply-reflected Alfvén wave model [ Belcher, J.W., 1987. Science 238, 170-176]. While both models successfully explain the general nature of the auroral footprint and corotational wake, and both predict the presence of multiple footprints, the details of the interaction near Io are complicated [ Saur, J., Neubauer, F.M., Connerney, J.E.P., Zarka, P., Kivelson, M.G., 2004. In: Bagenal, F., Dowling, T.E., McKinnon, W.B. (Eds.), Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 537-560; Kivelson, M.G., Bagenal, F., Kurth, W.S., Neubauer, F.M., Paranicas, C., Saur, J., 2004. In: Bagenal, F., Dowling, T.E., McKinnon, W.B. (Eds.), Jupiter: The Planet, Satellites and Magnetosphere. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK, pp. 513-536]. The auroral footprint brightness is believed to be a good remote indicator of the strength of the interaction near Io, indicating the energy and current strength linking Io with Jupiter's ionosphere. The brightness may also depend in part on local auroral acceleration processes near Jupiter. The relative importance of different physical processes in this interaction can be tested as Jupiter's rotation and Io's orbital motion shift Jupiter's magnetic centrifugal equator past Io, leading to longitudinal variations in the plasma density near Io and functionally different variations in the local field strength near Jupiter where the auroral emissions are produced. Initial HST WFPC2 observations found a high degree of variability in the footprint brightness with time, and some evidence for systematic variations with longitude [Clarke, J.T., Ben Jaffel, L., Gérard, J.-C., 1998. J. Geophys. Res. 103, 20217

  7. A real-time hybrid aurora alert system: Combining citizen science reports with an auroral oval model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, N. A.; Kingman, D.; MacDonald, E. A.

    2016-06-01

    Accurately predicting when, and from where, an aurora will be visible is particularly difficult, yet it is a service much desired by the general public. Several aurora alert services exist that attempt to provide such predictions but are, generally, based upon fairly coarse estimates of auroral activity (e.g., Kp or Dst). Additionally, these services are not able to account for a potential observer's local conditions (such as cloud cover or level of darkness). Aurorasaurus, however, combines data from the well-used, solar wind-driven, OVATION Prime auroral oval model with real-time observational data provided by a global network of citizen scientists. This system is designed to provide more accurate and localized alerts for auroral visibility than currently available. Early results are promising and show that over 100,000 auroral visibility alerts have been issued, including nearly 200 highly localized alerts, to over 2000 users located right across the globe.

  8. On auroral dynamics observed by HF radar: 1. Equatorward edge of the afternoon-evening diffuse luminosity belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Uspensky

    Full Text Available Observations and modelling are presented which illustrate the ability of the Finland CUTLASS HF radar to monitor the afternoon-evening equatorward auroral boundary during weak geomagnetic activity. The subsequent substorm growth phase development was also observed in the late evening sector as a natural continuation of the preceding auroral oval dynamics. Over an 8 h period the CUTLASS Finland radar observed a narrow (in range and persistent region of auroral F- and (later E-layer echoes which gradually moved equatorward, consistent with the auroral oval diurnal rotation. This echo region corresponds to the subvisual equatorward edge of the diffuse luminosity belt (SEEL and the ionospheric footprint of the inner boundary of the electron plasma sheet. The capability of the Finland CUTLASS radar to monitor the E-layer SEEL-echoes is a consequence of the nearly zero E-layer rectilinear aspect angles in a region 5–10° poleward of the radar site. The F-layer echoes are probably the boundary blob echoes. The UHF EISCAT radar was in operation and observed a similar subvisual auroral arc and an F-layer electron density enhancement when it appeared in its antenna beam.

    Key words: Ionsophere (ionospheric irregularities · Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetosphere–ionosphere interactions

  9. Testing our understanding of Arctic denitrification using MIPAS-E satellite measurements in winter 2002/2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Davies

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of gas-phase HNO3 and N2O in the polar stratosphere from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding aboard the ENVISAT satellite (MIPAS-E were made during the cold Arctic winter of 2002/2003. Vortex temperatures were unusually low in early winter and remained favourable for polar stratospheric cloud formation and denitrification until mid-January. MIPAS-E observations provide the first dataset with sufficient coverage of the polar vortex in mid-winter which enables a reasonable estimate of the timing of onset and spatial distribution of denitrification of the Arctic lower stratosphere to be performed. We use the observations from MIPAS-E to test the evolution of denitrification in the DLAPSE (Denitrification by Lagrangian Particle Sedimentation microphysical denitrification model coupled to the SLIMCAT chemical transport model. In addition, the predicted denitrification from a simple equilibrium nitric acid trihydrate-based scheme is also compared with MIPAS-E. Modelled denitrification is compared with in-vortex NOy and N2O observations from the balloon-borne MarkIV interferometer in mid-December. Denitrification was clearly observed by MIPAS-E in mid-December 2002 and reached 80% in the core of the vortex by early January 2003. The DLAPSE model is broadly able to capture both the timing of onset and the spatial distribution of the observed denitrification. A simple thermodynamic equilibrium scheme is able to reproduce the observed denitrification in the core of the vortex but overestimates denitrification closer to the vortex edge. This study also suggests that the onset of denitrification in simple thermodynamic schemes may be earlier than in the MIPAS-E observations.

  10. Testing our understanding of Arctic denitrification using MIPAS-E satellite measurements in winter 2002/3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Davies

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Observations of gas-phase HNO3 and N2O in the polar stratosphere from the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding aboard the ENVISAT satellite (MIPAS-E were made during the cold Arctic winter of 2002/3. Vortex temperatures were unusually low in early winter and remained favourable for polar stratospheric cloud formation and denitrification until mid-January. MIPAS-E observations provide the first dataset with sufficient coverage of the polar vortex in mid-winter which enables a reasonable estimate of the timing of onset and spatial distribution of denitrification of the Arctic lower stratosphere to be performed. We use the observations from MIPAS-E to test the evolution of denitrification in the DLAPSE (Denitrification by Lagrangian Particle Sedimentation microphysical denitrification model coupled to the SLIMCAT chemical transport model. In addition, the predicted denitrification from a simple equilibrium nitric acid trihydrate-based scheme is also compared with MIPAS-E. Modelled denitrification is compared with in-vortex NOy and N2O observations from the balloon-borne MarkIV interferometer in mid-December. Denitrification was clearly observed by MIPAS-E in mid-December 2002 and reached 80% in the core of the vortex by early January 2003. The DLAPSE model is broadly able to capture both the timing of onset and the spatial distribution of the observed denitrification. A simple thermodynamic equilibrium scheme is able to reproduce the observed denitrification in the core of the vortex but overestimates denitrification closer to the vortex edge. This study also suggests that the onset of denitrification in simple thermodynamic schemes may be earlier than in the MIPAS-E observations.

  11. El Nino-Southern Oscillation Correlated Aerosol Angstrom Exponent Anomaly Over the Tropical Pacific Discovered in Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2011-01-01

    El Nino.Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant mode of interannual variability in the tropical atmosphere. ENSO could potentially impact local and global aerosol properties through atmospheric circulation anomalies and teleconnections. By analyzing aerosol properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (AE; often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer, the Multiangle Imaging Spectroradiometer and the Sea ]viewing Wide Field ]of ]view Sensor for the period 2000.2011, we find a strong correlation between the AE data and the multivariate ENSO index (MEI) over the tropical Pacific. Over the western tropical Pacific (WTP), AE increases during El Nino events and decreases during La Nina events, while the opposite is true over the eastern tropical Pacific (ETP). The difference between AE anomalies in the WTP and ETP has a higher correlation coefficient (>0.7) with the MEI than the individual time series and could be considered another type of ENSO index. As no significant ENSO correlation is found in AOD over the same region, the change in AE (and hence aerosol size) is likely to be associated with aerosol composition changes due to anomalous meteorological conditions induced by the ENSO. Several physical parameters or mechanisms that might be responsible for the correlation are discussed. Preliminary analysis indicates surface wind anomaly might be the major contributor, as it reduces sea ]salt production and aerosol transport during El Nino events. Precipitation and cloud fraction are also found to be correlated with tropical Pacific AE. Possible mechanisms, including wet removal and cloud shielding effects, are considered. Variations in relative humidity, tropospheric ozone concentration, and ocean color during El Nino have been ruled out. Further investigation is needed to fully understand this AE ]ENSO covariability and the underlying physical processes responsible for

  12. Retrieval of SO2 from thermal infrared satellite measurements: correction procedures for the effects of volcanic ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Corradini

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous presence of SO2 and ash in a volcanic plume can lead to a significant error in the SO2 column abundance retrieval when multispectral Thermal InfraRed (TIR data are used. The ash particles within the plume with effective radii from 1 to 10 μm reduce the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA radiance in the entire TIR spectral range, including the channels used for SO2 retrieval. The net effect is a significant SO2 overestimation. In this work the interference of ash is discussed and two correction procedures for satellite SO2 volcanic plume retrieval in the TIR spectral range are developed to achieve an higher computational speed and a better accuracy. The ash correction can be applied when the sensor spectral range includes the 7.3 and/or 8.7 μm SO2 absorption bands, and the split window bands centered around 11 and 12 μm required for ash retrieval. This allows the possibility of simultaneous estimation of both volcanic SO2 and ash in the same data set. The proposed ash correction procedures have been applied to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI measurements. Data collected during the 24 November 2006 Mt. Etna eruption have been used to illustrate the technique. The SO2 and ash estimation is carried out by using a best weighted least squares fit method and the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD procedures, respectively. The simulated TOA radiance Look-Up Table (LUT needed for the SO2 column abundance and the ash retrievals have been computed using the MODTRAN 4 Radiative Transfer Model. The results show the importance of the ash correction on SO2 retrievals at 8.7 μm, where the corrected SO2 column abundance values are less than 50% of the uncorrected values. The ash correction on SO2 retrieval at 7.3 μm is much less important and only significant for low SO2 column abundances. Results also show that the simplified and faster correction procedure

  13. Retrieval of SO2 from thermal infrared satellite measurements: correction procedures for the effects of volcanic ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Prata

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The simultaneous presence of SO2 and ash in a volcanic plume can lead to a significant error in the SO2 columnar abundance retrieval when multispectral Thermal InfraRed (TIR data are used. The ash particles within the plume with effective radii (from 1 to 10 μm reduce the Top Of Atmosphere (TOA radiance in the entire TIR spectral range, including the channels used for SO2 retrieval. The net effect is a significant SO2 overestimation. In this work the interference of ash is discussed and two correction procedures for satellite SO2 volcanic plume retrieval in the TIR spectral range are developed to achieve an higher computation speed and a better accuracy. The ash correction can be applied when the sensor spectral range includes the 7.3 and/or 8.7 μm SO2 absorption bands, and the split window bands centered around 11 and 12 μm required for ash retrieval. This allows the possibility of a simultaneous estimation of both volcanic SO2 and ash in the same data set. The proposed ash correction procedures have been applied to the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS and the Spin Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI measurements. Data collected during the 24 November 2006 Mt. Etna eruption have been used to illustrate the technique. The SO2 and ash estimations are carried out by using a least squares fit method and the Brightness Temperature Difference (BTD procedures, respectively. The simulated TOA radiance Look-Up Table (LUT needed for the SO2 columnar abundance and the ash retrievals have been computed using the MODTRAN 4 Radiative Transfer Model. The results show the importance of the ash correction on SO2 retrieval at 8.7 μm – the SO2 columnar abundance corrected by the ash influence is less than one half of the values retrieved without the correction. The ash correction on SO2 retrieval at 7.3 μm is much less important and only significant for low SO2 columnar abundances. Results also show that the simplified and

  14. Investigation of Io's auroral hiss emissions due to its motion in Jupiter's magnetosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohsen H. Moghimi

    2012-01-01

    The left-hand side of the auroral hiss emission observed by Galileo has a frequency time profile shaped very similar to the funnel shape observed in the Earth's auroral region.This close similarity indicates that we can use the theory of whistlermode propagation near the resonance cone to locate the emission source.The general characteristics of the whistler mode are discussed.Then the position of the emission source is investigated using a geometrical method that takes into account the trajectory of Galileo.Initially a point source is assumed.Then the possibility of a sheet source aligned along the magnetic field lines which are tangent to the surface of Io is investigated.Both types of sources show that the whistler mode radiation originates very close to the surface of Io.

  15. Investigation of Io's Auroral Hiss Emissions Due To Its Motion in Jupiter's Magnetosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Moghimi, M H

    2011-01-01

    The left-hand side of the auroral hiss emission observed by Galileo has a frequency time shaped very similar to the funnel shape observed in the earth's auroral region. This close similarity indicates that we can use the whistler-mode propagation near resonance cone to locate the emission source. In this paper the general characteristic of the whistler mode are discussed. Then the position of the emission source has been investigated using a geometry method that takes into account the Galileo's trajectory. Initially it is assumed the source is a point. Then the possibility of sheet source aligned along the magnetic field lines which are tangent to the surface of Io is investigated. Both of two types of sources show that the whistler mode radiation originates very close to the surface of the Io.

  16. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter. Pt. 1. Dawn-dusk brightness asymmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfond, B.; Gustin, J.; Gerard, J.C.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Palmaerts, B. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Goettingen (Germany); Badman, S.V. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Khurana, K.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tao, C. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France)

    2015-07-01

    The main auroral emission at Jupiter generally appears as a quasi-closed curtain centered around the magnetic pole. This auroral feature, which accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range, is related to corotation enforcement currents in the middle magnetosphere. Early models for these currents assumed axisymmetry, but significant local time variability is obvious on any image of the Jovian aurorae. Here we use far-UV images from the Hubble Space Telescope to further characterize these variations on a statistical basis. We show that the dusk side sector is ∝ 3 times brighter than the dawn side in the southern hemisphere and ∝ 1:1 brighter in the northern hemisphere, where the magnetic anomaly complicates the interpretation of the measurements.We suggest that such an asymmetry between the dawn and the dusk sectors could be the result of a partial ring current in the nightside magnetosphere.

  17. Electric field and electron density thresholds for coherent auroral echo onset

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kustov, A.V.; Uspensky, M.V.; Sofko, G.J.; Koehler, J.A. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada)); Jones, G.O.L.; Williams, P.J.S. (University College of Wales, Aberystwyth (United Kingdom))

    1993-05-01

    The authors study the threshold dependence of electron density and electric field for the observation of coherent auroral echo onset. They make use of Polar Geophysical Institute 83 MHz auroral radar and the EISCAT facility in Scandanavia, to simultaneously get plasma parameter information and coherent scatter observations. They observe an electron density threshold of roughly 2.5[times]10[sup 11] m[sup [minus]3] for electric fields of 15 - 20 mV/m (near the Farley-Buneman instability threshold). For electric fields of 5 - 10 mV/m echos are not observed for even twice the previous electron density. Echo strength is observed to have other parametric dependences.

  18. Cluster observations and theoretical identification of broadband waves in the auroral region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Backrud-Ivgren

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Broadband waves are common on auroral field lines. We use two different methods to study the polarization of the waves at 10 to 180 Hz observed by the Cluster spacecraft at altitudes of about 4 Earth radii in the nightside auroral region. Observations of electric and magnetic wave fields, together with electron and ion data, are used as input to the methods. We find that much of the wave emissions are consistent with linear waves in homogeneous plasma. Observed waves with a large electric field perpendicular to the geomagnetic field are more common (electrostatic ion cyclotron waves, while ion acoustic waves with a large parallel electric field appear in smaller regions without suprathermal (tens of eV plasma. The regions void of suprathermal plasma are interpreted as parallel potential drops of a few hundred volts.

  19. Identification of the poleward boundary of the auroral oval using characteristics of ion precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troshichev, O.A.; Shishkina, E.M. [Arctic and Antartic Research Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Meng, C.I.; Newell, P.T. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1996-03-01

    The authors look for characteristics to identify the poleward edge of the auroral oval, by looking at precipitation properties of electrons and ions from DMSP F6 and F7 crossings of this region. They average the readings over 1/2 degree in latitude, and normalize them to flux maxima for each pass. The precipitation data clearly indicates the presence of the auroral oval. As one moves poleward then dependent upon the interplanetary magnetic field orientation, the precipitation falls off one or more orders of magnitude when B{sub z}>0, or when B{sub z}<0, it degenerates to an unstructured type of polar rain, with no clear ion precipitation evident. For B{sub z}>0 there are clear markers for identifying the inner edge of the oval, which are not so evident for southward fields. They discuss the significance of this boundary layer.

  20. "Unusual Rainbow and White Rainbow" A new auroral candidate in oriental historical sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hayakawa, Hisashi; Kawamura, Akito Davis; Tamazawa, Harufumi; Miyahara, Hiroko; Kataoka, Ryuho

    2016-01-01

    Solar activity has been recorded as auroras or sunspots in various historical sources. These records are of much importance for investigating both long-term solar activities and extremely intense solar flares. In previous studies, they were recorded as "vapor," "cloud," or "light," especially in oriental historical sources; however, the terminology was not discussed adequately and is still quite vague. In this paper, we suggest the possibility of "unusual rainbow" and "white rainbow" as candidates of historical auroras in oriental historical sources and examine if it is probable. This discovery will help us to make more comprehensive historical auroral catalogues and require us to add these terms to auroral candidates in oriental historical sources.

  1. Case Study of the Seeds and Evolution Auroral Ion Upflow From the SIERRA Sounding Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, K. A.; Labelle, J.; Samara, M.; Arnoldy, R.; MacDonald, E.; Klatt, E.; Kintner, P.

    2005-12-01

    The SIERRA nightside auroral sounding rocket made observations of the origins of ion upflow, at low altitudes (below 700 km), low scale height (densities above 20,000/cc), and low energies (10 eV.) Upflowing ions with bulk velocities up to 2 km/s are seen in conjunction with the poleward edge of a nightside substorm arc. The upflow is limited within the poleward edge to a region (a) of northward convection and (b) where Alfvenic and Pedersen conductivities are well-matched, leading to good ionospheric transmission of Alfvenic power. Also throughout the poleward edge, precipitation of moderate-energy (100s of eV) protons and oxygen is observed. This population is interpreted as reflection from a higher altitude field aligned potential of upgoing transversely heated ion conics. Details of this case study observation of the seeds and evolution of auroral ion outflow are presented as an example for testing of models of ionospheric/magnetospheric coupling.

  2. APIS : a value-added database of HST UV planetary auroral observations acquired since 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, L.; Henry, F.; Prangé, R.; Le Sidaner, P.

    2014-04-01

    The APIS service http://lesia.obspm.fr/apis/ (Auroral Planetary Imaging and Spectroscopy), aimed at facilitating the use of planetary auroral observations, was presented at EPSC last year, following its opening to the community in July 2013. This facility consists of : - a high level database derived from public Far-UV observations of Jupiter, Io, Ganymede, Saturn, Titan and Uranus acquired by the Hubble Space Telescope since 1997 (36 observational campaigns so far) ; - a specific search interface (Figure 1), aimed at browsing the database freely, quickly and efficiently through relevant search criteria (as planetary longitudes, moon or spacecraft ephemeris etc.). - Virtual-Observatory tools which enable the user to interactively work with images and spectra online. We will present the updated capabilities of APIS and illustrate them with several examples. Several tutorials are also directly available online.

  3. Right-hand polarized 4fce auroral roar emissions: 2. Nonlinear generation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, P. H.; LaBelle, J.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2016-08-01

    Auroral roar emissions are commonly interpreted as Z (or upper hybrid) mode naturally excited by precipitating auroral electrons. Subsequent conversion to escaping radiation makes it possible for these emissions to be detected on the ground. Most emissions are detected as having left-hand (L) circular (or ordinary O) polarization, but the companion paper presents a systematic experimental study on the rare occurrence of the right-hand polarized, or equivalently, extraordinary (X) mode 4fce emission. A similar observation was reported earlier by Sato et al. (2015). The suggested emission mechanism is the nonlinear coalescence of two upper hybrid roars at 2fce. The present paper formulates a detailed theory for such an emission mechanism.

  4. Dayside convection and auroral morphology during an interval of northward interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available We investigate the dayside auroral dynamics and ionospheric convection during an interval when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF had predominantly a positive Bz component (northward IMF but varying By. Polar UVI observations of the Northern Hemisphere auroral emission indicate the existence of a region of luminosity near local noon at latitudes poleward of the dayside auroral oval, which we interpret as the ionospheric footprint of a high-latitude reconnection site. The large field-of-view afforded by the satellite-borne imager allows an unprecedented determination of the dynamics of this region, which has not previously been possible with ground-based observations. The location of the emission in latitude and magnetic local time varies in response to changes in the orientation of the IMF; the cusp MLT and the IMF By component are especially well correlated, the emission being located in the pre- or post-noon sectors for By < 0 nT or By > 0 nT, respectively. Simultaneous ground-based observations of the ionospheric plasma drift are provided by the CUTLASS Finland HF coherent radar. For an interval of IMF By approx 0 nT, these convection flow measurements suggest the presence of a clockwise-rotating lobe cell contained within the pre-noon dayside polar cap, with a flow reversal closely co-located with the high-latitude luminosity region. This pattern is largely consistent with recent theoretical predictions of the convection flow during northward IMF. We believe that this represents the first direct measurement of the convection flow at the imaged location of the footprint of the high-latitude reconnection site.

    Key words: Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena; magnetopause · cusp · and boundary layers; plasma convection

  5. The Protonics project: distributed observations of auroral dayside Doppler-shifted hydrogen emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Holmes, Jeffrey Morgan

    2014-01-01

    The Protonics project is an effort to further understand the spatio-temporal dynamics of dayside auroral hydrogen emissions, also known as dayside proton aurorae. Spectrometers measuring dayside Balmer α (Hα) and Balmer β (Hβ) were deployed to two locations on Svalbard at Longyearbyen and Ny-Ålesund. Measured hydrogen Doppler profiles were analysed via a Monte Carlo model of proton precipitation, resulting in an estimate of characteristic energy of the precipitating proton/hydrogen population...

  6. Towards a synthesis of substorm electrodynamics: HF radar and auroral observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grocott

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available At 08:35 UT on 21 November 2004, the onset of an interval of substorm activity was captured in the southern hemisphere by the Far UltraViolet (FUV instrument on board the IMAGE spacecraft. This was accompanied by the onset of Pi2 activity and subsequent magnetic bays, evident in ground magnetic data from both hemispheres. Further intensifications were then observed in both the auroral and ground magnetic data over the following ~3 h. During this interval the fields-of-view of the two southern hemisphere Tasman International Geospace Enviroment Radars (TIGER moved through the evening sector towards midnight. Whilst initially low, the amount of backscatter from TIGER increased considerably during the early stages of the expansion phase such that by ~09:20 UT an enhanced dusk flow cell was clearly evident. During the expansion phase the equatorward portion of this flow cell developed into a narrow high-speed flow channel, indicative of the auroral and sub-auroral flows identified in previous studies (e.g. Freeman et al., 1992; Parkinson et al., 2003. At the same time, higher latitude transient flow features were observed and as the interval progressed the flow reversal region and Harang discontinuity became very well defined. Overall, this study has enabled the spatial and temporal development of many different elements of the substorm process to be resolved and placed within a simple conceptual framework of magnetospheric convection. Specifically, the detailed observations of ionospheric flows have illustrated the complex interplay between substorm electric fields and associated auroral dynamics. They have helped define the distinct nature of different substorm current systems such as the traditional substorm current wedge and the more equatorward currents associated with polarisation electric fields. Additionally, they have revealed a radar signature of nightside reconnection which provides the promise of quantifying nightside reconnection in a

  7. Custom auroral electrojet indices calculated by using MANGO value-added services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargatze, L. F.; Moore, W. B.; King, T. A.

    2009-12-01

    A set of computational routines called MANGO, Magnetogram Analysis for the Network of Geophysical Observatories, is utilized to calculate customized versions of the auroral electrojet indices, AE, AL, and AU. MANGO is part of an effort to enhance data services available to users of the Heliophysics VxOs, specifically for the Virtual Magnetospheric Observatory (VMO). The MANGO value-added service package is composed of a set of IDL routines that decompose ground magnetic field observations to isolate secular, diurnal, and disturbance variations of magnetic field disturbance, station-by-station. Each MANGO subroutine has been written in modular fashion to allow "plug and play"-style flexibility and each has been designed to account for failure modes and noisy data so that the programs will run to completion producing as much derived data as possible. The capabilities of the MANGO service package will be demonstrated through their application to the study of auroral electrojet current flow during magnetic substorms. Traditionally, the AE indices are calculated by using data from about twelve ground stations located at northern auroral zone latitudes spread longitudinally around the world. Magnetogram data are corrected for secular variation prior to calculating the standard version of the indices but the data are not corrected for diurnal variations. A custom version of the AE indices will be created by using the MANGO routines including a step to subtract diurnal curves from the magnetic field data at each station. The custom AE indices provide more accurate measures of auroral electrojet activity due to isolation of the sunstorm electrojet magnetic field signiture. The improvements in the accuracy of the custom AE indices over the tradition indices are largest during the northern hemisphere summer when the range of diurnal variation reaches its maximum.

  8. Electron heat flow in the auroral ionosphere inferred from EISCAT-VHF observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blelly, P.L.; Alcayde, D. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    1994-07-01

    This paper discusses heat flows into electrons in auroral regions. Two different altitude regions are considered, one coincident with the F2 region, and one coincident with the upper ionosphere. Energy input comes from solar extreme ultraviolet radiation, and coupling of magnetospheric energy sources. The authors present a method to take advantage of EISCAT VHF radar observations to study these processes. They observe daily and seasonal variations in the heat inputs.

  9. The cyclotron maser theory of AKR and Z-mode radiation. [Auroral Kilometric Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. S.

    1985-01-01

    The cyclotron maser mechanism which may be responsible for the generation of auroral kilometric radiation and Z-mode radiation is discussed. Emphasis is placed on the basic concepts of the cyclotron maser theory, particularly the relativistic effect of the cyclotron resonance condition. Recent development of the theory is reviewed. Finally, the results of a computer simulation study which helps to understand the nonlinear saturation of the maser instability are reported.

  10. Contributions to the Science Modeling Requirements Document; Earth Limb & Auroral Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    composition information. All models give these parameters as functions of altitude. Depending on its sophistication, a model may also report these...magnetospheric forcing (Huguenin et al., 1989; Wohlers et al., 1989). Malkmus et al. (1989) con- structed a limb clutter model for the middle ultraviolet (0.2...taken once per orbit (-100 — EL & A Bkgds, 35— Table 4-5a AURORAL ALERT SUMMARY — 1 Item Description Schedule Access Preliminary Report & Forecast

  11. Electron dispersion events in the morningside auroral zone and their relationship with VLF emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, David A.; Burke, William J.; Villalon, Elena

    1990-05-01

    This paper reports on observations of electron precipitation bursts observed in the morningside auroral zone with the J sensor, an electron detector aboard the Hilat satellite. The characteristics of these precipitation events are documented, and a theoretical explanation that could account for the observed properties is presented. According to this model, the dispersion events result from impulsive interactions of the electrons with intense asymmetric packets of VLF waves via the nonlinear ponderomotive force.

  12. Nonlinear wave structures in collisional plasma of auroral E-region ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volosevich

    Full Text Available Studies of the auroral plasma with small-scale inhomogenieties producing the VHF-radar reflections (radar aurora when observed in conditions of the saturated Farley-Buneman instability within the auroral E region, show strong nonlinear interactions and density fluctuations of 5–15%. Such nonlinearity and high fluctation amplitudes are inconsistent with the limitations of the weak turbulence theory, and thus a theory for arbitrary amplitudes is needed. To this end, a nonlinear theory is described for electrostatic MHD moving plasma structures of arbitrary amplitude for conditions throughout the altitude range of the collisional auroral E region. The equations are derived, from electron and ion motion self-consistent with the electric field, for the general case of the one-dimensional problem. They take into account nonlinearity, electron and ion inertia, diffusion, deviation from quasi-neutrality, and dynamical ion viscosity. The importance of the ion viscosity for dispersion is stressed, while deviation from the quasi-neutrality can be important only at rather low plasma densities, not typical for the auroral E region. In a small amplitude limit these equations have classical nonlinear solutions of the type of "electrostatic shock wave" or of knoidal waves. In a particular case these knoidal waves degrade to a dissipative soliton. A two-dimensional case of a quasi-neutral plasma is considered in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field by way of the Poisson brackets, but neglecting the nonlinearity and ion inertia. It is shown that in these conditions an effective saturation can be achieved at the stationary turbulence level of order of 10%.

  13. Anomalous width variation of rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves in the context of auroral plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. S. Ghosh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of dynamic, large amplitude solitary waves in the auroral regions of space is well known. Since their velocities are of the order of the ion acoustic speed, they may well be considered as being generated from the nonlinear evolution of ion acoustic waves. However, they do not show the expected width-amplitude correlation for K-dV solitons. Recent POLAR observations have actually revealed that the low altitude rarefactive ion acoustic solitary waves are associated with an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. This indicates that a weakly nonlinear theory is not appropriate to describe the solitary structures in the auroral regions. In the present work, a fully nonlinear analysis based on Sagdeev pseudopotential technique has been adopted for both parallel and oblique propagation of rarefactive solitary waves in a two electron temperature multi-ion plasma. The large amplitude solutions have consistently shown an increase in the width with increasing amplitude. The width-amplitude variation profile of obliquely propagating rarefactive solitary waves in a magnetized plasma have been compared with the recent POLAR observations. The width-amplitude variation pattern is found to fit well with the analytical results. It indicates that a fully nonlinear theory of ion acoustic solitary waves may well explain the observed anomalous width variations of large amplitude structures in the auroral region.

  14. Effects of substorm electrojet on declination along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes in the northern auroral zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsen, Inge; Johnsen, Magnar G.; Løvhaug, Unni P.

    2016-10-01

    The geomagnetic field often experiences large fluctuations, especially at high latitudes in the auroral zones. We have found, using simulations, that there are significant differences in the substorm signature, in certain coordinate systems, as a function of longitude. This is confirmed by the analysis of real, measured data from comparable locations. Large geomagnetic fluctuations pose challenges for companies involved in resource exploitation since the Earth's magnetic field is used as the reference when navigating drilling equipment. It is widely known that geomagnetic activity increases with increasing latitude and that the largest fluctuations are caused by substorms. In the auroral zones, substorms are common phenomena, occurring almost every night. In principle, the magnitude of geomagnetic disturbances from two identical substorms along concurrent geomagnetic latitudes around the globe, at different local times, will be the same. However, the signature of a substorm will change as a function of geomagnetic longitude due to varying declination, dipole declination, and horizontal magnetic field along constant geomagnetic latitudes. To investigate and quantify this, we applied a simple substorm current wedge model in combination with a dipole representation of the Earth's magnetic field to simulate magnetic substorms of different morphologies and local times. The results of these simulations were compared to statistical data from observatories and are discussed in the context of resource exploitation in the Arctic. We also attempt to determine and quantify areas in the auroral zone where there is a potential for increased space weather challenges compared to other areas.

  15. ;Long-hissler; fine structure within auroral hiss: A review and synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Howard F.; LaBelle, James; Spasojević, Maria

    2017-04-01

    One of the most prominent fine-structures of auroral hiss is the ;long-hissler;, defined here as a dispersed feature embedded within broadband auroral hiss emissions in the frequency range 1-40 kHz and lasting longer than 0.3 s. While theory is limited, there is evidence that hisslers can be used in remote sensing of density characteristics at altitudes of thousands of km. By applying an automatic threshold algorithm to VLF data collected at South Pole 2230-0130 UT daily during June-August 2014, 22 h of auroral hiss are identified on 49 of 93 days analyzed, for an occurrence rate of 9.7% during the applicable MLT interval. From manual inspection of these intervals, 414 groups (trains) of long hisslers are identified on 34 of the 49 days on which hiss occurred. Median lower (upper) frequency bounds of these features are 8 (22) kHz, median frequency-time slope is -10 kHz/s, and median hissler repetition time within a train (hissler period) is 1.2 s. Hissler period and frequency-time slope are inversely related. Data from previous studies are reviewed to provide a comprehensive description of the phenomenon. Contrary to some previous studies, subsequent long hissler features are found to commonly overlap in time, and no evidence is found for an inverse relationship between hissler train duration and geomagnetic activity.

  16. Coordinated ground and space measurements of an auroral surge over South Pole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Detrick, D.L.; Mizera, P.F.; Gorney, D.J.; Berkey, F.T.; Eather, R.H.; Lanzerotti, L.J.

    1987-10-01

    Coincident ground-based and satellite observations are presented of a premidnight auroral surge over Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. The set of near-simultaneous measurements provides an excellent opportunity to gain a more quantitative understanding of the nature of premidnight substorm activity at high geomagnetic latitudes. The surge produced a rapid onset of cosmic radio noise absorption at the station. On the polar-orbiting DMSP F6 spacecraft, intense X ray emissions with E>2 keV energy were imaged 1/sup 0/ to 2/sup 0/ magnetically equatorward of South Pole approximately 1 min prior to the peak of the absorption event. The spectrum of precipitating electrons determined from the X ray measurements could be characterized by an e-folding energy of approx.11 keV and is found to be adequate to account for the cosmic noise absorption and maximum auroral luminosity recorded at South Pole. Photometer, all-sky camera, riometer, and magnetometer data are used to estimate the velocity of motion and spatial extent of the auroral precipitation and the ionospheric currents associated with the surge. The electron precipitation region is deduced to have a latitudinal scale size of <100 km and to move poleward with a speed of approx.1--2 km/s coincident with the movement of a westward electrojet.

  17. Coordinated ground and space measurements of auroral surge over South Pole. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberg, T.J.; Detrick, D.L.; Mizera, P.F.; Gorney, D.J.; Berkey, F.T.

    1988-02-01

    Coincident ground-based and satellite observations are presented of a premidnight auroral surge over Amundsen-Scott South Pole station. The set of near-simultaneous measurements provides an excellent opportunity to gain a more-quantitative understanding of the nature of premidnight substorm activity at high geomagnetic latitudes. The surge produced a rapid onset of cosmic radio noise absorption at the station. On the polar-orbiting DMSP-F6 spacecraft, intense x-ray emissions with E > 2-keV energy were imaged 1 to 2 deg magnetically equatorward of the South Pole approximately 1 min prior to the peak of the absorption event. The precipitating electron spectrum determined from the x-ray measurements could be characterized by an e-folding energy of approx. 11 keV and is found to be adequate to account for the cosmic noise absorption and maximum auroral luminosity recorded at South Pole. Photometer, all-sky camera, riometer, and magnetometer data are used to estimate the velocity of motion and spatial extent of the auroral precipitation and the ionospheric currents associated with the surge.

  18. EISCAT observations of topside ionospheric ion outflows during auroral activity: Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlund, J.E.; Opgenoorth, H.J. (Swedish Inst. of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)); Haeggstroem, I. (Swedish Inst. of Space Physics, Kiruna (Sweden)); Winser, K.J. (Royal Coll. of Surgeons, Dublin (Ireland)); Jones, G.O.L. (Univ. Coll. of Wales, Aberystwyth (United Kingdom))

    1992-03-01

    New EISCAT observations of large field-aligned bulk ion outflows from the topside ionosphere during auroral activity are presented. The ions (mainly O{sup +}) start their outflows from a variable altitude and may reach field-aligned outward velocities of up to 1,500 m s{sup {minus}1} in the altitude region 900-1,500 km. The observed ion fluxes are about a factor of 10 larger than previously observed reaching 2 {times} 10{sup 14} m{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1}, and in some cases is nonconstant with altitude. Two different types of ion outflows have been identified. The first type is related to periods of strong perpendicular electric fields, enhanced and anisotropic ion temperatures, and low electron densities below 300 km, indicating small amounts of auroral precipitation. The second type is related to auroral arcs and enhanced electron temperatures. The exact mechanism causing the ion outflows is still not yet understood, but additional mechanism other than thermal expansion are required to explain the observations presented here.

  19. Using spectral characteristics to interpret auroral imaging in the 731.9 nm O+ line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Strømme

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous observations were made of dynamic aurora during substorm activity on 26 January 2006 with three high spatial and temporal resolution instruments: the ASK (Auroral Structure and Kinetics instrument, SIF (Spectrographic Imaging Facility and ESR (EISCAT Svalbard Radar, all located on Svalbard (78° N, 16.2° E. One of the narrow field of view ASK cameras is designed to detect O+ ion emission at 731.9 nm. From the spectrographic data we have been able to determine the amount of contaminating N2 and OH emission detected in the same filter. This is of great importance to further studies using the ASK instrument, when the O+ ion emission will be used to detect flows and afterglows in active aurora. The ratio of O+ to N2 emission is dependent on the energy spectra of electron precipitation, and was found to be related to changes in the morphology of the small-scale aurora. The ESR measured height profiles of electron densities, which allowed estimates to be made of the energy spectrum of the precipitation during the events studied with optical data from ASK and SIF. It was found that the higher energy precipitation corresponded to discrete and dynamic features, including curls, and low energy precipitation corresponded to auroral signatures that were dominated by rays. The evolution of these changes on time scales of seconds is of importance to theories of auroral acceleration mechanisms.

  20. Study of AKR hollow pattern characteristics at sub-auroral regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Sawas, Sami; Galopeau, Patrick; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques; Schwingenschuh, Konrad

    2014-05-01

    The Earth's auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is expected to exhibit a hollow pattern similar to that reported for the comparable emissions from Jupiter (e.g. Jovian decametric emissions - DAM). The hollow pattern is a hollow cone beam with apex at the point of AKR emission, axis tangent to the magnetic field direction, and an opening angle of the order of 80°. The properties of the hollow cone can be derived from the so-called dynamic spectrum which displays the radiation versus the observation time and the frequency. We analyze the auroral kilometric radiation recorded by the electric field experiment (ICE) onboard DEMETER micro-satellite. The dynamic spectra lead us to study the occurrence of the AKR recorded in the sub-auroral regions when the micro-satellite was at altitudes of about 700 km. We address in this contribution issues concerning the characteristics (occurrence, latitude and longitude) of the AKR hollow beam and their relations to the seasonal and solar activity variations.

  1. Electron distribution function behavior during localized transverse ion acceleration events in the topside auroral zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynch, K.A.; Arnoldy, R.L. [Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States); Kintner, P.M. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States); Vago, J.L. [European Space Agency, Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    1994-02-01

    The Topaz3 auroral sounding rocket made the following observations concerning the transfer of precipitating auroral electron energy to transverse ion acceleration in the topside auroral zone. During the course of the flight, the precipitating electron beam was modified to varying degrees by interaction with VLF hiss, at times changing the beam into a field-aligned plateau. The electron distribution functions throughout the flight are classified according to the extent of this modification, and correspondences with ion acceleration events are sought. The hiss power during most of this rocket flight apparently exceeded the threshold for collapse into solitary structures. At the times of plateaued electron distributions, the collapse of these structures was limited by Landau damping through the ambient ions, resulting in a velocity-dependent acceleration of both protons and oxygen. This initial acceleration is sufficient to supply the number flux of upflowing ions observed at satellite altitudes. The bursty ion acceleration was anticorrelated, on 1-s or smaller timescales, with dispersive bursts of precipitating field-aligned electrons, although on longer timescales the bursty ions and the bursty electrons are correlated. 45 refs., 9 figs.

  2. Average and worst-case specifications of precipitating auroral electron environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, D. A.; Burke, W. J.; Gussenhoven, M. S.; Holeman, E.; Yeh, H. C.

    1985-01-01

    The precipitation electrons in the auroral environment are highly variable in their energy and intensity in both space and time. As such they are a source of potential hazard to the operation of the Space Shuttle and other large spacecraft operating in polar orbit. In order to assess these hazards both the average and extreme states of the precipitating electrons must be determined. Work aimed at such a specification is presented. First results of a global study of the average characteristics are presented. In this study the high latitude region was divided into spatial elements in magnetic local time and corrected geomagnetic latitude. The average electron spectrum was then determined in each spatial element for seven different levels of activity as measured by K sub p using an extremely large data set of auroral observations. Second a case study of an extreme auroral electron environment is presented, in which the electrons are accelerated through field aligned potential as high as 30,000 volts and in which the spacecraft is seen to charge negatively to a potential approaching .5 kilovolts.

  3. A proposal to the dissipated energy budget in the auroral ionosphere at the substorm recovery phase: Challenge from thermospheric wind variations in the pulsating aurora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, S. I.; Hosokawa, K.; Miyoshi, Y.; Shiokawa, K.; Kurihara, J.; Tsuda, T. T.; Watkins, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    Pulsating aurora is a typical phenomenon of the recovery phase of magnetic substorm and is frequently observed in the morning sector. The widely accepted generation mechanism of pulsations in precipitating electrons is related to wave-particle interactions around the equatorial plane in the magnetospheric tail. This mechanism is completely different from the discrete-arc case, which generates high-energy auroral electrons by the inverted-V type potential structure in the magnetospheric acceleration region. This potential structure induces the perpendicular electric field. The electric field is mapped down to the ionosphere, and enhances the Pedersen current as the ionospheric closure current. Since the perpendicular electric field directly relates to the Joule heating rate and the Lorentz force, thermal and kinetic energies in the thermosphere are locally increased in the vicinity of the arc rather than the inside, resulting in wind variations in the thermosphere. However, this scenario cannot be simply applied to the pulsating-auroral case because of the completely different mechanism of the auroral-electron generation, and we have believed that large energies are not dissipated in the pulsating aurora and there should be no obvious wind variations in the thermosphere. However, we found thermospheric-wind variations in the pulsating aurora during simultaneous observations with a Fabry-Perot Interferometer (557.7 nm), several cameras, and incoherent-scatter radars. This is a significantly important finding in evaluating our understanding of the energy budget in the substorm recovery phase. As mentioned above, the Joule heating process and the Lorentz force play important roles for thermospheric-wind variations. While the both cases need enhancements of the perpendicular electric field, we well know that a typical level of the convection electric field is too low to generate the wind variations in a same level as the observed in the pulsating aurora. Thus the

  4. Statistics of a parallel Poynting vector in the auroral zone as a function of altitude using Polar EFI and MFE data and Astrid-2 EMMA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Janhunen

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We study the wave-related (AC and static (DC parallel Poynting vector (Poynting energy flux as a function of altitude in auroral field lines using Polar EFI and MFE data. The study is statistical and contains 5 years of data in the altitude range 5000–30000 km. We verify the low altitude part of the results by comparison with earlier Astrid-2 EMMA Poynting vector statistics at 1000 km altitude. The EMMA data are also used to statistically compensate the Polar results for the missing zonal electric field component. We compare the Poynting vector with previous statistical DMSP satellite data concerning the electron precipitation power. We find that the AC Poynting vector (Alfvén-wave related Poynting vector is statistically not sufficient to power auroral electron precipitation, although it may, for Kp>2, power 25–50% of it. The statistical AC Poynting vector also has a stepwise transition at R=4 RE, so that its amplitude increases with increasing altitude. We suggest that this corresponds to Alfvén waves being in Landau resonance with electrons, so that wave-induced electron acceleration takes place at this altitude range, which was earlier named the Alfvén Resonosphere (ARS. The DC Poynting vector is ~3 times larger than electron precipitation and corresponds mainly to ionospheric Joule heating. In the morning sector (02:00–06:00 MLT we find that the DC Poynting vector has a nontrivial altitude profile such that it decreases by a factor of ~2 when moving upward from 3 to 4 RE radial distance. In other nightside MLT sectors the altitude profile is more uniform. The morning sector nontrivial altitude profile may be due to divergence of the perpendicular Poynting vector field at R=3–4 RE.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena; Magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (Wave-particle interactions

  5. GREECE -- Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment: High resolution rocket and ground-based investigations of small-scale auroral structure and dynamics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Methodology The methodology is based on making comparisons between downward electron flux, DC electric fields, electromagnetic waves, and auroral morphology. The...

  6. Juno/JEDI observations of 0.01 to >10 MeV energetic ions in the Jovian auroral regions: Anticipating a source for polar X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, D. K.; Mauk, B. H.; Paranicas, C. P.; Clark, G.; Kollmann, P.; Rymer, A. M.; Bolton, S. J.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Levin, S. M.

    2017-07-01

    After a successful orbit insertion, the Juno spacecraft completed its first 53.5 day orbit and entered a very low altitude perijove with the full scientific payload operational for the first time on 27 August 2016. The Jupiter Energetic particle Detector Instrument measured ions and electrons over the auroral regions and through closest approach, with ions measured from 0.01 to >10 MeV, depending on species. This report focuses on the composition of the energetic ions observed during the first perijove of the Juno mission. Of particular interest are the ions that precipitate from the magnetosphere onto the polar atmosphere and ions that are accelerated locally by Jupiter's powerful auroral processes. We report preliminary findings on the spatial variations, species, including energy and pitch angle distributions throughout the prime science region during the first orbit of the Juno mission. The prime motivation for this work was to examine the heavy ions that are thought to be responsible for the observed polar X-rays. Jupiter Energetic particle Detector Instrument (JEDI) did observe precipitating heavy ions with energies >10 MeV, but for this perijove the intensities were far below those needed to account for previously observed polar X-ray emissions. During this survey we also found an unusual signal of ions between oxygen and sulfur. We include here a report on what appears to be a transitory observation of magnesium, or possibly sodium, at MeV energies through closest approach.

  7. Substorm and Magnetosphere Characteristic Scales Inferred from the SuperMAG Auroral Electrojet Indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, P.; Gjerloev, J.

    2012-04-01

    A generalization of the traditional 12-station auroral electrojet index, AE, to include more than 100 magnetometer stations, SME, is an excellent predictor of global auroral power, even at high cadence (1-min). We use this index, and a data base of more than 53,000 substorms derived from it, covering 1980-2009, to investigate time and energy scales in the magnetosphere, during substorms and otherwise. We find, contrary to common opinion, that substorms do not have a preferred recurrence rate, but instead have two distinct dynamic regimes, each following a power law. The number of substorms recurring after a time Δt, N(Δt), varies as Δt -1.19 for short times (3 hr). Other evidence also shows these distinct regimes for the magnetosphere, including a break in the power law spectra for SME at about 3 h. The time between two consecutive substorms is only weakly correlated (r=0.18 for isolated and r=0.06 for recurrent) with the time until the next, suggesting quasi-periodicity is not common. However substorms do have a preferred size, with the typical peak SME magnitude reaching 400-600 nT, but with a mean of 656 nT, corresponding to a bit less than 40 GW auroral power. More surprisingly, another characteristic scale exists in the magnetosphere, namely a peak in the SME distribution around 61 nT, corresponding to about 5 GW precipitating auroral power. The dominant form of auroral precipitation is diffuse aurora, thus these values are properties of the magnetotail thermal electron distribution. The characteristic 5 GW value specifically represents a preferred minimum below which the magnetotail rarely drops. The magnetotail experiences continuous loss by precipitation, so the existence of a preferred minimum implies driving which rarely disappears altogether. Finally, the distribution of SME values across all times, in accordance with earlier work on AE, is best fit by the sum of two distributions, each normal in log(SME). The lower distribution (with a 40% weighting

  8. Correlated variations of UV and radio emissions during an outstanding Jovian auroral event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, R.; Zarka, P.; Ballester, G. E.; Livengood, T. A.; Denis, L.; Carr, T.; Reyes, F.; Bame, S. J.; Moos, H. W.

    1993-01-01

    An exceptional Jovian aurora was detected in the FUV on December 21, 1990, by means of Vilspa and Goddard Space Flight Center (GFSC) International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) observations. This event included intensification by a factor of three between December 20 and 21, leading to the brightest aurora identified in the IUE data analyzed, and, in the north, to a shift of the emission peak towards larger longitudes. The Jovian radio emission simultaneously recorded at decameter wavelengths in Nancay also exhibits significant changes, from a weak and short-duration emission on December 20 to a very intense one, lasting several hours, on December 21. Confirmation of this intense radio event is also found in the observations at the University of Florida on December 21. The emissions are identified as right-handed Io-independent 'A' (or 'non Io-A') components from the northern hemisphere. The radio source region deduced from the Nancay observations lies, for both days, close to the UV peak emission, exhibiting in particular a similar shift of the source region toward larger longitudes from one day to the next. A significant broadening of the radio source was also observed and it is shown that on both days, the extent of the radio source closely followed the longitude range for which the UV brightness exceeds a given threshold. The correlated variations, both in intensity and longitude, strongly suggest that a common cause triggered the variation of the UV and radio emissions during this exceptional event. On one hand, the variation of the UV aurora could possibly be interpreted according to the Prange and Elkhamsi (1991) model of diffuse multicomponent auroral precipitation (electron and ion): it would arise from an increase in the precipitation rate of ions together with an inward shift of their precipitation locus from L approximately equal 10 to L approximately equal 6. On the other hand, the analysis of Ulysses observations in the upstream solar wind suggests that

  9. A statistical study of diurnal, seasonal and solar cycle variations of F-region and topside auroral upflows observed by EISCAT between 1984 and 1996

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Foster

    Full Text Available A statistical analysis of F-region and topside auroral ion upflow events is presented. The study is based on observations from EISCAT Common Programmes (CP 1 and 2 made between 1984 and 1996, and Common Programme 7 observations taken between 1990 and 1995. The occurrence frequency of ion upflow events (IUEs is examined over the altitude range 200 to 500 km, using field-aligned observations from CP-1 and CP-2. The study is extended in altitude with vertical measurements from CP-7. Ion upflow events were identified by consideration of both velocity and flux, with threshold values of 100 m s–1 and 1013 m–2 s–1, respectively. The frequency of occurrence of IUEs is seen to increase with increasing altitude. Further analysis of the field-aligned observations reveals that the number and nature of ion upflow events vary diurnally and with season and solar activity. In particular, the diurnal distribution of upflows is strongly dependent on solar cycle. Furthermore, events identified by the velocity selection criterion dominate at solar minimum, whilst events identified by the upward field-aligned flux criterion dominated at solar maximum. The study also provides a quantitative estimate of the proportion of upflows that are associated with enhanced plasma temperature. Between 50 and 60% of upflows are simultaneous with enhanced ion temperature, and approximately 80% of events are associated with either increased F-region ion or electron temperatures.

    Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle acceleration

  10. Alpha particles in solar cosmic rays over the last 80,000 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanzerotti, L. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Present-day (1967 to 1969) fluxes of alpha particles from solar cosmic rays, determined from satellite measurements, were used to calculate the production rates of cobalt-57, cobalt-58, and nickel-59 in lunar surface samples. Comparisons with the activities of nickel-59 (half-life, 80,000 years) measured in lunar samples indicate that the long-term and present-day fluxes of solar alpha particles are comparable within a factor of approximately 4.

  11. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  12. Spectrally Enhanced Cloud Objects—A generalized framework for automated detection of volcanic ash and dust clouds using passive satellite measurements: 1. Multispectral analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavolonis, Michael J.; Sieglaff, Justin; Cintineo, John

    2015-08-01

    While satellites are a proven resource for detecting and tracking volcanic ash and dust clouds, existing algorithms for automatically detecting volcanic ash and dust either exhibit poor overall skill or can only be applied to a limited number of sensors and/or geographic regions. As such, existing techniques are not optimized for use in real-time applications like volcanic eruption alerting and data assimilation. In an effort to significantly improve upon existing capabilities, the Spectrally Enhanced Cloud Objects (SECO) algorithm was developed. The SECO algorithm utilizes a combination of radiative transfer theory, a statistical model, and image processing techniques to identify volcanic ash and dust clouds in satellite imagery with a very low false alarm rate. This fully automated technique is globally applicable (day and night) and can be adapted to a wide range of low earth orbit and geostationary satellite sensors or even combinations of satellite sensors. The SECO algorithm consists of four primary components: conversion of satellite measurements into robust spectral metrics, application of a Bayesian method to estimate the probability that a given satellite pixel contains volcanic ash and/or dust, construction of cloud objects, and the selection of cloud objects deemed to have the physical attributes consistent with volcanic ash and/or dust clouds. The first two components of the SECO algorithm are described in this paper, while the final two components are described in a companion paper.

  13. How well can interannual to decadal-scale variability in stratospheric ozone and water vapor be quantified using limb-based satellite measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S. M.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Hurst, D. F.; Hassler, B.; Read, W. G.

    2015-12-01

    Vertical profiles of ozone and humidity from the upper troposphere to stratosphere have been retrieved from a number of limb sounding and solar occultation satellite instruments since the 1980's. In particular, measurements from the SAGE instruments, UARS MLS, UARS HALOE, and most recently Aura MLS, have provided overlapping data since 1984. In order to quantify interannual- to decadal-scale variability in water vapor and ozone, it is necessary to have a uniform and homogenous record over the period of interest. With this in mind, we merged the aforementioned satellite measurements to create the Stratospheric Water and Ozone Satellite Homogenized (SWOOSH) data set, which contains vertically resolved zonal-mean (2.5°) monthly-mean water vapor and ozone concentration at levels covering the stratosphere. In this presentation, we describe the process of merging the satellite data sets, which involves adjusting the data to a reference measurement using offsets calculated from coincident observations taken during instrument overlap periods. Uncertainties associated with individual measurement precision, geophysical variability, and the merging process are quantified and compared to one another. We show that while the SWOOSH data can be used to quantify interannual variability, quantifying long-term trends in SWOOSH is complicated by the various sources of uncertainty, as well as by potential drifts of individual instruments. The issue of satellite-derived trends is discussed in relation to the long-term record of balloon-borne frostpoint hygrometer measurements from Boulder, CO.

  14. Locating the Polar Cap Boundary of Postnoon Sector from Observations of 630.0 nm Auroral Emission at Zhongshan Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    We studied the ground observations of 630. 0 nm auroral emission at Zhongshan Station to de-termine the polar cap boundary with the latitudinal profile of emission intensity. The open-closed field lineboundary is assumed to lie at the boundary between polar rain and plasma sheet precipitation. We assumethat nonprecipitation-dependent sources of 630. 0 nm emission cause a spatially uniform luminosity in thepolar cap and that auroral zone luminosity is also spatially uniform. Therefore we determine the locationof the polar cap boundary of postnoon sector from the auroral emission data each time by finding the bestfit of the observations to a step function in latitude and we produce a time series of the location of the polarcap boundary. The average error of the practice in the paper is less than 0. 8 degree.

  15. The 2 μm spectrum of the auroral emission in the polar regions of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedziora-Chudczer, L.; Cotton, D. V.; Kedziora, D. J.; Bailey, J.

    2017-09-01

    We report observations of the high (R ∼ 18000) and medium (R ∼ 5900) resolution, near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's polar regions with the GNIRS instrument at the Gemini North telescope. The observations correspond to the area of main auroral oval in the South and the main spot of the Io footprint in the North. We detected and assigned 18 emission lines of the H3+ , 2ν2 → 0 overtone band in the region from 4800 to 4980 cm-1 and 5 additional lines in the extended low-resolution spectrum. We use our new modelling scheme, ATMOF to remove telluric absorption bands of CO2 that feature strongly in the 2 μm region. The H2 1-0 S(1), S(2) and S(3) emission lines are also detected in the observed spectral region. We found the rotational temperature and column density of H3+ emission at the peak intensity for both northern and southern auroral regions to be the same within the measurement errors (Trot ∼ 950K and N(H3+) ∼ 4.5× 1016 m-2). The estimates of Trot from H2 are consistent within much higher uncertainties with temperatures derived from H3+ emissions. We derived the profiles of the H3+ emissivity and ion density for both auroral regions providing the first such measurement for the emission associated with the main spot of the Io footprint. We also found a number of weaker lines in the high-resolution spectra that could be associated with emission from high excitation levels in neutral iron, which could be deposited in Jupiter's atmosphere as a result of meteor ablation.

  16. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Anid, H.; Lewis, B.J.; Bennett, L.G.I. [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Takada, M. [National Inst. of Radiological Science, International Space Radiation Lab., anagawa, Inage-Ku, Chiba (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    A transport code analysis using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code, MCNPX, has been used to propagate an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to estimate radiation exposure during solar storms at high altitudes. Neutron monitor count rate data from stations around the world were used to benchmark the model calculations during a Ground Level Event. A comparison was made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during GLE 60. A computer-code has been developed to implement the model for routine analysis. (author)

  17. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Anid, H.; Lewis, B.J.; Bennett, L.G.I. [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Takada, M. [National Inst. of Radiological Science, International Space Radiation Lab., Anagawa, Inage-Ku, Chiba (Japan)

    2011-03-15

    A transport code analysis using the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended code, MCNPX, has been used to propagate an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to estimate radiation exposure during solar storms at high altitudes. Neutron monitor count rate data from stations around the world were used to benchmark the model calculations during a Ground Level Event. A comparison was made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during GLE 60. A computer-code has been developed to implement the model for routine analysis. (author)

  18. Modelling of aircrew radiation exposure from solar particle events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Anid, H.; Lewis, B.J.; Bennett, L.G.I. [Royal Military College of Canada, Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    A transport code analysis using the Monte Carlo code, MCNPX, has been used to propagate an extrapolated particle spectrum based on GOES satellite measurements through the atmosphere to estimate aircrew radiation exposure due to solar particle events. Neutron monitor count rate data from ground stations around the world were used to benchmark the model calculations during several Ground Level Events (GLEs). In addition, a comparison was made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements made by some European investigators with various types of instrument used to measure the mixed radiation field during GLE 60 and 65. A computer-code has been further developed to implement the model for routine analysis. (author)

  19. Ionospheric response to particle precipitation within aurora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlund, J.E. (Swedish Inst. of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden))

    1992-03-01

    The aurora is just the visible signature of a large number of processes occurring in a planetary ionosphere as a response to energetic charged particles falling in from the near-empty space far above the planetary atmosphere. This thesis, based on measurements using the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar system in northern Scandinavia, discusses ionospheric response processes and especially a mechanism leading to atmospheric gas escape from a planet. One of the most spectacular events in the high latitude atmosphere on earth are the 'auroral arcs' - dynamic rayed sheets of light. An investigation of the conditions of the ionosphere surrounding auroral arcs shows that strong field-aligned bulk ion outflows appear in the topside ionosphere which account for a large fraction of the escape of atmospheric oxygen from earth. Four different additional ionospheric responses are closely related to this ion outflow; 1. enhanced electron temperatures of several thousand Kelvin above an altitude of about 250 km, 2. enhanced ionization around an altitude of 200 km corresponding to electron precipitation with energies of a few hundred eV, 3. the occurrence of naturally enhanced ion acoustic fluctuations seen in the radar spectrum, most likely produced by an ion-ion two-stream instability, and 4. upward directed field-aligned currents partly carried by the outflowing ions. From these observations, it is suggested that the energy dissipation into the background plasma through Joule heating, the production of a few hundred eV energetic run-away electrons, and strong ion outflows are partly produced by the simultaneous presence of ion acoustic turbulence and field-aligned currents above auroral arcs. (20 refs.) (au).

  20. Ionospheric response to particle precipitation within aurora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahlund, J.E. [Swedish Inst. of Space Physics, Uppsala (Sweden)

    1992-03-01

    The aurora is just the visible signature of a large number of processes occurring in a planetary ionosphere as a response to energetic charged particles falling in from the near-empty space far above the planetary atmosphere. This thesis, based on measurements using the EISCAT incoherent scatter radar system in northern Scandinavia, discusses ionospheric response processes and especially a mechanism leading to atmospheric gas escape from a planet. One of the most spectacular events in the high latitude atmosphere on earth are the `auroral arcs` - dynamic rayed sheets of light. An investigation of the conditions of the ionosphere surrounding auroral arcs shows that strong field-aligned bulk ion outflows appear in the topside ionosphere which account for a large fraction of the escape of atmospheric oxygen from earth. Four different additional ionospheric responses are closely related to this ion outflow; 1. enhanced electron temperatures of several thousand Kelvin above an altitude of about 250 km, 2. enhanced ionization around an altitude of 200 km corresponding to electron precipitation with energies of a few hundred eV, 3. the occurrence of naturally enhanced ion acoustic fluctuations seen in the radar spectrum, most likely produced by an ion-ion two-stream instability, and 4. upward directed field-aligned currents partly carried by the outflowing ions. From these observations, it is suggested that the energy dissipation into the background plasma through Joule heating, the production of a few hundred eV energetic run-away electrons, and strong ion outflows are partly produced by the simultaneous presence of ion acoustic turbulence and field-aligned currents above auroral arcs. (20 refs.) (au).

  1. Auroral vortex street formed by the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling instability

    CERN Document Server

    Hiraki, Yasutaka

    2014-01-01

    By performing three-dimensional nonlinear MHD simulations including Alfven eigenmode perturbations most unstable to the ionospheric feedback effects, we reproduced the auroral vortex street that often appears just before substorm onset. We found that an initially placed arc splits, intensifies, and rapidly deforms into a vortex street. We also found that there is a critical convection electric field for growth of the Alfven eigenmodes. The vortex street is shown to be a consequence of coupling between the magnetospheric Alfven waves carrying field-aligned currents and the ionospheric density waves driven by Pedersen/Hall currents.

  2. The solar flux influence on quiet time conductances in the auroral ionosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moen, J. (Univ. of Oslo (Norway)); Brekke, A. (Univ. of Tromso (Norway))

    1993-05-21

    The authors report on measurements of the Hall and Pedersen conductances of the quiet time auroral ionosphere made using the EISCAT radar. They derive expressions for the conductances as a function of the 10.7cm solar flux (S[sub a]) between 70 and 250 ([times]10[sup [minus]22]Wm[sup [minus]2]Hz[sup [minus]1]), and the solar zenith angle [chi]. The results are consistent with the recent model results of Rasmussen et al, but at higher levels of solar activity give results higher than previous models.

  3. Response of the auroral electrojet indices to abrupt southward IMF turnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Gjerloev

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present results from a study of the behavior of the auroral electrojet indices following abrupt southward turnings of the IMF Bz. The auroral electrojet indices are calculated from observations made by more than 100 ground based stations provided by the SuperMAG collaborators. Based on three simple criteria we selected 73 events. In each event the interval of analysis started at the time of the IMF Bz southward turning and ended 45 minutes later or at the onset of any abrupt energy unloading event in the magnetosphere, regardless of size. We refer to this period as the "pre-unloading phase". To isolate the dependence of the auroral electrojets on the solar induced ionospheric conductivity during this phase we separated the standard AU/AL indices into two new sets of indices defined by the upper and lower envelope of the north-south component for all sunlit stations (AUs/ALs and for all stations in darkness (AUd/ALd. Based on events and statistical analyses we can conclude that following a southward turning of the IMF Bz the AUd/ALd indices show no measurable response while the AUs/ALs indices clearly intensify. The intensifications of AUs/ALs are dependent on the intensity of the solar wind driver (as measured by IMF Bz or the Akasofu ε parameter. The lack of AUd/ALd response does not depend on the intensity of any subsequent substorm.

    We find that during these isolated events the ionospheric current system is primarily confined to the sunlit ionosphere. This truncated version of the classical global DP-2 current system suggests that auroral electrojet continuity is not maintained across the terminator. Because of its conductivity dependence on the solar zenith angle, this truncated global current pattern is expected to be highly dependent on UT and season and thus can be asymmetric between hemispheres. Thus we argue that the global two-cell DP-2 current system

  4. The Response of Auroral Electrojets to Steplike Enhancements of Energy Input from the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorstin, M.; Friel, M.; Botti, D.; Motoba, T.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ohtani, S.

    2012-12-01

    In this study we examined the response of auroral electrojets to step-like enhancements of energy input from the solar wind to the magnetosphere. As a measure of the intensity of auroral electrojets we used SMU, SML, and SME indices, which are equivalent to the official AU, AL, and AE indices but are derived from a more global data set available through the SuperMAG international collaborative effort (http://SuperMAG.jhuapl.edu). We used the optimal solar wind coupling function proposed by Newell et al. [2007], which we calculated from propagated solar wind and IMF data measured by the ACE spacecraft. This coupling function incorporates the effects of the solar wind velocity, By, Bz, and the IMF clock angle. The best correlation between the coupling function and the SME index occurred when the coupling function was sampled at 80 minutes from the step like change and SME was sampled at 120 minutes from the step like change, for a correlation of 0.674. If we integrated the coupling function, the best correlation occurred when the coupling function was integrated up to 95 minutes from the step like change and the SME index was sampled at 110 minutes from the step like change, for a correlation of 0.664. These results imply that there is a time delay of ~30 minutes, and that although similar solar wind conditions may cause different initial developments of auroral electrojets, they generally become similar after around 2 hours and release similar total amounts of energy. We also examined pairs of events with similar time-profiles of the solar wind energy input. Although we found that auroral electrojets very often develop in similar ways, in some events significant differences can be found in both the timing and intensity of electrojet enhancements. We examined the similarities and differences of the paired events in terms of the seasons of events, but we found that the dependence on season, if at all, is very weak. Based on these results we discuss several issues in

  5. Ionospheric Plasma Circulation Associated with Polar Cap Arcs Detached from the Auroral Oval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakymenko, K.; Koustov, A. V.; Hosokawa, K.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-12-01

    Joint observations of the OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, NWT (Canada), the SuperDARN radars and Swarm satellites are considered to investigate horizontal plasma flows and vertical field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with polar cap arcs "detached" from the auroral oval but not penetrated deep into the polar cap. All cases are for the near winter solstice, positive IMF Bz and mostly dominating IMF By. We show that the arcs are usually co-exist with strong flow shears driven by electric fields of the converging type. The shears, being added to the background flow, produce unusual convection patterns, for example reverse (sunward) flows on the nightside, several MLT hours away from the noon-midnight line. We also investigate the distribution of FACs in the arcs' vicinity, both duskward and dawnward, for several Swarm passes. Electron density data onboard Swarm satellites are used to identify the arc and auroral oval boundaries, along with the ground-based optics. The data suggest that the arcs correspond to a separate current system excited in addition to the background plasma circulation governed by the reconnection processes.Joint observations of the OMTI all-sky camera at Resolute Bay, NWT (Canada), the SuperDARN radars and Swarm satellites are considered to investigate horizontal plasma flows and vertical field-aligned currents (FACs) associated with polar cap arcs "detached" from the auroral oval but not penetrated deep into the polar cap. All cases are for the near winter solstice, positive IMF Bz and mostly dominating IMF By. We show that the arcs are usually co-exist with strong flow shears driven by electric fields of the converging type. The shears, being added to the background flow, produce unusual convection patterns, for example reverse (sunward) flows on the nightside, several MLT hours away from the noon-midnight line. We also investigate the distribution of FACs in the arcs' vicinity, both duskward and dawnward, for several Swarm passes

  6. Observations of E region irregularities generated at auroral latitudes by a high-power radio wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djuth, F. T.; Jost, R. J.; Noble, S. T.; Gordon, W. E.; Stubbe, P.

    1985-01-01

    The initial results of a series of observations made with the high-power HF heating facility near Tromso, Norway are reported. During these experiments, attention was focused on the production of artificial geomagnetic field-aligned irregularities (AFAIs) in the auroral E region by HF waves. A mobile 46.9-MHz radar was used to diagnose the formation of AFAIs having spatial scales of 3.2 across geomagnetic field lines. The dynamic characteristics of the AFAIs are discussed within the context of current theoretical work dealing with the natural production of AFAIs in the ionosphere.

  7. Representation of the Auroral and Polar Ionosphere in the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilitza, Dieter; Reinisch, Bodo

    2013-01-01

    This issue of Advances in Space Research presents a selection of papers that document the progress in developing and improving the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI), a widely used standard for the parameters that describe the Earths ionosphere. The core set of papers was presented during the 2010 General Assembly of the Committee on Space Research in Bremen, Germany in a session that focused on the representation of the auroral and polar ionosphere in the IRI model. In addition, papers were solicited and submitted from the scientific community in a general call for appropriate papers.

  8. On the Relation of Wave-Particle Interactions, Particle Dynamics, and Suprathermal Particle Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharek, Harald; Galvin, Antoinette; Farrugia, Charles; Klecker, Berndt; Pogorelov, Nikolai

    2016-04-01

    Wave-particle interactions, ion acceleration, and magnetic turbulence are closely interlinked and the physical processes may occur on different scales. These scales range from the kinetic scale to the macro-scale (MHD-scale). These processes are likely universal and the same basic processes occur at the Earth's environment, at the Earth's bow shock, the solar wind, and around the heliosphere. Undoubtedly, the Earth's environment as well as the close interplanetary space are the best plasma environments to study these processes using satellite measurements. Recently, ACE, STEREO, IBEX and Voyager observations clearly showed that turbulence and wave-particle interactions and turbulence are extremely important in interplanetary space and in the heliosphere. Using data from STEREO, Wind, we have investigated the spectral properties of suprathermal ion distributions. The results show that spectral slopes are very variable and depend on the plasma properties. We have also performed 3D hybrid simulations and studied particle dynamics. These simulations show that the particle dynamics in the turbulent magnetic wave field is Levy-Flight like which leads to a kappa distribution, which is often found in various space environments. This result is very significant of future mission such as THOR and IMAP and current operating missions such as STEREO, IBEX, and MMS.

  9. Evidence for particle acceleration during magnetospheric substorms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ramon E.; Baker, Daniel N.

    1994-01-01

    Magnetospheric substorms represent the episodic dissipation of energy stored in the geomagnetic tail that was previously extracted from the solar wind. This energy release produces activity throughout the entire magnetosphere-ionosphere system, and it results in a wide variety of phenomena such as auroral intensifications and the generation of new current systems. All of these phenomena involve the acceleration of particles, sometimes up to several MeV. We present a brief overview of substorm phenomenology. We then review some of the evidence for particle acceleration in Earth's magnetosphere during substorms. Such in-situ observations in this most accessible of all cosmic plasma domains may hold important clues to understanding acceleration processes in more distant astrophysical systems.

  10. Estimated total emissions of trace gases from the Canberra Wildfires of 2003: a new method using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth & the MOZART chemical transport model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Paton-Walsh

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we describe a new method for estimating trace gas emissions from large vegetation fires using satellite measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD at 550 nm, combined with an atmospheric chemical transport model. The method uses a threshold value to screen out normal levels of AOD that may be caused by raised dust, sea salt aerosols or diffuse smoke transported from distant fires. Using this method we infer an estimated total emission of 15±5 Tg of carbon monoxide, 0.05±0.02 Tg of hydrogen cyanide, 0.11±0.03 Tg of ammonia, 0.25±0.07 Tg of formaldehyde, 0.03±0.01 of acetylene, 0.10±0.03 Tg of ethylene, 0.03±0.01 Tg of ethane, 0.21±0.06 Tg of formic acid and 0.28±0.09 Tg of methanol released to the atmosphere from the Canberra fires of 2003. An assessment of the uncertainties in the new method is made and we show that our estimate agrees (within expected uncertainties with estimates made using current conventional methods of multiplying together factors for the area burned, fuel load, the combustion efficiency and the emission factor for carbon monoxide. A simpler estimate derived directly from the satellite AOD measurements is also shown to be in agreement with conventional estimates, suggesting that the method may, under certain meteorological conditions, be applied without the complication of using a chemical transport model. The new method is suitable for estimating emissions from distinct large fire episodes and although it has some significant uncertainties, these are largely independent of the uncertainties inherent in conventional techniques. Thus we conclude that the new method is a useful additional tool for characterising emissions from vegetation fires.

  11. The development of an improved long-term total ozone record through investigation into systematic and random differences between comparable satellite measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leigh, R. J.; Corlett, G. K.; Monks, P. S.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of stratospheric ozone trends is vital both for interpretation of the current record of surface temperature variation and for prediction of future patterns of climate evolution. Historically, data records from the TOMS satellite instruments and the Dobson ground-based networks have provided the premier standard for analysis, although recent work has invested much effort in deriving combined TOMS and GOME datasets. Despite problems of calibration and systematic uncertainties, the satellite data record has been valuable in demonstrating trends in total ozone as a function of latitude and month. Perhaps most critically, the trend analyses are complex, with disruption to the TOMS record due to the Mt. Pinatubo eruption (1991-93), and also a data gap (1994-96). Previous investigation in our department has shown systematic differences between comparable satellite measurements between 1996 and 1998. This poster presents results from an extended investigation into differences between total ozone measurements from TOVS, TOMS and GOME from 1996 to 2001. Such differences need to be quantified and understood in order to produce a reliable long-term record, and to provide a firm foundation that can be extended with data from new instruments such as SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2, which so far will be the only instruments operating in the post-TOMS era. The new analyses over the 1996 2001 time period provide further evidence of regular systematic discrepancies of up to 30DU between co-located and concurrent measurements of total ozone from the three instruments. The increased time-series has permitted a more detailed study of the temporal periodicity and geographic patterns evident in the residuals. Specifically, effects due to clouds, topography, and albedo have been investigated, with initial results indicating a clear correlation between albedo and differences between measurements from all three instruments. Moreover, the effects instrument-specific problems encountered

  12. Explaining Signatures of Auroral Arcs based on the Stationary Inertial Alfven Wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogami, Sh; Koepke, Me; Knudsen, Dj; Gillies, Dm; Donovan, E.; Vincena, S.

    2016-10-01

    Optical emission data from the THEMIS array of All Sky Imagers are analyzed to determine the lifetime of an auroral arc (i.e., the elapsed time during which an arc is visible). Lifetime is an important temporal signature related to the arc generation mechanism, by which arcs can be distinguished. An arc with a lifetime greater than ten minutes is consistent with arc generation by Stationary Inertial Alfven Wave (StIAW) which supports a steady-state wave electric field component parallel to a background magnetic field. An StIAW is a non-fluctuating, non-travelling, spatially periodic pattern of perturbed ion density that is static in the laboratory frame. StIAWs are the predicted result of the interaction between a magnetic-field-aligned electron current and plasma convection perpendicular to a background magnetic field. Electrostatic probes measure the fixed pattern of perturbed ion density in LAPD-U. Electron acceleration due to StIAWs is being investigated as a mechanism for the formation and support of long-lived auroral arcs. Preliminary evidence of electron acceleration from laboratory experiment is reported. This work was supported by NSF Grant PHY-130-1896, Grants from the Canadian Space Agency, and the THEMIS ASI teams at UCalgary and UC Berkeley. Facility use and experimental assistance from BaPSF is gratefully acknowledged.

  13. The far-ultraviolet main auroral emission at Jupiter. Pt. 2. Vertical emission profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonfond, B.; Gustin, J.; Gerard, J.C.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Palmaerts, B. [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Physique Atmospherique et Planetaire; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Goettingen (Germany); Badman, S.V. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Khurana, K.K. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Tao, C. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Toulouse (France)

    2015-07-01

    The aurorae at Jupiter are made up of many different features associated with a variety of generation mechanisms. The main auroral emission, also known as the main oval, is the most prominent of them as it accounts for approximately half of the total power emitted by the aurorae in the ultraviolet range. The energy of the precipitating electrons is a crucial parameter to characterize the processes at play which give rise to these auroral emissions, and the altitude of the emissions directly depends on this energy. Here we make use of far-UV (FUV) images acquired with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board the Hubble Space Telescope and spectra acquired with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph to measure the vertical profile of the main emissions. The altitude of the brightness peak as seen above the limb is ∝ 400 km, which is significantly higher than the 250 km measured in the post-dusk sector by Galileo in the visible domain. However, a detailed analysis of the effect of hydrocarbon absorption, including both simulations and FUV spectral observations, indicates that FUV apparent vertical profiles should be considered with caution, as these observations are not incompatible with an emission peak located at 250 km. The analysis also calls for spectral observations to be carried out with an optimized geometry in order to remove observational ambiguities.

  14. Dynamics of the auroral electrojets and their mapping to the magnetosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldstein, Y.I.; Gromova, L.I.; Grafe, A.; Meng, C.-I.; Kalegaev, V.V.; Alexeev, I.I.; Sumaruk, Yu.P

    1999-10-01

    Data of the EISCAT and IMAGE magnetic observatories chains in combination with data of three Russian observatories (St. Petersburg, Borok and Moscow) were used to determine the eastward and westward electrojet dynamics in the course of magnetic storms. During the storm main phase and maximum substorm intensity the eastward electrojet is located at latitudes lower than usual. During intervals between substorms the westward electrojet centre shifts equatorwards as Dst increases. At a substorm maximum the westward electrojet widens polewards. The spectrograms of precipitating electrons and ions of auroral energies obtained onboard the DMSP F8, F10 and F11 satellites allow to connect the regions of the electrojet location with characteristic plasma structures at ionospheric altitudes. The eastward electrojet in the evening sector is located in the region of diffuse electron precipitations. The electrojet centre coincides with the latitude of an energy flux maximum of auroral protons. In the course of substorms the westward electrojet at the nightside is located at latitudes of both diffuse and discrete electron precipitations. The electrojets and plasma region boundaries are mapped to the magnetosphere. The paraboloid model of the magnetosphere is used here. The influence of paraboloid model input parameters on the dayside cusp latitude, on the ionospheric boundaries between open and closed as well as dipole-like and tail-like field lines is considered. It is shown that tail currents influence magnetic field line configuration in the nightside magnetosphere stronger than the ring current.

  15. In-situ observation of electron kappa distributions associated with discrete auroral arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Keiichi; Livadiotis, George; Samara, Marilia; Michell, Robert; Grubbs, Guy

    2016-04-01

    The Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP) sensor aboard a NASA sounding rocket was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of Ground-to-Rocket Electrodynamics-Electrons Correlative Experiment (GREECE) mission. GREECE targeted to discover convergent E-field structures at low altitude ionosphere to find their contribution to the rapid fluid-like structures of aurora, and MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 2 to 200 keV within multiple discrete auroral arcs with the apogee of 350 km. MESP's unprecedented electron energy acceptance and high geometric factor made it possible to investigate precise populations of the suprathermal components measured in the inverted-V type electron energy distributions. The feature of these suprathermal electrons are explained by the kappa distribution functions with the parameters (densty, temperature, and kappa) consistent with the near-Earth tail plasma sheet, suggesting the source population of the auroral electrons. The kappa-values are different between each arc observed as a function of latitude, but are almost stable within one discrete arc. We suggest that this transition of kappa reflects the probagation history of source electrons through the plasma sheet by changing its state from non-equilibrium electron distributions to thermal ones.

  16. Development and performance of a suprathermal electron spectrometer to study auroral precipitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Keiichi; Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert G.; Samara, Marilia; Stange, Jason L.; Trevino, John A.; Webster, James; Jahn, Jörg-Micha

    2016-05-01

    The design, development, and performance of Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), dedicated to the in situ observation of suprathermal electrons in the auroral ionosphere, are summarized in this paper. MESP employs a permanent magnet filter with a light tight structure to select electrons with proper energies guided to the detectors. A combination of two avalanche photodiodes and a large area solid-state detector (SSD) provided 46 total energy bins (1 keV resolution for 3-20 keV range for APDs, and 7 keV resolution for >20 keV range for SSDs). Multi-channel ultra-low power application-specific integrated circuits are also verified for the flight operation to read-out and analyze the detector signals. MESP was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of ground-to-rocket electrodynamics-electrons correlative experiment (GREECE) mission. MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 3 to 120 keV in 120-ms time resolution and characterized the features of suprathermal distributions associated with auroral arcs throughout the flight. The measured electrons were showing the inverted-V type spectra, consistent with the past measurements. In addition, investigations of the suprathermal electron population indicated the existence of the energetic non-thermal distribution corresponding to the brightest aurora.

  17. Alaskan Auroral All-Sky Images on the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenbaek-Nielsen, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    In response to a 1995 NASA SPDS announcement of support for preservation and distribution of important data sets online, the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Alaska, proposed to provide World Wide Web access to the Poker Flat Auroral All-sky Camera images in real time. The Poker auroral all-sky camera is located in the Davis Science Operation Center at Poker Flat Rocket Range about 30 miles north-east of Fairbanks, Alaska, and is connected, through a microwave link, with the Geophysical Institute where we maintain the data base linked to the Web. To protect the low light-level all-sky TV camera from damage due to excessive light, we only operate during the winter season when the moon is down. The camera and data acquisition is now fully computer controlled. Digital images are transmitted each minute to the Web linked data base where the data are available in a number of different presentations: (1) Individual JPEG compressed images (1 minute resolution); (2) Time lapse MPEG movie of the stored images; and (3) A meridional plot of the entire night activity.

  18. Development and performance of a suprathermal electron spectrometer to study auroral precipitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogasawara, Keiichi, E-mail: kogasawara@swri.edu; Stange, Jason L.; Trevino, John A.; Webster, James [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States); Grubbs, Guy [University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States); Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Michell, Robert G.; Samara, Marilia [Goddard Space Flight Center, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, 8800 Greenbelt Rd, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Jahn, Jörg-Micha [Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States); University of Texas at San Antonio, One UTSA circle, San Antonio, Texas 78249 (United States)

    2016-05-15

    The design, development, and performance of Medium-energy Electron SPectrometer (MESP), dedicated to the in situ observation of suprathermal electrons in the auroral ionosphere, are summarized in this paper. MESP employs a permanent magnet filter with a light tight structure to select electrons with proper energies guided to the detectors. A combination of two avalanche photodiodes and a large area solid-state detector (SSD) provided 46 total energy bins (1 keV resolution for 3−20 keV range for APDs, and 7 keV resolution for >20 keV range for SSDs). Multi-channel ultra-low power application-specific integrated circuits are also verified for the flight operation to read-out and analyze the detector signals. MESP was launched from Poker Flat Research Range on 3 March 2014 as a part of ground-to-rocket electrodynamics-electrons correlative experiment (GREECE) mission. MESP successfully measured the precipitating electrons from 3 to 120 keV in 120-ms time resolution and characterized the features of suprathermal distributions associated with auroral arcs throughout the flight. The measured electrons were showing the inverted-V type spectra, consistent with the past measurements. In addition, investigations of the suprathermal electron population indicated the existence of the energetic non-thermal distribution corresponding to the brightest aurora.

  19. Enabling Future Large Searches for Exoplanet Auroral Emission with the EPIC Correlator Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyagarajan, Nithyanandan; Beardsley, Adam P.; Bowman, Judd D.; Morales, Miguel F.

    2017-05-01

    Extrasolar planets are expected to emit strong ``auroral'' emission at radio frequencies generated by the interaction of the host star's stellar winds with the planet's magnetosphere through electron-cyclotron maser emission. This transient emission lasts a few seconds to days and is almost fully circularly polarized. Detecting this emission in exoplanets is a critical probe of their magnetospheres and thus their interior compositions and habitability. The intensity and detectability of the emission depends on the suitability of many factors to the observing parameters such as the strength of the stellar wind power, the planetary magnetosphere cross-section, the highly beamed and coherent nature of electron-cyclotron emission, and narrow ranges of the planet's orbital phase. Large areas of sky must be surveyed continuously to high sensitivity to detect auroral emission. Next-generation radio telescopes with wide fields of view, large collecting areas and high efficiency are needed for these searches. This poses challenges to traditional correlator architectures whose computational cost scales as the square of the number of antennas. I will present a novel radio aperture synthesis imaging architecture - E-field Parallel Imaging Correlator (EPIC) - whose all-sky and full Stokes imaging capabilities will not only address the aforementioned factors preventing detection but also solve the computational challenges posed by large arrays. Compared to traditional imaging, EPIC is inherently fast and thus presents the unique advantage of probing transient timescales ranging orders of magnitude from tens of microseconds to days at no additional cost.

  20. What can we learn from the auroral footprints of the Jovian moons? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfond, B.

    2010-12-01

    The signature of electromagnetic interaction between the moons Io, Europa and Ganymede and the Jovian magnetosphere can be observed on Jupiter’s polar ionosphere in the form of auroral footprints. The observation campaigns carried out during the past few years by the Hubble Space Telescope in the Far UV domain provided not only a high spatial and temporal resolution but also an unprecedented System III longitude coverage. Consequently, these recent observations of the morphology and the dynamics of the footprints proved to be very powerful tools to probe these interactions. For example, the locations of the satellite footprints have been used as a valuable constraint for building Jovian magnetic field models. Moreover, analysis of the multiplicity of the Io footprint spots as well as their relative motion lead to new conclusions on the electron acceleration processes. The altitude of the Io footprint has also been used to infer the typical energy of the impinging electrons. Finally, the study of the three-dimensional shape and of the brightness of the different sub-structures of the footprints provides important clues on the processes at play between Io and the Jovian ionosphere. On the theoretical side, considerable efforts have also been recently carried out in order to model the propagation of the Alfvén waves generated at Io and the subsequent acceleration of auroral electrons. Coupled with HST images, radio decametric measurements and in situ data from the Galileo spacecraft, these advances provide a brand new understanding of the satellite footprints.

  1. Zakharov simulations of beam-induced turbulence in the auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, H.; Guio, P.; Hirsch, M. A.; Semeter, J. L.

    2016-05-01

    Recent detections of strong incoherent scatter radar echoes from the auroral F region, which have been explained as the signature of naturally produced Langmuir turbulence, have motivated us to revisit the topic of beam-generated Langmuir turbulence via simulation. Results from one-dimensional Zakharov simulations are used to study the interaction of ionospheric electron beams with the background plasma at the F region peak. A broad range of beam parameters extending by more than 2 orders of magnitude in average energy and electron number density is considered. A range of wave interaction processes, from a single parametric decay, to a cascade of parametric decays, to formation of stationary density cavities in the condensate region, and to direct collapse at the initial stages of turbulence, is observed as we increase the input energy to the system. The effect of suprathermal electrons, produced by collisional interactions of auroral electrons with the neutral atmosphere, on the dynamics of Langmuir turbulence is also investigated. It is seen that the enhanced Landau damping introduced by the suprathermal electrons significantly weakens the turbulence and truncates the cascade of parametric decays.

  2. X-Ray Probes of Jupiter's Auroral Zones, Galilean Moons, and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Swartz, D. A.; Rehak, P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Cooper, J. F.; Johnson, R. E.

    2005-01-01

    Remote observations from the Earth orbiting Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown the the Jovian system is a rich and complex source of x-ray emission. The planet's auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission, though with different origins. Chandra observations discovered x-ray emission from the Io plasma torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from the moons is due to bombardment of their surfaces by highly energetic magnetospheric protons, and oxygen and sulfur ions, producing fluorescent x-ray emission lines from the elements in their surfaces against an intense background continuum. Although very faint when observed from Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around the icy Galilean moons would provide a detail mapping of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we review the results of Chandra and XMM-Newton observations of the Jovian system and describe the characteristics of X-MIME, an imaging x-ray spectrometer undergoing study for possible application to future missions to Jupiter such as JIMO. X-MIME has the ultimate goal of providing detailed high-resolution maps of the elemental abundances of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as detailed study of the x-ray mission from the Io plasma torus, Jupiter's auroral zones, and the planetary disk.

  3. Landau Damping of Transverse Waves in the Exosphere by Fast Particle Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidman, D. A.; Jaggi, R. K.

    1962-01-01

    We have investigated the Landau damping of transverse waves propagating in the thermal exospheric plasma, by fast particle fluxes which also exist in these regions. The most intense non-thermal fluxes so far detected are those of the auroral producing electrons and protons measured by McIlwain. We find that these fluxes may considerably damp the propagation of whistler modes through some regions. The damping of hydromagnetic waves in the exosphere by this mechanism is negligible.

  4. Ion shell distributions as free energy source for plasma waves on auroral field lines mapping to plasma sheet boundary layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ion shell distributions are hollow spherical shells in velocity space that can be formed by many processes and occur in several regions of geospace. They are interesting because they have free energy that can, in principle, be transmitted to ions and electrons. Recently, a technique has been developed to estimate the original free energy available in shell distributions from in-situ data, where some of the energy has already been lost (or consumed. We report a systematic survey of three years of data from the Polar satellite. We present an estimate of the free energy available from ion shell distributions on auroral field lines sampled by the Polar satellite below 6 RE geocentric radius. At these altitudes the type of ion shells that we are especially interested in is most common on auroral field lines close to the polar cap (i.e. field lines mapping to the plasma sheet boundary layer, PSBL. Our analysis shows that ion shell distributions that have lost some of their free energy are commonly found not only in the PSBL, but also on auroral field lines mapping to the boundary plasma sheet (BPS, especially in the evening sector auroral field lines. We suggest that the PSBL ion shell distributions are formed during the so-called Velocity Dispersed Ion Signatures (VDIS events. Furthermore, we find that the partly consumed shells often occur in association with enhanced wave activity and middle-energy electron anisotropies. The maximum downward ion energy flux associated with a shell distribution is often 10mWm-2 and sometimes exceeds 40mWm-2 when mapped to the ionosphere and thus may be enough to power many auroral processes. Earlier simulation studies have shown that ion shell distributions can excite ion Bernstein waves which, in turn, energise electrons in the parallel direction. It is possible that ion shell distributions are the link between the X-line and the auroral wave activity and electron

  5. Retrieving the availability of light in the ocean utilising spectral signatures of Vibrational Raman Scattering in hyper-spectral satellite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinter, T.; Rozanov, V. V.; Burrows, J. P.; Bracher, A.

    2015-01-01

    The availability of light in the ocean is an important parameter for the determination of phytoplankton photosynthesis processes and primary production from satellite data. It is also a useful parameter for other applications, e.g. the determination of heat fluxes. In this study, a method was developed utilising the vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) effect of water molecules to determine the amount of photons available in the ocean water, which is expressed by the depth integrated scalar irradiance text-decoration:overline">E0. Radiative transfer simulations with the fully coupled ocean-atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) SCIATRAN show clearly the relationship of text-decoration:overline">E0 to the strength of the VRS signal measured at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). Taking advantage of VRS structures in hyper-spectral satellite measurements a retrieval technique to derive text-decoration:overline"> E0 in the wavelength region from 390 to 444.5 nm was developed. This approach uses the Weighting Function Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (WF-DOAS) technique, applied to TOA radiances, measured by the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). Based on the approach of Vountas et al. (2007), where the DOAS method was used to fit modelled spectra of VRS, the method was improved by using the weighting function of VRS (VRS-WF) in the DOAS fit. This was combined with a look-up table (LUT) technique, where the text-decoration:overline"> E0 value was obtained for each VRS satellite fit directly. The VRS-WF and the LUT were derived from calculations with the RTM SCIATRAN (Rozanov et al., 2014). RTM simulations for different chlorophyll a concentrations and illumination conditions clearly show, that low fit factors of VRS retrieval results correspond to low amounts of light in the water column and vice versa. Exemplary, one month of SCIAMACHY data were processed and a global map of the depth integrated scalar

  6. Overview of the Cassini In-Situ Observations of Auroral Field-Aligned Currents During the 2013 Saturn Aurora Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunce, E. J.; Badman, S. V.; Cowley, S. W.; Dougherty, M. K.; Gurnett, D. A.; Jinks, S.; Kurth, W. S.; Mitchell, D. G.; Nichols, J. D.; Provan, G.; Pryor, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Saturn Aurora Campaign 2013 is a coordinated effort to provide a clearer understanding of Saturn's auroral emissions at multiple wavelengths in the upper atmosphere, and their associated magnetospheric signatures and dynamics. Structures such as Corotating Interaction Regions (CIRs) are known to play a significant role in the modulation of Saturn's auroral emissions via abrupt changes in the dynamic pressure associated with forward shocks at the start of the CIR compression regions. Recent observations from the Cassini spacecraft at Saturn have also taught us that the 'magnetosphere oscillations' observed in magnetic field perturbations in the northern and southern hemispheres, which are associated with the SKR modulations in each hemisphere, also significantly modulate the magnetosphere and auroral emissions. Here we present an overview of the in situ magnetosphere measurements during the campaign, along with an overview of the solar wind conditions upstream of Saturn inferred from the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) emissions. We will discuss evidence of the high-latitude field-aligned currents and plasma boundaries (e.g. the open-closed field line (or related) boundary) from the magnetic field data, plasma signatures and/or auroral hiss observations (using the Cassini magnetometer-MAG, the Magnetospheric Imaging Instrument-MIMI, and the Radio Plasma Wave Science-RPWS instruments respectively). We will attempt to characterise the morphology and variability (e.g. co-latitude, intensity) of the current system(s) from both the knowledge of the northern or southern magnetosphere oscillation phase (according to the location of the spacecraft) and the inferred solar wind conditions. We will compare these results with available IR/UV auroral images from the campaign.

  7. On the current-voltage relationship in auroral breakups and westwards-travelling surges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Olsson

    Full Text Available Auroral precipitating electrons pass through an acceleration region before entering the atmosphere. Regardless of what produces it, a parallel electric field is assumed to cause the acceleration. It is well known that from kinetic theory an expression for the corresponding upward field-aligned current can be calculated, which under certain assumptions can be linearized to j=KV. The K constant, referred to as the Lyons-Evans-Lundin constant, depends on the source density and thermal energy of the magnetospheric electrons; it is an important parameter in magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling models. However, the K parameter is still rather unknown, and values are found in a wide range of 10–8–10–10 S m–2. In this study, we investigated how the type of auroral structure affects the K values. We look at onset and westwards-travelling surge (WTS events and make comparisons with earlier results from observations of more stable auroral arcs. A new analysis technique for studying those magnetospheric parameters using ground-based measurements is introduced. Electron density measurements are taken with the EISCAT radar, and through an inversion technique the flux-energy spectra are calculated. Source densities, thermal energies and potential drops are estimated from fittings of accelerated Maxwellian distributions. With this radar technique we have the possibility to study the changes of the mentioned parameters during the development of onsets and the passage of surges over EISCAT. The study indicates that the linearization of the full Knight formulation holds even for the very high potential drops and thermal temperatures found in the dynamic onset and WTS events. The values of K are found to be very low, around 10–11 S m–2 in onset cases as well as WTS events. The results may establish a new technique where ionospheric

  8. Electron ionization of metastable nitrogen and oxygen atoms in relation to the auroral emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Joshipura, K. N.

    Atomic and molecular excited metastable states (EMS) are exotic systems due to their special properties like long radiative life-time, large size (average radius) and large polarizability along with relatively smaller first ionization energy compared to their respective ground states (GS). The present work includes our theoretical calculations on electron impact ionization of metastable atomic states N( (2) P), N( (2) D) of nitrogen and O( (1) S), O( (1) D) of oxygen. The targets of our present interest, are found to be present in our Earth's ionosphere and they play an important role in auroral emissions observed in Earth’s auroral regions [1] as also in the emissions observed from cometary coma [2, 3] and airglow emissions. In particular, atomic oxygen in EMS can radiate, the visible O( (1) D -> (3) P) doublet 6300 - 6364 Å red doublet, the O( (1) S -> (1) D) 5577 Å green line, and the ultraviolet O( (1) S -> (3) P) 2972 Å line. For metastable atomic nitrogen one observes the similar emissions, in different wavelengths, from (2) D and (2) P states. At the Earth's auroral altitudes, from where these emissions take place in the ionosphere, energetic electrons are also present. In particular, if the metastable N as well as O atoms are ionized by the impact of electrons then these species are no longer available for emissions. This is a possible loss mechanism, and hence it is necessary to analyze the importance of electron ionization of the EMS of atomic O and N, by calculating the relevant cross sections. In the present paper we investigate electron ionization of the said metastable species by calculating relevant total cross sections. Our quantum mechanical calculations are based on projected approximate ionization contribution in the total inelastic cross sections [4]. Detailed results and discussion along with the significance of these calculations will be presented during the COSPAR-2014. References [1] A.Bhardwaj, and G. R. Gladstone, Rev. Geophys., 38

  9. Diffuse auroral electron scattering by electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves and electromagnetic whistler-mode chorus in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, B.; Thorne, R. M.; Horne, R. B.; Meredith, N. P.; Shprits, Y.; Chen, L.

    2009-12-01

    The diffuse aurora constitutes one of the most important loss processes of plasma sheet electrons, supplying the majority of ionizing energy input into the high-latitude region during conditions of both low and high solar wind driving. It is generally agreed that wave-particle interactions, including scattering losses by electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) waves and electromagnetic whistler-mode chorus waves, play an essential role in the occurrence of the diffuse aurora. However, the precise role of each wave mode has remained a source of controversy for many years. To quantify the scattering effects of these two wave modes, we have improved the methodology for computation of quasi-linear diffusion coefficients and adopted statistical wave models based on the survey of ECH waves and chorus using the entire CRRES database. Our results demonstrate that, whistler-mode chorus is the dominant mechanism for loss of injected plasma sheet electrons from the inner magnetosphere (4 1 keV, suggesting rather minor contributions from ECH waves to the diffuse auroral precipitation. Our results also show that the scattering effects on plasma sheet electrons by the waves are strongly dependent on the level of geomagnetic activity.

  10. Responses of the Equatorial Ionosphere to High Intensity Long Duration Continuous Auroral Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobral, J. H. A.; Abdu, M. A.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Gonzalez, A. C.; Tsurutani, B.; Daniela, D. C.; Arruda, C. S.

    This work focus the responses of the equatorial ionosphere over South America to intense substorms and, on the other hand, in the absence of magnetic storms. The substorms here concerned are related to what is known as High Intensity Long Duration Continuous Auroral Activity HILDCAA's. The analysis of these responses are carried out by means of ground-based ionosonde data from Fortaleza (3° 53'S 38° 25'W dip 2.7S for the epoch 1978-1979) and Cachoeira Paulista (22° 41'S , 45° 00W, dip 25.6S for 1978-1979)and ISEE-3 (Interplanetary Sun-Earth Explorer) satellite data during the 1978-1979 time frame. The substorm disturbed days are compared with the averages of quiet days. The ionospheric height variations are analyzed in the light of satellite data and intercomparisons of the two stations.

  11. The Role of Auroral Imaging in Understanding Ionosphere-Inner Magnetosphere Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spann, Jim; Khazanov, George; Mende, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    The more ways we probe the ionosphere and inner magnetosphere, the better we can understand their interaction. For example, the multifaceted imaging of geospace with the IMAGE mission complements the more traditional in situ measurements made with many previous missions. Together they have enabled new knowledge of the ionosphere-magnetosphere (IM) coupling. The role of imaging the aurora in understanding this interaction has received renewed attention recently. Based on in situ data, such as FAST or DMSP, and our recent theories, we believe that imaging multiscale features of the aurora is a key component to gaining insight into the processes and mechanisms at work. This talk will explore how auroral imaging can be used to provide improved insight of the dynamics of IM interaction on micro and meso scales, with an emphasis on the current limitations and future possibilities of quantitative analyses.

  12. Modulation of auroral electrojet currents using dual HF beams with ELF phase offset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golkowski, M.; Cohen, M.; Moore, R. C.

    2012-12-01

    The modulation of naturally occuring ionospheric currents with high power radio waves in the high frequency (HF, 3-10 MHz) band is a well known technique for generation of extremely low frequency (ELF, 3-3000 Hz) and very low frequency (VLF, 3-30 kHz) waves. We use the heating facility of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) to investigate the effect of using dual HF beams with an ELF/VLF phase offset between the modulation waveforms. Experiments with offset HF beams confirm the model of independent ELF/VLF sources. Experiments with co-located HF beams exhibit interaction between the first and second harmonics of the modulated tones when square and sine wave modulation waveforms are employed. Using ELF/VLF phase offsets for co-loacted beams is also shown to be a potential diagnostic for the D-region ionospheric profile.

  13. Scintillation and loss of signal lock from poleward moving auroral forms in the cusp ionosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Oksavik, K; Lorentzen, D A; Baddeley, L J; Moen, J

    2016-01-01

    We present two examples from the cusp ionosphere over Svalbard,where poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs) are causing significant phase scintillation in signals from navigation satellites. The data were obtained using a combination of ground-based optical instruments and a newly installed multiconstellation navigation signal receiver at Longyearbyen. Both events affected signals from GPS and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS). When one intense PMAF appeared, the signal from one GPS spacecraft also experienced a temporary loss of signal lock. Although several polar cap patches were also observed in the area as enhancements in total electron content, the most severe scintillation and loss of signal lock appear to be attributed to very intense PMAF activity. This shows that PMAFs are locations of strong ionospheric irregularities, which at times may cause more severe disturbances in the cusp ionosphere for navigation signals than polar cap patches.

  14. Stellar wind-magnetosphere interaction at exoplanets: computations of auroral radio powers

    CERN Document Server

    Nichols, J D

    2016-01-01

    We present calculations of the auroral radio powers expected from exoplanets with magnetospheres driven by an Earth-like magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind. Specifically, we compute the twin cell-vortical ionospheric flows, currents, and resulting radio powers resulting from a Dungey cycle process driven by dayside and nightside magnetic reconnection, as a function of planetary orbital distance and magnetic field strength. We include saturation of the magnetospheric convection, as observed at the terrestrial magnetosphere, and we present power law approximations for the convection potentials, radio powers and spectral flux densities. We specifically consider a solar-age system and a young (1 Gyr) system. We show that the radio power increases with magnetic field strength for magnetospheres with saturated convection potential, and broadly decreases with increasing orbital distance. We show that the magnetospheric convection at hot Jupiters will be saturated, and thus unable to dissipate the full av...

  15. A comparison of EISCAT and Dynasonde measurements of the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. F. Sedgemore

    Full Text Available Incoherent-scatter radar and ionospheric sounding are powerful and complementary techniques in the study of the Earth's ionosphere. The work presented here involves the use of the Tromsø Dynasonde as a correlative diagnostic with the EISCAT incoherent-scatter radar. A comparison of electron-density profiles shows how a Dynasonde can be used to calibrate an incoherent-scatter radar and to monitor changes in the system. Skymaps of the direction of Dynasonde echoes are compared with EISCAT-derived density profiles to illustrate how a Dynasonde can be used to measure the drift velocity of auroral features. Vector velocities fitted to Dynasonde echoes are compared with EISCAT-derived plasma velocities. The results show good agreement when the data are taken during quiet to moderately active conditions and averaged over time scales of 30 min or more.

  16. Explaining occurrences of auroral kilometric radiation in Van Allen radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; Su, Zhenpeng; He, Zhaoguo; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Gao, Zhonglei

    2016-12-01

    Auroral kilometric radiation (AKR) is a strong terrestrial radio emission and dominates at higher latitudes because of reflection in vicinities of the source cavity and plasmapause. Recently, Van Allen Probes have observed occurrences of AKR emission in the equatorial region of Earth's radiation belts but its origin still remains an open question. Equatorial AKR can produce efficient acceleration of radiation belt electrons and is a risk to space weather. Here we report high-resolution observations during two small storm periods 4-6 April and 18-20 May 2013 and show, using a 3-D ray tracing simulation, that AKR can propagate downward all the way into the equatorial plane in the radiation belts under appropriate conditions. The simulated results can successfully explain the observed AKR's spatial distribution and frequency range, and the current results have a wide application to all other magnetized astrophysical objects in the universe.

  17. Scaling in the space climatology of the auroral indices: is SOC the only possible description?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. W. Watkins

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of the robust features of the magnetosphere is motivated both by new "whole system" approaches, and by the idea of "space climate" as opposed to "space weather". We enumerate these features for the AE index, and discuss whether self-organised criticality (SOC is the most natural explanation of the "stylised facts" so far known for AE. We identify and discuss some open questions, answers to which will clarify the extent to which AE's properties provide evidence for SOC. We then suggest an SOC-like reconnection-based scenario drawing on the result of Craig (2001 as an explanation of the very recent demonstration by Uritsky et al. (2001b of power laws in several properties of spatiotemporal features seen in auroral images.

  18. Saturn's polar ionospheric flows and their relation to the main auroral oval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available We consider the flows and currents in Saturn's polar ionosphere which are implied by a three-component picture of large-scale magnetospheric flow driven both by planetary rotation and the solar wind interaction. With increasing radial distance in the equatorial plane, these components consist of a region dominated by planetary rotation where planetary plasma sub-corotates on closed field lines, a surrounding region where planetary plasma is lost down the dusk tail by the stretching out of closed field lines followed by plasmoid formation and pinch-off, as first described for Jupiter by Vasyliunas, and an outer region driven by the interaction with the solar wind, specifically by reconnection at the dayside magnetopause and in the dawn tail, first discussed for Earth by Dungey. The sub-corotating flow on closed field lines in the dayside magnetosphere is constrained by Voyager plasma observations, showing that the plasma angular velocity falls to around half of rigid corotation in the outer magnetosphere, possibly increasing somewhat near the dayside magnetopause, while here we provide theoretical arguments which indicate that the flow should drop to considerably smaller values on open field lines in the polar cap. The implied ionospheric current system requires a four-ring pattern of field-aligned currents, with distributed downward currents on open field lines in the polar cap, a narrow ring of upward current near the boundary of open and closed field lines, and regions of distributed downward and upward current on closed field lines at lower latitudes associated with the transfer of angular momentum from the planetary atmosphere to the sub-corotating planetary magnetospheric plasma. Recent work has shown that the upward current associated with sub-corotation is not sufficiently intense to produce significant auroral acceleration and emission. Here we suggest that the observed auroral oval at Saturn instead corresponds to the ring of

  19. Localized auroral disturbance in the morning sector of topside ionosphere as a standing electromagnetic wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinin, E.M.; Israelevich, P.L.; Nikolaeva, N.S.; Podgornyi, I.M.; Kutiev, I.

    1985-06-01

    The fine structure and plasma properties of an auroral disturbance observed with the Intercosmos-Bulgaria-1300 satellite are analyzed. The disturbance was detected in the morning sector of the sky at an altitude of about 850 km in December of 1981. Strong jumps (about 80 mV/m) in the electric and magnetic fields and fluctuations of ion density were detected within the disturbance. The electric and magnetic fields were characterized by a distinct spatial-temporal relationship typical for a standing quasi-monochromatic wave with a frequency of 1 Hz. The ratio of the amplitudes of electric and magnetic fluctuations was equal to the velocity of Alfven waves. The strong parallel component of the electric field (about 30 mV/m) and the large ion density of the fluctuations indicate changes in the plasma properties of the disturbance. The possibility of anomalous resistivity effects in the disturbance is also briefly considered. 23 references.

  20. Electromagnetic structures at auroral latitudes from luterkosmos-bolgariya-1300 satellite data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubinin, E.M.; Bankov, N.; Izraelevich, P.L.; Nikolaeva, N.S.; Podgornyi, I.M.; Todorieva, L.

    1986-11-01

    Strong electromagnetic disturbances in the auroral region at altitudes of about 900 km, which were recorded by the Interkosmos-Bolgariya-1300 satellite, are analyzed. An attempt is undertaken to determine general regularities in their structures. A specific class of events in which the disturbances of the electric and magnetic fields have the same form are distinguished. The events are a result of the propagation of oblique Alfven waves with lambda /sub z/ about 3.10 /sub s/ km, lambda /sub x/ less than or equal to 10 km, and f about 1 Hz. The lack of an apparent correlation between the mutually perpendicular components of the electric and magnetic fields is due to a significant phase shift between the disturbances of the electric and magnetic fields, which indicates the interference of the waves incident and reflected at the ionosphere.

  1. Statistical study of Saturn's auroral electron properties with Cassini/UVIS FUV spectral images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustin, J.; Grodent, D.; Radioti, A.; Pryor, W.; Lamy, L.; Ajello, J.

    2017-03-01

    About 2000 FUV spectra of different regions of Saturn's aurora, obtained with Cassini/UVIS from December 2007 to October 2014 have been examined. Two methods have been employed to determine the mean energy of the precipitating electrons. The first is based on the absorption of the auroral emission by hydrocarbons and the second uses the ratio between the brightness of the Lyman-α line and the H2 total UV emission (Lyα/H2), which is directly related to via a radiative transfer formalism. In addition, two atmospheric models obtained recently from UVIS polar occultations have been employed for the first time. It is found that the atmospheric model related to North observations near 70° latitude provides the results most consistent with constraints previously published. On a global point of view, the two methods provide comparable results, with mostly in the 7-17 keV range with the hydrocarbon method and in the 1-11 keV range with the Lyα/H2 method. Since hydrocarbons have been detected on ∼20% of the auroral spectra, the Lyα/H2 technique is more effective to describe the primary auroral electrons, as it is applicable to all spectra and allows an access to the lowest range of energies (≤5 keV), unreachable by the hydrocarbon method. The distribution of is found fully compatible with independent HST/ACS constraints (emission peak in the 840-1450 km range) and FUSE findings (emission peaking at pressure level ≤0.2 μbar). In addition, exhibits enhancements in the 3 LT-10 LT sector, consistent with SKR intensity measurements. An energy flux-electron energy diagram built from all the data points strongly suggests that acceleration by field-aligned potentials as described by Knight's theory is a main mechanism responsible for electron precipitation creating the aurora. Assuming a fixed electron temperature of 0.1 keV, a best-fit equatorial electron source population density of 3 × 103 m-3 is derived, which matches very well to the plasma properties observed with

  2. Arturo A. Roig: la filosofía latinoamericana como filosofía auroral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana P. Vignale

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available La filosofía latinoamericana es presentada por el filósofo argentino Arturo Roig como una filosofía de la mañana, en contrapunto con una filosofía vespertina que supone todo un futuro contenido en su pasado. Una apertura al futuro como alteridad desde una filosofía auroral afirma, en primer lugar, la historicidad de todo hombre, que no se juega en una toma de conciencia histórica por parte de los sujetos determinados, sino en la posibilidad de ¿un hacerse y un gestarse¿ del sujeto. La historicidad, de esta manera, es pensada desde la normatividad propia de la construcción de la sujetividad. Concebido como un sujeto plural y relativo y anclado en su contexto y en su tiempo, la historicidad lo constituye.

  3. A classification of spectral populations observed in HF radar backscatter from the E region auroral electrojets

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    S. E. Milan

    Full Text Available Observations of HF radar backscatter from the auroral electrojet E region indicate the presence of five major spectral populations, as opposed to the two predominant spectral populations, types I and II, observed in the VHF regime. The Doppler shift, spectral width, backscatter power, and flow angle dependencies of these five populations are investigated and described. Two of these populations are identified with type I and type II spectral classes, and hence, are thought to be generated by the two-stream and gradient drift instabilities, respectively. The remaining three populations occur over a range of velocities which can greatly exceed the ion acoustic speed, the usual limiting velocity in VHF radar observations of the E region. The generation of these spectral populations is discussed in terms of electron density gradients in the electrojet region and recent non-linear theories of E region irregularity generation.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities

  4. The relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter amplitude and Doppler velocity: a statistical study

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    B. A. Shand

    Full Text Available A statistical investigation of the relationship between VHF radar auroral backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity has been undertaken with data collected from 8 years operation of the Wick site of the Sweden And Britain Radar-auroral Experiment (SABRE. The results indicate three different regimes within the statistical data set; firstly, for Doppler velocities <200 m s–1, the backscatter intensity (measured in decibels remains relatively constant. Secondly, a linear relationship is observed between the backscatter intensity (in decibels and Doppler velocity for velocities between 200 m s–1 and 700 m s–1. At velocities greater than 700 m s–1 the backscatter intensity saturates at a maximum value as the Doppler velocity increases. There are three possible geophysical mechanisms for the saturation in the backscatter intensity at high phase speeds: a saturation in the irregularity turbulence level, a maximisation of the scattering volume, and a modification of the local ambient electron density. There is also a difference in the dependence of the backscatter intensity on Doppler velocity for the flow towards and away from the radar. The results for flow towards the radar exhibit a consistent relationship between backscatter intensity and measured velocities throughout the solar cycle. For flow away from the radar, however, the relationship between backscatter intensity and Doppler velocity varies during the solar cycle. The geometry of the SABRE system ensures that flow towards the radar is predominantly associated with the eastward electrojet, and flow away is associated with the westward electrojet. The difference in the backscatter intensity variation as a function of Doppler velocity is attributed to asymmetries between the eastward and westward electrojets and the geophysical parameters controlling the backscatter amplitude.

  5. Experimental investigation of auroral generator regions with conjugate Cluster and FAST data

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    O. Marghitu

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Here and in the companion paper, Hamrin et al. (2006, we present experimental evidence for the crossing of auroral generator regions, based on conjugate Cluster and FAST data. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation that concentrates on the evaluation of the power density, E·J, in auroral generator regions, by using in-situ measurements. The Cluster data we discuss were collected within the Plasma Sheet Boundary Layer (PSBL, during a quiet magnetospheric interval, as judged from the geophysical indices, and several minutes before the onset of a small substorm, as indicated by the FAST data. Even at quiet times, the PSBL is an active location: electric fields are associated with plasma motion, caused by the dynamics of the plasma-sheet/lobe interface, while electrical currents are induced by pressure gradients. In the example we show, these ingredients do indeed sustain the conversion of mechanical energy into electromagnetic energy, as proved by the negative power density, E·J<0. The plasma characteristics in the vicinity of the generator regions indicate a complicated 3-D wavy structure of the plasma sheet boundary. Consistent with this structure, we suggest that at least part of the generated electromagnetic energy is carried away by Alfvén waves, to be dissipated in the ionosphere, near the polar cap boundary. Such a scenario is supported by the FAST data, which show energetic electron precipitation conjugated with the generator regions crossed by Cluster. A careful examination of the conjunction timing contributes to the validation of the generator signatures.

  6. Separating spatial and temporal variations in auroral electric and magnetic fields by Cluster multipoint measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Karlsson

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Cluster multipoint measurements of the electric and magnetic fields from a crossing of auroral field lines at an altitude of 4RE are used to show that it is possible to resolve the ambiguity of temporal versus spatial variations in the fields. We show that the largest electric fields (of the order of 300mV/m when mapped down to the ionosphere are of a quasi-static nature, unipolar, associated with upward electron beams, stable on a time scale of at least half a minute, and located in two regions of downward current. We conclude that they are the high-altitude analogues of the intense return current/black auroral electric field structures observed at lower altitudes by Freja and FAST. In between these structures there are temporal fluctuations, which are shown to likely be downward travelling Alfvén waves. The periods of these waves are 20-40s, which is not consistent with periods associated with either the Alfvénic ionospheric resonator, typical field line resonances or substorm onset related Pi2 oscillations. The multipoint measurements enable us to estimate a lower limit to the perpendicular wavelength of the Alfvén waves to be of the order of 120km, which suggests that the perpendicular wavelength is similar to the dimension of the region between the two quasi-static structures. This might indicate that the Alfvén waves are ducted within a wave guide, where the quasi-static structures are associated with the gradients making up this waveguide.

  7. Spectral analysis of auroral geomagnetic activity during various solar cycles between 1960 and 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzé, Pieter Benjamin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we use wavelets and Lomb-Scargle spectral analysis techniques to investigate the changing pattern of the different harmonics of the 27-day solar rotation period of the AE (auroral electrojet) index during various phases of different solar cycles between 1960 and 2014. Previous investigations have revealed that the solar minimum of cycles 23-24 exhibited strong 13.5- and 9.0-day recurrence in geomagnetic data in comparison to the usual dominant 27.0-day synodic solar rotation period. Daily mean AE indices are utilized to show how several harmonics of the 27-day recurrent period change during every solar cycle subject to a 95 % confidence rule by performing a wavelet analysis of each individual year's AE indices. Results show that particularly during the solar minimum of 23-24 during 2008 the 27-day period is no longer detectable above the 95 % confidence level. During this interval geomagnetic activity is now dominated by the second (13.5-day) and third (9.0-day) harmonics. A Pearson correlation analysis between AE and various spherical harmonic coefficients describing the solar magnetic field during each Carrington rotation period confirms that the solar dynamo has been dominated by an unusual combination of sectorial harmonic structure during 23-24, which can be responsible for the observed anomalously low solar activity. These findings clearly show that, during the unusual low-activity interval of 2008, auroral geomagnetic activity was predominantly driven by high-speed solar wind streams originating from multiple low-latitude coronal holes distributed at regular solar longitude intervals.

  8. The thermospheric auroral red line polarization: confirmation of detection and first quantitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moen Joran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermospheric atomic oxygen red line is among the brightest in the auroral spectrum. Previous observations in Longyearbyen, Svalbard, indicated that it may be intrinsically polarized, but a possible contamination by light pollution could not be ruled out. During the winter 2010/2011, the polarization of the red line was measured for the first time at the Polish Hornsund polar base without contamination. Two methods of data analysis are presented to compute the degree of linear polarization (DoLP and angle of linear polarization (AoLP: one is based on averaging and the other one on filtering. Results are compared and are in qualitative agreement. For solar zenith angles (SZA larger than 108° (with no contribution from Rayleigh scattering, the DoLP ranges between 2 and 7%. The AoLP is more or less aligned with the direction of the magnetic field line, in agreement with the theoretical predictions of Bommier et al. (2010. However, the AoLP values range between ±20° around this direction, depending on the auroral conditions. Correlations between the polarization parameters and the red line intensity I were considered. The DoLP decreases when I increases, confirming a trend observed during the observations in Longyearbyen. However, for small values of I, DoLP varies within a large range of values, while for large values of I, DoLP is always small. The AoLP also varies with the red line intensity, slightly rotating around the magnetic field line.

  9. Cusp and LLBL as Sources of the Isolated Dayside Auroral Feature During Northward IMF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, S.-W.; Gallagher, D. L.; Spann, J. F.; Mende, S. B.; Greenwald, R. A.; Newell, P. T.

    2004-01-01

    An intense dayside proton aurora was observed by Imager for Magnetopause-to- Aurora Global Exploration Far Ultra-Violet imager (IMAGE FUV) for an extensive period of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) on 17 and 18 September 2000. This aurora partially coincided with the auroral oval and intruded farther poleward into the polar cap, and it showed longitudinal motions in response to IMF By variation. Intense magnetosheath-like electron and ion precipitations have been simultaneously detected by Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) above the poleward portion of the high-latitude dayside aurora. They resemble the typical plasmas observed in the low-altitude cusp. However, less intense electrons and more energetic ions were detected over the equatonvard part of the aurora. These plasmas are closer to the low-latitude boundary layer (LLBL) plasmas. Under strongly northward IMF, global ionospheric convection derived from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN) radar measurements showed a four-cell pattern with sunward convection in the middle of the dayside polar cap and the dayside aurora corresponded to two different convection cells. This result further supports two source regions for the aurora. The cusp proton aurora is on open magnetic field lines convecting sunward whereas the LLBL proton aurora is on closed field lines convecting antisunward. These IMAGE, DMSP, and SuperDARN observations reveal the structure and dynamics of the aurora and provide strong evidence for magnetic merging occurring at the high-latitude magnetopause poleward from the cusp. This merging process was very likely quasi-stationary.

  10. Electron dispersion events in the morningside auroral zone and their relationship with VLF emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, D.A.; Burke, W.J. (Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)); Villalon, E. (Northeastern Univ., Boston, MA (United States))

    1990-05-01

    Energy/time dispersion events have been observed in the precipitating electron data in the energy range from 630 eV to 20 keV recorded by the J sensor on the low-altitude, polar-orbiting HILAT satellite. The dispersions are such that the higher-energy electrons are observed earlier in time than the lower-energy electrons The time interval for single dispersion event is from 1 to 2 s. Within an auroral pass in which such energy/time dispersion events are observed, there are typically several such events, and they can be spaced within the pass in either a periodic or aperiodic manner. The events are typically observed within and toward the equatorward edge of the region of diffuse auroral electron precipitation. During a given pass the events can be observed over a wide range of L shells. The occurrence of these events maximizes in the interval 0600-1,200 hours MLT. The energy/time dispersion is generally consistent with the electrons originating from a common source. The events are seen at L shells from 3.7 to greater than 15. The source distance for the electrons is inferred to be generally beyond the equator for events at L shells less than approximately 8 and before the equator for events at higher L shells. Because of the low energies at which the dispersions are observed, it is unlikely that their occurrence can be explained by resonant interaction with VLF waves. Based on circumstantial evidence from other reported observations common to the morning sector, and alternative theoretical explanation is presented. According to this model the dispersion events result from impulsive interactions of the electrons with intense, asymmetric packets of VLF waves via the nonlinear, ponderomotive force.

  11. Upstream drivers of poleward moving auroral forms by satellite-imager coordinated observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, B.; Nishimura, T.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Frey, H. U.; Mende, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    Poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs) are observed near the dayside poleward auroral oval boundary. PMAFs are thought to be an ionospheric signature of dayside reconnection and flux transfer events. PMAFs tend to occur when the IMF is southward. Although a limited number of PMAFs has been found in association with IMF southward turning, events without appreciable changes in IMF have also been reported. While those PMAFs could be triggered spontaneously, many of the past studies used solar wind measurements far away from the bow shock nose and may have used inaccurate time shift or missed small-scale structures in the solar wind. To examine how often PMAFs are triggered by upstream structures using solar wind measurements close to the bow shock nose, we use the AGO all sky imager in Antarctic and THEMIS B and C satellites in 2008, 2009 and 2011. We identified 24 conjunction events, where at least one of the THEMIS satellites is in the solar wind and the AGO imager is located within 3 MLT from the THEMIS MLT. We found that, in 14 out of 24 conjunction events, PMAFs occur soon after IMF southward turning, indicating that IMF southward turning could be the major triggering of PMAFs. Interestingly, among these 14 cases, there are 7 cases with different IMF structures between THEMIS B/C and OMNI, which obtained IMF information from WIND and ACE. And the larger correlation coefficients between PMAFs and IMFs observed by THMEIS B/C than OMNI present the advantages of THEMIS B/C. Among the 10 cases without correlating with IMF structures, PMAFs in two events are shown to have good correlation with reflected ions in the foreshock. Based on all the conjunction events we identified, IMF southward turning is the major trigger of PMAFs and reflected ions have minor effects. The rest of the cases could be spontaneous PMAFs, although foreshock activities, even if exists, may be missed due to the IMF orientation.

  12. The occurrence frequency of auroral potential structures and electric fields as a function of altitude using Polar/EFI data

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    P. Janhunen

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to study how auroral potential structures close at high altitude. We analyse all electric field data collected by Polar on auroral field lines in 1996–2001 by integrating the electric field along the spacecraft orbit to obtain the plasma potential, from which we identify potential minima by an automatic method. From these we estimate the associated effective mapped-down electric field Ei, defined as the depth of the potential minimum divided by its half-width in the ionosphere. Notice that although we use the ionosphere as a reference altitude, the field Ei does not actually exist in the ionosphere but is just a convenient computational quantity. We obtain the statistical distribution of Ei as a function of altitude, magnetic local time (MLT, Kp index and the footpoint solar illumination condition. Surprisingly, we find two classes of electric field structures. The first class consists of the low-altitude potential structures that are presumably associated with inverted-V regions and discrete auroral arcs and their set of associated phenomena. We show that the first class exists only below ~3RE radial distance, and it occurs in all nightside MLT sectors (RE=Earth radius. The second class exists only above radial distance R=4RE and almost only in the midnight MLT sector, with a preference for high Kp values. Interestingly, in the middle altitudes (R=3–4RE the number of potential minima is small, suggesting that the low and high altitude classes are not simple field-aligned extensions of each other. This is also underlined by the fact that statistically the high altitude structures seem to be substorm-related, while the low altitude structures seem to correspond to stable auroral arcs. The new finding of the existence of the two classes is

  13. Stationary magnetospheric convection on November 24, 1981. 1. A case study of "pressure gradient/minimum-B" auroral arc generation

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    J. M. Bosqued

    Full Text Available We present two case studies in the night and evening sides of the auroral oval, based on plasma and field measurements made at low altitudes by the AUREOL-3 satellite, during a long period of stationary magnetospheric convection (SMC on November 24, 1981. The basic feature of both oval crossings was an evident double oval pattern, including (1 a weak arc-type structure at the equatorial edge of the oval/polar edge of the diffuse auroral band, collocated with an upward field-aligned current (FAC sheet of sim1.0 µA m-2, (2 an intermediate region of weaker precipitation within the oval, (3 a more intense auroral band at the polar oval boundary, and (4 polar diffuse auroral zone near the polar cap boundary. These measurements are compared with the published magnetospheric data during this SMC period, accumulated by Yahnin et al. and Sergeev et al., including a semi-empirical radial magnetic field profile BZ in the near-Earth neutral sheet, with a minimum at about 10-14 RE. Such a radial BZ profile appears to be very similar to that assumed in the "minimum- B/cross-tail line current" model by Galperin et al. (GVZ92 as the "root of the arc", or the arc generic region. This model considers a FAC generator mechanism by Grad-Vasyliunas-Boström-Tverskoy operating in the region of a narrow magnetic field minimum in the near-Earth neutral sheet, together with the concept of ion non-adiabatic scattering in the "wall region". The generated upward FAC branch of the double sheet current structure feeds the steady auroral arc/inverted-V at the equatorial border of the oval. When the semi-empirical BZ profile is introduced in the GVZ92 model, a good agreement is found between the modelled current and the measured characteristics of the FACs associated with the equatorial arc. Thus the main predictions of the GVZ92 model concerning the "minimum-B" region are consistent with these data, while some small-scale features are not reproduced. Implications of the GVZ92

  14. Effect of excess superthermal hot electrons on finite amplitude ion-acoustic solitons and supersolitons in a magnetized auroral plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rufai, O. R., E-mail: rrufai@csir.co.za [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa); Bharuthram, R., E-mail: rbharuthram@uwc.ac.za [University of the Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: lakhina@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel (W), Navi, Mumbai-410218 (India)

    2015-10-15

    The effect of excess superthermal electrons is investigated on finite amplitude nonlinear ion-acoustic waves in a magnetized auroral plasma. The plasma model consists of a cold ion fluid, Boltzmann distribution of cool electrons, and kappa distributed hot electron species. The model predicts the evolution of negative potential solitons and supersolitons at subsonic Mach numbers region, whereas, in the case of Cairn's nonthermal distribution model for the hot electron species studied earlier, they can exist both in the subsonic and supersonic Mach number regimes. For the dayside auroral parameters, the model generates the super-acoustic electric field amplitude, speed, width, and pulse duration of about 18 mV/m, 25.4 km/s, 663 m, and 26 ms, respectively, which is in the range of the Viking spacecraft measurements.

  15. Axi-symmetric models of auroral current systems in Jupiter's magnetosphere with predictions for the Juno mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available We develop two related models of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling in the jovian system by combining previous models defined at ionospheric heights with magnetospheric magnetic models that allow system parameters to be extended appropriately into the magnetosphere. The key feature of the combined models is thus that they allow direct connection to be made between observations in the magnetosphere, particularly of the azimuthal field produced by the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling currents and the plasma angular velocity, and the auroral response in the ionosphere. The two models are intended to reflect typical steady-state sub-corotation conditions in the jovian magnetosphere, and transient super-corotation produced by sudden major solar wind-induced compressions, respectively. The key simplification of the models is that of axi-symmetry of the field, flow, and currents about the magnetic axis, limiting their validity to radial distances within ~30 RJ of the planet, though the magnetic axis is appropriately tilted relative to the planetary spin axis and rotates with the planet. The first exploration of the jovian polar magnetosphere is planned to be undertaken in 2016–2017 during the NASA New Frontiers Juno mission, with observations of the polar field, plasma, and UV emissions as a major goal. Evaluation of the models along Juno planning orbits thus produces predictive results that may aid in science mission planning. It is shown in particular that the low-altitude near-periapsis polar passes will generally occur underneath the corresponding auroral acceleration regions, thus allowing brief examination of the auroral primaries over intervals of ~1–3 min for the main oval and ~10 s for narrower polar arc structures, while the "lagging" field deflections produced by the auroral current systems on these passes will be ~0.1°, associated with azimuthal fields above the ionosphere of a few hundred nT.

  16. Auroras Now! - Auroral nowcasting service for Hotels in Finnish Lapland and its performance during winter 2003-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauristie, K.; Mälkki, A.; Pulkkinen, A.; Nevanlinna, H.; Ketola, A.; Tulkki, V.; Raita, T.; Blanco, A.

    2004-12-01

    European Space Agency is currently supporting 17 Service Development Activities (SDA) within its Space Weather Pilot Project. Auroras Now!, one of the SDAs, has been operated during November 2003 - March 2004 as its pilot season. The service includes a public part freely accessible in Internet (http://aurora.fmi.fi) and a private part visible only to the customers of two hotels in the Finnish Lapland through the hotels' internal TV-systems. The nowcasting system is based on the magnetic recordings of two geophysical observatories, Sodankylä (SOD, MLAT ~64 N) and Nurmijärvi (NUR, MLAT ~57 N). The probability of auroral occurrence is continuously characterised with an empirically determined three-level scale. The index is updated once per hour and based on the magnetic field variations recorded at the observatories. During dark hours the near-real time auroral images acquired at SOD are displayed. The hotel service also includes cloudiness predictions for the coming night. During the pilot season the reliability of the three-level magnetic alarm system was weekly evaluated by comparing its prediction with auroral observations by the nearby all-sky camera. Successful hits and failures were scored according to predetermined rules. The highest credit points when it managed to spot auroras in a timely manner and predict their brightness correctly. Maximum penalty points were given when the alarm missed clear bright auroras lasting for more than one hour. In this presentation we analyse the results of the evaluation, present some ideas to further sharpen the procedure, and discuss more generally the correlation between local auroral and magnetic activity.

  17. Radiation of auroral electrons and the dynamics of the magnetosphere. Rentgenovskoe izluchenie avroralnykh elektronov i dinamika magnitosfery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazutin, L.L.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed concept is given of methods employed for aerostatic measurements of inhibitory radiation of auroral electrons and accompanying geophysical phenomena in order to identify the physical nature of magnetic storms, aurora borealis, electron precipitation, and other manifestations of magnetospheric processes in turbulent periods. A summarization is given of aerostatic studies by Soviet and foreign experimental groups who have undertaken measurements in the high altitude stratosphere. 302 references, 89 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Investigating the Role of Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream Electric Field in Coupled Magnetosphere-Ionosphere-Thermosphere Systemwide Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-04

    AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0028 Investigating the role of sub-auroral polarization stream electric field in coupled magnetosphere-ionosphere-thermosphere...systemwide processes Ildiko Horvath THE UNIVERSITY OF QUEENSLAND Final Report 04/04/2017 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF...ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 The public reporting burden for this

  19. Possible evidence for partial demagnetization of electrons in the auroral E-region plasma during electron gas heating

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    C. Haldoupis

    Full Text Available A previous study, based on incoherent and coherent radar measurements, suggested that during auroral E-region electron heating conditions, the electron flow in the auroral electrojet undergoes a systematic counterclockwise rotation of several degrees relative to the E×B direction. The observational evidence is re-examined here in the light of theoretical predictions concerning E-region electron demagnetization caused by enhanced anomalous cross-field diffusion during strongly-driven Farley-Buneman instability. It is shown that the observations are in good agreement with this theory. This apparently endorses the concept of wave-induced diffusion and anomalous electron collision frequency, and consequently electron demagnetization, under circumstances of strong heating of the electron gas in the auroral electrojet plasma. We recognize, however, that the evidence for electron demagnetization presented in this report cannot be regarded as definitive because it is based on a limited set of data. More experimental research in this direction is thus needed.

  20. Current-voltage and kinetic energy flux relations for relativistic field-aligned acceleration of auroral electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent spectroscopic observations of Jupiter's "main oval" auroras indicate that the primary auroral electron beam is routinely accelerated to energies of ~100 keV, and sometimes to several hundred keV, thus approaching the relativistic regime. This suggests the need to re-examine the classic non-relativistic theory of auroral electron acceleration by field-aligned electric fields first derived by Knight (1973, and to extend it to cover relativistic situations. In this paper we examine this problem for the case in which the source population is an isotropic Maxwellian, as also assumed by Knight, and derive exact analytic expressions for the field-aligned current density (number flux and kinetic energy flux of the accelerated population, for arbitrary initial electron temperature, acceleration potential, and field strength beneath the acceleration region. We examine the limiting behaviours of these expressions, their regimes of validity, and their implications for auroral acceleration in planetary magnetospheres (and like astrophysical systems. In particular, we show that for relativistic accelerating potentials, the current density increases as the square of the minimum potential, rather than linearly as in the non-relativistic regime, while the kinetic energy flux then increases as the cube of the potential, rather than as the square.

  1. Intensity asymmetries in the dusk sector of the poleward auroral oval due to IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$

    CERN Document Server

    Reistad, J P; Laundal, K M; Haaland, S; Tenfjord, P; Snekvik, K; Oksavik, K; Milan, S E

    2016-01-01

    In the exploration of global-scale features of the Earth's aurora, little attention has been given to the radial component of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF). This study investigates the global auroral response in both hemispheres when the IMF is southward and lies in the $\\textit{xz}$ plane. We present a statistical study of the average auroral response in the 12-24 magnetic local time (MLT) sector to an $\\textit{x}$ component in the IMF. Maps of auroral intensity in both hemispheres for two IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$ dominated conditions($ \\pm $ IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$) are shown during periods of negative IMF $\\mathit{B}_{z}$, small IMF $\\mathit{B}_{y}$, and local winter. This is obtained by using global imaging from the Wideband Imaging Camera on the IMAGE satellite. The analysis indicates a significant asymmetry between the two IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$ dominated conditions in both hemispheres. In the Northern Hemisphere the aurora is brighter in the 15-19 MLT region during negative IMF $\\mathit{B}_{x}$. In th...

  2. The presence of large sunspots near the central solar meridian at the times of modern Japanese auroral observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. M. Willis

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The validity of a technique developed by the authors to identify historical occurrences of intense geomagnetic storms, which is based on finding approximately coincident observations of sunspots and aurorae recorded in East Asian histories, is corroborated using more modern sunspot and auroral observations. Scientific observations of aurorae in Japan during the interval 1957–2004 are used to identify geomagnetic storms that are sufficiently intense to produce auroral displays at low geomagnetic latitudes. By examining white-light images of the Sun obtained by the Royal Greenwich Observatory, the Big Bear Solar Observatory, the Debrecen Heliophysical Observatory and the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory spacecraft, it is found that a sunspot large enough to be seen with the unaided eye by an "experienced" observer was located reasonably close to the central solar meridian immediately before all but one of the 30 distinct Japanese auroral events, which represents a 97% success rate. Even an "average" observer would probably have been able to see a sunspot with the unaided eye before 24 of these 30 events, which represents an 80% success rate. This corroboration of the validity of the technique used to identify historical occurences of intense geomagnetic storms is important because early unaided-eye observations of sunspots and aurorae provide the only possible means of identifying individual historical geomagnetic storms during the greater part of the past two millennia.

  3. The peak altitude of H3+ auroral emission: comparison with the ultraviolet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, J.; Stallard, T.; Miller, S.; Melin, H.; O'Donoghue, J.; Baines, K.

    2013-09-01

    The altitude of Saturn's peak auroral emission has previously been measured for specific cases in both the ultraviolet (UV) and the infrared (IR). Gerard et al [2009] concludes that the night side H2 UV emission is within the range of 800 to 1300 km above the 1-bar pressure surface. However, using colour ratio spectroscopy, Gustin et al [2009] located the emission layer at or above 610 km. Measurements of the infrared auroral altitude was conducted by Stallard et al [2012] on H3+ emissions from nine VIMS Cassini images, resulting in a measurement of 1155 ± 25 km above the 1-bar pressure surface. Here we present data analysed in a manner similar to Stallard et al [2012] on the observations of H3+ emission in twenty images taken by the Visual Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) aboard the spacecraft Cassini from the years 2006, 2008 and 2012. The bins covered were 3.39872, 3.51284, 3.64853, 4.18299 and 4.33280 μm. These observations were selected from a set of 15,000 as they contained a useful alignment of the aurorae on the limb and the body of the planet. The specific conditions that had to be met for each image were as follows; minimum integration time of 75 milliseconds per pixel, minimum number of pixels in the x and y direction of 32, the image must include the latitude range of 70 to 90 degrees for either hemisphere and the sub spacecraft angle must be between 0 and 20 degrees. This alignment allowed for the altitudinal profiles to be analysed in terms of the difference between the latitude of aurorae on the limb and on the body of Saturn; thus permitting an investigation into the effects of misalignment. In this instance, misalignment was defined as the difference between the latitude of the peak emission latitude on the planet and the latitude of the limb; assuming the aurorae to be approximately circular. A statistical study by Badman et al [2011] showed that centre of the oval is on average offset anti sunward of the pole by about 1.6 degrees. To

  4. Constraining Fully Convective Magnetic Dynamos using Brown Dwarf Auroral Radio Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Melodie; Hallinan, Gregg; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam; Bourke, Stephen; Stevenson, David

    2017-05-01

    An important outstanding problem in dynamo theory is understanding how magnetic fields are generated and sustained in fully convective objects, spanning stars through planets. For fully convective dynamo models to accurately predict exoplanet magnetic fields, pushing measurements to include the coolest T and Y dwarfs at the substellar-planetary boundary is critical. A number of models for possible dynamo mechanisms in this regime have been proposed but constraining data on magnetic field strengths and topologies across a wide range of mass, age, rotation rate, and temperature are sorely lacking, particularly in the brown dwarf regime.Detections of highly circularly polarized pulsed radio emission provide our only window into magnetic field measurements for objects in the ultracool brown dwarf regime. However, these detections are very rare; previous radio surveys encompassing ∼60 L6 or later targets have yielded only one detection. We have developed a selection strategy for biasing survey targets by leveraging the emergence of magnetic activity that is driven by planet-like auroral processes in the coolest brown dwarfs. Using our selection strategy, we previously observed six late L and T dwarfs with the Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) at 4-8 GHz and detected the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission for five targets. Our initial detections provided the most robust constraints on dynamo theory in this regime, confirming magnetic fields >2.5 kG. To further probe the mechanisms driving fully convective dynamos at the substellar-planetary boundary, we present magnetic field constraints for two Y-dwarfs and 8-12 GHz radio observations of late L and T dwarfs corresponding to >3.6 kG surface fields. We additionally present initial results for a comprehensive L and T dwarf survey spanning a wide range of rotation periods to test rotation-dominated dynamo models. Finally, we present a method for comparing magnetic field measurements derived from

  5. Automatic Georeferencing of Astronaut Auroral Photography: Providing a New Dataset for Space Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riechert, Maik; Walsh, Andrew P.; Taylor, Matt

    2014-05-01

    Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) have taken tens of thousands of photographs showing the aurora in high temporal and spatial resolution. The use of these images in research though is limited as they often miss accurate pointing and scale information. In this work we develop techniques and software libraries to automatically georeference such images, and provide a time and location-searchable database and website of those images. Aurora photographs very often include a visible starfield due to the necessarily long camera exposure times. We extend on the proof-of-concept of Walsh et al. (2012) who used starfield recognition software, Astrometry.net, to reconstruct the pointing and scale information. Previously a manual pre-processing step, the starfield can now in most cases be separated from earth and spacecraft structures successfully using image recognition. Once the pointing and scale of an image are known, latitudes and longitudes can be calculated for each pixel corner for an assumed auroral emission height. As part of this work, an open-source Python library is developed which automates the georeferencing process and aids in visualization tasks. The library facilitates the resampling of the resulting data from an irregular to a regular coordinate grid in a given pixel per degree density, it supports the export of data in CDF and NetCDF formats, and it generates polygons for drawing graphs and stereographic maps. In addition, the THEMIS all-sky imager web archive has been included as a first transparently accessible imaging source which in this case is useful when drawing maps of ISS passes over North America. The database and website are in development and will use the Python library as their base. Through this work, georeferenced auroral ISS photography is made available as a continously extended and easily accessible dataset. This provides potential not only for new studies on the aurora australis, as there are few all-sky imagers in

  6. Resonance scattering by auroral N2+: steady state theory and observations from Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ivchenko

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies of auroral energy input at high latitudes often depend on observations of emissions from the first negative band of ionised nitrogen. However, these emissions are affected by solar resonance scattering, which makes photometric and spectrographic measurements difficult to interpret. This work is a statistical study from Longyearbyen, Svalbard, Norway, during the solar minimum between January and March 2007, providing a good coverage in shadow height position and precipitation conditions. The High Throughput Imaging Echelle Spectrograph (HiTIES measured three bands of N2+ 1N (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3, and one N2 2P band (0,3 in the magnetic zenith. The brightness ratios of the N2+ bands are compared with a theoretical treatment with excellent results. Balance equations for all important vibrational levels of the three lowest electronic states of the N2+ molecule are solved for steady-state, and the results combined with ion chemistry modelling. Brightnesses of the (0,1, (1,2 and (2,3 bands of N2+ 1N are calculated for a range of auroral electron energies, and different values of shadow heights. It is shown that in sunlit aurora, the brightness of the (0,1 band is enhanced, with the scattered contribution increasing with decreasing energy of precipitation (10-fold enhancements for energies of 100 eV. The higher vibrational bands are enhanced even more significantly. In sunlit aurora the observed 1N (1,2/(0,1 and (2,3/(0,1 ratios increase as a function of decreasing precipitation energy, as predicted by theory. In non-sunlit aurora the N2+ species have a constant proportionality to neutral N2. The ratio of 2P(0,3/1N(0,1 in the morning hours shows a pronounced decrease, indicating enhancement of N2+ 1N emission. Finally we study the relationship of all emissions and their ratios to rotational temperatures. A clear effect is observed on rotational development of the bands. It is possible that greatly enhanced rotational temperatures may be a

  7. Use of Auroral Processes in Spacecraft Propulsion: A VASIMR VX-100 Status Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brukardt, M.; Bering, E. A.; Chang-Diaz, F. R.; Squire, J. P.; Glover, T. W.; Cassady, L. D.; Jacobson, V. T.; Chancery, W. J.; Longmier, B. W.

    2007-12-01

    Plasma physics has found an increasing range of practical industrial applications, including the development of electric spacecraft propulsion systems. One of these systems, the Variable Specific Impulse Magnetoplasma Rocket (VASIMR) engine, applies several important physical processes occurring in the magnetosphere. These processes include the mechanisms involved in the ion acceleration and heating that occur in the Birkeland currents of an auroral arc system. Auroral current region processes that are applied in VASIMR include lower hybrid heating, parallel electric field acceleration and ion cyclotron acceleration. This paper will focus on using two physics demonstration model VASIMR's to study ion cyclotron heating (ICRH). Prior to VASIMR, laboratory simulation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave heating has been difficult owing to the difficulty in obtaining efficient antenna coupling for this mode and to the fact that the ions involved only pass through the acceleration region once. The VX-50 and VX-100 VASIMR's use(d) a helicon antenna with 20 kW of power to generate plasma. Both devices then use(d) an RF booster stage that uses left hand polarized slow mode waves launched from the high field side of the resonance. The VX-50 used 2 to 4 MHz waves with 30 kW of power. The VX-100 operates at ~500 kHz, with up to 100 kW of available ICRH power. This paper will summarize results from high power ICRH experiments performed on the VX-50 using deuterium, neon and argon plasma during 2006 and will present preliminary results from the VX-100. Emphasis will be placed on results obtained since the last Fall meeting We have demonstrated ion cyclotron acceleration of a dense (>1019/m3) plasma flow using all three gasses. ICRH loading measurements are consistent with efficient (90%) RF coupling to the plasma. The ICRH experiments have demonstrated that an energy boost of over 500 eV is possible. Early VX-100 results indicate that it should be possible to obtain an exhaust

  8. Prediction of aircrew radiation exposure during solar particle events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Les

    A transport code analysis using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX is used to propagate an extrapolated particle spectrum based on GOES satellite measurements through the atmosphere to estimate aircrew radiation exposure for solar particle events. Comparison between code predictions and actual flight measurements made during ground level event (GLE) 60 and 65 are presented. Data from ground-level neutron monitoring stations around the world are also compared against the model predictions for various events. A computer code has been further developed implementing this methodology for routine aircrew exposure estimation from solar particle events to supplement those predictions from galactic cosmic radiation using the PCAIRE code in order to better determine the overall aircrew exposure at altitude.

  9. Interferometric radar observations of filamented structures due to plasma instabilities and their relation to dynamic auroral rays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Grydeland

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Several explanations have been proposed for Naturally Enhanced ion-acoustic Echoes observed at mid- and high-latitude Incoherent Scatter observatories. A decisive measure for distinguishing between these explanations is whether or not simultaneously observed up- and down-shifted enhancement occur simultaneously, or if they are the result of temporal and/or spatial averaging.

    The EISCAT Svalbard Radar has two antennas in the same radar system, which can be used as an interferometer when pointed parallel. In observations from 17 January 2002, between 06:46:10 and 06:46:30 UT, we used this possibility, in combination with direct sampling of the received signals, to yield measurements of "naturally enhanced ion-acoustic echoes" with sufficiently high resolution to resolve such averaging, if any. For the first time, radar interferometry has been employed to estimate the sizes of coherent structures. The observations were coordinated with an image intensified video camera with a narrow field of view. Together, this forms the initial study on the causal relationships between enhanced echoes and fine structure in the auroral activity on sub-kilometer, sub-second scales.

    The results confirm that the enhanced echoes originate from very localised regions (~300m perpendicular to the magnetic field at 500km altitude with varying range distribution, and with high time variability (≈200ms. The corresponding increase in scattering cross section, up to 50dB above incoherent scattering, eliminates theoretical explanations based on marginal stability. The simultaneously observed up- and down-shifted enhanced shoulders, when caused by sufficiently narrow structures to be detected by the interferometer technique, originate predominantly from the same volume. These results have significant impact on theories attempting to explain the enhancements, in particular it is found that the ion

  10. Probing the magnetosphere of the M8.5 dwarf TVLM 513-46546 by modelling its auroral radio emission. Hint of star exoplanet interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, P.; Trigilio, C.; Buemi, C. S.; Umana, G.; Ingallinera, A.; Cerrigone, L.

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, we simulate the cyclic circularly polarized pulses of the ultracool dwarf TVLM 513-46546, observed with the Very Large Array at 4.88 and 8.44 GHz on 2006 May, by using a three-dimensional model of the auroral radio emission from the stellar magnetosphere. During this epoch, the radio light curves are characterized by two pulses left-hand polarized at 4.88 GHz, and one doubly peaked (of opposite polarizations) pulse at 8.44 GHz. To take into account the possible deviation from the dipolar symmetry of the stellar magnetic-field topology, the model described in this paper is also able to simulate the auroral radio emission from a magnetosphere shaped like an offset dipole. To reproduce the timing and pattern of the observed pulses, we explored the space of parameters controlling the auroral beaming pattern and the geometry of the magnetosphere. Through the analysis of the TVLM 513-46546 auroral radio emission, we derive some indications on the magnetospheric field topology that is able to simultaneously reproduce the timing and patterns of the auroral pulses measured at 4.88 and 8.44 GHz. Each set of model solutions simulates two auroral pulses (singly or doubly peaked) per period. To explain the presence of only one 8.44 GHz pulse per period, we analyse the case of auroral radio emission limited only to a magnetospheric sector activated by an external body, like the case of the interaction of Jupiter with its moons.

  11. Shipboard Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth Spectra and Columnar Water Vapor During ACE-2 and Comparison with Selected Land, Ship, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Kapustin, Vladimir N.; Schmid, Beat; Russell, Philip B.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Bates, Timothy S.; Durkee, Philip A.; Smith, Peter J.; Freudenthaler, Volker; Wiegner, Matthias; Covert, Dave S.; Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean; Collins, Donald R.; Flagan, Richard C.; Seinfeld, John H.; Vitale, Vito; Tomasi, Claudio

    2000-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and colurnmn water vapor (CWV) measurements acquired with NASA Ames Research Center's 6-channel Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) operated aboard the R/V Professor Vodyanitskiy during the 2nd Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-2) are discussed. Data are compared with various in situ and remote measurements for selected cases. The focus is on 10 July, when the Pelican airplane flew within 70 km of the ship near the time of a NOAA-14/AVHRR satellite overpass and AOD measurements with the 14-channel Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) above the marine boundary layer (MBL) permitted calculation of AOD within the MBL from the AATS-6 measurements. A detailed column closure test is performed for MBL AOD on 10 July by comparing the AATS-6 MBL AODs with corresponding values calculated by combining shipboard particle size distribution measurements with models of hygroscopic growth and radiosonde humidity profiles (plus assumptions on the vertical profile of the dry particle size distribution and composition). Large differences (30-80% in the mid-visible) between measured and reconstructed AODs are obtained, in large part because of the high sensitivity of the closure methodology to hygroscopic growth models, which vary considerably and have not been validated over the necessary range of particle size/composition distributions. The wavelength dependence of AATS-6 AODs is compared with the corresponding dependence of aerosol extinction calculated from shipboard measurements of aerosol size distribution and of total scattering mearured by a shipboard integrating nephelometer for several days. Results are highly variable, illustrating further the great difficulty of deriving column values from point measurements. AATS-6 CWV values are shown to agree well with corresponding values derived from radiosonde measurements during 8 soundings on 7 days and also with values calculated from measurements taken on 10 July with

  12. Investigation of triggering of poleward moving auroral forms using satellite-imager coordinated observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Boyi; Nishimura, Yukitoshi; Zou, Ying; Lyons, Larry R.; Angelopoulos, Vassilis; Frey, Harald; Mende, Stephen

    2016-11-01

    Poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs) are thought to be an ionospheric signature of dayside magnetic reconnection. While PMAFs are more likely to occur when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) is southward, how often PMAFs are triggered by changes in solar wind parameters is still an open question. To address this issue, we used one of the Automatic Geophysical Observatories all-sky imagers in Antarctica and the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) B and C satellites, which can give solar wind measurements much closer to the subsolar bow shock than by Wind or ACE, to examine if PMAFs occurred in association with IMF orientation changes. We identified 60 PMAFs in conjunction with THEMIS B and C during 2008, 2009, and 2011 and 70% of events show reduction of Bz before PMAF onset indicating that IMF southward turning plays an important role in triggering a majority of PMAFs. In contrast, the magnitude of the IMF Bz reduction in OMNI data was smaller and the reduction occurred in a slightly smaller percentage of events (40-60%). This suggests that solar wind structures that missed the L1 point or evolution of solar wind between the L1 point and THEMIS may be important for identifying IMF changes responsible for transient dayside reconnection. Additionally, 17 PMAFs that did not have substantial IMF southward turnings are correlated well with foreshock events, indicating that foreshock phenomena may also play a role in triggering PMAFs.

  13. A Network of Small Spacecraft for Multipoint Measurement of Auroral Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, T. Maximillian; Lynch, Kristina; Clayton, Robert; Hampton, Donald

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of ionospheric plasma is often performed by a single in-situ device, or remotely using cameras and radar. This constrains determination of small scale variation in plasma structure to somewhat restrictive assumptions. We have developed and tested a local, multipoint measurement system composed of a network of small spacecraft which are ejected from a main payload carried by sounding rocket. The low-resource, spin-stabilized projectiles radio measurements to the main payload for transmission to ground. Measurements from an onboard LED array and IMU are used to determine the separation of the devices from the main payload and orientation relative to the geomagnetic field. The primary measurements are made by two orthogonal retarding potential analyzers on each spacecraft, allowing for determination of local ion parameters. A test flight in October 2015 demonstrated the successful application of this system, as well as revealing several important design issues. This work is in preparation for the February 2017 ISINGLASS sounding rocket mission to study the gradient scale lengths in auroral plasma, involving the deployment of two of these spacecraft networks. Supported by NASA Grants NNX14AH07G and NNX15AK51A.

  14. Fine structures and dynamics in auroral initial brightening at substorm onsets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Sakaguchi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We show four auroral initial brightening events at substorm onsets focusing on fine structures and their longitudinal dynamics, which were observed by all-sky TV cameras (30-Hz sampling on January 2008, in Canada. For two initial brightenings started in the field of views of the cameras, we found that they started at longitudinal segments with a size of less than ~30–60 km. One brightening expanded with wavy structures and the other expanded as a straight arc. Although the two events had different structures, both brightening auroras expanded with an average speed of ~20 km/s in the first 10 s, and ~10 km/s in the following 10 s. The other two events show that brightening auroras developed with periodic structures, with longitudinal wavelengths of ~100–200 km. Assuming that the brightening auroras are mapped to the physical processes occurring in the plasma sheet, we found that the scale size (30–60 km and the expanding speed (20 km/s of brightening auroras correspond to the order of ion gyro radii (~500–1400 km and Alfvén speed or fast ion-flow speed (~400 km/s, respectively, in the plasma sheet.

  15. Sheared magnetospheric plasma flows and discrete auroral arcs: a quasi-static coupling model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Echim

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available We consider sheared flows in magnetospheric boundary layers of tangential discontinuity type, forming a structure that is embedded in a large-scale convergent perpendicular electric field. We construct a kinetic model that couples the magnetospheric structure with the topside ionosphere. The contribution of magnetospheric electrons and ionospheric electrons and ions is taken into account into the current-voltage relationship derived for an electric potential monotonically decreasing with the altitude. The solution of the current continuity equation gives the distribution of the ionospheric potential consistent with the given magnetospheric electric potential. The model shows that a sheared magnetospheric flow generates current sheets corresponding to upward field-aligned currents, field-aligned potential drops and narrow bands of precipitating energy, as in discrete auroral arcs. Higher velocity magnetospheric sheared flows have the tendency to produce brighter and slightly broader arcs. An increase in arc luminosity is also associated with enhancements of magnetospheric plasma density, in which case the structures are narrower. Finally, the model predicts that an increase of the electron temperature of the magnetospheric flowing plasma corresponds to slightly wider arcs but does not modify their luminosity.

  16. Nonlinear excitations for the positron acoustic waves in auroral acceleration regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Asit; Ali, Rustam; Chatterjee, Prasanta

    2017-09-01

    Positron acoustic waves (PAWs) in an unmagnetized electron-positron-ion (e-p-i) plasma consisting of mobile cold positrons, immobile positive ions, q-nonextensive distributed electrons and hot positrons are studied. The standard reductive perturbation technique (RPT) is applied to derive the Kurteweg-de Vries (KdV) and modified Kurteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equations for PAWs. Variations of the total energy of the conservative systems corresponding to the KdV and mKdV equations are presented. Using numerical simulations, effect of the nonextensive parameter (q), temperature ratio (σ) of electrons to hot positrons and speed (U) of the traveling wave are discussed on the positron acoustic solitary wave solutions of the KdV and mKdV equations. Considering an external periodic perturbation, the perturbed dynamical systems corresponding to the KdV and mKdV equations are analyzed by employing phase orbit analysis, Poincare section and Lyapunov exponent. The frequency (ω) of the external periodic perturbation plays the role of the switching parameter in chaotic motions of the perturbed PAWs through quasiperiodic route to chaos. This work may be useful to understand the qualitative changes in the dynamics of nonlinear perturbations in auroral acceleration regions.

  17. Behavior of substorm auroral arcs and Pi2 waves: implication for the kinetic ballooning instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. F. Chang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We present synoptic observations of the 21 December 2006 substorm event by the THEMIS ground-based All-Sky-Imagers, the ISUAL CCD Imager aboard the FORMOSAT-2 satellite, the geosynchronous satellites and the ground-based magnetometers, and discuss the implication of the observations. There are three subsequent arc breakups with time separation of <1 min during the substorm expansion phase. In particular, we investigated the mode number of the substorm arc bead-like structure and the concurrent behavior of the arc intensity, the westward electroject intensity, and the ground Pi2 pulsation amplitude. Prior to each arc breakup there was a clear azimuthally-spaced bright spot structure along the arc with high mode number (~140–180 and the arc intensity increased together with the westward electrojet and the ground Pi2 pulsation amplitude under the arc. The Pi1 perturbations observed under the arc appeared at or after the arc breakup started. This suggests that the Pi2 pulsation is related to the arc formation. The Pi2 pulsation may be caused by the kinetic ballooning instability (KBI that is excited in the strong cross-tail current region. The longitudinal extent of the earthward expansion front of the substorm dipolarization region at the geosynchronous orbit is estimated from timings of the energetic proton and electron injections and is roughly located between ~19.50 MLT and ~23.00 MLT, which is consistent with the corresponding longitudinal extent of the auroral substorm activity.

  18. Naturally enhanced ion acoustic waves in the auroral ionosphere observed with the EISCAT 933-MHz radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rietveld, M.T. (EISCAT, Ramfjordbotn (Norway)); Collis, P.N. (EISCAT, Kiruna (Sweden)); St.Maurice, J.P. (Univ. of Western Ontario, London (Canada))

    1991-11-01

    Observations of strongly enhanced ion acoustic shoulders of the incoherent scatter spectrum at 933 MHz at altitudes from 138 to 587 km have been obtained with the European Incoherent Scatter UHF radar. The enhancements can be up to 1 or 2 orders of magnitude in total backscattered power and can occur at either one or both of the ion acoustic shoulders. They show a variation of frequency with height of about 2 to 1, the same as the normal ion line spectral width and the ion temperature. These unusual spectra appear in two preferred height regions having different characteristics, one below 200 km and one above about 300 km. The enhancements are associated with geomagnetic disturbance, high electron temperatures, auroral arcs, and red aurora in the F region. The observations, which are mainly along the magnetic field direction, indicate that field-aligned thermal electron drifts are destabilizing the ion acoustic waves. The confirm and extend the one other publication reporting on similar echoes. The authors suggest that field-aligned flows of soft electrons depositing their energy at horizontally poor conducting F region heights are the cause of parallel electric fields in the ionosphere. These fields then produce the thermal electron motions that they argue have to be the cause of the observations.

  19. Upper atmospheric effects of the hf active auroral research program ionospheric research instrument (HAARP IRI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eccles, V.; Armstrong, R.

    1993-05-01

    The earth's ozone layer occurs in the stratosphere, primarily between 10 and 30 miles altitude. The amount of ozone, O3, present is the result of a balance between production and destruction processes. Experiments have shown that natural processes such as auroras create molecules that destroy O. One family of such molecules is called odd nitrogen of which nitric oxide (NO) is an example. Because the HAARP (HF Active Auroral Research Program) facility is designed to mimic and investigate certain natural processes, a study of possible effects of HAARP on the ozone layer was conducted. The study used a detailed model of the thermal and chemical effects of the high power HF beam, which interacts with free electrons in the upper atmosphere above 50 miles altitude. It was found only a small fraction of the beam energy goes into the production of odd nitrogen molecules, whereas odd nitrogen is efficiently produced by auroras. Since the total energy emitted by HAARP in the year is some 200,000 times less than the energy deposited in the upper atmosphere by auroras, the study demonstrates that HAARP HF beam experiments will cause no measurable depletion of the earth's ozone layer.... Ozone, Ozone depletion, Ozone layer, Odd nitrogen, Nitric oxide, HAARP Emitter characteristics.

  20. Tests of Sunspot Number Sequences: 2. Using Geomagnetic and Auroral Data

    CERN Document Server

    Lockwood, Mike; Barnard, Luke A; Scott, Chris J; Usoskin, Ilya G; Nevanlinna, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    We compare four sunspot-number data sequences against geomagnetic and terrestrial auroral observations. The comparisons are made for the original SIDC composite of Wolf-Zurich-International sunspot number [$R_{ISNv1}$], the group sunspot number [$R_{G}$] by Hoyt and Schatten (Solar Phys., 1998), the new "backbone" group sunspot number [$R_{BB}$] by Svalgaard and Schatten (Solar Phys., 2016), and the "corrected" sunspot number [$R_{C}$] by Lockwood at al. (J.G.R., 2014). Each sunspot number is fitted with terrestrial observations, or parameters derived from terrestrial observations to be linearly proportional to sunspot number, over a 30-year calibration interval of 1982-2012. The fits are then used to compute test sequences, which extend further back in time and which are compared to $R_{ISNv1}$, $R_{G}$, $R_{BB}$, and $R_{C}$. To study the long-term trends, comparisons are made using averages over whole solar cycles (minimum-to-minimum). The test variations are generated in four ways: i) using the IDV(1d) an...

  1. Right-hand polarized 4fce auroral roar emissions: 1. Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBelle, J.; Chen, Y.

    2016-08-01

    A receiving system installed at Sondrestrom, Greenland, was used to monitor all detectable auroral radio emissions at the fourth harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency (called 4fce roar emissions) between May 2015 and March 2016. Of 88 events detected, 86 occurred during daylit conditions and were left-hand polarized. Two occurred during darkness conditions and were right-hand polarized. The left-hand and right-hand polarized events had entirely different frequency distributions. One of the right-hand polarized 4fce emissions occurred at the same time as and at exactly twice the frequency of a second harmonic emission (2fce roar). The occurrence rate of 4fce emissions during premidnight hours under daylit conditions at Sondrestrom is 5%, comparable to previously reported occurrence rates of 2fce roar in darkness conditions at optimum latitudes of occurrence, but the occurrence rate of 4fce emissions during dark conditions is much lower, suggesting that if the right-hand polarized events arise from coalescence of 2fce waves, only for a small fraction of nighttime 2fce roar emissions does such a process yield 4fce emissions detectable at ground level.

  2. Observations of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere from the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrini, Frederic; Valek, Phil; Bagenal, Fran; Bolton, Scott; Clark, George; Connerney, Jack; Ebert, Rob; Gladstone, Randy; Kim, Thomas; Kurth, William; Levin, Steve; Louarn, Philippe; Loeffler, Chad; Mauk, Barry; McComas, David; Pollock, Craig; Ranquist, Drake; Reno, Michelle; Szalay, Jamey; Thomsen, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The Juno mission employs a suite of instruments to perform the first-ever in situ measurements of Jupiter's polar magnetosphere. Observations of the plasma environment are performed by the Jovian Auroral Distributions Experiment (JADE). JADE measures the plasma using two nearly identical electron sensors and an ion sensor. The electron sensors (JADE-E) measure electron distributions in the range of 100 eV to 100 keV. The un-deflected field-of-view (FOV) of each electron sensor is in the spin plane of the spacecraft; approximately the plane which includes the spacecraft velocity direction and the local magnetic field. Around perijove, the JADE-E sensors use electrostatic deflection to track the local magnetic field in order to measure pitch angle distributions at 1 s time resolution. The JADE ion sensor (JADE-I) measures the energy per charge and time of flight (TOF) of incident ions (mass/q narrow beams and distributions with emptied loss cones. We present here in situ plasma observations of the Jovian polar magnetosphere made by the JADE instrument.

  3. Investigation of a possible control by Saturn satellites of auroral kilometric radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjada, M. Y.; Galopeau, P. H. M.; Rucker, H. O.

    2013-09-01

    We attempt in this contribution to investigate the possible control of the Saturnian kilometric radiation by the planet's satellites. We use the observation of the Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) onboard the Cassini spacecraft. We consider the variation of the flux density versus the observation in time and frequency. The auroral kilometric emissions of Saturn are recorded in the frequency band from few kilohertz up to 1 MHz. The investigated period started from 01 Jan. 2004 to 31 Dec. 2007. We distinguish in this analysis between different Saturnian 'sources' which can be recognized by their spectral characteristics. We define two kinds of arc structures: the 'vertex early arcs' (VEA) and the 'vertex late arcs' (VLA). The arcs of the first group set open toward increasing time, while the arcs of the other one open towards decreasing time. A total of 556 arcs have been observed during the four investigated years, where 310 and 246 correspond, respectively, to the vertex early and late arcs. We show how the occurrence of arcs may be related to the position of the satellite around the planet Saturn. We emphasis in this analysis on the eventual control of the Saturnian kilometric radiation by Titan. Our results are compared with previous investigations performed by Daigne et al. (1982) and Kurth et al. (2006) using, respectively, Voyager and Cassini observations.

  4. Langmuir turbulence in the auroral ionosphere 2: Nonlinear theory and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, D. L.; Goldman, M. V.; Ergun, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical interpretation of sounding rocket measurements of intense Langmuir wave fields (less than or equal to 500 mV/m) driven by a stream of 20 eV to 4 keV electrons in the lower auroral zone is developed. This interpretation is based on the ability of the 10 microseconds sampling rate of the wave detector to temporally resolve the structure of the Langmuir wave field envelope. A modified form of the Zakharov equations is used to numerically study beam-driven Langmuir turbulence in the presence of a moderate magnetic field (OMEGA (sub e) approximately equals Omega (sub pe). Strong Landau damping on observed nonthermal scattered electrons, which is treated in a companion paper (Newman et al., this issue), plays an important role by inhibiting backscatter cascade and the development of strong turbulence. A parameterized model of the linear electron stream-driven wave instability is introduced, which incorporates limited quasilinear plateau formation. A reasonable set of parameters is found that yields semiquantitative agreement between observed properties of the Langmuir fields and the results of Zakharov equation simulations, including the amplitude and characteristic frequency of the electric field envelope modulations.

  5. A localised co-rotating auroral absorption event observed near noon using imaging riometer and EISCAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. N. Collis

    Full Text Available An isolated region of energetic electron precipitation observed near local noon in the auroral zone has been investigated using imaging riometer (IRIS and incoherent-scatter radar (EISCAT techniques. IRIS revealed that the absorption event was essentially co-rotating with the Earth for about 2 h. The spatial and temporal variations in D-region electron density seen by EISCAT were able to be interpreted within a proper context when compared with the IRIS data. EISCAT detected significant increases in electron density at altitudes as low as 65 km as the event drifted through the radar beam. The altitude distribution of incremental radio absorption revealed that more than half of the absorption occurred below 75 km, with a maximum of 67 km. The energy spectrum of the precipitating electrons was highly uniform throughout the event, and could be described analytically by the sum of three exponential distributions with characteristic energies of 6, 70 and 250 keV. A profile of effective recombination coefficient that resulted in self-consistent agreement between observed electron desities and those inferred from an inversion procedure has been deduced. The observations suggest a co-rotating magnetospheric source region on closed dayside field lines. However, a mechanism is required that can sustain such hard precipitation for the relatively long duration of the event.

  6. Time-Fractional KdV Equation for the plasma in auroral zone using Variational Methods

    CERN Document Server

    El-Wakil, El-Said A; Elshewy, Emad K; Mahmoud, Aber A

    2010-01-01

    The reductive perturbation method has been employed to derive the Korteweg-de Vries (KdV) equation for small but finite amplitude electrostatic waves. The Lagrangian of the time fractional KdV equation is used in similar form to the Lagrangian of the regular KdV equation. The variation of the functional of this Lagrangian leads to the Euler-Lagrange equation that leads to the time fractional KdV equation. The Riemann-Liouvulle definition of the fractional derivative is used to describe the time fractional operator in the fractional KdV equation. The variational-iteration method given by He is used to solve the derived time fractional KdV equation. The calculations of the solution with initial condition A0*sech(cx)^2 are carried out. Numerical studies have been made using plasma parameters close to those values corresponding to the dayside auroral zone. The effects of the time fractional parameter on the electrostatic solitary structures are presented.

  7. Ion heating by strong electrostatic ion cyclotron turbulence. [in auroral zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysak, R. L.; Hudson, M. K.; Temerin, M.

    1980-01-01

    A theory of the ion heating due to electrostatic ion cyclotron (EIC) waves in the auroral zone is presented. Due to the slowly convecting nature of the EIC mode, quasi-linear plateau formation cannot stabilize the waves, and growth occurs until the nonlinear mechanisms of ion resonance broadening and electron trapping provide saturation. The large amplitude and coherent nature of the resulting wave imply that quasi-linear theory provides only a lower limit to the ion heating. An upper bound on the heating rate is derived using a time-average model of ion dynamics in the coherent waves. The effects of ion heating in the presence of the magnetic gradient force and parallel electric fields are considered, with the result that perpendicular energies over 100 eV are easily attainable from a 1 eV source plasma. Perpendicular heating in the absence of a parallel electric field yields conical ion distributions, which in the presence of an electric field become field-aligned beams.

  8. Aircrew radiation dose estimates during recent solar particle events and the effect of particle anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Anid, H; Lewis, B J; Bennett, L G I; Takada, M; Duldig, M

    2014-01-01

    A model was developed using a Monte-Carlo radiation transport code, MCNPX, to estimate the additional radiation exposure to aircrew members during solar particle events. The model transports an extrapolated particle spectrum based on satellite measurements through the atmosphere to aircraft altitudes. This code produces the estimated flux at a specific altitude where radiation dose conversion coefficients are applied to convert the particle flux into effective and ambient dose-equivalent rates. A cut-off rigidity model accounts for the shielding effects of the Earth's magnetic field. Comparisons were made between the model predictions and actual flight measurements taken with various types of instruments used to measure the mixed radiation field during ground level enhancements (GLEs) 60 and 65. An anisotropy analysis that uses neutron monitor responses and the pitch angle distribution of energetic solar particles was used to identify particle anisotropy for a solar event in December 2006. In anticipation of future commercial use, a computer code has been developed to implement the radiation dose assessment model for routine analysis.

  9. Comparison study between coherent echoes at VHF range and electron density estimated by Ionosphere Model for Auroral Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Takanori; Nakamura, Takuji; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Tanaka, Yoshi; Nishimura, Koji; Sato, Kaoru; Tomikawa, Yoshihiro; Kohma, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Polar Mesosphere Winter Echo (PMWE) is known as back scatter echo from 55 to 85 km in the mesosphere, and it has been observed by MST and IS radar in polar region during non-summer period. Since density of free electrons as scatterer is low in the dark mesosphere during winter, it is suggested that PMWE requires strong ionization of neutral atmosphere associated with Energetic Particles Precipitations (EPPs) during Solar Proton Events [Kirkwood et al., 2002] or during geomagnetically disturbed periods [Nishiyama et al., 2015]. However, studies on relationship between occurrence of PMWE and background electron density has been limited yet [Lübken et al., 2006], partly because the PMWE occurrence rate is known to be quite low (2.9%) [Zeller et al., 2006]. The PANSY (Program of the Antarctic Syowa MST/IS) radar, which is the largest MST radar in Antarctica, observed many PMWE events since it has started mesosphere observations in June 2012. We established an application method of the PANSY radar as riometer, which makes it possible to estimate Cosmic Noise Absorptions (CNA) as proxy of relative variations on background electron density. In addition, electron density profiles from 60 to 150 km altitude are calculated by Ionospheric Model for the Auroral Zone (IMAZ) [McKinnell and Friedrich, 2007] and CNA estimated by the PANSY radar. In this presentation, we would like to focus on strong PMWE during two big geomagnetic storm events, St. Patrick's Day and the Summer Solstice 2015 Event, in order to compare observed PMWE characteristics to model background electron density. On March 19 and 22, recovery phase of St. Patrick's Day Storm, sudden PMWE intensification was detected near 60 km by the PANSY radar. At the same time, strong Cosmic Noise Absorptions (CNA) of 0.8 dB and 1.0 dB were measured, respectively. However, calculated electron density profiles did not show high electron density at the altitude where the PMWE intensification were observed. On June 22, the

  10. Hint of star exoplanet interaction by modelling the stellar auroral radio emission of the M8.5 dwarf TVLM 513-46546

    CERN Document Server

    Leto, P; Buemi, C S; Umana, G; Ingallinera, A; Cerrigone, L

    2016-01-01

    The stellar auroral radio emission has been recognized in some early-type magnetic stars and in many ultra-cool dwarfs. The typical features are the highly polarized pulses explained in terms of Electron Cyclotron Maser emission mechanism. The A0 type star CU Virginis is the prototype of the stars showing this coherent emission; the repeatability and stability of its auroral radio emission allow us to well study this elusive phenomenon. Taking advantage of the CU Vir insights, we built a 3D-model able to reproduce the timing and pulse profile of the auroral radio emission from a dipolar magnetosphere. This model can be applied to stars with an overall symmetric magnetic field topology and showing auroral radio emission, like the ultra-cool dwarfs. In this paper, we simulate the cyclic circularly-polarized pulses of the ultra-cool dwarf TVLM 513-46546, observed with the VLA at 4.88 and 8.44 GHz on May 2006. The auroral radio emission originates in polar rings located at different elevations as a function of th...

  11. Ultrafine particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bekö, Gabriel; Weschler, Charles J.; Wierzbicka, Aneta;

    2013-01-01

    Particle number (PN) concentrations (10-300 nm in size) were continuously measured over a period of ∼45 h in 56 residences of nonsmokers in Copenhagen, Denmark. The highest concentrations were measured when occupants were present and awake (geometric mean, GM: 22.3 × 103 cm-3), the lowest when...... the homes were vacant (GM: 6.1 × 103 cm-3) or the occupants were asleep (GM: 5.1 × 103 cm-3). Diary entries regarding occupancy and particle related activities were used to identify source events and apportion the daily integrated exposure among sources. Source events clearly resulted in increased PN...... concentrations and decreased average particle diameter. For a given event, elevated particle concentrations persisted for several hours after the emission of fresh particles ceased. The residential daily integrated PN exposure in the 56 homes ranged between 37 × 103 and 6.0 × 106 particles per cm3·h/day (GM: 3...

  12. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  13. Correlation between convection electric fields in the nightside magnetosphere and several wave and particle phenomena during two isolated substorms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, D. L.; Fraser-Smith, A. C.; Unwin, R. S.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Heacock, R. R.

    1971-01-01

    Correlation of several magnetoionospheric wave and particle phenomena previously linked observationally to magnetospheric substorms and inferred to involve convection electric fields with whistler measurements of convection activity during two relatively isolated substorms. The events occurred at about 0600 UT on July 15, 1965, and about 0500 UT on Oct. 13, 1965. The correlated phenomena include cross-L inward plasma drifts near midnight within the plasmaphere, diffuse auroral radar echoes observed near the dusk meridian, IPDP micropulsations (intervals of pulsations of diminishing period) in the premidnight sector, apparent contractions and expansions of the plasma sheet at about 20 earth radii in the magnetotail, and Pc 1/Pi 1 micropulsation events near or before midnight. Two new vlf phenomena occurred during the October 13 event - a noise band within the plasmasphere associated with a convecting whistler path, and ?hisslers,' falling-tone auroral-hiss forms repeated at intervals of about 2 sec.

  14. Particle Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, B R

    2008-01-01

    An essential introduction to particle physics, with coverage ranging from the basics through to the very latest developments, in an accessible and carefully structured text. Particle Physics: Third Edition is a revision of a highly regarded introduction to particle physics. In its two previous editions this book has proved to be an accessible and balanced introduction to modern particle physics, suitable for those students needed a more comprehensive introduction to the subject than provided by the 'compendium' style physics books. In the Third Edition the standard mod

  15. On the collocation between dayside auroral activity and coherent HF radar backscatter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Moen

    Full Text Available The 2D morphology of coherent HF radar and optical cusp aurora has been studied for conditions of predominantly southward IMF conditions, which favours low-latitude boundary layer reconnection. Despite the variability in shape of radar cusp Doppler spectra, the spectral width criterion of > 220 m s–1 proves to be a robust cusp discriminator. For extended periods of well-developed radar backscatter echoes, the equatorward boundary of the > 220 m s–1 spectral width enhancement lines up remarkably well with the equatorward boundary of the optical cusp aurora. The spectral width boundary is however poorly determined during development and fading of radar cusp backscatter. Closer inspection of radar Doppler profile characteristics suggests that a combination of spectral width and shape may advance boundary layer identification by HF radar. For the two December days studied the onset of radar cusp backscatter occurred within pre-existing 630.0 nm cusp auroral activity and appear to be initiated by sunrise, i.e. favourable radio wave propagation conditions had to develop. Better methods are put forward for analysing optical data, and for physical interpretation of HF radar data, and for combining these data, as applied to detection, tracking, and better understanding of dayside aurora. The broader motivation of this work is to develop wider use by the scientific community, of results of these techniques, to accelerate understanding of dynamic high-latitude boundary-processes. The contributions in this work are: (1 improved techniques of analysis of observational data, yielding meaningfully enhanced accuracy for deduced cusp locations; (2 a correspondingly more pronounced validation of correlation of boundary locations derived from the observational data set; and (3 a firmer physical rationale as to why the good correlation observed should theoretically be expected.

    Key words: Ionosphere (ionospheric

  16. Diffuse auroral precipitation by resonant interaction with electron cyclotron harmonic and whistler mode waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, A. K.; Singhal, R. P.; Singh, K. P.; Singh, O. N.

    2013-05-01

    Bounce-averaged pitch angle diffusion coefficients of electrons due to resonant interaction with electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) and whistler mode waves have been calculated. Temporal growth rates obtained by solving the appropriate dispersion relation have been used to represent the distribution of wave energy with frequency. Calculations have been performed at two spatial locations L=4.6 and L=6.8. The results obtained suggest that ECH waves can put electrons on strong pitch angle diffusion at both spatial locations. However, at L=4.6, electrons with energy <100 eV and at L=6.8 electrons with energy up to ∼500 eV can be put on strong diffusion contributing to diffuse auroral precipitation. Whistler mode waves can put electrons of energy ≤5 keV on strong pitch angle diffusion at L=6.8 whereas at L=4.6 observed wave fields are insufficient to put electrons on strong diffusion. ECH waves contribute up to 17% of the total electron energy precipitation flux due to both ECH and whistler mode waves. A case study has been performed to calculate pitch angle diffusion coefficients using Gaussian function to represent wave energy distribution with frequency. It is found that, for electron energy <500 eV, the calculated diffusion coefficients using Gaussian function to represent ECH wave energy distribution are several orders of magnitude smaller or negligible as compared to diffusion coefficients calculated by temporal growth rates. However, the calculated pitch angle diffusion coefficients using Gaussian function for whistler mode wave energy distribution are in very good agreement with diffusion coefficients calculated by temporal growth rates. It is concluded that representing the ECH wave energy distribution with frequency by a Gaussian function grossly underestimates the low energy (<500 eV) electron precipitation flux due to ECH waves.

  17. A new type of daytime high-frequency VLF emissions at auroral latitudes ("bird emissions")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manninen, J.; Turunen, T.; Kleimenova, N. G.; Gromova, L. I.; Kozlovskii, A. E.

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a new, previously unknown type of high-frequency (above 4 kHz) VLF emissions that were detected during winter VLF campaigns in Kannuslehto ( L 5.5), Finland. These previously unknown emissions have been discovered as a result of the application of special digital filtering: it clears the VLF records from pulse signals of intensive atmospherics, which prevent other kinds of VLF emissions in the same frequency range from being seen on spectrograms. As it appears, aside from wellknown bursts of auroral hisses and discrete quasiperiodic emissions, a previously unknown type of daytime right-hand polarized VLF waves is also present at frequencies above 4 kHz. These emissions can persist for several hours as series of separate short discrete wideband (from 4 to 10 kHz and higher) signals, each with a duration between one and several minutes. It has been found that such signals can be observed almost daily in winter. These emissions sound like bird's chirping to a human ear; for that reason, they were called "bird emissions." The dynamic spectra of individual signals often resemble flying birds. The signals are observed during daytime, more often in magnetically quiet conditions preceded by geomagnetic disturbances. As a rule, the occurrence of these bird emissions is accompanied by a slight increase in electron density in the lower ionosphere, which is evidence of the precipitation of energetic (>30 keV) electrons. This raises a number of questions as to where and how the VLF bird emissions are generated and how such emissions, at frequencies greatly exceeding half the electron equatorial gyrofrequency at L 5.5, can reach the Earth's surface.

  18. Stellar wind-magnetosphere interaction at exoplanets: computations of auroral radio powers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, J. D.; Milan, S. E.

    2016-09-01

    We present calculations of the auroral radio powers expected from exoplanets with magnetospheres driven by an Earth-like magnetospheric interaction with the solar wind. Specifically, we compute the twin cell-vortical ionospheric flows, currents, and resulting radio powers resulting from a Dungey cycle process driven by dayside and nightside magnetic reconnection, as a function of planetary orbital distance and magnetic field strength. We include saturation of the magnetospheric convection, as observed at the terrestrial magnetosphere, and we present power-law approximations for the convection potentials, radio powers and spectral flux densities. We specifically consider a solar-age system and a young (1 Gyr) system. We show that the radio power increases with magnetic field strength for magnetospheres with saturated convection potential, and broadly decreases with increasing orbital distance. We show that the magnetospheric convection at hot Jupiters will be saturated, and thus unable to dissipate the full available incident Poynting flux, such that the magnetic Radiometric Bode's Law (RBL) presents a substantial overestimation of the radio powers for hot Jupiters. Our radio powers for hot Jupiters are ˜5-1300 TW for hot Jupiters with field strengths of 0.1-10 BJ orbiting a Sun-like star, while we find that competing effects yield essentially identical powers for hot Jupiters orbiting a young Sun-like star. However, in particular, for planets with weaker magnetic fields, our powers are higher at larger orbital distances than given by the RBL, and there are many configurations of planet that are expected to be detectable using SKA.

  19. An interhemispheric comparison of GPS phase scintillation with auroral emission observed at the South Pole and from the DMSP satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Prikryl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The global positioning system (GPS phase scintillation caused by high-latitude ionospheric irregularities during an intense high-speed stream (HSS of the solar wind from April 29 to May 5, 2011, was observed using arrays of GPS ionospheric scintillation and total electron content monitors in the Arctic and Antarctica. The one-minute phase-scintillation index derived from the data sampled at 50 Hz was complemented by a proxy index (delta phase rate obtained from 1-Hz GPS data. The scintillation occurrence coincided with the aurora borealis and aurora australis observed by an all-sky imager at the South Pole, and by special sensor ultraviolet scanning imagers on board satellites of the Defense Meteorological Satellites Program. The South Pole (SP station is approximately conjugate with two Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network stations on Baffin Island, Canada, which provided the opportunity to study magnetic conjugacy of scintillation with support of riometers and magnetometers. The GPS ionospheric pierce points were mapped at their actual or conjugate locations, along with the auroral emission over the South Pole, assuming an altitude of 120 km. As the aurora brightened and/or drifted across the field of view of the all-sky imager, sequences of scintillation events were observed that indicated conjugate auroras as a locator of simultaneous or delayed bipolar scintillation events. In spite of the greater scintillation intensity in the auroral oval, where phase scintillation sometimes exceeded 1 radian during the auroral break-up and substorms, the percentage occurrence of moderate scintillation was highest in the cusp. Interhemispheric comparisons of bipolar scintillation maps show that the scintillation occurrence is significantly higher in the southern cusp and polar cap.

  20. Combined optical, EISCAT and magnetic observations of the omega bands/Ps6 pulsations and an auroral torch in the late morning hours: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available We present here the results of multi-instrument observations of auroral torch and Ps6 magnetic pulsations, which are assumed to be the magnetic signature of the spatially periodic optical auroras known as omega bands. Data from TV and ASC cameras in Barentsburg and Ny Ålesund, EISCAT radars in Longyearbyen and Tromsø, as well as IMAGE network were used in this study. The auroral phenomenon which was considered differed from that previously discussed, as it occurred both in an unusual place (high latitudes and at an unusual time (late morning hours. We show that this might occur due to specific conditions in the interplanetary medium, causing the appropriate deformation of the magnetosphere. In such a case, the IMF turned out to be an additional factor in driving the regime of Ps6/omega bands, namely, only by acting together could a substorm onset in the night sector and Bz variations result in their generation. Since the presumable source of Ps6/omega bands does not co-locate with convection reversal boundaries, we suggest the interpretation of the phenomena in the frame of the interchange instability instead of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability that is widely discussed in the literature in connection with omega auroras. Some numerical characteristics of the auroral torch were obtained. We also emphasize to the dark hole in the background luminosity and the short-lived azimuthally-restricted auroral arc, since their appearance could initiate the auroral torch development.

    Keywords. Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena; Plasma convection; Solar wind-magnetosphere interaction

  1. Crowd-sourcing, Communicating, and Improving Auroral Science at the Speed of Social Media through Aurorasaurus.org

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K.; MacDonald, E.; Case, N.; Hall, M.; Clayton, J.; Heavner, M.; Tapia, A.; Lalone, N.; McCloat, S.

    2015-12-01

    On March 17, 2015, a geomagnetic storm—the largest of the solar cycle to date— hit Earth and gave many sky watchers around the world a beautiful auroral display. People made thousands of aurora-related tweets and direct reports to Aurorasaurus.org, an interdisciplinary citizen science project that tracks auroras worldwide in real-time through social media and the project's apps and website. Through Aurorasaurus, researchers are converting these crowdsourced observations into valuable data points to help improve models of where aurora can be seen. In this presentation, we will highlight how the team communicates with the public during these global, sporadic events to help drive and retain participation for Aurorasaurus. We will highlight some of the co-produced scientific results and increased media interest following this event. Aurorasaurus uses mobile apps, blogging, and a volunteer scientist network to reach out to aurora enthusiasts to engage in the project. Real-time tweets are voted on by other users to verify their accuracy and are pinned on a map located on aurorasaurus.org to help show the instantaneous, global auroral visibility. Since the project launched in October 2014, hundreds of users have documented the two largest geomagnetic storms of this solar cycle. In some cases, like for the St. Patrick's Day storm, users even reported seeing aurora in areas different than aurora models suggested. Online analytics indicate these events drive users to our page and many also share images with various interest groups on social media. While citizen scientists provide observations, Aurorasaurus gives back by providing tools to help the public see and understand the aurora. When people verify auroral sightings in a specific area, the project sends out alerts to nearby users of possible auroral visibility. Aurorasaurus team members around the world also help the public understand the intricacies of space weather and aurora science through blog articles

  2. Nonlinear coupling of lower hybrid waves to the kinetic low-frequency plasma response in the auroral ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanbonmatsu, K. Y.; Goldman, M. V.; Newman, D. L.

    A hybrid kinetic-fluid model is developed which is relevant to lower hybrid spikelets observed in the topside auroral ionosphere [Vago et al., 1992; Eriksson et al., 1994]. In contrast to previous fluid models [Shapiro et al., 1995; Tam and Chang, 1995; Seyler, 1994; Shapiro et al., 1993] our linear low frequency plasma response is magnetized and kinetic. Fluid theory is used to incorporate the nonlinear wave coupling. Performing a linear stability analysis, we calculate the growth rate for the modulational instability, driven by a lower hybrid wave pump. We find that both the magnetic and kinetic effects inhibit the modulational instability.

  3. Surface-Satellite Measurements for Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SMART)and Chemical, Optical and Microphysical Measurements of In-Situ Troposphere (COMMIT) Research Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsay, Si-Chee

    2004-01-01

    The GSFC SMART consists of a suite of remote sensing instruments, including many commercially available radiometers, spectrometer, interferometer, and three in-house developed inskuments: micro-pulse lidar (MPL), scanning microwave radiometer (SMiR), and sun-sky-surface photometer (S(sup 3)). SMART cover the spectral range from UV to microwave, and passive to active remote sensing. This is to enrich the EOS-like research activities (i.e., EOS validation, innovative investigations, and long-term local environmental observations). During past years, SMART has been deployed in many NASA supported field campaigns to collocate with satellite nadir overpass for intercomparisons, and for initializing model simulations. Built on the successful experience of SMART, we are currently developing a new ground-based in-situ sampling package, COMMIT, including measurements of trace gases (CO, SO2, NOx, and O3,) concentrations, fine/coarse particle sizers and chemical composition, single- and three-wavelength nephelometers, and surface meteorological probes. COMMIT is built for seeking a relationship between surface in-situ measurements and boundary layer characteristics. This is to enrich EOS-like research on removing boundary layer signal from the entire column from space observation - to deduce the stable (less variability) free-troposphere observations. The COMMIT will try its best to link the chemical, microphysical, and optical properties of the boundary layer with radiation. The next major activities for SMART-COMMIT are scheduled for 2004-2006 in BASE-ASIA and EAST-AIRE. The expected close collaboration of BASE-ASIA with various research projects in Asia (i.e., ABC in South Asia, led by Ramanathan et al.; EAST-AIRE in East Asia, led by Li et al.; and APEX in Northeast Asia, led by Nakajima et al.) will definitely provide a better understanding of the impact of the biomass burning and air pollutants on regional-to-global climate, hydrological and carbon cycles, and

  4. Letter to the EditorOn the use of the sunspot number for the estimation of past solar and upper atmosphere conditions from historical and modern auroral observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M Vaquero

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available In this short contribution the use of different sunspot numbers for the estimation of past solar and upper atmosphere conditions from historical and modern auroral observations realised by Schröder et al. (2004 is analysed. Moreover, some comments are made on the relationships between mean annual visual observations of the auroras at middle latitudes of Europe and the mean annual sunspot number during 1780–1829. Keywords. Atmospheric composition and structure (Airglow and aurora – Magnetospheric physics (Auroral phenomena, solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – History of geophysics (Solar-planetary relationship

  5. Volcanic ash infrared signature: porous non-spherical ash particle shapes compared to homogeneous spherical ash particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kylling, A.; Kahnert, M.; Lindqvist, H.; Nousiainen, T.

    2014-04-01

    The reverse absorption technique is often used to detect volcanic ash clouds from thermal infrared satellite measurements. From these measurements effective particle radius and mass loading may be estimated using radiative transfer modelling. The radiative transfer modelling usually assumes that the ash particles are spherical. We calculated thermal infrared optical properties of highly irregular and porous ash particles and compared these with mass- and volume-equivalent spherical models. Furthermore, brightness temperatures pertinent to satellite observing geometry were calculated for the different ash particle shapes. Non-spherical shapes and volume-equivalent spheres were found to produce a detectable ash signal for larger particle sizes than mass-equivalent spheres. The assumption of mass-equivalent spheres for ash mass loading estimates was found to underestimate mass loading compared to morphologically complex inhomogeneous ash particles. The underestimate increases with the mass loading. For an ash cloud recorded during the Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruption, the mass-equivalent spheres underestimate the total mass of the ash cloud by approximately 30% compared to the morphologically complex inhomogeneous particles.

  6. Low latitude aurorae as a diagnostic for energetic particle injections and their environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Dai, L.; Dombeck, J. P.; Cattell, C. A.; Mozer, F.; Russell, C. T.; Fennell, J. F.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Mende, S. B.; Frey, H. U.

    2012-12-01

    The region between the inner magnetosphere and the geomagnetic tail/plasma sheet is highly dynamic during geomagnetic storms and hosts many important magnetospheric phenomenon and structures, including particle injections and the outer radiation belt. The energy transport mechanisms in this region during major storms are not yet fully understood, however there is increasing evidence that in the range of invariant latitudes (ILAT) mapping to this dipole-tail boundary region, Alfven waves are an important energy source for the aurora. This range of latitudes, which is roughly 50 to 68 degrees ILAT varying somewhat on the level of magnetospheric disturbance, is low latitude for the aurora. We present a study of intense earthward Alfvenic Poynting flux at the location of, and concomitant with, energetic electron injections during dipolarizations, on field lines mapping to low latitude aurorae. The Poynting flux, when mapped to an ionospheric altitude of 100km, is of sufficient intensity to power the magnetically conjugate auroral luminosities. The preliminary results suggest that wave Poynting flux is an important link between injection events and low latitude aurorae. Thus the observation of the intensification and dynamic behavior of low latitude auroral arcs, i.e. those on field lines that during storms map to the near- tail boundary where particle injections are observed, are an important diagnostic for the occurrence, location, and plasma dynamics associated with energetic particle injections. This has important implications for the Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) mission. The data gathered by RBSP can be used in conjunction with auroral data from the THEMIS all-sky imaging array in Canada, providing a richer context for the study of radiation belt physics.

  7. Airborne Sunphotometer Measurements of Aerosol Optical Depth and Columnar Water Vapor During the Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, and Comparison with Land, Aircraft, and Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, John M.; Russell, Philip B.; Reid, Jeffrey; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Allen, Duane A.; Torres, Omar; Levy, Robert C.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Holben, Brent N.; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and columnar water vapor (CWV) measurements obtained with the six-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) mounted on a twin-engine aircraft during the summer 2000 Puerto Rico Dust Experiment are presented. In general, aerosol extinction values calculated from AATS-6 AOD measurements acquired during aircraft profiles up to 5 km ASL reproduce the vertical structure measured by coincident aircraft in-situ measurements of total aerosol number and surface area concentration. Calculations show that the spectral dependence of AOD was small (mean Angstrom wavelength exponents of approximately 0.20) within three atmospheric layers defined as the total column beneath the top of each aircraft profile, the region beneath the trade wind inversion, and the region within the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) above the trade inversion. This spectral behavior is consistent with attenuation of incoming solar radiation by large dust particles or by dust plus sea salt. Values of CWV calculated from profile measurements by AATS-6 at 941.9 nm and from aircraft in-situ measurements by a chilled mirror dewpoint hygrometer agree to within approximately 4% (0.13 g/sq cm). AATS-6 AOD values measured on the ground at Roosevelt Roads Naval Air Station and during low altitude aircraft runs over the adjacent Cabras Island aerosol/radiation ground site agree to within 0.004 to 0.030 with coincident data obtained with an AERONET Sun/sky Cimel radiometer located at Cabras Island. For the same observation times, AERONET retrievals of CWV exceed AATS-6 values by a mean of 0.74 g/sq cm (approximately 21 %) for the 2.9-3.9 g/sq cm measured by AATS-6. Comparison of AATS-6 aerosol extinction values obtained during four aircraft ascents over Cabras Island with corresponding values calculated from coincident aerosol backscatter measurements by a ground-based micro-pulse lidar (MPL-Net) located at Cabras yields a similar vertical structure above the trade

  8. Auroral radio emission from late L and T dwarfs: A new constraint on dynamo theory in the substellar regime

    CERN Document Server

    Kao, Melodie M; Pineda, J Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam; Bourke, Stephen; Stevenson, David

    2015-01-01

    We have observed 6 late-L and T dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to investigate the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission, associated with large-scale auroral currents. Previous surveys encompassing ~60 L6 or later targets in this spectral range have yielded only one detection. Our sample includes the previously detected T6.5 dwarf 2MASS 10475385+2124234 as well as 5 new targets selected for the presence of H-alpha emission or optical/infrared photometric variability, which are possible manifestations of auroral activity. We detect 2MASS 10475385+2124234, as well as 4 of the 5 targets in our biased sample, including the strong IR variable SIMP J01365662+0933473 and bright H-alpha emitter 2MASS 12373919+6526148, reinforcing the possibility that activity at these disparate wavelengths is related. The radio emission frequency corresponds to a precise determination of the lower-bound magnetic field strength near the surface of each dwarf and this new sample provides robust co...

  9. Electrostatic solitary structures in presence of non-thermal electrons and a warm electron beam on the auroral field lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S. V. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa); Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Pillay, S. R. [School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

    2011-12-15

    Electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) have been observed by satellites in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere. These ESWs are found to be having both positive and negative electrostatic potentials. Using the Sagdeeev psuedo-potential technique, arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves/double layers are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of non-thermally distributed hot electrons, fluid cold electrons, a warm electron beam, and ions. The inertia of the warm electrons, and not the beam speed, is essential for the existence of positive potential solitary structures. Existence domains for positive as well as negative potential electrostatic solitons/double layers are obtained. For the typical auroral region parameters, the electric field amplitude of the negative potential solitons is found to be in the range {approx}(3-30) mV/m and {approx}(5-80) mV/m for the positive potential solitons. For the negative potential solitons/double layers, the amplitudes are higher when their widths are smaller. On the other hand, the amplitude of the positive potential structures increase with their widths.

  10. Auroral Radio Emission from Late L and T Dwarfs: A New Constraint on Dynamo Theory in the Substellar Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Melodie M.; Hallinan, Gregg; Pineda, J. Sebastian; Escala, Ivanna; Burgasser, Adam; Bourke, Stephen; Stevenson, David

    2016-02-01

    We have observed six late L and T dwarfs with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to investigate the presence of highly circularly polarized radio emission, associated with large-scale auroral currents. Previous surveys encompassing ∼60 L6 or later targets have yielded only one detection. Our sample includes the previously detected T6.5 dwarf 2MASS 10475385+2124234, as well as five new targets selected for the presence of Hα emission and/or optical infrared photometric variability, which are possible manifestations of auroral activity. We detect 2MASS 10475385+2124234, as well as four of the five targets in our biased sample, including the strong IR-variable source SIMP J01365662+0933473 and bright Hα emitter 2MASS 12373919+6526148, reinforcing the possibility that activity at these disparate wavelengths is related. The radio emission frequency corresponds to a precise determination of the lower-bound magnetic field strength near the surface of each dwarf, and this new sample provides robust constraints on dynamo theory in the low-mass brown dwarf regime. Magnetic fields ≳ 2.5 kG are confirmed for five of six targets. Our results provide tentative evidence that the dynamo operating in this mass regime may be inconsistent with predicted values from a recently proposed model. Further observations at higher radio frequencies are essential for verifying this assertion.

  11. Plasma flows, Birkeland currents and auroral forms in relation to the Svalgaard-Mansurov effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The traditional explanation of the polar cap magnetic deflections, referred to as the Svalgaard-Mansurov effect, is in terms of currents associated with ionospheric flow resulting from the release of magnetic tension on newly open magnetic field lines. In this study, we aim at an updated description of the sources of the Svalgaard-Mansurov effect based on recent observations of configurations of plasma flow channels, Birkeland current systems and aurorae in the magnetosphere-ionosphere system. Central to our description is the distinction between two different flow channels (FC 1 and FC 2 corresponding to two consecutive stages in the evolution of open field lines in Dungey cell convection, with FC 1 on newly open, and FC 2 on old open, field lines. Flow channel FC 1 is the result of ionospheric Pedersen current closure of Birkeland currents flowing along newly open field lines. During intervals of nonzero interplanetary magnetic field By component FC 1 is observed on either side of noon and it is accompanied by poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs/prenoon and PMAFs/postnoon. In such cases the next convection stage, in the form of flow channel FC 2 on the periphery of the polar cap, is particularly important for establishing an IMF By-related convection asymmetry along the dawn-dusk meridian, which is a central element causing the Svalgaard-Mansurov effect. FC 2 flows are excited by the ionospheric Pedersen current closure of the northernmost pair of Birkeland currents in the four-sheet current system, which is coupled to the tail magnetopause and flank low-latitude boundary layer. This study is based on a review of recent statistical and event studies of central parameters relating to the magnetosphere-ionosphere current systems mentioned above. Temporal-spatial structure in the current systems is obtained by ground-satellite conjunction studies. On this point we emphasize the important information derived

  12. Origin of type-2 thermal-ion upflows in the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Kagan

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The origin of thermal ion outflows exceeding 1km/s in the high-latitude F-region has been a subject of considerable debate. For cases with strong convection electric fields, the "evaporation" of the ions due to frictional heating below 400-500km has been shown to provide some satisfactory answers. By contrast, in the more frequent subclass of outflow events observed over auroral arcs, called type-2, there is no observational evidence for ion frictional heating. Instead, an electron temperature increase of up to 6000° K is observed over the outflow region. In this case, field-aligned electric fields have long been suspected to be involved, but this explanation did not seem to agree with expectations from the ion momentum balance. In the present work we provide a consistent scenario for the type-2 ion upflows based on our case study of an event that occurred on 20 February 1990. We introduce, for the first time, the electron energy balance in the analysis. We couple this equation with the ion momentum balance to study the salient features of the observations and conclude that type-2 ion outflows and the accompanying electron heating events are indeed consistent with the existence of a field-aligned electric field. However, for our explanation to work, we have to require that an allowance be made for electron scattering by high frequency turbulence. This turbulence could be generated at first by the very fast response of the electrons themselves to a newly imposed electric field that would be partly aligned with the geomagnetic field. The high frequencies of the waves would make it impossible for the ions to react to the waves. We have found the electron collision frequency associated with scattering from the waves to be rather modest, i.e. comparable to the ambient electron-ion collision frequency. The field-aligned electric field inferred from the observations is likewise of the same order of magnitude as the normal ambipolar field, at least for

  13. Visualizing Space Weather: The Planeterrella Auroral Simulator as a Heliophysics Public Outreach Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masongsong, E. V.; Lilensten, J.; Booth, M. J.; Suri, G.; Heflinger, T. G.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA THEMIS and ARTEMIS satellite missions study "space weather," which describes the solar wind influence on Earth's protective magnetic shield, the magnetosphere. Space weather is important to study and predict because it can damage critical GPS and communications satellites, harm space travelers, and even disable our global electrical grid. The Planeterrella is an innovative heliophysics outreach demonstration, expanding public awareness of space weather by visualizing the sun-Earth connection up close and in-person. Using a glass vacuum chamber, two magnetized spheres and a 1kV power supply, the device can simulate plasma configurations of the solar corona, solar wind, Van Allen radiation belts, and auroral ovals, all of which are observable only by satellites. This "aurora in a bottle" is a modernized version of the original Terrella built by Kristian Birkeland in the 1890s to show that the aurora are electrical in nature. Adapted from plans by Lilensten et al. at CNRS-IPAG, the UCLA Planeterrella was completed in Nov. 2013, the second device of its kind in the U.S., and the centerpiece of the THEMIS/ARTEMIS mobile public outreach exhibit. In combination with captivating posters, 3D magnetic field models, dazzling aurora videos and magnetosphere animations, the Planeterrella has already introduced over 1200 people to the electrical link between our sun and the planets. Most visitors had seen solar flare images in the news, however the Planeterrella experience enhanced their appreciation of the dynamic solar wind and its effects on Earth's invisible magnetic field. Most importantly, visitors young and old realized that magnets are not just cool toys or only for powering hybrid car motors and MRIs, they are a fundamental aspect of ongoing life on Earth and are key to the formation and evolution of planets, moons, and stars, extending far beyond our galaxy to other planetary systems throughout the universe. Novel visualizations such as the Planeterrella can

  14. The observations of fluxes of relativistic electrons at the latitudes of the auroral oval: results of METEOR-M No.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazantseva, Maria; Antonova, Elizaveta; Marjin, Boris; Barinova, Vera; Myagkova, Irina

    We analyze the simultaneous observations of the fluxes of auroral electrons and the fluxes of relativistic electrons at the external boundary of the outer electron radiation belts using data of METEOR-M No1 satellite for the period from November 3, 2009 till April 30, 2010. The geomagnetic conditions during analyzed period were comparatively quite. METEOR-M No.1 has a polar solar-synchronous circular orbit with an altitude of ~832 km, a period of 101.3 min, and an inclination of 98.068 degrees. The electrons with the energies from 0.1 to 13 MeV and protons from 1 to 260 MeV were measured by GGAK-M instrument composed by semiconductor and scintillator detectors. The plasma electrons with the energies from 0.03 to 16 keV were measured by the segment electrostatic analyzer. The observation of fluxes of relativistic electrons were selected inside the auroral oval connected with the development of magnetospheric substorms. However, the fluxes of relativistic electrons are also observed during absolutely quite time intervals. We compare the obtained results with the observations of CORONAS-FOTON satellite demonstrating the quasistationary (for more than 3 hours) increases of relativistic electrons at the latitudes of the auroral oval and argue that the processes inside the auroral oval can play the considerable role in the acceleration of relativistic electrons.

  15. Variation of Jupiter's aurora observed by Hisaki/EXCEED: 1. Observed characteristics of the auroral electron energies compared with observations performed using HST/STIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Chihiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Badman, Sarah V.; Murakami, Go; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Tsuchiya, Fuminori; André, Nicolas; Yoshikawa, Ichiro; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Shiota, Daikou; Tadokoro, Hiroyasu; Fujimoto, Masaki

    2016-05-01

    Temporal variation of Jupiter's northern aurora is detected using the Extreme Ultraviolet Spectroscope for Exospheric Dynamics (EXCEED) on board JAXA's Earth-orbiting planetary space telescope Hisaki. The wavelength coverage of EXCEED includes the H2 Lyman and Werner bands at 80-148 nm from the entire northern polar region. The prominent periodic modulation of the observed emission corresponds to the rotation of Jupiter's main auroral oval through the aperture, with additional superposed -50%-100% temporal variations. The hydrocarbon color ratio (CR) adopted for the wavelength range of EXCEED is defined as the ratio of the emission intensity in the long wavelength range of 138.5-144.8 nm to that in the short wavelength range of 126.3-130 nm. This CR varies with the planetary rotation phase. Short- (within one planetary rotation) and long-term (> one planetary rotation) enhancements of the auroral power are observed in both wavelength ranges and result in a small CR variation. The occurrence timing of the auroral power enhancement does not clearly depend on the central meridian longitude. Despite the limitations of the wavelength coverage and the large field of view of the observation, the auroral spectra and CR-brightness distribution measured using EXCEED are consistent with other observations.

  16. Carbon particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  17. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Brian R

    2017-01-01

    An accessible and carefully structured introduction to Particle Physics, including important coverage of the Higgs Boson and recent progress in neutrino physics. Fourth edition of this successful title in the Manchester Physics series. Includes information on recent key discoveries including : An account of the discovery of exotic hadrons, beyond the simple quark model; Expanded treatments of neutrino physics and CP violation in B-decays; An updated account of ‘physics beyond the standard model’, including the interaction of particle physics with cosmology; Additional problems in all chapters, with solutions to selected problems available on the book’s website; Advanced material appears in optional starred sections.

  18. Auroral current systems in Saturn's magnetosphere: comparison of theoretical models with Cassini and HST observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. W. H. Cowley

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The first simultaneous observations of fields and plasmas in Saturn's high-latitude magnetosphere and UV images of the conjugate auroral oval were obtained by the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope (HST in January 2007. These data have shown that the southern auroral oval near noon maps to the dayside cusp boundary between open and closed field lines, associated with a major layer of upward-directed field-aligned current (Bunce et al., 2008. The results thus support earlier theoretical discussion and quantitative modelling of magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at Saturn (Cowley et al., 2004, that suggests the oval is produced by electron acceleration in the field-aligned current layer required by rotational flow shear between strongly sub-corotating flow on open field lines and near-corotating flow on closed field lines. Here we quantitatively compare these modelling results (the "CBO" model with the Cassini-HST data set. The comparison shows good qualitative agreement between model and data, the principal difference being that the model currents are too small by factors of about five, as determined from the magnetic perturbations observed by Cassini. This is suggested to be principally indicative of a more highly conducting summer southern ionosphere than was assumed in the CBO model. A revised model is therefore proposed in which the height-integrated ionospheric Pedersen conductivity is increased by a factor of four from 1 to 4 mho, together with more minor adjustments to the co-latitude of the boundary, the flow shear across it, the width of the current layer, and the properties of the source electrons. It is shown that the revised model agrees well with the combined Cassini-HST data, requiring downward acceleration of outer magnetosphere electrons through a ~10 kV potential in the current layer at the open-closed field line boundary to produce an auroral oval of ~1° width with UV emission intensities of a few tens of kR.

  19. Physical and Chemical Properties of Jupiter's Polar Vortices and Regions of Auroral Influence Revealed Through High-Resolution Infrared Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Josh; Orton, Glenn S.; Sinclair, James; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sato, Takao M.; Fujiyoshi, Takuya; Momary, Thomas W.; Yanamandra-Fisher, Padma A.

    2016-10-01

    We report characterization of the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions derived from mid-infrared imaging of Jupiter covering all longitudes at unprecedented spatial resolution using the COMICS instrument at the Subaru Telescope on the nights of January 24 and 25, 2016 (UT). Because of Jupiter's slight axial tilt of 3°, the low angular resolution and incomplete longitudinal coverage of previous mid-infrared observations, the physical and chemical properties of Jupiter's polar regions have been poorly characterized. In advance of the Juno mission's exploration of the polar regions, this study focuses on mapping the 3-dimensional structure of Jupiter's polar regions, specifically to characterize the polar vortices and compact regions of auroral influence. Using mid-infrared images taken in the 7.8 - 24.2 µm range, we determined the 3-dimensional temperature field, mapped the para-H2 fraction and aerosol opacity at 700 mbar and lower pressures, and constrained the distribution of gaseous NH3 in Jupiter's northern and southern polar regions. Retrievals of these atmospheric parameters was performed using NEMESIS, a radiative transfer forward model and retrieval code. Preliminary results indicate that there are vortices at both poles, each with very distinct low-latitude boundaries approximately 60° (planetocentric) from the equator, which can be defined by sharp thermal gradients extending at least from the upper troposphere (500 mbar) and into the stratosphere (0.1 mbar). These polar regions are characterized by lower temperatures, lower aerosol number densities, and lower NH3 volume mixing ratios, compared with the regions immediately outside the vortex boundaries. These images also provided the highest resolution of prominent auroral-related stratospheric heating to date, revealing a teardrop-shaped morphology in the north and a sharp-edged oval shape in the south. Both appear to be contained inside the locus of H3+ auroral emission detected

  20. Particles and plasmas in the earth's magnetotail at 60 earth radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, K. A.; Chase, L. M.; Lin, R. P.; Mcguire, R. E.; Mccoy, J. E.

    1974-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to describe the plasma and particle populations in the magnetotail near 60 earth radii geocentric distance. Both the plasma sheet and the high-latitude portions of the magnetotail are discussed. Electron and proton spectra at energies above about 20 keV and electron spectra down to 0.5 keV have been obtained. Another topic of importance is the comparison of the deep magnetotail plasma sheet with the Vela satellite measurements at about 20 earth radii geocentric distance.

  1. Analysis of the observation of particle detector inside ‘CBERS-1’ satellite under solar quiet conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZOU; Hong; XIAO; Zuo; HAO; Yongqiang; ZOU; Jiqing; ZHU; Wenming; WU; Zhongxiang

    2006-01-01

    Based on the knowledge and related theory of earth's radiation belt, the data chronous orbit were analyzed. It is proved that the observational results are in agreement with the theoretical description of the radiation belt structures. Analysis of more than 3years' data showed clearly that under quiet solar conditions, at a height of about 800 km the energetic particles were mainly located in three regions: northern auroral belt (40°-80°), southern auroral belt (-40°- -80°) and South Atlantic Geomagnetic Anomaly Region (SAA). Actually, this is for the global distribution, at each longitude the latitudinal coverage is much narrower and particles are along the geomagnetic latitude of about ±60°.The species of particles in different regions and their counting rates are different. In SAA,usually both electrons and protons are observed, which should come from inner radiation belt; in polar regions only energetic electrons are observed under the quiet condition,which belongs to the outer radiation belt. The distribution of outer radiation electrons is asymmetrical for longitudes as well as northern and southern polar regions. These asymmetries can be explained with the reflecting altitudes of the mirror points of charged particles at the same L shell.

  2. Ionospheric conductances and currents of a morning sector auroral arc from Swarm-A electric and magnetic field measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juusola, L.; Archer, W. E.; Kauristie, K.; Burchill, J. K.; Vanhamäki, H.; Aikio, A. T.

    2016-11-01

    We show the first ionospheric Hall and Pedersen conductances derived from Swarm magnetic and electric field measurements during a crossing of a morning sector auroral arc. Only Swarm-A was used, with assumptions of negligible azimuthal gradients and vanishing eastward electric field. We find upward field-aligned current, enhanced Hall and Pedersen conductances, and relatively weak electric field coincident with the arc. Poleward of the arc, the field-aligned current was downward, conductances lower, and the electric field enhanced. The arc was embedded in a westward electrojet, immediately equatorward of the peak current density. The equatorward portion of the electrojet could thus be considered conductance dominant and the poleward portion electric field dominant. Although the electric field measured by Swarm was intense, resulting in conductances lower than those typically reported, comparable electric fields have been observed earlier. These results demonstrate how Swarm data can significantly contribute to our understanding of the ionospheric electrodynamics.

  3. On the lifetime and extent of an auroral westward flow channel (AWFC observed during a magnetospheric substorm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. L. Parkinson

    Full Text Available A -190-nT negative bay in the geomagnetic X component measured at Macquarie Island ( -65° L showed that an ionospheric substorm occurred during 09:58 to 11:10 UT on 27 February 2000. Signatures of an auroral westward flow channel (AWFC were observed nearly simultaneously in the backscatter power, LOS Doppler velocity, and Doppler spectral width measured using the Tasman International Geospace Environment Radar (TIGER, a Southern Hemisphere HF SuperDARN radar. Many of the characteristics of the AWFC were similar to those occurring during a polarisation jet (PJ, or subauroral ion drift (SAID event, and suggest that it may have been a pre-cursor to a fully developed, intense westward flow channel satisfying all of the criteria defining a PJ/SAID. A beam-swinging analysis showed that the westward drifts (poleward electric field associated with the flow channel were very structured in time and space, but the smoothed velocities grew to ~ 800 ms-1 (47 mVm-1 during the 22-min substorm onset interval 09:56 to 10:18 UT. Maximum west-ward drifts of >1.3 km s-1 (>77 mVm-1 occurred during a ~ 5-min velocity spike, peaking at 10:40 UT during the expansion phase. The drifts decayed rapidly to ~ 300 ms-1 (18 mVm-1 during the 6-min recovery phase interval, 11:04 to 11:10 UT. Overall, the AWFC had a lifetime of 74 min, and was located near -65° L in the evening sector west of the Harang discontinuity. The large westward drifts were confined to a geographic zonal channel of longitudinal ex-tent >20° (>1.3 h magnetic local time, and latitudinal width ~2° L. Using a half-width of ~ 100 km in latitude, the peak electric potential was >7.7 kV. However, a transient velocity of >3.1 km s-1 with potential >18.4 kV was observed further poleward at the end of the recovery phase. Auroral oval boundaries determined

  4. Efficient statistical classification of satellite measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Mills, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Supervised statistical classification is a vital tool for satellite image processing. It is useful not only when a discrete result, such as feature extraction or surface type, is required, but also for continuum retrievals by dividing the quantity of interest into discrete ranges. Because of the high resolution of modern satellite instruments and because of the requirement for real-time processing, any algorithm has to be fast to be useful. Here we describe an algorithm based on kernel estimation called Adaptive Gaussian Filtering that incorporates several innovations to produce superior efficiency as compared to three other popular methods: k-nearest-neighbour (KNN), Learning Vector Quantization (LVQ) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). This efficiency is gained with no compromises: accuracy is maintained, while estimates of the conditional probabilities are returned. These are useful not only to gauge the accuracy of an estimate in the absence of its true value, but also to re-calibrate a retrieved image and...

  5. Improving Estuarine Transport Models using Satellite Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    standard methods (Siegel,2005; Palacios et al., 2009; Doxaran et. al. 2009, Hu et. al. 2004), we estimate turbidity and water temperature by regessing...mass conservation. Estuaries and Coasts, 30p.1095-1105. Palacios , L. Sherry. Tawnya D. Peterson., Raphael M. Kudela. (2009). Development of

  6. Modeling of Occurrence and Dynamics of Sub-Auroral Polarization Streams (SAPS) During Storm and Non-Storm Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazykin, S. Y.; Huba, J.; Coster, A. J.; Wolf, R.; Erickson, P. J.; Reiff, P. H.; Hairston, M. R.; Shepherd, S. G.; Baker, J. B. H.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Califf, S.

    2016-12-01

    Occurrence and evolution of Sub-Auroral Polarization Stream, or SAPS, structures, defined here as latitudinally narrow channels of enhanced westward convection flows in the evening ionosphere equatorward of the auroral electron precipitation boundary, is the subject of the ongoing CEDAR-GEM focus study. In this paper, we present simulation results of several event intervals selected for the focus study, obtained with the SAMI3-RCM ionosphere-magnetosphere coupled model. We simulate intervals that include quiet-times, storm main phases, and storm recovery phases, as well as non-storm intervals with variations in the high-latitude convection. We compare simulation results with multi-instrument observations. In the ionosphere, these include mid-latitude SuperDARN Doppler flow velocities, DMSP topside ionospheric ExB drifts, Millstone Hill incoherent scatter flow velocities and F-region densities, and ground-based GPS Total Electron Content (TEC) maps. Magnetospheric data used for model comparison are electric field and cold plasma densities from Van Allen Probes and plasma and fields measurements by the Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission (MMS) probes. Through comparing modeling results and data, we address the following questions: (1) Can observed occurrence of SAPS be predicted by the model based on time history of magnetospheric activity? (2) To what extent does non-linear ionospheric feedback affect dynamics of SAPS? (3) How does the preconditioning of the background ionosphere (specifically, night-time main ionospheric trough) affect SAPS dynamics? (4) How does presence of SAPS structures in the global ionospheric convection pattern affect storm-time plasma re-distribution (e.g., storm-enhanced densities (or SEDs), plasmaspheric plumes, traveling ionospheric disturbances (or TIDs))?

  7. X-ray Probes of Magnetospheric Interactions with Jupiter's Auroral zones, the Galilean Satellites, and the Io Plasma Torus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsner, R. F.; Ramsey, B. D.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Rehak, P.; Johnson, R. E.; Cooper, J. F.; Swartz, D. A.

    2004-01-01

    Remote observations with the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton Observatory have shown that the Jovian system is a source of x-rays with a rich and complicated structure. The planet's polar auroral zones and its disk are powerful sources of x-ray emission. Chandra observations revealed x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus and from the Galilean moons Io, Europa, and possibly Ganymede. The emission from these moons is certainly due to bombardment of their surfaces of highly energetic protons, oxygen and sulfur ions from the region near the Torus exciting atoms in their surfaces and leading to fluorescent x-ray emission lines. Although the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons is faint when observed fiom Earth orbit, an imaging x-ray spectrometer in orbit around these moons, operating at 200 eV and above with 150 eV energy resolution, would provide a detailed mapping (down to 40 m spatial resolution) of the elemental composition in their surfaces. Here we describe the physical processes leading to x-ray emission fiom the surfaces of Jupiter's moons and the instrumental properties, as well as energetic ion flux models or measurements, required to map the elemental composition of their surfaces. We discuss the proposed scenarios leading to possible surface compositions. For Europa, the two most extreme are (1) a patina produced by exogenic processes such as meteoroid bombardment and ion implantation, and (2) upwelling of material fiom the subsurface ocean. We also describe the characteristics of X - m , an imaging x-ray spectrometer under going a feasibility study for the JIM0 mission, with the ultimate goal of providing unprecedented x-ray studies of the elemental composition of the surfaces of Jupiter's icy moons and Io, as well as of Jupiter's auroral x-ray emission.

  8. Response of high-energy particle precipitation to substorm onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellerman, A. C.; Makarevich, R. A.

    2008-12-01

    The process of extra-terrestrial radiowave absorption by ionospheric electrons is known as cosmic noise absorption (CNA) and is routinely detected by ground-based relative opacity meters or riometers, which are sensitive to high-energy particle precipitation (>10 keV). In this study, we investigate the response of high- energy particle precipitation to substorm onset by employing a 7×7-beam imaging riometer system in Northern Scandinavia, IRIS, and the substorm onset database from the IMAGE satellite. The CNA response is investigated with respect to substorm location relative to IRIS. Instantaneous responses are mostly observed when IRIS is located on the same magnetic parallel as the substorm onset region. We investigate dispersionless injections (DIs) associated with substorm onsets as detected by the imaging riometer. It is shown that an auroral absorption signature is present predominantly for DIs located westward of IRIS, which is consistent with high-energy particles propagating eastward from substorm injection location. Superposed epoch analysis of CNA relative to substorm onset timing shows a strong dependence on the azimuthal sector in which the onset is located relative to IRIS. Rapid responses are observed in 90-135 deg geographic azimuths indicating fast westward and poleward propagation from onset location. Responses to onsets located between -90 to -180 deg show a monotonic decrease in rise time. The results are examined in the context of the geosynchronous LANL and GOES satellite data in order to investigate the two propagation mechanisms: expansion of injection region and particle drift.

  9. The brightness ratio of H Lyman‐α/H2 bands in FUV auroral emissions: A diagnosis for the energy of precipitating electrons and associated magnetospheric acceleration processes applied to Saturn

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tao, Chihiro; Lamy, Laurent; Prangé, Renée

    2014-01-01

    We propose that the ratio of the auroral brightness of H Lyman‐ α to that of far ultraviolet H 2 and the absolute value of the H 2 brightness provide good indicators of the acceleration versus nonacceleration processes for field...

  10. Particle physics

    CERN Document Server

    Kennedy, Eugene

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated by the Large Hadron Collider and the search for the elusive Higgs Boson, interest in particle physics continues at a high level among scientists and the general public. This book includes theoretical aspects, with chapters outlining the generation model and a charged Higgs boson model as alternative scenarios to the Standard Model. An introduction is provided to postulated axion photon interactions and associated photon dispersion in magnetized media. The complexity of particle physics research requiring the synergistic combination of theory, hardware and computation is described in terms of the e-science paradigm. The book concludes with a chapter tackling potential radiation hazards associated with extremely weakly interacting neutrinos if produced in copious amounts with future high-energy muon-collider facilities.

  11. Active particles

    CERN Document Server

    Degond, Pierre; Tadmor, Eitan

    2017-01-01

    This volume collects ten surveys on the modeling, simulation, and applications of active particles using methods ranging from mathematical kinetic theory to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics. The contributing authors are leading experts working in this challenging field, and each of their chapters provides a review of the most recent results in their areas and looks ahead to future research directions. The approaches to studying active matter are presented here from many different perspectives, such as individual-based models, evolutionary games, Brownian motion, and continuum theories, as well as various combinations of these. Applications covered include biological network formation and network theory; opinion formation and social systems; control theory of sparse systems; theory and applications of mean field games; population learning; dynamics of flocking systems; vehicular traffic flow; and stochastic particles and mean field approximation. Mathematicians and other members of the scientific commu...

  12. Particle astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Krauss, Lawrence M

    1997-01-01

    Astrophysics and cosmology provide fundamental testing grounds for many ideas in elementary particle physics, and include potential probes which are well beyond the range of current or even planned accelerators. In this series of 3 lectures, I will give and overview of existing constraints, and a discussion of the potential for the future. I will attempt whenever possible to demonstrate the connection between accelerator-based physics and astrophysicas/cosmology. The format of the kectures will be to examine observables from astrophysics, and explore how these can be used to constrain particle physics. Tentatively, lecture 1 will focus on the age and mass density of the universe and galaxy. Lecture 2 will focus on stars, stellar evolution, and the abundance of light elements. Lecture 3 will focus on various cosmic diffuse backgrounds, including possibly matter, photons, neutrinos and gravitational waves.

  13. Particle encapsulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xiaobin

    2000-01-01

    Several engineering processes are powder based, ranging from food processing to engineering ceramic and composite production. In most of these processes, powders of different composition are mixed together in order to produce the final product, and this combining of powders of different density, shape, and surface properties is often very difficult. Mixtures may be quite inhomogeneous. This research focuses on a method of avoiding such problems, by coating individual particles of one material...

  14. Martian Particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image of Martian soil was taken by the Phoenix Lander's atomic force microscope on Sol 74 of the mission, which began on May 25, 2008. This image of a flat, smooth-surfaced particle is consistent with the appearance of soil from Earth containing the mineral phyllosilicate. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Kinetic Model of Auroral Plasma Formation II: Simultaneous Multi-Satellite Ion Observations and Interpretations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    survey particle spec- trogram of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) plasma instrument on SCATHA e.g., Olsen, 1981], shown on Figure 4. In...Perraut, J.-A. Sauvaud, J.-M. Bosqued, A. Pedersen, and B. Aparicio , Drift boundary and ULF wave generation near noon at geostationary orbit, Geophys

  16. Particle Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Collinson, Chris

    1995-01-01

    * Assumes no prior knowledge* Adopts a modelling approach* Numerous tutorial problems, worked examples and exercises included* Elementary topics augmented by planetary motion and rotating framesThis text provides an invaluable introduction to mechanicsm confining attention to the motion of a particle. It begins with a full discussion of the foundations of the subject within the context of mathematical modelling before covering more advanced topics including the theory of planetary orbits and the use of rotating frames of reference. Truly introductory , the style adoped is perfect for those u

  17. The aurora as a source of planetary-scale waves in the middle atmosphere. [atmospheric turbulence caused by auroral energy absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Y. T.; Straus, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    Photographs of global scale auroral forms taken by scanning radiometers onboard weather satellites in 1972 show that auroral bands exhibit well organized wave motion with typical zonal wave number of 5 or so. The scale size of these waves is in agreement with that of well organized neutral wind fields in the 150- to 200-km region during the geomagnetic storm of May 27, 1967. Further, the horizontal scale size revealed by these observations are in agreement with that of high altitude traveling ionospheric disturbances. It is conjectured that the geomagnetic storm is a source of planetary and synoptic scale neutral atmospheric waves in the middle atmosphere. Although there is, at present, no observation of substorm related waves of this scale size at mesospheric and stratospheric altitudes, the possible existence of a new source of waves of the proper scale size to trigger instabilities in middle atmospheric circulation systems may be significant in the study of lower atmospheric response to geomagnetic activity.

  18. Plasma structure within poleward-moving cusp/cleft auroral transients: EISCAT Svalbard radar observations and an explanation in terms of large local time extent of events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Lockwood

    Full Text Available We report high-resolution observations of the southward-IMF cusp/cleft ionosphere made on December 16th 1998 by the EISCAT (European incoherent scatter Svalbard radar (ESR, and compare them with observations of dayside auroral luminosity, as seen at a wavelength of 630 nm by a meridian scanning photometer at Ny Ålesund, and of plasma flows, as seen by the CUTLASS (co-operative UK twin location auroral sounding system Finland HF radar. The optical data reveal a series of poleward-moving transient red-line (630 nm enhancements, events that have been associated with bursts in the rate of magnetopause reconnection generating new open flux. The combined observations at this time have strong similarities to predictions of the effects of soft electron precipitation modulated by pulsed reconnection, as made by Davis and Lockwood (1996; however, the effects of rapid zonal flow in the ionosphere, caused by the magnetic curvature force on the newly opened field lines, are found to be a significant additional factor. In particular, it is shown how enhanced plasma loss rates induced by the rapid convection can explain two outstanding anomalies of the 630 nm transients, namely how minima in luminosity form between the poleward-moving events and how events can re-brighten as they move poleward. The observations show how cusp/cleft aurora and transient poleward-moving auroral forms appear in the ESR data and the conditions which cause enhanced 630 nm emission in the transients: they are an important first step in enabling the ESR to identify these features away from the winter solstice when supporting auroral observations are not available.

    Key words: Ionosphere (polar ionosphere - Magnetospheric physics (magnetopause; cusp and boundary layers; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions

  19. Ion temperature anisotropy effects on threshold conditions of a shear-modified current driven electrostatic ion-acoustic instability in the topside auroral ionosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Perron, P. J. G.; J.-M. A. Noël; Kabin, K.; St-Maurice, J.-P.

    2013-01-01

    Temperature anisotropies may be encountered in space plasmas when there is a preferred direction, for instance, a strong magnetic or electric field. In this paper, we study how ion temperature anisotropy can affect the threshold conditions of a shear-modified current driven electrostatic ion-acoustic (CDEIA) instability. In particular, this communication focuses on instabilities in the context of topside auroral F-region situations and in the limit where finite Larmor radius...

  20. Causes of plasma flow bursts and dayside auroral transients: An evaluation of two models invoking reconnection pulses and changes in the Y component of the magnetosheath field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, M. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Didcot (United Kingdom); Cowley, S.W.H. [Imperial College, London (United Kingdom); Sandholt, P.E. [Univ. of Oslo (Norway)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The authors apply two models to interpret data observed by the EISCAT radar, and sky cameras, which observe bursty plasma flow events in conjunction with auroral transients near 630{angstrom}. One model argues the flows are caused by enhanced reconnection events at the magnetopause. The other argues they result from an increase in field line curvature forces associated with magnetosheath fields. The authors conclude that only the reconnection model can reliably explain the observed data.

  1. Magnetospheric solitary structure maintained by 3000 km/s ions as a cause of westward moving auroral bulge at 19 MLT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yamauchi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In the evening equatorial magnetosphere at about 4 RE geocentric distance and 19 MLT, the four Cluster spacecraft observed a solitary structure with a width of about 1000~2000 km in the propagation direction. The solitary structure propagates sunward with about 5~10 km/s carrying sunward electric field (in the propagation direction of up to about 10 mV/m (total potential drop of about 5~10 kV, depletion of magnetic field of about 25%, and a duskward E×B convection up to 50 km/s of He+ rich cold plasma without O+. At the same time, auroral images from the IMAGE satellite together with ground based geomagnetic field data showed a westward (sunward at this location propagating auroral bulge at the magnetically conjugate ionosphere with the solitary structure. The solitary structure is maintained by flux enhancement of selectively 3000 km/s ions (about 50 keV for H+, 200 keV for He+, and 750 keV for O+. These ions are the main carrier of the diamagnetic current causing the magnetic depletion, whereas the polarization is maintained by different behavior of energetic ions and electrons. Corresponding to aurora, field-aligned accelerated ionospheric plasma of several keV appeared at Cluster from both hemispheres simultaneously. Together with good correspondence in location and propagation velocity between the auroral bulge and the solitary structure, this indicates that the sunward moving auroral bulge is caused by the sunward propagation of the solitary structure which is maintained by energetic ions. The solitary structure might also be the cause of Pi2-like magnetic variation that started simultaneously at Cluster location.

  2. Particle Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Necia Grant; West, Geoffrey B.

    1988-06-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Theoretical Framework: 1. Scale and dimension - From animals to quarks Geoffrey B. West; 2. Particle physics and the standard model Stuart Raby, Richard C. Slansky and Geoffrey B. West; QCD on a Cray: the masses of elementary particles Gerald Guralnik, Tony Warnock and Charles Zemach; Lecture Notes - From simple field theories to the standard model; 3. Toward a unified theory: an essay on the role of supergravity in the search for unification Richard C. Slansky; 4. Supersymmetry at 100 GeV Stuart Raby; 5. The family problem T. Goldman and Michael Martin Nieto; Part II. Experimental Developments: 6. Experiments to test unification schemes Gary H. Sanders; 7. The march toward higher energies S. Peter Rosen; LAMPF II and the High-Intensity Frontier Henry A. Thiessen; The SSC - An engineering challenge Mahlon T. Wilson; 8. Science underground - the search for rare events L. M. Simmons, Jr; Part III. Personal Perspectives: 9. Quarks and quirks among friends Peter A. Carruthers, Stuart Raby, Richard C. Slansky, Geoffrey B. West and George Zweig; Index.

  3. Detailed dayside auroral morphology as a function of local time for southeast IMF orientation: implications for solar wind-magnetosphere coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Sandholt

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In two case studies we elaborate on spatial and temporal structures of the dayside aurora within 08:00-16:00 magnetic local time (MLT and discuss the relationship of this structure to solar wind-magnetosphere interconnection topology and the different stages of evolution of open field lines in the Dungey convection cycle. The detailed 2-D auroral morphology is obtained from continuous ground observations at Ny Ålesund (76° magnetic latitude (MLAT, Svalbard during two days when the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF is directed southeast (By>0; Bz<0. The auroral activity consists of the successive activations of the following forms: (i latitudinally separated, sunward moving, arcs/bands of dayside boundary plasma sheet (BPS origin, in the prenoon (08:00-11:00 MLT and postnoon (12:00-16:00 MLT sectors, within 70-75° MLAT, (ii poleward moving auroral forms (PMAFs emanating from the pre- and postnoon brightening events, and (iii a specific activity appearing in the 07:00-10:00 MLT/75-80° MLAT during the prevailing IMF By>0 conditions. The pre- and postnoon activations are separated by a region of strongly attenuated auroral activity/intensity within the 11:00-12:00 MLT sector, often referred to as the midday gap aurora. The latter aurora is attributed to the presence of component reconnection at the subsolar magnetopause where the stagnant magnetosheath flow lead to field-aligned currents (FACs which are of only moderate intensity. The much more active and intense aurorae in the prenoon (07:00-11:00 MLT and postnoon (12:00-16:00 MLT sectors originate in magnetopause reconnection events that are initiated well away from the subsolar point. The high-latitude auroral activity in the prenoon sector (feature iii is found to be accompanied by a convection channel at the polar cap boundary. The associated ground magnetic deflection (DPY is a Svalgaard-Mansurov effect. The convection channel is

  4. Modulation of whistler-mode chorus waves by ULF and the effects on auroral precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaynes, A. N.; Usanova, M.; Lessard, M.; Takahashi, K.; Ali, A.; Malaspina, D.; Michell, R.; Spanswick, E.; Donovan, E.; Klitzing, C.; Samara, M.; Spence, H. E.; Wygant, J. R.

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we present simultaneous observations of structured chorus waves being modulated by ULF waves generated as a result of a substorm injection. The in-situ wave data, measured by Van Allen Probes, were observed simultaneously with ground-based observations of pulsating aurora. Theory and observations have linked equatorial VLF waves with pulsating aurora for decades, invoking the process of pitch-angle scattering of 10's keV electrons in the equatorial magnetosphere. Recent satellite studies have strengthened this argument. In this case study, we propose the scenario being one of substorm-driven ULF pulsations modulating chorus waves, and thus providing the driver for pulsating particle precipitation into the Earth's atmosphere. To investigate the modulation of VLF waves further, we use the WHAMP plasma wave dispersion code to simulate this feature through ULF-modulated density variations. The emerging picture shows that ULF and VLF waves can be intimately related, which has implications for wave-particle interactions throughout the inner magnetosphere.

  5. New type of ensemble of quasi-periodic, long-lasting VLF emissions at the auroral zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Manninen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A new type of the series of quasi-periodic (QP very low frequency (VLF emissions in frequency range of 1–5 kHz, and not associated with geomagnetic pulsations, has been discovered at auroral latitudes (L = 5.3 during the Finnish VLF campaign (held in December 2011. At least five unusually spectacular events, each with a duration of several hours, have been observed during the night under conditions of quiet geomagnetic activity (Kp = 0–1, although QPs usually occur during the daytime. Contrary to the QP emissions typically occurring during the day, the spectral structure of these QP events represented an extended, complicated sequence of repeated discrete rising VLF signals. Their duration was about 2–3 min each, with the repetition periods ranging from ~1 min to ~10 min. Two such nighttime non-typical events are reported in this paper. The fine structure of the separated QP elements may represent a mixture of the different frequency band signals, which seem to have independent origins. It was found that the periodic signals with lower frequency appear to trigger the strong dispersive upper frequency signals. The temporal dynamics of the spectral structure of the QPs studied were significantly controlled by some disturbances in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF. This finding is very important for future theoretical investigations because the generation mechanism of this new type of QP emissions is not yet understood.

  6. Simulations of resonant Alfvén waves generated by artificial HF heating of the auroral ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pokhotelov

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Numerical two-dimensional two-fluid MHD simulations of dynamic magnetosphere-ionosphere (MI coupling have been performed to model the effects imposed on the auroral ionosphere by a powerful HF radio wave transmitter. The simulations demonstrate that modifications of the ionospheric plasma temperature and recombination due to artificial heating may trigger the ionospheric feedback instability when the coupled MI system is close to the state of marginal stability. The linear dispersion analysis of MI coupling has been performed to find the favorable conditions for marginal stability of the system. The development of the ionospheric feedback instability leads to the generation of shear waves which resonate in the magnetosphere between the heated ionospheric E-region and the strong gradient in the speed at altitudes of 1-2 RE. The application of the numerical results for the explanation of observations performed by low-orbiting satellites above the high-latitude ionosphere heated with a high power ground-based HF transmitter is discussed.