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Sample records for satellite-based snow albedo

  1. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

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    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the

  2. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  3. UV albedo of arctic snow in spring

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    O. Meinander

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of snow for climate studies is based on its physical properties, such as high surface reflectivity. Surface ultraviolet (UV albedo is an essential parameter for various applications based on radiative transfer modeling. Here, new continuous measurements of the local UV albedo of natural Arctic snow were made at Sodankylä (67.37° N, 26.63° E, 179 m a.s.l. during the spring of 2007. The data were logged at 1-min intervals. The accumulation of snow was up to 68 cm. The surface layer thickness varied from 0.5 to 35 cm with the snow grain size between 0.2 and 2.5 mm. The midday erythemally weighted UV albedo ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 in the accumulation period and 0.5–0.7 during melting. During the snow melt period, under cases of an almost clear sky and variable cloudiness, an unexpected diurnal decrease of 0.05 in albedo soon after midday, and recovery thereafter, was detected. This diurnal decrease in albedo was found to be asymmetric with respect to solar midday, thus indicating a change in the properties of the snow. Independent UV albedo results with two different types of instruments confirm these findings. The measured temperature of the snow surface was below 0°C on the following mornings. Hence, the reversible diurnal change, evident for ~1–2 h, could be explained by the daily metamorphosis of the surface of the snowpack, in which the temperature of the surface increases, melting some of the snow to liquid water, after which the surface freezes again.

  4. NASA Airborne Snow Observatory: Measuring Spatial Distribution of Snow Water Equivalent and Snow Albedo

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    Joyce, M.; Painter, T. H.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Laidlaw, R.; Bormann, K. J.; Skiles, M.; Richardson, M.; Berisford, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. Despite their importance in controlling volume and timing of runoff, snowpack albedo and SWE are still largely unquantified in the US and not at all in most of the globe, leaving runoff models poorly constrained. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in partnership with the California Department of Water Resources, has developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties for cutting edge cryospheric science, and provide complete, robust inputs to water management models and systems of the future. This poster will describe the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory, its outputs and their uses and applications, along with recent advancements to the system and plans for the project's future. Specifically, we will look at how ASO uses its imaging spectrometer to quantify spectral albedo, broadband albedo, and radiative forcing by dust and black carbon in snow. Additionally, we'll see how the scanning LiDAR is used to determine snow depth against snow-free acquisitions and to quantify snow water equivalent when combined with in-situ constrained modeling of snow density.

  5. Effective UV surface albedo of seasonally snow-covered lands

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    Tanskanen, A.; Manninen, T.

    2007-05-01

    At ultraviolet wavelengths the albedo of most natural surfaces is small with the striking exception of snow and ice. Therefore, snow cover is a major challenge for various applications based on radiative transfer modelling. The aim of this work was to determine the characteristic effective UV range surface albedo of various land cover types when covered by snow. First we selected 1 by 1 degree sample regions that met three criteria: the sample region contained dominantly subpixels of only one land cover type according to the 8 km global land cover classification product from the University of Maryland; the average slope of the sample region was less than 2 degrees according to the USGS's HYDRO1K slope data; the sample region had snow cover in March according to the NSIDC Northern Hemisphere weekly snow cover data. Next we generated 1 by 1 degree gridded 360 nm surface albedo data from the Nimbus-7 TOMS Lambertian equivalent reflectivity data, and used them to construct characteristic effective surface albedo distributions for each land cover type. The resulting distributions showed that each land cover type experiences a characteristic range of surface albedo values when covered by snow. The result is explained by the vegetation that extends upward beyond the snow cover and masks the bright snow covered surface.

  6. Measurements of spectral snow albedo at Neumayer, Antarctica

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    S. Wuttke

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Spectral albedo in high resolution, from 290 to 1050 nm, has been measured at Neumayer, Antarctica, (70°39' S, 8°15' W during the austral summer 2003/2004. At 500 nm, the spectral albedo nearly reaches unity, with slightly lower values below and above 500 nm. Above 600 nm, the spectral albedo decreases to values between 0.45 and 0.75 at 1000 nm. For one cloudless case an albedo up to 1.01 at 500 nm could be determined. This can be explained by the larger directional component of the snow reflectivity for direct incidence, combined with a slightly mislevelled sensor and the snow surface not being perfectly horizontal. A possible explanation for an observed decline in albedo is an increase in snow grain size. The theoretically predicted increase in albedo with increasing solar zenith angle (SZA could not be observed. This is explained by the small range of SZA during albedo measurements, combined with the effect of changing snow conditions outweighing the effect of changing SZA. The measured spectral albedo serves as input for radiative transfer models, describing radiation conditions in Antarctica.

  7. Changes in Snow Albedo Resulting from Snow Darkening Caused by Black Carbon

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    Engels, J.; Kloster, S.; Bourgeois, Q.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the potential impact of snow darkening caused by pre-industrial and present-day black carbon (BC) emissions on snow albedo and subsequently climate. To assess this impact, we implemented the effect of snow darkening caused by BC emitted from natural as well as anthropogenic sources into the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-M ESM). Considerable amounts of BC are emitted e.g. from fires and are transported through the atmosphere for several days before being removed by rain or snow precipitation in snow covered regions. Already very small quantities of BC reduce the snow reflectance significantly, with consequences for snow melting and snow spatial coverage. We implemented the snow albedo reduction caused by BC contamination and snow aging in the one layer land surface component (JSBACH) of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6, developed at MPI-M. For this we used the single-layer simulator of the SNow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR-Online (Flanner et al., 2007); http://snow.engin.umich.edu) model to derive snow albedo values for BC in snow concentrations ranging between 0 and 1500 ng(BC)/g(snow) for different snow grain sizes for the visible (0.3 - 0.7 μm) and near infrared range (0.7 - 1.5 μm). As snow grains grow over time, we assign different snow ages to different snow grain sizes (50, 150, 500, and 1000 μm). Here, a radius of 50 μm corresponds to new snow, whereas a radius of 1000 μm corresponds to old snow. The deposition rates of BC on snow are prescribed from previous ECHAM6-HAM simulations for two time periods, pre-industrial (1880-1889) and present-day (2000-2009), respectively. We perform a sensitivity study regarding the scavenging of BC by snow melt. To evaluate the newly implemented albedo scheme we will compare the modeled black carbon in snow concentrations to observed ones. Moreover, we will show the impact of the BC contamination and snow aging on the simulated snow albedo. The

  8. Diurnal variations in the UV albedo of arctic snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Meinander

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of snow for climate studies is based on its physical properties, such as high surface reflectivity. Surface ultraviolet (UV albedo is an essential parameter for various applications based on radiative transfer modeling. Here, new continuous measurements of the local UV albedo of natural Arctic snow were made at Sodankylä (67°22'N, 26°39'E, 179 m a.s.l. during the spring of 2007. The data were logged at 1-min intervals. The accumulation of snow was up to 68 cm. The surface layer thickness varied from 0.5 to 35 cm with the snow grain size between 0.2 and 2.5 mm. The midday erythemally weighted UV albedo ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 in the accumulation period, and from 0.5 to 0.7 during melting. During the snow melt period, under cases of an almost clear sky and variable cloudiness, an unexpected diurnal decrease of 0.05 in albedo soon after midday, and recovery thereafter, was detected. This diurnal decrease in albedo was found to be asymmetric with respect to solar midday, thus indicating a change in the properties of the snow. Independent UV albedo results with two different types of instruments confirm these findings. The measured temperature of the snow surface was below 0°C on the following mornings. Hence, the reversible diurnal change, evident for ~1–2 h, could be explained by the daily metamorphosis of the surface of the snowpack, in which the temperature of the surface increases, melting some of the snow to liquid water, after which the surface freezes again.

  9. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; Velde, van der R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Z.

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park (Colorado

  10. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; van der Velde, R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Zhongbo

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park

  11. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; van der Velde, R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Zhongbo

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park (Colorado

  12. A Model for the Spectral Albedo of Snow. II: Snow Containing Atmospheric Aerosols.

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    Warren, Stephen G.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    1980-12-01

    Small highly absorbing particles, present in concentrations of only 1 part per million by weight (ppmw) or less, can lower snow albedo in the visible by 5-15% from the high values (96-99%) predicted for pure snow in Part I. These particles have, however, no effect on snow albedo beyond 0.9 m wavelength where ice itself becomes a strong absorber. Thus we have an attractive explanation for the discrepancy between theory and observation described in Part I, a discrepancy which seemingly cannot be resolved on the basis of near-field scattering and nonsphericity effects.Desert dust and carbon soot are the most likely contaminants. But careful measurements of spectral snow albedo in the Arctic and Antarctic paint to a `grey' absorber, one whose imaginary refractive index is nearly constant across the visible spectrum. Thus carbon soot, rather than the red iron oxide normally present in desert dust, is strongly indicated at these sites. Soot particles of radius 0.1 m, in concentrations of only 0.3 ppmw, can explain the albedo measurements of Grenfell and Maykut on Arctic Ice Island T-3. This amount is consistent with some observations of soot in Arctic air masses. 1.5 ppmw of soot is required to explain the Antarctic observations of Kuhn and Siogas, which seemed an unrealistically large amount for the earth's most unpolluted continent until we learned that burning of camp heating fuel and aircraft exhaust indeed had contaminated the measurement site with soot.Midlatitude snowfields are likely to contain larger absolute amounts of soot and dust than their polar counterparts, but the snowfall is also much larger, so that the ppmw contamination does not differ drastically until melting begins. Nevertheless, the variations in absorbing particle concentration which will exist can help to explain the wide range of visible snow albedos reported in the literature.Longwave emissivity of snow is unaltered by its soot and dust content. Thus the depression of snow albedo in the

  13. An evaluation of high-resolution regional climate model simulations of snow cover and albedo over the Rocky Mountains, with implications for the simulated snow-albedo feedback

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    Minder, Justin R.; Letcher, Theodore W.; Skiles, S. McKenzie

    2016-08-01

    The snow-albedo feedback (SAF) strongly influences climate over midlatitude mountainous regions. However, over these regions the skill of regional climate models (RCMs) at simulating properties such as snow cover and surface albedo is poorly characterized. These properties are evaluated in a pair of 7 year long high-resolution RCM simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model over the central Rocky Mountains. Key differences between the simulations include the computational domain (regional versus continental) and land surface model used (Noah versus Noah-MP). Simulations are evaluated against high-resolution satellite estimates of snow cover and albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. Both simulations generally reproduce the observed seasonal and spatial variability of snow cover and also exhibit important biases. One simulation substantially overpredicts subpixel fractional snow cover over snowy pixels (by up to 0.4) causing large positive biases in surface albedo, likely due in part to inadequate representation of canopy effects. The other simulation exhibits a negative bias in areal snow extent (as much as 19% of the analysis domain). Surface measurements reveal large positive biases in snow albedo (exceeding 0.2) during late spring caused by neglecting radiative effects of impurities deposited onto snow. Semi-idealized climate change experiments show substantially different magnitudes of SAF-enhanced warming in the two simulations that can be tied to the differences in snow cover in their control climates. More confident projections of regional climate change over mountains will require further work to evaluate and improve representation of snow cover and albedo in RCMs.

  14. Estimate the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongMing Guo; NingLian Wang; XiaoBo Wu; HongBo Wu; YuWei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo is essential in obtaining the accurate albedo. In this paper, field measurement data, including snow grain size, snow depth and density was obtained. Black carbon samples were collected from the snow surface. A simultaneous observation using Analytical Spectral Devices was employed in the Qiyi Glacier located in the Qilian Mountain. Analytical Spectral Devices spectrum data were used to analyze spectral re-flectance of snow for different grain size and black carbon content. The measurements were compared with the results obtained from the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model, and the simulation was found to correlate well with the ob-served data. However, the simulated albedo was near to 0.98 times of the measured albedo, so the other factors were as-sumed to be constant using the corrected Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model to estimate the influence of measured snow grain size and black carbon on albedo. Field measurements were controlled to fit the relationship between the snow grain size and black carbon in order to estimate the influence of these factors on the snow albedo.

  15. The Alpine snow-albedo feedback in regional climate models

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    Winter, Kevin J.-P. M.; Kotlarski, Sven; Scherrer, Simon C.; Schär, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the snow-albedo feedback (SAF) on 2m temperatures and their future changes in the European Alps is investigated in the ENSEMBLES regional climate models (RCMs) with a focus on the spring season. A total of 14 re-analysis-driven RCM experiments covering the period 1961-2000 and 10 GCM-driven transient climate change projections for 1950-2099 are analysed. A positive springtime SAF is found in all RCMs, but the range of the diagnosed SAF is large. Results are compared against an observation-based SAF estimate. For some RCMs, values very close to this estimate are found; other models show a considerable overestimation of the SAF. Net shortwave radiation has the largest influence of all components of the energy balance on the diagnosed SAF and can partly explain its spatial variability. Model deficiencies in reproducing 2m temperatures above snow and ice and associated cold temperature biases at high elevations seem to contribute to a SAF overestimation in several RCMs. The diagnosed SAF in the observational period strongly influences the estimated SAF contribution to twenty first century temperature changes in the European Alps. This contribution is subject to a clear elevation dependency that is governed by the elevation-dependent change in the number of snow days. Elevations of maximum SAF contribution range from 1500 to 2000 m in spring and are found above 2000 m in summer. Here, a SAF contribution to the total simulated temperature change between 0 and 0.5 °C until 2099 (multi-model mean in spring: 0.26 °C) or 0 and 14 % (multi-model mean in spring: 8 %) is obtained for models showing a realistic SAF. These numbers represent a well-funded but only approximate estimate of the SAF contribution to future warming, and a remaining contribution of model-specific SAF misrepresentations cannot be ruled out.

  16. Towards the Development of a Global, Satellite-based, Terrestrial Snow Mission Planning Tool

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    Forman, Bart; Kumar, Sujay; Le Moigne, Jacqueline; Nag, Sreeja

    2017-01-01

    A global, satellite-based, terrestrial snow mission planning tool is proposed to help inform experimental mission design with relevance to snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE). The idea leverages the capabilities of NASAs Land Information System (LIS) and the Tradespace Analysis Tool for Constellations (TAT C) to harness the information content of Earth science mission data across a suite of hypothetical sensor designs, orbital configurations, data assimilation algorithms, and optimization and uncertainty techniques, including cost estimates and risk assessments of each hypothetical orbital configuration.One objective the proposed observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is to assess the complementary or perhaps contradictory information content derived from the simultaneous collection of passive microwave (radiometer), active microwave (radar), and LIDAR observations from space-based platforms. The integrated system will enable a true end-to-end OSSE that can help quantify the value of observations based on their utility towards both scientific research and applications as well as to better guide future mission design. Science and mission planning questions addressed as part of this concept include:1. What observational records are needed (in space and time) to maximize terrestrial snow experimental utility?2. How might observations be coordinated (in space and time) to maximize utility? 3. What is the additional utility associated with an additional observation?4. How can future mission costs being minimized while ensuring Science requirements are fulfilled?

  17. Investigating the spread in surface albedo for snow-covered forests in CMIP5 models

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    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason N. S.; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; Salzen, Knut

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40%) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  18. Investigating the spread of surface albedo in snow covered forests in CMIP5 models

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    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40 %) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  19. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

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    H. S. Negi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% differences. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The retrieved snow grain sizes using different models based on the ART theory were compared for various snow types and it was observed that the grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for the Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistent with temporal changes in grain size. This method can work very well for clean, dry snow as in the upper Himalaya, but sometimes, due to the low reflectances (<20% using wavelength 1.24 μm, the ART theory cannot be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is important for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  20. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

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    H. S. Negi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% measured error accuracy. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The snow grain sizes retrieved using different models based on ART theory are compared for different snow types and it was observed that presently grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistence with temporal increased grain size. This method can work very well for clean dry snow like in upper Himalaya but sometime due to low reflectances (<0.2 using wavelength 1.24 μm ART theory can not be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is of importance for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  1. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

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    Wickham, J.; Nash, M. S.; Barnes, C. A.

    2016-11-01

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-×-30 m) land cover change data and moderate resolution (~ 500 m-×-500 m) albedo data. The land cover change data spanned 10 years (2001 - 2011) and the albedo data included observations every eight days for 13 years (2001 - 2013). Empirical testing was based on autoregressive time series analysis of snow free albedo for verified locations of land cover change. Approximately one-third of the autoregressive analyses for woody to herbaceous or forest to shrub change classes were not significant, indicating that albedo did not change significantly as a result of land cover change at these locations. In addition, ~ 80% of mean differences in albedo arising from land cover change were less than ± 0.02, a nominal benchmark for precision of albedo measurements that is related to significant changes in radiative forcing. Under snow free conditions, we found that land cover change does not guarantee a significant albedo response, and that the differences in mean albedo response for the majority of land cover change locations were small.

  2. Bipolar high temporal resolution measurements of snow UV albedo in Sodankylä and Marambio

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    Meinander, Outi; Kontu, Anna; Asmi, Eija; Sanchez, Ricardo; Mei, Miguel; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview of our high temporal resolution polar snow UV albedo data from Arctic Sodankylä, and from Marambio, Antarctica. These both are WMO GAW stations with many measurement parameters relevant to the albedo data usage. We will also describe our campaign based polar albedo data (SNORTEX and SOS campaigns), and an important data set of light absorbing impurities (BC) in the Arctic snow. The black carbon (BC) has been estimated to be the second most important human emission after carbon dioxide, in terms of its climate forcing in the present-day atmosphere. The reflectance effect of BC deposited on snow surface is the bigger the smaller the wavelength, i.e. the albedo effect of BC is the biggest at UV. This is also shown in SNICAR-model simulated albedo values. In Sodankylä, our bipolar snow ultraviolet (UV) albedo research started within the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. In 2007, the continuous Sodankylä snow UV albedo measurements were installed in Sodankylä, in the operational albedo field of the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Center (FMI-ARC). These Sodankylä 1-min data during snow time were soon compared with the German Antarctic Neumayer Station UV albedo data, also with the same sensor type. In both data we found an up to 10 % decrease in albedo as a function of time within a day, ranging from 0.77 to 0.67 in Sodankylä and from 0.96 to 0.86 in Neumeyer. Physical explanations to asymmetry were found for cases with high relative humidity and low surface temperature during the previous night, favorable to frost and higher albedo on the next morning; new snow on the previous night; snow melting during day time and refreezing during night. In Marambio, in the beginning of 2013, our new continuous Finnish-Argentinian co-operation snow UV albedo measurements were installed and started as part of a larger continuous meteorological and environmental instrumentation. These new UV radiation data

  3. Physical and Chemical Properties of Seasonal Snow and the Impacts on Albedo in New Hampshire, USA

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    Adolph, A. C.; Albert, M. R.; Amante, J.; Dibb, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Snow albedo is critical to surface energy budgets and thus to the timing of mid-winter and vernal melt events in seasonal snow packs. Timing of these melt events is important in predicting flooding, understanding plant and animal phenology, and the availability of winter recreational activity. The state of New Hampshire experiences large spatial and temporal variability in snow albedo as a result of differences in meteorological conditions, physical snow structure, and chemical impurities in the snow, particularly highly absorptive black carbon (BC) and dust particles. This work focuses on the winters of 2012-2013 and 2013-2014, comparing three intensive study sites. Data collected at these sites include sub-hourly meteorological data, near daily measurements of snow depth, snow density, surface IR temperature, specific surface area (SSA) from contact spectroscopy, and spectrally resolved snow albedo using an ASD FieldSpec4 throughout the winter season. Additionally, snow samples were analyzed for black carbon content and other chemical impurities including Cl-, NO3-, NH4 , K , Na , Mg2+ , Ca2+ and SO42-. For each storm event at the three intensive sites, moisture sources and paths were determined using HYPLIT back trajectory modeling to determine potential sources of black carbon and other impurities in the snow. Storms with terrestrial-based paths across the US Midwest and Canada resulted in higher BC content than storms with ocean-based paths and sources. In addition to the variable storm path between sites and between years, the second year of study was on average 2.5°C colder than the first year, impacting duration of snow cover at each site and the SSA of surface snow which is sensitive to frequency of snow events and relies on cold temperatures to reduce grain metamorphism. Combining an understanding of storm frequency and path with physical and chemical attributes of the snow allows us to investigate snow albedo sensitivities with implications for

  4. Observations and model simulations of snow albedo reduction in seasonal snow due to insoluble light-absorbing particles during 2014 Chinese survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Pu, Wei; Ren, Yong; Zhang, Xuelei; Zhang, Xueying; Shi, Jinsen; Jin, Hongchun; Dai, Mingkai; Chen, Quanliang

    2017-02-01

    A snow survey was carried out to collect 13 surface snow samples (10 for fresh snow, and 3 for aged snow) and 79 subsurface snow samples in seasonal snow at 13 sites across northeastern China in January 2014. A spectrophotometer combined with chemical analysis was used to quantify snow particulate absorption by insoluble light-absorbing particles (ILAPs, e.g., black carbon, BC; mineral dust, MD; and organic carbon, OC) in snow. Snow albedo was measured using a field spectroradiometer. A new radiative transfer model (Spectral Albedo Model for Dirty Snow, or SAMDS) was then developed to simulate the spectral albedo of snow based on the asymptotic radiative transfer theory. A comparison between SAMDS and an existing model - the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) - indicates good agreements in the model-simulated spectral albedos of pure snow. However, the SNICAR model values tended to be slightly lower than those of SAMDS when BC and MD were considered. Given the measured BC, MD, and OC mixing ratios of 100-5000, 2000-6000, and 1000-30 000 ng g-1, respectively, in surface snow across northeastern China, the SAMDS model produced a snow albedo in the range of 0.95-0.75 for fresh snow at 550 nm, with a snow grain optical effective radius (Reff) of 100 µm. The snow albedo reduction due to spherical snow grains assumed to be aged snow is larger than fresh snow such as fractal snow grains and hexagonal plate or column snow grains associated with the increased BC in snow. For typical BC mixing ratios of 100 ng g-1 in remote areas and 3000 ng g-1 in heavy industrial areas across northern China, the snow albedo for internal mixing of BC and snow is lower by 0.005 and 0.036 than that of external mixing for hexagonal plate or column snow grains with Reff of 100 µm. These results also show that the simulated snow albedos by both SAMDS and SNICAR agree well with the observed values at low ILAP mixing ratios but tend to be higher than surface observations at high ILAP

  5. Albedo Variations and Surface Energy Balance in Different Snow-Ice Media in Antarctica

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    V.D. Mishra

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study is aimed at investigating the radiation budget in different snow-ice media (shelf ice,continental ice and natural snow at three different elevated sites in the general area of Prince Astrid Coast of EastAntarctica. Measurements of the dependence of albedo in different snow and ice media on solar elevation angle,cloud cover, liquid water content, grain size, etc. can be interpreted in terms of single and multiple scatteringradiative transfer theory. Detailed albedo measurements were carried out during summer and winter in differentsnow and ice media in 1997-98 at different selected sites at Antarctica. The average albedo values were found to behigh (90 per cent in snow medium, moderate (83 per cent in shelf ice and very low (50 per cent in continentalice medium. The albedo was found to be a function of cloud amount, increasing with the amount and thickness. Inwhite-out condition during blizzards, high albedo (average 83 per cent was found as compared to clear sky day(76 per cent and after blizzard (average 78 per cent. It showed dependence on the type and age of snow also. Newsnowfall over old snow displayed higher values (90 per cent than older snow (70 per cent and decreased with theageof snow from 13- 16 per cent. Naturalmelt-water in snowpack increases from 1- 10 per cent, resulting in albedodecay from 7-10 per cent. As the minimum solar elevation angle in Antarctica goes to 3O, strong qualitativeanalyses have been ma e of the dependenceof albedo on the solar elevation angle. Albedo values showed diurnalhysteresis and m in values were found to be higher than evening values at the same angle of elevation. Thedependence was 4 sligh or solar elevations during day time when 0 % 12-IS0, but became larger with low angleswhen 8 = 3-12'. Solar insolations were also calculated for different months in order to calculate short waveradiation absorbed by snow and ice media. Insolations in different months at different selected sites lie

  6. Mixing of anthropogenic dust and carbonaceous aerosols in seasonal snow on snow albedo reduction in 2014 China survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Huang, Jianping; Pu, Wei

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic dusts produced from the affected by human activities derived from the industrial areas and carbonaceous aerosols (black carbon and organic carbon) deposited into snow or ice core via wet and dry deposition play key roles to the regional and global climate. Recently, a China survey was performed to measure the concentrations of insoluble light-absorbing particles (ILAP) in seasonal snow across northern China in January and February of 2014. The results indicate that the higher concentration of NO3- and SO42- and heavy metals of Zn, Pb, Cd, Ni, and Cu are likely to be attributed to enhanced local industrial emissions due to human activities. The emissions from fossil fuel combustion and biomass burning are likely to be important for the chemical elements in the seasonal snow with long-range transport, while medium enrichment factors of Mg, Ca, and Al were predominantly associated with soil dust, which is the most important natural source. There are large ranges of the BC and AD in seasonal snow over northeast China because of the anthropogenic emissions, which are caused by human activities. In addition, although the values of the snow albedo by model simulations are little higher in the visible to near-infrared wavelength than that during the China survey, the surface snow albedo by field campaign measurements have good agreement with the model simulations in the visible wavelength.

  7. Snow spectral albedo at Summit, Greenland: measurements and numerical simulations based on physical and chemical properties of the snowpack

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    C. M. Carmagnola

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The broadband albedo of surface snow is determined both by the near-surface profile of the physical and chemical properties of the snowpack and by the spectral and angular characteristics of the incident solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements of the physical and chemical properties of snow were carried out at Summit Camp, Greenland (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W, 3210 m a.s.l. in May and June 2011, along with spectral albedo measurements. One of the main objectives of the field campaign was to test our ability to predict snow spectral albedo by comparing the measured albedo to the albedo calculated with a radiative transfer model, using measured snow physical and chemical properties. To achieve this goal, we made daily measurements of the snow spectral albedo in the range 350–2200 nm and recorded snow stratigraphic information down to roughly 80 cm. The snow specific surface area (SSA was measured using the DUFISSS instrument (DUal Frequency Integrating Sphere for Snow SSA measurement, Gallet et al., 2009. Samples were also collected for chemical analyses including black carbon (BC and dust, to evaluate the impact of light absorbing particulate matter in snow. This is one of the most comprehensive albedo-related data sets combining chemical analysis, snow physical properties and spectral albedo measurements obtained in a polar environment. The surface albedo was calculated from density, SSA, BC and dust profiles using the DISORT model (DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer, Stamnes et al., 1988 and compared to the measured values. Results indicate that the energy absorbed by the snowpack through the whole spectrum considered can be inferred within 1.10%. This accuracy is only slightly better than that which can be obtained considering pure snow, meaning that the impact of impurities on the snow albedo is small at Summit. In the near infrared, minor deviations in albedo up to 0.014 can be due to the accuracy of radiation and SSA measurements and to

  8. Accuracy of physically based snow albedo model evaluated with measured data at Sapporo, Japan during five winters from 2006 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, T.; Kuchiki, K.; Niwano, M.; Kodama, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Physically based snow albedo model (PBSAM) to calculate broadband albedos and solar heating profile in a general circulation model was developed by Aoki et al. (2011), in which the accuracy for albedos was evaluated with the data of radiation budget and snow pit work performed at Sapporo during two winters from 2007 to 2009. The model calculates the broadband albedos for the visible, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave bands for any snow layer structure of snow grain size, snow impurity concentrations, and snow water equivalent under any solar illumination condition. The estimated root mean square errors (RMSE) from the measured data were 0.047 for the visible albedo and 0.057 for the NIR albedo. In the paper, it is described that possible error causes for calculated albedos are (1) PBSAM faultiness; (2) inappropriately modeled snow layers structure (e.g., number of layers and depths of layer boundaries); (3) the assumption that the diffuse fractions of the visible and NIR bands are the same as the measured diffuse fraction of the shortwave radiation; (4) errors in the measured snow grain size and snow impurity concentrations; and (5) errors in the albedo measurements. Using the data obtained at Sapporo during five winters from 2006 to 2011, we further investigated the effects of snow grain size, mass concentrations of snow impurities (black carbon and dust), air temperature, snow surface temperature, snow depth, diffuse fraction of solar radiation, continuous snow cover days, wet snow days, new snow days, ice layer days, and albedo values themselves on the accuracy of calculated albedos for each winter. Among them, the best (worst) RMSE value of calculated albedos by PBSAM for each winter during five winters is 2008-2009 (2010-2011) for the visible albedo and 2007-2008 (2006-2007) for the NIR albedos. The estimated RMSE for each winter have a high correlation with continuous snow cover days and wet snow days for each winter, meaning that PBSAM error may increase

  9. Comparison between Snow Albedo Obtained from Landsat TM, ETM+ Imagery and the SPOT VEGETATION Albedo Product in a Mediterranean Mountainous Site

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    Rafael Pimentel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Albedo plays an important role in snow evolution modeling quantifying the amount of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by the snowpack, especially in mid-latitude regions with semiarid conditions. Satellite remote sensing is the most extensive technique to determine the variability of snow albedo over medium to large areas; however, scale effects from the pixel size of the sensor source may affect the results of snow models, with different impacts depending on the spatial resolution. This work presents the evaluation of snow albedo values retrieved from (1 Landsat images, L (16-day frequency with 30 × 30 m pixel size and (2 SPOT VEGETATION albedo products, SV (10-day frequency with 1 × 1 km pixel size in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in South Spain, a Mediterranean site representative of highly heterogeneous conditions. Daily snow albedo map series were derived from both sources, and used as input for the snow module in the WiMMed (Watershed Integrated Management in Mediterranean Environment hydrological model, which was operational at the study area for snow monitoring for two hydrological years, 2011–2012 and 2012–2013, in the Guadalfeo river basin in Sierra Nevada. The results showed similar albedo trends in both data sources, but with different values, the shift between both sources being distributed in space according to the altitude. This difference resulted in lower snow cover fraction values in the SV-simulations that affected the rest of snow variables included in the simulation. This underestimation, mainly due to the effects of mixed pixels composed by both snow and snow-free areas, produced higher divergences from both sources during the melting periods when the evapo-sublimation and melting fluxes are more relevant. Therefore, the selection of the albedo data source in these areas, where snow evapo-sublimation plays a very important role and the presence of snow-free patches is very frequent, can condition the final

  10. Comparison of Snow Albedo from MISR, MODIS and AVHRR with ground-based observations on the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Nolin, A.

    2001-12-01

    The surface albedo is an important climate parameter, as it controls the amount of solar radiation absorbed by the surface. For snow-covered surfaces, the albedo may be greater than 0.80, thereby allowing very little solar energy to be absorbed by the snowpack. As the snow ages and/or begins to melt, the albedo is reduced considerably, leading to enhanced absorption of solar radiation. Consequently, snow melt, comprises an unstable, positive feedback component of the climate system, which amplifies small pertubations to that system. Satellite remote sensing offers a means for measuring and monitoring the surface albedo of snow-covered areas. This study evaluates snow surface albedo retrievals from MISR, MODIS and AVHRR through comparisons with surface albedo measurements obtained in Greenland. Data from automatic weather stations, in addition to other in situ data collected during 2000 provide the ground-based measurements with which to compare coincident clear-sky satellite albedo retrievals. In general, agreements are good with the satellite data. However, satellite calibration and difficulties accurately representing the angular signature of the snow surface make it difficult to reach an albedo accuracy within 0.05.

  11. NOAA NESDIS global automated satellite-based snow mapping system and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Accurate, timely and spatially detailed information on the snow cover distribution and on the snow pack properties is needed in various research and practical applications including numerical weather prediction, climate modeling, river runoff estimates and flood forecasts. Owing to the wide area coverage, high spatial resolution and short repeat cycle of observations satellites present one of the key components of the global snow and ice cover monitoring system. The Global Multisensor Automated Snow and Ice Mapping System (GMASI) has been developed at the request of NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) and NOAA National Ice Center (NIC) to facilitate NOAA operational monitoring of snow and ice cover and to provide information on snow and ice for use in NWP models. Since 2006 the system has been routinely generating daily snow and ice cover maps using combined observations in the visible/infrared and in the microwave from operational meteorological satellites. The output product provides continuous (gap free) characterization of the global snow and ice cover distribution at 4 km spatial resolution. The paper presents a basic description of the snow and ice mapping algorithms incorporated in the system as well as of the product generated with GMASI. It explains the approach used to validate the derived snow and ice maps and provides the results of their accuracy assessment.

  12. Snow Metamorphism and Albedo Process (SMAP) model for climate studies: Model validation using meteorological and snow impurity data measured at Sapporo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwano, Masashi; Aoki, Teruo; Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Hosaka, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We developed a multilayered physical snowpack model named Snow Metamorphism and Albedo Process (SMAP), which is intended to be incorporated into general circulation models for climate simulations. To simulate realistic physical states of snowpack, SMAP incorporates a state-of-the-art physically based snow albedo model, which calculates snow albedo and solar heating profile in snowpack considering effects of snow grain size and snow impurities explicitly. We evaluated the performance of SMAP with meteorological and snow impurities (black carbon and dust) input data measured at Sapporo, Japan during two winters: 2007-2008 and 2008-2009, and found SMAP successfully reproduced all observed variations of physical properties of snowpack for both winters. We have thus confirmed that SMAP is suitable for climate simulations. With SMAP, we also investigated the effects of snow impurities on snowmelt at Sapporo during the two winters. We found that snowpack durations at Sapporo were shortened by 19 days during the 2007-2008 winter and by 16 days during the 2008-2009 winter due to radiative forcings caused by snow impurities. The estimated radiative forcings due to snow impurities during the accumulation periods were 3.7 W/m2 (it corresponds to albedo reduction in 0.05) and 3.2 W/m2 (albedo reduction in 0.05) for the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 winters, respectively. While during the ablation periods they were 25.9 W/m2 (albedo reduction in 0.18) and 21.0 W/m2 (albedo reduction in 0.17) for each winter, respectively.

  13. Improving snow process modeling with satellite-based estimation of near-surface-air-temperature lapse rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Sun, Litao; Shrestha, Maheswor; Li, Xiuping; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Jing; Yang, Kun; Lu, Hui; Chen, Deliang

    2016-10-01

    In distributed hydrological modeling, surface air temperature (Tair) is of great importance in simulating cold region processes, while the near-surface-air-temperature lapse rate (NLR) is crucial to prepare Tair (when interpolating Tair from site observations to model grids). In this study, a distributed biosphere hydrological model with improved snow physics (WEB-DHM-S) was rigorously evaluated in a typical cold, large river basin (e.g., the upper Yellow River basin), given a mean monthly NLRs. Based on the validated model, we have examined the influence of the NLR on the simulated snow processes and streamflows. We found that the NLR has a large effect on the simulated streamflows, with a maximum difference of greater than 24% among the various scenarios for NLRs considered. To supplement the insufficient number of monitoring sites for near-surface-air-temperature at developing/undeveloped mountain regions, the nighttime Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer land surface temperature is used as an alternative to derive the approximate NLR at a finer spatial scale (e.g., at different elevation bands, different land covers, different aspects, and different snow conditions). Using satellite-based estimation of NLR, the modeling of snow processes has been greatly refined. Results show that both the determination of rainfall/snowfall and the snowpack process were significantly improved, contributing to a reduced summer evapotranspiration and thus an improved streamflow simulation.

  14. Impact of absorbing aerosol deposition on snow albedo reduction over the southern Tibetan plateau based on satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Liang; Liou, K. N.; He, Cenlin; Liang, Hsin-Chien; Wang, Tai-Chi; Li, Qinbin; Liu, Zhenxin; Yue, Qing

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the snow albedo variation in spring over the southern Tibetan Plateau induced by the deposition of light-absorbing aerosols using remote sensing data from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra satellite during 2001-2012. We have selected pixels with 100 % snow cover for the entire period in March and April to avoid albedo contamination by other types of land surfaces. A model simulation using GEOS-Chem shows that aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a good indicator for black carbon and dust deposition on snow over the southern Tibetan Plateau. The monthly means of satellite-retrieved land surface temperature (LST) and AOD over 100 % snow-covered pixels during the 12 years are used in multiple linear regression analysis to derive the empirical relationship between snow albedo and these variables. Along with the LST effect, AOD is shown to be an important factor contributing to snow albedo reduction. We illustrate through statistical analysis that a 1-K increase in LST and a 0.1 increase in AOD indicate decreases in snow albedo by 0.75 and 2.1 % in the southern Tibetan Plateau, corresponding to local shortwave radiative forcing of 1.5 and 4.2 W m-2, respectively.

  15. Spectral albedo of seasonal snow during intensive melt period at Sodankylä, beyond the Arctic Circle

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    O. Meinander

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We have measured spectral albedo, as well as ancillary parameters, of seasonal European Arctic snow at Sodankylä, Finland (67°22' N, 26°39' E. The springtime intensive melt period was observed during the Snow Reflectance Transition Experiment (SNORTEX in April 2009. The upwelling and downwelling spectral irradiance, measured at 290–550 nm with a double monochromator spectroradiometer, revealed albedo values of ~0.5–0.7 for the ultraviolet and visible range, both under clear sky and variable cloudiness. During the most intensive snowmelt period of four days, albedo decreased from 0.65 to 0.45 at 330 nm, and from 0.72 to 0.53 at 450 nm. In the literature, the UV and VIS albedo for clean snow are ~0.97–0.99, consistent with the extremely small absorption coefficient of ice in this spectral region. Our low albedo values were supported by two independent simultaneous broadband albedo measurements, and simulated albedo data. We explain the low albedo values to be due to (i large snow grain sizes up to ~3 mm in diameter; (ii meltwater surrounding the grains and increasing the effective grain size; (iii absorption caused by impurities in the snow, with concentration of elemental carbon (black carbon in snow of 87 ppb, and organic carbon 2894 ppb, at the time of albedo measurements. The high concentrations of carbon, detected by the thermal–optical method, were due to air masses originating from the Kola Peninsula, Russia, where mining and refining industries are located.

  16. Early Spring Post-Fire Snow Albedo Dynamics in High Latitude Boreal Forests Using Landsat-8 OLI Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuosen; Erb, Angela M.; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Sun, Qingsong; Liu, Yan; Yang, Yun; Shuai, Yanmin; Casey, Kimberly A.; Roman, Miguel O.

    2016-01-01

    Taking advantage of the improved radiometric resolution of Landsat-8 OLI which, unlike previous Landsat sensors, does not saturate over snow, the progress of fire recovery progress at the landscape scale (less than 100 m) is examined. High quality Landsat-8 albedo retrievals can now capture the true reflective and layered character of snow cover over a full range of land surface conditions and vegetation densities. This new capability particularly improves the assessment of post-fire vegetation dynamics across low- to high-burn severity gradients in Arctic and boreal regions in the early spring, when the albedos during recovery show the greatest variation. We use 30 m resolution Landsat-8 surface reflectances with concurrent coarser resolution (500 m) MODIS high quality full inversion surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Functions (BRDF) products to produce higher resolution values of surface albedo. The high resolution full expression shortwave blue sky albedo product performs well with an overall RMSE of 0.0267 between tower and satellite measures under both snow-free and snow-covered conditions. While the importance of post-fire albedo recovery can be discerned from the MODIS albedo product at regional and global scales, our study addresses the particular importance of early spring post-fire albedo recovery at the landscape scale by considering the significant spatial heterogeneity of burn severity, and the impact of snow on the early spring albedo of various vegetation recovery types. We found that variations in early spring albedo within a single MODIS gridded pixel can be larger than 0.6. Since the frequency and severity of wildfires in Arctic and boreal systems is expected to increase in the coming decades, the dynamics of albedo in response to these rapid surface changes will increasingly impact the energy balance and contribute to other climate processes and physical feedback mechanisms. Surface radiation products derived from Landsat-8 data will

  17. The effects of additional black carbon on Arctic sea ice surface albedo: variation with sea ice type and snow cover

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    A. A. Marks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon in sea ice will decrease sea ice surface albedo through increased absorption of incident solar radiation, exacerbating sea ice melting. Previous literature has reported different albedo responses to additions of black carbon in sea ice and has not considered how a snow cover may mitigate the effect of black carbon in sea ice. Sea ice is predominately snow covered. Visible light absorption and light scattering coefficients are calculated for a typical first year and multi-year sea ice and "dry" and "wet" snow types that suggest black carbon is the dominating absorbing impurity. The albedo response of first year and multi-year sea ice to increasing black carbon, from 1–1024 ng g−1, in a top 5 cm layer of a 155 cm thick sea ice was calculated using the radiative transfer model: TUV-snow. Sea ice albedo is surprisingly unresponsive to black carbon additions up to 100 ng g−1 with a decrease in albedo to 98.7% of the original albedo value due to an addition of 8 ng g−1 of black carbon in first year sea ice compared to an albedo decrease to 99.6% for the same black carbon mass ratio increase in multi-year sea ice. The first year sea ice proved more responsive to black carbon additions than the multi-year ice. Comparison with previous modelling of black carbon in sea ice suggests a more scattering sea ice environment will be less responsive to black carbon additions. Snow layers on sea ice may mitigate the effects of black carbon in sea ice. "Wet" and "dry" snow layers of 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm were added onto the sea ice surface and the snow surface albedo calculated with the same increase in black carbon in the underlying sea ice. Just a 0.5 cm layer of snow greatly diminishes the effect of black carbon on surface albedo, and a 2–5 cm layer (less than half the e-folding depth of snow is enough to "mask" any change in surface albedo owing to additional black carbon in sea ice, but not thick enough to ignore the underlying sea ice.

  18. Satellite Based Probabilistic Snow Cover Extent Mapping (SCE) at Hydro-Québec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, Mylène; De Sève, Danielle; Angers, Jean-François; Perreault, Luc

    2016-04-01

    Over 40% of Canada's water resources are in Quebec and Hydro-Quebec has developed potential to become one of the largest producers of hydroelectricity in the world, with a total installed capacity of 36,643 MW. The Hydro-Québec fleet park includes 27 large reservoirs with a combined storage capacity of 176 TWh, and 668 dams and 98 controls. Thus, over 98% of all electricity used to supply the domestic market comes from water resources and the excess output is sold on the wholesale markets. In this perspective the efficient management of water resources is needed and it is based primarily on a good river flow estimation including appropriate hydrological data. Snow on ground is one of the significant variables representing 30% to 40% of its annual energy reserve. More specifically, information on snow cover extent (SCE) and snow water equivalent (SWE) is crucial for hydrological forecasting, particularly in northern regions since the snowmelt provides the water that fills the reservoirs and is subsequently used for hydropower generation. For several years Hydro Quebec's research institute ( IREQ) developed several algorithms to map SCE and SWE. So far all the methods were deterministic. However, given the need to maximize the efficient use of all resources while ensuring reliability, the electrical systems must now be managed taking into account all risks. Since snow cover estimation is based on limited spatial information, it is important to quantify and handle its uncertainty in the hydrological forecasting system. This paper presents the first results of a probabilistic algorithm for mapping SCE by combining Bayesian mixture of probability distributions and multiple logistic regression models applied to passive microwave data. This approach allows assigning for each grid point, probabilities to the set of the mutually exclusive discrete outcomes: "snow" and "no snow". Its performance was evaluated using the Brier score since it is particularly appropriate to

  19. Satellite observations of changes in snow-covered land surface albedo during spring in the Northern Hemisphere

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    K. Atlaskina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Thirteen years of MODIS surface albedo data for the Northern Hemisphere during the spring months (March–May were analysed to determine temporal and spatial changes over snow-covered land surfaces. Tendencies in land surface albedo change north of 50° N were analysed using data on snow cover fraction, air temperature, vegetation index and precipitation. To this end, the study domain was divided into six smaller areas, based on their geographical position and climate similarity. Strong differences were observed between these areas. As expected, snow cover fraction (SCF has a strong influence on the albedo in the study area and can explain 56% of variation of albedo in March, 76% in April and 92% in May. Therefore the effects of other parameters were investigated only for areas with 100% SCF. The second largest driver for snow-covered land surface albedo changes is the air temperature when it exceeds −15 °C. At monthly mean air temperatures below this value no albedo changes are observed. Enhanced vegetation index (EVI and precipitation amount and frequency were independently examined as possible candidates to explain observed changes in albedo for areas with 100% SCF. Amount and frequency of precipitation were identified to influence the albedo over some areas in Eurasia and North America, but no clear effects were observed in other areas. EVI is positively correlated with albedo in Chukotka Peninsula and negatively in Eastern Siberia. For other regions the spatial variability of the correlation fields is too high to reach any conclusions.

  20. Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Lau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kodama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Present-day land surface models rarely account for the influence of both black carbon and dust in the snow on the snow albedo. Snow impurities increase the absorption of incoming shortwave radiation (particularly in the visible bands), whereby they have major consequences for the evolution of snowmelt and life cycles of snowpack. A new parameterization of these snow impurities was included in the catchment-based land surface model used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Earth Observing System version 5. Validation tests against in situ observed data were performed for the winter of 2003.2004 in Sapporo, Japan, for both the new snow albedo parameterization (which explicitly accounts for snow impurities) and the preexisting baseline albedo parameterization (which does not). Validation tests reveal that daily variations of snow depth and snow surface albedo are more realistically simulated with the new parameterization. Reasonable perturbations in the assigned snow impurity concentrations, as inferred from the observational data, produce significant changes in snowpack depth and radiative flux interactions. These findings illustrate the importance of parameterizing the influence of snow impurities on the snow surface albedo for proper simulation of the life cycle of snow cover.

  1. Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Lau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kodama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Present-day land surface models rarely account for the influence of both black carbon and dust in the snow on the snow albedo. Snow impurities increase the absorption of incoming shortwave radiation (particularly in the visible bands), whereby they have major consequences for the evolution of snowmelt and life cycles of snowpack. A new parameterization of these snow impurities was included in the catchment-based land surface model used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Earth Observing System version 5. Validation tests against in situ observed data were performed for the winter of 2003.2004 in Sapporo, Japan, for both the new snow albedo parameterization (which explicitly accounts for snow impurities) and the preexisting baseline albedo parameterization (which does not). Validation tests reveal that daily variations of snow depth and snow surface albedo are more realistically simulated with the new parameterization. Reasonable perturbations in the assigned snow impurity concentrations, as inferred from the observational data, produce significant changes in snowpack depth and radiative flux interactions. These findings illustrate the importance of parameterizing the influence of snow impurities on the snow surface albedo for proper simulation of the life cycle of snow cover.

  2. Case study of spatial and temporal variability of snow cover, grain size, albedo and radiative forcing in the Sierra Nevada and Rocky Mountain snowpack derived from imaging spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, Felix C.; Rittger, Karl; McKenzie Skiles, S.; Molotch, Noah P.; Painter, Thomas H.

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying the spatial distribution and temporal change in mountain snow cover, microphysical and optical properties is important to improve our understanding of the local energy balance and the related snowmelt and hydrological processes. In this paper, we analyze changes of snow cover, optical-equivalent snow grain size (radius), snow albedo and radiative forcing by light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) with respect to terrain elevation and aspect at multiple dates during the snowmelt period. These snow properties are derived from the NASA/JPL Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data from 2009 in California's Sierra Nevada and from 2011 in Colorado's Rocky Mountains, USA. Our results show a linearly decreasing snow cover during the ablation period in May and June in the Rocky Mountains and a snowfall-driven change in snow cover in the Sierra Nevada between February and May. At the same time, the snow grain size is increasing primarily at higher elevations and north-facing slopes from 200 microns to 800 microns on average. We find that intense snowmelt renders the mean grain size almost invariant with respect to elevation and aspect. Our results confirm the inverse relationship between snow albedo and grain size, as well as between snow albedo and radiative forcing by LAISI. At both study sites, the mean snow albedo value decreases from approximately 0.7 to 0.5 during the ablation period. The mean snow grain size increased from approximately 150 to 650 microns. The mean radiative forcing increases from 20 W m-2 up to 200 W m-2 during the ablation period. The variability of snow albedo and grain size decreases in general with the progression of the ablation period. The spatial variability of the snow albedo and grain size decreases through the melt season while the spatial variability of radiative forcing remains constant.

  3. Snow spectral albedo at Summit, Greenland: comparison between in situ measurements and numerical simulations using measured physical and chemical properties of the snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, C. M.; Domine, F.; Dumont, M.; Wright, P.; Strellis, B.; Bergin, M.; Dibb, J.; Picard, G.; Morin, S.

    2012-12-01

    The albedo of surface snow is determined both by the near-surface profile of the physical and chemical properties of the snowpack and by the spectral and angular characteristics of the incident solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements of the physical and chemical properties of snow were carried out at Summit Camp, Greenland (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W, 3210 m a.s.l.) in May and June 2011, along with spectral albedo measurements. One of the main objectives of the field campaign was to test our ability to predict snow albedo comparing measured snow spectral albedo to the albedo calculated with a radiative transfer model. To achieve this goal, we made daily measurements of the snow spectral albedo in the range 350-2200 nm and recorded snow stratigraphic information down to roughly 80 cm. The snow specific surface area (SSA) was measured using the DUFISSS instrument (DUal Frequency Integrating Sphere for Snow SSA measurement, Gallet et al., 2009). Samples were also collected for chemical analyses including black carbon (BC) and trace elements, to evaluate the impact of light absorbing particulate matter in snow. This is one of the most comprehensive albedo-related data sets combining chemical analysis, snow physical properties and spectral albedo measurements obtained in a polar environment. The surface albedo was calculated from density, SSA, BC and dust profiles using the DISORT model (DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer, Stamnes et al., 1988) and compared to the measured values. Results indicate that the energy absorbed by the snowpack through the whole spectrum considered can be inferred within 1.35%. This accuracy is only slightly better than that which can be obtained considering pure snow, meaning that the impact of impurities on the snow albedo is small at Summit. In the visible region, the discrepancies between measured and simulated albedo are mostly due to the lack of correction of the cosine collector deviation from a true cosine response. In the near

  4. Black carbon in snow in the upper Himalayan Khumbu Valley, Nepal: observations and modeling of the impact on snow albedo, melting, and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Jacobi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC in the snow in the Himalayas has recently attracted considerable interest due to its impact on snow albedo, snow and glacier melting, regional climate and water resources. A single particle soot photometer (SP2 instrument was used to measure refractory BC (rBC in a series of surface snow samples collected in the upper Khumbu Valley in Nepal between November 2009 and February 2012. The obtained time series indicates annual cycles with maximum concentration before the onset of the monsoon season and fast decreases in rBC during the monsoon period. Measured concentrations ranged from a few ppb up to 70 ppb rBC. However, due to the handling of the samples the measured concentrations possess rather large uncertainties. Detailed modeling of the snowpack including the measured range and an estimated upper limit of rBC concentrations was performed to study the role of BC in the seasonal snowpack. Simulations were performed for three winter seasons with the snowpack model Crocus including a detailed description of the radiative transfer inside the snowpack. While the standard Crocus model strongly overestimates the height and the duration of the seasonal snowpack, a better calculation of the snow albedo with the new radiative transfer scheme enhanced the representation of the snow. However, the period with snow on the ground neglecting BC in the snow was still over-estimated between 37 and 66 days, which was further diminished by 8 to 15% and more than 40% in the presence of 100 or 300 ppb of BC. Compared to snow without BC the albedo is on average reduced by 0.027 and 0.060 in the presence of 100 and 300 ppb BC. While the impact of increasing BC in the snow on the albedo was largest for clean snow, the impact on the local radiative forcing is the opposite. Here, increasing BC caused an even larger impact at higher BC concentrations. This effect is related to an accelerated melting of the snowpack caused by a more efficient metamorphism

  5. Analysis of Snow Line and Albedo Conditions By Means of Time-Lapse Photography on Tapado Glacier, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivero, S.; MacDonell, S.; McPhee, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    In the semiarid Coquimbo Region of Chile, high-altitude glaciers and seasonal snow are important sources of freshwater for irrigated agriculture and urban consumption. Due to the aridity of the environment, losses due to sublimation are large which means that accurate melt modelling is essential in order to reliably estimate streamflow. Since 2008, the CEAZA glaciology group has been studying the energy and mass balance of the largest glacier in the catchment, the Tapado Glacier using field and remote sensing measurements, and numerical modelling. The Tapado glacier system (30°08' S, 69°55' W) is a complex assemblage of uncovered and debris-covered ice located at the head of the Elqui basin between 4500 and 5536 m a.s.l. Energy balance modelling studies at the site have been limited in scope due to the development of ice pinnacles or penitentes on snow and ice surfaces. These features complicate energy distribution across the surface, due to modifications of parameters such as albedo. In this paper, we use time-lapse photography and automatic weather station (AWS) measurements to investigate how the development of penitentes impacts the spatial and temporal variability of albedo across the glacier surface and whether terrestrial photography is appropriate for use at such locations. Oblique photographs obtained from a high vantage point were georeferenced using a high resolution digital elevation model available for the entire glacier and its environs. By comparing the photographic data with point albedo measurements made at an AWS, distributed albedo maps were produced. Preliminary results suggest that distributed albedo values may be underestimated by the formation and development of penitentes during the ablation season. Moreover, it was observed that the evolution of the snow line during summer was not only topographically controlled but also modified by occasional convective snowfalls. Time-lapse photography provided to be a cost-effective tool for monitoring

  6. An Algorithm for the Retrieval of 30-m Snow-Free Albedo from Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new methodology to generate 30-m resolution land surface albedo using Landsat surface reflectance and anisotropy information from concurrent MODIS 500-m observations. Albedo information at fine spatial resolution is particularly useful for quantifying climate impacts associated with land use change and ecosystem disturbance. The derived white-sky and black-sky spectral albedos maybe used to estimate actual spectral albedos by taking into account the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. A further spectral-to-broadband conversion based on extensive radiative transfer simulations is applied to produce the broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated using 270 Landsat scenes covering six field stations supported by the SURFace RADiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM/SGP) network. Comparison with field measurements shows that Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave albedos from all seasons generally achieve an absolute accuracy of +/-0.02 - 0.05 for these validation sites during available clear days in 2003-2005,with a root mean square error less than 0.03 and a bias less than 0.02. This level of accuracy has been regarded as sufficient for driving global and regional climate models. The Landsat-based retrievals have also been compared to the operational 16-day MODIS albedo produced every 8-days from MODIS on Terra and Aqua (MCD43A). The Landsat albedo provides more detailed landscape texture, and achieves better agreement (correlation and dynamic range) with in-situ data at the validation stations, particularly when the stations include a heterogeneous mix of surface covers.

  7. Analysis of Light Absorbing Aerosols in Northern Pakistan: Concentration on Snow/Ice, their Source Regions and Impacts on Snow Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gul, C.; Praveen, P. S.; Shichang, K.; Adhikary, B.; Zhang, Y.; Ali, S.

    2016-12-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) and light absorbing organic carbon (OC) are important particulate impurities in snow and ice which significantly reduce the albedo of glaciers and accelerate their melting. Snow and ice samples were collected from Karakorum-Himalayan region of North Pakistan during the summer campaign (May-Jun) 2015 and only snow samples were collected during winter (Dec 2015- Jan 2016). Total 41 surface snow/ice samples were collected during summer campaign along different elevation ranges (2569 to 3895 a.m.s.l) from six glaciers: Sachin, Henarche, Barpu, Mear, Gulkin and Passu. Similarly 18 snow samples were collected from Sust, Hoper, Tawas, Astore, Shangla, and Kalam regions during the winter campaign. Quartz filters were used for filtering of melted snow and ice samples which were then analyzed by thermal optical reflectance (TOR) method to determine the concentration of EC and OC. The average concentration of EC (ng/g), OC (ng/g) and dust (ppm) were found as follows: Passu (249.5, 536.8, 475), Barpu (1190, 397.6, 1288), Gulkin (412, 793, 761), Sachin (911, 2130, 358), Mear (678, 2067, 83) and Henarche (755, 1868, 241) respectively during summer campaign. Similarly, average concentration of EC (ng/g), OC (ng/g) and dust (ppm) was found in the samples of Sust (2506, 1039, 131), Hoper (646, 1153, 76), Tawas (650, 1320, 16), Astore (1305, 2161, 97), Shangla (739, 2079, 31) and Kalam (107, 347, 5) respectively during winter campaign. Two methods were adopted to identify the source regions: one coupled emissions inventory with back trajectories, second with a simple region tagged chemical transport modeling analysis. In addition, CALIPSO subtype aerosol composition indicated that frequency of smoke in the atmosphere over the region was highest followed by dust and then polluted dust. SNICAR model was used to estimate the snow albedo reduction from our in-situ measurements. Snow albedo reduction was observed to be 0.3% to 27.6%. The derived results were used

  8. Airborne LiDAR and hyperspectral mapping of snow depth and albedo in the Upper Colorado River Basin, Colorado, USA by the NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deems, J. S.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Operational hydrologic simulation and forecasting in snowmelt-dominated watersheds currently relies on indices of snow accumulation and melt from measurements at a small number of point locations or geographically-limited manual surveys. These data sources cannot adequately characterize the spatial distribution of snow depth/water equivalent, which is the primary determinant of snowpack volume and runoff rates. The NASA JPL Airborne Snow Observatory's airborne laser scanning system maps snow depth at high spatial and temporal resolutions, and is paired with a hyperspectral imager to provide an unprecedented snowpack monitoring capability and enabling a new operational paradigm. We present the initial results from this new application of multi-temporal LiDAR and hyperspectral mapping. During the snowmelt seasons of 2013 and 2014, the ASO mapped snow depth and albedo in the Uncompahgre River Basin in Colorado's Upper Colorado River Basin on a nominally monthly basis. These products enable an assessment and comparison of spatial snow accumulation and melt processes in two years with very different snowmelt hydrographs.

  9. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-&t...

  10. Effect of land cover change on snow free surface albedo across the continental United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Land cover changes (e.g., forest to grassland) affect albedo, and changes in albedo can influence radiative forcing (warming, cooling). We empirically tested albedo response to land cover change for 130 locations across the continental United States using high resolution (30 m-&t...

  11. Evaluation of MODIS Albedo Product (MCD43A) over Grassland, Agriculture and Forest Surface Types During Dormant and Snow-Covered Periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhousen; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Strahler, Alan H.; Chopping, Mark J.; Roman, Miguel O.; Shuai, Yanmin; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Hollinger, David Y.; Fitzjarrald, David R.

    2013-01-01

    This study assesses the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/albedo 8 day standard product and products from the daily Direct Broadcast BRDF/albedo algorithm, and shows that these products agree well with ground-based albedo measurements during the more difficult periods of vegetation dormancy and snow cover. Cropland, grassland, deciduous and coniferous forests are considered. Using an integrated validation strategy, analyses of the representativeness of the surface heterogeneity under both dormant and snow-covered situations are performed to decide whether direct comparisons between ground measurements and 500-m satellite observations can be made or whether finer spatial resolution airborne or spaceborne data are required to scale the results at each location. Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM +) data are used to generate finer scale representations of albedo at each location to fully link ground data with satellite data. In general, results indicate the root mean square errors (RMSEs) are less than 0.030 over spatially representative sites of agriculture/grassland during the dormant periods and less than 0.050 during the snow-covered periods for MCD43A albedo products. For forest, the RMSEs are less than 0.020 during the dormant period and 0.025 during the snow-covered periods. However, a daily retrieval strategy is necessary to capture ephemeral snow events or rapidly changing situations such as the spring snow melt.

  12. The effects of additional black carbon on the albedo of Arctic sea ice: variation with sea ice type and snow cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Marks

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of the albedo of bare sea ice and snow-covered sea ice to the addition of black carbon is calculated. Visible light absorption and light-scattering cross-sections are derived for a typical first-year and multi-year sea ice with both "dry" and "wet" snow types. The cross-sections are derived using data from a 1970s field study that recorded both reflectivity and light penetration in Arctic sea ice and snow overlying sea ice. The variation of absorption cross-section over the visible wavelengths suggests black carbon is the dominating light-absorbing impurity. The response of first-year and multi-year sea ice albedo to increasing black carbon, from 1 to 1024 ng g−1, in a top 5 cm layer of a 155 cm-thick sea ice was calculated using a radiative-transfer model. The albedo of the first-year sea ice is more sensitive to additional loadings of black carbon than the multi-year sea ice. An addition of 8 ng g−1 of black carbon causes a decrease to 98.7% of the original albedo for first-year sea ice compared to a decrease to 99.7% for the albedo of multi-year sea ice, at a wavelength of 500 nm. The albedo of sea ice is surprisingly unresponsive to additional black carbon up to 100 ng g−1 . Snow layers on sea ice may mitigate the effects of black carbon in sea ice. Wet and dry snow layers of 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm depth were added onto the sea ice surface. The albedo of the snow surface was calculated whilst the black carbon in the underlying sea ice was increased. A layer of snow 0.5 cm thick greatly diminishes the effect of black carbon in sea ice on the surface albedo. The albedo of a 2–5 cm snow layer (less than the e-folding depth of snow is still influenced by the underlying sea ice, but the effect of additional black carbon in the sea ice is masked.

  13. Suppression of the water ice and snow albedo feedback on planets orbiting red dwarf stars and the subsequent widening of the habitable zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Manoj M; Haberle, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    M stars comprise 80% of main sequence stars, so their planetary systems provide the best chance for finding habitable planets, that is, those with surface liquid water. We have modeled the broadband albedo or reflectivity of water ice and snow for simulated planetary surfaces orbiting two observed red dwarf stars (or M stars), using spectrally resolved data of Earth's cryosphere. The gradual reduction of the albedos of snow and ice at wavelengths greater than 1 μm, combined with M stars emitting a significant fraction of their radiation at these same longer wavelengths, means that the albedos of ice and snow on planets orbiting M stars are much lower than their values on Earth. Our results imply that the ice/snow albedo climate feedback is significantly weaker for planets orbiting M stars than for planets orbiting G-type stars such as the Sun. In addition, planets with significant ice and snow cover will have significantly higher surface temperatures for a given stellar flux if the spectral variation of cryospheric albedo is considered, which in turn implies that the outer edge of the habitable zone around M stars may be 10-30% farther away from the parent star than previously thought.

  14. Incorporation of the Mass Concentration and the New Snow Albedo Schemes into the Global Forecasting Model, GEOS-5 and the Impact of the New Schemes over Himalayan Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei

    2012-01-01

    Recently the issue on glacier retreats comes up and many factors should be relevant to the issue. The absorbing aerosols such as dust and black carbon (BC) are considered to be one of the factors. After they deposited onto the snow surface, it will reduce snow albedo (called snow darkening effect) and probably contribute to further melting of glacier. The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) has developed at NASA/GSFC. However, the original snowpack model used in the land surface model in the GEOS-5 did not consider the snow darkening effect. Here we developed the new snow albedo scheme which can consider the snow darkening effect. In addition, another scheme on calculating mass concentrations on the absorbing aerosols in snowpack was also developed, in which the direct aerosol depositions from the chemical transport model in the GEOS-5 were used. The scheme has been validated with the observed data obtained at backyard of the Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, by Dr. Teruo Aoki (Meteorological Research Institute) et aL including me. The observed data was obtained when I was Ph.D. candidate. The original GEOS-5during 2007-2009 over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau region showed more reductions of snow than that of the new GEOS-5 because the original one used lower albedo settings. On snow cover fraction, the new GEOS-5 simulated more realistic snow-covered area comparing to the MODIS snow cover fraction. The reductions on snow albedo, snow cover fraction, and snow water equivalent were seen with statistically significance if we consider the snow darkening effect comparing to the results without the snow darkening effect. In the real world, debris cover, inside refreezing process, surface flow of glacier, etc. affect glacier mass balance and the simulated results immediately do not affect whole glacier retreating. However, our results indicate that some surface melting over non debris covered parts of the glacier would be

  15. Expanded science and management utllity of SWE and albedo data from the NASA/JPL Airborne Snow Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T. H.; Deems, J. S.; Marks, D. G.; Hedrick, A. R.; Bormann, K.; Skiles, S. M.; Boardman, J. W.; Graham, C. B.; McGurk, B. J.; Gehrke, F.; Berisford, D. F.; Ferraz, A.; Saatchi, S.; Schimel, D.

    2016-12-01

    The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and imaging LiDAR system, to quantify snow water equivalent and snow albedo, provide unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete, robust inputs to snowmelt runoff models, water management models, and systems of the future. This talk presents results from the fourth year of the ASO program, 2016, and the now four years of data record in the Western United States. Following on the heels of the most intense, sustained drought in California history, 2016 held promise of a large snowfall year due to an intense El Nino anomaly. Ultimately, the year had approximately 85% of average peak SWE. In the Sierra Nevada, ASO measured 10x greater SWE than near peak in the dramatic 2015 drought year, and twice that of the more moderate drought year of 2013. Water managers in the Sierra were using these data regularly and extending the dynamic range of newly established relationships between accumulated runoff (circa April through July runoff) and ASO total basin SWE acquisitions. ASO also participated in the NASA OLYMPEX project by flying the entire snow-covered reghions of the Olympic Peninsula for distributed SWE. These data are now being used to validate snowfall estimates from modeling and accumulation patterns as inferred from the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM). The ASO snow program expanded to acquire data in the McKenzie and Deschutes Rivers of Oregon in participation with university and state/federal agencies; Sagehen and Lee Vining basins in the Sierra Nevada, California; the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in Idaho; and the East River, in the Colorado River Basin. These regions extend the existing program flying the Tuolumne, Merced, Lakes, Rush Creek, and Middle+South Forks of Kings River Basins in the California Sierra Nevada and the Upper Rio Grande, Conejos, and Uncompahgre Basins in the Colorado Rocky Mountains.The ASO SWE and albedo data are now being

  16. Changing Climate Sensitivity in Response to Forest-Tundra Snow Albedo Feedback during the mid to late Pliocene Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiewonsky, P.

    2015-12-01

    The forest-tundra snow albedo feedback is an important feedback in Earth's climate system, especially due to its potential role in modulating glacial cycles. Until now, little research has been done on how the strength of this feedback might vary with the background climate state. Over the last 4 million years, I hypothesize that the feedback has been generally weaker under warm Northern Hemispheric conditions when tundra has been primarily confined to the high Arctic and forest has extended to most of the Arctic coastline than under cooler Northern Hemispheric conditions in which the forest-tundra boundary has generally lain to the south, extending across the interiors of the large continental land masses. To test the hypothesis of the weakened/strengthened feedback, I used an Earth System Model of Intermediate Complexity that consists of a dynamic terrestrial vegetation model coupled to a climate model. A set of time-slice experiments with different orbital and greenhouse gas concentrations were analyzed. In one set of experiments, the feedback gain with respect to annual average top-of-atmosphere net short wave radiation due to vegetation was 1.42 for modern conditions but only 1.14 for the mid-Pliocene. Additionally, we compared experiments with different shortwave-radiation parameterizations, which differed in the amount of shortwave energy flux reaching the surface (and subsequently affecting vegetative biomass). These techniques allowed us to isolate the mechanisms responsible for the varying strength of the forest-tundra snow albedo feedback. The results also show that many factors affect the strength of feedback. In this presentation I will concentrate on the availability of land for conversion of forest to tundra (and vice versa), cloud cover near the forest-tundra boundary, and the integrated surface insolation contrast between tundra and forest during the snow-covered season.

  17. Suppression of the water ice and snow albedo feedback on planets orbiting red dwarf stars and the subsequent widening of the habitable zone

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, M

    2012-01-01

    M-stars comprise 80% of main-sequence stars, and so their planetary systems provide the best chance for finding habitable planets, i.e.: those with surface liquid water. We have modelled the broadband albedo or reflectivity of water ice and snow for simulated planetary surfaces orbiting two observed red dwarf stars (or M-stars) using spectrally resolved data of the Earth's cryosphere. The gradual reduction of the albedos of snow and ice at wavelengths greater than 1 ?m, combined with M-stars emitting a significant fraction of their radiation at these same longer wavelengths, mean that the albedos of ice and snow on planets orbiting M-stars are much lower than their values on Earth. Our results imply that the ice/snow albedo climate feedback is significantly weaker for planets orbiting M-stars than for planets orbiting G-type stars such as the Sun. In addition, planets with significant ice and snow cover will have significantly higher surface temperatures for a given stellar flux if the spectral variation of c...

  18. The price of snow: albedo valuation and a case study for forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, David A.; Howarth, Richard B.

    2015-06-01

    Several climate frameworks have included the role of carbon storage in natural landscapes as a potential mechanism for climate change mitigation. This has resulted in an incentive to grow and maintain intact long-lived forest ecosystems. However, recent research has suggested that the influence of albedo-related radiative forcing can impart equal and in some cases greater magnitudes of climate mitigation compared to carbon storage in forests where snowfall is common and biomass is slow-growing. While several methodologies exist for relating albedo-associated radiative forcing to carbon storage for the analysis of the tradeoffs of these ecosystem services, they are varied, and they have yet to be contrasted in a case study with implications for future forest management. Here we utilize four methodologies for calculating a shadow price for albedo radiative forcing and apply the resulting eight prices to an ecological and economic forest model to examine the effects on optimal rotation periods on two different forest stands in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire, USA. These pricing methodologies produce distinctly different shadow prices of albedo, varying from a high of 9.36 × 10-4 and a low of 1.75 × 10-5 w-1yr-1 in the initial year, to a high of 0.019 and a low of 3.55 × 10-4 w-1yr-1 in year 200 of the simulation. When implemented in the forest model, optimal rotation periods also varied considerably, from a low of 2 to a high of 107 years for a spruce-fir stand and from 35 to 80 years for a maple-beech-birch stand. Our results suggest that the choice of climate metrics and pricing methodologies for use with forest albedo alter albedo prices considerably, may substantially adjust optimal rotation period length, and therefore may have consequences with respect to forest land cover change.

  19. The Airborne Snow Observatory: fusion of scanning lidar, imaging spectrometer, and physically-based modeling for mapping snow water equivalent and snow albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow cover and its melt dominate regional climate and water resources in many of the world’s mountainous regions. Snowmelt timing and magnitude in mountains tend to be controlled by absorption of solar radiation and snow water equivalent, respectively, and yet both of these are very poorly known ev...

  20. Narrowband-to-broadband albedo conversion for glacier ice and snow: equations based on modeling and ranges of validity of the equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuell, W.; Oerlemans, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose equations for narrowband-to-broadband (NTB) albedo conversion for glacier ice and snow for four types of satellite sensors: thematic mapper (TM), advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), and multi-angle imaging

  1. Estimated impact of black carbon deposition during pre-monsoon season from Nepal Climate Observatory – Pyramid data and snow albedo changes over Himalayan glaciers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Yasunari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The possible minimal range of reduction in snow surface albedo due to dry deposition of black carbon (BC in the pre-monsoon period (March–May was estimated as a lower bound together with the estimation of its accuracy, based on atmospheric observations at the Nepal Climate Observatory – Pyramid (NCO-P sited at 5079 m a.s.l. in the Himalayan region. A total BC deposition rate was estimated as 2.89 μg m−2 day−1 providing a total deposition of 266 μg m−2 for March–May at the site, based on a calculation with a minimal deposition velocity of 1.0×10−4 m s−1 with atmospheric data of equivalent BC concentration. Main BC size at NCO-P site was determined as 103.1–669.8 nm by correlation analyses between equivalent BC concentration and particulate size distributions in the atmosphere. The BC deposition from the size distribution data was also estimated. It was found that 8.7% of the estimated dry deposition corresponds to the estimated BC deposition from equivalent BC concentration data. If all the BC is deposited uniformly on the top 2-cm pure snow, the corresponding BC concentration is 26.0–68.2 μg kg−1, assuming snow density variations of 195–512 kg m−3 of Yala Glacier close to NCO-P site. Such a concentration of BC in snow could result in 2.0–5.2% albedo reductions. By assuming these albedo reductions continue throughout the year, and then applying simple numerical experiments with a glacier mass balance model, we estimated reductions would lead to runoff increases of 70–204 mm of water. This runoff is the equivalent of 11.6–33.9% of the annual discharge of a typical Tibetan glacier. Our estimates of BC concentration in snow surface for pre-monsoon season is comparable to those at similar altitudes in the Himalayan region, where glaciers and perpetual snow regions begin, in the vicinity of NCO-P. Our estimates from only BC are likely to

  2. Snow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    小雅

    2011-01-01

    雪花,雪花,白又凉。雪花,雪花,来了又走。啊,雪花!你去哪儿?我不知道,我不知道,飘到哪儿。%Snow, snow, White and cold. Snow, snow, Come and go. Oh, snow! Where do you go? I don't know, I don't know. Where I go.

  3. Vertical profile of the specific surface area and density of the snow at Dome C and on a transect to Dumont D'Urville, Antarctica – albedo calculations and comparison to remote sensing products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Gallet

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The specific surface area (SSA of snow determines in part the albedo of snow surfaces and the capacity of the snow to adsorb chemical species and catalyze reactions. Despite these crucial roles, almost no value of snow SSA are available for the largest permanent snow expanse on Earth, the Antarctic. We report the first extensive study of vertical profiles of snow SSA near Dome C (DC: 75°06' S, 123°20' E, 3233 m a.s.l. on the Antarctic plateau, and at seven sites during the logistical traverse between Dome C and the French coastal base Dumont D'Urville (DDU: 66°40' S, 140°01' E during the Austral summer 2008–2009. We used the DUFISSS system, which measures the IR reflectance of snow at 1310 nm with an integrating sphere. At DC, the mean SSA of the snow in the top 1 cm is 38 m2 kg−1, decreasing monotonically to 14 m2 kg−1 at a depth of 50 cm. Along the traverse, the snow SSA profile is similar to that at DC in the first 600 km from DC. Closer to DDU, the SSA of the top 5 cm is 23 m2 kg−1, decreasing to 19 m2 kg−1 at 50 cm depth. This difference is attributed to wind, which causes a rapid decrease of surface snow SSA, but forms hard windpacks whose SSA decrease more slowly with time. Since light-absorbing impurities are not concentrated enough to affect albedo, the vertical profiles of SSA and density were used to calculate the spectral albedo of the snow for several realistic illumination conditions, using the DISORT radiative transfer model. A preliminary comparison with MODIS data is presented and our calculations and MODIS data show similar trends.

  4. Preliminary Estimation of Black Carbon Deposition from Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid Data and Its Possible Impact on Snow Albedo Changes Over Himalayan Glaciers During the Pre-Monsoon Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, T. J.; Bonasoni, P.; Laj, P.; Fujita, K.; Vuillermoz, E.; Marinoni, A.; Cristofanelli, P.; Duchi, R.; Tartari, G.; Lau, K.-M.

    2010-01-01

    The possible minimal range of reduction in snow surface albedo due to dry deposition of black carbon (BC) in the pre-monsoon period (March-May) was estimated as a lower bound together with the estimation of its accuracy, based on atmospheric observations at the Nepal Climate Observatory-Pyramid (NCO-P) sited at 5079 m a.s.l. in the Himalayan region. We estimated a total BC deposition rate of 2.89 g m-2 day-1 providing a total deposition of 266 micrograms/ square m for March-May at the site, based on a calculation with a minimal deposition velocity of 1.0 10(exp -4) m/s with atmospheric data of equivalent BC concentration. Main BC size at NCO-P site was determined as 103.1-669.8 nm by correlation analysis between equivalent BC concentration and particulate size distribution in the atmosphere. We also estimated BC deposition from the size distribution data and found that 8.7% of the estimated dry deposition corresponds to the estimated BC deposition from equivalent BC concentration data. If all the BC is deposited uniformly on the top 2-cm pure snow, the corresponding BC concentration is 26.0-68.2 microgram/kg assuming snow density variations of 195-512 kg/ cubic m of Yala Glacier close to NCO-P site. Such a concentration of BC in snow could result in 2.0-5.2% albedo reductions. From a simple numerical calculations and if assuming these albedo reductions continue throughout the year, this would lead to a runoff increases of 70-204 mm of water drainage equivalent of 11.6-33.9% of the annual discharge of a typical Tibetan glacier. Our estimates of BC concentration in snow surface for pre-monsoon season can be considered comparable to those at similar altitude in the Himalayan region, where glaciers and perpetual snow region starts in the vicinity of NCO-P. Our estimates from only BC are likely to represent a lower bound for snow albedo reductions, since a fixed slower deposition velocity was used and atmospheric wind and turbulence effects, snow aging, dust deposition

  5. Advancing Glaciological Applications of Remote Sensing with EO-1: (1) Mapping Snow Grain Size and Albedo on the Greenland Ice Sheet Using an Imaging Spectrometer, and (2) ALI Evaluation for Subtle Surface Topographic Mapping via Shape-from Shading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The Hyperion sensor, onboard NASA's Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite,is an imaging spectroradiometer with 220 spectral bands over the spectral range from 0.4 - 2.5 microns. Over the course of summer 2001, the instrument acquired numerous images over the Greenland ice sheet. Our main motivation is to develop an accurate and robust approach for measuring the broadband albedo of snow from satellites. Satellite-derived estimates of broadband have typically been plagued with three problems: errors resulting from inaccurate atmospheric correction, particularly in the visible wavelengths from the conversion of reflectance to albedo (accounting for snow BRDE); and errors resulting from regression-based approaches used to convert narrowband albedo to broadband albedo. A typerspectral method has been developed that substantially reduces these three main sources of error and produces highly accurate estimates of snow albedo. This technique uses hyperspectral data from 0.98 - 1.06 microns, spanning a spectral absorption feature centered at 1.03 microns. A key aspect of this work is that this spectral range is within an atmospheric transmission window and reflectances are largely unaffected by atmospheric aerosols, water vapor, or ozone. In this investigation, we make broadband albedo measurements at four sites on the Greenland ice sheet: Summit, a high altitude station in central Greenland; the ETH/CU camp, a camp on the equilibrium line in western Greenland; Crawford Point, a site located between Summit and the ETH/CU camp; and Tunu, a site located in northeastern Greenland at 2000 m. altitude. Each of these sites has an automated weather station (AWS) that continually measures broadband albedo thereby providing validation data.

  6. Estimation of black carbon deposition from particulate data in the atmosphere at NCO-P site in Himalayas during pre-monsoon season and its implication to snow surface albedo reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, T. J.; Bonasoni, P.; Laj, P.; Fujita, K.; Vuillermoz, E.; Marinoni, A.; Cristofanelli, P.; Calzolari, F.; Duchi, R.; Tartari, G.; Lau, W. K.

    2009-12-01

    The black carbon (BC) impact on snow surface may contribute to snow melting and acceleration of glacier retreat. The BC deposition amount onto snow surface in 2006 during pre-monsoon season (March-May) was estimated from the observed equivalent BC (eqBC) concentration (MAAP) and aerosol size distribution observation (SMPS and OPC) in the atmosphere at Nepal Climate Observatory at Pyramid (NCO-P) site in Himalayan region. We, first, carried out correlation analyses in time series data between the eqBC and aerosol size distribution and then determined main eqBC size range here as higher correlations coefficient of more than 0.8. The corresponding eqBC size at NCO-P site was determined predominantly in the 103.1-669.8 nm size range. Simply terminal velocity for each particle size bin was used for calculating deposition flux of BC onto surface. Our estimation of the deposition is considered to be minimal estimation because deposition velocity is in general faster if we include aerodynamic and other terms; moreover we didn’t take into account deposition processes other than gravitational deposition. We estimated the BC deposition of 209 µg m-2 for March-May. If we use snow density variations in surface snow of 192-512 kg m-3, as measured at Yala glacier in Himalayas, the BC concentrations in 2-cm surface snow of 20.4-53.6 µg kg-1 is estimated. This leads to a snow albedo reduction of 1.6-4.1% by using regression relationship between BC concentration in snow and snow albedo reductions by previous studies. If we used the values of the albedo reductions as continuous forcing for a sensitivity test of glacier melting by using a mass-balance model with the same initial settings in a previous study (pointed out for Dongkemadi Glaciers in Tibetan region), increase of total melt water runoff of 54-149 mm w.e. is expected. We are aware of the limitation of this preliminary estimate but it is important to consider that it clearly indicates that BC deposition during March

  7. An Approach for the Long-Term 30-m Land Surface Snow-Free Albedo Retrieval from Historic Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS-based A Priori Anisotropy Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.; He, Tao

    2014-01-01

    respectively with that from the "concurrent" approach and the coincident MODIS operational surface albedo products. Using the tower measurements as reference, the derived Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave broadband albedo yields an absolute accuracy of 0.02 with a root mean square error less than 0.016 and a bias of no more than 0.007. A further cross-comparison over individual scenes shows that the retrieved white sky shortwave albedo from the "pre-MODIS era" LUT approach is highly consistent (R(exp 2) = 0.988, the scene-averaged low RMSE = 0.009 and bias = -0.005) with that generated by the earlier "concurrent" approach. The Landsat albedo also exhibits more detailed landscape texture and a wider dynamic range of albedo values than the coincident 500-m MODIS operational products (MCD43A3), especially in the heterogeneous regions. Collectively, the "pre-MODIS" LUT and "concurrent" approaches provide a practical way to retrieve long-term Landsat albedo from the historic Landsat archives as far back as the 1980s, as well as the current Landsat-8 mission, and thus support investigations into the evolution of the albedo of terrestrial biomes at fine resolution.

  8. Snow, ice and solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    The snow-covered ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland reflect most of the incoming solar radiation. The reflectivity, commonly called the albedo, of snow on these ice sheets has been observed to vary in space and time. In this thesis, temporal and spatial changes in snow albedo is found to depend

  9. Snow, ice and solar radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers Munneke, P.

    2009-01-01

    The snow-covered ice sheets of Antarctica and Greenland reflect most of the incoming solar radiation. The reflectivity, commonly called the albedo, of snow on these ice sheets has been observed to vary in space and time. In this thesis, temporal and spatial changes in snow albedo is found to depend

  10. Spatial and Temporal Distribution and Trend of Snow Albedo Changes in the Source Region of the Yangtze River in Last Decade Based on MODIS%基于MODIS的长江源近10年积雪反照率时空分布及动态变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴雪娇; 鲁安新; 王丽红; 张华伟

    2013-01-01

    利用EOS-MODIS卫星的积雪反照率数据和一元线性回归法分析2001~2010年长江源区积雪反照率的分布及变化趋势.结果表明:①长江源区积雪季积雪反照率空间分布差异大.冰川区是积雪反照率高值中心(0.67~0.91),长江源东部地区是低值中心(0.15~0.48).②积雪反照率空间分布四季变化明显,峰值出现在次年1月份.③长江源区近10a积雪季平均积雪反照率在高海拔区和冰川区增大比较显著(0.001 2/a).与积雪面积和积雪季降雪量变化呈显著正相关;而源区夏季各月积雪反照率有明显降低趋势,与夏季温度的变暖趋势呈正反馈关系.%Albedo determines surface absorption capability for the solar radiation and impacts the surface radiation balance. The albedo on snow and ice is higher comparing other surfaces, and the absorption of energy from the sun is little on an ice or snow field. Monitoring and researching snow and ice albedo characteristics and variation are necessary to provide accurate data and the theoretical basis for hydrological process research of snow and ice. EOS-MODIS satellite data of snow albedo (MOD10A1 on Level3)were used in the article to analyze the regional and seasonal distribution of snow albedo, as well as the inter-annual trends in the source region of the Changjiang River from 2001 to 2010 using softwares such as ArcGIS and ENVI. Based on the meteorological data of 3 stations on the source region of the Changjiang River from 2000 to 2010, the basic features of temporal changes of temperature and precipitation were investigated. The results show that: 1) Snow albedo were different with space distribution in the snow season in the source region of the Yangtze River. The snow albedo was high on the northern source region of the Yangtze River and on the southwest of the source region of the Changjiang River with 0.67 to 0.91, respectively, whereas part of the east of the source region of the Changjiang River

  11. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43C2 BRDF-Albedo Snow-Free Quality 16-Day L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  12. Neutron Albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatovich, V K

    2005-01-01

    A new, algebraic, method is applied to calculation of neutron albedo from substance to check the claim that use of ultradispersive fuel and moderator of an active core can help to gain in size and mass of the reactor. In a model of isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons it is shown that coherent scattering on separate grains in the case of thermal neutrons increases transport cross section negligibly, however it decreases albedo from a wall of finite thickness because of decrease of substance density. A visible increase of albedo takes place only for neutrons with wave length of the order of the size of a single grain.

  13. Albedo decline on Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher in a warming climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Malmros, Jeppe K.; Yde, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    Albedo is one of the parameters that govern energy availability for snow and ice surface ablation, and subsequently the surface mass balance conditions of temperate glaciers and ice caps (GIC). Here, we document snow and ice albedo changes for Mittivakkat Gletscher (MG) in Southeast Greenland (20.......10. The greatest decline in albedo, of 0.25, occurred near the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), an important surface cover and albedo transitional zone. The EBY albedo correlates significantly with ELA and net winter and summer glacier mass balance records....

  14. Satellite Observations of Desert Dust-induced Himalayan Snow Darkening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Ritesh; Hsu, N. Christina; Lau, William K.-M.; Yasunari, Teppei J.

    2013-01-01

    The optically thick aerosol layer along the southern edge of the Himalaya has been subject of several recent investigations relating to its radiative impacts on the South Asian summer monsoon and regional climate forcing. Prior to the onset of summer monsoon, mineral dust from southwest Asian deserts is transported over the Himalayan foothills on an annual basis. Episodic dust plumes are also advected over the Himalaya, visible as dust-laden snow surface in satellite imagery, particularly in western Himalaya. We examined spectral surface reflectance retrieved from spaceborne MODIS observations that show characteristic reduction in the visible wavelengths (0.47 nm) over western Himalaya, associated with dust-induced solar absorption. Case studies as well as seasonal variations of reflectance indicate a significant gradient across the visible (0.47 nm) to near-infrared (0.86 nm) spectrum (VIS-NIR), during premonsoon period. Enhanced absorption at shorter visible wavelengths and the resulting VIS-NIR gradient is consistent with model calculations of snow reflectance with dust impurity. While the role of black carbon in snow cannot be ruled out, our satellite-based analysis suggests the observed spectral reflectance gradient dominated by dust-induced solar absorption during premonsoon season. From an observational viewpoint, this study underscores the importance of mineral dust deposition toward darkening of the western Himalayan snow cover, with potential implications to accelerated seasonal snowmelt and regional snow albedo feedbacks.

  15. Inversion of the MODIS snow abundance ratio based on NDSI-Albedo feature space%基于NDSI-Albedo特征空间的MODIS积雪丰度信息反演方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙永猛; 丁建丽; 瞿娟

    2013-01-01

    积雪是新疆地区重要的水源补给,是冰冻和融雪洪水灾害的直接原因,也是水资源管理、气候变化、灾害防治和融雪模拟预报的主要参数.针对多种积雪信息提取方法的优缺点,提出运用特征空间方法,构建积雪丰度反演模型,并与支持向量机提取积雪丰度进行精度对比分析,NA模型方法的相关系数(R2)值比支持向量机方法高2.4百分点,而均方根误差(RMSE)提高了0.106.结果表明:利用归一化差分积雪指数(NDSI)和反照率(Albedo)建立二维特征空间反演积雪丰度的方法是可行的,并且提取精度优于支持向量机(SVM)方法.因此,该方法对水资源管理、气候变化以及洪水模拟预测等方面的研究具有一定参考意义.%As one of the most important surface water resources in Xinjiang,accumulated snow (snowcover) plays an irreplaceable role in sustainable economic and social development.And it is also an important factor affecting the ground water resource management,climate change,disaster prevention and snowmelt simulation forecast.While the snowcover area is the main parameters of accumulated snow,as well as one of the main input parameters for water management,climate change and snowmelt flood simulation and prediction research.At present,the access to snowcover area is via the image data's NDSI obtained from Landsat TM and MODIS,mixed pixel decomposition or direct application of MODIS snowcover products MOD 10A2 data.However,the applicability of the various ways in different locations varies.Snowcover abundance represents the pixel within the snowcover content,so the improvement of snowcover abundance extraction accuracy can promote snowcover classification accuracy increases,thereby increasing the extraction accuracy of the snowcover area.For the problem of the fluctuation of snowcover the normalized difference snowcover index (NDSI) values (usually 0.4) for different locations,this paper introduces Albedo which is

  16. Albedo evolution of seasonal Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Polashenski, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    There is an ongoing shift in the Arctic sea ice cover from multiyear ice to seasonal ice. Here we examine the impact of this shift on sea ice albedo. Our analysis of observations from four years of field experiments indicates that seasonal ice undergoes an albedo evolution with seven phases; cold snow, melting snow, pond formation, pond drainage, pond evolution, open water, and freezeup. Once surface ice melt begins, seasonal ice albedos are consistently less than albedos for multiyear ice resulting in more solar heat absorbed in the ice and transmitted to the ocean. The shift from a multiyear to seasonal ice cover has significant implications for the heat and mass budget of the ice and for primary productivity in the upper ocean. There will be enhanced melting of the ice cover and an increase in the amount of sunlight available in the upper ocean.

  17. Snow specific surface area simulation using the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS)

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Snow grain size is a key parameter for modeling microwave snow emission properties and the surface energy balance because of its influence on the snow albedo, thermal conductivity and diffusivity. A model of the specific surface area (SSA) of snow was implemented in the one-layer snow model in the Canadian LAnd Surface Scheme (CLASS) version 3.4. This offline multilayer model (CLASS-SSA) simulates the decrease of SSA based on snow age, snow temperature and t...

  18. The biogeography of red snow microbiomes and their role in melting arctic glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Stefanie; Anesio, Alexandre M.; Raiswell, Rob; Edwards, Arwyn; Newton, Rob J.; Gill, Fiona; Benning, Liane G.

    2016-06-01

    The Arctic is melting at an unprecedented rate and key drivers are changes in snow and ice albedo. Here we show that red snow, a common algal habitat blooming after the onset of melting, plays a crucial role in decreasing albedo. Our data reveal that red pigmented snow algae are cosmopolitan as well as independent of location-specific geochemical and mineralogical factors. The patterns for snow algal diversity, pigmentation and, consequently albedo, are ubiquitous across the Arctic and the reduction in albedo accelerates snow melt and increases the time and area of exposed bare ice. We estimated that the overall decrease in snow albedo by red pigmented snow algal blooms over the course of one melt season can be 13%. This will invariably result in higher melt rates. We argue that such a `bio-albedo' effect has to be considered in climate models.

  19. Soot on snow experiment: bidirectional reflectance factor measurements of contaminated snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. I. Peltoniemi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to quantify the effects of absorbing contaminants on snow, a series of spectral reflectance measurements were conducted. Chimney soot, volcanic sand, and glaciogenic silt were deposited on a natural snow surface in a controlled way as a part of the Soot on Snow (SoS campaign. The bidirectional reflectance factors of these soiled surfaces and untouched snow were measured using the Finnish Geodetic Institute's Field Goniospectropolariradiometer, FIGIFIGO. A remarkable feature is the fact that the absorbing contaminants on snow enhanced in our experiments the metamorphosis of snow under strong sunlight. Immediately after deposition, the contaminated snow surface appeared darker than the pure snow in all viewing directions, but the absorbing particles sank deep into the snow in minutes. The nadir measurement remained the darkest, but at larger zenith angles the surface of the contaminated snow changed back to almost as white as clean snow. Thus, for a ground observer the darkening caused by impurities can be completely invisible, overestimating the albedo, but a nadir observing satellite sees the darkest points, now underestimating the albedo. By a reciprocity argument, we predict, that at noon the albedo should be lower than in the morning or afternoon. When sunlight stimulates sinking more than melting, the albedo should be higher in the afternoon than in the morning, and vice versa when melting dominates. However, differences in the hydrophobic properties, porosity, clumping, or size of the impurities may cause different results than observed in these measurements.

  20. Soot on Snow experiment: bidirectional reflectance factor measurements of contaminated snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoniemi, J. I.; Gritsevich, M.; Hakala, T.; Dagsson-Waldhauserová, P.; Arnalds, Ó.; Anttila, K.; Hannula, H.-R.; Kivekäs, N.; Lihavainen, H.; Meinander, O.; Svensson, J.; Virkkula, A.; de Leeuw, G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to quantify the effects of absorbing contaminants on snow, a series of spectral reflectance measurements were conducted. Chimney soot, volcanic sand, and glaciogenic silt were deposited on a natural snow surface in a controlled way as a part of the Soot on Snow (SoS) campaign. The bidirectional reflectance factors of these soiled surfaces and untouched snow were measured using the Finnish Geodetic Institute's Field Goniospectropolariradiometer, FIGIFIGO. A remarkable feature is the fact that the absorbing contaminants on snow enhanced the metamorphism of snow under strong sunlight in our experiments. Immediately after deposition, the contaminated snow surface appeared darker than the natural snow in all viewing directions, but the absorbing particles sank deep into the snow in minutes. The nadir measurement remained the darkest, but at larger zenith angles, the surface of the contaminated snow changed back to almost as white as clean snow. Thus, for a ground observer the darkening caused by impurities can be completely invisible, overestimating the albedo, but a nadir-observing satellite sees the darkest points, underestimating the albedo. Through a reciprocity argument, we predict that at noon, the albedo perturbation should be lower than in the morning or afternoon. When sunlight stimulates sinking more than melting, the albedo should be higher in the afternoon than in the morning, and vice versa when melting dominates. However, differences in the hydrophobic properties, porosity, clumping, or size of the impurities may cause different results than observed in these measurements.

  1. 14 CFR 141.91 - Satellite bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Satellite bases. 141.91 Section 141.91... OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 141.91 Satellite bases. The holder of a... assistant chief instructor is designated for each satellite base, and that assistant chief instructor...

  2. Snow on Antarctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massom, Robert A.; Eicken, Hajo; Hass, Christian; Jeffries, Martin O.; Drinkwater, Mark R.; Sturm, Matthew; Worby, Anthony P.; Wu, Xingren; Lytle, Victoria I.; Ushio, Shuki; Morris, Kim; Reid, Phillip A.; Warren, Stephen G.; Allison, Ian

    2001-08-01

    Snow on Antarctic sea ice plays a complex and highly variable role in air-sea-ice interaction processes and the Earth's climate system. Using data collected mostly during the past 10 years, this paper reviews the following topics: snow thickness and snow type and their geographical and seasonal variations; snow grain size, density, and salinity; frequency of occurrence of slush; thermal conductivity, snow surface temperature, and temperature gradients within snow; and the effect of snow thickness on albedo. Major findings include large regional and seasonal differences in snow properties and thicknesses; the consequences of thicker snow and thinner ice in the Antarctic relative to the Arctic (e.g., the importance of flooding and snow-ice formation); the potential impact of increasing snowfall resulting from global climate change; lower observed values of snow thermal conductivity than those typically used in models; periodic large-scale melt in winter; and the contrast in summer melt processes between the Arctic and the Antarctic. Both climate modeling and remote sensing would benefit by taking account of the differences between the two polar regions.

  3. Climatic Benefit of Swiss Forest Cover Change: Including Albedo Change into Net Carbon Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwaab, J.; Lehning, M.; Bebi, P.

    2012-12-01

    Forests influence climate through physical, chemical and biological processes. It has been shown that warming caused by the comparatively low albedo of forests (albedo-effect), can reduce or even exceed cooling caused by carbon storage in forests (CO2-effect). Although warming caused by albedo and the amount of carbon storage depend on local characteristics, studies are lacking that investigate the combined local patterns of albedo and CO2-effect. Our study area, Switzerland, provides a variety of geographical features and thus the possibility to show how different geographical variables influence the two effects. We used the concept of radiative forcing to compare the effect of a changing albedo and a change in atmospheric CO2 concentration due to land cover change in the past. The change of forest cover was analysed over a period of 12 years based on aerial photographs. We estimate the albedo-effect by combining albedo data derived from the satellite sensor MODIS and data on snow cover derived from the satellite sensor AVHRR. Changes in carbon storage were calculated as differences in biomass and soil stocks of specific land cover classes. We found carbon storage induced cooling to be higher than albedo induced warming everywhere in Switzerland. However, especially in altitudes over 1200 m the albedo-effect reduced the benefits of carbon storage by more than 50%. In lower altitudes the albedo change was less important. The albedo-effect in altitudes above 1200 m was more relevant because of a more persistent snow-cover, a slightly higher global radiation and less additional carbon storage. The relevance of warming caused by an albedo change did not only depend on altitude, but also on the characteristics of forest cover change. While transitions from open land to open forest were accompanied by high albedo changes, the albedo change was only marginal if open forest turned into closed forest. Since snow cover has a large influence on the albedo effect, we included

  4. A Simple Method to Determine the Timing of Snow Melt by Remote Sensing with Application to the CO2 Balances of Northern Mire and Heath Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terhikki Manninen

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The timing of the disappearance of the snow cover in spring, or snow melt day (SMD, is a key parameter controlling the carbon dioxide balance between the northern mire and heath ecosystems and the atmosphere. We present a simple method for the determination of the SMD using a satellite-based surface albedo product (SAL. The method is based on the local change of albedo from higher wintertime values towards the lower summertime values. The satellite SMD timing correlates well with the SMD determined from snow depth measurements at Finnish weather stations (r = 0.86, slope 1.05. In 50% of the cases the error was 3.4 days or less and bias less than half a day. This would lead to a moderate uncertainty in the annual CO2 balance of mire and heath ecosystems, if the published SMD—CO2 balance relations are valid. However, due to the limited data sets available a systematic validation is left for the future.

  5. CHARACTERISTICS OF VEGETATION COVER, ROUGHNESS AND ALBEDO DISTRIBUTION OVER CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张正秋; 周秀骥; 李维亮; 徐兴奎

    2001-01-01

    To build land surface dataset for climate model, with application of remote sensing technique as well as the Geographic Information System (GIS), the data of surface type, roughness and albedo over China in 1997 were retrieved, resolutions being 10 km× 10 km. Based on these data,an analysis is conducted on the geographic distributions and seasonal variations of surface vegetation cover and roughness as well as albedo over China. Results show that surface vegetation cover is mainly located to the south of Yangtze River, in Southwest and Northeast China and sparse vegetation cover is in the Northwest. The variation of land surface cover affects the variations of land surface roughness and albedo. High albedo occurred in the north of Xinjiang Autonomous Region, the north of Northeast China and the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau in winter, in correspondence with the location of snow cover.For most part of China, surface roughness decreases and albedo increases in winter, while the roughness increases and the albedo decreases in summer, which could mainly result from land surface cover (snow cover and vegetation cover) and soil moisture changes. This shows that the geographic distribution and seasonal variation of the albedo are alnost opposite to those of the roughness, in agreement with theoretical results. Temporally, the amplitude of surface roughness change is quite small in comparison with the roughness itself.

  6. Changes in the Albedo of the Pegasus and Phoenix Runways, 2000-2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-18

    albedo, increase solar energy absorption in the ice shelf, and significantly alter the energy balance, resulting in in- creased melting , snow density...a snow or ice surface also lowers the surface albedo, increasing solar energy absorp- tion. This increased energy uptake can initiate melting of the...further reducing pavement strength and promoting more melting . To prevent or delay reaching the melt tipping point, it is critical to maintain the

  7. The reflectance characteristics of snow covered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batten, E. S.

    1979-01-01

    Data analysis techniques were developed to most efficiently use available satellite measurements to determine and understand components of the surface energy budget for ice and snow-covered areas. The emphasis is placed on identifying the important components of the heat budget related to snow surfaces, specifically the albedo and the energy consumed in the melting process. Ice and snow charts are prepared by NOAA from satellite observations which map areas into three relative reflectivity zones. Field measurements are analyzed of the reflectivity of an open snow field to assist in the interpretation of the NOAA reflectivity zones.

  8. Satellite-Based Quantum Communications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Richard J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nordholt, Jane E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; McCabe, Kevin P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newell, Raymond T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Peterson, Charles G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-20

    Single-photon quantum communications (QC) offers the attractive feature of 'future proof', forward security rooted in the laws of quantum physics. Ground based quantum key distribution (QKD) experiments in optical fiber have attained transmission ranges in excess of 200km, but for larger distances we proposed a methodology for satellite-based QC. Over the past decade we have devised solutions to the technical challenges to satellite-to-ground QC, and we now have a clear concept for how space-based QC could be performed and potentially utilized within a trusted QKD network architecture. Functioning as a trusted QKD node, a QC satellite ('QC-sat') could deliver secret keys to the key stores of ground-based trusted QKD network nodes, to each of which multiple users are connected by optical fiber or free-space QC. A QC-sat could thereby extend quantum-secured connectivity to geographically disjoint domains, separated by continental or inter-continental distances. In this paper we describe our system concept that makes QC feasible with low-earth orbit (LEO) QC-sats (200-km-2,000-km altitude orbits), and the results of link modeling of expected performance. Using the architecture that we have developed, LEO satellite-to-ground QKD will be feasible with secret bit yields of several hundred 256-bit AES keys per contact. With multiple ground sites separated by {approx} 100km, mitigation of cloudiness over any single ground site would be possible, potentially allowing multiple contact opportunities each day. The essential next step is an experimental QC-sat. A number of LEO-platforms would be suitable, ranging from a dedicated, three-axis stabilized small satellite, to a secondary experiment on an imaging satellite. to the ISS. With one or more QC-sats, low-latency quantum-secured communications could then be provided to ground-based users on a global scale. Air-to-ground QC would also be possible.

  9. Land Surface Albedos Computed from BRF Measurements with a Study of Conversion Formulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aku Riihelä

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Land surface hemispherical albedos of several targets have been resolved using the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF library of the Finnish Geodetic Institute (FGI. The library contains BRF data measured by FGI during the years 2003–2009. Surface albedos are calculated using selected BRF datasets from the library. Polynomial interpolation and extrapolation have been used in computations. Several broadband conversion formulae generally used for satellite based surface albedo retrieval have been tested. The albedos were typically found to monotonically increase with increasing zenith angle of the Sun. The surface albedo variance was significant even within each target category / surface type. In general, the albedo estimates derived using diverse broadband conversion formulas and estimates obtained by direct integration of the measured spectra were in line.

  10. Strength of forest-albedo feedback in mid-Holocene climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Otto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of the mid-Holocene climate, 6000 years before present, suggest that spring temperatures were higher at high northern latitudes compared to the pre-industrial period. A positive feedback between expansion of forest and climate presumably contributed to this warming. In the presence of snow, forests have a lower albedo than grass land. Therefore, the expansion of forest likely favoured a warming in spring, counteracting the lower insolation at the mid-Holocene.

    We investigate the sensitivity of the vegetation-atmosphere interaction under mid-Holocene orbital forcing with respect to the strength of the forest-albedo feedback by using a comprehensive coupled atmosphere-vegetation model (ECHAM5/JSBACH. We perform two sets of model simulations: a first set of simulations with a relatively weak reduction of albedo of snow by forest; and a second set of simulations with a relatively strong reduction of the albedo of snow by forest.

    We show that the parameterisation of the albedo of snow leads to uncertainties in the temperature signal. Compared to the set with weak snow masking, the simulations with strong snow masking reveal a spring warming that is three times higher, by 0.34 °C north of 60° N. This warming is related to a forest expansion of only 13%.

  11. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  12. ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, S; Gaustad, K; Long, C; Mlawer, E

    2011-07-15

    This document describes the input requirements, output data products, and methodology for the Spectral Surface Albedo (SURFSPECALB) value-added product (VAP). The SURFSPECALB VAP produces a best-estimate near-continuous high spectral resolution albedo data product using measurements from multifilter radiometers (MFRs). The VAP first identifies best estimates for the MFR downwelling and upwelling shortwave irradiance values, and then calculates narrowband spectral albedo from these best-estimate irradiance values. The methodology for finding the best-estimate values is based on a simple process of screening suspect data and backfilling screened and missing data with estimated values when possible. The resulting best-estimate MFR narrowband spectral albedos are used to determine a daily surface type (snow, 100% vegetation, partial vegetation, or 0% vegetation). For non-snow surfaces, a piecewise continuous function is used to estimate a high spectral resolution albedo at 1 min temporal and 10 cm-1 spectral resolution.

  13. Operational snow mapping with simplified data assimilation using the seNorge snow model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saloranta, Tuomo M.

    2016-07-01

    Frequently updated maps of snow conditions are useful for many applications, e.g., for avalanche and flood forecasting services, hydropower energy situation analysis, as well as for the general public. Numerical snow models are often applied in snow map production for operational hydrological services. However, inaccuracies in the simulated snow maps due to model uncertainties and the lack of suitable data assimilation techniques to correct them in near-real time may often reduce the usefulness of the snow maps in operational use. In this paper the revised seNorge snow model (v.1.1.1) for snow mapping is described, and a simplified data assimilation procedure is introduced to correct detected snow model biases in near real-time. The data assimilation procedure is theoretically based on the Bayesian updating paradigm and is meant to be pragmatic with modest computational and input data requirements. Moreover, it is flexible and can utilize both point-based snow depth and satellite-based areal snow-covered area observations, which are generally the most common data-sources of snow observations. The model and analysis codes as well as the "R" statistical software are freely available. All these features should help to lower the challenges and hurdles hampering the application of data-assimilation techniques in operational hydrological modeling. The steps of the data assimilation procedure (evaluation, sensitivity analysis, optimization) and their contribution to significantly increased accuracy of the snow maps are demonstrated with a case from eastern Norway in winter 2013/2014.

  14. User requirements for satellite snow data service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolberg, S.; Standley, A.; Hiltbrunner, D.; Hallikainen, M.

    1997-12-31

    This report discusses the answers given by ten users or potential users of remotely sensed snow data when asked about their data needs and present measurements, their requirements for remote sensing data and potential of using such, and the models or other analysis tools in which the information is used. The answers show both consensus and differences among the respondents` use of snow data and requirements for remote sensing snow products. For water resources planning and management, the most important variable is snow water equivalent, with acceptable errors around 10%. Acceptable spatial error is typically in the range of 200 m to 1 km. For flood forecasting and short-term runoff simulation, snow covered area is more important, with a classification of 5 to 8 steps being generally sufficient. Meteorologists tend to focus on albedo and snow coverage data, with 5% steps desired for albedo. Geometric resolution and accuracy is less important, temporal resolution and delivery time is more important than in water resource management. For avalanche use, most snow variables except water equivalent are important, several in depth profiles. Spatial and temporal requirements are high. In all user groups there is a desire for models which can use measured values quantitatively. Today, measured snow information is largely interpreted manually and subjectively and lead to actions based on experience and judgement. The organizing of measurements, simulations and calibrated sub-models with varying uncertainty levels is partly a conceptual problem, partly a software problem. 1 ref.

  15. A statistics-based temporal filter algorithm to map spatiotemporally continuous shortwave albedo from MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Liu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Land-surface albedo plays a critical role in the earth's radiant energy budget studies. Satellite remote sensing provides an effective approach to acquire regional and global albedo observations. Owing to cloud coverage, seasonal snow and sensor malfunctions, spatiotemporally continuous albedo datasets are often inaccessible. The Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS project aims at providing a suite of key land surface parameter datasets with high temporal resolution and high accuracy for a global change study. The GLASS preliminary albedo datasets are global daily land-surface albedo generated by an angular bin algorithm (Qu et al., 2013. Like other products, the GLASS preliminary albedo datasets are affected by large areas of missing data; beside, sharp fluctuations exist in the time series of the GLASS preliminary albedo due to data noise and algorithm uncertainties. Based on the Bayesian theory, a statistics-based temporal filter (STF algorithm is proposed in this paper to fill data gaps, smooth albedo time series, and generate the GLASS final albedo product. The results of the STF algorithm are smooth and gapless albedo time series, with uncertainty estimations. The performance of the STF method was tested on one tile (H25V05 and three ground stations. Results show that the STF method has greatly improved the integrity and smoothness of the GLASS final albedo product. Seasonal trends in albedo are well depicted by the GLASS final albedo product. Compared with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS product, the GLASS final albedo product has a higher temporal resolution and more competence in capturing the surface albedo variations. It is recommended that the quality flag should be always checked before using the GLASS final albedo product.

  16. Snow hydrology in a general circulation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Susan; Roads, John O.; Glatzmaier, Gary

    1994-01-01

    A snow hydrology has been implemented in an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). The snow hydrology consists of parameterizations of snowfall and snow cover fraction, a prognostic calculation of snow temperature, and a model of the snow mass and hydrologic budgets. Previously, only snow albedo had been included by a specified snow line. A 3-year GCM simulation with this now more complete surface hydrology is compared to a previous GCM control run with the specified snow line, as well as with observations. In particular, the authors discuss comparisons of the atmospheric and surface hydrologic budgets and the surface energy budget for U.S. and Canadian areas. The new snow hydrology changes the annual cycle of the surface moisture and energy budgets in the model. There is a noticeable shift in the runoff maximum from winter in the control run to spring in the snow hydrology run. A substantial amount of GCM winter precipitation is now stored in the seasonal snowpack. Snow cover also acts as an important insulating layer between the atmosphere and the ground. Wintertime soil temperatures are much higher in the snow hydrology experiment than in the control experiment. Seasonal snow cover is important for dampening large fluctuations in GCM continental skin temperature during the Northern Hemisphere winter. Snow depths and snow extent show good agreement with observations over North America. The geographic distribution of maximum depths is not as well simulated by the model due, in part, to the coarse resolution of the model. The patterns of runoff are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to observed patterns of streamflow averaged over the continental United States. The seasonal cycles of precipitation and evaporation are also reasonably well simulated by the model, although their magnitudes are larger than is observed. This is due, in part, to a cold bias in this model, which results in a dry model atmosphere and enhances the hydrologic cycle everywhere.

  17. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumont

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps. The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the root mean square deviation (RMSD between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000–2009 of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snow line is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snow line is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally

  18. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M.; Gardelle, J.; Sirguey, P.; Guillot, A.; Six, D.; Rabatel, A.; Arnaud, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps). The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the root mean square deviation (RMSD) between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000-2009) of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface) observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snow line is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snow line is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally low albedo

  19. [The research of the relationship between snow properties and the bidirectional polarized reflectance from snow surface].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zhong-Qiu; Wu, Zheng-Fang; Zhao, Yun-Sheng

    2014-10-01

    In the context of remote sensing, the reflectance of snow is a key factor for accurate inversion for snow properties, such as snow grain size, albedo, because of it is influenced by the change of snow properties. The polarized reflectance is a general phenomenon during the reflected progress in natural incident light In this paper, based on the correct measurements for the multiple-angle reflected property of snow field in visible and near infrared wavelength (from 350 to 2,500 nm), the influence of snow grain size and wet snow on the bidirectional polarized property of snow was measured and analyzed. Combining the results measured in the field and previous conclusions confirms that the relation between polarization and snow grain size is obvious in infrared wavelength (at about 1,500 nm), which means the degree of polarization increasing with an increase of snow grain size in the forward scattering direction, it is because the strong absorption of ice near 1,500 nm leads to the single scattering light contributes to the reflection information obtained by the sensor; in other word, the larger grain size, the more absorption accompanying the larger polarization in forward scattering direction; we can illustrate that the change from dry snow to wet snow also influences the polarization property of snow, because of the water on the surface of snow particle adheres the adjacent particles, that means the wet snow grain size is larger than the dry snow grain size. Therefore, combining the multiple-angle polarization with reflectance will provide solid method and theoretical basis for inversion of snow properties.

  20. Greenland ice sheet albedo feedback: thermodynamics and atmospheric drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Box

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Greenland ice sheet mass loss has accelerated in the past decade responding to combined glacier discharge and surface melt water runoff increases. During summer, absorbed solar energy, modulated at the surface primarily by albedo, is the dominant factor governing surface melt variability in the ablation area. Using satellite-derived surface albedo with calibrated regional climate modeled surface air temperature and surface downward solar irradiance, we determine the spatial dependence and quantitative impact of the ice sheet albedo feedback over 12 summer periods beginning in 2000. We find that, while albedo feedback defined by the change in net solar shortwave flux and temperature over time is positive over 97% of the ice sheet, when defined using paired annual anomalies, a second-order negative feedback is evident over 63% of the accumulation area. This negative feedback damps the accumulation area response to warming due to a positive correlation between snowfall and surface air temperature anomalies. Positive anomaly-gauged feedback concentrated in the ablation area accounts for more than half of the overall increase in melting when satellite-derived melt duration is used to define the timing when net shortwave flux is sunk into melting. Abnormally strong anticyclonic circulation, associated with a persistent summer North Atlantic Oscillation extreme since 2007, enabled three amplifying mechanisms to maximize the albedo feedback: (1 increased warm (south air advection along the western ice sheet increased surface sensible heating that in turn enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, further reducing albedo; (2 increased surface downward shortwave flux, leading to more surface heating and further albedo reduction; and (3 reduced snowfall rates sustained low albedo, maximizing surface solar heating, progressively lowering albedo over multiple years. The summer net infrared and solar radiation for the high elevation accumulation area approached

  1. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Angelen, J.H.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Lhermitte, S.; Fettweis, X.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van Meijgaard, E.; Smeets, C.J.P.P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The snow albedo scheme uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover,

  2. The Airborne Snow Observatory: fusion of imaging spectrometer and scanning lidar for studies of mountain snow cover (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T. H.; Andreadis, K.; Berisford, D. F.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Heneghan, C.; Deems, J. S.; Gehrke, F.; Marks, D. G.; Mattmann, C. A.; McGurk, B. J.; Ramirez, P.; Seidel, F. C.; Skiles, M.; Trangsrud, A.; Winstral, A. H.; Kirchner, P.; Zimdars, P. A.; Yaghoobi, R.; Boustani, M.; Khudikyan, S.; Richardson, M.; Atwater, R.; Horn, J.; Goods, D.; Verma, R.; Boardman, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    Snow cover and its melt dominate regional climate and water resources in many of the world's mountainous regions. However, we face significant water resource challenges due to the intersection of increasing demand from population growth and changes in runoff total and timing due to climate change. Moreover, increasing temperatures in desert systems will increase dust loading to mountain snow cover, thus reducing the snow cover albedo and accelerating snowmelt runoff. The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. Despite their importance in controlling volume and timing of runoff, snowpack albedo and SWE are still poorly quantified in the US and not at all in most of the globe, leaving runoff models poorly constrained. Recognizing this need, JPL developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and imaging LiDAR system, to quantify snow water equivalent and snow albedo, provide unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete, robust inputs to snowmelt runoff models, water management models, and systems of the future. Critical in the design of the ASO system is the availability of snow water equivalent and albedo products within 24 hours of acquisition for timely constraint of snowmelt runoff forecast models. In spring 2013, ASO was deployed for its first year of a multi-year Demonstration Mission of weekly acquisitions in the Tuolumne River Basin (Sierra Nevada) and monthly acquisitions in the Uncompahgre River Basin (Colorado). The ASO data were used to constrain spatially distributed models of varying complexities and integrated into the operations of the O'Shaughnessy Dam on the Hetch Hetchy reservoir on the Tuolumne River. Here we present the first results from the ASO Demonstration Mission 1 along with modeling results with and without the constraint by the ASO's high spatial resolution and spatially

  3. Persistent spread in seasonal albedo change radiative forcings linked to forest cover changes at northern latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, R. M.; Myhre, G.; Astrup, R. A.; Antón-Fernández, C.; Strømman, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale land use and land cover change (LULCC) can significantly affect regional climates from changes in surface biogeophysics, and a substantial part of historical LULCC from forest to crop or pasture occurred in the mid- and high-latitudes of North America and Eurasia where the snow-masking effect of forests often leads to a negative radiative forcing from albedo changes linked to deforestation. Results from several recent historical LULCC modeling studies, however, reveal an order of magnitude spread in climate forcing from the snow-masking effect by forests. This is likely because, in months with snow cover, the interactions between vegetation and snow significantly complicate the relationship between the change in forest cover fraction and albedo, thus accurate characterizations of land surface-albedo dynamics are essential given the importance of albedo feedbacks when ground or canopy surfaces are covered in snow Here, we evaluate snow masking parameterization schemes of seven prominent climate models in greater detail in order to pinpoint major sources of the persistent variability in albedo predictions across models. Using a comprehensive dataset of forest structure, meteorology, and daily MODIS albedo observations spanning three winter-spring seasons in three regions of boreal Norway, we estimate radiative forcings connected to canopy snow masking and compare it to the observed forcings. We develop a physically-based regression model and compare its performance to existing modeling schemes, concluding with a discussion on the utility of purely empirical parameterizations relative to those rooted in radiative transfer theory and/or process-based modeling.

  4. Quantifying the impacts of snow on surface energy balance through assimilating snow cover fraction and snow depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunlei

    2016-10-01

    Seasonal snow plays an important part in Earth's climate system. Snow cover regulates the land surface energy balance through altering the albedo of the land surface. To utilize the satellite-retrieved snow cover fraction (SCF) and snow depth (SD) data sufficiently and avoid inconsistency, this paper developed a very simple but robust quality control method to assimilate Fengyun satellite-retrieved SCF and SD simultaneously. The results show that the assimilation method which this paper implemented can not only utilize the satellite-retrieved SCF and SD data sufficiently but also avoid the inconsistency of them. Two experiments were designed and performed to quantify the impacts of snow on land surface energy balance using the integrated urban land model. With the increase of the SCF and SD, the net radiation decreased significantly during the day and increased a little at night; the sensible heat flux decreased significantly during the day; the evapotranspiration and ground heat flux decreased during the day too.

  5. Clear-Sky Narrowband Albedo Variations Derived from VIRS and MODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun-Mack, Sunny; Chen, Yan; Arduini, Robert F.; Minnis, Patrick

    2004-01-01

    A critical parameter for detecting clouds and aerosols and for retrieving their microphysical properties is the clear-sky radiance. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Project uses the visible (VIS; 0.63 m) and near-infrared (NIR; 1.6 or 2.13 m) channels available on same satellites as the CERES scanners. Another channel often used for cloud and aerosol, and vegetation cover retrievals is the vegetation (VEG; 0.86- m) channel that has been available on the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) for many years. Generally, clear-sky albedo for a given surface type is determined for conditions when the vegetation is either thriving or dormant and free of snow. Snow albedo is typically estimated without considering the underlying surface type. The albedo for a surface blanketed by snow, however, should vary with surface type because the vegetation often emerges from the snow to varying degrees depending on the vertical dimensions of the vegetation. For example, a snowcovered prairie will probably be brighter than a snowcovered forest because the snow typically falls off the trees exposing the darker surfaces while the snow on a grassland at the same temperatures will likely be continuous and, therefore, more reflective. Accounting for the vegetation-induced differences should improve the capabilities for distinguishing snow and clouds over different surface types and facilitate improvements in the accuracy of radiative transfer calculations between the snow-covered surface and the atmosphere, eventually leading to improvements in models of the energy budgets over land. This paper presents a more complete analysis of the CERES spectral clear-sky reflectances to determine the variations in clear-sky top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedos for both snow-free and snow-covered surfaces for four spectral channels using data from Terra and Aqua.. The results should be valuable for improved cloud retrievals and for modeling radiation fields.

  6. Multi-modal albedo distributions in the ablation area of the southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, S. E.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Smith, L. C.; Miller, M. A.; Mioduszewski, J. R.; Koenig, L. S.; Hom, M. G.; Shuman, C. A.

    2015-05-01

    Surface albedo is a key variable controlling solar radiation absorbed at the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface and, thus, meltwater production. Recent decline in surface albedo over the GrIS has been linked to enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, earlier snowmelt, and amplified melt-albedo feedback from atmospheric warming. However, the importance of distinct surface types on ablation area albedo and meltwater production is still relatively unknown. In this study, we analyze albedo and ablation rates using in situ and remotely sensed data. Observations include (1) a new high-quality in situ spectral albedo data set collected with an Analytical Spectral Devices Inc. spectroradiometer measuring at 325-1075 nm along a 1.25 km transect during 3 days in June 2013; (2) broadband albedo at two automatic weather stations; and (3) daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo (MOD10A1) between 31 May and 30 August 2012 and 2013. We find that seasonal ablation area albedos in 2013 have a bimodal distribution, with snow and ice facies characterizing the two peaks. Our results show that a shift from a distribution dominated by high to low albedos corresponds to an observed melt rate increase of 51.5% (between 10-14 July and 20-24 July 2013). In contrast, melt rate variability caused by albedo changes before and after this shift was much lower and varied between ~10 and 30% in the melting season. Ablation area albedos in 2012 exhibited a more complex multimodal distribution, reflecting a transition from light to dark-dominated surface, as well as sensitivity to the so called "dark-band" region in southwest Greenland. In addition to a darkening surface from ice crystal growth, our findings demonstrate that seasonal changes in GrIS ablation area albedos are controlled by changes in the fractional coverage of snow, bare ice, and impurity-rich surface types. Thus, seasonal variability in ablation area albedos appears to be regulated primarily as a function

  7. On the importance of the albedo parameterization for the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet in EC-Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Helsen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The albedo of the surface of ice sheets changes as a function of time due to the effects of deposition of new snow, ageing of dry snow, bare ice exposure, melting and run-off. Currently, the calculation of the albedo of ice sheets is highly parameterized within the earth system model EC-Earth by taking a constant value for areas with thick perennial snow cover. This is an important reason why the surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS is poorly resolved in the model. The purpose of this study is to improve the SMB forcing of the GrIS by evaluating different parameter settings within a snow albedo scheme. By allowing ice-sheet albedo to vary as a function of wet and dry conditions, the spatial distribution of albedo and melt rate improves. Nevertheless, the spatial distribution of SMB in EC-Earth is not significantly improved. As a reason for this, we identify omissions in the current snow albedo scheme, such as separate treatment of snow and ice and the effect of refreezing. The resulting SMB is downscaled from the lower-resolution global climate model topography to the higher-resolution ice-sheet topography of the GrIS, such that the influence of these different SMB climatologies on the long-term evolution of the GrIS is tested by ice-sheet model simulations. From these ice-sheet simulations we conclude that an albedo scheme with a short response time of decaying albedo during wet conditions performs best with respect to long-term simulated ice-sheet volume. This results in an optimized albedo parameterization that can be used in future EC-Earth simulations with an interactive ice-sheet component.

  8. On the importance of the albedo parameterization for the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet in EC-Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Michiel M.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; Reerink, Thomas J.; Bintanja, Richard; Madsen, Marianne S.; Yang, Shuting; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Qiong

    2017-08-01

    The albedo of the surface of ice sheets changes as a function of time due to the effects of deposition of new snow, ageing of dry snow, bare ice exposure, melting and run-off. Currently, the calculation of the albedo of ice sheets is highly parameterized within the earth system model EC-Earth by taking a constant value for areas with thick perennial snow cover. This is an important reason why the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is poorly resolved in the model. The purpose of this study is to improve the SMB forcing of the GrIS by evaluating different parameter settings within a snow albedo scheme. By allowing ice-sheet albedo to vary as a function of wet and dry conditions, the spatial distribution of albedo and melt rate improves. Nevertheless, the spatial distribution of SMB in EC-Earth is not significantly improved. As a reason for this, we identify omissions in the current snow albedo scheme, such as separate treatment of snow and ice and the effect of refreezing. The resulting SMB is downscaled from the lower-resolution global climate model topography to the higher-resolution ice-sheet topography of the GrIS, such that the influence of these different SMB climatologies on the long-term evolution of the GrIS is tested by ice-sheet model simulations. From these ice-sheet simulations we conclude that an albedo scheme with a short response time of decaying albedo during wet conditions performs best with respect to long-term simulated ice-sheet volume. This results in an optimized albedo parameterization that can be used in future EC-Earth simulations with an interactive ice-sheet component.

  9. Satellite-based terrestrial production efficiency modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obersteiner Michael

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Production efficiency models (PEMs are based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE which states that a relatively constant relationship exists between photosynthetic carbon uptake and radiation receipt at the canopy level. Challenges remain however in the application of the PEM methodology to global net primary productivity (NPP monitoring. The objectives of this review are as follows: 1 to describe the general functioning of six PEMs (CASA; GLO-PEM; TURC; C-Fix; MOD17; and BEAMS identified in the literature; 2 to review each model to determine potential improvements to the general PEM methodology; 3 to review the related literature on satellite-based gross primary productivity (GPP and NPP modeling for additional possibilities for improvement; and 4 based on this review, propose items for coordinated research. This review noted a number of possibilities for improvement to the general PEM architecture - ranging from LUE to meteorological and satellite-based inputs. Current PEMs tend to treat the globe similarly in terms of physiological and meteorological factors, often ignoring unique regional aspects. Each of the existing PEMs has developed unique methods to estimate NPP and the combination of the most successful of these could lead to improvements. It may be beneficial to develop regional PEMs that can be combined under a global framework. The results of this review suggest the creation of a hybrid PEM could bring about a significant enhancement to the PEM methodology and thus terrestrial carbon flux modeling. Key items topping the PEM research agenda identified in this review include the following: LUE should not be assumed constant, but should vary by plant functional type (PFT or photosynthetic pathway; evidence is mounting that PEMs should consider incorporating diffuse radiation; continue to pursue relationships between satellite-derived variables and LUE, GPP and autotrophic respiration (Ra; there is an urgent need for

  10. Albedo changes of the Arctic sea ice cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D. K.; Light, B.; Jones, K. F.; Eicken, H.; Runciman, K.; Nghiem, S. V.; Stroeve, J.; Markus, T.

    2008-12-01

    The summer extent of the Arctic sea ice cover has decreased in recent decades and there have been alterations in the timing and duration of the summer melt season. This has resulted in changes in the evolution of albedo of the Arctic sea ice cover, and consequently in the partitioning of solar energy. These changes are examined on a pan-Arctic scale on a 25 x 25 km Equal Area Scalable Earth Grid for the years 1979 - 2007. Daily values of incident solar irradiance are obtained from ERA-40 reanalysis products and ice concentrations are determined from passive microwave satellite data. The albedo of the ice is modeled by a five-phase process that includes dry snow, melting snow, melt pond formation, melt pond evolution, and freezeup. The timing of these phases is governed by the onset dates of summer melt and fall freezeup, which are determined from satellite observations. Results indicate a general trend of increasing solar heat input to the Arctic ice-ocean system due to reductions in ice concentration and longer melt seasons. This trend may accelerate the loss of sea ice through the ice-albedo feedback. The evolution of albedo, and hence the total solar heating of the ocean, is more sensitive to the date of melt onset than the date of fall freezeup.

  11. A predictive model for the spectral "bioalbedo" of snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J. M.; Hodson, A. J.; Taggart, A. J.; Mernild, S. H.; Tranter, M.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first physical model for the spectral "bioalbedo" of snow, which predicts the spectral reflectance of snowpacks contaminated with variable concentrations of red snow algae with varying diameters and pigment concentrations and then estimates the effect of the algae on snowmelt. The biooptical model estimates the absorption coefficient of individual cells; a radiative transfer scheme calculates the spectral reflectance of snow contaminated with algal cells, which is then convolved with incoming spectral irradiance to provide albedo. Albedo is then used to drive a point-surface energy balance model to calculate snowpack melt rate. The model is used to investigate the sensitivity of snow to algal biomass and pigmentation, including subsurface algal blooms. The model is then used to recreate real spectral albedo data from the High Sierra (CA, USA) and broadband albedo data from Mittivakkat Gletscher (SE Greenland). Finally, spectral "signatures" are identified that could be used to identify biology in snow and ice from remotely sensed spectral reflectance data. Our simulations not only indicate that algal blooms can influence snowpack albedo and melt rate but also highlight that "indirect" feedback related to their presence are a key uncertainty that must be investigated.

  12. Detailed spatiotemporal albedo observations at Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Knudsen, Niels T.; Yde, Jacob C.; Malmros, Jeppe K.

    2015-04-01

    Surface albedo is defined as the reflected fraction of incoming solar shortwave radiation at the surface. On Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher the mean glacier-wide MODIS-estimated albedo dropped by 0.10 (2000-2013) from 0.43 to 0.33 by the end of the mass balance year (EBY). Hand-held albedo measurements as low as 0.10 were observed over debris-covered ice at the glacier margin at the EBY: these values were slightly below observed values for proglacial bedrock (~0.2). The albedo is highly variable in space - a significant variability occurred within few meters at the glacier margin area ranging from 0.10 to 0.39 due to variability in debris-cover thickness and composition, microbial activity (including algae and cyanobacteria), snow grain crystal metamorphism, bare ice exposure, and meltwater ponding. Huge dark-red-brown-colored ice algae colonies were observed. Albedo measurements on snow patches and bare glacier ice changed significant with increasing elevations (180-600 m a.s.l.) by lapse rates of 0.04 and 0.03 per 100 m, respectively, indicating values as high as 0.82 and 0.40 on the upper part of the glacier. Over a period of two weeks from early August to late August 2014 the hand-held observed mean glacier-wide albedo changed from 0.40 to 0.30 indicating that on average 10% more incoming solar shortwave radiation became available for surface ablation at the end of the melt season.

  13. Biases in modeled surface snow BC mixing ratios in prescribed-aerosol climate model runs

    OpenAIRE

    Doherty, S. J.; C. M. Bitz; M. G. Flanner

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) in snow lowers its albedo, increasing the absorption of sunlight, leading to positive radiative forcing, climate warming and earlier snowmelt. A series of recent studies have used prescribed-aerosol deposition flux fields in climate model runs to assess the forcing by black carbon in snow. In these studies, the prescribed mass deposition flux of BC to surface snow is decoupled from the mass deposition flux of snow water to the surface. Here we compare progn...

  14. Evaluation of North Eurasian snow-off dates in the ECHAM5.4 atmospheric GCM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Räisänen

    2014-06-01

    Ts from rising above 0 °C before all snow has vanished. Consequently, too much (too little of the surface net radiation is consumed in melting snow (heating the air. On the other hand, ECHAM5 does not include a canopy layer. Thus, while the albedo reduction due to canopy is accounted for, the shielding of snow on ground by the overlying canopy is not considered, which leaves too much solar radiation available for melting snow.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Sensitivities of Snow Melting to Spectral Composition of the Incoming Solar Radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Weiping; SUN Shufen; WANG Siao; LIU Xin

    2009-01-01

    Snow albedo is an important factor influencing the snow surface energy budget and snow melting,yet uncertainties remain in the calculation of spectrally resolved snow surface albedo because the spectral composition (visible versus near infrared) of the incident solar radiation is seldom available. The influence of the spectral composition of the incoming solar radiation on the snow surface albedo, snow surface energy budget, and final snow ablation is investigated through sensitivity experiments of four snow seasons at two open sites in the Alps by using a multi-layer Snow-Atmosphere-Soil-Transfer scheme (SAST). Since the snow albedo in the near infrared (NIR) spectral band is significantly lower than that in the visible (VIS) band, and almost the entire NIR part of the solar radiation is absorbed in the top layer of the snow pack, given a fixed amount of incoming solar radiation, a lower VIS/NIR ratio implies that more NIR radiation is reaching the ground surface and more is absorbed by the top layer of the snow pack, therefore, speeding up the snow melting and increasing the surface runoff, although a lesser part of the solar radiation in the visible band is transmitted into and trapped by the sub-layer of the snow pack. The above VIS/NIR ratio effect of the incoming solar radiation can result in a couple of days difference in the timing of snow ablation and it becomes more significant in late spring when the total solar radiation is intensified with seasonal evolution. Snow aging also slightly intensifies this VIS/NIR ratio effect.

  16. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains Central Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Gaustad, Krista L.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Long, Charles N.; Delamere, Jennifer

    2011-09-01

    We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs), four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated) can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs) and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  17. Global Climate Forcing from Albedo Change Caused by Large-scale Deforestation and Reforestation: Quantification and Attribution of Geographic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Tong; Williams, Christopher A.; Ghimire, Bardan; Masek, Jeffrey; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale deforestation and reforestation have contributed substantially to historical and contemporary global climate change in part through albedo-induced radiative forcing, with meaningful implications for forest management aiming to mitigate climate change. Associated warming or cooling varies widely across the globe due to a range of factors including forest type, snow cover, and insolation, but resulting geographic variation remain spoorly described and has been largely based on model assessments. This study provides an observation-based approach to quantify local and global radiative forcings from large-scale deforestation and reforestation and further examines mechanisms that result in the spatial heterogeneity of radiative forcing. We incorporate a new spatially and temporally explicit land cover-specific albedo product derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer with a historical land use data set (Land Use Harmonization product). Spatial variation in radiative forcing was attributed to four mechanisms, including the change in snow-covered albedo, change in snow-free albedo, snow cover fraction, and incoming solar radiation. We find an albedo-only radiative forcing (RF) of -0.819 W m(exp -2) if year 2000 forests were completely deforested and converted to croplands. Albedo RF from global reforestation of present-day croplands to recover year 1700 forests is estimated to be 0.161 W m)exp -2). Snow-cover fraction is identified as the primary factor in determining the spatial variation of radiative forcing in winter, while the magnitude of the change in snow-free albedo is the primary factor determining variations in summertime RF. Findings reinforce the notion that, for conifers at the snowier high latitudes, albedo RF diminishes the warming from forest loss and the cooling from forest gain more so than for other forest types, latitudes, and climate settings.

  18. Constraining snow model choices in a transitional snow environment with intensive observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayand, N. E.; Massmann, A.; Clark, M. P.; Lundquist, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    The performance of existing energy balance snow models exhibits a large spread in the simulated snow water equivalent, snow depth, albedo, and surface temperature. Indentifying poor model representations of physical processes within intercomparison studies is difficult due to multiple differences between models as well as non-orthogonal metrics used. Efforts to overcome these obstacles for model development have focused on a modeling framework that allows multiple representations of each physical process within one structure. However, there still exists a need for snow study sites within complex terrain that observe enough model states and fluxes to constrain model choices. In this study we focus on an intensive snow observational site located in the maritime-transitional snow climate of Snoqualmie Pass WA (Figure 1). The transitional zone has been previously identified as a difficult climate to simulate snow processes; therefore, it represents an ideal model-vetting site. From two water years of intensive observational data, we have learned that a more honest comparison with observations requires that the modeled states or fluxes be as similar to the spatial and temporal domain of the instrument, even if it means changing the model to match what is being observed. For example, 24-hour snow board observations do not capture compaction of the underlying snow; therefore, a modeled "snow board" was created that only includes new snow accumulation and new snow compaction. We extend this method of selective model validation to all available Snoqualmie observations to constrain model choices within the Structure for Understanding Multiple Modeling Alternatives (SUMMA) framework. Our end goal is to provide a more rigorous and systematic method for diagnosing problems within snow models at a site given numerous snow observations.

  19. Mars surface albedo and changes

    CERN Document Server

    Vincendon, Mathieu; Altieri, Francesca; Ody, Anouck

    2014-01-01

    The pervasive Mars dust is continually transported between surface and atmosphere. When on the surface, dust increases the albedo of darker underlying rocks and regolith, which modifies climate energy balance and must be quantified. Remote observation of surface albedo absolute value and albedo change is however complicated by dust itself when lifted in the atmosphere. Here we present a method to calculate and map the bolometric solar hemispherical albedo of the Martian surface using the 2004 - 2010 OMEGA imaging spectrometer dataset. This method takes into account aerosols radiative transfer, surface photometry, and instrumental issues such as registration differences between visible and near-IR detectors. Resulting albedos are on average 17% higher than previous estimates for bright surfaces while similar for dark surfaces. We observed that surface albedo changes occur mostly during the storm season due to isolated events. The main variations are observed during the 2007 global dust storm and during the fol...

  20. Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

    2011-01-01

    A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

  1. Vegetation and Variable Snow Cover: Spatial Patterns of Shrubland, and Grassland Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liston, G. E.; Hiemstra, C. A.; Strack, J. E.

    2003-12-01

    Regions that experience long winters with snowfall and high winds frequently exhibit heterogeneous snow distribution patterns that arise from interactions among snow, wind, topography, and vegetation. Variable snow cover and resultant heterogeneities in albedo and growing season length can affect local weather patterns and energy budgets, and produce spatially co-variable ecosystem properties. While snow influences local atmospheric processes and ecosystems, an important and underappreciated feedback exists between vegetation and snow cover. Plant size, canopy density, and rigidity determine how much snow accumulates on the lee side of individual plants (e.g., shrubland vs. grassland). In addition, the canopy can also influence how much energy reaches the snowpack, thereby hindering or accelerating snowmelt. An overhanging canopy reduces incoming solar radiation while providing a source of turbulent sensible and longwave radiative energy. Historically, most snow vegetation interaction studies have been limited to areas that experience an abundance of snow (e.g., mountainous areas) where trees have a large influence on seasonal snow-cover. In contrast, snow cover patterns associated with shrublands and grasslands have received little attention, despite covering vast expanses (53%) of the seasonally snow-covered globe. In this study, snow depths were measured every two weeks from December through March in a small, 0.25 km2 study area located in North Park, Colorado. The study area possesses little topographic relief and consists of shrub patches, dominated by greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus) and sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), embedded in a matrix of graminoids (sedges, rushes, and grasses). Snow cover patterns and spatial statistics were dramatically different in graminoid-dominated cover compared with shrub cover. The graminoid snow cover was thinner, less variable, and more ephemeral than the shrub snow pack. Snow was readily eroded by wind from graminoid

  2. Role of snow cover on urban heat island intensity investigated by urban canopy model with snow effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, T.; Mori, K.

    2015-12-01

    Urban heat islands have been investigated around the world including snowy regions. However, the relationship between urban heat island and snow cover remains unclear. This study examined the effect of snow cover in urban canopy on energy budget in urban areas of Sapporo, north Japan by 1km mesh WRF experiments. The modified urban canopy model permits snow cover in urban canopy by the modification of surface albedo, surface emissivity, and thermal conductivity for roof and road according to snow depth and snow water equivalent. The experiments revealed that snow cover in urban canopy decreases urban air temperature more strongly for daily maximum temperature (0.4-0.6 K) than for daily minimum temperature (0.1-0.3 K). The high snow albedo reduces the net radiation at building roof, leading to decrease in sensible heat flux. Interestingly, the cooling effect of snow cover compensates the warming effect by anthropogenic heat release in Sapporo, suggesting the importance of snow cover treatment in urban canopy model as well as estimating accurate anthropogenic heat distributions. In addition, the effect of road snow clearance tends to increase nocturnal surface air temperature in urban areas. A possible role of snow cover on urban heat island intensity was evaluated by two experiments with snow cover (i.e., realistic condition) and without snow cover in entire numerical domain. The snow cover decreases surface air temperature more in rural areas than in urban areas, which was commonly seen throughout a day, with stronger magnitude during nighttime than daytime, resulting in intensifying urban heat island by 4.0 K for daily minimum temperature.

  3. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo retrieved from MODIS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dumont

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODerate Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS on board the TERRA and AQUA satellites, provide a means to monitor glacier surface albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier surface albedo from MODIS data are compared. The effect of multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are particularly investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin Glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps. The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements, at two automatic weather stations located on the glacier, and albedo values derived from terrestrial photographs. For summers 2008 and 2009, the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS data at 250 m spatial resolution was found to be 0.052 or about 10% relative error. The RMSD estimated for the MOD10 daily albedo product is about three times higher. One decade (2000–2009 of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin Glacier during the ablation season. The annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (average over the whole glacier surface observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A strong linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the date when the average albedo of the whole glacier reaches a minimum closely corresponds to the period when the snowline is located at its highest elevation, thus when the snowline is a good indicator of the glacier equilibrium line. This indicates that this strong correlation results from the fact that the minimal average albedo values of the glacier contains a considerable information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e. ice with generally

  4. Satellite-Based Sunshine Duration for Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodo Ahrens

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, two different methods were applied to derive daily and monthly sunshine duration based on high-resolution satellite products provided by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring using data from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager. The satellite products were either hourly cloud type or hourly surface incoming direct radiation. The satellite sunshine duration estimates were not found to be significantly different using the native 15-minute temporal resolution of SEVIRI. The satellite-based sunshine duration products give additional spatial information over the European continent compared with equivalent in situ-based products. An evaluation of the satellite sunshine duration by product intercomparison and against station measurements was carried out to determine their accuracy. The satellite data were found to be within ±1 h/day compared to high-quality Baseline Surface Radiation Network or surface synoptic observations (SYNOP station measurements. The satellite-based products differ more over the oceans than over land, mainly because of the treatment of fractional clouds in the cloud type-based sunshine duration product. This paper presents the methods used to derive the satellite sunshine duration products and the performance of the different retrievals. The main benefits and disadvantages compared to station-based products are also discussed.

  5. Building a Cloud-based Global Snow Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Coll, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Snow covers some 40 percent of Earth's land masses year in and year out and constitutes a vitally important variable for the planet's climate, hydrology, and biosphere due to its high albedo and insulation. It affects atmospheric circulation patterns, permafrost, glacier mass balance, river discharge, and groundwater recharge (Dietz et al. 2015). Snow is also nature's igloo where species from microscopic fungi to 800-pound moose survive the winter each in its own way (Pauli et al. 2013; Petty et al. 2015). Many studies have found that snow in high elevation regions is particularly sensitive to global climate change and is considered as sentinel of change. For human beings, about one-sixth of the world's population depends on seasonal snow and glaciers for their water supply (Barnett et al. 2005) and more than 50% of mountainous areas have an essential or supportive role for downstream regions (Viviroli et al. 2007). Large snowstorms also have a major impact on society in terms of human life, economic loss, and disruption (Squires et al. 2014). Remote sensing provides a practical approach of monitoring global snow and ice cover change. Based on our comprehensive validation and assessment on MODIS snow products, we build a cloud-based Global Snow Observatory (GSO) using Google Earth Engine (GEE) to serve as a platform for global researchers and the general public to access, visualize, and analyze snow data and to build snowmelt runoff models for mountain watersheds. Specifically, we build the GSO to serve global MODIS daily snow cover data and their analyses through GEE on Google App Engine. The GSO provides users the functions of accessing and extracting cloud-gap-filled snow data and interactive snow cover change exploration. In addition to snow cover frequency (SCF), we also plan to develop several other snow cover parameters, including snow cover duration/days, snow cover onset dates, and snow cover melting dates, and to study the shift and trend of global snow

  6. New spectral functions of the near-ground albedo derived from aircraft diffraction spectrometer observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A. Varotsos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The airborne spectral observations of the upward and downward irradiances are revisited to investigate the dependence of the near-ground albedo as a function of wavelength in the entire solar spectrum for different surfaces (sand, water, snow and in different conditions (clear or cloudy sky. The radiative upward and downward fluxes were determined by a diffraction spectrometer flown on a research aircraft that was performing multiple flight paths near ground. The results obtained show that the near-ground albedo does not generally increase with increasing wavelengths for all kinds of surfaces as is widely believed today. Particularly, in the case of water surfaces we found that the albedo in the ultraviolet region is more or less independent of the wavelength on a long-term basis. Interestingly, in the visible and near-infrared spectra the water albedo obeys an almost constant power-law relationship with wavelength. In the case of sand surfaces we found that the sand albedo is a quadratic function of wavelength, which becomes more accurate, if the ultraviolet wavelengths are neglected. Finally, we found that the spectral dependence of snow albedo behaves similarly to that of water, i.e. both decrease from the ultraviolet to the near-infrared wavelengths by 20–50%, despite of the fact that their values differ by one order of magnitude (water albedo being lower. In addition, the snow albedo versus ultraviolet wavelength is almost constant, while in the visible-near infrared spectrum the best simulation is achieved by a second-order polynomial, as in the case of sand, but with opposite slopes.

  7. Impact of Clouds on the Shortwave Radiation Budget of the Surface: Atmosphere System for Snow Covered Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemesure, Seth; Cess, Robert D.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; DeLuisi, John J.; Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Recent data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) have raised the question as to whether or not the addition of clouds to the atmospheric column can decrease the top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) albedo over bright snow-covered surfaces. To address this issue, ERBE shortwave pixel measurements have been collocated with surface insolation measurements made at two snow-covered locations: the South Pole and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Both collocated datasets show a negative correlation (with solar zenith angle variability removed) between TOA albedo and surface insolation. Because increased cloudiness acts to reduce surface insolation, these negative correlations demonstrate that clouds increase the TOA albedo at both snow-covered locations.

  8. Impact of clouds on the shortwave radiation budget of the surface-atmosphere system for snow-covered surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemesure, Seth; Cess, Robert D.; Dutton, Ellsworth; Deluisi, John J.; Li, Zhanqing; Leighton, Henry G.

    1994-01-01

    Recent data from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) have raised the question as to whether or not the addition of clouds to the atmospheric column can decrease the top-of-the atmosphere (TOA) albedo over bright snow-covered surface. To address this issue, ERBE shortwave pixel measurements have been collected with surface insolation measurements made at two snow-covered locations: the South Pole and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. Both collected datasets show a negative correlation (with solar zenith angle variability removed) between TOA albedo and surfaces insolation. Because increased cloudiness acts to reduce surface insolation, these negative correlations demonstrate that clouds increase the TOA albedo at both snow-covered locations.

  9. Developing a Model-Based Framework for Quality Assessments of In-Situ Measurement Protocols for Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jennifer Susan; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-08-01

    Validation of satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo using in-situ measurements is essential to identify differences between them, to improve retrieval algorithms and to assess conformity to accuracy requirements. Differences between in-situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on the actual difference and their associated uncertainties, where it is crucial that the uncertainties of both can be computed to properly understand potential differences. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in-situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested.

  10. Improving the snow physics of WEB-DHM and its point evaluation at the SnowMIP sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Shrestha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the snow physics of a distributed biosphere hydrological model, referred to as the Water and Energy Budget based Distributed Hydrological Model (WEB-DHM is significantly improved by incorporating the three-layer physically based energy balance snowmelt model of Simplified Simple Biosphere 3 (SSiB3 and the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS albedo scheme. WEB-DHM with improved snow physics is hereafter termed WEB-DHM-S. Since the in-situ observations of spatially-distributed snow variables with high resolution are currently not available over large regions, the new distributed system (WEB-DHM-S is at first rigorously tested with comprehensive point measurements. The stations used for evaluation comprise the four open sites of the Snow Model Intercomparison Project (SnowMIP phase 1 with different climate characteristics (Col de Porte in France, Weissfluhjoch in Switzerland, Goose Bay in Canada and Sleepers River in USA and one open/forest site of the SnowMIP phase 2 (Hitsujigaoka in Japan. The comparisons of the snow depth, snow water equivalent, surface temperature, snow albedo and snowmelt runoff at the SnowMIP1 sites reveal that WEB-DHM-S, in general, is capable of simulating the internal snow process better than the original WEB-DHM. Sensitivity tests (through incremental addition of model processes are performed to illustrate the necessity of improvements over WEB-DHM and indicate that both the 3-layer snow module and the new albedo scheme are essential. The canopy effects on snow processes are studied at the Hitsujigaoka site of the SnowMIP2 showing that the snow holding capacity of the canopy plays a vital role in simulating the snow depth on ground. Through these point evaluations and sensitivity studies, WEB-DHM-S has demonstrated the potential to address basin-scale snow processes (e.g., the snowmelt runoff, since it inherits the distributed hydrological framework from the WEB-DHM (e.g., the slope-driven runoff

  11. Snow and sea ice thermodynamics in the Arctic: Model validation and sensitivity study against SHEBA data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Bin; Timo Vihma; ZHANG Zhan-hai; LI Zhi-jun; WU Hui-ding

    2008-01-01

    Evolution of the Arctic sea ice and its snow cover during the SHEBA year were simulated by applying a high-resolution thermodynamic snow/ice model (HIGHTSI). Attention was paid to the impact of albedo on snow and sea ice mass balance, effect of snow on total ice mass balance, and the model vertical resolution.The SHEBA annual simulation was made applying the best possible external forcing data set created by the Sea Ice Model Intercomparison Project. The HIGHTSI control run reasonably reproduced the observed snow and ice thickness. A number of albedo schemes were incorporated into HIGHTSI to study the feedhack processes between the albedo and snow and ice thickness. The snow thickness turned out to be an essential variable in the albedo parametetization. Albedo schemes dependent on the surface temperature were liable to excessive positive feedback effects generated by errors in the modelled surface temperature. The superimposed ice formation should be taken into account for the annual Arctic sea ice mass balance.

  12. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. van Angelen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo parameterization. The snow albedo parameterization uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover, solar zenith angle and black carbon concentration. For the control experiment the overestimation of absorbed shortwave radiation (+6 % at the K-transect (West Greenland for the period 2004–2009 is considerably reduced compared to the previous density-dependent albedo parameterization (+22 %. To simulate realistic snow albedo values, a small concentration of black carbon is needed. A background ice albedo field derived from MODIS imagery improves the agreement between the modeled and observed SMB gradient along the K-transect. The effect of enhanced retention and refreezing is a decrease of the albedo due to an increase in snow grain size. As a secondary effect of refreezing the snowpack is heated, enhancing melt and further lowering the albedo. Especially in a warmer climate this process is important, since it reduces the refreezing potential of the firn layer covering the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  13. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. van Angelen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The snow albedo scheme uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover, solar zenith angle and black carbon concentration. For the control experiment the overestimation of absorbed shortwave radiation (+6% at the K-transect (west Greenland for the period 2004–2009 is considerably reduced compared to the previous density-dependent albedo scheme (+22%. To simulate realistic snow albedo values, a small concentration of black carbon is needed, which has strongest impact on melt in the accumulation area. A background ice albedo field derived from MODIS imagery improves the agreement between the modeled and observed SMB gradient along the K-transect. The effect of enhanced meltwater retention and refreezing is a decrease of the albedo due to an increase in snow grain size. As a secondary effect of refreezing the snowpack is heated, enhancing melt and further lowering the albedo. Especially in a warmer climate this process is important, since it reduces the refreezing potential of the firn layer that covers the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  14. Linking glacier annual mass balance and glacier albedo from MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, M.; Gardelle, J.; Arnaud, Y.; Guillot, A.; Sirguey, P.; Six, D.

    2012-04-01

    The albedo is one of the variables controlling the mass balance of temperate glaciers. Multispectral imagers, such as MODIS on board TERRA and AQUA, provide a means to monitor glacier albedo. In this study, different methods to retrieve broadband glacier albedo from MODIS data are compared. In particular, the effect of the multiple reflections due to the rugged topography and that of the anisotropic reflection of snow and ice are investigated. The methods are tested on the Saint Sorlin glacier (Grandes Rousses area, French Alps). The accuracy of the retrieved albedo is estimated using both field measurements and albedo derived from terrestrial photographs. The root mean square deviation between field measurements and the broadband albedo retrieved from MODIS pixels at 250m spatial resolution was found to be less than 0.06. One decade (2000-2010) of MODIS data were then processed to create a time series of albedo maps of Saint Sorlin glacier during the ablation season. It appears that the albedo in the ablation area of the glacier does not exhibit any marked decreasing trend during the decade under study. This contrasts with the situation observed on other glaciers in the Alps. In addition, the annual mass balance of Saint Sorlin Glacier was compared with the minimum albedo value (spatial averaged over the whole glacier) observed with MODIS during the ablation season. A high linear correlation exists between the two variables. Furthermore, the day on which the albedo reaches a minimum over the glacier closely corresponds to the day on which the snowline is found to be at its highest elevation, thus close to the glacier's equilibrium line. This indicates that the high correlation can be explained by the fact that this minimal albedo contains a high degree of information regarding the relative share of areal surfaces between the ablation zone (i.e., ice with a generally lower albedo) and the accumulation zone (i.e., snow with a relatively high albedo). This implies

  15. Assessment of Northern Hemisphere Snow Water Equivalent Datasets in ESA SnowPEx project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luojus, Kari; Pulliainen, Jouni; Cohen, Juval; Ikonen, Jaakko; Derksen, Chris; Mudryk, Lawrence; Nagler, Thomas; Bojkov, Bojan

    2016-04-01

    Reliable information on snow cover across the Northern Hemisphere and Arctic and sub-Arctic regions is needed for climate monitoring, for understanding the Arctic climate system, and for the evaluation of the role of snow cover and its feedback in climate models. In addition to being of significant interest for climatological investigations, reliable information on snow cover is of high value for the purpose of hydrological forecasting and numerical weather prediction. Terrestrial snow covers up to 50 million km² of the Northern Hemisphere in winter and is characterized by high spatial and temporal variability. Therefore satellite observations provide the best means for timely and complete observations of the global snow cover. There are a number of independent SWE products available that describe the snow conditions on multi-decadal and global scales. Some products are derived using satellite-based information while others rely on meteorological observations and modelling. What is common to practically all the existing hemispheric SWE products, is that their retrieval performance on hemispherical and multi-decadal scales are not accurately known. The purpose of the ESA funded SnowPEx project is to obtain a quantitative understanding of the uncertainty in satellite- as well as model-based SWE products through an internationally coordinated and consistent evaluation exercise. The currently available Northern Hemisphere wide satellite-based SWE datasets which were assessed include 1) the GlobSnow SWE, 2) the NASA Standard SWE, 3) NASA prototype and 4) NSIDC-SSM/I SWE products. The model-based datasets include: 5) the Global Land Data Assimilation System Version 2 (GLDAS-2) product 6) the European Centre for Medium-Range Forecasts Interim Land Reanalysis (ERA-I-Land) which uses a simple snow scheme 7) the Modern Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) which uses an intermediate complexity snow scheme; and 8) SWE from the Crocus snow scheme, a

  16. SNOW CLEARING

    CERN Multimedia

    Groupe de Transport/Transport Group

    1999-01-01

    In order to facilitate snow-clearing operations, which commence at 4.30 every morning, drivers of CERN vehicles are kindly requested to group their cars together in the car parks. This will greatly help us in our work. Thank you for your co-operation.Transport Group / ST-HMTel. 72202

  17. Snow clearance

    CERN Multimedia

    Mauro Nonis

    2005-01-01

    In reply to the numerous questions received, we should like to inform you of the actions and measures taken in an effort to maintain the movements of vehicles and pedestrians since the heavy snow fall on Sunday 23 January. Our contractor's employees began clearing the snow during the morning of Sunday 23 January on the main CERN sites (Meyrin, Prévessin), but an accident prevented them from continuing. The vehicle in question was repaired by Monday morning when two other vehicles joined it to resume snow clearing; priority was given to access points to the main sites and the LHC sites, as well as to the main roads inside the sites. The salt sprinklers were also brought into action that same day; the very low temperature during the night from Monday to Tuesday prevented the snow from melting and compacted the ice; the continuing cold during the day on Tuesday (-6°C at 10:00 on the Meyrin site) meant that all efforts to remove the ice were doomed to failure. In order to ensure more efficie...

  18. Impact of Dust on Mars Surface Albedo and Energy Flux with LMD General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Flanner, M.; Millour, E.; Martinez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Mars, just like Earth experience different seasons because of its axial tilt (about 25°). This causes growth and retreat of snow cover (primarily CO2) in Martian Polar regions. The perennial caps are the only place on the planet where condensed H2O is available at surface. On Mars, as much as 30% atmospheric CO2 deposits in each hemisphere depending upon the season. This leads to a significant variation on planet's surface albedo and hence effecting the amount of solar flux absorbed or reflected at the surface. General Circulation Model (GCM) of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) currently uses observationally derived surface albedo from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument for the polar caps. These TES albedo values do not have any inter-annual variability, and are independent of presence of any dust/impurity on surface. Presence of dust or other surface impurities can significantly reduce the surface albedo especially during and right after a dust storm. This change will also be evident in the surface energy flux interactions. Our work focuses on combining earth based Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model with current state of GCM to incorporate the impact of dust on Martian surface albedo, and hence the energy flux. Inter-annual variability of surface albedo and planet's top of atmosphere (TOA) energy budget along with their correlation with currently available mission data will be presented.

  19. Sensitivity of aerosol retrieval over snow surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidel, F. C.; Painter, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Significant amounts of black carbon and dust aerosols are transported to and accumulated in snowpacks of mountain ranges around the globe. The direct climate forcing of these particles is increasingly understood, whereas its indirect radiative forcing due to snow albedo and snow cover changes is still under investigation. In-situ and new remote sensing techniques are used to estimate snowpack properties from local to regional scales. Nevertheless, orbital and suborbital Earth observation data are difficult to analyze due to high spatial variability of the snowpack in rugged terrain. In addition, changes in atmospheric turbidity significantly complicate the estimation of snow cover characteristics and requires prior retrieval of optical and microphysical aerosol properties. Unfortunately, most aerosol retrieval techniques work only over dark surfaces. We therefore present a study on the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrieval over snow surfaces. Radiative transfer calculations show that the sensitivity to surface spectral albedo depends strongly on the aerosol single scattering albedo (ratio of scattering efficiency to total extinction efficiency). Absorbing aerosol types (e.g. soot) provide a relatively good AOD retrieval sensitivity for very bright surfaces. The findings provide a basis for the development of future techniques and algorithms, which are able to concurrently retrieve snow and aerosol properties using remote sensing data. We explore these sensitivities with synthetic data and a time series of imaging spectrometer data, in situ spectral irradiance measurements, and sunphotometer measurements of AOD in the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, USA. Ultimately, this research is important to map and better understand regional influences of aerosol and climate forcings on the cryosphere and water cycle in mountainous and other cold regions.

  20. Spatially Complete Surface Albedo Data Sets: Value-Added Products Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. Recent observations of diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky ) land surface albedo included in the MOD43B3 product from MODIS instruments aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics. Cloud and seasonal snow cover, however, curtail retrievals to approximately half the global land surfaces on an annual equal-angle basis, precluding MOD43B3 albedo products from direct inclusion in some research projects and production environments.

  1. Distinguishing Ice from Snow for Melt Modeling Using Daily Observations from MODIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittger, K.; Brodzik, M. J.; Racoviteanu, A.; Barrett, A. P.; Khalsa, S. J. S.; Painter, T. H.; Armstrong, R. L.; Burgess, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    In Earth's mountainous regions, melt from both seasonal snow and glacier ice contributes to streamflow. Few in-situ observations exist that can help distinguish between the two components of melt, particularly across large mountain ranges. In this study, we analyze daily time series of MODIS data products to distinguish ice from snow as the seasonal snowpack recedes revealing firn and glacier ice surfaces. We run a temperature index melt model for the Hunza, a sub-basin of the Upper Indus basin using the MODIS data to discriminate between glacier ice and snow and partition the corresponding streamflow. During the ablation period, this high elevation mid-latitude snowpack receives intense incoming solar radiation resulting in snow grain growth and surface albedo decreases. To explore snow grain growth, we use estimates of grain size from both the MODIS Snow Covered Area and Grain Size Model (MODSCAG) and MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS). To explore albedo reduction we use 2 standard albedo products from MODIS, the Terra Daily Snow Cover algorithm (MOD10A1) and Surface Reflectance BRDF/Albedo (MOD43). We use a threshold on the grain size and albedo products to discriminate ice from snow. We test the ability of the 4 MODIS products to discriminate snow from glacier ice using higher resolution data from the Landsat 8 sensor from July 5th and July 21st, 2013 for a subset of the study area in the Karakoram region of the Himalaya that includes the Yazghil and Hopper Glaciers that drain north and northeast in the Shimshall Valley, part of the Hunza River basin. Snow and glacier ice are mapped using band ratio techniques, and are then separated on the basis of broadband albedo values calculated from Landsat bands for comparison with MODIS-derived snow and glacier ice pixels. We run a temperature index melt model that uses gap filled snow covered area from MODSCAG and interpolated station temperature data for the Hunza River basin. The model outputs daily melt

  2. The Low Albedo of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Choukroun, M.; Bauer, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Comets are among the handful of objects with very low albedos, in the 0.02-0.06 range. Dark material is common in the outer Solar System, but analysis of the spectra and albedo of this material by spacecraft including Cassini and New Horizons shows that it is diverse, covering a range of compositions. Some is neutral-colored in the visible, such as that found on Phoebe, while some is very red, such as that on the surfaces of D-type asteroids or the low-albedo side of Iapetus. The different types of low-albedo material may reflect both compositional diversity, including contamination by volatiles or darkening agents, and divergent alteration histories. The key question is whether a particular sub-type of low albedo material is pristine - an unprocessed accumulation of interstellar dust - or an end product of polymerization and photolysis into ever more complex materials. Comets have albedos similar to the leading hemisphere of Iapetus, the surface of Titan, and the lowest-albedo C-type and D-type asteroids. Observations by the WISE and NEOWISE cameras show that comets have consistently low albedos (1). The first quantitative measurement of low-albedo material in the Kuiper Belt, from which comets such as Jupiter Family Comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko come, shows that even this material is not as dark as that found on comets (2). Results from both Stardust (3) and more recently Rosetta (4, 5) show that cometary surfaces contain prebiotic molecules, including the amino acid glycine. Other very low albedo objects have also been connected to complex organic molecules: on Iapetus, PAHs have been detected (6), and Titan's surface is believed to be covered with hydrocarbons produced in its haze layer (7). The presence of organic molecules, including complex ones, could be the unique characteristic of the very darkest material. The delivery of pre-biotic material from comets to the young Earth could represent a key link in the origins of terrestrial life. (1

  3. Development of a MODIS-Derived Surface Albedo Data Set: An Improved Model Input for Processing the NSRDB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclaurin, Galen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Xie, Yu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gilroy, Nicholas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    A significant source of bias in the transposition of global horizontal irradiance to plane-of-array (POA) irradiance arises from inaccurate estimations of surface albedo. The current physics-based model used to produce the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) relies on model estimations of surface albedo from a reanalysis climatalogy produced at relatively coarse spatial resolution compared to that of the NSRDB. As an input to spectral decomposition and transposition models, more accurate surface albedo data from remotely sensed imagery at finer spatial resolutions would improve accuracy in the final product. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an improved white-sky (bi-hemispherical reflectance) broadband (0.3-5.0 ..mu..m) surface albedo data set for processing the NSRDB from two existing data sets: a gap-filled albedo product and a daily snow cover product. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites have provided high-quality measurements of surface albedo at 30 arc-second spatial resolution and 8-day temporal resolution since 2001. The high spatial and temporal resolutions and the temporal coverage of the MODIS sensor will allow for improved modeling of POA irradiance in the NSRDB. However, cloud and snow cover interfere with MODIS observations of ground surface albedo, and thus they require post-processing. The MODIS production team applied a gap-filling methodology to interpolate observations obscured by clouds or ephemeral snow. This approach filled pixels with ephemeral snow cover because the 8-day temporal resolution is too coarse to accurately capture the variability of snow cover and its impact on albedo estimates. However, for this project, accurate representation of daily snow cover change is important in producing the NSRDB. Therefore, NREL also used the Integrated Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System data set, which provides daily snow cover observations of the

  4. Evaluating Multispectral Snowpack Reflectivity With Changing Snow Correlation Lengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Do Hyuk; Barros, Ana P.; Kim, Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the sensitivity of multispectral reflectivity to changing snow correlation lengths. Matzler's ice-lamellae radiative transfer model was implemented and tested to evaluate the reflectivity of snow correlation lengths at multiple frequencies from the ultraviolet (UV) to the microwave bands. The model reveals that, in the UV to infrared (IR) frequency range, the reflectivity and correlation length are inversely related, whereas reflectivity increases with snow correlation length in the microwave frequency range. The model further shows that the reflectivity behavior can be mainly attributed to scattering rather than absorption for shallow snowpacks. The largest scattering coefficients and reflectivity occur at very small correlation lengths (approximately 10(exp -5 m) for frequencies higher than the IR band. In the microwave range, the largest scattering coefficients are found at millimeter wavelengths. For validation purposes, the ice-lamella model is coupled with a multilayer snow physics model to characterize the reflectivity response of realistic snow hydrological processes. The evolution of the coupled model simulated reflectivities in both the visible and the microwave bands is consistent with satellite-based reflectivity observations in the same frequencies. The model results are also compared with colocated in situ snow correlation length measurements (Cold Land Processes Field Experiment 2002-2003). The analysis and evaluation of model results indicate that the coupled multifrequency radiative transfer and snow hydrology modeling system can be used as a forward operator in a data-assimilation framework to predict the status of snow physical properties, including snow correlation length.

  5. Snow cover detection algorithm using dynamic time warping method and reflectances of MODIS solar spectrum channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyeong-sang; Choi, Sungwon; Seo, Minji; Lee, Chang suk; Seong, Noh-hun; Han, Kyung-Soo

    2016-10-01

    Snow cover is biggest single component of cryosphere. The Snow is covering the ground in the Northern Hemisphere approximately 50% in winter season and is one of climate factors that affects Earth's energy budget because it has higher reflectance than other land types. Also, snow cover has an important role about hydrological modeling and water resource management. For this reason, accurate detection of snow cover acts as an essential element for regional water resource management. Snow cover detection using satellite-based data have some advantages such as obtaining wide spatial range data and time-series observations periodically. In the case of snow cover detection using satellite data, the discrimination of snow and cloud is very important. Typically, Misclassified cloud and snow pixel can lead directly to error factor for retrieval of satellite-based surface products. However, classification of snow and cloud is difficult because cloud and snow have similar optical characteristics and are composed of water or ice. But cloud and snow has different reflectance in 1.5 1.7 μm wavelength because cloud has lower grain size and moisture content than snow. So, cloud and snow shows difference reflectance patterns change according to wavelength. Therefore, in this study, we perform algorithm for classifying snow cover and cloud with satellite-based data using Dynamic Time Warping (DTW) method which is one of commonly used pattern analysis such as speech and fingerprint recognitions and reflectance spectral library of snow and cloud. Reflectance spectral library is constructed in advance using MOD21km (MODIS Level1 swath 1km) data that their reflectance is six channels including 3 (0.466μm), 4 (0.554μm), 1 (0.647μm), 2 (0.857μm), 26 (1.382μm) and 6 (1.629μm). We validate our result using MODIS RGB image and MOD10 L2 swath (MODIS swath snow cover product). And we use PA (Producer's Accuracy), UA (User's Accuracy) and CI (Comparison Index) as validation criteria

  6. Multiplatform observations enabling albedo retrievals with high temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihelä, Aku; Manninen, Terhikki; Key, Jeffrey; Sun, Qingsong; Sütterlin, Melanie; Lattanzio, Alessio; Schaaf, Crystal

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we show that combining observations from different polar orbiting satellite families (such as AVHRR and MODIS) is physically justifiable and technically feasible. Our proposed approach will lead to surface albedo retrievals at higher temporal resolution than the state of the art, with comparable or better accuracy. This study is carried out in the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sustained and coordinated processing of Environmental Satellite data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) project SCM-02 (http://www.scope-cm.org/projects/scm-02/). Following a spectral homogenization of the Top-of-Atmosphere reflectances of bands 1 & 2 from AVHRR and MODIS, both observation datasets are atmospherically corrected with a coherent atmospheric profile and algorithm. The resulting surface reflectances are then fed into an inversion of the RossThick-LiSparse-Reciprocal surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model. The results of the inversion (BRDF kernels) may then be integrated to estimate various surface albedo quantities. A key principle here is that the larger number of valid surface observations with multiple satellites allows us to invert the BRDF coefficients within a shorter time span, enabling the monitoring of relatively rapid surface phenomena such as snowmelt. The proposed multiplatform approach is expected to bring benefits in particular to the observation of the albedo of the polar regions, where persistent cloudiness and long atmospheric path lengths present challenges to satellite-based retrievals. Following a similar logic, the retrievals over tropical regions with high cloudiness should also benefit from the method. We present results from a demonstrator dataset of a global combined AVHRR-GAC and MODIS dataset covering the year 2010. The retrieved surface albedo is compared against quality-monitored in situ albedo observations from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). Additionally, the combined retrieval

  7. Spring Snow Depth on Arctic Sea Ice using the IceBridge Snow Depth Product (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, M.; Rigor, I. G.; Nghiem, S. V.; Kurtz, N. T.; Farrell, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Snow has dual roles in the growth and decay of Arctic sea ice. In winter, it insulates sea ice from colder air temperatures, slowing its growth. From spring into summer, the albedo of snow determines how much insolation is transmitted through the sea ice and into the underlying ocean, ultimately impacting the progression of the summer ice melt. Knowing the snow thickness and distribution are essential for understanding and modeling sea ice thermodynamics and the surface heat budget. Therefore, an accurate assessment of the snow cover is necessary for identifying its impacts in the changing Arctic. This study assesses springtime snow conditions on Arctic sea ice using airborne snow thickness measurements from Operation IceBridge (2009-2012). The 2012 data were validated with coordinated in situ measurements taken in March 2012 during the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment field campaign. We find a statistically significant correlation coefficient of 0.59 and RMS error of 5.8 cm. The comparison between the IceBridge snow thickness product and the 1937, 1954-1991 Soviet drifting ice station data suggests that the snow cover has thinned by 33% in the western Arctic and 44% in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. A rudimentary estimation shows that a thinner snow cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas translates to a mid-December surface heat flux as high as 81 W/m2 compared to 32 W/m2. The relationship between the 2009-2012 thinner snow depth distribution and later sea ice freeze-up is statistically significant, with a correlation coefficient of 0.59. These results may help us better understand the surface energy budget in the changing Arctic, and may improve our ability to predict the future state of the sea ice cover.

  8. Snow physics as relevant to snow photochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Domine

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Snow on the ground is a complex multiphase photochemical reactor that dramatically modifies the chemical composition of the overlying atmosphere. A quantitative description of the emissions of reactive gases by snow requires the knowledge of snow physical properties. This overview details our current understanding of how those physical properties relevant to snow photochemistry vary during snow metamorphism. Properties discussed are density, specific surface area, optical properties, thermal conductivity, permeability and gas diffusivity. Inasmuch as possible, equations to parameterize these properties as a function of climatic variables are proposed, based on field measurements, laboratory experiments and theory. The potential of remote sensing methods to obtain information on some snow physical variables such as grain size, liquid water content and snow depth are discussed. The possibilities for and difficulties of building a snow photochemistry model by adapting current snow physics models are explored. Elaborate snow physics models already exist, and including variables of particular interest to snow photochemistry such as light fluxes and specific surface area appears possible. On the other hand, understanding the nature and location of reactive molecules in snow seems to be the greatest difficulty modelers will have to face for lack of experimental data, and progress on this aspect will require the detailed study of natural snow samples.

  9. Light-absorbing impurities in Arctic snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Doherty

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Absorption of radiation by ice is extremely weak at visible and near-ultraviolet wavelengths, so small amounts of light-absorbing impurities in snow can dominate the absorption of solar radiation at these wavelengths, reducing the albedo relative to that of pure snow, contributing to the surface energy budget and leading to earlier snowmelt. In this study Arctic snow is surveyed for its content of light-absorbing impurities, expanding and updating the 1983–1984 survey of Clarke and Noone. Samples were collected in Alaska, Canada, Greenland, Svalbard, Norway, Russia, and the Arctic Ocean during 2005–2009, on tundra, glaciers, ice caps, sea ice, frozen lakes, and in boreal forests. Snow was collected mostly in spring, when the entire winter snowpack is accessible for sampling. Sampling was carried out in summer on the Greenland ice sheet and on the Arctic Ocean, of melting glacier snow and sea ice as well as cold snow. About 1200 snow samples have been analyzed for this study.

    The snow is melted and filtered; the filters are analyzed in a specially designed spectrophotometer system to infer the concentration of black carbon (BC, the fraction of absorption due to non-BC light-absorbing constituents and the absorption Ångstrom exponent of all particles. The reduction of snow albedo is primarily due to BC, but other impurities, principally brown (organic carbon, are typically responsible for ~40% of the visible and ultraviolet absorption. The meltwater from selected snow samples was saved for chemical analysis to identify sources of the impurities. Median BC amounts in surface snow are as follows (nanograms of carbon per gram of snow: Greenland 3, Arctic Ocean snow 7, melting sea ice 8, Arctic Canada 8, Subarctic Canada 14, Svalbard 13, Northern Norway 21, Western Arctic Russia 26, Northeastern Siberia 17. Concentrations are more variable in the European Arctic than in Arctic Canada or the Arctic Ocean, probably because of the proximity

  10. Monitoring land surface albedo and vegetation dynamics using high spatial and temporal resolution synthetic time series from Landsat and the MODIS BRDF/NBAR/albedo product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuosen; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Sun, Qingsong; Kim, JiHyun; Erb, Angela M.; Gao, Feng; Román, Miguel O.; Yang, Yun; Petroy, Shelley; Taylor, Jeffrey R.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Papuga, Shirley A.

    2017-07-01

    bias within the range of ±0.006. These synthetic time series provide much greater spatial detail than the 500 m gridded MODIS data, especially over more heterogeneous surfaces, which improves the efforts to characterize and monitor the spatial variation across species and communities. The mean of the difference between maximum and minimum synthetic time series of albedo within the MODIS pixels over a subset of satellite data of Harvard Forest (16 km by 14 km) was as high as 0.2 during the snow-covered period and reduced to around 0.1 during the snow-free period. Similarly, we have used STARFM to also couple MODIS Nadir BRDF Adjusted Reflectances (NBAR) values with Landsat 5 reflectances to generate daily synthetic times series of NBAR and thus Enhanced Vegetation Index (NBAR-EVI) at a 30 m resolution. While normally STARFM is used with directional reflectances, the use of the view angle corrected daily MODIS NBAR values will provide more consistent time series. These synthetic times series of EVI are shown to capture seasonal vegetation dynamics with finer spatial and temporal details, especially over heterogeneous land surfaces.

  11. A model-based framework for the quality assessment of surface albedo in situ measurement protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jennifer; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-09-01

    Satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo are essential for climate and environmental modelling communities. To be of use, satellite-retrievals are required to comply to given accuracy requirements, mainly achieved through comparison with in situ measurements. Differences between in situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on their actual difference and their associated uncertainties. It is essential that these uncertainties can be computed to properly understand the differences between satellite-based and in situ measurements of albedo, however quantifying the individual contributions of uncertainty is difficult. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested. 8 scenarios were investigated, covering a range of ecosystem types and canopy structures, seasons, illumination angles and tree heights. Results indicate that height of measurement above the canopy is the controlling factor in accuracy, with each canopy scenario reaching the WMO requirement at different heights. Increasing canopy heterogeneity and tree height noticeably reduces the accuracy, whereas changing seasonality from summer to winter in a deciduous forest increases accuracy. For canopies with a row structure, illumination angle can significantly impact accuracy as a result of shadowing effects. Tests were made on the potential use of multiple in situ measurements, indicating considerably increased accuracy if two or more in situ measurements can be made.

  12. Operational Testing of Satellite based Hydrological Model (SHM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaur, Srishti; Paul, Pranesh Kumar; Singh, Rajendra; Mishra, Ashok; Gupta, Praveen Kumar; Singh, Raghavendra P.

    2017-04-01

    Incorporation of the concept of transposability in model testing is one of the prominent ways to check the credibility of a hydrological model. Successful testing ensures ability of hydrological models to deal with changing conditions, along with its extrapolation capacity. For a newly developed model, a number of contradictions arises regarding its applicability, therefore testing of credibility of model is essential to proficiently assess its strength and limitations. This concept emphasizes to perform 'Hierarchical Operational Testing' of Satellite based Hydrological Model (SHM), a newly developed surface water-groundwater coupled model, under PRACRITI-2 program initiated by Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad. SHM aims at sustainable water resources management using remote sensing data from Indian satellites. It consists of grid cells of 5km x 5km resolution and comprises of five modules namely: Surface Water (SW), Forest (F), Snow (S), Groundwater (GW) and Routing (ROU). SW module (functions in the grid cells with land cover other than forest and snow) deals with estimation of surface runoff, soil moisture and evapotranspiration by using NRCS-CN method, water balance and Hragreaves method, respectively. The hydrology of F module is dependent entirely on sub-surface processes and water balance is calculated based on it. GW module generates baseflow (depending on water table variation with the level of water in streams) using Boussinesq equation. ROU module is grounded on a cell-to-cell routing technique based on the principle of Time Variant Spatially Distributed Direct Runoff Hydrograph (SDDH) to route the generated runoff and baseflow by different modules up to the outlet. For this study Subarnarekha river basin, flood prone zone of eastern India, has been chosen for hierarchical operational testing scheme which includes tests under stationary as well as transitory conditions. For this the basin has been divided into three sub-basins using three flow

  13. Validation of the Global NASA Satellite-based Flood Detection System in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffitt, C. B.

    2009-12-01

    Floods are one of the most destructive natural forces on earth, affecting millions of people annually. Nations lying in the downstream end of an international river basin often suffer the most damage during flooding and could benefit from the real-time communication of rainfall and stream flow data from countries upstream. This is less likely to happen among developing nations due to a lack of freshwater treaties (Balthrop and Hossain, Water Policy, 2009). A more viable option is for flood-prone developing nations to utilize the global satellite rainfall and modeled runoff data that is independently and freely available from the NASA Satellite-based Global Flood Detection System. Although the NASA Global Flood Detection System has been in operation in real-time since 2006, the ‘detection’ capability of flooding has only been validated against qualitative reports in news papers and other types of media. In this study, a more quantitative validation against in-situ measurements of the flood detection system over Bangladesh is presented. Using ground-measured stream flow data as well as satellite-based flood potential and rainfall data, the study looks into the relationship between rainfall and flood potential, rainfall and stream flow, and stream flow and flood potential for three very distinct river systems in Bangladesh - 1) Ganges- a snow-fed river regulated by upstream India 2) Brahmaputra - a snow-fed river that is also braided 3) Meghna - a rain-fed river. The quantitative assessment will show the effectiveness of the NASA Global Flood Detection System for a very humid and flood prone region like Bangladesh that is also faced with tremendous transboundary hurdles that can only be resolved from the vantage of space.

  14. Black Carbon in Seasonal Snow across Northern Xinjiang, Northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, H.; Zhang, R.; Shi, J.; Huang, J.; Warren, S. G.; Fu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles in snow can significantly reduce the snow albedo and enhance the absorption of solar radiation, with important impacts on climate and the hydrological cycle. A field campaign was carried out to measure the BC content in seasonal snow in Qinghai and Xinjiang provinces of western China, in January and February, 2012. About 300 snow samples were collected at 38 sites, 6 in Qinghai and 32 in Xinjiang. The observational results at the sites in Xinjiang, where the dominant absorbing impurities in snow are BC particles, are reported in this paper. The BC mass-fractions in seasonal snow across northern Xinjiang have a median value of ~70 ng/g, lower than those in northeast China but comparable to those in snow on glaciers of the Tianshan Mountains. The estimated concentration of BC at the cleanest site in Xinjiang is 20 ng/g, which is similar to that found along the coast of the Arctic Ocean. In general, the BC content of snow decreases with altitude. The data from this field campaign should be useful for testing transport models and climate models for the simulated BC in snow.

  15. Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Delamere

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a method for identifying dominant surface type and estimating high spectral resolution surface albedo at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM facility at the Southern Great Plains (SGP site in Oklahoma for use in radiative transfer calculations. Given a set of 6-channel narrowband visible and near-infrared irradiance measurements from upward and downward looking multi-filter radiometers (MFRs, four different surface types (snow-covered, green vegetation, partial vegetation, non-vegetated can be identified. A normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI is used to distinguish between vegetated and non-vegetated surfaces, and a scaled NDVI index is used to estimate the percentage of green vegetation in partially vegetated surfaces. Based on libraries of spectral albedo measurements, a piecewise continuous function is developed to estimate the high spectral resolution surface albedo for each surface type given the MFR albedo values as input. For partially vegetated surfaces, the albedo is estimated as a linear combination of the green vegetation and non-vegetated surface albedo values. The estimated albedo values are evaluated through comparison to high spectral resolution albedo measurements taken during several Intensive Observational Periods (IOPs and through comparison of the integrated spectral albedo values to observed broadband albedo measurements. The estimated spectral albedo values agree well with observations for the visible wavelengths constrained by the MFR measurements, but have larger biases and variability at longer wavelengths. Additional MFR channels at 1100 nm and/or 1600 nm would help constrain the high resolution spectral albedo in the near infrared region.

  16. Towards a satellite-based sea ice climate data record

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, W. N.; Fetterer, F.; Stroeve, J.; Cavalieri, D.; Parkinson, C.; Comiso, J.; Weaver, R.

    2005-12-01

    Sea ice plays an important role in the Earth's climate through its influence on the surface albedo, heat and moisture transfer between the ocean and the atmosphere, and the thermohaline circulation. Satellite data reveal that since 1979, summer Arctic sea ice has, overall, been declining at a rate of almost 8%/decade, with recent summers (beginning in 2002) being particularly low. The receding sea ice is having an effect on wildlife and indigenous peoples in the Arctic, and concern exists that these effects may become increasingly severe. Thus, a long-term, ongoing climate data record of sea ice is crucial for tracking the changes in sea ice and for assessing the significance of long-term trends. Since the advent of passive microwave satellite instruments in the early 1970s, sea ice has been one of the most consistently monitored climate parameters. There is now a 27+ year record of sea ice extent and concentration from multi-channel passive microwave radiometers that has undergone inter-sensor calibration and other quality controls to ensure consistency throughout the record. Several algorithms have been developed over the years to retrieve sea ice extent and concentration and two of the most commonly used algorithms, the NASA Team and Bootstrap, have been applied to the entire SMMR-SSM/I record to obtain a consistent time series. These algorithms were developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and are archived at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. However, the complex surface properties of sea ice affect the microwave signature, and algorithms can yield ambiguous results; no single algorithm has been found to work uniformly well under all sea ice conditions. Thus there are ongoing efforts to further refine the algorithms and the time series. One approach is to develop data fusion methods to optimally combine sea ice fields from two or more algorithms. Another approach is to take advantage of the improved capabilities of JAXA's AMSR-E sensor on NASA's Aqua

  17. Co-Channel Interference Mitigation Using Satellite Based Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    While there is some phase noise present in the continuous time-shifted signal, it is important to recognize that this signal is plotted over the [−π...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS CO-CHANNEL INTERFERENCE MITIGATION USING SATELLITE BASED RECEIVERS by John E. Patterson...07-02-2012 to 12-19-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE CO-CHANNEL INTERFERENCE MITIGATION USING SATELLITE BASED RE- CEIVERS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S

  18. Impacts of snow and organic soils parameterization on northern Eurasian soil temperature profiles simulated by the ISBA land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decharme, Bertrand; Brun, Eric; Boone, Aaron; Delire, Christine; Le Moigne, Patrick; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    In this study we analyzed how an improved representation of snowpack processes and soil properties in the multilayer snow and soil schemes of the Interaction Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere (ISBA) land surface model impacts the simulation of soil temperature profiles over northern Eurasian regions. For this purpose, we refine ISBA's snow layering algorithm and propose a parameterization of snow albedo and snow compaction/densification adapted from the detailed Crocus snowpack model. We also include a dependency on soil organic carbon content for ISBA's hydraulic and thermal soil properties. First, changes in the snowpack parameterization are evaluated against snow depth, snow water equivalent, surface albedo, and soil temperature at a 10 cm depth observed at the Col de Porte field site in the French Alps. Next, the new model version including all of the changes is used over northern Eurasia to evaluate the model's ability to simulate the snow depth, the soil temperature profile, and the permafrost characteristics. The results confirm that an adequate simulation of snow layering and snow compaction/densification significantly impacts the snowpack characteristics and the soil temperature profile during winter, while the impact of the more accurate snow albedo computation is dominant during the spring. In summer, the accounting for the effect of soil organic carbon on hydraulic and thermal soil properties improves the simulation of the soil temperature profile. Finally, the results confirm that this last process strongly influences the simulation of the permafrost active layer thickness and its spatial distribution.

  19. Predicting Clear-Sky Reflectance Over Snow/Ice in Polar Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Sun-Mack, Sunny; Arduini, Robert F.; Hong, Gang; Minnis, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing of clouds requires an accurate estimate of the clear-sky radiances for a given scene to detect clouds and aerosols and to retrieve their microphysical properties. Knowing the spatial and angular variability of clear-sky albedo is essential for predicting clear-sky radiance at solar wavelengths. The Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) Project uses the nearinfrared (NIR; 1.24, 1.6 or 2.13 micrometers), visible (VIS; 0.63 micrometers) and vegetation (VEG; 0.86 micrometers) channels available on the Terra and Aqua Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) to help identify clouds and retrieve their properties in both snow-free and snow-covered conditions. Thus, it is critical to have reliable distributions of clear-sky albedo for all of these channels. In CERES Edition 4 (Ed4), the 1.24-micrometer channel is used to retrieve cloud optical depth over snow/ice-covered surfaces. Thus, it is especially critical to accurately predict the 1.24-micrometer clear-sky albedo alpha and reflectance rho for a given location and time. Snow albedo and reflectance patterns are very complex due to surface texture, particle shapes and sizes, melt water, and vegetation protrusions from the snow surface. To minimize those effects, this study focuses on the permanent snow cover of Antarctica where vegetation is absent and melt water is minimal. Clear-sky albedos are determined as a function of solar zenith angle (SZA) from observations over all scenes determined to be cloud-free to produce a normalized directional albedo model (DRM). The DRM is used to develop alpha(SZA=0 degrees) on 10 foot grid for each season. These values provide the basis for predicting r at any location and set of viewing & illumination conditions. This paper examines the accuracy of this approach for two theoretical snow surface reflectance models.

  20. Quantification of uncertainties in snow accumulation, snowmelt, and snow disappearance dates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, Mark S.

    Seasonal mountain snowpack holds hydrologic and ecologic significance worldwide. However, observation networks in complex terrain are typically sparse and provide minimal information about prevailing conditions. Snow patterns and processes in this data sparse environment can be characterized with numerical models and satellite-based remote sensing, and thus it is essential to understand their reliability. This research quantifies model and remote sensing uncertainties in snow accumulation, snowmelt, and snow disappearance as revealed through comparisons with unique ground-based measurements. The relationship between snow accumulation uncertainty and model configuration is assessed through a controlled experiment at 154 snow pillow sites in the western United States. To simulate snow water equivalent (SWE), the National Weather Service SNOW-17 model is tested as (1) a traditional "forward" model based primarily on precipitation, (2) a reconstruction model based on total snowmelt before the snow disappearance date, and (3) a combination of (1) and (2). For peak SWE estimation, the reliability of the parent models was indistinguishable, while the combined model was most reliable. A sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the parent models had opposite sensitivities to temperature that tended to cancel in the combined model. Uncertainty in model forcing and parameters significantly controlled model accuracy. Uncertainty in remotely sensed snow cover and snow disappearance in forested areas is enhanced by canopy obstruction but has been ill-quantified due to the lack of sub-canopy observations. To better quantify this uncertainty, dense networks of near-surface temperature sensors were installed at four study areas (≤ 1 km2) with varying forest cover in the Sierra Nevada, California. Snow presence at each sensor was detected during periods when temperature was damped, which resulted from snow cover insulation. This methodology was verified using time-lapse analysis and

  1. Georectification and snow classification of webcam images: potential for complementing satellite-derrived snow maps over Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizerens, Céline; Hüsler, Fabia; Wunderle, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of snow cover has a significant impact on climate and environment and is of great socio-economic importance for the European Alps. Satellite remote sensing data is widely used to study snow cover variability and can provide spatially comprehensive information on snow cover extent. However, cloud cover strongly impedes the surface view and hence limits the number of useful snow observations. Outdoor webcam images not only offer unique potential for complementing satellite-derived snow retrieval under cloudy conditions but could also serve as a reference for improved validation of satellite-based approaches. Thousands of webcams are currently connected to the Internet and deliver freely available images with high temporal and spatial resolutions. To exploit the untapped potential of these webcams, a semi-automatic procedure was developed to generate snow cover maps based on webcam images. We used daily webcam images of the Swiss alpine region to apply, improve, and extend existing approaches dealing with the positioning of photographs within a terrain model, appropriate georectification, and the automatic snow classification of such photographs. In this presentation, we provide an overview of the implemented procedure and demonstrate how our registration approach automatically resolves the orientation of a webcam by using a high-resolution digital elevation model and the webcam's position. This allows snow-classified pixels of webcam images to be related to their real-world coordinates. We present several examples of resulting snow cover maps, which have the same resolution as the digital elevation model and indicate whether each grid cell is snow-covered, snow-free, or not visible from webcams' positions. The procedure is expected to work under almost any weather condition and demonstrates the feasibility of using webcams for the retrieval of high-resolution snow cover information.

  2. A minimal, statistical model for the surface albedo of Vestfonna ice cap, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Möller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice cap Vestfonna is located in northeastern Svalbard and forms one of the largest ice bodies of the Eurasian Arctic. Its surface albedo plays a key role in the understanding and modelling of its energy and mass balance. The principle governing factors for albedo evolution, i.e. precipitation and air temperature and therewith snow depth and melt duration, were found to vary almost exclusively with terrain elevation throughout the ice cap. Hence, surface albedo can be expected to develop a comparable pattern. A new statistical model is presented that estimates this mean altitudinal albedo profile of the ice cap on the basis of a minimal set of meteorological variables on a monthly resolution. Model calculations are based on a sigmoid function of the artificial quantity rain-snow ratio and a linear function of cumulative snowfall and cumulative positive degree days. Surface albedo fields of the MODIS snow product MOD10A1 from the period March to October in the years 2001–2008 serve as a basis for both calibration and cross-validation of the model. The meteorological model input covers the period September 2000 until October 2008 and is based on ERA-Interim data of a grid point located close to the ice cap. The albedo model shows a good performance. The root mean square error between observed and modelled albedo values along the altitudinal profile is 0.057±0.028 (mean ± one standard deviation. The area weighted mean even reduces to a value of 0.054. Distinctly higher deviations (0.07–0.09 are only present throughout the very lowest and uppermost parts of the ice cap that are either small in area or hardly affected by surface melt. Thus, the new, minimal, statistical albedo model presented in this study is found to reproduce the albedo evolution on Vestfonna ice cap on a high level of accuracy and is thus suggested to be fully suitable for further application in broader energy or mass-balance studies of the ice cap.

  3. Remote Sensing-based Methodologies for Snow Model Adjustments in Operational Streamflow Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, S.; Miller, W. P.; Bernard, B.; Stokes, M.; Oaida, C. M.; Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Water management agencies rely on hydrologic forecasts issued by operational agencies such as NOAA's Colorado Basin River Forecast Center (CBRFC). The CBRFC has partnered with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) under funding from NASA to incorporate research-oriented, remotely-sensed snow data into CBRFC operations and to improve the accuracy of CBRFC forecasts. The partnership has yielded valuable analysis of snow surface albedo as represented in JPL's MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) data, across the CBRFC's area of responsibility. When dust layers within a snowpack emerge, reducing the snow surface albedo, the snowmelt rate may accelerate. The CBRFC operational snow model (SNOW17) is a temperature-index model that lacks explicit representation of snowpack surface albedo. CBRFC forecasters monitor MODDRFS data for emerging dust layers and may manually adjust SNOW17 melt rates. A technique was needed for efficient and objective incorporation of the MODDRFS data into SNOW17. Initial development focused in Colorado, where dust-on-snow events frequently occur. CBRFC forecasters used retrospective JPL-CBRFC analysis and developed a quantitative relationship between MODDRFS data and mean areal temperature (MAT) data. The relationship was used to generate adjusted, MODDRFS-informed input for SNOW17. Impacts of the MODDRFS-SNOW17 MAT adjustment method on snowmelt-driven streamflow prediction varied spatially and with characteristics of the dust deposition events. The largest improvements occurred in southwestern Colorado, in years with intense dust deposition events. Application of the method in other regions of Colorado and in "low dust" years resulted in minimal impact. The MODDRFS-SNOW17 MAT technique will be implemented in CBRFC operations in late 2015, prior to spring 2016 runoff. Collaborative investigation of remote sensing-based adjustment methods for the CBRFC operational hydrologic forecasting environment will continue over the next several years.

  4. Three-year changes of surface albedo of degraded grassland and cropland surfaces in a semiarid area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU HuiZhi; TU Gang; DONG WenJie

    2008-01-01

    Diurnal, seasonal and interannual variations of surface albedo of degraded grassland and cropland surfaces at a semiarid area of Tognyu have been investigated based on the continuous three years observational data from 2003 to 2005. The changes of surface albedo with solar elevation angle and soil moisture have been discussed also. It has been found that surface albedo has almost the same diurnal and seasonal variations on degraded grassland and cropland surfaces in the semiarid area, while sur-face albedo is large in winter and small in summer. The diurnal variation of the surface albedo has re-lationship with the weather condition. The diurnal cycle of the surface albedo likes the "U" shape curve in sunny day, while it is low-high after the rain, and high-low after the snow. The surface albedo has large variation in cloudy day, while it has no any variation in overcast day. The large difference of the surface albedo can be 0.04 in winter between two land surfaces, because the snow has large effects on the surface albedo in winter. The rainfall is an important factor in summer on the surface albedo, while the difference of the surface albedo is 0.01 only between two land surfaces. The differences of the surface aibedo can also be 0.04 in autumn due to vegetation growing. The seasonal-average surface albeo from 2003-2005 is 0.25, 0.22, 0.24, 0.32 respectively in spring, summer, autumn and winter on the degraded grassland surface, while it is 0.25, 0.21,0.22, 0.33 respectively in spring, summer, autumn and winter on the cropland surface. The surface albedo becomes smaller with the increase of solar elevation angle. When the solar elevation angle is greater than 40°, the surface albedo changes very little and tends to be a constant. The surface albedo has negative exponent functions with soil moisture in the growing season.

  5. The impact of Saharan dust and black carbon on albedo and long-term glacier mass balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gabbi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice control glacier melt as shortwave radiation represents the main component of the surface energy balance. Here, we investigate the long-term effect of snow impurities, i.e. Saharan dust and black carbon (BC, on albedo and glacier mass balance. The analysis was performed over the period 1914–2014 for two sites on Claridenfirn, Swiss Alps, where an outstanding 100 year record of seasonal mass balance measurements is available. Information on atmospheric deposition of mineral dust and BC over the last century was retrieved from two firn/ice cores of high-alpine sites. A combined mass balance and snow/firn layer model was employed to assess the dust/BC-albedo feedback. Compared to pure snow conditions, the presence of Saharan dust and BC lowered the mean annual albedo by 0.04–0.06 and increased melt by 15–19% on average depending on the location on the glacier. BC clearly dominated absorption which is about three times higher than that of mineral dust. The upper site has experienced mainly positive mass balances and impurity layers were continuously buried whereas at the lower site, surface albedo was more strongly influenced by re-exposure of dust-enriched layers due to frequent years with negative mass balances.

  6. Narrowband-to-broadband albedo conversion for glacier ice and snowbased on aircraft and near-surface measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuell, W.; Reijmer, C.; Oerlemans, J.

    2002-01-01

    This article presents albedo measurements of snow and glacier ice at Vatnajökull (Iceland) and the Kangerlussuaq transect (Greenland). Radiative fluxes were measured in the broadband and in four narrowbands, namely, Thematic Mapper (TM) Bands 2 and 4, and Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

  7. Snow-atmosphere coupling strength and its contribution to climate predictability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.

    2010-12-01

    This study investigated the snow-atmosphere coupling strength (the degree to which atmosphere responds to anomalies in the land surface snow cover and their subsequently interaction) and this coupling strength contribution to short range climate predictability, based on the realistic snow information from the MODIS snow retrieval from NASA satellites and GLDAS land “reanalysis” data. A complex land surface model (CLM 3.5) with an advanced snow scheme coupled to the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) were employed to quantify continental snow-atmosphere coupling strength. A series of ensemble experiment will be designed to investigate the snow albedo effect and hydrological effect separately. A recently derived index Ω was used to quantify the coupling strength and predictability estimated separately by the phase and shape characteristics of a forecast ensemble. In addition, the climate predictability represented by Signal-to-Total Ratio (STR) due to realistic snow information, including Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) and Snow Cover Fraction (SCF), will also be investigated. This study improved our understanding of the interaction between snow cover and atmosphere. Determining the seasonal forecast skill attributed by snow information increased our knowledge of climate predictability. These designed experiments also offer a prototype of testing snow-atmosphere coupling strength that could be implemented in other weather and climate models in the future.

  8. The dependence of the ice-albedo feedback on atmospheric properties

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Kitzmann, D; Rauer, H

    2013-01-01

    The ice-albedo feedback is a potentially important de-stabilizing effect for the climate of terrestrial planets. It is based on the positive feedback between decreasing surface temperatures, an increase of snow and ice cover and an associated increase in planetary albedo, which then further decreases surface temperature. A recent study shows that for M stars, the strength of the ice-albedo feedback is reduced This study investigates the influence of the atmosphere (in terms of surface pressure and atmospheric composition) for this feedback. A plane-parallel radiative transfer model is used for the calculation of planetary albedos. We varied CO2 partial pressures as well as the H2O, CH4, and O3 content in the atmosphere for planets orbiting Sun-like and M-type stars. Results suggest that for planets around M stars, the ice-albedo effect is significantly reduced, compared to planets around Sun-like stars. Including the effects of an atmosphere further suppresses the sensitivity to the ice-albedo effect. Atmosph...

  9. Experimental evidence that microbial activity lowers the albedo of glacier surfaces: the cryoconite casserole experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, M.; Tranter, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Anesio, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Darkened glacier and ice sheet surfaces have lower albedos, absorb more solar radiation and consequently melt more rapidly. The increase in glacier surface darkening is an important positive feedback to warming global temperatures, leading to ever growing world-wide ice mass loss. Most studies focus primarily on glacial albedo darkening caused by the physical properties of snow and ice surfaces, and the deposition of dark impurities on glaciers. To date, however, the important effects of biological activity have not been included in most albedo reduction models. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microbial activity can significantly decrease the albedo of glacier surfaces. An original laboratory experiment, the cryoconite casserole, was designed to test the microbial darkening of glacier surface debris (cryoconite) under simulated Greenlandic summer conditions. It was found that minor fertilisation of the cryoconite (at nutrient concentrations typical of glacial ice melt) stimulated extensive microbial activity. Microbes intensified their organic carbon fixation and even mined phosphorous out of the glacier surface sediment. Furthermore, the microbial organic carbon production, accumulation and transformation caused the glacial debris to darken further by 17.3% reflectivity (albedo analogue). These experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced fertilisation by anthropogenic inputs results in substantial amounts of organic carbon fixation, debris darkening and ultimately to a considerable decrease in the ice albedo of glacier surfaces on global scales. The sizeable amounts of microbially produced glacier surface organic matter and nutrients can thus be a vital source of bioavailable nutrients for subglacial and downstream environments.

  10. Dependence of snow melting and surface-atmosphere interactions on the forest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Staenz, K.; Itten, K. I.; Kukla, G.

    1988-01-01

    The surface albedo and the surface roughness for forested areas with snow on the ground are expressed in terms of the tree silhouette parameter, s, the projection on the vertical plane of trees per unit area. The absorption of insolation (direct solar beam) is quantitatively described for a horizontal snow surface with vertical tree trunks, stressing the role of the bark at snow level as triggering the snow melt. Measurement of s by field sampling in two forested sites in central Switzerland yielded values ranging from 1.8 to 2.1.

  11. The decreasing albedo of the Zhadang glacier on western Nyainqentanglha and the role of light-absorbing impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, B.; Ming, J.; Kang, S.-C.; Zhang, G.-S.; Li, Y.-W.; Li, C.-D.; Zhao, S.-Y.; Ji, Z.-M.; Cao, J.-J.

    2014-10-01

    A large change in albedo has a significant effect on glacier ablation. Atmospheric aerosols - e.g. black carbon (BC) and dust - can reduce the albedo of glaciers and thus contribute to their melting. In this study, two main themes were explored: (1) the decrease in albedo of the Zhadang glacier on Mt. Nyainqentanglha between 2001 and 2012, as observed by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on-board the Terra satellite, and the correlation of this albedo with mass balance; and (2) the concentrations of BC and dust in the glacier measured during 2012, and the associated impacts of these impurities on albedo and radiative forcings (RF). The average albedo of the Zhadang glacier from the MODIS increased with the altitude and fluctuated but had a decreasing trend (-0.003 a-1) during the period 2001-2012, with the highest (0.722) in 2003 and the lowest (0.597) in 2009 and 2010. The mass balance of the glacier has a positively significant correlation with its surface albedo derived from MODIS. Snow samples were collected on the Zhadang glacier to measure the BC and dust in the summer of 2012. The impacts of BC and dust on albedo reduction in different melting conditions were identified with the SNow ICe Aerosol Radiative (SNICAR) model initiated by in situ observation data. The sensitivity analysis showed that BC was a major factor in albedo reduction when the glacier was covered by newly fallen snow. Nevertheless, the contribution of dust to albedo reduction can reach as high as 56%, much exceeding that of BC (28%), when the glacier experiences strong surficial melting and its surface is almost bare ice. The average RF caused by dust could increase from 1.1 to 8.6 W m-2, exceeding the RF caused by BC after snow was deposited and surface melting occurred in the Zhadang glacier. This implies that it may be dust that primarily dominates the melting of some glaciers in the inner Tibetan Plateau during melting seasons, rather than BC.

  12. High fidelity remote sensing of snow properties from MODIS and the Airborne Snow Observatory: Snowflakes to Terabytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T.; Mattmann, C. A.; Brodzik, M.; Bryant, A. C.; Goodale, C. E.; Hart, A. F.; Ramirez, P.; Rittger, K. E.; Seidel, F. C.; Zimdars, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    The response of the cryosphere to climate forcings largely determines Earth's climate sensitivity. However, our understanding of the strength of the simulated snow albedo feedback varies by a factor of three in the GCMs used in the Fourth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, mainly caused by uncertainties in snow extent and the albedo of snow-covered areas from imprecise remote sensing retrievals. Additionally, the Western US and other regions of the globe depend predominantly on snowmelt for their water supply to agriculture, industry and cities, hydroelectric power, and recreation, against rising demand from increasing population. In the mountains of the Upper Colorado River Basin, dust radiative forcing in snow shortens snow cover duration by 3-7 weeks. Extended to the entire upper basin, the 5-fold increase in dust load since the late-1800s results in a 3-week earlier peak runoff and a 5% annual loss of total runoff. The remotely sensed dynamics of snow cover duration and melt however have not been factored into hydrological modeling, operational forecasting, and policymaking. To address these deficiencies in our understanding of snow properties, we have developed and validated a suite of MODIS snow products that provide accurate fractional snow covered area and radiative forcing of dust and carbonaceous aerosols in snow. The MODIS Snow Covered Area and Grain size (MODSCAG) and MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) algorithms, developed and transferred from imaging spectroscopy techniques, leverage the complete MODIS surface reflectance spectrum. The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. We have created the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete

  13. Incorporating changes in albedo in estimating the climate mitigation benefits of land use change projects

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, D. N.; Kunda, M.; Mayer, A.; Schlamadinger, B.; Canella, L.; Johnston, M.

    2008-01-01

    Some climate scientists are questioning whether the practice of converting of non-forest lands to forest land (afforestation or reforestation) is an effective climate change mitigation option. The discussion focuses particularly on areas where the new forest is primarily coniferous and there is significant amount of snow since the increased climate forcing due to the change in albedo may counteract the decreased climate forcing due to carbon dioxide removal.

    In this pape...

  14. Climate warming feedback from mountain birch forest expansion: reduced albedo dominates carbon uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wit, Heleen A; Bryn, Anders; Hofgaard, Annika; Karstensen, Jonas; Kvalevåg, Maria M; Peters, Glen P

    2014-07-01

    Expanding high-elevation and high-latitude forest has contrasting climate feedbacks through carbon sequestration (cooling) and reduced surface reflectance (warming), which are yet poorly quantified. Here, we present an empirically based projection of mountain birch forest expansion in south-central Norway under climate change and absence of land use. Climate effects of carbon sequestration and albedo change are compared using four emission metrics. Forest expansion was modeled for a projected 2.6 °C increase in summer temperature in 2100, with associated reduced snow cover. We find that the current (year 2000) forest line of the region is circa 100 m lower than its climatic potential due to land-use history. In the future scenarios, forest cover increased from 12% to 27% between 2000 and 2100, resulting in a 59% increase in biomass carbon storage and an albedo change from 0.46 to 0.30. Forest expansion in 2100 was behind its climatic potential, forest migration rates being the primary limiting factor. In 2100, the warming caused by lower albedo from expanding forest was 10 to 17 times stronger than the cooling effect from carbon sequestration for all emission metrics considered. Reduced snow cover further exacerbated the net warming feedback. The warming effect is considerably stronger than previously reported for boreal forest cover, because of the typically low biomass density in mountain forests and the large changes in albedo of snow-covered tundra areas. The positive climate feedback of high-latitude and high-elevation expanding forests with seasonal snow cover exceeds those of afforestation at lower elevation, and calls for further attention of both modelers and empiricists. The inclusion and upscaling of these climate feedbacks from mountain forests into global models is warranted to assess the potential global impacts.

  15. Variability in Albedo Associated with Fire-Mediated Controls on Stand Density in Siberian Larch Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranty, M. M.; Fullmer, J.; Nguyen, C. L.; Alexander, H. D.; Natali, S.; Bunn, A. G.; Davydov, S. P.; Goetz, S. J.; Mack, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Fire is an integral component of boreal forests, and exerts strong control over ecosystem structure and function. The frequency and spatial extent of fire controls the age-class distribution of forests on the landscape. In addition, recent evidence from North American boreal forests has show that fire severity influences post-fire succession via impacts on seedling recruitment that manifest in mature ecosystems dominated by either deciduous or coniferous tree species. The effects of fire on ecosystem structure have important climate feedback implications; changes in forest density or leaf habit can influence surface net radiation by altering the snow-masking effects of vegetation. Although Siberian larch forests occupy a more than 2.8 million km2 of the boreal biome, and are the most prevalent forests in Russia, the influence of fire severity on succession and associated surface energy dynamics are less well understood in comparison to North American boreal forests. There is evidence suggesting that increased fire severity may lead to higher density of post-fire regrowth, but the influence of stand density on surface energy dynamics remains poorly quantified. Here, we quantify the effects of stand density on albedo across the Kolyma River basin using satellite-derived albedo and fire history in conjunction with maps and field observations of ecosystem structure. During snow-free periods albedo varies little with stand density. During periods of snow cover we find consistent negative correlations between multiple metrics of canopy cover and albedo. Albedo decreased with fire recovery over the forty-year fire record for the study area. However, the range of albedo observed within individual fire scars was similar to the magnitude of albedo recovery during the study period. This result indicates the importance of variability in post-fire regrowth within individual fire scars, potentially associated with fire severity, for understanding fire effects on surface energy

  16. Global analysis of radiative forcing from fire-induced shortwave albedo change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. López-Saldaña

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Land surface albedo, a key parameter to derive Earth's surface energy balance, is used in the parameterization of numerical weather prediction, climate monitoring and climate change impact assessments. Changes in albedo due to fire have not been fully investigated at continental and global scale. The main goal of this study therefore, is to quantify the changes in albedo produced by biomass burning activities and their associated shortwave radiative forcing. The study relies on the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS MCD64A1 burned area product to create an annual composite of areas affected by fire and the MCD43C2 BRDF-Albedo snow-free product to compute a bihemispherical reflectance time series. The approximate day of burn is used to calculate the instantaneous change in shortwave Albedo. Using the corresponding National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP monthly mean downward solar radiation flux at the surface, the global radiative forcing associated to fire was computed. The analysis reveals a mean decrease in shortwave albedo of −0.023 (1σ = 0.018 causing a mean positive radiative forcing of 6.31 W m–2 (1σ = 5.04 over the 2002–2012 time period in areas affected by fire. The greatest drop in mean shortwave albedo change occurs in 2002, which corresponds to the highest total area burnt (3.66 Mha observed in the same year and produces the highest mean radiative forcing (6.75 W m–2. Africa is the main contributor in terms of burned area but forests globally are giving the highest radiative forcing per unit area, thus give detectable changes in shortwave albedo. The global mean radiative forcing for the whole studied period ~ 0.04 W m–2 shows that the contribution of fires into the Earth system is not insignificant.

  17. The GAC-SAL: A new 27-year surface albedo data record from AVHRR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihelä, A.; Manninen, T.; Andersson, K.; Laine, V.

    2012-04-01

    Studies on the Earth's climate require knowledge on the interactions between solar radiation and the Earth's atmosphere-surface system. One of the key variables that govern those interactions is the surface albedo, the ratio of reflected to incoming solar radiation at Earth's surface. Recent studies (Holland et al, 2010, Fletcher et al., 2009) point to surface albedo and its variations being especially important for the climate of the Arctic. Against this background, there is a clear and growing need for robust long-term timeseries of surface albedo on a global scale. The Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF), a project of EUMETSAT, answers this need by releasing the first edition of the GAC-SAL surface albedo data record. The GAC-SAL describes the directional-hemispherical reflectance (or black-sky albedo) of the Earth's surface. The data record covers 27 years (1982-2009), is fully global with 0.25 degree spatial resolution, and implements published algorithms for the calculation of surface albedo over land, snow, sea ice and water. The product also incorporates a correction for topography-induced effects on image geolocation and radiometric accuracy. The data is available for all interested users, free of charge. Of special interest is the Arctic sea ice area, for which this is the first long time series reaching present day. We present an overall description of the albedo retrieval scheme and present some results from an extensive validation effort, where GAC-SAL data was compared against in situ observations of surface albedo at 10 different Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) and Greenland Climate Network (GC-Net) sites, each validation period spanning ~15 years. We have also performed comparisons between GAC-SAL, CERES FSW, and MODIS 43C3 products. Some results of these comparisons are presented. The achieved mean accuracy over all validation results was ~10% (in relative terms). Stability of the data record will also be

  18. Impact of MODIS Sensor Calibration Updates on Greenland Ice Sheet Surface Reflectance and Albedo Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Kimberly A.; Polashenski, Chris M.; Chen, Justin; Tedesco, Marco

    2017-01-01

    We evaluate Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) surface reflectance and albedo trends using the newly released Collection 6 (C6) MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) products over the period 2001-2016. We find that the correction of MODIS sensor degradation provided in the new C6 data products reduces the magnitude of the surface reflectance and albedo decline trends obtained from previous MODIS data (i.e., Collection 5, C5). Collection 5 and 6 data product analysis over GrIS is characterized by surface (i.e., wet vs. dry) and elevation (i.e., 500-2000 m, 2000 m and greater) conditions over the summer season from 1 June to 31 August. Notably, the visible-wavelength declining reflectance trends identified in several bands of MODIS C5 data from previous studies are only slightly detected at reduced magnitude in the C6 versions over the dry snow area. Declining albedo in the wet snow and ice area remains over the MODIS record in the C6 product, albeit at a lower magnitude than obtained using C5 data. Further analyses of C6 spectral reflectance trends show both reflectance increases and decreases in select bands and regions, suggesting that several competing processes are contributing to Greenland Ice Sheet albedo change. Investigators using MODIS data for other ocean, atmosphere and/or land analyses are urged to consider similar re-examinations of trends previously established using C5 data.

  19. ESA GlobSnow Snow Water Equivalent (SWE)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The European Space Agency (ESA) Global Snow Monitoring for Climate Research (GlobSnow) snow water equivalent (SWE) v2.0 data record contains snow information derived...

  20. Measuring the specific surface area of wet snow using 1310 nm reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Gallet

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The specific surface area (SSA of snow can be used as an objective measurement of grain size and is therefore a central variable to describe snow physical properties such as albedo. Snow SSA can now be easily measured in the field using optical methods based on infrared reflectance. However, existing optical methods have only been validated for dry snow. Here we test the possibility to use the DUFISSS instrument, based on the measurement of the 1310 nm reflectance of snow with an integrating sphere, to measure the SSA of wet snow. We perform cold room experiments where we measure the SSA of a wet snow sample, freeze it and measure it again, to quantify the difference in reflectance between frozen and wet snow. We study snow samples in the SSA range 12–37 m2 kg−1 and in the mass liquid water content range 5–32%. We conclude that the SSA of wet snow can be obtained from the measurement of its 1310 nm reflectance using three simple steps. In most cases, the SSA thus obtained is less than 10% different from the value that would have been obtained if the sample had been considered dry, so that the three simple steps constitute a minor correction. We also run two optical models to interpret the results, but no model reproduces correctly the water-ice distribution in wet snow, so that their predictions of wet snow reflectance are imperfect.

  1. Parameterization of single-scattering properties of snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Räisänen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Snow consists of non-spherical grains of various shapes and sizes. Still, in many radiative transfer applications, single-scattering properties of snow have been based on the assumption of spherical grains. More recently, second-generation Koch fractals have been employed. While they produce a relatively flat phase function typical of deformed non-spherical particles, this is still a rather ad-hoc choice. Here, angular scattering measurements for blowing snow conducted during the CLimate IMpacts of Short-Lived pollutants In the Polar region (CLIMSLIP campaign at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, are used to construct a reference phase function for snow. Based on this phase function, an optimized habit combination (OHC consisting of severely rough (SR droxtals, aggregates of SR plates and strongly distorted Koch fractals is selected. The single-scattering properties of snow are then computed for the OHC as a function of wavelength λ and snow grain volume-to-projected area equivalent radius rvp. Parameterization equations are developed for λ = 0.199–2.7 μm and rvp = 10–2000 μm, which express the single-scattering co-albedo β, the asymmetry parameter g and the phase function P11 as functions of the size parameter and the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index. The parameterizations are analytic and simple to use in radiative transfer models. Compared to the reference values computed for the OHC, the accuracy of the parameterization is very high for β and g. This is also true for the phase function parameterization, except for strongly absorbing cases (β > 0.3. Finally, we consider snow albedo and reflected radiances for the suggested snow optics parameterization, making comparisons to spheres and distorted Koch fractals.

  2. Parameterization of single-scattering properties of snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Räisänen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Snow consists of non-spherical grains of various shapes and sizes. Still, in many radiative transfer applications, single-scattering properties of snow have been based on the assumption of spherical grains. More recently, second-generation Koch fractals have been employed. While they produce a relatively flat phase function typical of deformed non-spherical particles, this is still a rather ad hoc choice. Here, angular scattering measurements for blowing snow conducted during the CLimate IMpacts of Short-Lived pollutants In the Polar region (CLIMSLIP campaign at Ny Ålesund, Svalbard, are used to construct a reference phase function for snow. Based on this phase function, an optimized habit combination (OHC consisting of severely rough (SR droxtals, aggregates of SR plates and strongly distorted Koch fractals is selected. The single-scattering properties of snow are then computed for the OHC as a function of wavelength λ and snow grain volume-to-projected area equivalent radius rvp. Parameterization equations are developed for λ = 0.199–2.7 μm and rvp = 10–2000 μm, which express the single-scattering co-albedo β, the asymmetry parameter g and the phase function P11 as functions of the size parameter and the real and imaginary parts of the refractive index. The parameterizations are analytic and simple to use in radiative transfer models. Compared to the reference values computed for the OHC, the accuracy of the parameterization is very high for β and g. This is also true for the phase function parameterization, except for strongly absorbing cases (β > 0.3. Finally, we consider snow albedo and reflected radiances for the suggested snow optics parameterization, making comparisons to spheres and distorted Koch fractals.

  3. Fractional snow-covered area parameterization over complex topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Helbig

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Fractional snow-covered area (SCA is a key parameter in large-scale hydrological, meteorological and climate models. Since SCA affects albedos and surface energy balance fluxes, it is especially of interest over mountainous terrain where generally a reduced SCA is observed in large grid cells. Temporal and spatial snow distributions are however difficult to measure over complex topography. We therefore present a parameterization of the SCA based on a new subgrid parameterization for the standard deviation of snow depth over complex topography. Highly-resolved snow depth data at peak of winter were used from two distinct climatic regions, in eastern Switzerland and in the Spanish Pyrenees. Topographic scaling parameters are derived assuming Gaussian slope characteristics. We use computationally cheap terrain parameters, namely the correlation length of subgrid topographic features and the mean squared slope. A scale dependent analysis was performed by randomly aggregating the alpine catchments in domain sizes ranging from 50 m to 3 km. For the larger domain sizes, snow depth was predominantly normally distributed. Trends between terrain parameters and standard deviation of snow depth were similar for both climatic regions, allowing to parameterize the standard deviation of snow depth based on terrain parameters. To make the parameterization widely applicable, we introduced the mean snow depth as a climate indicator. Assuming a normal snow distribution and spatially homogeneous melt, snow cover depletion curves were derived for a broad range of coefficients of variations. The most accurate closed form fit resembled an existing SCA parameterization. By including the subgrid parameterization for the standard deviation of snow depth, we extended the SCA parameterization for topographic influences. For all domain sizes we obtained errors lower than 10% between measured and parameterized SCA.

  4. An Overview of the Studies on Black Carbon and Mineral Dust Deposition in Snow and Ice Cores in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin; XU Baiqing; MING Jing

    2014-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is the most eff ective insoluble light-absorbing particulate (ILAP), which can strongly absorb solar radiation at visible wavelengths. Once BC is deposited in snow via dry or wet process, even a small amount of BC could signifi cantly decrease snow albedo, enhance absorption of solar radiation, accelerate snow melting, and cause climate feedback. BC is considered the second most important component next to CO2 in terms of global warming. Similarly, mineral dust (MD) is another type of ILAP. So far, little attention has been paid to quantitative measurements of BC and MD deposition on snow surface in the midlatitudes of East Asia, especially over northern China. In this paper, we focus on reviewing several experiments performed for collecting and measuring scavenging BC and MD in the high Asian glaciers over the mountain range (such as the Himalayas) and in seasonal snow over northern China. Results from the surveyed literature indicate that the absorption of ILAP in seasonal snow is dominated by MD in the Qilian Mountains and by local soil dust in the Inner Mongolian region close to dust sources. The detection of BC in snow and ice cores using modern techniques has a large bias and uncertainty when the snow sample is mixed with MD. Evidence also indicates that the reduction of snow albedo by BC and MD perturbations can signifi cantly increase the net surface solar radiation, cause surface air temperature to rise, reduce snow accumulation, and accelerate snow melting.

  5. Multi-spectral band selection for satellite-based systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clodius, W.B.; Weber, P.G.; Borel, C.C.; Smith, B.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of satellite based multispectral imaging systems requires the consideration of a number of tradeoffs between cost and performance. The authors have recently been involved in the design and evaluation of a satellite based multispectral sensor operating from the visible through the long wavelength IR. The criteria that led to some of the proposed designs and the modeling used to evaluate and fine tune the designs will both be discussed. These criteria emphasized the use of bands for surface temperature retrieval and the correction of atmospheric effects. The impact of cost estimate changes on the final design will also be discussed.

  6. Snow Cover on the Arctic Sea Ice: Model Validation, Sensitivity, and 21st Century Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazey, Benjamin Andrew

    The role of snow cover in controlling Arctic Ocean sea ice thickness and extent is assessed with a series of models. Investigations with the stand alone Community Ice CodE (CICE) show, first, a reduction in snow depth triggers a decrease in ice volume and area, and, second, that the impact of increased snow is heavily dependent on ice and atmospheric conditions. Hindcast snow depths on the Arctic ice, simulated by the fully coupled Community Climate System Model (CCSM) are validated with 20th century in situ snow depth measurements. The snow depths in CCSM are found to be deeper than observed, likely due to excessive precipitation produced by the component atmosphere model. The sensitivity of the ice to the thermal barrier imposed by the biased snow depth is assessed. The removal of the thermodynamic impact of the exaggerated snow depth increases ice area and volume. The initial increases in ice due to enhanced conductive flux triggers feedback mechanisms with the atmosphere and ocean, reinforcing the increase in ice. Finally, the 21st century projections of decreased Arctic Ocean snow depth in CCSM are reported and diagnosed. The changes in snow are dominated by reduced accumulation due to the lack of autumn ice cover. Without this platform, much of the early snowfall is lost directly to the ocean. While this decrease in snow results in enhanced conductive flux through the ice as in the validation sensitivity experiment, the decreased summer albedo is found to dominate, as in the CICE stand alone sensitivity experiment. As such, the decrease in snow projected by CCSM in the 21st century presents a mechanism to continued ice loss. These negative (ice growth due decreased insulation) and positive (ice melt due to decreased albedo) feedback mechanisms highlight the need for an accurate representation snow cover on the ice in order to accurately simulate the evolution of Arctic Ocean sea ice.

  7. A minimal, statistical model for the surface albedo of Vestfonna ice cap, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Möller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ice cap Vestfonna is located in Northeastern Svalbard and forms one of the largest ice bodies of the Eurasian Arctic. Its surface albedo plays a key role in understanding and modelling of its energy and mass balance. The principle governing factors for albedo evolution, i.e. precipitation and air temperature and therewith snowdepth and melt duration, were found to vary almost exclusively with terrain elevation throughout the ice cap. Hence, surface albedo can be expected to develop a comparable pattern. A new statistical model is presented that estimates this mean altitudinal albedo profile of the ice cap on the basis of a minimal set of meteorological variables on a monthly resolution. Model calculations are based on a logistic function of the artificial quantity rain-snow ratio and a linear function of cumulative snowfall and cumulative positive degree days. Surface albedo fields of the MODIS snow product MOD10A1 of the period March to October of the years 2001–2008 serve as a basis for both calibration and cross-validation of the model. The meteorological model input covers the period September 2000 until October 2008 and is based on ERA-Interim data of a grid point located close to the ice cap. The albedo model shows a good performance. The root mean square error between observed and modelled albedo values along the altitudinal profile is 0.057 ± 0.028 (mean ± one standard deviation. The area weighted mean even reduces to a value of 0.053. Distinctly higher deviations (0.07–0.09 are only present throughout the very lowest and uppermost parts of the ice cap that are either small in area or hardly affected by surface melt. Thus, the new, minimal, statistical albedo model presented in this study is found to reproduce the albedo evolution on Vestfonna ice cap on a high level of accuracy and is thus suggested to be fully suitable for further application in broader energy or mass-balance studies of the ice cap.

  8. Surface energy balance of seasonal snow cover for snow-melt estimation in N–W Himalaya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prem Datt; P K Srivastava; P S Negi; P K Satyawali

    2008-10-01

    This study describes time series analysis of snow-melt,radiation data and energy balance for a seasonal snow cover at Dhundi field station of SASE,which lies in Pir Panjal range of the N –W Himalaya,for a winter season from 13 January to 12 April 2005.The analysis shows that mean snow surface temperature remains very close to the melting temperature of snow.It was found close to -1°C for the complete observational period which makes the snow pack at Dhundi moist from its beginning.The average air temperature over this period was found to be 3.5°C with hourly average variation from -5.5°C to 13°C. The snow surface at this station received a mean short wave radiation of 430 W m−2, out of which 298 W m−2 was re flected back by the snow surface with mean albedo value of 0.70. The high average temperature and more absorption of solar radiation resulted in higher thermal state of the snowpack which was further responsible for faster and higher densification of the snowpack. Net radiation energy was the major component of surface energy budget with a mean value of 83 W m−2. Bulk transfer model was used to calculate turbulent fluxes. The net energy was utilized for satisfying cold content and snow-melt by using measured snow surface temperature and density of snow pack. The mean square error between calculated and measured daily snow-melt was found to be approximately 6.6 mm of water equivalent.

  9. Research relative to angular distribution of snow reflectance/snow cover characterization and microwave emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dozier, Jeff; Davis, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    Remote sensing has been applied in recent years to monitoring snow cover properties for applications in hydrologic and energy balance modeling. In addition, snow cover has been recently shown to exert a considerable local influence on weather variables. Of particular importance is the potential of sensors to provide data on the physical properties of snow with high spatial and temporal resolution. Visible and near-infrared measurements of upwelling radiance can be used to infer near-surface properties through the calculation of albedo. Microwave signals usually come from deeper within the snow pack and thus provide depth-integrated information, which can be measured through clouds and does not relay on solar illumination.Fundamental studies examining the influence of snow properties on signals from various parts of the electromagnetic spectrum continue in part because of the promise of new remote sensors with higher spectral and spatial accuracy. Information in the visible and near-infrared parts of the spectrum comprise nearly all available data with high spatial resolution. Current passive microwave sensors have poor spatial resolution and the data are problematic where the scenes consist of mixed landscape features, but they offer timely observations that are independent of cloud cover and solar illumination.

  10. Vertical profiles of the specific surface area of the snow at Dome C, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-C. Gallet

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The specific surface area (SSA of snow determines in Part the albedo of snow surfaces and the capacity of the snow to adsorb chemical species and catalyze reactions. Despite these crucial roles, almost no value of snow SSA are available for the largest permanent snow expanse on Earth, the Antarctic. We have measured the first vertical profiles of snow SSA near Dome C (DC: 75°06´ S, 123°20´ E, 3233 m a.s.l. on the Antarctic plateau, and at seven sites during the logistical traverse between Dome C and the French coastal base Dumont D'Urville (DDU: 66°40´ S, 140°01´ E during the Austral summer 2008–2009. We used the DUFISSS system, which measures the IR reflectance of snow at 1310 nm with an integrating sphere. At DC, the mean SSA of the snow in the top 1 cm is 38 m2 kg−1, decreasing monotonically to 14 m2 kg−1 at a depth of 15 cm. Along the traverse, the snow SSA profile is similar to that at DC in the first 600 km from DC. Closer to DDU, the SSA of the top 5 cm is 23 m2 kg−1, decreasing to 19 m2 kg−1 at 50 cm depth. This is attributed to wind, which causes a rapid decrease of surface snow SSA, but forms hard windpacks whose SSA decrease more slowly with time. Since light-absorbing impurities are not concentrated enough to affect albedo, the vertical profiles of SSA and density were used to calculate the spectral albedo of the snow for several realistic illumination conditions, using the DISORT radiative transfer model. A preliminary comparison with MODIS data is presented for use in energy balance calculations and for comparison with other satellite retrievals. These calculated albedos are compared to the few existing measurements on the Antarctic plateau. The interest of postulating a submillimetric, high-SSA layer at the snow surface to explain measured albedos is discussed.

  11. Validation of an Innovative Satellite-Based UV Dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Marco; Masini, Andrea; Simeone, Emilio; Khazova, Marina

    2016-08-01

    We present an innovative satellite-based UV (ultraviolet) radiation dosimeter with a mobile app interface that has been validated by exploiting both ground-based measurements and an in-vivo assessment of the erythemal effects on some volunteers having a controlled exposure to solar radiation.Both validations showed that the satellite-based UV dosimeter has a good accuracy and reliability needed for health-related applications.The app with this satellite-based UV dosimeter also includes other related functionalities such as the provision of safe sun exposure time updated in real-time and end exposure visual/sound alert. This app will be launched on the global market by siHealth Ltd in May 2016 under the name of "HappySun" and available both for Android and for iOS devices (more info on http://www.happysun.co.uk).Extensive R&D activities are on-going for further improvement of the satellite-based UV dosimeter's accuracy.

  12. Satellite based wind resource assessment over the South China Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Astrup, Poul; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2014-01-01

    modeling to develop procedures and best practices for satellite based wind resource assessment offshore. All existing satellite images from the Envisat Advanced SAR sensor by the European Space Agency (2002-12) have been collected over a domain in the South China Sea. Wind speed is first retrieved from...

  13. Modelling of snow exceedances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, Pavlina K.; Sadovský, Zoltán; Stehlík, Milan

    2017-07-01

    Modelling of snow exceedances is of great importance and interest for ecology, civil engineering and general public. We suggest the favorable fit for exceedances related to the exceptional snow loads from Slovakia, assuming that the data is driven by Generalised Pareto Distribution or Generalized Extreme Value Distribution. Further, the statistical dependence between the maximal snow loads and the corresponding altitudes is studied.

  14. Inferring past land use-induced changes in surface albedo from satellite observations: a useful tool to evaluate model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Boisier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Regional cooling resulting from increases in surface albedo has been identified in several studies as the main biogeophysical effect of past land use-induced land cover changes (LCC on climate. However, the amplitude of this effect remains quite uncertain due to, among other factors, (a uncertainties in the extent of historical LCC and, (b differences in the way various models simulate surface albedo and more specifically its dependency on vegetation type and snow cover. We derived monthly albedo climatologies for croplands and four other land cover types from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS satellite observations. We then reconstructed the changes in surface albedo between preindustrial times and present-day by combining these climatologies with the land cover maps of 1870 and 1992 used by seven land surface models (LSMs in the context of the LUCID ("Land Use and Climate: identification of robust Impacts" intercomparison project. These reconstructions show surface albedo increases larger than 10% (absolute in winter, and larger than 2% in summer between 1870 and 1992 over areas that experienced intense deforestation in the northern temperate regions. The historical surface albedo changes estimated with MODIS data were then compared to those simulated by the various climate models participating in LUCID. The inter-model mean albedo response to LCC shows a similar spatial and seasonal pattern to the one resulting from the MODIS-based reconstructions, that is, larger albedo increases in winter than in summer, driven by the presence of snow. However, individual models show significant differences between the simulated albedo changes and the corresponding reconstructions, despite the fact that land cover change maps are the same. Our analyses suggest that the primary reason for those discrepancies is how LSMs parameterize albedo. Another reason, of secondary importance, results from differences in their simulated snow extent

  15. Characterization of absorbing aerosol types using ground and satellites based observations over an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bibi, Samina; Alam, Khan; Chishtie, Farrukh; Bibi, Humera

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, for the first time, an effort has been made to seasonally characterize the absorbing aerosols into different types using ground and satellite based observations. For this purpose, optical properties of aerosol retrieved from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) were utilized over Karachi for the period 2012 to 2014. Firstly, OMI AODabs was validated with AERONET AODabs and found to have a high degree of correlation. Then, based on this validation, characterization was conducted by analyzing aerosol Fine Mode Fraction (FMF), Angstrom Exponent (AE), Absorption Angstrom Exponent (AAE), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and Aerosol Index (AI) and their mutual correlation, to identify the absorbing aerosol types and also to examine the variability in seasonal distribution. The absorbing aerosols were characterized into Mostly Black Carbon (BC), Mostly Dust and Mixed BC & Dust. The results revealed that Mostly BC aerosols contributed dominantly during winter and postmonsoon whereas, Mostly Dust were dominant during summer and premonsoon. These types of absorbing aerosol were also confirmed with MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) observations.

  16. Soot on snow experiments: light-absorbing impurities effect on the natural snowpack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Svensson

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Light-absorbing impurities affect snow and ice via a decrease in albedo and a consequent disturbance to the radiative energy balance. Experimentally, these matters have only been examined in a few studies. Here we present results from a series of experiments in which we deposited different soot concentrations onto natural snow in different regions of Finland, and thereafter monitored the changes of the snowpack through the melting season. Measurements of the particulates in the snow indicated concentrations in the range of thousands of ppb to have clear effects on the snow properties, including the albedo, the physical snow characteristics, and an increased melt rate. For soot concentrations in the hundreds of ppb range, the effects were not as clearly visible, and it was more difficult to attribute the effects solely to the soot on the snow. Comparisons between our experimental data and the widely used Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR model showed a general agreement when the model was specifically tuned to our measurements. This study highlights the importance of additional experimental studies, to further articulate and quantify the effects of light-absorbing impurities on snow.

  17. Simulation of black carbon in snow and its climate impact in the Canadian Global Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, M.; von Salzen, K.; Cole, J. N. S.

    2015-09-01

    A new physically based parameterisation of black carbon (BC) in snow was developed and implemented in the Canadian Atmospheric Global Climate Model (CanAM4.2). Simulated BC snow mixing ratios and BC snow radiative forcings are in good agreement with measurements and results from other models. Simulations with the improved model yield considerable trends in regional BC concentrations in snow and BC snow radiative forcings during the time period from 1950-1959 to 2000-2009. Increases in radiative forcings for Asia and decreases for Europe and North America are found to be associated with changes in BC emissions. Additional sensitivity simulations were performed in order to study the impact of BC emission changes between 1950-1959 and 2000-2009 on surface albedo, snow cover fraction, and surface air temperature. Results from these simulations indicate that impacts of BC emission changes on snow albedos between these 2 decades are small and not significant. Overall, changes in BC concentrations in snow have much smaller impacts on the cryosphere than the net warming surface air temperatures during the second half of the 20th century.

  18. Simulation of black carbon in snow and its climate impact in the Canadian Global Climate Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Namazi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A new physically-based parameterization of black carbon (BC in snow was developed and implemented in the Canadian Atmospheric Global Climate Model (CanAM4.2. Simulated BC snow mixing ratios and BC snow radiative forcings are in good agreement with measurements and results from other models. Simulations with the improved model yield considerable trends in regional BC concentrations in snow and BC snow radiative forcings during the time period from 1950–1959 to 2000–2009. Increases in radiative forcings for Asia and decreases for Europe and North America are found to be associated with changes in BC emissions. Additional sensitivity simulations were performed in order to study the impact of BC emission changes between 1950–1959 and 2000–2009 on surface albedo, snow cover fraction, and surface air temperature. Results from these simulations indicate that impacts of BC emission changes on snow albedos between these two decades are small and not significant. Overall, changes in BC concentrations in snow have much smaller impacts on the cryosphere than the net warming surface air temperatures during the second half of the 20th century.

  19. Soot on snow experiments: light-absorbing impurities effect on the natural snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, J.; Virkkula, A.; Meinander, O.; Kivekäs, N.; Hannula, H.-R.; Järvinen, O.; Peltoniemi, J. I.; Gritsevich, M.; Heikkilä, A.; Kontu, A.; Hyvärinen, A.-P.; Neitola, K.; Brus, D.; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, P.; Anttila, K.; Hakala, T.; Kaartinen, H.; Vehkamäki, M.; de Leeuw, G.; Lihavainen, H.

    2015-02-01

    Light-absorbing impurities affect snow and ice via a decrease in albedo and a consequent disturbance to the radiative energy balance. Experimentally, these matters have only been examined in a few studies. Here we present results from a series of experiments in which we deposited different soot concentrations onto natural snow in different regions of Finland, and thereafter monitored the changes of the snowpack through the melting season. Measurements of the particulates in the snow indicated concentrations in the range of thousands of ppb to have clear effects on the snow properties, including the albedo, the physical snow characteristics, and an increased melt rate. For soot concentrations in the hundreds of ppb range, the effects were not as clearly visible, and it was more difficult to attribute the effects solely to the soot on the snow. Comparisons between our experimental data and the widely used Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model showed a general agreement when the model was specifically tuned to our measurements. This study highlights the importance of additional experimental studies, to further articulate and quantify the effects of light-absorbing impurities on snow.

  20. Estimating Snow Water Equivalent with Backscattering at X and Ku Band Based on Absorption Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yurong Cui

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Snow water equivalent (SWE is a key parameter in the Earth’s energy budget and water cycle. It has been demonstrated that SWE can be retrieved using active microwave remote sensing from space. This necessitates the development of forward models that are capable of simulating the interactions of microwaves and the snow medium. Several proposed models have described snow as a collection of sphere- or ellipsoid-shaped ice particles embedded in air, while the microstructure of snow is, in reality, more complex. Natural snow usually forms a sintered structure following mechanical and thermal metamorphism processes. In this research, the bi-continuous vector radiative transfer (bi-continuous-VRT model, which firstly constructs snow microstructure more similar to real snow and then simulates the snow backscattering signal, is used as the forward model for SWE estimation. Based on this forward model, a parameterization scheme of snow volume backscattering is proposed. A relationship between snow optical thickness and single scattering albedo at X and Ku bands is established by analyzing the database generated from the bi-continuous-VRT model. A cost function with constraints is used to solve effective albedo and optical thickness, while the absorption part of optical thickness is obtained from these two parameters. SWE is estimated after a correction for physical temperature. The estimated SWE is correlated with the measured SWE with an acceptable accuracy. Validation against two-year measurements, using the SnowScat instrument from the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx, shows that the estimated SWE using the presented algorithm has a root mean square error (RMSE of 16.59 mm for the winter of 2009–2010 and 19.70 mm for the winter of 2010–2011.

  1. Improving winter leaf area index estimation in coniferous forests and its significance in estimating the land surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Chen, Jing M.; Pavlic, Goran; Arain, Altaf

    2016-09-01

    Winter leaf area index (LAI) of evergreen coniferous forests exerts strong control on the interception of snow, snowmelt and energy balance. Simulation of winter LAI and associated winter processes in land surface models is challenging. Retrieving winter LAI from remote sensing data is difficult due to cloud contamination, poor illumination, lower solar elevation and higher radiation reflection by snow background. Underestimated winter LAI in evergreen coniferous forests is one of the major issues limiting the application of current remote sensing LAI products. It has not been fully addressed in past studies in the literature. In this study, we used needle lifespan to correct winter LAI in a remote sensing product developed by the University of Toronto. For the validation purpose, the corrected winter LAI was then used to calculate land surface albedo at five FLUXNET coniferous forests in Canada. The RMSE and bias values for estimated albedo were 0.05 and 0.011, respectively, for all sites. The albedo map over coniferous forests across Canada produced with corrected winter LAI showed much better agreement with the GLASS (Global LAnd Surface Satellites) albedo product than the one produced with uncorrected winter LAI. The results revealed that the corrected winter LAI yielded much greater accuracy in simulating land surface albedo, making the new LAI product an improvement over the original one. Our study will help to increase the usability of remote sensing LAI products in land surface energy budget modeling.

  2. Use of Sentinels to aid the global monitoring of snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulliainen, Jouni; Salminen, Miia; Luojus, Kari; Metsämäki, Sari; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Takala, Matias; Cohen, Juval; Böttcher, Kristine

    2014-05-01

    Earth observation instruments onboard Sentinel satellites provide a unique opportunity for the monitoring and investigation of global snow processes. The issue of the possible decay of seasonal snow cover is highly relevant for climate research. In addition to water cycle, the extent and amount of snow affects to surface albedo, and indirectly to carbon cycling. The latter issue includes snow-induced changes in permafrost regions (active layer characteristics), as well as the effect of snow (melt) to vegetation growth and soil respiration. Recent advances in ESA DUE GlobSnow project have shown that by combining data from optical satellite sensors and passive microwave instruments advanced Climate Data Records (CDR) on seasonal snow cover can be produced, extending to time periods of over 30 years. The combined snow cover products provide information both on Snow Extent (SE) and Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) on a daily basis. The applicable instruments providing historical data for CDR generation include such microwave radiometers as SMMR, AMSR and SSMI/I, and such optical sensors as AVHRR, AATSR and VIIRS. Sentinel 3, especially its SLSTR instrument, is a prominent tool for expanding the snow CDR for forthcoming years. The developed global snow cover monitoring methodology, demonstrated and discussed here, derives the SWE information from passive microwave data (accompanied with in situ observations of snow depth at synoptic weather stations). The snow extent and fractional snow cover (FSC) on ground is derived from optical satellite data, in order to accurately map the continental line of seasonal snow cover, and to map regions of ephemeral snow cover. An advanced feature in the developed methodology is the provision of uncertainty information on snow cover characteristics associated with each individual satellite data footprint on ground and moment of time. In addition to assisting the generation and extension of the global snow cover CDR, Sentinel missions provide

  3. The temporal scale research of MODIS albedo product authenticity verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongxing; Xue, Zhihang; Cheng, Hui; Xiong, Yajv; Chen, Yunping; Tong, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study introduces a method that normalizes the inversed ETM+ albedo to the local solar noon albedo for the temporal scale of the MODIS albedo validation. Firstly, the statistical relation model between the surface albedo and the solar elevation angle was set up, and then deducing relationship between ETM+ albedo and the solar elevation angle, so the ETM+ albedo at local solar noon could be got. Secondly, the ground measurement albedo at the local solar noon was used to assess the inversed ETM+ albedo and the normalized albedo. The experiment results show that the method can effectively improve the accuracy of product certification.

  4. Evaluation of North Eurasian snow-off dates in the ECHAM5.4 atmospheric general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Räisänen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The timing of springtime end of snowmelt (snow-off date in northern Eurasia in version 5.4 of the ECHAM5 atmospheric general circulation model (GCM is evaluated through comparison with a snow-off date data set based on space-borne microwave radiometer measurements and with Russian snow course data. ECHAM5 reproduces well the observed gross geographical pattern of snow-off dates, with earliest snow-off (in March in the Baltic region and latest snow-off (in June in the Taymyr Peninsula and in northeastern parts of the Russian Far East. The primary biases are (1 a delayed snow-off in southeastern Siberia (associated with too low springtime temperature and too high surface albedo, in part due to insufficient shielding by canopy; and (2 an early bias in the western and northern parts of northern Eurasia. Several sensitivity experiments were conducted, where biases in simulated atmospheric circulation were corrected through nudging and/or the treatment of surface albedo was modified. While this alleviated some of the model biases in snow-off dates, 2 m temperature and surface albedo, especially the early bias in snow-off in the western parts of northern Eurasia proved very robust and was actually larger in the nudged runs. A key issue underlying the snow-off biases in ECHAM5 is that snowmelt occurs at too low temperatures. Very likely, this is related to the treatment of the surface energy budget. On one hand, the surface temperature Ts is not computed separately for the snow-covered and snow-free parts of the grid cells, which prevents Ts from rising above 0 °C before all snow has vanished. Consequently, too much of the surface net radiation is consumed in melting snow and too little in heating the air. On the other hand, ECHAM5 does not include a canopy layer. Thus, while the albedo reduction due to canopy is accounted for, the shielding of snow on ground by the overlying canopy is not considered, which leaves too much solar radiation available for

  5. The response of Arctic vegetation to the summer climate: relation between shrub cover, NDVI, surface albedo and temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blok, Daan; Heijmans, Monique M P D; Berendse, Frank [Nature Conservation and Plant Ecology Group, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela [Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies, University of Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, 8057 Zuerich (Switzerland); Bartholomeus, Harm [Centre for Geo-Information, Wageningen University, PO Box 47, 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands); Maximov, Trofim C, E-mail: daan.blok@wur.nl [Biological Problems of the Cryolithozone, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Division, 41, Lenin Prospekt, Yakutsk, The Republic of Sakha, Yakutia 677980 (Russian Federation)

    2011-07-15

    Recently observed Arctic greening trends from normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data suggest that shrub growth is increasing in response to increasing summer temperature. An increase in shrub cover is expected to decrease summer albedo and thus positively feed back to climate warming. However, it is unknown how albedo and NDVI are affected by shrub cover and inter-annual variations in the summer climate. Here, we examine the relationship between deciduous shrub fractional cover, NDVI and albedo using field data collected at a tundra site in NE Siberia. Field data showed that NDVI increased and albedo decreased with increasing deciduous shrub cover. We then selected four Arctic tundra study areas and compiled annual growing season maximum NDVI and minimum albedo maps from MODIS satellite data (2000-10) and related these satellite products to tundra vegetation types (shrub, graminoid, barren and wetland tundra) and regional summer temperature. We observed that maximum NDVI was greatest in shrub tundra and that inter-annual variation was negatively related to summer minimum albedo but showed no consistent relationship with summer temperature. Shrub tundra showed higher albedo than wetland and barren tundra in all four study areas. These results suggest that a northwards shift of shrub tundra might not lead to a decrease in summer minimum albedo during the snow-free season when replacing wetland tundra. A fully integrative study is however needed to link results from satellite data with in situ observations across the Arctic to test the effect of increasing shrub cover on summer albedo in different tundra vegetation types.

  6. Global trends in satellite-based emergency mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Stefan; Giulio-Tonolo, Fabio; Lyons, Josh; Kučera, Jan; Jones, Brenda; Schneiderhan, Tobias; Platzeck, Gabriel; Kaku, Kazuya; Hazarika, Manzul Kumar; Czaran, Lorant; Li, Suju; Pedersen, Wendi; James, Godstime Kadiri; Proy, Catherine; Muthike, Denis Macharia; Bequignon, Jerome; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-07-15

    Over the past 15 years, scientists and disaster responders have increasingly used satellite-based Earth observations for global rapid assessment of disaster situations. We review global trends in satellite rapid response and emergency mapping from 2000 to 2014, analyzing more than 1000 incidents in which satellite monitoring was used for assessing major disaster situations. We provide a synthesis of spatial patterns and temporal trends in global satellite emergency mapping efforts and show that satellite-based emergency mapping is most intensively deployed in Asia and Europe and follows well the geographic, physical, and temporal distributions of global natural disasters. We present an outlook on the future use of Earth observation technology for disaster response and mitigation by putting past and current developments into context and perspective.

  7. Global trends in satellite-based emergency mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Stefan; Giulio-Tonolo, Fabio; Lyons, Josh; Kučera, Jan; Jones, Brenda; Schneiderhan, Tobias; Platzeck, Gabriel; Kaku, Kazuya; Hazarika, Manzul Kumar; Czaran, Lorant; Li, Suju; Pedersen, Wendi; James, Godstime Kadiri; Proy, Catherine; Muthike, Denis Macharia; Bequignon, Jerome; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 15 years, scientists and disaster responders have increasingly used satellite-based Earth observations for global rapid assessment of disaster situations. We review global trends in satellite rapid response and emergency mapping from 2000 to 2014, analyzing more than 1000 incidents in which satellite monitoring was used for assessing major disaster situations. We provide a synthesis of spatial patterns and temporal trends in global satellite emergency mapping efforts and show that satellite-based emergency mapping is most intensively deployed in Asia and Europe and follows well the geographic, physical, and temporal distributions of global natural disasters. We present an outlook on the future use of Earth observation technology for disaster response and mitigation by putting past and current developments into context and perspective.

  8. Global trends in satellite-based emergency mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Stefan; Giulio-Tonolo, Fabio; Lyons, Josh; Kučera, Jan; Jones, Brenda; Schneiderhan, Tobias; Platzeck, Gabriel; Kaku, Kazuya; Hazarika, Manzul Kumar; Czaran, Lorant; Li, Suju; Pedersen, Wendi; James, Godstime Kadiri; Proy, Catherine; Muthike, Denis Macharia; Bequignon, Jerome; Guha-Sapir, Debarati

    2016-07-01

    Over the past 15 years, scientists and disaster responders have increasingly used satellite-based Earth observations for global rapid assessment of disaster situations. We review global trends in satellite rapid response and emergency mapping from 2000 to 2014, analyzing more than 1000 incidents in which satellite monitoring was used for assessing major disaster situations. We provide a synthesis of spatial patterns and temporal trends in global satellite emergency mapping efforts and show that satellite-based emergency mapping is most intensively deployed in Asia and Europe and follows well the geographic, physical, and temporal distributions of global natural disasters. We present an outlook on the future use of Earth observation technology for disaster response and mitigation by putting past and current developments into context and perspective.

  9. Trellis-coded CPM for satellite-based mobile communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrishamkar, Farrokh; Biglieri, Ezio

    1988-01-01

    Digital transmission for satellite-based land mobile communications is discussed. To satisfy the power and bandwidth limitations imposed on such systems, a combination of trellis coding and continuous-phase modulated signals are considered. Some schemes based on this idea are presented, and their performance is analyzed by computer simulation. The results obtained show that a scheme based on directional detection and Viterbi decoding appears promising for practical applications.

  10. Hydrological response to Black Carbon deposition in seasonally snow covered catchments in Norway using two different atmospheric transport models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, F.; Burkhart, J. F.; Pietikäinen, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    Black Carbon (BC) has been shown to significantly impact snow melt through lowering the albedo of snow and increasing the absorption rate of short wave radiation. Yet few studies have investigated the effect of the enhanced melt on hydrological variability. BC sources for Norway are rather remote and deposition rates low. However, once deposited on snow even low concentrations of BC can have a detectable effect on the snow melt. Variations in snow melt have a direct impact on the snow cover duration and the timing and magnitude of peak outflow. In this study, we use two different atmospheric transport models (the Lagrangian transport and dispersion model FELXPART and the regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM) and GAINS emissions to simulate deposition rates over Norway and Statkraft's Hydrologic Forecasting Toolbox (ShyFT) to simulate the impact of BC deposition on the seasonal snow melt. The Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model coupled to the snow routine of the hydrological model is used to determine the albedo of the snow as a function of the BC concentration in two snow layers. To investigate the impact range of BC on the seasonal snow melt, we simulate the catchment hydrology of catchments in south-east, south-west and northern Norway under the impact of deposition rates from both transport models, respectively. Comparing the deposition rates from the two transport models, we observe large differences in the seasonal cycle which in turn results in a significantly different response in the snow melt. Furthermore, we investigate the overall impact of BC deposition on the snow melt and duration on a catchment scale for both transport models.

  11. A satellite based telemetry link for a UAV application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloise, Anthony

    1995-01-01

    The requirements for a satellite based communication facility to service the needs of the Geographical Information System (GIS) data collection community are addressed in this paper. GIS data is supplied in the form of video imagery at sub-television rates in one or more spectral bands / polarizations laced with a position correlated data stream. The limitations and vicissitudes of using a terrestrial based telecommunications link to collect GIS data are illustrated from actual mission scenarios. The expectations from a satellite based communications link by the geophysical data collection community concerning satellite architecture, operating bands, bandwidth, footprint agility, up link and down link hardware configurations on the UAV, the Mobile Control Vehicle and at the Central Command and Data Collection Facility comprise the principle issues discussed in the first section of this paper. The final section of the paper discusses satellite based communication links would have an increased volume and scope of services the GIS data collection community could make available to the GIS user community, and the price the data collection community could afford to pay for access to the communication satellite described in the paper.

  12. Variations of albedo and spectral reflectance on Qiyi Glacier in Qilian Mountains during the ablation season

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the data observed at two sites (site H1, 4,473 m a.s.l., and site H2, 4,696 m a.s.l.) on Qiyi Glacier in Qilian Mountains, China, by automatic weather station and spectral pyranometer during the period of June 9 through September 27, 2006, we investigated the temporal and spatial variations in surface albedo and spectral reflectance on the glacier. At site H1, the daily mean surface albedos fluctuated between 0.233 and 0.866, which were significantly affected by the air temperature on the glacier. It was found that the albedos clearly showed a diurnal cycle with the lowest value at noon at the two observation sites over the study period, and the difference of albedos between the upper site H2 and the lower site H1 also showed diurnal cycle but with the highest value at noon. The reflectance on the glacier was higher in the ultraviolet (0.28-0.4 μm) and visible (0.4-0.76 μm) wavelengths, lower in the near infrared wavelength (0.76-3 μm), which is quite contrary to the spectral reflectance on other ground surfaces. At the two observation sites, the spectral reflectance declined in all wavelengths with the ablation of snow generally. However, it declined drastically in ultraviolet (0.28-0.4 μm) and 0.6-0.7 μm wavelength, and declined less in 0.4-0.5 μm wavelength. On fresh snow surface, the spectral reflectance had the high values of 0.983 and 0.815 in the ultraviolet and visible (0.4-0.76 μm) wavelengths, respectively; but it had a relatively lower value of 0.671 in near infrared (0.76-3 μm) wavelengths. However, on dirty and melting ice surfaces, the reflectance had the very low values of 0.305 and 0.256 in the ultraviolet and visible wavelengths, with the lowest value of 0.082 in near infrared wavelengths. The spectral reflectance also showed a diurnal cycle like that of albedo. The diurnal variations of spectral reflectance on snow surface in ultraviolet and visible wavelength changed to a greater degree than that on ice surface. The diurnal

  13. Aerosol optical depth retrieval in the Arctic region using MODIS data over snow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, L.; Xue, Y.; Leeuw, G. de; Hoyningen-Huene, W. von; Kokhanovsky, A.A.; Istomina, L.; Guang, J.; Burrows, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The Arctic is vulnerable to the long-term transport of aerosols because they affect the surface albedo when particles are deposited on snow and ice. However, aerosol observations for this area are sparse and hence there is considerable uncertainty in the knowledge on the properties of the Arctic aer

  14. Radiative transfer in forest canopies with intercepted and underlying snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essery, R.

    2012-12-01

    Representations of shortwave radiative transfer through forest canopies are required for modelling energy balance below the canopy for hydrological and ecological applications and energy balance above the canopy for meteorological applications. Although highly detailed ray-tracing models of canopy radiative transfer exist, large-scale models invariably treat canopies as plane-parallel absorbing or scattering media. Within these simplifications, however, there are a range of common choices for handling canopy architecture, multiple reflections, anisotropic incoming radiation and the influence of intercepted snow. A representative range of parametrizations will be compared with radiation measurements above and below canopies at sites with seasonal snow cover to identify sources of uncertainty and implications for modelling of forest snow dynamics.bserved and modelled albedo above and transmission through a mountain pine canopy

  15. Relating C-band Microwave and Optical Satellite Observations as A Function of Snow Thickness on First-Year Sea Ice during the Winter to Summer Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Yackel, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic sea ice and its snow cover have a direct impact on both the Arctic and global climate system through their ability to moderate heat exchange across the ocean-sea ice-atmosphere (OSA) interface. Snow cover plays a key role in the OSA interface radiation and energy exchange, as it controls the growth and decay of first-year sea ice (FYI). However, meteoric accumulation and redistribution of snow on FYI is highly stochastic over space and time, which makes it poorly understood. Previous studies have estimated local-scale snow thickness distributions using in-situ technique and modelling but it is spatially limited and challenging due to logistic difficulties. Moreover, snow albedo is also critical for determining the surface energy balance of the OSA during the critical summer ablation season. Even then, due to persistent and widespread cloud cover in the Arctic at various spatio-temporal scales, it is difficult and unreliable to remotely measure albedo of snow cover on FYI in the optical spectrum. Previous studies demonstrate that only large-scale sea ice albedo was successfully estimated using optical-satellite sensors. However, space-borne microwave sensors, with their capability of all-weather and 24-hour imaging, can provide enhanced information about snow cover on FYI. Daily spaceborne C-band scatterometer data (ASCAT) and MODIS data are used to investigate the the seasonal co-evolution of the microwave backscatter coefficient and optical albedo as a function of snow thickness on smooth FYI. The research focuses on snow-covered FYI near Cambridge Bay, Nunavut (Fig.1) during the winter to advanced-melt period (April-June, 2014). The ACSAT time series (Fig.2) show distinct increase in scattering at melt onset indicating the first occurrence of melt water in the snow cover. The corresponding albedo exhibits no decrease at this stage. We show how the standard deviation of ASCAT backscatter on FYI during winter can be used as a proxy for surface roughness

  16. The GOddard SnoW Impurity Module (GOSWIM) for the NASA GEOS-5 Earth System Model: Preliminary Comparisons with Observations in Sapporo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Lau, K.-M.; Mahanama, Sarith P. P.; Colarco, Peter R.; daSilva, Arlindo M.; Aoki, Teruo; Aoki, Kazuma; Murao, Naoto; Yamagata, Sadamu; Kodama, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    The snow darkening module evaluating dust, black carbon, and organic carbon depositions on mass and albedo has been developed for the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) Earth System Model, as the GOddard SnoW Impurity Module (GOSWIM). GOSWIM consists of the snow albedo scheme from a previous study (Yasunari et al. 2011) with updates and a newly developed mass concentration scheme, using aerosol depositions from the chemical transport model (GOCART) in GEOS-5. Compared to observations at Sapporo, the numerical experiments, forced by observation-based meteorology and aerosol depositions from GOES-5, better simulated the seasonal migration of snow depth, albedos, and impurities of dust, BC, and OC in the snow surface. However, the magnitude of the impurities is underestimated, compared to the sporadic snow impurity measurements. Increasing the deposition rates of dust and BC could explain the differences on the snow darkening effect between observation and simulation. Ignoring BC deposition can possibly lead to an extension of snow cover duration in Sapporo for four days. Comparing the off-line GOSWIM and the GEOS-5 global simulations, we found that determining better local precipitation and deposition rates of the aerosols are key factors in generating better GOSWIM snow darkening simulation in NASA GEOS-5.

  17. Black carbon in seasonal snow across northern Xinjiang in northwestern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Hao; Zhang, Rudong; Shi, Jinsen; Huang, Jianping; Warren, Stephen G.; Fu, Qiang

    2012-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) particles in snow can significantly reduce the snow albedo and enhance the absorption of solar radiation, with important impacts on climate and the hydrological cycle. A field campaign was carried out to measure the BC content in seasonal snow in Qinghai and Xinjiang provinces of western China, in January and February 2012. 284 snow samples were collected at 38 sites, 6 in Qinghai and 32 in Xinjiang. The observational results at the sites in Xinjiang, where the absorbing impurities in snow are dominated by BC particles, are reported in this work. The BC mass fractions in seasonal snow across northern Xinjiang have a median value of ˜70 ng g-1, much lower than those in northeast China. The estimated concentration of BC at the cleanest site in Xinjiang is 20 ng g-1, which is similar to that found along the coast of the Arctic Ocean. It is found that the BC content of snow decreases with altitude. Taking into account this altitude dependence, our measured BC contents in snow are consistent with a recent measurement of BC in winter snow on Tianshan glacier. The data from this field campaign should be useful for testing transport models and climate models for the simulated BC in snow.

  18. Measuring snow and glacier ice properties from satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    KöNig, Max; Winther, Jan-Gunnar; Isaksson, Elisabeth

    2001-02-01

    Satellite remote sensing is a convenient tool for studying snow and glacier ice, allowing us to conduct research over large and otherwise inaccessible areas. This paper reviews various methods for measuring snow and glacier ice properties with satellite remote sensing. These methods have been improving with the use of new satellite sensors, like the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) during the last decade, leading to the development of new and powerful methods, such as SAR interferometry for glacier velocity, digital elevation model generation of ice sheets, or snow cover mapping. Some methods still try to overcome the limitations of present sensors, but future satellites will have much increased capability, for example, the ability to measure the whole optical spectrum or SAR sensors with multiple polarization or frequencies. Among the methods presented are the satellite-derived determination of surface albedo, snow extent, snow volume, snow grain size, surface temperature, glacier facies, glacier velocities, glacier extent, and ice sheet topography. In this review, emphasis is put on the principles and theory of each satellite remote sensing method. An extensive list of references, with an emphasis on studies from the 1990s, allows the reader to delve into specific topics.

  19. Snow Roads and Runways

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    CONSTRUCT ROADS FOR MARCHING COLUMNS ALL ARMS (1) Pass over the trace twice with (1) Two passes with the harrow the harrow. and roller. (2) After harrowing...should be accomplished by successive passes with beams or slabs to the towing bars. A method forballasting D-7 orD-8 tractortracks. Normally twoto five... waffle -type snow surface (Fig. 85)and is notas suitable for snow pavement surface has been previously compacted snow compaction as other types of rollers

  20. Snow molds: A group of fungi that prevail under snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Naoyuki

    2009-01-01

    Snow molds are a group of fungi that attack dormant plants under snow. In this paper, their survival strategies are illustrated with regard to adaptation to the unique environment under snow. Snow molds consist of diverse taxonomic groups and are divided into obligate and facultative fungi. Obligate snow molds exclusively prevail during winter with or without snow, whereas facultative snow molds can thrive even in the growing season of plants. Snow molds grow at low temperatures in habitats where antagonists are practically absent, and host plants deteriorate due to inhibited photosynthesis under snow. These features characterize snow molds as opportunistic parasites. The environment under snow represents a habitat where resources available are limited. There are two contrasting strategies for resource utilization, i.e., individualisms and collectivism. Freeze tolerance is also critical for them to survive freezing temperatures, and several mechanisms are illustrated. Finally, strategies to cope with annual fluctuations in snow cover are discussed in terms of predictability of the habitat.

  1. Snow Cover Monitoring Using MODIS Data in Liaoning Province, Northeastern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Lu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of snow cover monitoring studies in Liaoning Province, northeastern China, using MODIS data. Snow cover plays an important role in both the regional water balance and soil moisture properties during the early spring in northeastern China. In addition, heavy snowfalls commonly trigger hazards such as flooding, caused by rapid snow melt, or crop failure, resulting from fluctuations in soil temperature associated with changes in the snow cover. The latter is a function of both regional, or global, climatic changes, as well as fluctuations in the albedo resulting from variations in the Snow Covered Area (SCA. These impacts are crucial to human activities, especially to those living in middle-latitude areas such as Liaoning Province. Thus, SCA monitoring is currently an important tool in studies of global climate change, particularly because satellite remote sensing data provide timely and efficient snow cover information for large areas. In this study, MODIS L1B data, MODIS Daily Snow Products (MOD10A1 and MODIS 8-day Snow Products (MOD10A2 were used to monitor the SCA of Liaoning Province over the winter months of November–April, 2006–2008. The effects of cloud masking and forest masking on the snow monitoring results were also assessed. The results show that the SCA percentage derived from MODIS L1B data is relatively consistent, but slightly higher than that obtained from MODIS Snow Products. In situ data from 25 snow stations were used to assess the accuracy of snow cover monitoring from the SCA compared to the results from MODIS Snow Products. The studies found that the SCA results were more reliable than MODIS Snow Products in the study area.

  2. Snow multivariable data assimilation for hydrological predictions in Alpine sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Gaia; Thirel, Guillaume; Campo, Lorenzo; Gabellani, Simone; Stevenin, Hervè

    2017-04-01

    , relative air humidity, precipitation and incident solar radiation) to provide a complete estimate of snowpack state. The implementation of a DA scheme enables to assimilate simultaneously ground-based observations of different snow-related variables (snow depth, snow density, surface temperature and albedo). SMASH performances are evaluated by using observed data supplied by meteorological stations located in three experimental Alpine sites: Col de Porte (1325 m, France); Torgnon (2160 m, Italy); Weissfluhjoch (2540 m, Switzerland). A comparison analysis between the resulting performaces of Particle Filter and Ensemble Kalman Filter schemes is shown.

  3. Validating reconstruction of snow water equivalent in California's Sierra Nevada using measurements from the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Edward H.; Rittger, Karl; Davis, Robert E.; Painter, Thomas H.; Dozier, Jeff

    2016-11-01

    Accurately estimating basin-wide snow water equivalent (SWE) is the most important unsolved problem in mountain hydrology. Models that rely on remotely sensed inputs are especially needed in ranges with few surface measurements. The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) provides estimates of SWE at 50 m spatial resolution in several basins across the Western U.S. during the melt season. Primarily, water managers use this information to forecast snowmelt runoff into reservoirs; another impactful use of ASO measurements lies in validating and improving satellite-based snow estimates or models that can scale to whole mountain ranges, even those without ground-based measurements. We compare ASO measurements from 2013 to 2015 to four methods that estimate spatially distributed SWE: two versions of a SWE reconstruction method, spatial interpolation from snow pillows and courses, and NOAA's Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS). SWE reconstruction downscales energy forcings to compute potential melt, then multiplies those values by satellite-derived estimates of fractional snow-covered area to calculate snowmelt. The snowpack is then built in reverse from the date the snow is observed to disappear. The two SWE reconstruction models tested include one that employs an energy balance calculation of snowmelt, and one that combines net radiation and degree-day approaches to estimate melt. Our full energy balance model, without ground observations, performed slightly better than spatial interpolation from snow pillows, having no systematic bias and 26% mean absolute error when compared to SWE from ASO. Both reconstruction models and interpolation were more accurate than SNODAS.

  4. Advancing satellite-based solar power forecasting through integration of infrared channels for automatic detection of coastal marine inversion layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostylev, Vladimir; Kostylev, Andrey; Carter, Chris; Mahoney, Chad; Pavlovski, Alexandre; Daye, Tony [Green Power Labs Inc., Dartmouth, NS (Canada); Cormier, Dallas Eugene; Fotland, Lena [San Diego Gas and Electric Co., San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The marine atmospheric boundary layer is a layer or cool, moist maritime air with the thickness of a few thousand feet immediately below a temperature inversion. In coastal areas as moist air rises from the ocean surface, it becomes trapped and is often compressed into fog above which a layer of stratus clouds often forms. This phenomenon is common for satellite-based solar radiation monitoring and forecasting. Hour ahead satellite-based solar radiation forecasts are commonly using visible spectrum satellite images, from which it is difficult to automatically differentiate low stratus clouds and fog from high altitude clouds. This provides a challenge for cloud motion tyracking and cloud cover forecasting. San Diego Gas and Electric {sup registered} (SDG and E {sup registered}) Marine Layer Project was undertaken to obtain information for integration with PV forecasts, and to develop a detailed understanding of long-term benefits from forecasting Marine Layer (ML) events and their effects on PV production. In order to establish climatological ML patterns, spatial extent and distribution of marine layer, we analyzed visible and IR spectrum satellite images (GOES WEST) archive for the period of eleven years (2000 - 2010). Historical boundaries of marine layers impact were established based on the cross-classification of visible spectrum (VIS) and infrared (IR) images. This approach is successfully used by us and elsewhere for evaluating cloud albedo in common satellite-based techniques for solar radiation monitoring and forecasting. The approach allows differentiation of cloud cover and helps distinguish low laying fog which is the main consequence of marine layer formation. ML occurrence probability and maximum extent inland was established for each hour and day of the analyzed period and seasonal/patterns were described. SDG and E service area is the most affected region by ML events with highest extent and probability of ML occurrence. Influence of ML was the

  5. Monitoring Snow Using Geostationary Satellite Retrievals During the SAAWSO Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, Robert M.; Gultepe, Ismail; Kuligowski, Robert J.; Heidinger, Andrew K.

    2016-09-01

    The SAAWSO (Satellite Applications for Arctic Weather and SAR (Search And Rescue) Operations) field programs were conducted by Environment Canada near St. Johns, NL and Goose Bay, NL in the winters of 2012-13 and 2013-14, respectively. The goals of these programs were to validate satellite-based nowcasting products, including snow amount, wind intensity, and cloud physical parameters (e.g., cloud cover), over northern latitudes with potential applications to Search And Rescue (SAR) operations. Ground-based in situ sensors and remote sensing platforms were used to measure microphysical properties of precipitation, clouds and fog, radiation, temperature, moisture and wind profiles. Multi-spectral infrared observations obtained from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-13 provided estimates of cloud top temperature and height, phase (water, ice), hydrometer size, extinction, optical depth, and horizontal wind patterns at 15 min intervals. In this work, a technique developed for identifying clouds capable of producing high snowfall rates and incorporating wind information from the satellite observations is described. The cloud top physical properties retrieved from operational satellite observations are validated using measurements obtained from the ground-based in situ and remote sensing platforms collected during two precipitation events: a blizzard heavy snow storm case and a moderate snow event. The retrieved snow precipitation rates are found to be comparable to those of ground-based platform measurements in the heavy snow event.

  6. Spatial estimates of snow water equivalent from reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittger, Karl; Bair, Edward H.; Kahl, Annelen; Dozier, Jeff

    2016-08-01

    Operational ground-based measurements of snow water equivalent (SWE) do not adequately explain spatial variability in mountainous terrain. To address this problem, we combine satellite-based retrievals of fractional snow cover for the period 2000 to 2011 with spatially distributed energy balance calculations to reconstruct SWE values throughout each melt season in the Sierra Nevada of California. Modeled solar radiation, longwave radiation, and air temperature from NLDAS drive the snowmelt model. The modeled solar radiation compares well to ground observations, but modeled longwave radiation is slightly lower than observations. Validation of reconstructed SWE with snow courses and our own snow surveys shows that the model can accurately estimate SWE at the sampled locations in a variety of topographic settings for a range of wet to dry years. The relationships of SWE with elevation and latitude are significantly different for wet, mean and dry years as well as between drainages. In all the basins studied, the relationship between remaining SWE and snow-covered area (SCA) becomes increasingly correlated from March to July as expected because SCA is an important model input. Though the SWE is calculated retrospectively SCA observations are available in near-real time and combined with historical reconstructions may be sufficient for estimating SWE with more confidence as the melt season progresses.

  7. Land Surface Albedo From EPS/AVHRR : Method For Retrieval and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.

    2015-12-01

    The scope of Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) is to increase benefit from EUMETSAT Satellites (MSG and EPS) data by providing added value products for the meteorological and environmental science communities with main applications in the fields of climate modelling, environmental management, natural hazards management, and climate change detection. The MSG/SEVIRI daily albedo product is disseminated operationally by the LSA-SAF processing centre based in Portugal since 2009. This product so-called MDAL covers Europe and Africa includes in the visible, near infrared and shortwave bands at a resolution of 3km at the equator. Recently, an albedo product at 1km so-called ETAL has been built from EPS/AVHRR observations in order to primarily MDAL product outside the MSG disk, while ensuring a global coverage. The methodology is common to MSG and EPS data and relies on the inversion of the BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) model of Roujean et al. On a given target, ETAL products exploits the variability of viewing angles whereas MDAL looks at the variations of solar illumination. The comparison of ETAL albedo product against MODIS and MSG/SEVIRI products over the year 2015 is instructive in many ways and shows in general a good agreement between them. The dispersion may be accounted by different factors that will be explained The additional information provided by EPS appears to be particularly beneficial for high latitudes during winter and for snow albedo.

  8. Impacts of coal dust from an active mine on the spectral reflectance of Arctic surface snow in Svalbard, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Alia L.; Dierssen, Heidi; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Schmitt, Carl; Chlus, Adam; Hermanson, Mark; Painter, Thomas H.; McKnight, Diane M.

    2017-02-01

    Light-absorbing particles (LAPs) in snow such as dust and black carbon influence the radiative forcing at the Earth's surface, which has major implications for global climate models. LAPs also significantly influence the melting of glaciers, sea ice, and seasonal snow. Here we present an in situ study of surface snow near an active coal mine in the Norwegian Arctic. We couple measurements of spectral hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) with measurements of LAPs characterized in two ways, as refractory black carbon using a Single Particle Soot Photometer and the total light absorption of LAPs measured with the Light Absorption Heating Method. The Snow Ice and Aerosol Radiation model was constrained by LAP measurements. Results were compared to observed spectral albedo measurements. Modeled and observed albedos were similar at the cleaner and more remote sites. However, the modeled spectral albedos do not fully account for the low spectral albedo measured next to the mine. LAP measurements also showed a large variation in particle sizes (tenths to tens of microns) related to transport distance of the particles from the mine. Here we find that LAPs from coal dust reduce the spectral HDRF by up to 84% next to the mine and 55% 0.5 km downwind of the mine. The coupling of extreme LAP observations (1 ng g-1 to 4863 ng g-1) with HDRF measurements from 350 to 2500 nm has facilitated the development of spectral band pairs, which could be used in the future to remotely assess LAPs in Arctic snow.

  9. Correlated declines in Pacific arctic snow and sea ice cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert P.; Douglas, David C.; Belchansky, Gennady I.; Drobot, Sheldon

    2005-01-01

    Simulations of future climate suggest that global warming will reduce Arctic snow and ice cover, resulting in decreased surface albedo (reflectivity). Lowering of the surface albedo leads to further warming by increasing solar absorption at the surface. This phenomenon is referred to as “temperature–albedo feedback.” Anticipation of such a feedback is one reason why scientists look to the Arctic for early indications of global warming. Much of the Arctic has warmed significantly. Northern Hemisphere snow cover has decreased, and sea ice has diminished in area and thickness. As reported in the Arctic Climate Impact Assessment in 2004, the trends are considered to be outside the range of natural variability, implicating global warming as an underlying cause. Changing climatic conditions in the high northern latitudes have influenced biogeochemical cycles on a broad scale. Warming has already affected the sea ice, the tundra, the plants, the animals, and the indigenous populations that depend on them. Changing annual cycles of snow and sea ice also affect sources and sinks of important greenhouse gases (such as carbon dioxide and methane), further complicating feedbacks involving the global budgets of these important constituents. For instance, thawing permafrost increases the extent of tundra wetlands and lakes, releasing greater amounts of methane into the atmosphere. Variable sea ice cover may affect the hemispheric carbon budget by altering the ocean–atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide. There is growing concern that amplification of global warming in the Arctic will have far-reaching effects on lower latitude climate through these feedback mechanisms. Despite the diverse and convincing observational evidence that the Arctic environment is changing, it remains unclear whether these changes are anthropogenically forced or result from natural variations of the climate system. A better understanding of what controls the seasonal distributions of snow and ice

  10. The impact of Saharan dust and black carbon on albedo and long-term mass balance of an Alpine glacier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Gabbi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice control glacier melt as shortwave radiation represents the main component of the surface energy balance. Here, we investigate the long-term effect of snow impurities, i.e., mineral dust and black carbon (BC, on albedo and glacier mass balance. The analysis was performed over the period 1914–2014 for two sites on Claridenfirn, Swiss Alps, where an outstanding 100-year record of seasonal mass balance measurements is available. Information on atmospheric deposition of mineral dust and BC over the last century was retrieved from two firn/ice cores of high-alpine sites. A combined mass balance and snow/firn layer model was employed to assess the effects of melt and accumulation processes on the impurity concentration at the surface and thus on albedo and glacier mass balance. Compared to pure snow conditions, the presence of Saharan dust and BC lowered the mean annual albedo by 0.04–0.06 depending on the location on the glacier. Consequently, annual melt was increased by 15–19 %, and the mean annual mass balance was reduced by about 280–490 mm w.e. BC clearly dominated absorption which is about 3 times higher than that of mineral dust. The upper site has experienced mainly positive mass balances and impurity layers were continuously buried whereas at the lower site, surface albedo was more strongly influenced by re-exposure of dust and BC-enriched layers due to frequent years with negative mass balances.

  11. The impact of Saharan dust and black carbon on albedo and long-term mass balance of an Alpine glacier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbi, J.; Huss, M.; Bauder, A.; Cao, F.; Schwikowski, M.

    2015-07-01

    Light-absorbing impurities in snow and ice control glacier melt as shortwave radiation represents the main component of the surface energy balance. Here, we investigate the long-term effect of snow impurities, i.e., mineral dust and black carbon (BC), on albedo and glacier mass balance. The analysis was performed over the period 1914-2014 for two sites on Claridenfirn, Swiss Alps, where an outstanding 100-year record of seasonal mass balance measurements is available. Information on atmospheric deposition of mineral dust and BC over the last century was retrieved from two firn/ice cores of high-alpine sites. A combined mass balance and snow/firn layer model was employed to assess the effects of melt and accumulation processes on the impurity concentration at the surface and thus on albedo and glacier mass balance. Compared to pure snow conditions, the presence of Saharan dust and BC lowered the mean annual albedo by 0.04-0.06 depending on the location on the glacier. Consequently, annual melt was increased by 15-19 %, and the mean annual mass balance was reduced by about 280-490 mm w.e. BC clearly dominated absorption which is about 3 times higher than that of mineral dust. The upper site has experienced mainly positive mass balances and impurity layers were continuously buried whereas at the lower site, surface albedo was more strongly influenced by re-exposure of dust and BC-enriched layers due to frequent years with negative mass balances.

  12. Measurements of snow radiometric and microstructure properties over a transect of plot-scale field observations: Application to snow thermodynamic and passive microwave emission models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, A.; Royer, A.; Montpetit, B.; Roy, A.; Derksen, C.

    2010-12-01

    Snow geophysical and thermophysical properties are known to be sensitive to climate variability and change and are of primary importance for hydrological and climatological processes in northern regions. Specifically, spatial and temporal variations of snow extent and thickness are good indicators of climate variability and change, and better tools are required to assess those changes from space. Numerous studies have looked at the linkages between passive microwave brightness temperatures (Tb) and snow thickness and water equivalent (SWE), but lingering uncertainties remain with regards to the effect of snow grain metamorphism on the microwave emission. Snow grains play an important role in the scattering mechanisms, but the lack of objectivity and repeatability in the measurement of snow grain morphology highlights the need for improved observations in order to fully exploit passive microwave radiometry. This work presents an innovative approach to measure and better define snow grains through accurate measurements of specific surface area (SSA) using near-infrared photography at 715 nm and laser measurements at 1310 nm. The relationship between infrared reflectance and snow grain morphology parameters measured from directional lighting photographs is also investigated. Using the theoretical snow albedo model of Kokhanovsky and Zege (2004), vertical SSA profiles are derived and coupled to snow thermodynamic and microwave emission models (SNOWPACK and MEMLS). Measurements of snow properties and microwave emission at 19 and 37 GHz were performed over a transect of 2 000 km in northerneastern Canada, from the dense boreal forest to arctic tundra. A series of plot-scale observations were performed every 40 km. Results show that with proper assessment of snow grains, simulations of brightness temperatures are improved when compared to field measurements from airborne passive microwave radiometers.

  13. Loropetalum chinense 'Snow Panda'

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new Loropetalum chinense, ‘Snow Panda’, developed at the U.S. National Arboretum is described. ‘Snow Panda’ (NA75507, PI660659) originated from seeds collected near Yan Chi He, Hubei, China in 1994 by the North America-China Plant Exploration Consortium (NACPEC). Several seedlings from this trip w...

  14. Impact of dust deposition on the albedo of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Monika; Dorothea Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Pálsson, Finnur; Arnalds, Olafur; Björnsson, Helgi; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Deposition of small amounts of airborne dust on glaciers causes positive radiative forcing and enhanced melting due to the reduction of surface albedo. To study the effects of dust deposition on the mass balance of Brúarjökull, an outlet glacier of the largest ice cap in Iceland, Vatnajökull, a study of dust deposition events in the year 2012 was carried out. The dust-mobilisation module FLEXDUST was used to calculate spatio-temporally resolved dust emissions from Iceland and the dispersion model FLEXPART was used to simulate atmospheric dust dispersion and deposition. We used albedo measurements at two automatic weather stations on Brúarjökull to evaluate the dust impacts. Both stations are situated in the accumulation area of the glacier, but the lower station is close to the equilibrium line. For this site ( ˜ 1210 m a.s.l.), the dispersion model produced 10 major dust deposition events and a total annual deposition of 20.5 g m-2. At the station located higher on the glacier ( ˜ 1525 m a.s.l.), the model produced nine dust events, with one single event causing ˜ 5 g m-2 of dust deposition and a total deposition of ˜ 10 g m-2 yr-1. The main dust source was found to be the Dyngjusandur floodplain north of Vatnajökull; northerly winds prevailed 80 % of the time at the lower station when dust events occurred. In all of the simulated dust events, a corresponding albedo drop was observed at the weather stations. The influence of the dust on the albedo was estimated using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 to simulate the albedo of a clean glacier surface without dust. By comparing the measured albedo to the modelled albedo, we determine the influence of dust events on the snow albedo and the surface energy balance. We estimate that the dust deposition caused an additional 1.1 m w.e. (water equivalent) of snowmelt (or 42 % of the 2.8 m w.e. total melt) compared to a hypothetical clean glacier surface at the lower station, and 0.6 m w.e. more melt (or 38 % of

  15. Snow water content estimation from measured snow temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The vertical temperature profiles of snow and sea ice have been measured in the Arctic during the 2nd Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition in 2003 (CHINARE2003). The high-resolution temperature profile in snow is solved by one-dimensional heat transfer equation. The effective heat diffusivity, internal heat sources are identified. The internal heat source refers to the penetrated solar radiation which usually warms the lower part of the snow layer in summer. By temperature gradient analysis, the zero level can be clarified quantitatively as the boundary of the dry and wet snow. According to the in situ time series of vertical temperature profile, the time series of water content in snow is obtained based on an evaluation method of snow water content associated with the snow and ice physical parameters. The relationship of snow water content and snow temperature and temporal-spatial distribution of snow water content are presented

  16. The NASA Airborne Snow Observatory: Demonstration Mission 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T. H.; Berisford, D. F.; Boardman, J. W.; Bormann, K.; Deems, J. S.; Gehrke, F.; Horn, J.; Marks, D. G.; Mattmann, C. A.; McGurk, B. J.; Ramirez, P.; Richardson, M.; Skiles, M.; Winstral, A. H.; Zimdars, P.

    2014-12-01

    The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and imaging LiDAR system, to quantify snow water equivalent and snow albedo, provide unprecedented knowledge of snow properties, and provide complete, robust inputs to snowmelt runoff models, water management models, and systems of the future. This talk presents results from the second Demonstration Mission that occurred during the intense California drought of spring 2014. With the acquisition of the new cutting edge lidar system, ASO was able to fly higher and as such acquire complete basin coverage for the Tuolumne, Merced, Lakes, and South Fork of Kings River Basins in the California Sierra Nevada. Despite the intensity of the California drought, several snowfalls occurred during the Demonstration Mission and we were able to uniquely map snowfall distribution, providing unprecedented capability to test our understanding of orographics and redistribution of snowfall. A new snow density model and analysis were integrated into the ASO data system. Despite a > 4-fold increase in data volume from the new lidar, the landing-to-data delivery remained at < 24 hrs. ASO SWE and albedo data are assimilated into models of varying complexity and results presented here. We use the ASO data in the Sierra Nevada to evaluate SWE simulations from the NWS SNODAS and SWE reconstruction models. Finally, the ASO data were watched carefully during the drought, suggesting that the Hetch Hetchy reservoir original infrastructure's forecast of falling well short of fill would be biased low and that the reservoir would come close to filling.

  17. Spatial and temporal variability of Arctic summer sea-ice albedo and its dependence on meltwater hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicken, H.; Perovich, D. K.; Grenfell, T. C.; Richter-Menge, J. A.; Frey, K.

    2001-12-01

    Next to ice extent and thickness, the area-averaged albedo of the summer sea-ice cover is a key parameter in determining the large-scale heat exchange over the Arctic Ocean. Various remote sensing applications have yielded a substantial data base for the former two parameters, not least due to the efforts of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) over the past 25 years. In contrast, the spatial and temporal variability of Arctic summer sea-ice albedo is much less well described. Despite its importance (incl. for ice-albedo feedback processes), few if any large-scale sea-ice and global circulation models actually predict summer ice based on the underlying physical processes. Most models employ simple parameterization schemes instead. Remote sensing of surface ice albedo also faces substantial challenges, some of which still need to be addressed in more detail. Here, we report on albedo measurements completed over first- and multi-year sea ice in the summers of 1998, 2000 and 2001 in the North American at the SHEBA drifting ice camp and in fast ice near Barrow, Alaska. As has been established in a number of studies, spatial and temporal variability in summer sea-ice albedo is mostly determined by the areal extent of meltwater ponding at the ice surface. Given the importance of this process, a comprehensive ice hydrological program (meltwater distribution, surface topography, meltwater flow and discharge, ice permeability) has been carried out in conjunction with the optical measurements. Measurements demonstrate that Arctic summer sea-ice albedo is critically dependent on the hydrology of surface melt ponds, as controlled by meltwater production rate, ice permeability and topography. Both, remarkable short-term variability (a reduction of albedo by 43% within two days) as well as the seasonal evolution of the pond fraction and hence area-averaged albedo are forced by changes in pond water level on the order of a few centimeters. While some of these forcing

  18. Investigating the effect and uncertainties of light absorbing impurities in snow and ice on snow melt and discharge generation using a hydrologic catchment model and satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matt, Felix; Burkhart, John F.

    2017-04-01

    Light absorbing impurities in snow and ice (LAISI) originating from atmospheric deposition enhance snow melt by increasing the absorption of short wave radiation. The consequences are a shortening of the snow cover duration due to increased snow melt and, with respect to hydrologic processes, a temporal shift in the discharge generation. However, the magnitude of these effects as simulated in numerical models have large uncertainties, originating mainly from uncertainties in the wet and dry deposition of light absorbing aerosols, limitations in the model representation of the snowpack, and the lack of observable variables required to estimate model parameters and evaluate the simulated variables connected with the representation of LAISI. This leads to high uncertainties in the additional energy absorbed by the snow due to the presence of LAISI, a key variable in understanding snowpack energy-balance dynamics. In this study, we assess the effect of LAISI on snow melt and discharge generation and the involved uncertainties in a high mountain catchment located in the western Himalayas by using a distributed hydrological catchment model with focus on the representation of the seasonal snow pack. The snow albedo is hereby calculated from a radiative transfer model for snow, taking the increased absorption of short wave radiation by LAISI into account. Meteorological forcing data is generated from an assimilation of observations and high resolution WRF simulations, and LAISI mixing ratios from deposition rates of Black Carbon simulated with the FLEXPART model. To asses the quality of our simulations and the related uncertainties, we compare the simulated additional energy absorbed by the snow due to the presence of LAISI to the MODIS Dust Radiative Forcing in Snow (MODDRFS) algorithm satellite product.

  19. SURFACE ALBEDO AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF CERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Sykes, Mark V.; Prettyman, Thomas H. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Ft. Lowell Road, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Carsenty, Uri; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Schröder, Stefan E. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, Berlin (Germany); Castillo-Rogez, Julie C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Schenk, Paul [Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Williams, David A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Smith, David E. [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zuber, Maria T. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km{sup 2}, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  20. The effect of host star spectral energy distribution and ice-albedo feedback on the climate of extrasolar planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Aomawa L; Meadows, Victoria S; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-08-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO(2) (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO(2) in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global ice

  1. Airborne radar surveys of snow depth over Antarctic sea ice during Operation IceBridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panzer, B.; Gomez-Garcia, D.; Leuschen, C.; Paden, J. D.; Gogineni, P. S.

    2012-12-01

    Over the last decade, multiple satellite-based laser and radar altimeters, optimized for polar observations, have been launched with one of the major objectives being the determination of global sea ice thickness and distribution [5, 6]. Estimation of sea-ice thickness from these altimeters relies on freeboard measurements and the presence of snow cover on sea ice affects this estimate. Current means of estimating the snow depth rely on daily precipitation products and/or data from passive microwave sensors [2, 7]. Even a small uncertainty in the snow depth leads to a large uncertainty in the sea-ice thickness estimate. To improve the accuracy of the sea-ice thickness estimates and provide validation for measurements from satellite-based sensors, the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets deploys the Snow Radar as a part of NASA Operation IceBridge. The Snow Radar is an ultra-wideband, frequency-modulated, continuous-wave radar capable of resolving snow depth on sea ice from 5 cm to more than 2 meters from long-range, airborne platforms [4]. This paper will discuss the algorithm used to directly extract snow depth estimates exclusively using the Snow Radar data set by tracking both the air-snow and snow-ice interfaces. Prior work in this regard used data from a laser altimeter for tracking the air-snow interface or worked under the assumption that the return from the snow-ice interface was greater than that from the air-snow interface due to a larger dielectric contrast, which is not true for thick or higher loss snow cover [1, 3]. This paper will also present snow depth estimates from Snow Radar data during the NASA Operation IceBridge 2010-2011 Antarctic campaigns. In 2010, three sea ice flights were flown, two in the Weddell Sea and one in the Amundsen and Bellingshausen Seas. All three flight lines were repeated in 2011, allowing an annual comparison of snow depth. In 2011, a repeat pass of an earlier flight in the Weddell Sea was flown, allowing for a

  2. Interaction between temperature, precipitation and snow cover trends in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Jonathan; Brox Nilsen, Irene; Stagge, James Howard; Gisnås, Kjersti; Merete Tallaksen, Lena

    2016-04-01

    Northern latitudes are experiencing faster warming than other regions, partly due to the snow--albedo feedback. A reduction in snow cover, which has a strong positive feedback on the energy balance, leads to a lowering of the albedo and thus, an amplification of the warming signal. Norway, in particular, can be considered a "cold climate laboratory" with large gradients in geography and climate that allows studying the effect of changing temperature and precipitation on snow in highly varying regions. Previous research showed that during last decades there has been an increase in air temperature for the entire country and a concurrent reduction in the land surface area covered by snow. However, these studies also demonstrate the sensitivity of the trend analysis to the period of record, to the start and end of the period, and to the presence of extreme years. In this study, we analyse several variables and their spatial and temporal variability across Norway, including mean, minimum and maximum daily temperature, daily precipitation, snow covered area and total snow water equivalent. Climate data is retrieved from seNorge (http://www.senorge.no), an operationally gridded dataset for Norway with a resolution of 1 km2. Analysis primarily focused on three overlapping 30-year periods (i.e., 1961-1990, 1971-2000, 1981-2010), but also tested trend sensitivity by varying period lengths. For each climate variable the Theil-Sen trend was calculated for each 30-year period along with the difference between 30-year mean values. In addition, indices specific to each variable were calculated (e.g. the number of days with a shift from negative to positive temperature values). The analysis was performed for the whole of Norway as well as for separate climatological regions previously defined based on temperature, precipitation and elevation. Results confirm a significant increase in mean daily temperatures and accelerating warming trends, especially during winter and spring

  3. Dust radiative forcing in snow of the Upper Colorado River Basin: 1. A 6 year record of energy balance, radiation, and dust concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Thomas H.; Skiles, S. Mckenzie; Deems, Jeffrey S.; Bryant, Ann C.; Landry, Christopher C.

    2012-07-01

    Dust in snow accelerates snowmelt through its direct reduction of snow albedo and its further indirect reduction of albedo by accelerating the growth of snow grains. Since the westward expansion of the United States that began in the mid-19th century, the mountain snow cover of the Colorado River Basin has been subject to five-fold greater dust loading, largely from the Colorado Plateau and Great Basin. Radiative forcing of snowmelt by dust is not captured by conventional micrometeorological measurements, and must be monitored by a more comprehensive suite of radiation instruments. Here we present a 6 year record of energy balance and detailed radiation measurements in the Senator Beck Basin Study Area, San Juan Mountains, Colorado, USA. Data include broadband irradiance, filtered irradiance, broadband reflected flux, filtered reflected flux, broadband and visible albedo, longwave irradiance, wind speed, relative humidity, and air temperatures. The gradient of the snow surface is monitored weekly and used to correct albedo measurements for geometric effects. The snow is sampled weekly for dust concentrations in plots immediately adjacent to each tower over the melt season. Broadband albedo in the last weeks of snow cover ranged from 0.33 to 0.55 across the 6 years and two sites. Total end of year dust concentration in the top 3 cm of the snow column ranged from 0.23 mg g-1 to 4.16 mg g-1. These measurements enable monitoring and modeling of dust and climate-driven snowmelt forcings in the Upper Colorado River Basin.

  4. John Snow and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, D A

    1989-03-01

    John Snow's leadership in epidemiology as well as anaesthesia resulted from his research as much as his clinical practice. In anaesthesia, Snow's research concerned the regulation of concentrations of volatile agents and the development of efficient inhalers; the uptake and elimination of volatile agents; stages of anaesthesia; carbon dioxide metabolism and rebreathing; and metabolism in anaesthesia and the theory of anaesthesia. In epidemiology, Snow investigated the relationship of water supplies to mortality in cholera during the London epidemic in 1854, which led him to formulate an original and valid theory of the transmission of cholera. Snow's research, which has received less attention than anecdotes concerning his career (e.g., his anaesthetizing Queen Victoria and urging removal of the handle of a contaminated water pump), was always directed towards solving specific problems. The significance of his research is evident in its leading not only to improvements in health care but also to the evolution of anaesthesia and epidemiology as professional disciplines.

  5. Accounting for spectral albedo, solar light penetration and impurity content in detailed snowpack simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Marie; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Picard, Ghislain; Arnaud, Laurent; Libois, Quentin; Morin, Samuel

    2016-04-01

    The energy balance of the snowpack, driven in particular by its spectral albedo and the penetration depth of solar light, is of primary importance to drive the time evolution of snow on the ground. Here we introduce new developments of the detailed snowpack model SURFEX/ISBA-Crocus (Brun et al., 1992 ; Vionnet et al., 2012) which now includes a spectrally-resolved two-stream calculation of solar light absorption within the snowpack (Libois et al. ,2013) and of the spectral partitioning of the direct and diffuse atmospheric irradiance and a prognostic snow impurity content. The added value of these refined representation of processes is evaluated with respect to field measurements of snow spectral reflectance and snow water equivalent. Simulations were performed at Col de Porte site (Chartreuse, France, 1325 m a.s.l.) using in situ meteorological forcings during winter 2013-2014 and aerosols deposition fluxes from MOCAGE chemistry transport atmospheric model. A major Saharian dust deposition event occurred in February 2014. Using simulations and measurements, we investigate in particular the impact of this event on the physical characteristics of the snowpack with a special focus on metamorphism and on the timing of melt.

  6. Dry Snow Metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    S. Chen and I. Baker, 12th International Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Ice, Sapporo , Japan, September 5-10th, 2010. “Advanced...Microstructural Characterization of Snow and Ice”, I. Baker, 12th International Conference on the Physics and Chemistry of Ice, Sapporo , Japan, September 5...on the Physics and Chemistry of Ice, Sapporo , Japan, September 5-10th, 2010. 10 “Advanced Microstructural Characterization of Snow and Ice”, I

  7. Satellite-Based EMI Detection, Identification, and Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stottler, R.; Bowman, C.

    2016-09-01

    Commanding, controlling, and maintaining the health of satellites requires a clear operating spectrum for communications. Electro Magnetic Interference (EMI) from other satellites can interfere with these communications. Determining which satellite is at fault improves space situational awareness and can be used to avoid the problem in the future. The Rfi detection And Prediction Tool, Optimizing Resources (RAPTOR) monitors the satellite communication antenna signals to detect EMI (also called RFI for Radio Frequency Interference) using a neural network trained on past cases of both normal communications and EMI events. RAPTOR maintains a database of satellites that have violated the reserved spectrum in the past. When satellite-based EMI is detected, RAPTOR first checks this list to determine if any are angularly close to the satellite being communicated with. Additionally, RAPTOR checks the Space Catalog to see if any of its active satellites are angularly close. RAPTOR also consults on-line databases to determine if the described operating frequencies of the satellites match the detected EMI and recommends candidates to be added to the known offenders database, accordingly. Based on detected EMI and predicted orbits and frequencies, RAPTOR automatically reschedules satellite communications to avoid current and future satellite-based EMI. It also includes an intuitive display for a global network of satellite communications antennas and their statuses including the status of their EM spectrum. RAPTOR has been prototyped and tested with real data (amplitudes versus frequency over time) for both satellite communication signals and is currently undergoing full-scale development. This paper describes the RAPTOR technologies and results of testing.

  8. Spectral characterization of soil and coal contamination on snow reflectance using hyperspectral analysis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K Singh; A V Kulkarni; B S Chaudhary

    2011-04-01

    Snow is a highly reflecting object found naturally on the Earth and its albedo is highly influenced by the amount and type of contamination. In the present study, two major types of contaminants (soil and coal) have been used to understand their effects on snow reflectance in the Himalayan region. These contaminants were used in two categories quantitatively – addition in large quantity and addition in small quantity. Snow reflectance data were collected between 350 and 2500 nm spectral ranges and binned at 10 nm interval by averaging. The experiment was designed to gather the field information in controlled conditions, and radiometric observations were collected. First derivative, band absorption depth, asymmetry, percentage change in reflectance and albedo in optical region were selected to identify and discriminate the type of contamination. Band absorption depth has shown a subtle increasing pattern for soil contamination, however, it was significant for small amounts of coal contamination. The absorption peak asymmetry was not significant for soil contamination but showed a nature towards left asymmetry for coal. The width of absorption feature at 1025 nm was not significant for both the contaminations. The percentage change in reflectance was quite high for small amount of coal contamination rather than soil contamination, however, a shift of peak was observed in soil-contaminated snow which was not present in coal contamination. The albedo drops exponentially for coal contamination rather than soil contamination.

  9. Soot on snow in Iceland: First results on black carbon and organic carbon in Iceland 2016 snow and ice samples, including the glacier Solheimajökull

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinander, Outi; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Gritsevich, Maria; Aurela, Minna; Arnalds, Olafur; Dragosics, Monika; Virkkula, Aki; Svensson, Jonas; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Kontu, Anna; Kivekäs, Niku; Leppäranta, Matti; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Laaksonen, Ari; Lihavainen, Heikki; Arslan, Ali N.; Paatero, Jussi

    2017-04-01

    New results on black carbon (BC) and organic carbon (OC) on snow and ice in Iceland in 2016 will be presented in connection to our earlier results on BC and OC on Arctic seasonal snow surface, and in connection to our 2013 and 2016 experiments on effects of light absorbing impurities, including Icelandic dust, on snow albedo, melt and density. Our sampling included the glacier Solheimajökull in Iceland. The mass balance of this glacier is negative and it has been shrinking during the last 20 years by 900 meters from its southwestern corner. Icelandic snow and ice samples were not expected to contain high concentrations of BC, as power generation with domestic renewable water and geothermal power energy sources cover 80 % of the total energy consumption in Iceland. Our BC results on filters analyzed with a Thermal/Optical Carbon Aerosol Analyzer (OC/EC) confirm this assumption. Other potential soot sources in Iceland include agricultural burning, industry (aluminum and ferroalloy production and fishing industry), open burning, residential heating and transport (shipping, road traffic, aviation). On the contrary to low BC, we have found high concentrations of organic carbon in our Iceland 2016 samples. Some of the possible reasons for those will be discussed in this presentation. Earlier, we have measured and reported unexpectedly low snow albedo values of Arctic seasonally melting snow in Sodankylä, north of Arctic Circle. Our low albedo results of melting snow have been confirmed by three independent data sets. We have explained these low values to be due to: (i) large snow grain sizes up to 3 mm in diameter (seasonally melting snow); (ii) meltwater surrounding the grains and increasing the effective grain size; (iii) absorption caused by impurities in the snow, with concentration of elemental carbon (black carbon) in snow of 87 ppb, and organic carbon 2894 ppb. The high concentrations of carbon were due to air masses originating from the Kola Peninsula, Russia

  10. Central Asian supra-glacier snow melt enhanced by anthropogenic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Flanner, Mark; Kang, Shichang; Sprenger, Michael; Farinotti, Daniel; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Li, Yang; Lawrence, Mark; Schwikowski, Margit

    2016-04-01

    In Central Asia, more than 60 % of the population depends on water stored in glaciers and mountain snow. Densely populated areas near lower-lying mountain ranges are particularly vulnerable and a recent study showed that the region might lose 50 % of its glacier mass by 2050. While temperature, precipitation and dynamic processes are key drivers of glacial change, deposition of light absorbing impurities such as mineral dust and black carbon can lead to accelerated melting through surface albedo reduction. Here, we discuss the origin of deposited mineral dust and black carbon and their impacts on albedo change and snow melt. 218 snow samples were taken on 4 glaciers, Abramov (Pamir), Suek, Glacier No. 354 and Golubin (Tien Shan), representing deposition between summer 2012 and 2014. They were analyzed for elemental carbon, mineral dust and iron among other parameters. We find the elemental carbon concentration to be at the higher end of the range reported for neighboring mountain ranges between 70 and 502 ng g-1 (interquartile range). To investigate the origin of the snow impurities, we used a Lagrangian particle dispersion model, LAGRANTO. Back trajectory ensembles of 40 members with varied starting points to capture the meteorological spread were released every 6 hours for the covered period at all sites. "Footprints" were calculated and combined with emission inventories to estimate the relative contribution of anthropogenic and natural BC to deposited aerosol on the glaciers. We find that more than 94 % of BC is of anthropogenic origin and the major source region is Central Asia followed by the Middle East. Further exploring the implications of mineral dust and BC deposition, we calculate the snow albedo reduction with the Snow-Ice-Aerosol-Radiative model (SNICAR). Even though mineral dust concentrations were up to a factor of 50 higher than BC concentrations, BC dominates the albedo reduction. Using these results we calculate the snow melt induced by

  11. Reflection and transmission of irradiance by snow and sea ice in the central Arctic Ocean in summer 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Lei, Ruibo; Zhang, Zhanhai; Matero, Ilkka; Cheng, Bin; Li, Qun; Huang, Wenfeng

    2012-01-01

    Reflection and transmission of irradiance by the combined snow and sea ice layer were measured at an ice camp (ca. 10 days) and several short-term stations (ca. 2 h) established in the western sector of the Arctic Ocean above 80°N during the 2010 summer. These measurements were made with an intention to quantify the apparent optical properties of snow and sea ice, and to evaluate their roles in the mass balance of snow-covered sea ice in the High Arctic. The integrated 350–920 nm albedo range...

  12. Distribution and Variation of Spring Snow Cover in Laohugou Watershed of the Qilian Mountains%祁连山老虎沟流域春季积雪属性的分布及变化特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨俊华; 秦翔; 吴锦奎; 杜文涛; 孙维君; 张明杰; 张雪艳; 陈记祖

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the physical process of snow cover and its feedback to climate system, it is necessary to study the properties of snow cover. In this paper, the distribution and variation of snow cover in spring in Laohugou wa- tershed of the Qilian Mountains was investigated. The snow cover properties, i.e., snow depth, snow density, snow liquid water content, snow re- flectance, snow surface albedo, snow grain size and temperature, were measured using some ad- vanced instruments during the observation. In ad- dition, snow cover profile was measured in snow pits. Snow cover depth measurement found that the spatial distribution of snow cover depth is quite various. The snow cover in shaded area is deeper than that on other slopes. The measured snow spectral reflectance shows a distinct dependence on snow grain size, snow type, snow depth, snow density, snow liquid water content and surface roughness. Snow surface albedo was measured by automatic weather station. When snow depth rea- ches a certain value, the snow cover always has heat preservation effect. There was a temperature profile with a temperature inversion layer depen- ding on snow cover depth and surface temperature. Within a day, new snow density variation is con- sistent with water content variation.%利用祁连山老虎沟流域布设的花杆观测了该区春季积雪的属性(深度、表面反射率、密度及含水量、粒径),并结合自动气象站上的积雪深度和反照率数据,对研究区春季积雪属性的分布及变化特征进行了观测和分析.结果表明:流域内积雪分布很不均一,在阴坡雪深大,阳坡雪深小;在不同海拔上,雪深随海拔有增高的趋势;不同类型、不同表面粗糙度、不同密度、不同含水率的积雪反射率不同,不同地物的反射率也不同;积雪剖面中逆温层结的形成与表面温度、雪深有密切关系,在一天内新降雪的密度及含水率随时间的变化具有较好的一致性.

  13. Metagenomic and satellite analyses of red snow in the Russian Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisakawa, Nao; Quistad, Steven D; Hester, Eric R; Martynova, Daria; Maughan, Heather; Sala, Enric; Gavrilo, Maria V; Rohwer, Forest

    2015-01-01

    Cryophilic algae thrive in liquid water within snow and ice in alpine and polar regions worldwide. Blooms of these algae lower albedo (reflection of sunlight), thereby altering melting patterns (Kohshima, Seko & Yoshimura, 1993; Lutz et al., 2014; Thomas & Duval, 1995). Here metagenomic DNA analysis and satellite imaging were used to investigate red snow in Franz Josef Land in the Russian Arctic. Franz Josef Land red snow metagenomes confirmed that the communities are composed of the autotroph Chlamydomonas nivalis that is supporting a complex viral and heterotrophic bacterial community. Comparisons with white snow communities from other sites suggest that white snow and ice are initially colonized by fungal-dominated communities and then succeeded by the more complex C. nivalis-heterotroph red snow. Satellite image analysis showed that red snow covers up to 80% of the surface of snow and ice fields in Franz Josef Land and globally. Together these results show that C. nivalis supports a local food web that is on the rise as temperatures warm, with potential widespread impacts on alpine and polar environments worldwide.

  14. Evaluation of a physically-based snow model with infrared and microwave satellite-derived estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.

    2013-05-01

    Snow (with high albedo, as well as low roughness and thermal conductivity) has significant influence on the land-atmosphere interactions in the cold climate and regions of high elevation. The spatial and temporal variability of the snow distribution on a basin scale greatly determines the timing and magnitude of spring snowmelt runoff. For improved water resources management, a physically-based distributed snow model has been developed and applied to the upper Yellow River Basin to provide the outputs of snow variables as well as streamflows from 2001 to 2005. Remotely-sensed infrared information from MODIS satellites has been used to evaluate the model's outputs of spatially-distributed snow cover extent (SCE) and land surface temperature (LST); while the simulated snow depth (SD) and snow water equivalent (SWE) have been compared with the microwave information from SSM/I and AMSR-E satellites. In general, the simulated streamflows (including spring snowmelt) agree fairly well with the gauge-based observations; while the modeled snow variables show acceptable accuracies through comparing to various satellite-derived estimates from infrared or microwave information.;

  15. Snow multivariable data assimilation for hydrological predictions in mountain areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazzi, Gaia; Campo, Lorenzo; Gabellani, Simone; Rudari, Roberto; Castelli, Fabio; Cremonese, Edoardo; Morra di Cella, Umberto; Stevenin, Hervé; Ratto, Sara Maria

    2016-04-01

    -based and remotely sensed data of different snow-related variables (snow albedo and surface temperature, Snow Water Equivalent from passive microwave sensors and Snow Cover Area). SMASH performance was evaluated in the period June 2012 - December 2013 at the meteorological station of Torgnon (Tellinod, 2 160 msl), located in Aosta Valley, a mountain region in northwestern Italy. The EnKF algorithm was firstly tested by assimilating several ground-based measurements: snow depth, land surface temperature, snow density and albedo. The assimilation of snow observed data revealed an overall considerable enhancement of model predictions with respect to the open loop experiments. A first attempt to integrate also remote sensed information was performed by assimilating the Land Surface Temperature (LST) from METEOSAT Second Generation (MSG), leading to good results. The analysis allowed identifying the snow depth and the snowpack surface temperature as the most impacting variables in the assimilation process. In order to pinpoint an optimal number of ensemble instances, SMASH performances were also quantitatively evaluated by varying the instances amount. Furthermore, the impact of the data assimilation frequency was analyzed by varying the assimilation time step (3h, 6h, 12h, 24h).

  16. Evaluation of the SMAP model-simulated snow internal physical properties at Sapporo, Japan from 2005 to 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwano, Masashi; Aoki, Teruo; Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Matoba, Sumito; Kodama, Yuji; Tanikawa, Tomonori

    2016-04-01

    Temporal evolution of snow internal physical properties such as grain size, density, temperature, and water content are controlled by changes in meteorological conditions. On the other hand, in a snow covered area, surface atmospheric conditions are modulated in response to variations of snow albedo, which is affected by (optically equivalent) snow grain size as well as mass concentration of snow impurities such as black carbon and dust. Therefore, it is necessary for snowpack models incorporated in climate models to simulate realistic snow internal physical properties to perform accurate future climate prediction especially in the cryosphere. In this study, we evaluated snow internal physical properties at Sapporo (43° 05'N, 141° 21'E, 15 m a.s.l.), Japan from 2005 to 2015 simulated with a 1-D multilayered physical snowpack model SMAP (Snow Metamorphism and Albedo Process). The model was driven by quality controlled 30-min averaged data for air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, surface pressure, snow depth, downward and upward shortwave radiant flux, downward longwave radiant flux, and ground surface soil heat flux. Simulation results were compared against the data obtained from snow pit works performed twice a week at Sapporo. First of all, the model-simulated column integrated SWE (snow water equivalent) were compared against in-situ measurements (273 data were available during the 10 winters). The results show that the model tends to underestimate SWE (mean error; ME was -19 mm); however, root mean square error (RMSE) was 34 mm, and these scores are better than those for simulations driven by not snow depth but precipitation (ME was less than -25 mm and RMSE was more than 40 mm). It suggests that the correction technique for precipitation measurements considering catch efficiency of a rain gauge is still insufficient. Next, the model-simulated profiles for snow density and snow temperature were compared against in-situ measurements. For this purpose

  17. Evaluation of Satellite Remote Sensing Albedo Retrievals over the Ablation Area of the Southwestern Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Samiah E.; Rennermalm, Asa K.; Roman, Miguel O.; Wang, Zhuosen; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Smith, Laurence C.; Koenig, Lora S.; Erb, Angela

    2017-01-01

    MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) albedo products have been validated over spatially uniform, snow-covered areas of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) using the so-called single 'point-to-pixel' method. This study expands on this methodology by applying a 'multiple-point-to-pixel' method and examination of spatial autocorrelation (here using semivariogram analysis) by using in situ observations, high-resolution World- View-2 (WV-2) surface reflectances, and MODIS Collection V006 daily blue-sky albedo over a spatially heterogeneous surfaces in the lower ablation zone in southwest Greenland. Our results using 232 ground-based samples within two MODIS pixels, one being more spatial heterogeneous than the other, show little difference in accuracy among narrow and broad band albedos (except for Band 2). Within the more homogenous pixel area, in situ and MODIS albedos were very close (error varied from -4% to +7%) and within the range of ASD standard errors. The semivariogram analysis revealed that the minimum observational footprint needed for a spatially representative sample is 30 m. In contrast, over the more spatially heterogeneous surface pixel, a minimum footprint size was not quantifiable due to spatial autocorrelation, and far exceeds the effective resolution of the MODIS retrievals. Over the high spatial heterogeneity surface pixel, MODIS is lower than ground measurements by 4-7%, partly due to a known in situ undersampling of darker surfaces that often are impassable by foot (e.g., meltwater features and shadowing effects over crevasses). Despite the sampling issue, our analysis errors are very close to the stated general accuracy of the MODIS product of 5%. Thus, our study suggests that the MODIS albedo product performs well in a very heterogeneous, low-albedo, area of the ice sheet ablation zone. Furthermore, we demonstrate that single 'point-to-pixel' methods alone are insufficient in characterizing and validating the variation of surface

  18. Photographic Snow-cover Monitoring on St Sorlin Glacier, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbaux, M.; Genthon, C.; Dedieu, J.; Balestrieri, J.

    2004-12-01

    Like most other glaciers in the Alps, the St Sorlin glacier (french Alps, 45.16°N, 6.16°E, 2900 m asl mean elevation and 3km2 of surface area) has been retreating fast in the last 20 years. To understand the meteorological factors responsible for this retreat, and to tentatively predict glaciers evolution in a changing (warming) climate, we use a distributed snow/ice mass and energy balance model derived from the CROCUS snow model (Météo-France). There is no direct meteorological observation on or near St Sorlin glacier yet, and hourly meteorology to force the snow/ice model is obtained from disaggregated meteorological analyses. The model is found to reproduce the St Sorlin mass balance of the last 20 years as obtained from field glaciological measurements and stereophotographic reconstructions. The model is also found to reproduce the interannual variations of the equilibrium line as determined from optical satellite imagery. Because of the albedo feedback involved, it is also important to verify that the summer snow/ice transition on the glacier is correctly simulated. Thus, an automated photographic system was set up facing St Sorlin glacier to monitor the evolution of the snow cover. The system was installed on the 13th of July 2004 and is still in operation at time of abstract writing. Digital photographies are taken every 4 hours, permitting so far at least one non-obstructed (rain, fog) picture per day. The first pictures in the series show an almost fully snow-covered glacier while the latest ones show bare ice up to the highest parts of the glacier. Snow is occasionally deposited during precipitation events but hardly last more than 3 days. Snow line position is deduced from pictures using a DEM with georeferenced points visible on pictures. It should then be compared with the modelled one. The automated photographic system provides not only snow cover to check snow/ice model results at seasonal time-scales, but also qualitative meteorological

  19. Changes in Snow Cover Characteristics over Northern Eurasia since 1966

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulygina, Olga; Groisman, Pavel; Razuvaev, Vyacheslav; Korshunova, Natalia

    2010-05-01

    metamorphosis on its surface changing snow albedo and generating snow crust as well as on its bottom generating ice crust. Once formed, the crusts will not disappear until complete snowmelt. These crusts have numerous modes of impact on the wild birds and animals in the Arctic environment as well as on domesticated reindeers. In extreme cases, the crusts may kill some wild species and prevent reindeers' migration and feeding. In the temperate zone, the ice crust can affect the winter crop yield. The warming and earlier snowmelt worldwide signal that the 'shoulder' spring period when ice crust remains on the ground may shorten. However, earlier and more frequent thaw occurrence may cause an opposite tendency and lengthen the period with the ice crust. Our study reveals substantial changes in the snow and ice crust characteristics that have practical importance for wildlife and human activity in the Arctic as well as in the major agricultural regions of Russia. Among the two competing factors that can cause a systematic change in the ice crust characteristics over the humid half of Northern Eurasia, i.e., the increase in thaws due to strong regional warming and a potential shortening of the period of snowmelt, the second factor appeared to be more significant during the past 43 years. In particular, the entire process of the spring snowmelt has become shorter in duration and (taking into account a parallel rise in the snow depth across most of Russia) more intense. This might contribute to increasing frequencies and severity of spring floods, and require further studies.

  20. Arctic sea ice albedo in summer: observation and modelling experiments%北极夏季海冰反照率的观测和数值模拟试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨清华; 程斌; 雷瑞波; 王先桥; 杨宇; 张占海

    2011-01-01

    在中国第3次北极科学考察浮冰站开展了积雪/海冰反照率观测.本文对观测结果进行了分析,并结合一维高分辨雪/冰模式(HIGHTSI)对3个常用的反照率参数化方案在天气尺度的表现进行了评估.观测期间测站反照率变化范围0.75~0.85,其天气尺度变化同天气和表面冰、雪状况紧密相关,降雪和吹雪过程可改变表面积雪厚度及水平分布,进而显著影响反照率.考虑雪、冰厚度变化时,模式能很好的再现反照率的变化趋势,但难以准确模拟出反照率的日变化.%The surface albedo was observed at the Ice Camp during the Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) at the end of melting season in 2008. The in situ data were investigated in this paper. Several albedo parameterizations were incorporated into a one-dimensional high-resolution thermodynamic snow/ice model (HIGHTSI) to simulate local surface albedo. The observed albedo varies between O. 75~0. 85 during the observation period with a slightly decreasing trend, the local change of albedo was strongly linked with snowfall/sleet and snow drift events. The trend of observed surface albedo can be captured by an albedo scheme taken snow and ice thicknesses into account. Albedo schemes with the current complexity, however, are difficult to reconstruct the short-term variability.

  1. Nordic Snow Radar Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmetyinen, Juha; Kontu, Anna; Pulliainen, Jouni; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Wiesmann, Andreas; Mätzler, Christian; Werner, Charles; Rott, Helmut; Nagler, Thomas; Schneebeli, Martin; Proksch, Martin; Schüttemeyer, Dirk; Kern, Michael; Davidson, Malcolm W. J.

    2016-09-01

    The objective of the Nordic Snow Radar Experiment (NoSREx) campaign was to provide a continuous time series of active and passive microwave observations of snow cover at a representative location of the Arctic boreal forest area, covering a whole winter season. The activity was a part of Phase A studies for the ESA Earth Explorer 7 candidate mission CoReH2O (Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory). The NoSREx campaign, conducted at the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Centre (FMI-ARC) in Sodankylä, Finland, hosted a frequency scanning scatterometer operating at frequencies from X- to Ku-band. The radar observations were complemented by a microwave dual-polarization radiometer system operating from X- to W-bands. In situ measurements consisted of manual snow pit measurements at the main test site as well as extensive automated measurements on snow, ground and meteorological parameters. This study provides a summary of the obtained data, detailing measurement protocols for each microwave instrument and in situ reference data. A first analysis of the microwave signatures against snow parameters is given, also comparing observed radar backscattering and microwave emission to predictions of an active/passive forward model. All data, including the raw data observations, are available for research purposes through the European Space Agency and the Finnish Meteorological Institute. A consolidated dataset of observations, comprising the key microwave and in situ observations, is provided through the ESA campaign data portal to enable easy access to the data.

  2. Evolution of the Specific Surface Area of Snow in a High Temperature Gradient Metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Baker, I.

    2014-12-01

    The structural evolution of low-density snow under a high temperature gradient over a short period usually takes place in the surface layers during diurnal recrystallization or on a clear, cold night. To relate snow microstructures with their thermal properties, we combined X-ray computed microtomography (micro-CT) observations with numerical simulations. Different types of snow were tested over a large range of TGs (100 K m-1- 500 K m-1). The Specific Surface Area (SSA) was used to characterize the temperature gradient metamorphism (TGM). The magnitude of the temperature gradient and the initial snow type both influence the evolution of SSA. The SSA evolution under TGM was dominated by grain growth and the formation of complex surfaces. Fresh snow experienced a logarithmic decrease of SSA with time, a feature been observed previously by others [Calonne et al., 2014; Schneebeli and Sokratov, 2004; Taillandier et al., 2007]. However, for initial rounded and connected snow structures, the SSA will increase during TGM. Understanding the SSA increase is important in order to predict the enhanced uptake of chemical species by snow or increase in snow albedo. Calonne, N., F. Flin, C. Geindreau, B. Lesaffre, and S. Rolland du Roscoat (2014), Study of a temperature gradient metamorphism of snow from 3-D images: time evolution of microstructures, physical properties and their associated anisotropy, The Cryosphere Discussions, 8, 1407-1451, doi:10.5194/tcd-8-1407-2014. Schneebeli, M., and S. A. Sokratov (2004), Tomography of temperature gradient metamorphism of snow and associated changes in heat conductivity, Hydrological Processes, 18(18), 3655-3665, doi:10.1002/hyp.5800. Taillandier, A. S., F. Domine, W. R. Simpson, M. Sturm, and T. A. Douglas (2007), Rate of decrease of the specific surface area of dry snow: Isothermal and temperature gradient conditions, Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface (2003-2012), 112(F3), doi: 10.1029/2006JF000514.

  3. Evaluating the hydrological consistency of satellite based water cycle components

    KAUST Repository

    Lopez Valencia, Oliver M.

    2016-06-15

    Advances in multi-satellite based observations of the earth system have provided the capacity to retrieve information across a wide-range of land surface hydrological components and provided an opportunity to characterize terrestrial processes from a completely new perspective. Given the spatial advantage that space-based observations offer, several regional-to-global scale products have been developed, offering insights into the multi-scale behaviour and variability of hydrological states and fluxes. However, one of the key challenges in the use of satellite-based products is characterizing the degree to which they provide realistic and representative estimates of the underlying retrieval: that is, how accurate are the hydrological components derived from satellite observations? The challenge is intrinsically linked to issues of scale, since the availability of high-quality in-situ data is limited, and even where it does exist, is generally not commensurate to the resolution of the satellite observation. Basin-scale studies have shown considerable variability in achieving water budget closure with any degree of accuracy using satellite estimates of the water cycle. In order to assess the suitability of this type of approach for evaluating hydrological observations, it makes sense to first test it over environments with restricted hydrological inputs, before applying it to more hydrological complex basins. Here we explore the concept of hydrological consistency, i.e. the physical considerations that the water budget impose on the hydrologic fluxes and states to be temporally and spatially linked, to evaluate the reproduction of a set of large-scale evaporation (E) products by using a combination of satellite rainfall (P) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) observations of storage change, focusing on arid and semi-arid environments, where the hydrological flows can be more realistically described. Our results indicate no persistent hydrological

  4. Interoperability of satellite-based augmentation systems for aircraft navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Donghai

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is pioneering a transformation of the national airspace system from its present ground based navigation and landing systems to a satellite based system using the Global Positioning System (GPS). To meet the critical safety-of-life aviation positioning requirements, a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS), the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), is being implemented to support navigation for all phases of flight, including Category I precision approach. The system is designed to be used as a primary means of navigation, capable of meeting the Required Navigation Performance (RNP), and therefore must satisfy the accuracy, integrity, continuity and availability requirements. In recent years there has been international acceptance of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), spurring widespread growth in the independent development of SBASs. Besides the FAA's WAAS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service System (EGNOS) and the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau's MTSAT-Satellite Augmentation System (MSAS) are also being actively developed. Although all of these SBASs can operate as stand-alone, regional systems, there is increasing interest in linking these SBASs together to reduce costs while improving service coverage. This research investigated the coverage and availability improvements due to cooperative efforts among regional SBAS networks. The primary goal was to identify the optimal interoperation strategies in terms of performance, complexity and practicality. The core algorithms associated with the most promising concepts were developed and demonstrated. Experimental verification of the most promising concepts was conducted using data collected from a joint international test between the National Satellite Test Bed (NSTB) and the EGNOS System Test Bed (ESTB). This research clearly shows that a simple switch between SBASs made by the airborne equipment is the most effective choice for achieving the

  5. SAMIRA - SAtellite based Monitoring Initiative for Regional Air quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philipp; Stebel, Kerstin; Ajtai, Nicolae; Diamandi, Andrei; Horalek, Jan; Nicolae, Doina; Stachlewska, Iwona; Zehner, Claus

    2016-04-01

    Here, we present a new ESA-funded project entitled Satellite based Monitoring Initiative for Regional Air quality (SAMIRA), which aims at improving regional and local air quality monitoring through synergetic use of data from present and upcoming satellites, traditionally used in situ air quality monitoring networks and output from chemical transport models. Through collaborative efforts in four countries, namely Romania, Poland, the Czech Republic and Norway, all with existing air quality problems, SAMIRA intends to support the involved institutions and associated users in their national monitoring and reporting mandates as well as to generate novel research in this area. Despite considerable improvements in the past decades, Europe is still far from achieving levels of air quality that do not pose unacceptable hazards to humans and the environment. Main concerns in Europe are exceedances of particulate matter (PM), ground-level ozone, benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). While overall sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions have decreased in recent years, regional concentrations can still be high in some areas. The objectives of SAMIRA are to improve algorithms for the retrieval of hourly aerosol optical depth (AOD) maps from SEVIRI, and to develop robust methods for deriving column- and near-surface PM maps for the study area by combining satellite AOD with information from regional models. The benefit to existing monitoring networks (in situ, models, satellite) by combining these datasets using data fusion methods will be tested for satellite-based NO2, SO2, and PM/AOD. Furthermore, SAMIRA will test and apply techniques for downscaling air quality-related EO products to a spatial resolution that is more in line with what is generally required for studying urban and regional scale air quality. This will be demonstrated for a set of study sites that include the capitals of the four countries and the highly polluted areas along the border of Poland and the

  6. A False Positive For Ocean Glint on Exoplanets: the Latitude-Albedo Effect

    CERN Document Server

    Cowan, Nicolas B; Voigt, Aiko

    2012-01-01

    Identifying liquid water on the surface of planets is a high priority, as this traditionally defines habitability. One proposed signature of oceans is specular reflection ("glint"), which increases the apparent albedo of a planet at crescent phases. We post-process a global climate model of an Earth-like planet to simulate reflected lightcurves. Significantly, we obtain glint-like phase variations even though we do not include specular reflection in our model. This false positive is the product of two generic properties: 1) for modest obliquities, a planet's poles receive less orbit-averaged stellar flux than its equator, so the poles are more likely to be covered in highly reflective snow and ice, and 2) we show that reflected light from a modest-obliquity planet at crescent phases probes higher latitudes than at gibbous phases, therefore a planet's apparent albedo will naturally increase at crescent phase. We suggest that this "latitude-albedo effect" will operate even for large obliquities: in that case th...

  7. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol–cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects. PMID:25404677

  8. Snow and glaciers in the tropics: the importance of snowfall level and snow line altitude in the Peruvian Cordilleras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauwecker, Simone; Rohrer, Mario; Huggel, Christian; Salzmann, Nadine; Montoya, Nilton; Endries, Jason; Perry, Baker

    2016-04-01

    The snow line altitude, defined as the line separating snow from ice or firn surfaces, is among the most important parameters in the glacier mass and energy balance of tropical glaciers, since it determines net shortwave radiation via surface albedo. Therefore, hydroglaciological models require estimations of the melting layer during precipitation events, as well as parameterisations of the transient snow line. Typically, the height of the melting layer is implemented by simple air temperature extrapolation techniques, using data from nearby meteorological stations and constant lapse rates. Nonetheless, in the Peruvian mountain ranges, stations at the height of glacier tongues (>5000 m asl.) are scarce and the extrapolation techniques must use data from distant and much lower elevated stations, which need prior careful validation. Thus, reliable snowfall level and snow line altitude estimates from multiple data sets are necessary. Here, we assemble and analyse data from multiple sources (remote sensing, in-situ station data, reanalysis data) in order to assess their applicability in estimating both, the melting layer and snow line altitude. We especially focus on the potential of radar bright band data from TRMM and CloudSat satellite data for its use as a proxy for the snow/rain transition height. As expected for tropical regions, the seasonal and regional variability in the snow line altitude is comparatively low. During the course of the dry season, Landsat satellite as well as webcam images show that the transient snow line is generally increasing, interrupted by light snowfall or graupel events with low precipitation amounts and fast decay rates. We show limitations and possibilities of different data sources as well as their applicability to validate temperature extrapolation methods. Further on, we analyse the implications of the relatively low variability in seasonal snow line altitude on local glacier mass balance gradients. We show that the snow line

  9. Projected changes in atmospheric heating due to changes in fire disturbance and the snow season in the western Arctic, 2003–2100

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euskirchen, E.S.; McGuire, Anthony; Rupp, T.S.; Chapin, F. S.; Walsh, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    In high latitudes, changes in climate impact fire regimes and snow cover duration, altering the surface albedo and the heating of the regional atmosphere. In the western Arctic, under four scenarios of future climate change and future fire regimes (2003–2100), we examined changes in surface albedo and the related changes in regional atmospheric heating due to: (1) vegetation changes following a changing fire regime, and (2) changes in snow cover duration. We used a spatially explicit dynamic vegetation model (Alaskan Frame-based Ecosystem Code) to simulate changes in successional dynamics associated with fire under the future climate scenarios, and the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model to simulate changes in snow cover. Changes in summer heating due to the changes in the forest stand age distributions under future fire regimes showed a slight cooling effect due to increases in summer albedo (mean across climates of −0.9 W m−2 decade−1). Over this same time period, decreases in snow cover (mean reduction in the snow season of 4.5 d decade−1) caused a reduction in albedo, and a heating effect (mean across climates of 4.3 W m−2 decade−1). Adding both the summer negative change in atmospheric heating due to changes in fire regimes to the positive changes in atmospheric heating due to changes in the length of the snow season resulted in a 3.4 W m−2 decade−1 increase in atmospheric heating. These findings highlight the importance of gaining a better understanding of the influences of changes in surface albedo on atmospheric heating due to both changes in the fire regime and changes in snow cover duration.

  10. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Yang; Nathues, Andreas; Corre, Lucille Le; Izawa, Matthew R M; Clouts, Edward A; Sykes, Mark V; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E; Williams, David A; Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Konopliv, Alexander S; Park, Ryan S; Raymond, Carol A; Russell, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active but possibly sporadic water outgassing, and possibly varying spectral characteristics in a time scale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, and the newly acquired images by Dawn Framing Camera to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, in both a global scale and local regions, particularly the bright spots inside Occator crater, over time scales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over various time scales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km$^2...

  11. The low energy atmospheric antiproton albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. B.; Ormes, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The flux of albedo antiprotons in the 100-1000 MeV kinetic energy range produced by the cosmic ray primaries in the atmosphere is calculated. It is shown that this is not a significant background to measurements of the low energy anti-proton cosmic ray flux.

  12. Improvements in Snow Mapping of the Rio Grande Basin using MODIS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    G¢mez-Landesa, E.; Rango, A.

    2002-12-01

    Snow covered area data is valuable for assessing watershed condition. Additionally it is being used as an input for the Snowmelt Runoff Model (SRM), which provides simulations and forecasts of a basin's daily streamflow. A visible and a near infrared channel of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) are being used to generate snow maps, replacing the traditional Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, and therefore improving the spatial resolution of the snow maps from 1 km to 250 m. In order to implement the MODIS data, a geometric correction algorithm was developed to remove the so called "Bowtie Effect" from the MODIS scenes. Radiances from pixels located on shaded slopes of the basin are strongly diminished because the two channels used in this method receive radiation from the solar reflective region of the spectrum. To correct this problem, an algorithm was developed to simulate the shaded areas on a Digital Elevation Model (DEM). This effect was found to be dependent on the altitude of the pixel, so an empirical second-order polynomial was applied. In order to make the snow mapping system as automated as possible, new methods were studied to retrieve snow albedo using bidirectional reflectance distribution functions (BRDF). Albedo retrieval can also be used as a criterium to infer the start of the snowmelt season, due to the decrease in reflectance of the snowpack as it ages.

  13. Snow White Trenches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 25th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 24 (June 19, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing. This image shows the trenches informally called 'Snow White 1' (left) and 'Snow White 2' (right). The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. 'Snow White' is located in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The 'dump pile' is located at the top of the trench, the side farthest away from the lander, and has been dubbed 'Croquet Ground.' The digging site has been named 'Wonderland.' This image has been enhanced to brighten shaded areas. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  14. Pavement Snow Melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lund, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The design of pavement snow melting systems is presented based on criteria established by ASHRAE. The heating requirements depends on rate of snow fall, air temperature, relative humidity and wind velocity. Piping materials are either metal or plastic, however, due to corrosion problems, cross-linked polyethylene pipe is now generally used instead of iron. Geothermal energy is supplied to systems through the use of heat pipes, directly from circulating pipes, through a heat exchanger or by allowing water to flow directly over the pavement, by using solar thermal storage. Examples of systems in New Jersey, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Switzerland and Oregon are presented. Key words: pavement snow melting, geothermal heating, heat pipes, solar storage, Wyoming, Virginia, Japan, Argentina, Klamath Falls.

  15. Development and validation of satellite based estimates of surface visibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J.; Pierce, R. B.; Lenzen, A.

    2015-10-01

    A satellite based surface visibility retrieval has been developed using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) measurements as a proxy for Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) data from the next generation of Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-R). The retrieval uses a multiple linear regression approach to relate satellite aerosol optical depth, fog/low cloud probability and thickness retrievals, and meteorological variables from numerical weather prediction forecasts to National Weather Service Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) surface visibility measurements. Validation using independent ASOS measurements shows that the GOES-R ABI surface visibility retrieval (V) has an overall success rate of 64.5% for classifying Clear (V ≥ 30 km), Moderate (10 km ≤ V skill during June through September, when Heidke skill scores are between 0.2 and 0.4. We demonstrate that the aerosol (clear sky) component of the GOES-R ABI visibility retrieval can be used to augment measurements from the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and National Park Service (NPS) Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network, and provide useful information to the regional planning offices responsible for developing mitigation strategies required under the EPA's Regional Haze Rule, particularly during regional haze events associated with smoke from wildfires.

  16. Estimation of snowpack matching ground-truth data and MODIS satellite-based observations by using regression kriging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan Collados-Lara, Antonio; Pardo-Iguzquiza, Eulogio; Pulido-Velazquez, David

    2016-04-01

    The estimation of Snow Water Equivalent (SWE) is essential for an appropriate assessment of the available water resources in Alpine catchment. The hydrologic regime in these areas is dominated by the storage of water in the snowpack, which is discharged to rivers throughout the melt season. An accurate estimation of the resources will be necessary for an appropriate analysis of the system operation alternatives using basin scale management models. In order to obtain an appropriate estimation of the SWE we need to know the spatial distribution snowpack and snow density within the Snow Cover Area (SCA). Data for these snow variables can be extracted from in-situ point measurements and air-borne/space-borne remote sensing observations. Different interpolation and simulation techniques have been employed for the estimation of the cited variables. In this paper we propose to estimate snowpack from a reduced number of ground-truth data (1 or 2 campaigns per year with 23 observation point from 2000-2014) and MODIS satellite-based observations in the Sierra Nevada Mountain (Southern Spain). Regression based methodologies has been used to study snowpack distribution using different kind of explicative variables: geographic, topographic, climatic. 40 explicative variables were considered: the longitude, latitude, altitude, slope, eastness, northness, radiation, maximum upwind slope and some mathematical transformation of each of them [Ln(v), (v)^-1; (v)^2; (v)^0.5). Eight different structure of regression models have been tested (combining 1, 2, 3 or 4 explicative variables). Y=B0+B1Xi (1); Y=B0+B1XiXj (2); Y=B0+B1Xi+B2Xj (3); Y=B0+B1Xi+B2XjXl (4); Y=B0+B1XiXk+B2XjXl (5); Y=B0+B1Xi+B2Xj+B3Xl (6); Y=B0+B1Xi+B2Xj+B3XlXk (7); Y=B0+B1Xi+B2Xj+B3Xl+B4Xk (8). Where: Y is the snow depth; (Xi, Xj, Xl, Xk) are the prediction variables (any of the 40 variables); (B0, B1, B2, B3) are the coefficients to be estimated. The ground data are employed to calibrate the multiple regressions. In

  17. Interdecadal changes in snow depth on Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Melinda A.; Rigor, Ignatius G.; Nghiem, Son V.; Kurtz, Nathan T.; Farrell, Sinead L.; Perovich, Donald K.; Sturm, Matthew

    2014-08-01

    Snow plays a key role in the growth and decay of Arctic sea ice. In winter, it insulates sea ice from cold air temperatures, slowing sea ice growth. From spring to summer, the albedo of snow determines how much insolation is absorbed by the sea ice and underlying ocean, impacting ice melt processes. Knowledge of the contemporary snow depth distribution is essential for estimating sea ice thickness and volume, and for understanding and modeling sea ice thermodynamics in the changing Arctic. This study assesses spring snow depth distribution on Arctic sea ice using airborne radar observations from Operation IceBridge for 2009-2013. Data were validated using coordinated in situ measurements taken in March 2012 during the Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX) field campaign. We find a correlation of 0.59 and root-mean-square error of 5.8 cm between the airborne and in situ data. Using this relationship and IceBridge snow thickness products, we compared the recent results with data from the 1937, 1954-1991 Soviet drifting ice stations. The comparison shows thinning of the snowpack, from 35.1 ± 9.4 to 22.2 ± 1.9 cm in the western Arctic, and from 32.8 ± 9.4 to 14.5 ± 1.9 cm in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. These changes suggest a snow depth decline of 37 ± 29% in the western Arctic and 56 ± 33% in the Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Thinning is negatively correlated with the delayed onset of sea ice freezeup during autumn.

  18. Integrated ‘omics’, targeted metabolite and single-cell analyses of Arctic snow algae functionality and adaptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie eLutz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Snow algae are poly-extremophilic microalgae and important primary colonisers and producers on glaciers and snow fields. Depending on their pigmentation they cause green or red mass blooms during the melt season. This decreases surface albedo and thus further enhances snow and ice melting. Although the phenomenon of snow algal blooms has been known for a long time, large aspects of their physiology and ecology sill remain cryptic. This study provides the first in-depth and multi-omics investigation of two very striking adjacent green and red snow fields on a glacier in Svalbard. We have assessed the algal community composition of green and red snow including their associated microbiota, i.e., bacteria and archaea, their metabolic profiles (targeted and non-targeted metabolites on the bulk and single-cell level, and assessed the feedbacks between the algae and their physico-chemical environment including liquid water content, pH, albedo and nutrient availability. We demonstrate that green and red snow clearly vary in their physico-chemical environment, their microbial community composition and their metabolic profiles. For the algae this likely reflects both different stages of their life cycles and their adaptation strategies. Green snow represents a wet, carbon and nutrient rich environment and is dominated by the algae Microglena sp. with a metabolic profile that is characterized by key metabolites involved in growth and proliferation. In contrast, the dry and nutrient poor red snow habitat is colonised by various Chloromonas species with a high abundance of storage and reserve metabolites likely to face upcoming severe conditions. Combining a multitude of techniques we demonstrate the power of such complementary approaches in elucidating the function and ecology of extremophiles such as green and red snow algal blooms, which play crucial roles in glacial ecosystems.

  19. Mineral dust radiative effect on snow in European Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Fava, Francesco; Ferrero, Luca; Garzonio, Roberto; Baccolo, Giovanni; Delmonte, Barbara; Colombo, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    Mineral Dust (MD) is known to increase the absorption of solar radiation when deposited on snow and ice. This process causes a decrease in the albedo and may enhance snow melting, resulting in a positive radiative forcing (RF) in climate system. The RF from MD on snow can assume high values (~100-200 W/m2) after depositional events altering snow and ice radiative balance and hydrological cycle. In this study, we analyzed a significant MD transport happened during spring in 2014 and in particular its impact on snow optical properties. The dust plume was entrained in the troposphere over the Saharan desert (North African Grand Erg Oriental) during the passage of a cold front, and then transported NE over the Mediterranean by cyclonic atmospheric conditions. MD reached the European Alps where it was deposited by snowfall. We conducted a field proximal sensing survey in 10 plots (2x2 meters) at the Artavaggio plains (Lecco, Italy) with a hyperspectral radiometer (ASD Field-spec pro) collecting reflected radiance of snow in a spectral range between 350 and 2500 nm. Surface snow samples were collected and analyzed in clean room with microparticle counter in order to determine the size distribution and the concentration of MD in each sample. In addition, total mass of insoluble material was also measured by filtering the melted snow. Observed spectra were compared to those simulated by parameterizing the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) radiative transfer model with observed variables such as snow grain size, snow density and size distribution of MD. We defined a novel spectral index, the Snow Darkening Index (SDI) to combine red and green wavelengths showing nonlinear correlation with measured MD concentration. Instantaneous radiative forcing was then estimated as the spectral difference between upwelling irradiance of plot containing MD and pure snow plots. MD concentration was up to 107 ppm and total mass of insoluble material up to 325 ppm. Measured RF values

  20. Modulation of snow reflectance and snowmelt from Central Asian glaciers by anthropogenic black carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmale, Julia; Flanner, Mark; Kang, Shichang; Sprenger, Michael; Zhang, Qianggong; Guo, Junming; Li, Yang; Schwikowski, Margit; Farinotti, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Deposited mineral dust and black carbon are known to reduce the albedo of snow and enhance melt. Here we estimate the contribution of anthropogenic black carbon (BC) to snowmelt in glacier accumulation zones of Central Asia based on in-situ measurements and modelling. Source apportionment suggests that more than 94% of the BC is emitted from mostly regional anthropogenic sources while the remaining contribution comes from natural biomass burning. Even though the annual deposition flux of mineral dust can be up to 20 times higher than that of BC, we find that anthropogenic BC causes the majority (60% on average) of snow darkening. This leads to summer snowmelt rate increases of up to 6.3% (7 cm a‑1) on glaciers in three different mountain environments in Kyrgyzstan, based on albedo reduction and snowmelt models.

  1. snowBOTS: a mobile robot on snow covered ice

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    We introduce snowBOTs as a generic name for robots working in snow. This paper is a study on using scan ning range measuring lasers towards an autonomous snow cleaning robot, working in an environment consisting al most entirely of snow and ice. The problem addressed here is using lasers for detecting the edges generated by "the snow meeting the road". First the laser data were filtered using his togram/median to discriminate against falling snowflakes and small objects. Then the road surface w...

  2. Assessing modeled Greenland surface mass balance in the GISS Model E2 and its sensitivity to surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patrick; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tedesco, Marco; Moustafa, Samiah E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Fischer, Robert P.; Fettweis, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays an important role in global sea level change. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) such as the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) have been employed at high spatial resolution with relatively complex physics to simulate ice sheet SMB. Global climate models (GCMs) incorporate less sophisticated physical schemes and provide outputs at a lower spatial resolution, but have the advantage of modeling the interaction between different components of the earth's oceans, climate, and land surface at a global scale. Improving the ability of GCMs to represent ice sheet SMB is important for making predictions of future changes in global sea level. With the ultimate goal of improving SMB simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E2 GCM, we compare simulated GrIS SMB against the outputs of the MAR model and radar-derived estimates of snow accumulation. In order to reproduce present-day climate variability in the Model E2 simulation, winds are constrained to match the reanalysis datasets used to force MAR at the lateral boundaries. We conduct a preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated Model E2 SMB to surface albedo, a parameter that is known to strongly influence SMB. Model E2 albedo is set to a fixed value of 0.8 over the entire ice sheet in the initial configuration of the model (control case). We adjust this fixed value in an ensemble of simulations over a range of 0.4 to 0.8 (roughly the range of observed summer GrIS albedo values) to examine the sensitivity of ice-sheet-wide SMB to albedo. We prescribe albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43A3 v6 to examine the impact of a more realistic spatial and temporal variations in albedo. An age-dependent snow albedo parameterization is applied, and its impact on SMB relative to observations and the RCM is assessed.

  3. Accounting for radiative forcing from albedo change in future global land-use scenarios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Andrew D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Calvin, Katherine V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Collins, William D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Edmonds, James A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate the effectiveness of a new method for quantifying radiative forcing from land use and land cover change (LULCC) within an integrated assessment model, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The method relies on geographically differentiated estimates of radiative forcing from albedo change associated with major land cover transitions derived from the Community Earth System Model. We find that conversion of 1 km² of woody vegetation (forest and shrublands) to non-woody vegetation (crops and grassland) yields between 0 and –0.71 nW/m² of globally averaged radiative forcing determined by the vegetation characteristics, snow dynamics, and atmospheric radiation environment characteristic within each of 151 regions we consider globally. Across a set of scenarios designed to span a range of potential future LULCC, we find LULCC forcing ranging from –0.06 to –0.29 W/m² by 2070 depending on assumptions regarding future crop yield growth and whether climate policy favors afforestation or bioenergy crops. Inclusion of this previously uncounted forcing in the policy targets driving future climate mitigation efforts leads to changes in fossil fuel emissions on the order of 1.5 PgC/yr by 2070 for a climate forcing limit of 4.5 Wm–2, corresponding to a 12–67 % change in fossil fuel emissions depending on the scenario. Scenarios with significant afforestation must compensate for albedo-induced warming through additional emissions reductions, and scenarios with significant deforestation need not mitigate as aggressively due to albedo-induced cooling. In all scenarios considered, inclusion of albedo forcing in policy targets increases forest and shrub cover globally.

  4. Influence of manure application on surface energy and snow cover: field experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongoli, C E; Bland, W L

    2002-01-01

    Application of manure to frozen and/or snow-covered soils of high-latitude, continental climate regions is associated with enhanced P losses to surface water bodies, but the practice is an essential part of most animal farming systems in these regions. Field experiments of the fates of winter-applied manure P are so difficult as to make them essentially impractical, so a mechanistic, modeling approach is required. Central to a mechanistic understanding of manure P snow-melt runoff is knowledge of snowpack disappearance (ablation) as affected by manure application. The objective of this study was to learn how solid manure applied to snow-covered fields modulates the surface energy balance and thereby snow cover ablation. Manure landspreading experiments were conducted in Arlington, WI during the winters of 1998 and 1999. Solid dairy manure was applied on top of snow at a rate of 70 Mg ha(-1) in 1998, and at 45 and 100 Mg ha(-1) in 1999. Results showed that the manure retarded melt, in proportion to the rate applied. The low-albedo manure increased absorption of shortwave radiation compared with snow, but this extra energy was lost in longwave radiation and turbulent flux of sensible and latent heat. These losses result in significant attenuation of melt peaks, retarding snowmelt. Lower snowmelt rates beneath manure may allow more infiltration of meltwater compared with bare snow. This infiltration and attenuated snowmelt runoff may partially mitigate the enhanced likelihood of P runoff from unincorporated winter-spread manure.

  5. Automated Webcam Monitoring of Fractional Snow Cover in Northern Boreal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nadir Arslan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fractional snow cover (FSC is an important parameter to estimate snow water equivalent (SWE and surface albedo important to climatic and hydrological applications. The presence of forest creates challenges to retrieve FSC accurately from satellite data, as forest canopy can block the sensor’s view of snow cover. In addition to the challenge related to presence of forest, in situ data of FSC—necessary for algorithm development and validation—are very limited. This paper investigates the estimation of FSC using digital imagery to overcome the obstacle caused by forest canopy, and the possibility to use this imagery in the validation of FSC derived from satellite data. FSC is calculated here using an algorithm based on defining a threshold value according to the histogram of an image, to classify a pixel as snow-covered or snow-free. Images from the MONIMET camera network, producing a continuous image series in Finland, are used in the analysis of FSC. The results obtained from automated image analysis of snow cover are compared with reference data estimated by visual inspection of same images. The results show the applicability and usefulness of digital imagery in the estimation of fractional snow cover in forested areas, with a Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE in the range of 0.1–0.3 (with the full range of 0–1.

  6. Snow White II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundy, Jan

    1978-01-01

    Presented as a fairy tale with the characters of Snow White and the seven dwarves, this paper points out some of the professional, emotional, and health characteristics and problems of individual teachers, and ways an administrator might deal with them. (SJL)

  7. Snow White 5 Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm Camera on the 35th Martian day of the mission, or Sol 34 (June 29, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing. This image shows the trench informally called 'Snow White 5.' The trench is 4-to-5 centimeters (about 1.5-to-1.9 inches) deep, 24 centimeters (about 9 inches) wide and 33 centimeters (13 inches) long. Snow White 5 is Phoenix's current active digging area after additional trenching, grooming, and scraping by Phoenix's Robotic Arm in the last few sols to trenches informally called Snow White 1, 2, 3, and 4. Near the top center of the image is the Robotic Arm's Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe. Snow White 5 is located in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed 'Cheshire Cat.' The digging site has been named 'Wonderland.' This image has been enhanced to brighten shaded areas. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Snow-clearing operations

    CERN Multimedia

    EN Department

    2010-01-01

    To facilitate snow clearing operations, which commence at 4.30 in the morning, all drivers of CERN cars are kindly requested to park them together in groups. This will help us greatly assist us in our work. Thank-you for your help. Transport Group / EN-HE Tel. 72202

  9. Principles of snow hydrology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeWalle, David R; Rango, Albert

    2008-01-01

    ... Hydrology describes the factors that control the accumulation, melting, and runoff of water from seasonal snowpacks over the surface of the earth. The book addresses not only the basic principles governing snow in the hydrologic cycle, but also the latest applications of remote sensing, and principles applicable to modelling streamflow from snowmelt across lar...

  10. Backpack Snow Shovel/Snow Kit and Ahkio Snow Shovel/Snow Saw Kit

    Science.gov (United States)

    for backpacking by the individual soldier. A larger, more durable shovel is for use in conjunction with the man-hauled sled (Ahkio). A snow saw in a...scabbard is provided which can be attached either to the handle of the Ahkio shovel, to the disassembled backpack shovel in the carrying case, to the rucksack or to the belt.

  11. Snow-white teeth

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarll, D

    2006-01-01

    ... well have pointed out, but unavailingly, that snow-white teeth adorn only the grins of infants.There is, however, another ploy that colleagues might try in their quest to enlighten patients, particularly those of a literary disposition: adduce the attributes of 'youthful beauty' given to us by Virginia Woolf (1882 - 1941). From her novel, Orla...

  12. Effect of satellite formations and imaging modes on global albedo estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sreeja; Gatebe, Charles K.; Miller, David W.; de Weck, Olivier L.

    2016-05-01

    We confirm the applicability of using small satellite formation flight for multi-angular earth observation to retrieve global, narrow band, narrow field-of-view albedo. The value of formation flight is assessed using a coupled systems engineering and science evaluation model, driven by Model Based Systems Engineering and Observing System Simulation Experiments. Albedo errors are calculated against bi-directional reflectance data obtained from NASA airborne campaigns made by the Cloud Absorption Radiometer for the seven major surface types, binned using MODIS' land cover map - water, forest, cropland, grassland, snow, desert and cities. A full tradespace of architectures with three to eight satellites, maintainable orbits and imaging modes (collective payload pointing strategies) are assessed. For an arbitrary 4-sat formation, changing the reference, nadir-pointing satellite dynamically reduces the average albedo error to 0.003, from 0.006 found in the static referencecase. Tracking pre-selected waypoints with all the satellites reduces the average error further to 0.001, allows better polar imaging and continued operations even with a broken formation. An albedo error of 0.001 translates to 1.36 W/m2 or 0.4% in Earth's outgoing radiation error. Estimation errors are found to be independent of the satellites' altitude and inclination, if the nadir-looking is changed dynamically. The formation satellites are restricted to differ in only right ascension of planes and mean anomalies within slotted bounds. Three satellites in some specific formations show average albedo errors of less than 2% with respect to airborne, ground data and seven satellites in any slotted formation outperform the monolithic error of 3.6%. In fact, the maximum possible albedo error, purely based on angular sampling, of 12% for monoliths is outperformed by a five-satellite formation in any slotted arrangement and an eight satellite formation can bring that error down four fold to 3%. More than

  13. Performance of the Falling Snow Retrieval Algorithms for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Munchak, Stephen J.; Ringerud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Retrievals of falling snow from space represent an important data set for understanding the Earth's atmospheric, hydrological, and energy cycles, especially during climate change. Estimates of falling snow must be captured to obtain the true global precipitation water cycle, snowfall accumulations are required for hydrological studies, and without knowledge of the frozen particles in clouds one cannot adequately understand the energy and radiation budgets. While satellite-based remote sensing provides global coverage of falling snow events, the science is relatively new and retrievals are still undergoing development with challenges remaining). This work reports on the development and testing of retrieval algorithms for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Core Satellite, launched February 2014.

  14. 'Snow Queen' Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This animation consists of two close-up images of 'Snow Queen,' taken several days apart, by the Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Snow Queen is the informal name for a patch of bright-toned material underneath the lander. Thruster exhaust blew away surface soil covering Snow Queen when Phoenix landed on May 25, 2008, exposing this hard layer comprising several smooth rounded cavities beneath the lander. The RAC images show how Snow Queen visibly changed between June 15, 2008, the 21st Martian day, or sol, of the mission and July 9, 2008, the 44th sol. Cracks as long as 10 centimeters (about four inches) appeared. One such crack is visible at the left third and the upper third of the Sol 44 image. A seven millimeter (one-third inch) pebble or clod appears just above and slightly to the right of the crack in the Sol 44 image. Cracks also appear in the lower part of the left third of the image. Other pieces noticeably shift, and some smooth texture has subtly roughened. The Phoenix team carefully positioned and focused RAC the same way in both images. Each image is about 60 centimeters, or about two feet, wide. The object protruding in from the top on the right half of the images is Phoenix's thermal and electrical conductivity probe. Snow Queen and other ice exposed by Phoenix landing and trenching operations on northern polar Mars is the first time scientists have been able to monitor Martian ice at a place where temperatures are cold enough that the ice doesn't immediately sublimate, or vaporize, away. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  15. Reflective properties of white sea ice and snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinka, Aleksey; Zege, Eleonora; Heygster, Georg; Istomina, Larysa

    2016-11-01

    White ice (ice with a highly scattering granular layer on top of its surface) and snow-covered ice occupy a large part of the sea ice area in the Arctic, the former in summer, the latter in the cold period. The inherent optical properties (IOPs) and the reflectance of these types of ice are considered from the point of view of the light scattering and radiative transfer theories. The IOPs - the extinction and absorption coefficients and the scattering phase function - are derived with the assumption that both the snow cover and the scattering layer of white ice are random mixtures of air and ice with the characteristic grain size significantly larger than the wavelength of incident light. Simple analytical formulas are put forward to calculate the bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF), albedo at direct incidence (the directional-hemispherical reflectance), and albedo at diffuse incidence (the bihemispherical reflectance). The optical model developed is verified with the data of the in situ measurements made during the R/V Polarstern expedition ARK-XXVII/3 in 2012.

  16. Lunar Regolith Albedos Using Monte Carlos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. L.; Andersen, V.; Pinsky, L. S.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of planetary regoliths for their backscatter albedos produced by cosmic rays (CRs) is important for space exploration and its potential contributions to science investigations in fundamental physics and astrophysics. Albedos affect all such experiments and the personnel that operate them. Groups have analyzed the production rates of various particles and elemental species by planetary surfaces when bombarded with Galactic CR fluxes, both theoretically and by means of various transport codes, some of which have emphasized neutrons. Here we report on the preliminary results of our current Monte Carlo investigation into the production of charged particles, neutrons, and neutrinos by the lunar surface using FLUKA. In contrast to previous work, the effects of charm are now included.

  17. Modeling Earth Albedo for Satellites in Earth Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan; Bak, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many satellite are influences by the Earthøs albedo, though very few model schemes exist.in order to predict this phenomenon. Earth albedo is often treated as noise, or ignored completely. When applying solar cells in the attitude hardware, Earth albedo can cause the attitude estimate to deviate...... with as much as 20 deg. Digital Sun sensors with Earth albedo correction in hardware exist, but are expensive. In addition, albedo estimates are necessary in thermal calculations and power budgets. We present a modeling scheme base4d on Eartht reflectance, measured by NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer......, in which the Earth Probe Satellite has recorded reflectivity data daily since mid 1996. The mean of these data can be used to calculate the Earth albedo given the positions of the satellite and the Sun. Our results show that the albedo varies highly with the solar angle to the satellite's field of view...

  18. Quantifying the trade-off between carbon sequestration and albedo in midlatitude and high-latitude North American forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mykleby, P. M.; Snyder, P. K.; Twine, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    Afforestation is a viable and widely practiced method of sequestering carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. However, because of a change in surface albedo, placement of less reflective forests can cause an increase in net-absorbed radiation and localized surface warming. This effect is enhanced in northern high latitudes where the presence of snow cover exacerbates the albedo difference. Regions where afforestation could provide a climate benefit are determined by comparing net ecosystem production and net radiation differences from afforestation in midlatitude and high latitude of North America. Using the dynamic vegetation model Integrated Biosphere Simulator, agricultural version (Agro-IBIS), we find a boundary through North America where afforestation results in a positive equivalent carbon balance (cooling) to the south, and a negative equivalent carbon balance (warming) to the north. Including the effects of stand age and fraction cover affect whether a site contributes to mitigating global warming.

  19. Assessment of Satellite-based Precipitation Products (TRMM) in Hydrologic Modeling: Case Studies from Northern Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    EL kadiri, R.; Milewski, A.; Durham, M.

    2012-12-01

    Precipitation is the most important forcing parameter in hydrological modeling, yet it is largely unknown in the arid Middle East. We assessed the magnitude, probability of detection, and false alarm rates of various rainfall satellite products (e.g., TRMM, RFE2.0) compared to in situ gauge data (~79 stations) across the Our Er Rbia, Sebou, and Melouya Watersheds in Northern Morocco. Precipitation over the area is relatively high with an average of ~400mm/year according to TRMM (1998-2008). The existing gauges indicate that the average annual precipitation across the Tadla and Coastal Plains region is 260mm/year and 390mm/year across the Atlas Mountains. Following the assessment of satellite products against in situ gauge data, we evaluated the effects (e.g., runoff and recharge amounts) of using satellite driven hydrologic models using SWAT. Specifically, we performed a four-fold exercise: (1) The first stage focused on the analysis of the rainfall products; (2) the second stage involved the construction of a rainfall-runoff model using gauge data; (3) the third stage entailed the calibration of the model against flow gauges and/or dams storage variability, and (4) model simulation using satellite based rainfall products using the calibrated parameters from the initial simulation. Results suggest the TRMM V7 has a much better correlation with the field data over the Oum Er Rbia watershed. The Correlation E (Nash-Suncliffe coefficient) has a positive value of 0.5, while the correlation coefficient of TRMM V6 vs. gauges data is a negative value of -0.25. This first order evaluation of the TRMM V7 shows the new algorithm has partially overcame the underestimation effect in the semi-arid environments. However, more research needs to be done to increase the usability of TRMM V7 in hydrologic models. Low correlations are most likely a result of the following: (1) snow at the high elevations in the Oum Er Rbia watershed, (2) the ocean effect on TRMM measurements along

  20. The Satellite Based Hydrological Model (SHM): Routing Scheme and its Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    kumari, Nikul; Paul, Pranesh Kumar; Singh, Rajendra; Panigrahy, Niranjan; Mishra, Ashok; Gupta, Praveen Kumar; Singh, Raghavendra P.

    2016-04-01

    The collection of spatially extensive data by using the traditional methods of data acquisition is a challenging task for a large territory like India. To overcome such problems, the Satellite based Hydrological Model (SHM), a large scale conceptual hydrological model for the Indian Territory, is being developed under the PRACRITI-2 program of the Space Applications Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad. The model aims at preparing sustainable water management scenarios using remote sensing data from Indian satellites to handle the fresh water crisis in India. There are five modules namely, Surface Water (SW), Forest (F), Snow (S), Groundwater (GW) and Routing (ROU) in the SHM. The SW, F and S modules convert rainfall into surface runoff and generate input (infiltration and percolation) for the GW module, and GW generates baseflow using that input. In this study, a cell-to-cell routing (ROU) module has been developed for SHM. It is based on the principle of Time Variant Spatially Distributed Direct Hydrograph (SDDH) to route the generated runoff and baseflow generated by various modules upto the outlet. The entire India is divided into 5km x 5km grid cells and properties at the center of the cell are assumed to represent the property of the cell. In the routing scheme, for each cell a single downstream cell is defined in the direction of steepest descent, to create the flow network. These grid cells are classified into overland cells and channel cells based on the threshold value taken into consideration. The overland flow travel time of each overland cell is estimated by combining a steady state kinematic wave approximation with Manning's equation and the channel flow travel time of each channel cell is estimated using Manning's equation and the steady state continuity equation. The travel time for each cell is computed by dividing the travel distance through that cell with cell velocity. The cumulative travel time from each grid cell to the watershed outlet is the sum of

  1. Satellite-Based Study of Glaciers Retreat in Northern Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, Siraj

    Glaciers serve as a natural regulator of regional water supplies. About 16933 Km 2 area of glaciers is covered by Pakistan. These glaciers are enormous reservoirs of fresh water and their meltwater is an important resource which feed rivers in Pakistan. Glacier depletion, especially recent melting can affect agriculture, drinking water supplies, hydro-electric power, and ecological habitats. This can also have a more immediate impact on Pakistan's economy that depends mainly on water from glacier melt. Melting of seasonal snowfall and permanent glaciers has resulted not only in reduction of water resources but also caused flash floods in many areas of Pakistan. With the advent of satellite technology, using optical and SAR data the study of glaciers, has become possible. Using temporal data, based on calculation of snow index, band ratios and texture reflectance it has been revealed that the rate of glacier melting has increased as a consequent of global warming. Comparison of Landsat images of Batura glacier for October 1992 and October 2000 has revealed that there is a decrease of about 17 sq km in Batura glaciers. Although accurate changes in glacier extent cannot be assessed without baseline information, these efforts have been made to analyze future changes in glaciated area.

  2. Snow HDRF Measurements on Various Snow Surfaces with the new IAC-Gonio-Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, C. S.; Schroff, K.; Frei, H.

    2004-12-01

    This work presents a field Gonio-Spectrometer developed at the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich (IAC-ETH). The main motivation to built this Gonio-Spectrometer was the study of the Hemispherical Distribution Reflectance Factor (HDRF) of dry snow on the Ice Sheet of Greenland and to examine the influence of the HDRF on the surface energy balance. The surface Albedo is of great importance for both, large scale and small scale climate modelling and energy balance studies. Especially for remote regions, satellites provide an extraordinary means to measure reflected sunlight. However, raw satellite data have to undergo several corrections depending on the viewing angles of the sensors relative to the targets and the irradiance source (sun). The function that describes the distribution of reflected radiance with angle is called Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF). The HDRF is the commonly used dimensionless form of the angular distribution of reflectance. BRDF and HDRF are a functions of four angles: incoming (solar) zenith angle and azimuth, and outgoing (reflected) zenith angle and azimuth. In situ measurements of HDRF data, a combination of multidirectional and hyperspectral data, require complex and demanding experiments. Therefore, existing data sets a rare. However, the advent of new satellite systems that offer hyperspectral resolution and off-nadir tilting capability ask for ground truth data sets. The IAC-Gonio-Spectrometer measures the HDRF with a distance of 1 meter between sensor and target. The sensor, an optic cable, can be placed on an arbitrary place on the hemisphere and always points towards the same surface area. Depending on the viewing geometry, the diameter of the footprint area varies from 5~cm (at nadir) to 20~cm (at 75 degree zenith angle). The pointing accuracy, analyzed in a laboratory experiment with a laser beam, was measured at ± 2.5~cm. In the summer field

  3. Satellite Based Extrusion Rates for the 2006 Augustine Eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Dean, K. G.; Skoog, R.; Valcic, L.

    2006-12-01

    include pyroclastic deposits or ashfall, which are included in the DEM subtraction approach. However the pyroclastics should only account for a small amount of the extruded volume. In spite of its limitations, satellite based extrusion modeling provides a reasonable and safe method to monitor volcanoes and detect change in eruption style in near real time.

  4. Groundwater Modelling For Recharge Estimation Using Satellite Based Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soheili, Mahmoud; (Tom) Rientjes, T. H. M.; (Christiaan) van der Tol, C.

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater movement is influenced by several factors and processes in the hydrological cycle, from which, recharge is of high relevance. Since the amount of aquifer extractable water directly relates to the recharge amount, estimation of recharge is a perquisite of groundwater resources management. Recharge is highly affected by water loss mechanisms the major of which is actual evapotranspiration (ETa). It is, therefore, essential to have detailed assessment of ETa impact on groundwater recharge. The objective of this study was to evaluate how recharge was affected when satellite-based evapotranspiration was used instead of in-situ based ETa in the Salland area, the Netherlands. The Methodology for Interactive Planning for Water Management (MIPWA) model setup which includes a groundwater model for the northern part of the Netherlands was used for recharge estimation. The Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL) based actual evapotranspiration maps from Waterschap Groot Salland were also used. Comparison of SEBAL based ETa estimates with in-situ abased estimates in the Netherlands showed that these SEBAL estimates were not reliable. As such results could not serve for calibrating root zone parameters in the CAPSIM model. The annual cumulative ETa map produced by the model showed that the maximum amount of evapotranspiration occurs in mixed forest areas in the northeast and a portion of central parts. Estimates ranged from 579 mm to a minimum of 0 mm in the highest elevated areas with woody vegetation in the southeast of the region. Variations in mean seasonal hydraulic head and groundwater level for each layer showed that the hydraulic gradient follows elevation in the Salland area from southeast (maximum) to northwest (minimum) of the region which depicts the groundwater flow direction. The mean seasonal water balance in CAPSIM part was evaluated to represent recharge estimation in the first layer. The highest recharge estimated flux was for autumn

  5. Albedo changes on Vatnajökull associated with dust events, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragosics, Monika; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Pálsson, Finnur

    2015-04-01

    Deposition of aerosols on the glacier surface changes the albedo, thus enhances melt rates and affects the glacier mass balance. There are extensive sources for particles in Iceland; volcanic sandy deserts and glacial outwash plains cover more than 22% of the country. (Arnalds et al., 2001) Particles from these sources get airborne and transported on to the ice caps in several dust storms in most years, causing changes in albedo and surface energy balance. Long-term observations of atmospheric dust over the last 60 years show a high frequency of dust events in Iceland, with more than 34 dust days per year (Dagsson-Waldhauserova et al., 2013). Volcanoes are sources of large quantities of particles during an eruption, and for some years (even decades or centuries) after, due to re-suspension. Volcanic eruptions are frequent in Iceland, often with subsequent deposition of volcanic tephra on glaciers. The most recent are the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull and Grímsvötn in 2010 and 2011. The evolution of surface albedo is measured with in-situ automatic weather stations (AWS), during summer, on a few locations on icelandic ice-caps. To detect dust events on Brúarjökull outlet (NE Vatnajökull ice-cap), drops in albedo are compared with energy balance results from the measured values of the AWSs, temperature, dust storm occurrence (recorded at manned weather stations in the lowlands), and visible changes on satellite observations (MODIS images) as in-situ samples. A dust deposition event is detected by comparing the MODIS images of 20 May and 28 May 2012 and explains a drop in albedo on 21 May, lasting to June 4 from 0.86 to 0.51. The in-situ samples are: snow surface samples from Vatnajökull with impurities collected in October 2013, representing the deposition of one summer over the ice cap; and two firn cores of about 8 meters depth from Brúarjökull, taken in June 2014. The firn cores were analysed to detect dust layers and to measure mass, volume, density of

  6. Seasonal changes in surface albedo of Himalayan glaciers from MODIS data and links with the annual mass balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Brun

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Few glaciological field data are available on glaciers in the Hindu Kush–Karakoram–Himalayan (HKH region, and remote sensing data are thus critical for glacier studies in this region. The main objectives of this study are to document, using satellite images, the seasonal changes of surface albedo for two Himalayan glaciers, Chhota Shigri Glacier (Himachal Pradesh, India and Mera Glacier (Everest region, Nepal, and to reconstruct the annual mass balance of these glaciers based on the albedo data. Albedo is retrieved from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS images, and evaluated using ground based measurements. At both sites, we find high coefficients of determination between annual minimum albedo averaged over the glacier (AMAAG and glacier-wide annual mass balance (Ba measured with the glaciological method (R2 = 0.75. At Chhota Shigri Glacier, the relation between AMAAG found at the end of the ablation season and Ba suggests that AMAAG can be used as a proxy for the maximum snow line altitude or equilibrium line altitude (ELA on winter-accumulation-type glaciers in the Himalayas. However, for the summer-accumulation-type Mera Glacier, our approach relied on the hypothesis that ELA information is preserved during the monsoon. At Mera Glacier, cloud obscuration and snow accumulation limits the detection of albedo during the monsoon, but snow redistribution and sublimation in the post-monsoon period allows for the calculation of AMAAG. Reconstructed Ba at Chhota Shigri Glacier agrees with mass balances previously reconstructed using a positive degree-day method. Reconstructed Ba at Mera Glacier is affected by heavy cloud cover during the monsoon, which systematically limited our ability to observe AMAAG at the end of the melting period. In addition, the relation between AMAAG and Ba is constrained over a shorter time period for Mera Glacier (6 years than for Chhota Shigri Glacier (11 years. Thus the mass balance reconstruction

  7. 'Snow White' Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 43, the 43rd Martian day after landing (July 8, 2008). This image shows the trench informally called 'Snow White.' Two samples were delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory, which is part of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA). The first sample was taken from the surface area just left of the trench and informally named 'Rosy Red.' It was delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 30 (June 25, 2008). The second sample, informally named 'Sorceress,' was taken from the center of the 'Snow White' trench and delivered to the Wet Chemistry Laboratory on Sol 41 (July 6, 2008). The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  8. Snow Radiance Assimilation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, E. J.; Durand, M. T.; Toure, A.; Margulis, S. A.; Goita, K.; Royer, A.; Lu, H.

    2009-12-01

    Passive microwave-based retrievals of terrestrial snow parameters from satellite observations form a 30-year global record which will continue for the forseeable future. So far, these snow retrievals have been generated primarily by regression-based empirical “inversion” methods based on snapshots in time, and are limited to footprints around 25 km in diameter. Assimilation of microwave radiances into physical land surface models may be used to create a retrieval framework that is inherently self-consistent with respect to model physics as well as a more physically-based approach vs. legacy retrieval/inversion methods. This radiance assimilation approach has been used for years for atmospheric parameters by the operational weather forecasting community with great success, and represents one motivation for our work. A radiance assimilation scheme for snow requires a snowpack land surface model (LSM) coupled to a radiative transfer model (RTM). In previous local-scale studies, Durand, Kim, & Margulis (2008) explored the requirements on LSM model fidelity (i.e., snowpack state information) required in order for the RTM to produce brightness temperatures suitable for radiance assimilation purposes at a local scale, using the well-known Microwave Emission Model for Layered Snowpacks (MEMLS) as the RTM and a combination of Simple SIB (SSiB) and Snow Atmosphere (SAST) as the LSM. They also demonstrated improvement of simulated snow depth through the use of an ensemble Kalman filter scheme at this local scale (2009). This modeling framework reflects another motivation—namely, possibilities for downscaling. Our focus at this stage has been at the local scale where high-quality ground truth data is available in order to evaluate radiance assimilation under a “best case scenario.” The quantitative results then form a benchmark for future assessment of effects such as sparse forcing data, upscaling/downscaling, forest attenuation, and model details. Field data from

  9. Impacts of Snow Darkening by Absorbing Aerosols on Eurasian Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyu-Myong; Lau, William K M.; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Kim, Maeng-Ki; Koster, Randal D.

    2016-01-01

    The deposition of absorbing aerosols on snow surfaces reduces snow-albedo and allows snowpack to absorb more sunlight. This so-called snow darkening effect (SDE) accelerates snow melting and leads to surface warming in spring. To examine the impact of SDE on weather and climate during late spring and early summer, two sets of NASA GEOS-5 model simulations with and without SDE are conducted. Results show that SDE-induced surface heating is particularly pronounced in Eurasian regions where significant depositions of dust transported from the North African deserts, and black carbon from biomass burning from Asia and Europe occur. In these regions, the surface heating due to SDE increases surface skin temperature by 3-6 degrees Kelvin near the snowline in spring. Surface energy budget analysis indicates that SDE-induced excess heating is associated with a large increase in surface evaporation, subsequently leading to a significant reduction in soil moisture, and increased risks of drought and heat waves in late spring to early summer. Overall, we find that rainfall deficit combined with SDE-induced dry soil in spring provide favorable condition for summertime heat waves over large regions of Eurasia. Increased frequency of summer heat waves with SDE and the region of maximum increase in heat-wave frequency are found along the snow line, providing evidence that early snowmelt by SDE may increase the risks of extreme summer heat wave. Our results suggest that climate models that do not include SDE may significantly underestimate the effect of global warming over extra-tropical continental regions.

  10. The Effect of Host Star Spectral Energy Distribution and Ice-Albedo Feedback on the Climate of Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Aomawa; Meadows, V.; Bitz, C. M.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Joshi, M. M.; Robinson, T. D.

    2013-01-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. A one dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative-transfer model is used to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy-balance climate model. We simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Our results show that terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibit a stronger ice-albedo feedback. Using a general circulation model we demonstrate that an ocean-covered planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M-dwarf star has a higher global mean surface temperature than a planet orbiting the Sun (a G-dwarf star) at an equivalent stellar flux distance. The effect is even more pronounced when the albedos of snow and ice are lowered, indicating the importance of the spectral dependence of surface ice and snow on climate for these planets. We find that the sensitivity of climate to changes in stellar insolation for M-dwarf planets is weaker than for planets orbiting stars with greater visible and near-UV radiation. While a planet orbiting the Sun becomes ice-covered with an 8% reduction in stellar insolation, a similar planet orbiting an M dwarf requires a 27% reduction to become ice-covered. A 2% reduction in stellar insolation is all that is required for global ice cover on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star. Consequently the habitable zone for surface liquid water on planets with Earth-like greenhouse gas concentrations may be ~12% wider for M-dwarf stars than for G-dwarf stars, and ~3% narrower for F-dwarf stars. Higher obliquities expand the outer habitable zone boundary for surface liquid water. Raising atmospheric CO2 can reduce the ice-albedo effect on M-dwarf planets, but ~3-10 bars are required to entirely mask the climatic effect of ice and snow.

  11. Snow White Trench (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animation shows the evolution of the trench called 'Snow White' that NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander began digging on the 22nd Martian day of the mission after the May 25, 2008, landing. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  12. Snow accretion on overhead wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, Y. [Meteorological Research Inst. for Technology Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tachizaki, S.; Sudo, N. [Tohoku Electric Power Co. Ltd., Miyagi (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Wet snow accretion can cause extensive damage to transmission systems. This paper reviewed some of the difficulties faced by researchers in the study of wet snow accretion on overhead lines in Japan. The study of snow accretion phenomena is complicated by the range of phase changes in water. Snowflakes produced in an upper atmospheric layer with a temperature below freezing do not melt when they go through a lower atmospheric layer with a temperature above freezing, but are in a mixed state of solid and liquid due to the latent heat of melting. The complicated properties of water make studies of snow accretion difficult, as well as the fact that snow changes its physical properties rapidly, due to the effects of ambient temperature, rainfall, and solar radiation. The adhesive forces that cause snow accretion include freezing; bonding through freezing; sintering; condensation and freezing of vapor in the air; mechanical intertwining of snowflakes; capillary action due to liquids; coherent forces between ice particles and water formed through the metamorphosis of snowflakes. In addition to these complexities, differences in laboratory room environments and natural snow environments can also pose difficulties for researchers. Equations describing the relationship between the density of accreted snow and the meteorological parameters involved were presented, as well as empirical equations which suggested that snow accretion efficiency has a dependency on air temperature. An empirical model for estimating snow loads in Japan was outlined, as well as various experiments observing show shedding. Correlations for wet snow accretion included precipitation intensity; duration of precipitation; air temperature; wind speed and wind direction in relation to the overhead line. Issues concerning topography and wet snow accretion were reviewed. It was concluded that studies of snow accretion will benefit by the collection of data in each matrix of the relevant parameters. 12 refs

  13. Impact of Model and Observation Error on Assimilating Snow Cover Fraction Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Kristi R.

    Accurately modeling or observing snow cover fraction (SCF) estimates, which represent fractional snow cover area within a gridcell, can help with better understanding earth system dynamics, improving weather and climate prediction, and providing end-use water solutions. Seeking to obtain more accurate snowpack estimates, high resolution snow cover fraction observations are assimilated with different data assimilation (DA) methods within a land surface model (LSM). The LSM simulates snowpack states, snow water equivalent and snow depth, to obtain improved snowpack estimates known as the analysis. Data assimilation experiments are conducted for two mountainous areas where high spatial snow variability occurs, which can impact realistic snowpack representation for different hydrological and meteorological applications. Consequently, the experiments are conducted at higher model resolutions to better capture this variability. This study focuses on four key aspects of how assimilating SCF observations may improve snowpack estimates and impact the LSM overall. These include investigating the role of data assimilation method complexity, evaluating the impact of model and observational errors on snow state analysis estimates, improving the model's SCF representation for assimilation using observation operators, and examining subsequent model state and flux impacts when SCF observations are assimilated. A simpler direct insertion (DI) and a more complex ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation method were applied. The more complex method proved to be superior to the simpler one; however, this method required accounting for more realistic observational and model errors. Also, the EnKF method required an ensemble of model forecasts, in which bias in the ensemble generation was found and removed. Reducing this bias improved the model snowpack estimates. Detection and geolocation errors in the satellite-based snow cover fraction observations also contributed to degrading

  14. Response of Colorado river runoff to dust radiative forcing in snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T.H.; Deems, J.S.; Belnap, J.; Hamlet, A.F.; Landry, C.C.; Udall, B.

    2010-01-01

    The waters of the Colorado River serve 27 million people in seven states and two countries but are overallocated by more than 10% of the river's historical mean. Climate models project runoff losses of 7-20% from the basin in this century due to human-induced climate change. Recent work has shown however that by the late 1800s, decades prior to allocation of the river's runoff in the 1920s, a fivefold increase in dust loading from anthropogenically disturbed soils in the southwest United States was already decreasing snow albedo and shortening the duration of snow cover by several weeks. The degree to which this increase in radiative forcing by dust in snow has affected timing and magnitude of runoff from the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB) is unknown. Hereweuse the Variable Infiltration Capacity model with postdisturbance and predisturbance impacts of dust on albedo to estimate the impact on runoff from the UCRB across 1916-2003. We find that peak runoff at Lees Ferry, Arizona has occurred on average 3 wk earlier under heavier dust loading and that increases in evapotranspiration from earlier exposure of vegetation and soils decreases annual runoff by more than 1.0 billion cubic meters or ???5% of the annual average. The potential to reduce dust loading through surface stabilization in the deserts and restore more persistent snow cover, slow runoff, and increase water resources in the UCRB may represent an important mitigation opportunity to reduce system management tensions and regional impacts of climate change.

  15. Light-absorbing Particles in Snow and Ice: Measurement and Modeling of Climatic and Hydrological Impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Yun; Yasunari, Teppei J.; Doherty, Sarah J.; Flanner, M. G.; Lau, William K.; Ming, J.; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Mo; Warren, Stephen G.; Zhang, Rudong

    2015-01-01

    Light absorbing particles (LAP, e.g., black carbon, brown carbon, and dust) influence water and energy budgets of the atmosphere and snowpack in multiple ways. In addition to their effects associated with atmospheric heating by absorption of solar radiation and interactions with clouds, LAP in snow on land and ice can reduce the surface reflectance (a.k.a., surface darkening), which is likely to accelerate the snow aging process and further reduces snow albedo and increases the speed of snowpack melt. LAP in snow and ice (LAPSI) has been identified as one of major forcings affecting climate change, e.g. in the fourth and fifth assessment reports of IPCC. However, the uncertainty level in quantifying this effect remains very high. In this review paper, we document various technical methods of measuring LAPSI and review the progress made in measuring the LAPSI in Arctic, Tibetan Plateau and other mid-latitude regions. We also report the progress in modeling the mass concentrations, albedo reduction, radiative forcing, andclimatic and hydrological impact of LAPSI at global and regional scales. Finally we identify some research needs for reducing the uncertainties in the impact of LAPSI on global and regional climate and the hydrological cycle.

  16. Study on the Retrieval of Snow Depth from FY3B/MWRI in the Atctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lele; Chen, Haihua; Guan, Lei

    2016-06-01

    temperatures. Given the high albedo and low thermal conductivity, snow is regarded as one of the key reasons for the amplification of the warming in polar regions. The distributions of sea ice and snow depth are essential to the whole thermal conduction in the Arctic. This study focused on the retrieval of snow depth on sea ice from brightness temperatures of the MicroWave Radiometer Imager (MWRI) onboard the FengYun (FY)-3B satellite during the period from December 1, 2010 to April 30, 2011. After cross calibrated to the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) Level 2A data, the MWRI brightness temperatures were applied to calculate the sea ice concentrations based on the Arctic Radiation and Turbulence Interaction Study Sea Ice (ASI) algorithm. According to the proportional relationship between the snow depth and the surface scattering in 18.7 and 36.5 GHz, the snow depths were derived. In order to eliminate the influence of uncertainties in grain sizes of snow as well as sporadic weather effects, the seven-day averaged snow depths were calculated. Then the results were compared with the snow depths from the AMSR-E Level 3 Sea Ice products. The bias of differences between the MWRI and the AMSR-E Level 3 products are ranged between -1.09 and -0.32 cm while the standard deviations and the correlation coefficients are ranged from 2.47 to 2.88 cm and from 0.78 to 0.90 for different months. As a result, it could be summarized that FY3B/MWRI showed a promising prospect in retrieving snow depth on sea ice.

  17. Simulation of the melt season using a resolved sea ice model with snow cover and melt ponds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyllingstad, Eric D.; Shell, Karen M.; Collins, Lee; Polashenski, Chris

    2015-07-01

    A three-dimensional sea ice model is presented with resolved snow thickness variations and melt ponds. The model calculates heating from solar radiative transfer and simulates the formation and movement of brine/melt water through the ice system. Initialization for the model is based on observations of snow topography made during the summer melt seasons of 2009, 2010, and 2012 from a location off the coast of Barrow, AK. Experiments are conducted to examine the importance of snow properties and snow and ice thickness by comparing observed and modeled pond fraction and albedo. One key process simulated by the model is the formation of frozen layers in the ice as relatively warm fresh water grid cells freeze when cooled by adjacent, cold brine-filled grid cells. These layers prevent vertical drainage and lead to flooding of melt water commonly observed at the beginning of the melt season. Flooding persists until enough heat is absorbed to melt through the frozen layer. The resulting long-term melt pond coverage is sensitive to both the spatial variability of snow cover and the minimum snow depth. For thin snow cover, initial melting results in earlier, reduced flooding with a small change in pond fraction after drainage of the melt water. Deeper snow tends to generate a delayed, larger peak pond fraction before drainage.

  18. The melt pond fraction and spectral sea ice albedo retrieval from MERIS data: validation and trends of sea ice albedo and melt pond fraction in the Arctic for years 2002–2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Istomina

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence of melt ponds on the Arctic sea ice strongly affects the energy balance of the Arctic Ocean in summer. It affects albedo as well as transmittance through the sea ice, which has consequences on the heat balance and mass balance of sea ice. An algorithm to retrieve melt pond fraction and sea ice albedo (Zege et al., 2014 from the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS data is validated against aerial, ship borne and in situ campaign data. The result show the best correlation for landfast and multiyear ice of high ice concentrations (albedo: R = 0.92, RMS = 0.068, melt pond fraction: R = 0.6, RMS = 0.065. The correlation for lower ice concentrations, subpixel ice floes, blue ice and wet ice is lower due to complicated surface conditions and ice drift. Combining all aerial observations gives a mean albedo RMS equal to 0.089 and a mean melt pond fraction RMS equal to 0.22. The in situ melt pond fraction correlation is R = 0.72 with an RMS = 0.14. Ship cruise data might be affected by documentation of varying accuracy within the ASPeCT protocol, which is the reason for discrepancy between the satellite value and observed value: mean R = 0.21, mean RMS = 0.16. An additional dynamic spatial cloud filter for MERIS over snow and ice has been developed to assist with the validation on swath data. The case studies and trend analysis for the whole MERIS period (2002–2011 show pronounced and reasonable spatial features of melt pond fractions and sea ice albedo. The most prominent feature is the melt onset shifting towards spring (starting already in weeks 3 and 4 of June within the multiyear ice area, north to the Queen Elizabeth Islands and North Greenland.

  19. Spatiotemporal variability in surface energy balance across tundra, snow and ice in Greenland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Magnus; Stiegler, Christian; Abermann, Jakob; Citterio, Michele; Hansen, Birger U; van As, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    The surface energy balance (SEB) is essential for understanding the coupled cryosphere-atmosphere system in the Arctic. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal variability in SEB across tundra, snow and ice. During the snow-free period, the main energy sink for ice sites is surface melt. For tundra, energy is used for sensible and latent heat flux and soil heat flux leading to permafrost thaw. Longer snow-free period increases melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and glaciers and may promote tundra permafrost thaw. During winter, clouds have a warming effect across surface types whereas during summer clouds have a cooling effect over tundra and a warming effect over ice, reflecting the spatial variation in albedo. The complex interactions between factors affecting SEB across surface types remain a challenge for understanding current and future conditions. Extended monitoring activities coupled with modelling efforts are essential for assessing the impact of warming in the Arctic.

  20. Spatiotemporal variability in surface energy balance across tundra, snow and ice in Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Magnus; Stiegler, Christian; Abermann, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    The surface energy balance (SEB) is essential for understanding the coupled cryosphere–atmosphere system in the Arctic. In this study, we investigate the spatiotemporal variability in SEB across tundra, snow and ice. During the snow-free period, the main energy sink for ice sites is surface melt....... For tundra, energy is used for sensible and latent heat flux and soil heat flux leading to permafrost thaw. Longer snow-free period increases melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet and glaciers and may promote tundra permafrost thaw. During winter, clouds have a warming effect across surface types whereas during...... summer clouds have a cooling effect over tundra and a warming effect over ice, reflecting the spatial variation in albedo. The complex interactions between factors affecting SEB across surface types remain a challenge for understanding current and future conditions. Extended monitoring activities coupled...

  1. Snow monitoring using microwave radars

    OpenAIRE

    Koskinen, Jarkko

    2001-01-01

    Remote sensing has proven its usefulness in various applications. For mapping, land-use classification and forest monitoring optical satellite and airborne images are used operationally. However, this is not the case with snow monitoring. Currently only ground-based in situ and weather measurements are used operationally for snow monitoring in Finland. Ground measurements are conducted once a month on special snow courses. These measurements are used to update the hydrological model that simu...

  2. Effects of snow grain non-sphericity on climate simulations: Sensitivity tests with the NorESM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Räisänen, Petri; Makkonen, Risto; Kirkevåg, Alf

    2017-04-01

    Snow grains are non-spherical and generally irregular in shape. Still, in radiative transfer calculations, they are often treated as spheres. This also applies to the computation of snow albedo in the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model and in the Los Alamos sea ice model, version 4 (CICE4), both of which are employed in the Community Earth System Model and in the Norwegian Earth System Model (NorESM). In this work, we evaluate the effect of snow grain shape on climate simulated by NorESM in a slab ocean configuration of the model. An experiment with spherical snow grains (SPH) is compared with another (NONSPH) in which the snow shortwave single-scattering properties are based on a combination of non-spherical snow grain shapes optimized using measurements of angular scattering by blowing snow. The key difference between these treatments is that the asymmetry parameter is smaller in the non-spherical case (≈ 0.78 in the visible region) than in the spherical case (≈ 0.89). Therefore, for a given snow grain size, the use of non-spherical snow grains yields a higher snow broadband albedo, typically by ≈0.03. Consequently, considering the spherical case as the baseline, the use of non-spherical snow grains results in a negative radiative forcing (RF), with a global-mean top-of-the-model value of ≈ -0.22 W m-2. Although this global-mean RF is modest, it has a rather substantial impact on the climate simulated by NoRESM. In particular, the global annual-mean 2-m air temperature in NONSPH is 1.17 K lower than in SPH, with substantially larger differences at high latitudes. The climatic response is amplified by strong snow and sea ice feedbacks. It is further found that the difference between NONSPH and SPH could be largely "tuned away" by adjusting the snow grain size in the NONSPH experiment by ≈ 70%. The impact of snow grain shape on the radiative effect (RE) of absorbing aerosols in snow (black carbon and mineral dust) is also discussed. For an

  3. Characterization of the time dynamics of monthly satellite snow cover data on Mountain Chains in Lebanon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesca, Luciano; Shaban, Amin; Gascoin, Simon; Darwich, Talal; Drapeau, Laurent; Hage, Mhamad El; Faour, Ghaleb

    2014-11-01

    In this study, the time dynamics of the monthly means of the snow cover have been on Lebanese Mountain Chains from 2000 to 2012, derived from the MODIS Aqua/Terra satellite snow products was analyzed. This represents the longest satellite-based snow cover time series produced for Lebanon so far. Field survey was also carried out over the last three years in order to measure the in-situ snow/water equivalent and depth in different localities. Analyzing the regime of the snow cover in Mount-Lebanon (Western Mountain Chains) region, it was found that: (i) snowmelt accounts for about 31% of the rivers and springs discharge in Lebanon; (ii) consecutive peaks in the snow cover time series, representing the change-point between accumulation phase and ablation phase are present in three different patterns (edged, non-edged and double peaked); (iii) the areal snow coverage has big diversity between different years; (iv) the annual periodicity represents the most statistically significant and predominant frequency of the series contributing for about the 40% of the total variance of the snow cover series; (v) the long-term trend, totally hidden by the more powerful yearly component and detected by using the singular spectrum analysis (SSA), accounts for about the 33% of the total variance of the series; (vi) the long-term trend shows an apparent cyclic behavior with an estimated period (interval between the two minima) of about nine years; (vii) the comparison of the long-term trend with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) monthly index reveals that the minima in 2009-2010 of the SSA long-term component coincides with a persistent negative phase in the NAO Index.

  4. Albedo and transmittance of inhomogeneous stratus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuev, V.E.; Kasyanov, E.I.; Titov, G.A. [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    A highly important topic is the study of the relationship between the statistical parameters of optical and radiative charactertistics of inhomogeneous stratus clouds. This is important because the radiation codes of general circulation models need improvement, and it is important for geophysical information. A cascade model has been developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to treat stratocumulus clouds with the simplest geometry and horizontal fluctuations of the liquid water path (optical thickness). The model evaluates the strength with which the stochastic geometry of clouds influences the statistical characteristics of albedo and the trnasmittance of solar radiation.

  5. The Spherical Bolometric Albedo of Planet Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Mallama, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Published reflectance data covering several different wavelength intervals has been combined and analyzed in order to determine the spherical bolometric albedo of Mercury. The resulting value of 0.088 +/- 0.003 spans wavelengths from 0 to 4 {\\mu}m which includes over 99% of the solar flux. This bolometric result is greater than the value determined between 0.43 and 1.01 {\\mu}m by Domingue et al. (2011, Planet. Space Sci., 59, 1853-1872). The difference is due to higher reflectivity at wavelen...

  6. Discovery of a Transiting Planet Near the Snow-Line

    CERN Document Server

    Kipping, David M; Buchhave, Lars A; Kenyon, Scott J; Henze, Christopher E; Isaacson, Howard; Kolbl, Rea; Marcy, Geoff W; Bryson, Stephen T; Stassun, Keivan G; Bastien, Fabienne A

    2014-01-01

    In most theories of planet formation, the snow-line represents a boundary between the emergence of the interior rocky planets and the exterior ice giants. The wide separation of the snow-line makes the discovery of transiting worlds challenging, yet transits would allow for detailed subsequent characterization. We present the discovery of Kepler-421b, a Uranus-sized exoplanet transiting a G9/K0 dwarf once every 704.2 days in a near-circular orbit. Using public Kepler photometry, we demonstrate that the two observed transits can be uniquely attributed to the 704.2 day period. Detailed light curve analysis with BLENDER validates the planetary nature of Kepler-421b to >4 sigmas confidence. Kepler-421b receives the same insolation as a body at ~2AU in the Solar System and for a Uranian albedo would have an effective temperature of ~180K. Using a time-dependent model for the protoplanetary disk, we estimate that Kepler-421b's present semi-major axis was beyond the snow-line after ~3Myr, indicating that Kepler-421b...

  7. Discovery of a transiting planet near the snow-line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kipping, D. M.; Torres, G.; Buchhave, L. A.; Kenyon, S. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Henze, C.; Bryson, S. T. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Isaacson, H.; Kolbl, R.; Marcy, G. W. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Stassun, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, 1807 Station B, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Bastien, F., E-mail: dkipping@cfa.harvard.edu [Physics Department, Fisk University, 1000 17th Ave. N, Nashville, TN 37208 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    In most theories of planet formation, the snow-line represents a boundary between the emergence of the interior rocky planets and the exterior ice giants. The wide separation of the snow-line makes the discovery of transiting worlds challenging, yet transits would allow for detailed subsequent characterization. We present the discovery of Kepler-421b, a Uranus-sized exoplanet transiting a G9/K0 dwarf once every 704.2 days in a near-circular orbit. Using public Kepler photometry, we demonstrate that the two observed transits can be uniquely attributed to the 704.2 day period. Detailed light curve analysis with BLENDER validates the planetary nature of Kepler-421b to >4σ confidence. Kepler-421b receives the same insolation as a body at ∼2 AU in the solar system, as well as a Uranian albedo, which would have an effective temperature of ∼180 K. Using a time-dependent model for the protoplanetary disk, we estimate that Kepler-421b's present semi-major axis was beyond the snow-line after ∼3 Myr, indicating that Kepler-421b may have formed at its observed location.

  8. Estimation of Sub Hourly Glacier Albedo Values Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya Quiroga, Vladimir; Mano, Akira; Asaoka, Yoshihiro; Udo, Keiko; Kure, Shuichi; Mendoza, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Glaciers are the most important fresh water reservoirs storing about 67% of total fresh water. Unfortunately, they are retreating and some small glaciers have already disappeared. Thus, snow glacier melt (SGM) estimation plays an important role in water resources management. Whether SGM is estimated by complete energy balance or a simplified method, albedo is an important data present in most of the methods. However, this is a variable value depending on the ground surface and local conditions. The present research presents a new approach for estimating sub hourly albedo values using different artificial intelligence techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees along with measured and easy to obtain data. . The models were developed using measured data from the Zongo-Ore station located in the Bolivian tropical glacier Zongo (68°10' W, 16°15' S). This station automatically records every 30 minutes several meteorological parameters such as incoming short wave radiation, outgoing short wave radiation, temperature or relative humidity. The ANN model used was the Multi Layer Perceptron, while the decision tree used was the M5 model. Both models were trained using the WEKA software and validated using the cross validation method. After analysing the model performances, it was concluded that the decision tree models have a better performance. The model with the best performance was then validated with measured data from the Equatorian tropical glacier Antizana (78°09'W, 0°28'S). The model predicts the sub hourly albedo with an overall mean absolute error of 0.103. The highest errors occur for albedo measured values higher than 0.9. Considering that this is an extreme value coincident with low measured values of incoming short wave radiation, it is reasonable to assume that such values include errors due to censored data. Assuming a maximum albedo of 0.9 improved the accuracy of the model reducing the MAE to less than 0.1. Considering that the

  9. Incorporating changes in albedo in estimating the climate mitigation benefits of land use change projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. N. Bird

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Some climate scientists are questioning whether the practice of converting of non-forest lands to forest land (afforestation or reforestation is an effective climate change mitigation option. The discussion focuses particularly on areas where the new forest is primarily coniferous and there is significant amount of snow since the increased climate forcing due to the change in albedo may counteract the decreased climate forcing due to carbon dioxide removal.

    In this paper, we develop a stand-based model that combines changes in surface albedo, solar radiation, latitude, cloud cover and carbon sequestration. As well, we develop a procedure to convert carbon stock changes to equivalent climatic forcing or climatic forcing to equivalent carbon stock changes. Using the model, we investigate the sensitivity of combined affects of changes in surface albedo and carbon stock changes to model parameters. The model is sensitive to amount of cloud, atmospheric absorption, timing of canopy closure, carbon sequestration rate among other factors. The sensitivity of the model is investigated at one Canadian site, and then the model is tested at numerous sites across Canada.

    In general, we find that the change in albedo reduces the carbon sequestration benefits by approximately 30% over 100 years, but this is not drastic enough to suggest that one should not use afforestation or reforestation as a climate change mitigation option. This occurs because the forests grow in places where there is significant amount of cloud in winter. As well, variations in sequestration rate seem to be counterbalanced by the amount and timing of canopy closure.

    We close by speculating that the effects of albedo may also be significant in locations at lower latitudes, where there are less clouds, and where there are extended dry seasons. These conditions make grasses light coloured and when irrigated crops, dark forests or other vegetation such as

  10. DroughtView: Satellite Based Drought Monitoring and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartfield, K. A.; Van Leeuwen, W. J. D.; Crimmins, M.; Marsh, S. E.; Torrey, Y.; Rahr, M.; Orr, B. J.

    2014-12-01

    applications will be demonstrated live during the poster session. Expansion of DroughtView includes future plans to add snow products, phenology data and climate scenarios. Extension of the spatial coverage of the data to other parts of the world is also planned.

  11. Black carbon in the atmosphere and snow, from pre-industrial times until present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Skeie

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of black carbon (BC in the atmosphere and the deposition of BC on snow surfaces since pre-industrial time until present are modelled with the Oslo CTM2 model. The model results are compared with observations including recent measurements of BC in snow in the Arctic. The global mean burden of BC from fossil fuel and biofuel sources increased during two periods. The first period, until 1920, is related to increases in emissions in North America and Europe, and the last period after 1970 are related mainly to increasing emissions in East Asia. Although the global burden of BC from fossil fuel and biofuel increases, in the Arctic the maximum atmospheric BC burden as well as in the snow was reached in 1960s, with a slight reduction thereafter. The global mean burden of BC from open biomass burning sources has not changed significantly since 1900. With current inventories of emissions from open biomass sources, the modelled burden of BC in snow and in the atmosphere north of 65° N is small compared to the BC burden of fossil fuel and biofuel origin. From the concentration changes radiative forcing time series due to the direct aerosol effect as well as the snow-albedo effect is calculated for BC from fossil fuel and biofuel. The calculated radiative forcing in 2000 for the direct aerosol effect is 0.35 W m−2 and for the snow-albedo effect 0.016 W m−2 in this study. Due to a southward shift in the emissions there is an increase in the lifetime of BC as well as an increase in normalized radiative forcing, giving a change in forcing per unit of emissions of 26 % since 1950.

  12. Black carbon in the atmosphere and snow, from pre-industrial times until present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. B. Skeie

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The distribution of black carbon (BC in the atmosphere and the deposition of BC on snow surfaces since pre-industrial time until present are modelled with the Oslo CTM2 model. The model results are compared with observations including recent measurements of BC in snow in the Arctic. The global mean burden of BC from fossil fuel and biofuel sources increased during two periods. The first period, until 1920, is related to increases in emissions in North America and Europe, and the last period after 1970 are related mainly to increasing emissions in East Asia. Although the global burden of BC from fossil fuel and biofuel increases, in the Arctic the maximum atmospheric BC burden as well as in the snow was reached in 1960s, with a slight reduction thereafter. The global mean burden of BC from open biomass burning sources has not changed significantly since 1900. With current inventories of emissions from open biomass sources, the modelled burden of BC in snow and in the atmosphere north of 65° N is small compared to the BC burden of fossil fuel and biofuel origin. From the concentration changes radiative forcing time series due to the direct aerosol effect as well as the snow-albedo effect is calculated for BC from fossil fuel and biofuel. The calculated radiative forcing in 2000 for the direct aerosol effect is 0.35 W m−2 and for the snow-albedo effect 0.016 W m−2. Due to a southward shift in the emissions there is an increase in the lifetime of BC as well as an increase in normalized radiative forcing, giving a change in forcing per unit of emissions of 26% since 1950.

  13. Spacecraft Attitude Determination with Earth Albedo Corrected Sun Sensor Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    This thesis focuses on advanced modeling of the Earth albedo experienced by satellites in Earth orbit. The model of the Earth albedo maintains directional information of the Earth albedo irradiance from each partition on the Earth surface. This allows enhanced modeling of Sun sensor current outputs......-Method, Extended Kalman Filter, and Unscented Kalman Filter algorithms are presented and the results are compared. Combining the Unscented Kalman Filter with Earth albedo and enhanced Sun sensor modeling allows for three-axis attitude determination from Sun sensor only, which previously has been perceived...

  14. LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY ARA V NEFIAN*, TAEMIN KIM, MICHAEL BROXTON, AND ZACH MORATTO Abstract. Generating accurate three...

  15. Reflection and transmission of irradiance by snow and sea ice in the central Arctic Ocean in summer 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruibo Lei

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reflection and transmission of irradiance by the combined snow and sea ice layer were measured at an ice camp (ca. 10 days and several short-term stations (ca. 2 h established in the western sector of the Arctic Ocean above 80°N during the 2010 summer. These measurements were made with an intention to quantify the apparent optical properties of snow and sea ice, and to evaluate their roles in the mass balance of snow-covered sea ice in the High Arctic. The integrated 350–920 nm albedo ranged from 0.54 to 0.88, and was primarily dependent on the geophysical properties of snow, but not those of sea ice. This implies that all snow cover was still optically thick, even though snow melting had commenced at all measurement sites. For sea ice about 1.66 m thick and covered by 2.5–8.5 cm of snow at the ice camp, the integrated 350–920 nm transmittance ranged from 0.017 to 0.065. Rapid snow melting resulting from an event of slight drizzle doubled the available solar irradiance under the ice (from ca. 3.6 to 7.2 W·m−2, which further accelerated ice-bottom decay. During the measurement at the camp, the temporally averaged incident solar irradiance at 320–950 nm was 110.6±33.6 W·m−2, 29.2±2.9% of which was absorbed by snow and sea ice and utilized to melt snow and sea ice. The melting of snow and sea ice had a distinctly greater effect on the spectral reflection and transmission for the near-infrared spectrum than for the ultraviolet and visible spectra.

  16. Snow Plow Activity (2015-2016)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Snow Plow data from the the City of Pittsburgh's Snow Plow Tracker. These data are collected from the Snow Plow Tracker's Fusion Table and converted to geoJSON....

  17. 'Snow White' in Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    This color image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the trench dubbed 'Snow White,' after further digging on the 25th Martian day, or sol, of the mission (June 19, 2008). The lander's solar panel is casting a shadow over a portion of the trench. The trench is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep and 30 centimeters (12 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  18. Phoenix's Snow White Trench

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    A soil sample taken from the informally named 'Snow White' trench at NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander work site produced minerals that indicate evidence of past interaction between the minerals and liquid water. This image was taken by the Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 103, the 103rd day since landing (Sept. 8, 2008). The trench is approximately 23 centimeters (9 inches) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by JPL, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development was by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Ice Caps and Ice Belts: The Effects of Obliquity on Ice‑Albedo Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Brian E. J.; Cronin, Timothy W.; Bitz, Cecilia M.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary obliquity determines the meridional distribution of the annual mean insolation. For obliquity exceeding 55°, the weakest insolation occurs at the equator. Stable partial snow and ice cover on such a planet would be in the form of a belt about the equator rather than polar caps. An analytical model of planetary climate is used to investigate the stability of ice caps and ice belts over the widest possible range of parameters. The model is a non-dimensional diffusive Energy Balance Model, representing insolation, heat transport, and ice‑albedo feedback on a spherical planet. A complete analytical solution for any obliquity is given and validated against numerical solutions of a seasonal model in the “deep-water” regime of weak seasonal ice line migration. Multiple equilibria and unstable transitions between climate states (ice-free, Snowball, or ice cap/belt) are found over wide swaths of parameter space, including a “Large Ice-Belt Instability” and “Small Ice-Belt Instability” at high obliquity. The Snowball catastrophe is avoided at weak radiative forcing in two different scenarios: weak albedo feedback and inefficient heat transport (favoring stable partial ice cover), or efficient transport at high obliquity (favoring ice-free conditions). From speculative assumptions about distributions of planetary parameters, three-fourths to four-fifths of all planets with stable partial ice cover should be in the form of Earth-like polar caps.

  20. Improved identification of clouds and ice/snow covered surfaces in SCIAMACHY observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Krijger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the ultra-violet, visible and near infra-red wavelength range the presence of clouds can strongly affect the satellite-based passive remote sensing observation of constituents in the troposphere, because clouds effectively shield the lower part of the atmosphere. Therefore, cloud detection algorithms are of crucial importance in satellite remote sensing. However, the detection of clouds over snow/ice surfaces is particularly difficult in the visible wavelengths as both clouds an snow/ice are both white and highly reflective. The SCIAMACHY Polarisation Measurement Devices (PMD Identification of Clouds and Ice/snow method (SPICI uses the SCIAMACHY measurements in the wavelength range between 450 nm and 1.6 μm to make a distinction between clouds and ice/snow covered surfaces, specifically developed to identify cloud-free SCIAMACHY observations. For this purpose the on-board SCIAMACHY PMDs are used because they provide higher spatial resolution compared to the main spectrometer measurements. In this paper we expand on the original SPICI algorithm (Krijger et al., 2005a to also adequately detect clouds over snow-covered forests which is inherently difficult because of the similar spectral characteristics. Furthermore the SCIAMACHY measurements suffer from degradation with time. This must be corrected for adequate performance of SPICI over the full SCIAMACHY time range. Such a correction is described here. Finally the performance of the new SPICI algorithm is compared with various other datasets, such as from FRESCO, MICROS and AATSR, focusing on the algorithm improvements.

  1. Surface Albedo Variations Across Opportunity's Traverse in Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer-Ellis, G. L.; Rice, M. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo measurements from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity mission can be used to help understand surface-atmosphere interactions at Meridiani Planum. Opportunity has acquired 117 albedo panoramas with the Pancam instrument as of sol 3870, across the first 40 km of its traverse. To date, only the first 32 panoramas have been reported upon in previous studies [1]. Here we present an analysis of the full set of PDS-released albedo observations from Opportunity and correlate our measurements with terrain type and known atmospheric events. To acquire a 360-degree albedo observation, Pancam's L1 ("clear") filter is used to take 27 broad-spectrum images, which are stitched into a mosaic. Pancam images are calibrated to reflectance factor (R*), which is taken as an approximation of the Lambertian albedo. Areas of interest are selected and average albedo calculations are applied to all of the selections. Results include the average albedo of each scene, as well as equal-area corrections where applicable, in addition to measurements of specific classes of surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty terrain, and rover tracks). Average scene albedo measurements range from 0.11 ± 0.04 to 0.30 ± 0.04, with the highest value observed on sol 1290 (immediately after the planet-encircling dust storm of 2007). We compare these results to distance traveled, surface morphologies, local wind driven events, and dust opacity measurements. Future work will focus on correlating Pancam albedo values with orbital data from cameras such as HiRISE, CTX, MOC, THEMIS-VIS, and MARCI, and completion of the same analysis for the full Pancam albedo dataset from Spirit. References: [1] Bell, J. F., III, M. S. Rice, J. R. Johnson, and T. M. Hare (2008), Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E06S18, doi:10.1029/2007JE002976.

  2. The Ecology of Snow: A Biome-Based Analysis of Trends in Northern Hemisphere Snow-covered Area and Duration, 1971-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allchin, M.; Déry, S.

    2016-12-01

    The seasonal 'lifetime' of snowpack depends on appropriate conditions of both temperature and humidity. Biomes also evolve in response to the same influences, but over timescales of centuries to millenia. It follows that biomes provide a useful spatial framework for studies of snow climatology. Such an investigation would additionally yield information relating to the climatological and hydrological stresses being experienced in each ecological setting. This submission therefore describes research to quantify the intra-annual variation of trends in snow-covered area (SA) among Northern Hemisphere (NH) biomes. Weekly biome SA was estimated through the continuous 1971-2014 period of the NOAA - Rutgers NH snow climate data record by overlaying the grid on the WWF Terrestrial EcoRegions spatial dataset. The resultant 43-year time-series for each week and biome was tested for trends using Mann-Kendall Analysis. Significant negative trends in snow-season length were identified in almost all snow-dominated biomes. The strengths and signs of biome SA trends vary throughout the year, in some cases dramatically, controlled largely by influences of latitude and elevation. Prior studies have shown how negative trends which dominate through spring and summer at continental and hemispheric scales intensify linearly as the season progresses: intriguingly, the same phenomenon is noted among biomes, but the gradients of these amplifications vary with context. This is thought likely to relate to modulation of the snow-albedo feedback by the contrasting land-cover characteristics in each biome. Dividing the long-term mean weekly SA in each biome by the corresponding trend offers a (highly conservative) estimate of the years remaining before snow becomes `extinct' in each biome in each week of the year.

  3. The value of snow cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokratov, S. A.

    2009-04-01

    Snow is the natural resource, like soil and water. It has specific properties which allow its use not just for skiing but also for houses cooling in summer (Swedish experience), for air fields construction (Arctic and Antarctic), for dams (north of Russia), for buildings (not only snow-houses of some Polar peoples but artistic hotel attracting tourists in Sweden), and as art material (Sapporo snow festival, Finnish events), etc. "Adjustment" of snow distribution and amount is not only rather common practice (avalanche-protection constructions keeping snow on slopes) but also the practice with long history. So-called "snow irrigation" was used in Russia since XIX century to protect winter crop. What is now named "artificial snow production", is part of much larger pattern. What makes it special—it is unavoidable in present climate and economy situation. 5% of national income in Austria is winter tourism. 50% of the economy in Savoy relay on winter tourism. In terms of money this can be less, but in terms of jobs and income involved this would be even more considerable in Switzerland. As an example—the population of Davos is 14000 in Summer and 50000 in Winter. Skiing is growing business. In present time you can find ski slopes in Turkey and Lebanon. To keep a cite suitable for attracting tourists you need certain amount of sunny days and certain amount of snow. The snow cannons are often the only way to keep a place running. On the other hand, more artificial snow does not necessary attract more tourists, while heavy natural snowfall does attract them. Artificial snow making is costly and requires infrastructure (ponds and electric lines) with very narrow range of weather conditions. Related companies are searching for alternatives and one of them can be "weather regulation" by distribution of some chemical components in clouds. It did not happen yet, but can happen soon. The consequences of such interference in Nature is hardly known. The ski tourism is not the

  4. Cloud albedo increase from carbonaceous aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Leaitch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements from two consecutive days, analysed with the aid of an aerosol-adiabatic cloud parcel model, are used to study the effect of carbonaceous aerosol particles on the reflectivity of sunlight by water clouds. The measurements, including aerosol chemistry, aerosol microphysics, cloud microphysics, cloud gust velocities and cloud light extinction, were made below, in and above stratocumulus over the northwest Atlantic Ocean. On the first day, the history of the below-cloud fine particle aerosol was marine and the fine particle sulphate and organic carbon mass concentrations measured at cloud base were 2.4 μg m−3 and 0.9 μg m−3 respectively. On the second day, the below-cloud aerosol was continentally influenced and the fine particle sulphate and organic carbon mass concentrations were 2.3 μg m−3 and 2.6 μg m−3 respectively. Over the range 0.06–0.8 μm diameter, the shapes of the below-cloud size distributions were similar on both days and the number concentrations were approximately a factor of two higher on the second day. The cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC on the second day were approximately three times higher than the CDNC measured on the first day. Using the parcel model to separate the influence of the differences in gust velocities, we estimate from the vertically integrated cloud light scattering measurements a 6% increase in the cloud albedo principally due to the increase in the carbonaceous components on the second day. Assuming no additional absorption by this aerosol, a 6% albedo increase translates to a local daytime radiative cooling of ∼12 W m−2. This result provides observational evidence that the role of anthropogenic carbonaceous components in the cloud albedo effect can be much larger than that of anthropogenic sulphate, as some global simulations have indicated.

  5. Impacts of light-absorbing impurities on snow and their quantification with bidirectional reflectance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritsevich, Maria; Peltoniemi, Jouni; Meinander, Outi; Dagsson-Waldhauserová, Pavla; Zubko, Nataliya; Hakala, Teemu; Virkkula, Aki; Svensson, Jonas; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2017-04-01

    In order to quantify the effects of absorbing impurities on snow and define their contribution to the climate change, we have conducted a series of dedicated bidirectional reflectance measurements. Chimney soot, volcanic sand, and glaciogenic silt have been deposited on the snow in the controlled way. The bidirectional reflectance factors of these targets and untouched snow have been measured using the Finnish Geodetic Institute's field goniospectrometer FIGIFIGO, see, e.g., [1, 2] and references therein. It has been found that the contaminants darken the snow, and modify its appearance mostly as expected, with clear directional signal and modest spectral signal. A remarkable feature is the fact that any absorbing contaminant on snow enhances the metamorphosis under strong sunlight [3, 4]. Immediately after deposition, the contaminated snow surface appears darker than the pure snow in all viewing directions, but the heated soot particles start sinking down deeply into the snow in minutes. The nadir measurement remains darkest, but at larger zenith angles the surface of the soot-contaminated snow changes back to almost as white as clean snow. Thus, for on ground observer the darkening by impurities can be completely invisible, overestimating the albedo, but a nadir looking satellite sees the darkest points, now underestimating the albedo. After more time, also the nadir view brightens, and the remaining impurities may be biased towards more shadowed locations or less absorbing orientations by natural selection. This suggests that at noon the albedo should be lower than in the morning or afternoon. When sunlight stimulates more sinking than melting, albedo should be higher in the afternoon than in the morning, and vice versa when melting is dominating. Thus to estimate the effects caused by black carbon (BC) deposited on snow on climate changes may one need to take into account possible rapid diffusion of the BC inside the snow from its surface. When the snow melt

  6. The effect of pulverization on the albedo of lunar rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, Marcel Gilles Jozef

    1969-01-01

    Measures of the albedo under full-moon conditions have been made on two samples of very dark rocks, pulverized and sieved so as to obtain powders of different grain size. Below a size of 0.05 mm the albedo suddenly increases, obviously because the individual grains become transparent. By a rough cal

  7. Narrowband to broadband conversion of Landsat TM glacier albedos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Knap, W.H.; Reijmer, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an empirical relationship between the broadband glacier albedo (alpha) and the narrowband glacier albedos in Landsat TM bands 2 and 4 (alpha2 and alpha4, respectively). The relationship was established on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis of 112 ground-based s

  8. Narrowband to broadband conversion of Landsat TM glacier albedos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Knap, W.H.; Reijmer, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an empirical relationship between the broadband glacier albedo (alpha) and the narrowband glacier albedos in Landsat TM bands 2 and 4 (alpha2 and alpha4, respectively). The relationship was established on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis of 112 ground-based

  9. The Albedo of Pervious Cement Concrete Linearly Decreases with Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pervious pavements have been advocated as a potential countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. To understand if pervious pavements stay cooler than conventional pavements, the albedo of the pervious concrete must be understood. This study measured the albedo of pervious concrete with different porosity. Four Portland cement concrete mixes were casted, using designed amounts of sand to vary the porosity of the pervious concrete samples. The samples were sliced and the spectral reflectance and albedo of the sliced samples were measured and analyzed. It is found that the albedo of pervious concrete decreases linearly with the increase of the porosity. The albedo of a pervious Portland concrete varies from 0.25 to 0.35, which is 0.05~0.15 lower than the albedo of conventional cement concrete. Due to this lower albedo, it should be cautious to develop pervious concrete to battle with urban heat island unless the evaporation of pervious concrete is promoted to compensate the additional solar absorption caused by the low albedo.

  10. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  11. The effect of pulverization on the albedo of lunar rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, Marcel Gilles Jozef

    Measures of the albedo under full-moon conditions have been made on two samples of very dark rocks, pulverized and sieved so as to obtain powders of different grain size. Below a size of 0.05 mm the albedo suddenly increases, obviously because the individual grains become transparent. By a rough

  12. Anthropogenic desertification by high-albedo pollution Observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Rosenberg, N. W.; Rosenberg, E.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 MSS albedo data of Western Negev, Sinai and the Gaza strip are presented. A sharp contrast in albedo exists across the Negev-Sinai and Negev-Gaza strip borders. Anthropogenic desertification has occurred on the Arab side due to overgrazing and Bedouin agriculture, whereas natural vegetation grows much more abundantly on the Israeli side.

  13. Assessment of surface dryness due to deforestation using satellite-based temperature-vegetation dryness index (TVDI) in Rondônia, Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, J. H.; Cho, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Rondônia is the most deforested region in the Amazon due to human activities such as forest lumbering for the several decades. The deforestation affects to water cycle because evapotranspiration was reduced, and then soil moisture and precipitation will be changed. In this study, we assess surface dryness using satellite-based data such as moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), albedo, TRMM Multi-sensor Precipitation Analysis (TMPA) precipitation from 2002 to 2014, and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 (GOME-2) sun-induced fluorescence (SIF) from 2007 to 2014. Temperature-vegetation dryness index (TVDI) was calculated using LST and NDVI to evaluate surface dryness during dry season (June-July). TVDI relatively represents the surface dryness on specific area and period. Forest, deforesting and deforested regions were selected in the Rondônia to assess the relative changes on surface dryness occurred from human activity. The relative TVDI (rTVDI) at deforesting region increased because of deforestation, it means that surface in deforesting region became more dryness. We also found that to assess the impact of deforestation using satellite-based precipitation and vegetation conditions such as NDVI and sun-induced fluorescence (SIF) is possible. The relative NDVI (rNDVI) and SIF decreased when TVDI increased, and two variables (rTVDI-rNDVI, rTVDI-SIF) had linear correlation. Thesis results can be helpful to comprehend impact of deforestation in Amazon, and to validate simulations of deforestation from hydrological models.

  14. The Effect of Host Star Spectral Energy Distribution and Ice-Albedo Feedback on the Climate of Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, Aomawa L; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-01-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. Here we explore this effect using a one dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative-transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy-balance climate model. A three-dimensional general circulation model is also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models we simulate planets covered by ocean, land, and water ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibit a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We find that ice-covered conditions occur on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO2 (present atmospheric level on Ea...

  15. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    CERN Document Server

    Nugent, C R; Bauer, J; Cutri, R M; Kramer, E A; Grav, T; Masiero, J; Sonnett, S; Wright, E L

    2016-01-01

    The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids and 8,885 other asteroids. $84\\%$ of the near-Earth asteroids did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within $ \\pm \\sim20\\%$ and $\\pm\\sim40\\%$, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large ($>100$ m), and have low albedos.

  16. The solar zenith angle dependence of desert albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Dickinson, Robert E.; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2005-03-01

    Most land models assume that the bare soil albedo is a function of soil color and moisture but independent of solar zenith angle (SZA). However, analyses of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and albedo data over thirty desert locations indicate that bare soil albedo does vary with SZA. This is further confirmed using the in situ data. In particular, bare soil albedo normalized by its value at 60° SZA can be adequately represented by a one-parameter formulation (1 + C)/(1 + 2C * cos(SZA)) or a two-parameter formulation (1 + B1 * f1(SZA) + B2 * f2(SZA)). Using the MODIS and in situ data, the empirical parameters C, B1, and B2 are taken as 0.15, 0.346 and 0.063. The SZA dependence of soil albedo is also found to significantly affect the modeling of land surface energy balance over a desert site.

  17. HONO emissions from snow surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beine, Harry; Colussi, AgustIn J; Hoffmann, Michael R [California Institute of Technology, Environmental Science and Engineering, Pasadena, CA (United States); Amoroso, Antonio; Esposito, Giulio; Montagnoli, Mauro [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto Inquinamento Atmosferico (CNR-IIA), Roma (Italy)], E-mail: hbeine@ucdavis.edu

    2008-10-15

    Photochemical production of NO{sub x} and HONO from surface snow can significantly impact the NO{sub x}, OH, and O{sub 3} budgets in the overlying atmosphere. NO{sub x} production is driven by the solar photolysis of NO{sub 3}{sup -} within or at the surface of snowpacks. HONO, however, is a secondary species that involves H-atom transfer between natural donors and photogenerated NO{sub 2}. Here we investigate the mechanism of HONO generation in snowpacks by exploring how its emissions respond to on-and-off illumination and temperature cycles, and to the addition of various snow dopants. The presence of humic substances within or at the surface of the snowpack significantly enhances, and may be an essential requisite for HONO production. Emission fluxes of NO, NO{sub 2}, and HONO from snow surfaces were measured under controlled temperature, ozone mixing ratio and actinic flux conditions. We used natural mid-latitude surface snow as the snow substrate. Their combined peak emission fluxes reached up to {approx}3 x 10{sup 10} molecules cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, {approx}10{sup 3} times larger than typical emissions from polar snowpacks. Less than 1% of available N was released in these experiments. We report significant post-irradiation HONO emissions from the snow. Present results indicate a strong, direct correlation between HONO emissions and the HULIS (humic-like substances) content of the snow surface.

  18. Candidate perennial bioenergy grasses have a higher albedo than annual row crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. N.; VanLoocke, A.; Gomez-Casanovas, N.; Bernacchi, C.

    2015-12-01

    The production of perennial cellulosic feedstocks for bioenergy presents the potential to diversify regional economies and the national energy supply, while also serving as climate 'regulators' due to a number of biogeochemical and biogeophysical differences relative to row crops. Numerous observational and model based approaches have investigated biogeochemical tradeoffs, such as increased carbon sequestration and increased water use, associated with growing cellulosic feedstocks. A less understood aspect is the biogeophysical changes associated with the difference in albedo (α), which could alter the local energy balance and cause local to regional cooling several times larger than that associated with offsetting carbon. Here, we established paired fields of Miscanthus × giganteus (miscanthus) and Panicum virgatum (switchgrass), two of the leading perennial cellulosic feedstock candidates, and traditional annual row crops in the highly productive "Corn-belt". Our results show that miscanthus did and switchgrass did not have an overall higher α than current row crops but a strong seasonal pattern existed. Both perennials had consistently higher growing season α than row crops and winter α did not differ. The lack of observed differences in winter α, however, masked an interaction between snow cover and species differences, with the perennial species, compared with the row crops, having a higher α when snow was absent and a much lower α when snow was present. Overall, these changes resulted in an average net reduction in annual absorbed energy of about 5 W/m2 for switchgrass and about 8 W/m2 for miscanthus relative to annual crops. Therefore, the conversion from annual row to perennial crops alters the radiative balance of the surface via changes in α and could lead to regional cooling.

  19. Validation of PV performance models using satellite-based irradiance measurements : a case study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Parkins, Andrew (Clean Power Research); Perez, Richard (University at Albany)

    2010-05-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) system performance models are relied upon to provide accurate predictions of energy production for proposed and existing PV systems under a wide variety of environmental conditions. Ground based meteorological measurements are only available from a relatively small number of locations. In contrast, satellite-based radiation and weather data (e.g., SUNY database) are becoming increasingly available for most locations in North America, Europe, and Asia on a 10 x 10 km grid or better. This paper presents a study of how PV performance model results are affected when satellite-based weather data is used in place of ground-based measurements.

  20. Efficient enhancing scheme for TCP performance over satellite-based internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lina; Gu Xuemai

    2007-01-01

    Satellite link characteristics drastically degrade transport control protocol (TCP) performance. An efficient performance enhancing scheme is proposed. The improvement of TCP performance over satellite-based Intemet is accomplished by protocol transition gateways at each end ora satellite link. The protocol which runs over a satellite link executes the receiver-driven flow control and acknowledgements- and timeouts-based error control strategies. The validity of this TCP performance enhancing scheme is verified by a series of simulation experiments. Results show that the proposed scheme can efficiently enhance the TCP performance over satellite-based Intemet and ensure that the available bandwidth resources of the satellite link are fully utilized.

  1. [Characteristics of carbonaceous aerosol concentration in snow and ice of glaciers in Tianshan Mountains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng-Jie; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Wang, Fei-Teng; Li, Zhong-Qin

    2012-03-01

    The snow and ice samples, collected at Glacier No. 1 at the headwaters of Urumqi River (UG1) and Glacier No. 51 at Haxilegen of Kuytun River (HG51) in 2002 and 2004, were analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and element carbon (EC) by thermal/ optical reflectance (TOR). The spatio-temporal characteristics and environmental significance of OC and EC concentration were discussed in details. The concentration order of total carbon (TC) was: snowpack of west branch on UG1 (1 943 ng x g(-1)) > snowpack of east branch on UG1 (989 ng x g(-1)) > snowpack of HG51 (150 ng x g(-1)) > glacier ice of east branch on UG1 (77 ng x g(-1)), and the concentration order of OC and EC lay similar as TC. The concentration of OC and EC in snowpack of Tianshan Mountains were 557 ng x g(-1) and 188 ng x g(-1), respectively. Concentration peak of carbonaceous aerosol usually appeared near the dust layer at the bottom section of snowpack, but the some sudden events could increase the concentration in the surface snow. Because of the seasonality of carbon emission (e. g. heating and agricultural activities) and transportation (e. g. atmospheric circulation), the concentration of carbonaceous aerosol increased from July to November with fluctuations. Difference on the order of magnitude might exist between the concentration in snow (firn) and glacier ice, which was influenced by the glacier surroundings, sampling situation and other factors. EC on the surface snow affected the albedo significantly, and an average albedo reduction of 0.22 in the wavelength of 300-700 nm was simulated by SNICAR (snow, ice, and aerosol radiative) model.

  2. Airborne Snow Observatory: measuring basin-wide seasonal snowpack with LiDAR and an imaging spectrometer to improve runoff forecasting and reservoir operation (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    The Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) NASA-JPL demonstration mission collected detailed snow information for portions of the Tuolumne Basin in California and the Uncompahgre Basin in Colorado in spring of 2013. The ASO uses an imaging spectrometer and LiDAR sensors mounted in an aircraft to collect snow depth and extent data, and snow albedo. By combining ground and modeled density fields, the ~weekly flights over the Tuolumne produced both basin-wide and detailed sub-basin snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates that were used in a hydrologic simulation model to improve the accuracy and timing of runoff forecasting tools used to manage Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the source of 85% of the water supply for 2.5 million people on the San Francisco Peninsula. The USGS PRMS simulation model was calibrated to the 459 square mile basin and was updated with both weather forecast data and distributed snow information from ASO flights to inform the reservoir operators of predicted inflow volumes and timing. Information produced by the ASO data collection was used to update distributed SWE and albedo state variables in the PRMS model and improved inflow forecasts for Hetch Hetchy. Data from operational ASO programs is expected to improve the ability of reservoir operators to more efficiently allocate the last half of the recession limb of snowmelt inflow and be more assured of meeting operational mandates. This presentation will provide results from the project after its first year.

  3. Soil Albedo in Relation to Soil Color, Moisture and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adan Fimbres

    Land surface albedo is the ratio of reflected to incident solar radiation. It is a function of several surface parameters including soil color, moisture, roughness and vegetation cover. A better understanding of albedo and how it changes in relation to variations in these parameters is important in order to help improve our ability to model the effects of land surface modifications on climate. The objectives of this study were (1) To determine empirical relationships between smooth bare soil albedo and soil color, (2) To develop statistical relationships between albedo and ground-based thematic mapper (TM) measurements of spectral reflectances, (3) To determine how increased surface roughness caused by tillage reduces bare soil albedo and (4) To empirically relate albedo with TM data and other physical characteristics of mixed grass/shrubland sites at Walnut Gulch Watershed. Albedos, colors and spectral reflectances were measured by Eppley pyranometer, Chroma Meter CR-200 and a Spectron SE-590, respectively. Measurements were made on two field soils (Gila and Pima) at the Campus Agricultural Center (CAC), Tucson, AZ. Soil surface roughness was measured by a profile meter developed by the USDA/ARS. Additional measurements were made at the Maricopa Agricultural Center (MAC) for statistical model testing. Albedos of the 15 smooth, bare soils (plus silica sand) were determined by linear regression to be highly correlated (r^2 = 0.93, p > 0.01) with color values for both wet and dry soil conditions. Albedos of the same smooth bare soils were also highly correlated (r^2>=q 0.86, p > 0.01) with spectral reflectances. Testing of the linear regression equations relating albedo to soil color and spectral reflectances using the data from MAC showed a high correlation. A general nonlinear relationship given by y = 8.366ln(x) + 37.802 r^2 = 0.71 was determined between percent reduction in albedo (y) and surface roughness index (x) for wet and dry Pima and Gila field soils

  4. Ground measurements of the hemispherical-directional reflectance of Arctic snow covered tundra for the validation of satellite remote sensing products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, C. P.; Marks, A. A.; Green, P.; Mac Arthur, A.; Fox, N.; King, M. D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface albedo is the hemispherical and wavelength integrated reflectance over the visible, near infrared and shortwave infrared regions of the solar spectrum. The albedo of Arctic snow can be in excess of 0.8 and it is a critical component in the global radiation budget because it determines the proportion of solar radiation absorbed, and reflected, over a large part of the Earth's surface. We present here our first results of the angularly resolved surface reflectance of Arctic snow at high solar zenith angles (~80°) suitable for the validation of satellite remote sensing products. The hemispherical directional reflectance factor (HDRF) of Arctic snow covered tundra was measured using the GonioRAdiometric Spectrometer System (GRASS) during a three-week field campaign in Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard, in March/April 2013. The measurements provide one of few existing HDRF datasets at high solar zenith angles for wind-blown Arctic snow covered tundra (conditions typical of the Arctic region), and the first ground-based measure of HDRF at Ny-Ålesund. The HDRF was recorded under clear sky conditions with 10° intervals in view zenith, and 30° intervals in view azimuth, for several typical sites over a wavelength range of 400-1500 nm at 1 nm resolution. Satellite sensors such as MODIS, AVHRR and VIIRS offer a method to monitor the surface albedo with high spatial and temporal resolution. However, snow reflectance is anisotropic and is dependent on view and illumination angle and the wavelength of the incident light. Spaceborne sensors subtend a discrete angle to the target surface and measure radiance over a limited number of narrow spectral bands. Therefore, the derivation of the surface albedo requires accurate knowledge of the surfaces bidirectional reflectance as a function of wavelength. The ultimate accuracy to which satellite sensors are able to measure snow surface properties such as albedo is dependant on the accuracy of the BRDF model, which can only be assessed

  5. Uncertainty analysis of the optical satellite data-derived snow products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Miia; Pulliainen, Jouni; Metsämäki, Sari; Luojus, Kari; Böttcher, Kristin; Hannula, Henna-Reetta

    2014-05-01

    The behavior of the global snow cover can be effectively estimated using optical Earth Observation (EO) data, in particular during the end of the melting season. In addition to successful dry and continuous 100% (full) snow cover mapping, optical methods perform well over snowmelt regions with patchy wet snow. Long decadal scale time series of satellite data estimates on global Snow Extent (SE) or Fractional Snow Cover (FSC) and albedo are needed for constructing Climate Data Records (CDR). CDRs have a high relevance in climate research e.g. in climate monitoring including trend analysis and verification of climate models. Currently, the available optical satellite data records for hemispherical snow monitoring reach back for several decades, e.g. AVHRR (since ca 1980), ATSR (since ca 1990), AATSR and MODIS (since ca 2000). Also, the current VIIRS (since 2011) and the future Sentinel-3 both provide very potential data for global snow monitoring. It is fundamental to generate extensive CDRs with quality/estimation error information attached to each snow estimate, as the usefulness of the EO-based snow estimate is highly dependent on the quality of the interpretation. The objective of this work is to establish and develop a methodology to determine a dynamic retrieval error estimate for the optical satellite-retrieved FSC. This is performed by applying an error propagation analysis for the consideration of the statistical error of FSC estimation. The procedure is demonstrated here by using the SCAmod algoritm, which is suited for global snow detection and able to perform well also in forested regions. Apart from determining the statistical (random) error, we outline the procedure for the evaluation of the systematic error (biases) of FSC products, both of which are essential for the generation of snow cover CDR. As we focus here on determining the statistical random error, it is crucial to know the variability of the different factors affecting the satellite

  6. Snow economics and the NOHRSC Snow Information System (SNOW-INFO) for the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, T.; Cline, D.; Berkowitz, E.; Savage, D.

    2003-04-01

    The National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) in the National Weather Service (NWS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), provides remotely sensed and modeled snow cover products and data sets to support river and flood forecasting in the United States and also to enhance the national economy. Nationwide, on average, about 16% of the total annual precipitation occurs as snowfall. Many sectors of the U.S. economy rely on surface water from snowfall for production, including manufacturing, mining, thermoelectric power, agriculture, and others. Snow contributes 1.7 trillion annually (16%) to the Nation's gross domestic product (GDP) of 10.5 trillion. Manufacturing is by far the largest contributor to the Nation's GDP and is also the Nation's largest surface-water user. The contribution of snow to manufacturing revenue totals 1.6 trillion annually for the Nation and ranges from just a few billion dollars in the southeastern U.S. to over 200 billion each in Michigan and New York. Hydropower supplies about 10% of the electricity used in the United States, enough to serve the needs of 28 million people. Annual hydroelectric power production exceeds 250 billion kilowatt-hours with the contribution from snow exceeding 6 billion in energy revenue each year (i.e., 30% of the Nation's annual hydroelectric production of 20 billion). Seasonal snowpacks are an essential component of agricultural water supplies throughout most of the U.S. and provide much of the surface water used to irrigate over 55 million acres of U.S. farmland each year. Agriculture net revenue supported by snowmelt exceeds 33 billion annually. Surface water supplies are essential for thermoelectric power generation by coal-fired, oil-fired, and nuclear power plants. Providing about 90% of the Nation's electricity supply, thermoelectric power revenues exceed 215 billion each year while water from snow contributes about 25 billion to this revenue annually. With 1

  7. Surface albedo measurements in Mexico City metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, T; Mar, B; Longoria, R; Ruiz Suarez, L. G [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Morales, L [Instituto de Geografia, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Optical and thermal properties of soils are important input data for the meteorological and photochemical modules of air quality models. As development of these models increase on spatial resolution good albedo data become more important. In this paper measurements of surface albedo of UV (295-385 nm) and visible (450-550 nm) radiation are reported for different urban and rural surfaces in the vicinity of Mexico City. It was found for the downtown zone and average albedo value of 0.05 which is in very good agreement with reported values for urban surfaces. Our albedo values measured in UV region for grey cement and green grass are of 0.10 and 0.009, respectively, and quite similar to those found at the literature of 0.11 and 0.008 for those type of surfaces. [Spanish] Las propiedades opticas y termicas de suelos son datos importantes para los modulos meteorologicos y fotoquimicos de los modelos de calidad del aire. Conforme aumenta la resolucion espacial del modelo se vuelve mas importante contar con buenos datos de albedo. En este articulo se presentan mediciones de albedo superficial de radiacion Ultravioleta (295-385 nm) y visible (450-550 nm) para diferentes superficies urbanas. Los valores medidos de albedo en la region UV para cemento gris y pasto verde son de 0.10 y 0.009, respectivamente, y son muy similares a los reportados en la literatura, 0.11 y 0.008 para este tipo de superficies.

  8. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  9. The application of time-lapse photography for the observation of snow processes in mountainous catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvelmann, J.; Pohl, S.; Weiler, M.

    2012-04-01

    For the forecast of snowmelt flood events in mountainous catchments it is very important to know the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of the snowcover. Topography and vegetation have the most important influence on the spatio-temporal variability of the snowcover. In order to accomplish a continuous observation of the quantity and the status of the snowcover, an extensive measurement network consisting of numerous standalone snow and meteorological sensors and time-lapse photography was established in three catchments in the Black Forest, a typical mid latitude medium elevation mountain range. Catchments with different topographic characteristic and areal extent were specifically chosen for this study. Within the catchments, a stratified sampling design was used to cover a wide range of altitudes and exposures. In order to investigate the influence of a vegetation cover on the snow processes beneath sensors and cameras have been installed under the forest canopy and on adjacent open field sites, respectively. In the presented study the application of spatially distributed time-lapse cameras for the observation of snow processes and snowcover properties at the catchment scale will be discussed. Image analysis software was applied to extract information about snowdepth, snow albedo and canopy interception from the digital images. A measurement scale with a black/white board was installed in the focus of every camera to allow a determination of the snowdepth at every camera location while the black/white board was used to provide a white balance for the albedo estimation. The albedo provides important information about the status of the snowcover and its temporal evolution is a crucial factor for the snowmelt energy balance. Furthermore the time-lapse images provided a continuous observation of the forest canopy allowing the estimation of the interception efficiency and the temporal evolution of the snow interception for different topographic situations

  10. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager Falling Snow Retrieval Algorithm Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skofronick Jackson, Gail; Munchak, Stephen J.; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2015-04-01

    Retrievals of falling snow from space represent an important data set for understanding the Earth's atmospheric, hydrological, and energy cycles. While satellite-based remote sensing provides global coverage of falling snow events, the science is relatively new and retrievals are still undergoing development with challenges and uncertainties remaining. This work reports on the development and post-launch testing of retrieval algorithms for the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Core Observatory satellite launched in February 2014. In particular, we will report on GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) radiometer instrument algorithm performance with respect to falling snow detection and estimation. Since GPM's launch, the at-launch GMI precipitation algorithms, based on a Bayesian framework, have been used with the new GPM data. The at-launch database is generated using proxy satellite data merged with surface measurements (instead of models). One year after launch, the Bayesian database will begin to be replaced with the more realistic observational data from the GPM spacecraft radar retrievals and GMI data. It is expected that the observational database will be much more accurate for falling snow retrievals because that database will take full advantage of the 166 and 183 GHz snow-sensitive channels. Furthermore, much retrieval algorithm work has been done to improve GPM retrievals over land. The Bayesian framework for GMI retrievals is dependent on the a priori database used in the algorithm and how profiles are selected from that database. Thus, a land classification sorts land surfaces into ~15 different categories for surface-specific databases (radiometer brightness temperatures are quite dependent on surface characteristics). In addition, our work has shown that knowing if the land surface is snow-covered, or not, can improve the performance of the algorithm. Improvements were made to the algorithm that allow for daily inputs of ancillary snow cover

  11. Modeling visible and near-infrared snow surface reflectance-simulation and validation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongyi Wu; Ling Tong

    2011-01-01

    Retrieving snow surface reflectance is difficult in optical remote sensing.Hence,this letter evaluates five surface reflectance models,including the Ross-Li,Roujean,Walthall,modified Rahman and Staylor models,in terms of their capacities to capture snow reflectance signatures using ground measurements in Antarctica.The biases of all the models are less than 0.0003 in both visible and near-infrared regions.Moreover,with the exception of the Staylor model,all models have root-mean-square errors of around 0.02,indicating that they can simulate the reflectance magnitude well.The R2 performances of the Ross-Li and Roujean models are higher than those of the others,indicating that these two models can capture the angle distribution of snow surface reflectance better.The bidirectional reflectance distribution flmction (BRDF) characterizes the angular distribution of surface reflection[1,2].It plays an important role in performing atmospheric correction,detecting land cover types,and calculating other biophysical parameters[3].Howcver,the retrieval of snow BRDF/albedo is always a difficult issue in the application of remotely sensed information.%Retrieving snow surface reflectance is difficult in optical remote sensing. Hence, this letter evaluates five surface reflectance models, including the Ross-Li, Roujean, Walthall, modified Rahman and Staylor models, in terms of their capacities to capture snow reflectance signatures using ground measurements in Antarctica. The biases of all the models are less than 0.0003 in both visible and near-infrared regions. Moreover, with the exception of the Staylor model, all models have root-mean-square errors of around 0.02, indicating that they can simulate the reflectance magnitude well. The R2 performances of the Ross-Li and Roujean models are higher than those of the others, indicating that these two models can capture the angle distribution of snow surface reflectance better.

  12. Causes of variability in light absorption by particles in snow at sites in Idaho and Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Sarah J.; Hegg, Dean A.; Johnson, James E.; Quinn, Patricia K.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Dang, Cheng; Warren, Stephen G.

    2016-05-01

    A characterization of black carbon (BC) and other light-absorbing particles in snow is presented for three mountain valley sites in Idaho in early 2014 and for one site near Vernal, Utah, in early 2013 and 2014. The focus of the study was on constraining the magnitude and drivers of variations in particulate absorbers in midlatitude U.S. seasonal snow. Mass mixing ratios of BC in newly fallen snow were similar at all three Idaho sites, with a median of 4.7 ± 4.2 ng BC per gram of snow. The median total light-absorbing particulate mixing ratios in new snow, expressed as an equivalent mixing ratio of BC, was 18 ± 23 ng g-1. At the Utah site, which is near sources of both fossil fuel and dust, the mixing ratios of BC varied from 7 to 45 ng g-1 across seven new snowfall samples, and the BC-equivalent mixing ratios varied from 9 to 1500 ng g-1. At all sites, dry deposition and in-snow processes increase the mixing ratio of BC by up to an order of magnitude and increase the mixing ratio of all light-absorbing particulates by up to 2 orders of magnitude, highlighting the importance of capturing these processes for accurately representing snow albedo in climate models. Spatial variability at a range of scales is found to be considerably smaller than the temporal variations at a given site, with implications for the representativeness of field samples used in observation/model comparisons.

  13. Assimilation of Airborne Snow Observatory Snow Water Equivalent to Improve Runoff Forecasting Model Performance and Reservoir Management During Warm and Dry Winters

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    The Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) NASA-JPL demonstration mission has collected detailed snow information for portions of the Tuolumne Basin in California for three years, 2013 - 2015. Both 2014 and 2015 were low snow years, and 2015 was exceptionally warm and analogous to future years after climate change. The ASO uses an imaging spectrometer and LiDAR sensors mounted in an aircraft to collect snow depth and extent data, and snow albedo. By combining ground and modeled density fields, the ~weekly flights over the Tuolumne produced both basin-wide and detailed sub-basin snow water equivalent (SWE) estimates that were provided to Hetch Hetchy Reservoir operators. The data were also assimilated into an hydrologic simulation model in an attempt to improve the accuracy and timing of a runoff forecasting tool that can be used to improve the management of Hetch Hetchy Reservoir, the source of 85% of the water supply for 2.6 million people on the San Francisco Peninsula. The USGS Precipitation Runoff Modeling System was calibrated to the 1181 square kilometer basin and simulation results compared to observed runoff with and without assimilation of ASO data. Simulated and observed were also compared with observed with both single updates associated with each flight, and with sequential updates from each flight. Sequential updating was found to improve correlation between observed and simulated reservoir inflows, and there by improve the ability of reservoir operators to more efficiently allocate the last half of the recession limb of snowmelt inflow and be assured of filling the reservoir and minimizing ecologically-damaging late season spills.

  14. MODIS Snow Cover Mapping Decision Tree Technique: Snow and Cloud Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, George A.; Hall, Dorothy K.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate mapping of snow cover continues to challenge cryospheric scientists and modelers. The Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) snow data products have been used since 2000 by many investigators to map and monitor snow cover extent for various applications. Users have reported on the utility of the products and also on problems encountered. Three problems or hindrances in the use of the MODIS snow data products that have been reported in the literature are: cloud obscuration, snow/cloud confusion, and snow omission errors in thin or sparse snow cover conditions. Implementation of the MODIS snow algorithm in a decision tree technique using surface reflectance input to mitigate those problems is being investigated. The objective of this work is to use a decision tree structure for the snow algorithm. This should alleviate snow/cloud confusion and omission errors and provide a snow map with classes that convey information on how snow was detected, e.g. snow under clear sky, snow tinder cloud, to enable users' flexibility in interpreting and deriving a snow map. Results of a snow cover decision tree algorithm are compared to the standard MODIS snow map and found to exhibit improved ability to alleviate snow/cloud confusion in some situations allowing up to about 5% increase in mapped snow cover extent, thus accuracy, in some scenes.

  15. Daily snow cover estimation from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer Polar Pathfinder data over Northern Hemisphere land surfaces during 1982-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongxu; Fernandes, Richard

    2009-03-01

    The Global Climate Observing System has identified the need for systematic global daily snow cover data sets over land. Current in situ snow cover data sets have limited spatial coverage while satellite-based snow cover records have either limited historical extent or limited temporal and spatial resolution because of cloud cover or specific sensor availability. NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data offers nearly complete daily global coverage of the Northern Hemisphere, extending back to the early 1980s with successors slated to continue into the next decade. In this paper, we apply a new algorithm, Snowcover, to estimate daily snow cover, including periods of cloudy conditions, from AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) data over Northern Hemisphere land surfaces. This new snow cover product is compared to snow cover estimates derived from long-term in situ snow depth measurements over Canada and the northern Eurasia. The APP snow cover maps showed an 80% agreement rate or better at 95% of the in situ sites. This performance was comparable to the agreement of MODIS 0.05 degree snow cover products over the same sites; although the MODIS product was only retrieved ˜20% of the time corresponding to clear sky conditions in contrast to over 95% of the time with the APP snow product. The almost continuously temporal and spatial coverage for the past 23 years from 1982 to 2004 over Northern Hemisphere makes the new daily snow cover product especially suitable for analysis of large-scale patterns of spring snowmelt in association with variability of circumpolar climate and ecological parameters.

  16. Satellite-based empirical models linking river plume dynamics with hypoxic area andvolume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based empirical models explaining hypoxic area and volume variation were developed for the seasonally hypoxic (O2 < 2 mg L−1) northern Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Mississippi River. Annual variations in midsummer hypoxic area and ...

  17. Satellite-Based actual evapotranspiration over drying semiarid terrain in West-Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuttemeyer, D.; Schillings, Ch.; Moene, A.F.; Bruin, de H.A.R.

    2007-01-01

    A simple satellite-based algorithm for estimating actual evaporation based on Makkink¿s equation is applied to a seasonal cycle in 2002 at three test sites in Ghana, West Africa: at a location in the humid tropical southern region and two in the drier northern region. The required input for the algo

  18. The Albedo Distribution of Near Earth Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Edward L; Masiero, Joseph; Grav, Tommy; Bauer, James

    2016-01-01

    The cryogenic WISE mission in 2010 was extremely sensitive to asteroids and not biased against detecting dark objects. The albedos of 428 Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) observed by WISE during its fully cryogenic mission can be fit quite well by a 3 parameter function that is the sum of two Rayleigh distributions. The Rayleigh distribution is zero for negative values, and follows $f(x) = x \\exp[-x^2/(2\\sigma^2)]/\\sigma^2$ for positive x. The peak value is at x=\\sigma, so the position and width are tied together. The three parameters are the fraction of the objects in the dark population, the position of the dark peak, and the position of the brighter peak. We find that 25.3% of the NEAs observed by WISE are in a very dark population peaking at $p_V = 0.03$, while the other 74.7% of the NEAs seen by WISE are in a moderately dark population peaking at $p_V = 0.168$. A consequence of this bimodal distribution is that the Congressional mandate to find 90% of all NEAs larger than 140 m diameter cannot be satisfied by...

  19. How robust are in situ observations for validating satellite-derived albedo over the dark zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. C.; Hubbard, A.; Irvine-Fynn, T. D.; Doyle, S. H.; Cook, J. M.; Stibal, M.; Box, J. E.

    2017-06-01

    Calibration and validation of satellite-derived ice sheet albedo data require high-quality, in situ measurements commonly acquired by up and down facing pyranometers mounted on automated weather stations (AWS). However, direct comparison between ground and satellite-derived albedo can only be justified when the measured surface is homogeneous at the length-scale of both satellite pixel and in situ footprint. Here we use digital imagery acquired by an unmanned aerial vehicle to evaluate point-to-pixel albedo comparisons across the western, ablating margin of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Our results reveal that in situ measurements overestimate albedo by up to 0.10 at the end of the melt season because the ground footprints of AWS-mounted pyranometers are insufficient to capture the spatial heterogeneity of the ice surface as it progressively ablates and darkens. Statistical analysis of 21 AWS across the entire Greenland Ice Sheet reveals that almost half suffer from this bias, including some AWS located within the wet snow zone.

  20. Assimilation of satellite information in a snowpack model to improve characterization of snow cover for runoff simulation and forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Kuchment

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for constructing spatial fields of snow characteristics for runoff simulation and forecasting is presented. The technique incorporates satellite land surface monitoring data and available ground-based hydrometeorological measurements in a physical based snowpack model. The snowpack model provides simulation of temporal changes of the snow depth, density and water equivalent (SWE, accounting for snow melt, sublimation, refreezing melt water and snow metamorphism processes with a special focus on forest cover effects. The model was first calibrated against available ground-based snow measurements and then was applied to calculate the spatial distribution of snow characteristics using satellite data and interpolated ground-based meteorological data. The remote sensing data used in the model consist of products derived from observations of MODIS and AMSR-E instruments onboard Terra and Aqua satellites. They include daily maps of snow cover, snow water equivalent (SWE, land surface temperature, and weekly maps of surface albedo. Maps of land cover classes and tree cover fraction derived from NOAA AVHRR were used to characterize the vegetation cover. The developed technique was tested over a study area of approximately 200 000 km2 located in the European part of Russia (56° N to 60° N, and 48° E to 54° E. The study area comprises the Vyatka River basin with the catchment area of 124 000 km2. The spatial distributions of SWE, obtained with the coupled model, as well as solely from satellite data were used as the inputs in a physically-based model of runoff generation to simulate runoff hydrographs on the Vyatka river for spring seasons of 2003, 2005. The comparison of simulated hydrographs with the observed ones has shown that suggested procedure gives a higher accuracy of snow cover spatial distribution representation and hydrograph simulations than the direct use of satellite SWE data.

  1. Understanding and modeling the physical processes that govern the melting of snow cover in a tropical mountain environment in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagnon, P.; Lafaysse, M.; Lejeune, Y.; Maisincho, L.; Rojas, M.; Chazarin, J. P.

    2009-10-01

    The ISBA/CROCUS coupled ground-snow model developed for the Alps and subsequently adapted to the outer tropical conditions of Bolivia has been applied to a full set of meteorological data recorded at 4860 m above sea level on a moraine area in Ecuador (Antizana 15 glacier, 0°28'S; 78°09'W) between 16 June 2005 and 30 June 2006 to determine the physical processes involved in the melting and disappearance of transient snow cover in nonglaciated areas of the inner tropics. Although less accurate than in Bolivia, the model is still able to simulate snow behavior over nonglaciated natural surfaces, as long as the modeled turbulent fluxes over bare ground are reduced and a suitable function is included to represent the partitioning of the surface between bare soil and snow cover. The main difference between the two tropical sites is the wind velocity, which is more than 3 times higher at the Antizana site than at the Bolivian site, leading to a nonuniform spatial distribution of snow over nonglaciated areas that is hard to describe with a simple snow partitioning function. Net solar radiation dominates the surface energy balance and is responsible for the energy stored in snow-free areas (albedo = 0.05) and transferred horizontally to adjacent snow patches by conduction within the upper soil layers and by turbulent advection. These processes can prevent the snow cover from lasting more than a few hours or a few days. Sporadically, and at any time of the year, this inner tropical site, much wetter than the outer tropics, experiences heavy snowfalls, covering all the moraine area, and thus limiting horizontal transfers and inducing a significant time lag between precipitation events and runoff.

  2. Assimilation of satellite information in a snowpack model to improve characterization of snow cover for runoff simulation and forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchment, L. S.; Romanov, P.; Gelfan, A. N.; Demidov, V. N.

    2009-08-01

    A new technique for constructing spatial fields of snow characteristics for runoff simulation and forecasting is presented. The technique incorporates satellite land surface monitoring data and available ground-based hydrometeorological measurements in a physical based snowpack model. The snowpack model provides simulation of temporal changes of the snow depth, density and water equivalent (SWE), accounting for snow melt, sublimation, refreezing melt water and snow metamorphism processes with a special focus on forest cover effects. The model was first calibrated against available ground-based snow measurements and then was applied to calculate the spatial distribution of snow characteristics using satellite data and interpolated ground-based meteorological data. The remote sensing data used in the model consist of products derived from observations of MODIS and AMSR-E instruments onboard Terra and Aqua satellites. They include daily maps of snow cover, snow water equivalent (SWE), land surface temperature, and weekly maps of surface albedo. Maps of land cover classes and tree cover fraction derived from NOAA AVHRR were used to characterize the vegetation cover. The developed technique was tested over a study area of approximately 200 000 km2 located in the European part of Russia (56° N to 60° N, and 48° E to 54° E). The study area comprises the Vyatka River basin with the catchment area of 124 000 km2. The spatial distributions of SWE, obtained with the coupled model, as well as solely from satellite data were used as the inputs in a physically-based model of runoff generation to simulate runoff hydrographs on the Vyatka river for spring seasons of 2003, 2005. The comparison of simulated hydrographs with the observed ones has shown that suggested procedure gives a higher accuracy of snow cover spatial distribution representation and hydrograph simulations than the direct use of satellite SWE data.

  3. An algorithm to determine backscattering ratio and single scattering albedo

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Nayak, S.R.; Naik, P.

    Algorithms to determine the inherent optical properties of water, backscattering probability and single scattering albedo at 490 and 676 nm from the apparent optical property, remote sensing reflectance are presented here. The measured scattering...

  4. MCNP simulation of the incident and Albedo neutron response of the IRD Albedo Neutron Dosemeter for {sup 241}Am-Be moderated sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Bruno M.; Martins, Marcelo M.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P. da, E-mail: claudia@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The IRD TLD Albedo dosemeter measures both incident and albedo neutron component. The incident to Albedo ratio is used to take into account the energy dependence of its response. In this paper, the behavior of the IRD Albedo dosemeter response as a function of the incident to Albedo ratio for {sup 241}Am-Be sources was simulated to improve its algorithm. The simulation was performed in MCNPX transport code and presents a good agreement with experimental measurements. The results obtained in this work are very useful to improve the accuracy of the IRD Albedo dosemeter at real neutron workplace. (author)

  5. Snow and Ice Products from the Aqua, Terra, and ICESat Satellites at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, W. N.; Marquis, M.; Kaminski, M.; Armstrong, R.; Brodzik, M.

    2004-05-01

    The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado, Boulder - one of eight NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) - archives and distributes several products from sensors on the suite of NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites. These include the sun-synchronous polar-orbiting Aqua (launched 4 May 2002) and Terra (launched 18 December 1999) platforms and the Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) (launched 12 January 2003). The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS (AMSR-E) is a multi-channel passive microwave radiometer on Aqua (http://nsidc.org/daac/amsr/). AMSR-E Level 3 snow products are produced in EASE-Grid format for both the Northern and Southern Hemisphere and are available as daily, 5-day, and monthly fields. Daily AMSR-E Level 3 sea ice products are produced on a polar stereographic projection at gridded spatial resolutions of 6.25 km, 12.5 km and 25 km. Since April 2004, these products have been available for public distribution from NSIDC. The Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua is a 36-channel visible/infrared sensor that produces a consistent long-term time series of fully-automated, quality-controlled data. Level 2 swath products are available for both snow cover and sea ice. Daily and 8-day Level 3 gridded snow cover products are available with estimates of snow extent and albedo at 500m resolution, along with daily Level 3 gridded sea ice products with estimates for sea ice extent and ice surface temperature at 1 km resolution. These products are currently available from NSIDC (http://nsidc.org/daac/modis/). The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) is the sole instrument on ICESat. The standard GLAS Level 2 ice sheet altimetry product contains the ice sheet elevation and elevation distribution calculated from algorithms fine-tuned for ice sheet returns. The standard GLAS Level 2 sea ice altimetry product contains the sea ice freeboard and sea ice

  6. Light Absorbing Impurities in Snow in the Western US: Partitioning Radiative Impacts from Mineral Dust and Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, M.; Painter, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Melt of annual mountain snow cover dominates water resources in the western United States. Recent studies in the Upper Colorado River Basin have shown that radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities (LAIs) in mountain snow cover has accelerated snowmelt, impacted runoff timing and magnitude, and reduced annual flow. However, these studies have assumed that LAIs are primarily mineral dust, and have not quantified the radiative contribution by carbonaceous particles from bio and fossil fuel (industrial and urban) sources. Here we quantify both dust and black carbon (BC) content and assess the unique BC radiative forcing contribution in this dust dominated impurity regime using a suite of advanced field, lab, and modeling techniques. Daily measurements of surface spectral albedo and optical grain radius were collected with a field spectrometer over the 2013 spring melt season in Senator Beck Basin Study Area in the San Juan Mountains, CO, Southwestern US. Coincident snow samples were collected daily and processed for; (1) dust and BC content (2) impurity particle size, and (3) impurity optical properties. Measured snow and impurity properties were then used to drive the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model. Partitioning the unique radiative contribution from each constituents is achieved through unique model runs for clean snow, dust only, and BC only.

  7. Observed High-altitude Warming and Snow Cover Retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas Enhanced by Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2014-12-01

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau form the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In situ observations of snow cover extent, since the 1960s and satellite measurement of surface albedo during the last decade, both suggest that the glaciers and snow pack in the region have gradually retreated, accompanied by surface warming of about 2.5ºC observed over the peak altitudes of the Tibetan Plateau. To-date none of the climate models have simulated either the record surface warming or its anomalously strong altitude dependence. Using a high-resolution (100 km) ocean-atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) forcing that is about a factor of 2.5 larger than the IPCC-model forcing values, we reproduce the observed altitude dependence of warming trends and the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover extent. We conclude that BC aerosols, by direct atmospheric heating and deposition on the snow surface, play a major role in causing the trends, especially the vertical gradient of temperature change and a decrease in the snow cover. Despite the fact that CO2 effects on global mean warming are five times larger, BC has a disproportionately stronger effect on climate change over the elevated Himalayan/Tibetan region and its impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections. The findings also provide practical intervention options for slowing down the dramatic changes over the Third Pole.

  8. Observed high-altitude warming and snow cover retreat over Tibet and the Himalayas enhanced by black carbon aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y.; Ramanathan, V.; Washington, W. M.

    2016-02-01

    Himalayan mountain glaciers and the snowpack over the Tibetan Plateau provide the headwater of several major rivers in Asia. In situ observations of snow cover extent since the 1960s suggest that the snowpack in the region have retreated significantly, accompanied by a surface warming of 2-2.5 °C observed over the peak altitudes (5000 m). Using a high-resolution ocean-atmosphere global climate model and an observationally constrained black carbon (BC) aerosol forcing, we attribute the observed altitude dependence of the warming trends as well as the spatial pattern of reductions in snow depths and snow cover extent to various anthropogenic factors. At the Tibetan Plateau altitudes, the increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration exerted a warming of 1.7 °C, BC 1.3 °C where as cooling aerosols cause about 0.7 °C cooling, bringing the net simulated warming consistent with the anomalously large observed warming. We therefore conclude that BC together with CO2 has contributed to the snow retreat trends. In particular, BC increase is the major factor in the strong elevation dependence of the observed surface warming. The atmospheric warming by BC as well as its surface darkening of snow is coupled with the positive snow albedo feedbacks to account for the disproportionately large role of BC in high-elevation regions. These findings reveal that BC impact needs to be properly accounted for in future regional climate projections, in particular on high-altitude cryosphere.

  9. Wind tunnel observations of drifting snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterna, Enrico; Crivelli, Philip; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Drifting snow has a significant impact on snow redistribution in mountains, prairies as well as on glaciers, ice shelves, and sea ice. In all these environments, the local mass balance is highly influenced by drifting snow. Understanding the dynamic of snow saltation is crucial to the accurate description of the process. We applied digital shadowgraphy in a cold wind tunnel to measure drifting snow over natural snow covers. The acquisition and evaluation of time-resolved shadowgraphy images allowed us to resolve a large part of the saltation layer. The technique has been successfully compared to the measurements obtained from a Snow Particle Counter, considered the most robust technique for snow mass-flux measurements so far. The streamwise snow transport is dominated by large-scale events. The vertical snow transport has a more equal distribution of energy across the scales, similarly to what is observed for the flow turbulence velocities. It is hypothesized that the vertical snow transport is a quantity that reflects the local entrainment of the snow crystals into the saltation layer while the streamwise snow transport results from the streamwise development of the trajectories of the snow particles once entrained, and therefore is rather a non-local quantity.

  10. Densification and grain coarsening of melting snow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周石硚; 中尾正义; 桥本重将; 坂井亚规子; 成田英器; 石川信敬

    2003-01-01

    A field work was conducted at Moshiri in Japan.The work included intensive snow pit work, taking snow grain photos, recording snow and air temperatures, as well as measuring snow water content.By treating the snow as a viscous fluid, it is found that the snow compactive viscosity decreases as the density increases, which is opposite to the relation for dry snow.Based on the measurements of snow grain size, it is shown that, similar to the water-saturated snow, the frequency distributions of grain size at different times almost have the same shape.This reveals that the water-unsaturated melting snow holds the same grain-coarsening behavior as the water-saturated snow does.It is also shown that the water-unsaturated melting snow coarsens much more slowly than the water-saturated snow.The C value, which is the viscosity when the snow density is zero, is related to the mean grain size and found to decrease with increasing grain size.The decreasing rate of C value increases with decreasing grain-coarsening rate.

  11. Sodankylä manual snow survey program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Leppänen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The manual snow survey program of the Arctic Research Centre of Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI-ARC consists of numerous observations of natural seasonal taiga snowpack in Sodankylä, northern Finland. The easily accessible measurement areas represent the typical forest and soil types in the boreal forest zone. Systematic snow measurements began in 1909 with snow depth (SD and snow water equivalent (SWE; however some older records of the snow and ice cover exists. In 2006 the manual snow survey program expanded to cover snow macro- and microstructure from regular snow pits at several sites using both traditional and novel measurement techniques. Present-day measurements include observations of SD, SWE, temperature, density, horizontal layers of snow, grain size, specific surface area (SSA, and liquid water content (LWC. Regular snow pit measurements are performed weekly during the snow season. Extensive time series of manual snow measurements are important for the monitoring of temporal and spatial changes in seasonal snowpack. This snow survey program is an excellent base for the future research of snow properties.

  12. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  13. Global albedo particles: a new approach from loss cone distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, K; Huang, Ming-Huey A.; Wang, Kaiti

    2006-01-01

    Global distributions of albedo particles measured by Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) are investigated by modeling loss cones derived from adiabatic invariants. Particles can be immediately determined as being loss to the atmosphere in a bounce period, or a drift period, or being trapped, without any computing-time consumption on particle trajectories. The results suggest this new approach is a faster tool to categorize the observed albedo particles and it can be applied to particles with energies up to GeV.

  14. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  15. HIMALA: climate impacts on glaciers, snow, and hydrology in the Himalayan region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Ouyang, Hua; Habib, Shahid; Shrestha, Basanta; Shrestha, Mandira; Panday, Prajjwal; Tzortziou, Maria; Policelli, Frederick; Artan, Guleid; Giriraj, Amarnath; Bajracharya, Sagar R.; Racoviteanu, Adina

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers are the largest reservoir of freshwater on Earth, supporting one third of the world's population. The Himalaya possess one of the largest resources of snow and ice, which act as a freshwater reservoir for more than 1.3 billion people. This article describes a new project called HIMALA, which focuses on utilizing satellite-based products for better understanding of hydrological processes of the river basins of the region. With support from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), together with its partners and member countries, has been working on the application of satellite-based rainfall estimates for flood prediction. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partners are working with ICIMOD to incorporate snowmelt and glacier melt into a widely used hydrological model. Thus, through improved modeling of the contribution of snow and ice meltwater to river flow in the region, the HIMALA project will improve the ability of ICIMOD and its partners to understand the impact of weather and climate on floods, droughts, and other water- and climate-induced natural hazards in the Himalayan region in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan.

  16. HIMALA: Climate Impacts on Glaciers, Snow, and Hydrology in the Himalayan Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Molly Elizabeth; Ouyang, Hua; Habib, Shahid; Shrestha, Basanta; Shrestha, Mandira; Panday, Prajjwal; Tzortziou, Maria; Policelli, Frederick; Artan, Guleid; Giriraj, Amarnath; hide

    2010-01-01

    Glaciers are the largest reservoir of freshwater on Earth, supporting one third of the world s population. The Himalaya possess one of the largest resources of snow and ice, which act as a freshwater reservoir for more than 1.3 billion people. This article describes a new project called HIMALA, which focuses on utilizing satellite-based products for better understanding of hydrological processes of the river basins of the region. With support from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD), together with its partners and member countries, has been working on the application of satellite-based rainfall estimates for flood prediction. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) partners are working with ICIMOD to incorporate snowmelt and glacier melt into a widely used hydrological model. Thus, through improved modeling of the contribution of snow and ice meltwater to river flow in the region, the HIMALA project will improve the ability of ICIMOD and its partners to understand the impact of weather and climate on floods, droughts, and other water- and climate-induced natural hazards in the Himalayan region in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan.

  17. Assimilation of snow cover and snow depth into a snow model to estimate snow water equivalent and snowmelt runoff in a Himalayan catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigter, Emmy E.; Wanders, Niko; Saloranta, Tuomo M.; Shea, Joseph M.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; Immerzeel, Walter W.

    2017-07-01

    Snow is an important component of water storage in the Himalayas. Previous snowmelt studies in the Himalayas have predominantly relied on remotely sensed snow cover. However, snow cover data provide no direct information on the actual amount of water stored in a snowpack, i.e., the snow water equivalent (SWE). Therefore, in this study remotely sensed snow cover was combined with in situ observations and a modified version of the seNorge snow model to estimate (climate sensitivity of) SWE and snowmelt runoff in the Langtang catchment in Nepal. Snow cover data from Landsat 8 and the MOD10A2 snow cover product were validated with in situ snow cover observations provided by surface temperature and snow depth measurements resulting in classification accuracies of 85.7 and 83.1 % respectively. Optimal model parameter values were obtained through data assimilation of MOD10A2 snow maps and snow depth measurements using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). Independent validations of simulated snow depth and snow cover with observations show improvement after data assimilation compared to simulations without data assimilation. The approach of modeling snow depth in a Kalman filter framework allows for data-constrained estimation of snow depth rather than snow cover alone, and this has great potential for future studies in complex terrain, especially in the Himalayas. Climate sensitivity tests with the optimized snow model revealed that snowmelt runoff increases in winter and the early melt season (December to May) and decreases during the late melt season (June to September) as a result of the earlier onset of snowmelt due to increasing temperature. At high elevation a decrease in SWE due to higher air temperature is (partly) compensated by an increase in precipitation, which emphasizes the need for accurate predictions on the changes in the spatial distribution of precipitation along with changes in temperature.

  18. Politics of Snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burko, D.

    2012-12-01

    In a 2010 catalog introduction for my exhibition titled: POLITICS OF SNOW, Eileen Claussen, President of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change wrote the following: "Climate change has been taken over by politics…We are awash in talking points, briefing papers, scientific studies, and communiqués from national governments… Diane Burko's paintings remind us that all these words can often obscure or even obstruct our view of what is truly happening …..There is only so much you can do with words. People need to see that the world is changing before our eyes. When we look at Diane's images of the effects of climate change, we connect to something much deeper and more profound (and more moving) than the latest political pitch from one side or another in this debate…These paintings also connect us to something else. Even as Diane documents how things are changing, she also reminds us of the stunning beauty of nature - and, in turn, the urgency of doing everything in our power to protect it." The creation of this body of work was made possible because of the collaboration of many glacial geologists and scientists who continually share their visual data with me. Since 2006 I've been gathering repeats from people like Bruce Molnia (USGS) and Tad Pfeffer of Alaskan glaciers, from Daniel Fagre (USGS) of Glacier National Park and Lonnie Thompson and Jason Box (Ohio University's Byrd Polar Center) about Kilimanjaro, Qori Kalis and Petermann glaciers as well as from photographer David Breashears on the disappearing Himalayan glaciers. In my practice, I acknowledge the photographers, or archive agencies, such as USGS, NASA or Snow and Ice Center, in the title and all printed material. As a landscape painter and photographer my intent is to not reproduce those images but rather use them as inspiration. At first I used the documentary evidence in sets of diptychs or triptychs. Since 2010 I have incorporated geological charts of recessional lines, graphs, symbols and

  19. Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S.; Moon, W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-10-01

    A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo α. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snowmelt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freezeup. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at α $\\gtrsim$ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the α distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained provide a simple framework for model studies of albedo parameterizations and sensitivities.

  20. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years' duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  1. A framework for consistent estimation of leaf area index, fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation, and surface albedo from MODIS time-series data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Zhiqiang; Liang, Shunlin; Wang, Jindi

    2015-01-01

    -series MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) surface reflectance data. If the reflectance data showed snow-free areas, an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) technique was used to estimate leaf area index (LAI) for a two-layer canopy reflectance model (ACRM) by combining predictions from a phenology......-surface parameter profiles from MODIS time-series reflectance data even if some of the reflectance data are contaminated by residual cloud or are missing and that the retrieved LAI, FAPAR, and surface albedo values are physically consistent. The root mean square errors of the retrieved LAI, FAPAR, and surface...

  2. A coupled melt-freeze temperature index approach in a one-layer model to predict bulk volumetric liquid water content dynamics in snow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzi, Francesco; Yamaguchi, Satoru; Hirashima, Hiroyuki; De Michele, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Liquid water in snow rules runoff dynamics and wet snow avalanches release. Moreover, it affects snow viscosity and snow albedo. As a result, measuring and modeling liquid water dynamics in snow have important implications for many scientific applications. However, measurements are usually challenging, while modeling is difficult due to an overlap of mechanical, thermal and hydraulic processes. Here, we evaluate the use of a simple one-layer one-dimensional model to predict hourly time-series of bulk volumetric liquid water content in seasonal snow. The model considers both a simple temperature-index approach (melt only) and a coupled melt-freeze temperature-index approach that is able to reconstruct melt-freeze dynamics. Performance of this approach is evaluated at three sites in Japan. These sites (Nagaoka, Shinjo and Sapporo) present multi-year time-series of snow and meteorological data, vertical profiles of snow physical properties and snow melt lysimeters data. These data-sets are an interesting opportunity to test this application in different climatic conditions, as sites span a wide latitudinal range and are subjected to different snow conditions during the season. When melt-freeze dynamics are included in the model, results show that median absolute differences between observations and predictions of bulk volumetric liquid water content are consistently lower than 1 vol%. Moreover, the model is able to predict an observed dry condition of the snowpack in 80% of observed cases at a non-calibration site, where parameters from calibration sites are transferred. Overall, the analysis show that a coupled melt-freeze temperature-index approach may be a valid solution to predict average wetness conditions of a snow cover at local scale.

  3. Role of blowing snow in snow processes in Qilian Mountainous region

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HongYi Li; Jian Wang; XiaoHua Hao

    2014-01-01

    Blowing snow is an important part of snow hydrologic processes in mountainous region, however the related researches were rare for the Qilian mountainous region where blowing snow is frequent. Using the observation dataset in 2008 snow season in Binggou wa-tershed in Qilian mountainous region, we systematically studied the energy and mass processes of blowing snow by field observation and model simulation. The results include the analysis of snow observation, the occurrence probability of blowing snow, blowing snow transport and blowing snow sublimation. It was found that blowing snow was obvious in high altitude region (4,146 m), the snow redistribution phenomena was remarkable. In Yakou station in the study region, blowing snow was easily occurred in midwinter and early spring when no snowmelt, the blowing snow transport was dominated in this period;when snowmelt beginning, the occur-rence probability of blowing snow decreased heavily because of the increasing air temperature, melt, and refrozen phenomena. The blowing snow sublimation accounted for 41.5%of total snow sublimation at Yakou station in 2008 snow season.

  4. Prognostic land surface albedo from a dynamic global vegetation model clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme and satellite-derived geographic forest heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.; Aleinov, I. D.; Jonas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation cover was introduced into general circulations models (GCMs) in the 1980's to account for the effect of land surface albedo and water vapor conductance on the Earth's climate. Schemes assigning canopy albedoes by broad biome type have been superceded in 1990's by canopy radiative transfer schemes for homogeneous canopies obeying Beer's Law extinction as a function of leaf area index (LAI). Leaf albedo and often canopy height are prescribed by plant functional type (PFT). It is recognized that this approach does not effectively describe geographic variation in the radiative transfer of vegetated cover, particularly for mixed and sparse canopies. GCM-coupled dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have retained these simple canopy representations, with little further evaluation of their albedos. With the emergence lidar-derived canopy vertical structure data, DGVM modelers are now revisiting albedo simulation. We present preliminary prognostic global land surface albedo produced by the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), a DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. The Ent TBM is a next generation DGVM designed to incorporate variation in canopy heights, and mixed and sparse canopies. For such dynamically varying canopy structure, it uses the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer model, which is derived from gap probability theory for canopies of tree cohorts with ellipsoidal crowns, and accounts for soil, snow, and bare stems. We have developed a first-order global vegetation structure data set (GVSD), which gives a year of satellite-derived geographic variation in canopy height, maximum canopy leaf area, and seasonal LAI. Combined with Ent allometric relations, this data set provides population density and foliage clumping within crowns. We compare the Ent prognostic albedoes to those of the previous GISS GCM scheme, and to satellite estimates. The impact of albedo differences on surface

  5. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building`s envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  6. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building's envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  7. Sodankylä manual snow survey program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppänen, Leena; Kontu, Anna; Hannula, Henna-Reetta; Sjöblom, Heidi; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2016-05-01

    The manual snow survey program of the Arctic Research Centre of the Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI-ARC) consists of numerous observations of natural seasonal taiga snowpack in Sodankylä, northern Finland. The easily accessible measurement areas represent the typical forest and soil types in the boreal forest zone. Systematic snow measurements began in 1909 with snow depth (HS) and snow water equivalent (SWE). In 2006 the manual snow survey program expanded to cover snow macro- and microstructure from regular snow pits at several sites using both traditional and novel measurement techniques. Present-day snow pit measurements include observations of HS, SWE, temperature, density, stratigraphy, grain size, specific surface area (SSA) and liquid water content (LWC). Regular snow pit measurements are performed weekly during the snow season. Extensive time series of manual snow measurements are important for the monitoring of temporal and spatial changes in seasonal snowpack. This snow survey program is an excellent base for the future research of snow properties.

  8. Snow Roads at McMurdo Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    We found that the disaggregation was not uniform and it left the snow in larger clumps rather than fine particles . These data indicate that snow...33 Snow moisture ............................................................................................................................ 33...52 Snow moisture

  9. Performance Tests of Snow-Related Variables Over the Tibetan Plateau and Himalayas Using a New Version of NASA GEOS-5 Land Surface Model that Includes the Snow Darkening Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Tppei J.; Lau, K.-U.; Koster, Randal D.; Suarez, Max; Mahanama, Sarith; Dasilva, Arlindo M.; Colarco, Peter R.

    2011-01-01

    The snow darkening effect, i.e. the reduction of snow albedo, is caused by absorption of solar radiation by absorbing aerosols (dust, black carbon, and organic carbon) deposited on the snow surface. This process is probably important over Himalayan and Tibetan glaciers due to the transport of highly polluted Atmospheric Brown Cloud (ABC) from the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). This effect has been incorporated into the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System model, version 5 (GEOS-5) atmospheric transport model. The Catchment land surface model (LSM) used in GEOS-5 considers 3 snow layers. Code was developed to track the mass concentration of aerosols in the three layers, taking into account such processes as the flushing of the compounds as liquid water percolates through the snowpack. In GEOS-5, aerosol emissions, transports, and depositions are well simulated in the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation and Transport (GO CART) module; we recently made the connection between GOCART and the GEOS-5 system fitted with the revised LSM. Preliminary simulations were performed with this new system in "replay" mode (i.e., with atmospheric dynamics guided by reanalysis) at 2x2.5 degree horizontal resolution, covering the period 1 November 2005 - 31 December 2009; we consider the final three years of simulation here. The three simulations used the following variants of the LSM: (1) the original Catchment LSM with a fixed fresh snowfall density of 150 kg m-3 ; (2) the LSM fitted with the new snow albedo code, used here without aerosol deposition but with changes in density formulation and melting water effect on snow specific surface area, (3) the LSM fitted with the new snow albedo code as same as (2) but with fixed aerosol deposition rates (computed from GOCART values averaged over the Tibetan Plateau domain [Ion.: 60-120E; lat.: 20-50N] during March-May 2008) applied to all grid points at every time step. For (2) and (3), the same setting on the fresh snowfall density as in (1

  10. Implementing earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders for water resource and climate modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boegh, E.; Dellwik, Ebba; Hahmann, Andrea N.;

    This paper discusses preliminary remote sensing (MODIS) based hydrological modelling results for the Danish island Sjælland (7330 km2) in relation to project objectives and methodologies of a new research project “Implementing Earth observation and advanced satellite based atmospheric sounders...... for effective land surface representation in water resource modeling” (2009- 2012). The purpose of the new research project is to develop remote sensing based model tools capable of quantifying the relative effects of site-specific land use change and climate variability at different spatial scales....... For this purpose, a) internal catchment processes will be studied using a Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) system, b) Earth observations will be used to upscale from field to regional scales, and c) at the largest scale, satellite based atmospheric sounders and meso-scale climate modelling will be used...

  11. Effect of Dust and Anthropogenic Activities on the Himalayan Snow Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh; Senthil Kumar, J.; Gautam, Ritesh; Mehdi, Waseem; Prasad, Anup; Kafatos, M.; Hsu, Christina

    The snow cover of the Himalayas, north of the Indo-Gangetic (IG) plains, and its characteristics are highly variable in space and time. In recent years, dust events and anthropogenic pollution activities have significantly affected the air quality and even climate of the Indo-Gangetic plains. Enhancements of water vapor and carbon monoxide are found during the passage of dust events. In the last three decades, aerosol loading over the IG plains is found to increase continuously. The cause of this increase is attributed to the growing urbanization, industrialization, and associated energy demand and use of fossil fuels. In the present work , we show the detailed analysis of satellite data, namely TOMS, MODIS, MISR, SSM/I, AMSU, NOAA AVHRR, LANDSAT, OMI AURA and CALIPSO to study the impact of dust during pre-monsoon/summer season (April - June) and anthropogenic activities during winter (December - January) on the snow, atmospheric and meteorological parameters in the last three decades. Pronounced effect of dust on the snow albedo and atmospheric/meteorological parameters are examined which may be associated with the receding Himalayan snow cover over the last three decades. This would clearly provide further evidence of regional impacts of global climate change.

  12. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  13. Long-term increase in snow depth leads to compositional changes in arctic ectomycorrhizal fungal communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Luis N; Semenova, Tatiana A; Welker, Jeffrey M; Walker, Marilyn D; Smets, Erik; Geml, József

    2016-09-01

    Many arctic ecological processes are regulated by soil temperature that is tightly interconnected with snow cover distribution and persistence. Recently, various climate-induced changes have been observed in arctic tundra ecosystems, e.g. shrub expansion, resulting in reduction in albedo and greater C fixation in aboveground vegetation as well as increased rates of soil C mobilization by microbes. Importantly, the net effects of these shifts are unknown, in part because our understanding of belowground processes is limited. Here, we focus on the effects of increased snow depth, and as a consequence, increased winter soil temperature on ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal communities in dry and moist tundra. We analyzed deep DNA sequence data from soil samples taken at a long-term snow fence experiment in Northern Alaska. Our results indicate that, in contrast with previously observed responses of plants to increased snow depth at the same experimental site, the ECM fungal community of the dry tundra was more affected by deeper snow than the moist tundra community. In the dry tundra, both community richness and composition were significantly altered while in the moist tundra, only community composition changed significantly while richness did not. We observed a decrease in richness of Tomentella, Inocybe and other taxa adapted to scavenge the soil for labile N forms. On the other hand, richness of Cortinarius, and species with the ability to scavenge the soil for recalcitrant N forms, did not change. We further link ECM fungal traits with C soil pools. If future warmer atmospheric conditions lead to greater winter snow fall, changes in the ECM fungal community will likely influence C emissions and C fixation through altering N plant availability, fungal biomass and soil-plant C-N dynamics, ultimately determining important future interactions between the tundra biosphere and atmosphere.

  14. Radiative Forcing and Climate Response Due to Black Carbon in Snow and Ice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhili; ZHANG Hua; SHEN Xueshun

    2011-01-01

    The radiative forcing and climate response due to black carbon (BC) in snow and/or ice were investigated by integrating observed effects of BC on snow/ice albedo into an atmospheric general circulation model (BCC_AGCM2.0.1) developed by the National Climate Center (NCC) of the China Meteorological Administration (CMA).The results show that the global annual mean surface radiative forcing due to BC in snow/ice is +0.042 W m-2,with maximum forcing found over the Tibetan Plateau and regional mean forcing exceeding +2.8 W m-2.The global annual mean surface temperature increased 0.071℃ due to BC in snow/ice.Positive surface radiative forcing was clearly shown in winter and spring and increased the surface temperature of snow/ice in the Northern Hemisphere.The surface temperatures of snow-covered areas of Eurasia and North America in winter (spring) increased by 0.83℃ (0.6℃) and 0.83℃ (0.46℃),respectively.Snowmelt rates also increased greatly,leading to earlier snowmelt and peak runoff times.With the rise of surface temperatures in the Arctic,more water vapor could be released into the atmosphere,allowing easier cloud formation,which could lead to higher thermal emittance in the Arctic. However,the total cloud forcing could decrease due to increasing cloud cover,which will offset some of the positive feedback mechanism of the clouds.

  15. Satellite-based assessment of climate controls on US burned area

    OpenAIRE

    D. C. Morton; G. J. Collatz; Wang, D.; Randerson, J. T.; Giglio, L.; Chen, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Climate regulates fire activity through the buildup and drying of fuels and the conditions for fire ignition and spread. Understanding the dynamics of contemporary climate–fire relationships at national and sub-national scales is critical to assess the likelihood of changes in future fire activity and the potential options for mitigation and adaptation. Here, we conducted the first national assessment of climate controls on US fire activity using two satellite-based estimates of monthly burne...

  16. Changes of snow cover in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szwed, Małgorzata; Pińskwar, Iwona; Kundzewicz, Zbigniew W.; Graczyk, Dariusz; Mezghani, Abdelkader

    2017-02-01

    The present paper examines variability of characteristics of snow cover (snow cover depth, number of days with snow cover and dates of beginning and end of snow cover) in Poland. The study makes use of a set of 43 long time series of observation records from the stations in Poland, from 1952 to 2013. To describe temporal changes in snow cover characteristics, the intervals of 1952-1990 and of 1991-2013 are compared and trends in analysed data are sought (e.g., using the Mann-Kendall test). Observed behaviour of time series of snow-related variables is complex and not easy to interpret, for instance because of the location of the research area in the zone of transitional moderate climate, where strong variability of climate events is one of the main attributes. A statistical link between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index and the snow cover depth, as well as the number of snow cover days is found.

  17. MONITORING OF SNOW COVER VARIATION USING MODIS SNOW PRODUCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Fayaz

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Snow is one of the integral components of hydrological and climatic systems. Needless to say, snow cover areas (SCA are considered as indispensable input of hydrological and general circulation models. Studying the spatial and temporal variability of SCA is of the paramount importance for tremendous variety of research such as climate change, water supply and properly managing water resources. In this study by means of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS snow cover product, the variation of snow cover extent (SCE in Karoun basin located in western part of Iran is evaluated for twelve years' duration; since 2000 to 2012. The results show that the paramount occurrence of SCE is observed during February months of 2003, 2010 and 2011 as well as during December months of 2006 and 2009.The utmost occurrence of SCE is considered during January months of the other remaining years. Annual average shows that SCE varies from 11% in 2011 to 22% in 2006. According to Mann-Kendal trend test, throughout twelve years; 2000 to 2012, a majority of the pixels in the study area have no considerable trend although there is a decreasing trend on a small portion of the pixels located in the eastern part the study domain.

  18. A Continental United States High Resolution NLCD Land Cover – MODIS Albedo Database to Examine Albedo and Land Cover Change Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface albedo influences climate by affecting the amount of solar radiation that is reflected at the Earth’s surface, and surface albedo is, in turn, affected by land cover. General Circulation Models typically use modeled or prescribed albedo to assess the influence of land co...

  19. [Snow cover pollution monitoring in Ufa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daukaev, R A; Suleĭmanov, R A

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of examining the snow cover polluted with heavy metals in the large industrial town of Ufa. The level of man-caused burden on the snow cover of the conventional parts of the town was estimated and compared upon exposure to a wide range of snow cover pollutants. The priority snow cover pollutants were identified among the test heavy metals.

  20. A Modeling Study of the Effects of Anomalous Snow Cover over the Tibetan Plateau upon the South Asian Summer Monsoon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华强; 孙照渤; 王举; 闵锦忠

    2004-01-01

    The effect of anomalous snow cover over the Tibetan Plateau upon the South Asian summer monsoon is investigated by numerical simulations using the NCAR regional climate model (RegCM2) into which gravity wave drag has been introduced. The simulations adopt relatively realistic snow mass forcings based on Scanning Multi-channel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) pentad snow depth data. The physical mechanism and spatial structure of the sensitivity of the South Asian early summer monsoon to snow cover anomaly over the Tibetan Plateau are revealed. The main results are summarized as follows. The heavier than normal snow cover over the Plateau can obviously reduce the shortwave radiation absorbed by surface through the albedo effect, which is compensated by weaker upward sensible heat flux associated with colder surface temperature, whereas the effects of snow melting and evaporation are relatively smaller.The anomalies of surface heat fluxes can last until June and become unobvions in July. The decrease of the Plateau surface temperature caused by heavier snow cover reaches its maximum value from late April to early May. The atmospheric cooling in the mid-upper troposphere over the Plateau and its surrounding areas is most obvious in May and can keep a fairly strong intensity in June. In contrast, there is warming to the south of the Plateau in the mid-lower troposphere from April to June with a maximum value in May.The heavier snow cover over the Plateau can reduce the intensity of the South Asian summer monsoon and rainfall to some extent, but this influence is only obvious in early summer and almost disappears in later stages.

  1. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Langen, Peter L.; Pálsson, Finnur; Mottram, Ruth; Gascoin, Simon; Björnsson, Helgi

    2017-07-01

    A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980-2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB). This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs) from the period 2001-2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995-2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995-2014) shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981-2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes currently not accounted for in RCMs

  2. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Schmidt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980–2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB. This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs from the period 2001–2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995–2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995–2014 shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981–2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes

  3. Improvement of Surface Albedo Simulations over Arid Regions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Yan; L(U) Shihua; ZHANG Yu; MENG Xianhong; YANG Shengpeng

    2008-01-01

    To improve the simulation of the surface radiation budget and related thermal processes in arid regions, three sophisticated surface albedo schemes designed for such regions were incorporated into the Biosphere-Atmosphere Transfer Scheme (BATS). Two of these schemes are functions of the solar zenith angle (SZA), where the first one has one adjustable parameter defined as SZA1 scheme, and the second one has two empir-ical parameters defined as SZA2 scheme. The third albedo scheme is a function of solar angle and soil water that were developed based on arid-region observations from the Dunhuang field experiment (DHEX) (defined as DH scheme). We evaluated the performance of the original and newly-incorporated albedo schemes within BATS using the in-situ data from the Oasis System Energy and Water Cycle Field Experiment that was carried out in JinTa, Gansu arid area (JTEX). The results indicate that a control run by the original version of the BATS generates a constant albedo, while the SZA1 and SZA2 schemes basically can reproduce the observed diurnal cycle of surface albedo, although these two schemes still underestimate the albedo when SZA is high in the early morning and late afternoon, and overestimate it when SZA is low during noontime. The SZA2 scheme has a better overall performance than the SZA1 scheme. In addition, BATS with the DH scheme slightly improves the albedo simulation in magnitude as compared to that from the control run, but a diurnal cycle of albedo is not produced by this scheme. The SZAl and SZA2 schemes significantly increase the surface absorbed solar radiation by nearly 70 W m~2, which further raises the ground temperature by 6 K and the sensible heat flux by 35 W m~2. The increased solar radiation, heat flux, and temperature are more consistent with the observations that those from the control run. However, a significant improvement in these three variables is not found in BATS with the DH scheme due to the neglect of the diurnal cycle of

  4. Potential effects of forest management on surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, J.; Bréon, F.-M.; Schelhaas, M.-J.; Pinty, B.; Luyssaert, S.

    2012-04-01

    Currently 70% of the world's forests are managed and this figure is likely to rise due to population growth and increasing demand for wood based products. Forest management has been put forward by the Kyoto-Protocol as one of the key instruments in mitigating climate change. For temperate and boreal forests, the effects of forest management on the stand-level carbon balance are reasonably well understood, but the biophysical effects, for example through changes in the albedo, remain elusive. Following a modeling approach, we aim to quantify the variability in albedo that can be attributed to forest management through changes in canopy structure and density. The modelling approach chains three separate models: (1) a forest gap model to describe stand dynamics, (2) a Monte-Carlo model to estimate the probability density function of the optical path length of photons through the canopy and (3) a physically-based canopy transfer model to estimate the interaction between photons and leaves. The forest gap model provides, on a monthly time step the position, height, diameter, crown size and leaf area index of individual trees. The Monte-Carlo model computes from this the probability density function of the distance a photon travels through crown volumes to determine the direct light reaching the forest floor. This information is needed by the canopy transfer model to calculate the effective leaf area index - a quantity that allows it to correctly represent a 3D process with a 1D model. Outgoing radiation is calculated as the result of multiple processes involving the scattering due to the canopy layer and the forest floor. Finally, surface albedo is computed as the ratio between incident solar radiation and calculated outgoing radiation. The study used two time series representing thinning from below of a beech and a Scots pine forest. The results show a strong temporal evolution in albedo during stand establishment followed by a relatively stable albedo once the canopy

  5. Observation and modeling of the seasonal evolution of the snow specific surface area at Dome C in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picard, G.; Libois, Q.; Arnaud, L.; Dumont, M.; Lafaysse, M.; Morin, S.

    2015-12-01

    The specific surface area (SSA) of surface snow evolves in response to meteorological conditions (e.g. temperature and precipitation). It is the main driver of the albedo in the near infrared range where most of the solar energy is absorbed in Antarctica. In turn, albedo change affects snow temperature, which drives SSA evolution rate, and at a larger scale influences the climate of snow-covered regions through snow-albedo feedback loops. Here we present a SSA retrieval method based on in-situ spectral albedo measurements and explore the factors limiting the accuracy of this method. The snowpack model Crocus is also used to simulate SSA evolution, and to investigate the respective role of temperature and precipitation Automatic spectral measurements of the upwelling and downwelling irradiance in the range 800nm - 1050nm are acquired every hour with a spectrophotometer deployed at Dome C since 2012. Spectral albedo is derived from these measurements and is used in conjunction with an asymptotic analytical solution of the radiative transfer equation to retrieve surface SSA estimates representative of the topmost centimeter. The sensitivity analysis of this method shows that the spectro-angular response of the cosine collector used to capture the light, and the uncertainty in the surface roughness are the largest sources of error, and can account for up to 20% uncertainty in SSA retrieval. In contrast, the dark current of the spectrometer, the inter-calibration of the upwelling and downwelling lines are good enough or sufficiently easy to correct not to impact the retrieval. To compare the surface SSA time-series to Crocus simulations, a few adaptations to the Antarctic conditions have been implemented in the model. The results show that the Crocus successfully matches the observations at daily to seasonal time scales, except for a few cases when snowfalls are not present in the meteorological forcing. On the contrary, the inter-annual variability of summer SSA

  6. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Chen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, cloud regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air, nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  7. Occurrence of lower cloud albedo in ship tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.-C. Chen

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The concept of geoengineering by marine cloud brightening is based on seeding marine stratocumulus clouds with sub-micrometer sea-salt particles to enhance the cloud droplet number concentration and cloud albedo, thereby producing a climate cooling effect. The efficacy of this as a strategy for global cooling rests on the extent to which aerosol-perturbed marine clouds will respond with increased albedo. Ship tracks, quasi-linear cloud features prevalent in oceanic regions impacted by ship exhaust, are a well-known manifestation of the effect of aerosol injection on marine clouds. We present here an analysis of the albedo responses in ship tracks, based on in situ aircraft measurements and three years of satellite observations of 589 individual ship tracks. It is found that the sign (increase or decrease and magnitude of the albedo response in ship tracks depends on the mesoscale cloud structure, the free tropospheric humidity, and cloud top height. In a closed cell structure (cloud cells ringed by a perimeter of clear air, nearly 30% of ship tracks exhibited a decreased albedo. Detailed cloud responses must be accounted for in global studies of the potential efficacy of sea-spray geoengineering as a means to counteract global warming.

  8. 'Snow White' and Language Awareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Deborah Aldrich

    1987-01-01

    Noting that knowledge of grammar rules does not ensure correct usage in one's own writing, describes an approach used in a summer workshop to promote awareness of appropriate idiom where 35 highly motivated black students produced 'Snow White' using their own script, half in standard dialect and half in black dialect. (JG)

  9. Estimating time and spatial distribution of snow water equivalent in the Hakusan area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, K.; Matsui, Y.; Touge, Y.

    2015-12-01

    hydrological model, satellite based precipitation product, GCM output, etc.

  10. Composition of dust deposited to snow cover in the Wasatch Range (Utah, USA): Controls on radiative properties of snow cover and comparison to some dust-source sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Bryant, Ann C.; Skiles, S. McKenzie; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Flagg, Cody B.; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma S.; Breit, George N.; Ketterer, Michael; Fernandez, Daniel; Miller, Mark E.; Painter, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    Dust layers deposited to snow cover of the Wasatch Range (northern Utah) in 2009 and 2010 provide rare samples to determine the relations between their compositions and radiative properties. These studies are required to comprehend and model how such dust-on-snow (DOS) layers affect rates of snow melt through changes in the albedo of snow surfaces. We evaluated several constituents as potential contributors to the absorption of solar radiation indicated by values of absolute reflectance determined from bi-conical reflectance spectroscopy. Ferric oxide minerals and carbonaceous matter appear to be the primary influences on lowering snow-cover albedo. Techniques of reflectance and Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as rock magnetism provide information about the types, amounts, and grain sizes of ferric oxide minerals. Relatively high amounts of ferric oxide, indicated by hard isothermal remanent magnetization (HIRM), are associated with relatively low average reflectance (hematite and goethite, representing about 35% of the total Fe-bearing phases. Nevertheless, goethite (α-FeOOH) is the dominant ferric oxide found by reflectance spectroscopy and thus appears to be the main iron oxide control on absorption of solar radiation. At least some goethite occurs as nano-phase grain coatings less than about 50 nm thick. Relatively high amounts of organic carbon, indicating as much as about 10% organic matter, are also associated with lower reflectance values. The organic matter, although not fully characterized by type, correlates strongly with metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, As, Cd, Mo, Zn) derived from distal urban and industrial settings, probably including mining and smelting sites. This relation suggests anthropogenic sources for at least some of the carbonaceous matter, such as emissions from transportation and industrial activities. The composition of the DOS samples can be compared with sediments in a likely dust-source setting at the Milford Flat Fire (MFF) area about 225

  11. Composition of dust deposited to snow cover in the Wasatch Range (Utah, USA): Controls on radiative properties of snow cover and comparison to some dust-source sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.; Moskowitz, Bruce M.; Bryant, Ann C.; Skiles, S. McKenzie; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Flagg, Cody B.; Yauk, Kimberly; Berquó, Thelma; Breit, George; Ketterer, Michael; Fernandez, Daniel; Miller, Mark E.; Painter, Thomas H.

    2014-12-01

    Dust layers deposited to snow cover of the Wasatch Range (northern Utah) in 2009 and 2010 provide rare samples to determine the relations between their compositions and radiative properties. These studies are required to comprehend and model how such dust-on-snow (DOS) layers affect rates of snow melt through changes in the albedo of snow surfaces. We evaluated several constituents as potential contributors to the absorption of solar radiation indicated by values of absolute reflectance determined from bi-conical reflectance spectroscopy. Ferric oxide minerals and carbonaceous matter appear to be the primary influences on lowering snow-cover albedo. Techniques of reflectance and Mössbauer spectroscopy as well as rock magnetism provide information about the types, amounts, and grain sizes of ferric oxide minerals. Relatively high amounts of ferric oxide, indicated by hard isothermal remanent magnetization (HIRM), are associated with relatively low average reflectance (iron oxide control on absorption of solar radiation. At least some goethite occurs as nano-phase grain coatings less than about 50 nm thick. Relatively high amounts of organic carbon, indicating as much as about 10% organic matter, are also associated with lower reflectance values. The organic matter, although not fully characterized by type, correlates strongly with metals (e.g., Cu, Pb, As