WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite systems gnss

  1. GNSS global navigation satellite systems : GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and more

    CERN Document Server

    Hofmann-Wellenhof, Bernhard; Wasle, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    This book is an extension to the acclaimed scientific bestseller "GPS - Theory and Practice". It covers Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and includes the Russian GLONASS, the European system Galileo, and additional systems.

  2. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS: The Utmost Interdisciplinary Integrator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Eissfeller

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Currently four global satellite navigation systems are under modernization and development: The US American GPS III, the Russian GLONASS, the European Galileo and Chinese BeiDou systems. In the paper the interdisciplinary contributions of different scientific areas to GNSS are assessed. It is outlined that GNSS is not only a technical system but also a basic element of mobile computing high-tech market. At the same time a GNSS has the role of a force enabler in security related applications. Technology, market and security policies are interdependent and are sometimes in a relationship of tension. The goal of the paper is to describe the overall systemics of GNSS from a holistic point of view. The paper also addresses the human factor side of GNSS. The requirements on human resources in GNSS are at least two-fold: On the one hand very specialized engineers are needed; on the other hand the generalists are necessary who are able to understand the system aspects. Decision makers in institutions and industry need special knowledge in technologies, economics and political strategies. Is the current university system able to educate and prepare such generalists? Are specialized master courses for GNSS needed? Are external training courses necessary?

  3. Short-term GNSS satellite clock stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, E.; Kursinski, E. R.; Akos, D.

    2015-08-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) clock stability is characterized via the modified Allan deviation using active hydrogen masers as the receiver frequency reference. The high stability of the maser reference allows the GNSS clock contribution to the GNSS carrier phase variance to be determined quite accurately. Satellite clock stability for four different GNSS constellations are presented, highlighting the similarities and differences between the constellations as well as satellite blocks and clock types. Impact on high-rate applications, such as GNSS radio occultation (RO), is assessed through the calculation of the maximum carrier phase error due to clock instability. White phase noise appears to dominate at subsecond time scales. However, while we derived the theoretical contribution of white phase modulation to the modified Allan deviation, our analysis of the GNSS satellite clocks was limited to 1-200 s time scales because of inconsistencies between the subsecond results from the commercial and software-defined receivers. The rubidium frequency standards on board the Global Positioning System (GPS) Block IIF, BeiDou, and Galileo satellites show improved stability results in comparison to previous GPS blocks for time scales relevant to RO. The Globalnaya Navigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) satellites are the least stable of the GNSS constellations in the short term and will need high-rate corrections to produce RO results comparable to those from the other GNSS constellations.

  4. Preface: BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS)/GNSS+: Recent progress and new applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuanggen

    2017-02-01

    Nowadays, the new China's BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has been developed well. At the end of 2016, over 23 BDS satellites were launched, including five geostationary Earth orbit (GEO) satellites, five inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) satellites and nine medium Earth orbit (MEO) satellites. The current BDS service covers China and most Asia-Pacific regions with accuracy of better than 10 m in positioning, 0.2 m/s in velocity and 50 ns in timing. The BDS with global coverage will be completely established by 2020 with five GEO satellites and 30 MEO satellites. The main function of BDS is the positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) as well as short message communications. Together with the United States' GPS, Russia's GLONASS and the European Union's Galileo system as well as other regional augmentation systems, more new applications of multi-Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) will be exploited and realized in the next decades.

  5. Implementation of a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Augmentation to Tsunami Early Warning Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrecque, John

    2016-04-01

    The Global Geodetic Observing System has issued a Call for Participation to research scientists, geodetic research groups and national agencies in support of the implementation of the IUGG recommendation for a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Augmentation to Tsunami Early Warning Systems. The call seeks to establish a working group to be a catalyst and motivating force for the definition of requirements, identification of resources, and for the encouragement of international cooperation in the establishment, advancement, and utilization of GNSS for Tsunami Early Warning. During the past fifteen years the populations of the Indo-Pacific region experienced a series of mega-thrust earthquakes followed by devastating tsunamis that claimed nearly 300,000 lives. The future resiliency of the region will depend upon improvements to infrastructure and emergency response that will require very significant investments from the Indo-Pacific economies. The estimation of earthquake moment magnitude, source mechanism and the distribution of crustal deformation are critical to rapid tsunami warning. Geodetic research groups have demonstrated the use of GNSS data to estimate earthquake moment magnitude, source mechanism and the distribution of crustal deformation sufficient for the accurate and timely prediction of tsunamis generated by mega-thrust earthquakes. GNSS data have also been used to measure the formation and propagation of tsunamis via ionospheric disturbances acoustically coupled to the propagating surface waves; thereby providing a new technique to track tsunami propagation across ocean basins, opening the way for improving tsunami propagation models, and providing accurate warning to communities in the far field. These two new advancements can deliver timely and accurate tsunami warnings to coastal communities in the near and far field of mega-thrust earthquakes. This presentation will present the justification for and the details of the GGOS Call for

  6. GNSS--global navigation satellite systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and more

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hofmann-Wellenhof, B; Lichtenegger, Herbert; Wasle, Elmar

    2008-01-01

    ... long period of insufficient maintenance with respect to the number of available satellites, a proper consideration in the book was also required. "GNSS - GPS, GLONASS, Galileo & more" - is this title correct? This simple question is not that easily to be answered. Following a definition as given in the document A/CONF.184/BP/4 on satellite navigatio...

  7. Analysis the Visible Satellites of Combined GNSS System%组合GNSS系统可见卫星分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡自全; 何秀凤

    2015-01-01

    为解决高山峡谷地区及城市建筑群区域,G PS用户接收到的卫星个数少无法满足定位的最低要求的问题,提出组合GNSS导航定位的方法。利用GPS、GLONASS及GAL‐ILEO系统的卫星轨道参数模拟,计算不同卫星高度角下全球范围内单 GNSS 系统及组合GNSS系统的可见卫星数。研究表明:组合GNSS系统增加了可见卫星数,突破了极端条件下卫星高度角对导航定位的限制,扩展了卫星定位的范围。%In order to solve the problem of the alpine and gorge region and urban built -up area ,the number of satellite receiver to the GPS user cannot meet the minimum require‐ments for the positioning of the small problems ,propose the way of combining of GNSS nav‐igation and positioning .Simulation using GPS ,GLONASS and GALILEO satellite orbit pa‐rameters ,the number of visible satellites are calculated under different satellite elevation an‐gle in the global scope of single GNSS system and GNSS system .Research show s that the combination of GNSS system increase the number of visible satellites ,broke through the limitation of the extreme conditions of satellite elevation angle of navigation and positioning , expanding the scope of satellite positioning .

  8. GNSS systems in vehicle fleet management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz TYSZKO

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System in connection with othertechnologies, such as mobile telephone GSM will improve management of chains of orders and fleet management in all types of transport. The paper describes existing navigation satellite systems (NAVSTAR GPS, GLONASS, EGNOS. It also presents advantages and barriers of using GNSS in transportation systems.

  9. GNSS systems in vehicle fleet management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arkadiusz TYSZKO; Tomasz TEMLIN; Stanisław OSZCZAK

    2007-01-01

    GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) in connection with othertechnologies, such as mobile telephone GSM will improve management of chains of orders and fleet management in all types of transport...

  10. Kinematic Precise Point Positioning Using Multi-Constellation Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xidong Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-constellation global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs are expected to enhance the capability of precise point positioning (PPP by improving the positioning accuracy and reducing the convergence time because more satellites will be available. This paper discusses the performance of multi-constellation kinematic PPP based on a multi-constellation kinematic PPP model, Kalman filter and stochastic models. The experimental dataset was collected from the receivers on a vehicle and processed using self-developed software. A comparison of the multi-constellation kinematic PPP and real-time kinematic (RTK results revealed that the availability, positioning accuracy and convergence performance of the multi-constellation kinematic PPP were all better than those of both global positioning system (GPS-based PPP and dual-constellation PPP. Multi-constellation kinematic PPP can provide a positioning service with centimetre-level accuracy for dynamic users.

  11. Spatial and temporal characteristics of optimum process noise values of tropospheric parameters for kinematic analysis of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) sites in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Yu'ichiro; Ohta, Yusaku

    2016-12-01

    Kinematic analysis of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is useful for the extraction of crustal deformation phenomena occurring over short timescales ranging from seconds to 1 day, such as coseismic and postseismic deformation following large earthquakes. However, a fundamental challenge in kinematic GNSS analysis is to separate unknown parameters, such as site coordinate and tropospheric parameters, due to the strong correlation between them. In this study, we assessed the spatial and temporal characteristics of process noise for unknown tropospheric parameters such as zenith wet tropospheric delay and tropospheric gradient by means of kinematic precise point positioning analysis using Kalman filtering across the Japanese nationwide continuous GNSS network. We estimated kinematic site coordinate time series under different process noise combinations of zenith wet tropospheric delay and tropospheric gradient. The spatial distribution of the optimum process noise value for the zenith wet tropospheric parameter with vertical site coordinate time series clearly showed regional characteristics. In comparison with the wet tropospheric parameter, the spatial characteristics of the tropospheric gradient parameter are less well defined within the scale of the GNSS network. The temporal characteristics of the optimum process noise parameters for each site coordinate component at specific sites indicated a clear annual pattern in the tropospheric gradient parameter for the horizontal components. Finally, we assessed the effects on the kinematic GNSS site coordinate time series of optimizing tropospheric parameter process noise. Compared with recommended process noise values from previous studies, the use of estimated "common" optimum process noise values improved the standard deviation of coordinate time series for the majority of stations. These results clearly indicate that the use of appropriate process noise values is important for kinematic GNSS analysis

  12. Estimation of differential code biases for Beidou navigation system using multi-GNSS observations: How stable are the differential satellite and receiver code biases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Junchen; Song, Shuli; Zhu, Wenyao

    2016-04-01

    Differential code biases (DCBs) are important parameters that must be estimated accurately and reliably for high-precision GNSS applications. For optimal operational service performance of the Beidou navigation system (BDS), continuous monitoring and constant quality assessment of the BDS satellite DCBs are crucial. In this study, a global ionospheric model was constructed based on a dual system BDS/GPS combination. Daily BDS DCBs were estimated together with the total electron content from 23 months' multi-GNSS observations. The stability of the resulting BDS DCB estimates was analyzed in detail. It was found that over a long period, the standard deviations (STDs) for all satellite B1-B2 DCBs were within 0.3 ns (average: 0.19 ns) and for all satellite B1-B3 DCBs, the STDs were within 0.36 ns (average: 0.22 ns). For BDS receivers, the STDs were greater than for the satellites, with most values BDS satellite DCBs between two consecutive days was BDS DCBs, they only require occasional estimation or calibration. Furthermore, the 30-day averaged satellite DCBs can be used reliably for the most demanding BDS applications.

  13. PAU/GNSS-R: Implementation, Performance and First Results of a Real-Time Delay-Doppler Map Reflectometer Using Global Navigation Satellite System Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Valencia

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS were originally conceived for position and speed determination, but they can be used as signals of opportunity as well. The reflection process over a given surface modifies the properties of the scattered signal, and therefore, by processing the reflected signal, relevant geophysical data regarding the surface under study (land, sea, ice… can be retrieved. In essence, a GNSS-R receiver is a multi-channel GNSS receiver that computes the received power from a given satellite at a number of different delay and Doppler bins of the incoming signal. The first approaches to build such a receiver consisted of sampling and storing the scattered signal for later post-processing. However, a real-time approach to the problem is desirable to obtain immediately useful geophysical variables and reduce the amount of data. The use of FPGA technology makes this possible, while at the same time the system can be easily reconfigured. The signal tracking and processing constraints made necessary to fully design several new blocks. The uniqueness of the implemented system described in this work is the capability to compute in real-time Delay-Doppler maps (DDMs either for four simultaneous satellites or just one, but with a larger number of bins. The first tests have been conducted from a cliff over the sea and demonstrate the successful performance of the instrument to compute DDMs in real-time from the measured reflected GNSS/R signals. The processing of these measurements shall yield quantitative relationships between the sea state (mainly driven by the surface wind and the swell and the overall DDM shape. The ultimate goal is to use the DDM shape to correct the sea state influence on the L-band brightness temperature to improve the retrieval of the sea surface salinity (SSS.

  14. Study of Some Strategies for Disposal of the GNSS Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Merguizo Sanchez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the GNSS and the several types of satellites in the MEO region turns the creation of a definitive strategy to dispose the satellites of this system into a hard task. Each constellation of the system adopts its own disposal strategy; for example, in the American GPS, the disposal strategy consists in changing the altitude of the nonoperational satellites to 500 km above or below their nominal orbits. In this work, we propose simple but efficient techniques to discard satellites of the GNSS by exploiting Hohmann type maneuvers combined with the use of the 2ω˙+Ω˙≈0 resonance to increase its orbital eccentricity, thus promoting atmospheric reentry. The results are shown in terms of the increment of velocity required to transfer the satellites to the new orbits. Some comparisons with direct disposal maneuvers (Hohmann type are also presented. We use the exact equations of motion, considering the perturbations of the Sun, the Moon, and the solar radiation pressure. The geopotential model was considered up to order and degree eight. We showed the quantitative influence of the sun and the moon on the orbit of these satellites by using the method of the integral of the forces over the time.

  15. A novel emergency system for low earth orbit satellites using Galileo GNSS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.K.A.; Helderweirt, A.

    2010-01-01

    Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites have a limited direct contact time with the stations of their ground segment. This fundamentally constraints a timeliness reaction of the mission control center in case of emergency situations onboard the LEO spacecraft. To enable such a rapid reaction to emergency s

  16. Methods of practice and guidelines for using survey-grade global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) to establish vertical datum in the United States Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlund, Paul H.; Densmore, Brenda K.

    2012-01-01

    Geodetic surveys have evolved through the years to the use of survey-grade (centimeter level) global positioning to perpetuate and post-process vertical datum. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) uses Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) technology to monitor natural hazards, ensure geospatial control for climate and land use change, and gather data necessary for investigative studies related to water, the environment, energy, and ecosystems. Vertical datum is fundamental to a variety of these integrated earth sciences. Essentially GNSS surveys provide a three-dimensional position x, y, and z as a function of the North American Datum of 1983 ellipsoid and the most current hybrid geoid model. A GNSS survey may be approached with post-processed positioning for static observations related to a single point or network, or involve real-time corrections to provide positioning "on-the-fly." Field equipment required to facilitate GNSS surveys range from a single receiver, with a power source for static positioning, to an additional receiver or network communicated by radio or cellular for real-time positioning. A real-time approach in its most common form may be described as a roving receiver augmented by a single-base station receiver, known as a single-base real-time (RT) survey. More efficient real-time methods involving a Real-Time Network (RTN) permit the use of only one roving receiver that is augmented to a network of fixed receivers commonly known as Continually Operating Reference Stations (CORS). A post-processed approach in its most common form involves static data collection at a single point. Data are most commonly post-processed through a universally accepted utility maintained by the National Geodetic Survey (NGS), known as the Online Position User Service (OPUS). More complex post-processed methods involve static observations among a network of additional receivers collecting static data at known benchmarks. Both classifications provide users

  17. Industry leading satellite based GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) positioning and monitoring solutions with real-time CORS (Continuously Operating Reference Station) networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janousek, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Real-Time CORS (Continuously Operating Reference Station Networks) today are typically GNSS networks for positioning and monitoring purposes. Real-Time networks can consist of a few stations for a local network up to nation- or continental wide networks with several hundred CORS stations. Such networks use wide area modeling of GNSS error sources including ionospheric, tropospheric and satellite orbit correction parameters to produce highest precision and efficiency method of positioning using GNSS. In 1998 Trimble Navigation Ltd. introduced a method of surveying with a non-physical or computed base station, called VRS (Virtual Reference Station). It is the most widely supported method of producing a network solution for precise carrier phase positioning in the industry. Surveying historically required one base as the fixed point of reference, and one or multiple rovers using that point of reference to compute their location by processing a vector result, either in real-time or in a postprocessed sense. Real-time survey is often referred to as RTK, short for real-time kinematic, and as the name suggests the results are in real time and you can move. The power of VRS is in the ability to compute a real-time wide-area solution to the factors that cause single base methods to degrade with distance. Namely, ionospheric and tropospheric modeling, and satellite orbit corrections. This is achieved by the reference network of CORS. A wide scattering of CORS across a state, typically 50-70km in mid-latitudes, creates a ground based sampling which significantly reduces the distance dependent errors that accumulate in the single base-rover relationship described early. Furthermore, GNSS networks can be used for real-time monitoring purposes at various distance range. Trimble Integrity Manager software provides a suite of motion engines designed to detect and quantify any movement in a range of scales from slow, creeping movement like subsidence, through sudden events such as

  18. GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument): A New Airborne GNSS-R receiver for land surface applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Erwan; Zribi, Mehrez; Fanise, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    GLORI (GLObal navigation satellite system Reflectometry Instrument) is a new receiver dedicated to the airborne measurement of surface parameters such as soil moisture and biomass above ground and sea state (wave height and direction) above oceans. The instrument is based on the PARIS concept [Martin-Neira, 1993] using both the direct and surface-reflected L-band signals from the GPS constellation as a multistatic radar source. The receiver is based on one up-looking and one down-looking dual polarization hemispherical active antennas feeding a low-cost 4-channel SDR direct down-conversion receiver tuned to the GPS L1 frequency. The raw measurements are sampled at 16.368MHz and stored as 2-bit, IQ binary files. In post-processing, GPS acquisition and tracking are performed on the direct up-looking signal while the down-looking signal is processed blindly using tracking parameters from the direct signal. The obtained direct and reflected code-correlation waveforms are the basic observables for geophysical parameters inversion. The instrument was designed to be installed aboard the ATR42 experimental aircraft from the French SAFIRE fleet as a permanent payload. The long term goal of the project is to provide real-time continuous surface information for every flight performed. The aircraft records attitude information through its Inertial Measurement Unit and a commercial GPS receiver records additional information such as estimated doppler and code phase, receiver location, satellites azimuth and elevation. A series of test flights were performed over both the Toulouse and Gulf of Lion (Mediterranean Sea) regions during the period 17-21 Nov 2014 together with the KuROS radar [Hauser et al., 2014]. Using processing methods from the literature [Egido et al., 2014], preliminary results demonstrate the instrument sensitivity to both ground and ocean surface parameters estimation. A dedicated scientific flight campaign is planned at the end of second quarter 2015 with

  19. Combined analysis of GNSS and SLR observations for the GIOVE satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaller, D.; Steinbach, A.; Dach, R.

    2009-04-01

    The GGSP (Galileo Geodetic Service Provider) is responsible to provide the geodetic basement of the future European GNSS, the Galileo system. The AIUB is one partner of the consortium of seven institutions. In the context of this project, the data of 13 GESS (Galileo Experimental Sensor Stations) are processed together with the GPS data of about 120 IGS sites. Apart from the station coordinates also the satellite orbits, ERPs, and clock corrections are computed. Since the 13 GESS do not only provide GPS data but also track the two first Galileo satellites (i.e., GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B), a combined processing of the GPS and Galileo data using microwave data is possible. Due to the sparse network of GESS the GPS data highly support the Galileo related products (the orbits and satellite clock corrections). Nevertheless, the quality of the GIOVE orbits is limited to about 20 cm. As both GIOVE are equipped with retro-reflector arrays, the satellites are tracked by satellite laser ranging (SLR), as it is already done for some GLONASS satellites and those two GPS satellites equipped with retro-reflectors. The availability of SLR data allows a validation of the satellite orbits determined from GNSS observations. The range residuals show whether there is any systematic difference between the GNSS and SLR system and, thus, may help to improve the orbit modeling for the GIOVE satellites. Furthermore, we will include the SLR tracking data into the orbit determination in order to derive a combined GNSS+SLR orbit. It will be studied whether the inclusion of SLR data shows any significant improvement for the combined orbit compared to the GNSS-only orbit. This study can be seen as a further step toward the combined processing of GNSS and SLR observations for a fully integrated multi-technique data analysis.

  20. Ionospheric Challenges for GNSS Based Augmentation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, P.; Valladares, C. E.

    2007-12-01

    The ionosphere is a highly dynamic physical phenomenon that presents a variable source of error for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals and GNSS based operational systems. The Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Wide-Area Augmentation System (WAAS) was designed to enhance the GNSS standard positioning service by providing additional accuracy, availability and integrity that is sufficient for use in commercial aviation. It is the first of a number of planned regional Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS). Other systems in development include the European EGNOS system, the MSAS system in Japan and the GAGAN system in India. In addition, the South American countries are investigating the feasibility of operating an SBAS system in this region. Much of the WAAS ionospheric research and development focused on defining and mitigating ionospheric challenges characteristic of the mid-latitude regions, where the ionosphere is well studied and relatively quiescent. The EGNOS and MSAS systems will primarily operate under a similarly quiescent mid-latitude ionosphere. SBAS system development in South America, India and other low-latitude regions, however, will have to contend with much more extreme conditions. These conditions include strong spatial and temporal gradients, plasma depletions and scintillation. All of these conditions have a potential to limit SBAS performance in the low latitude regions. This presentation will review the effects that the ionosphere has on the mid-latitude WAAS system. It will present the techniques that are used to mitigate ionospheric disturbances induced on the system during severe geomagnetic activity and it will quantify the effect that this activity has on system performance. The presentation will then present data from the South American Low-latitude Ionospheric Sensor Network (LISN) that can be used to infer the ionospheric effects on SBAS performance in the most challenging low-latitude ionospheric environment

  1. Using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data for Hazard Estimation in Some Active Regions in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayed Mohamed, Abdel-Monem

    2016-07-01

    Egypt rapidly growing development is accompanied by increasing levels of standard living particular in its urban areas. However, there is a limited experience in quantifying the sources of risk management in Egypt and in designing efficient strategies to keep away serious impacts of earthquakes. From the historical point of view and recent instrumental records, there are some seismo-active regions in Egypt, where some significant earthquakes had occurred in different places. The special tectonic features in Egypt: Aswan, Greater Cairo, Red Sea and Sinai Peninsula regions are the territories of a high seismic risk, which have to be monitored by up-to date technologies. The investigations of the seismic events and interpretations led to evaluate the seismic hazard for disaster prevention and for the safety of the dense populated regions and the vital national projects as the High Dam. In addition to the monitoring of the recent crustal movements, the most powerful technique of satellite geodesy GNSS are used where geodetic networks are covering such seismo-active regions. The results from the data sets are compared and combined in order to determine the main characteristics of the deformation and hazard estimation for specified regions. The final compiled output from the seismological and geodetic analysis threw lights upon the geodynamical regime of these seismo-active regions and put Aswan and Greater Cairo under the lowest class according to horizontal crustal strains classifications. This work will serve a basis for the development of so-called catastrophic models and can be further used for catastrophic risk management. Also, this work is trying to evaluate risk of large catastrophic losses within the important regions including the High Dam, strategic buildings and archeological sites. Studies on possible scenarios of earthquakes and losses are a critical issue for decision making in insurance as a part of mitigation measures.

  2. Frequency synchronization scheme for parasitical BiSAR with GNSS satellites as illuminator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Weiming; Zeng, Tao; Hu, Cheng

    Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (BiSAR) has a lot of advantages comparing with monostatic counterpart. What is more, parasitical BiSAR can utilize the existing Global Navigation Satel-lite System (GNSS) satellites to compose parasitical BiSAR system and form remote-sensing image. As performance of frequency synchronization scheme is crucial to BiSAR system, fre-quency synchronization scheme must be well designed. In fact high-precision frequency syn-chronization is required to obtain navigation data and assist positioning in GNSS receiver. In GNSS receivers, transient carrier frequency is tracked by digital Phase-Locked Loop (PLL). PLL method is applied to estimate frequency synchronization error and this has been verified in the primary experiment. Through tracking the carrier transient frequency of direct signal, frequency synchronization error can be obtained from the transient frequency when theoretical Doppler is calculated from ephemeris data.

  3. REVISITING THE DOPPLER FILTER OF LEO SATELLITE GNSS RECEIVERS FOR PRECISE VELOCITY ESTIMATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Xi; Gao Wenyun; Wan Yunheng

    2013-01-01

    The theoretical aspects of the precise velocity determination of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites' onboard Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are derived.It shows that the receiver's Phase Lock Loop (PLL) is required to feature extremely small group delay within its low frequency band,which is in contrast to existing work that proposed wide band linear phase filters.Following this theory,a Finite Impulse Response (FⅠR) filter is proposed.To corroborate,the proposed FIR filter and an Infinite Impulse Response (ⅡR) filter lately proposed in literals are implemented in a LEO satellite onboard GNSS receiver.Tests are conducted using a third party commercial GPS,signal generator.The results show that the GNSS receiver with the proposed FⅠR achieves 11 mm/s R.M.S precision,while the GNSS receiver with the ⅡR filter has a filter-caused velocity error that can not be ignored for space borne GNSS receivers.

  4. Getting into networks and clusters: evidence from the Midi-Pyrenean Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Collaboration Network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vicente, J.; Balland, P.M.A.; Brossard, O.

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses clusters from collaborative knowledge relations. Focusing on the interface of clusters and networks contributes to a better understanding of collaboration, within and across places and cognitive domains. We propose an empirical analysis of the Midi-Pyrenean GNSS (Global Navigatio

  5. On the impact of Multi-GNSS solutions to Satellite Products and Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, K. E.; Teferle, F. N.; Hunegnaw, A.; Dach, R.

    2016-12-01

    In Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) coordinate time series unrecognised errors and un-modelled (periodic) effects may bias non-linear motions induced by geophysical signals. Those spurious signals can be caused either due to un-modelled long periodic signals or propagation of sub-daily signals into the time series. Understanding and mitigating these errors is vital to reduce biases and on revealing subtle geophysical signals. Mostly, the spurious signals are caused by unmodelled errors which recur due to the draconitic years, satellite ground repeats and absorption into resonant GNSS orbits. Accordingly, different features can be observed on GNSS derived products from different single or combined GNSS solutions. To assess the nature of periodic signals on station coordinate time series Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solutions are generated using Bernese GNSS software V5.2. The solutions are considering only Global positioning system (GPS), GLObalnaya NAvigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) or combined GPS+GLONASS (GNSS) observations. We assess the periodic signals of station coordinates computed using the combined International GNSS Service (IGS) and four of its Analysis Centers (ACs) products. A faint fortnightly signal in our PPP solution based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) products and the existence of 8-day period for those ACs generating a combined GPS+GLONASS solution are the main features in the GPS-only solutions. The existence of the 8-day period in the GPS-only solution indicates that GPS orbits computed from a GNSS solution contain GLONASSspecific signal. The main features in the GLONASS-only solution are highly elevated powers at the 3rd draconitic harmonics ( 120-day period) and 8- day period and its harmonics (4-day, 2.67-day). We show that the GLONASS constellation gaps before December 2011 contribute to the powers of some of the frequencies. However, the well known fortnightly signal in GPS-only solutions is soaked in the

  6. Permanent GNSS Observations at Agh-Ust Satellite Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudrys, Jacek

    2016-06-01

    GPS satellite observations at the Faculty of Mining Surveying and Environmental Engineering AGH-UST are conducted since the early 90s of the last century. In 2001, efforts have been made on getting permanently functioning GPS station. At present, observatory is EPN operational center for two GNSS stations KRAW and KRA1. Moreover, KRA1 station is one of fundamental control points in polish horizontal network. The article gives the history and scope of the research carried out in the satellite observatory AGH-UST during the period 2001 - 2015.

  7. GNSS kinematic position and velocity determination for airborne gravimetry

    OpenAIRE

    K. He

    2015-01-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) plays a significant role in the fields of airborne gravimetry. The objective of this thesis is to develop reliable GNSS algorithms and software for kinematic highly precise GNSS data analysis in airborne gravimetry.

  8. Single photon time transfer link model for GNSS satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Michael; Michalek, Vojtech; Peca, Marek; Prochazka, Ivan; Blazej, Josef

    2015-05-01

    The importance of optical time transfer serving as a complement to traditional microwave links, has been attested for GNSSes and for scientific missions. Single photon time transfer (SPTT) is a process, allowing to compare (subtract) time readings of two distant clocks. Such a comparison may be then used to synchronize less accurate clock to a better reference, to perform clock characterization and calibration, to calculate mean time out of ensemble of several clocks, displaced in space. The single-photon time transfer is well established in field of space geodesy, being supported by passive retro-reflectors within space segment of five known GNSSes. A truly two-way, active terminals work aboard of Jason-2 (T2L2) - multiphoton operation, GNSS Beidou (Compass) - SPTT, and are going to be launched within recent ACES project (ELT) - SPTT, and GNSS GLONASS - multiphoton operation. However, there is still missing comprehensive theoretical model of two-way (using satellite receiver and retroreflector) SPTT link incorporating all crucial parameters of receiver (both ground and space segment receivers), transmitter, atmosphere effects on uplink and downlink path, influence of retroreflector. The input to calculation of SPTT link performance will be among others: link budget (distance, power, apertures, beam divergence, attenuation, scattering), propagating medium (atmosphere scintillation, beam wander, etc.), mutual Tx/Rx velocity, wavelength. The SPTT model will be evaluated without the properties of real components. These will be added in the further development. The ground-to-space SPTT link performance of typical scenarios are modeled. This work is a part of the ESA study "Comparison of optical time-transfer links."

  9. Mapping sea ice using reflected GNSS signals in a bistatic radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Clara; Zuffada, Cinzia; Shah, Rashmi; Mannucci, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals can be used as a kind of bistatic radar, with receivers opportunistically recording ground-reflected signals transmitted by the GNSS satellites themselves. This technique, GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), has primarily been explored using receivers flown on aircraft or balloons, or in modeling studies. Last year's launch of the TechDemoSat-1 (TDS-1) satellite represents an enormous opportunity to investigate the potential of using spaceborne GNSS receivers to sense changes in the land and ocean surface. Here, we examine the ability of reflected GNSS signals to estimate sea ice extent and sea ice age, as well as comment on the possibility of using GNSS-R to detect leads and polynyas within the ice. In particular, we quantify how the peak power of Delay Doppler Maps (DDMs) generated within the GNSS receiver responds as the satellite flies over the Polar Regions. To compute the effective peak power of each DDM, we first normalize the peak power of the DDM by the noise floor. We also correct for antenna gain, range, and incidence angle. Once these corrections are made, the effective peak power across DDMs may be used as a proxy for changes in surface permittivity and surface roughness. We compare our calculations of reflected power to existing sea ice remote sensing products such as data from the SSMI/S as well as Landsat imagery. Our analysis shows that GNSS reflections are extremely sensitive to the sea ice edge, with increases in reflected power of more than 10 dB relative to reflected power over the open ocean. As the sea ice ages, it thickens and roughens, and reflected power decreases, though it does not decrease below the power over the open ocean. Given the observed sensitivity of GNSS reflections to small features over land and the sensitivity to the sea ice edge, we hypothesize that reflection data could help map the temporal evolution of leads and polynyas.

  10. On the Evaluation of Gnss Complementary by Using Quasizenith Satellite of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, N.; Shikada, M.; Kanai, T.

    2016-06-01

    The positional information has an important role in our lifestyle. People need to get positional information by GNSS. The satellite positioning must receive a signal from four or more satellites, however, most of Japanese country is covered with mountain and urban area has a lot of tall buildings. Then Japanese government launched QZS (Quasi Zenith Satellite) which is the first satellite of QZSS (Quasi Zenith Satellite System) in 2010. QZSS including QZS can improve positioning accuracy and reliability. QZS has 6 signals by using four kinds of frequency. These signals are the same frequency of GPS and GLONASS and so on. This paper was reported about the comparison of the positioning between GPS and QZSS.

  11. New Quality Control Algorithm Based on GNSS Sensing Data for a Bridge Health Monitoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Kang; Lee, Jae One; Kim, Jung Ok

    2016-05-27

    This research introduces an improvement plan for the reliability of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning solutions. It should be considered the most suitable methodology in terms of the adjustment and positioning of GNSS in order to maximize the utilization of GNSS applications. Though various studies have been conducted with regards to Bridge Health Monitoring System (BHMS) based on GNSS, the outliers which depend on the signal reception environment could not be considered until now. Since these outliers may be connected to GNSS data collected from major bridge members, which can reduce the reliability of a whole monitoring system through the delivery of false information, they should be detected and eliminated in the previous adjustment stage. In this investigation, the Detection, Identification, Adaptation (DIA) technique was applied and implemented through an algorithm. Moreover, it can be directly applied to GNSS data collected from long span cable stayed bridges and most of outliers were efficiently detected and eliminated simultaneously. By these effects, the reliability of GNSS should be enormously improved. Improvement on GNSS positioning accuracy is directly linked to the safety of bridges itself, and at the same time, the reliability of monitoring systems in terms of the system operation can also be increased.

  12. New Quality Control Algorithm Based on GNSS Sensing Data for a Bridge Health Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Kang Lee

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research introduces an improvement plan for the reliability of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS positioning solutions. It should be considered the most suitable methodology in terms of the adjustment and positioning of GNSS in order to maximize the utilization of GNSS applications. Though various studies have been conducted with regards to Bridge Health Monitoring System (BHMS based on GNSS, the outliers which depend on the signal reception environment could not be considered until now. Since these outliers may be connected to GNSS data collected from major bridge members, which can reduce the reliability of a whole monitoring system through the delivery of false information, they should be detected and eliminated in the previous adjustment stage. In this investigation, the Detection, Identification, Adaptation (DIA technique was applied and implemented through an algorithm. Moreover, it can be directly applied to GNSS data collected from long span cable stayed bridges and most of outliers were efficiently detected and eliminated simultaneously. By these effects, the reliability of GNSS should be enormously improved. Improvement on GNSS positioning accuracy is directly linked to the safety of bridges itself, and at the same time, the reliability of monitoring systems in terms of the system operation can also be increased.

  13. On Chinese National Continuous Operating Reference Station System of GNSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Junyong

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Global navigation satellite system (GNSS Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS System can maintain a accurate, 3D, geocentric and dynamic reference coordinate frame in the corresponding area, can provide positioning and navigation service. It can also serve for the meteorology, geodynamics, earthquake monitoring and Location Based services (LBS etc in the same area. Until now, our country can’t provide a facing National CORS System serving for every profession and trade, and the national sharing platform of CORS System resources has not been established. So this paper discusses some valuable insight how to construct the National CORS System in China. Method: Constructing goal、Service object、CORS distribution、CORS geographic、geology and communication environment and other factors, are major considerations for the Constructing the National CORS System. Moreover, constructing GNSS CORS is more specific, mainly from four aspects, namely site-selection、civil construction、security measures and equipment-selection for consideration. Outcome: The project of the Constructing Global navigation satellite system (GNSS Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS System in china is put forward, and is discussed from goal、principle、project and other for construction. Some meaning thought how to construct the National CORS System is submitted Conclusion: The Global navigation satellite system (GNSS Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS System in china is the lack of a unified planning and design in the national level. So far, the national CORS system serving all walks of life has not been provided, and the national sharing platform of CORS System resources has not been established The primary mission of the Global navigation satellite system (GNSS Continuous Operating Reference Station (CORS System in china is as follows: using data set of GNSS and receiving, transport, process, integration, transmit information and

  14. A satellite constellation optimization for a regional GNSS remote sensing mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavili Kilaneh, Narin; Mashhadi Hossainali, Masoud

    2017-04-01

    Due to the recent advances in the Global Navigation Satellite System Remote sensing (GNSS¬R) applications, optimization of a satellite orbit to investigate the Earth's properties seems significant. The comparison of the GNSS direct and reflected signals received by a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite introduces a new technique to remotely sense the Earth. Several GNSS¬R missions including Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) have been proposed for different applications such as the ocean wind speed and height monitoring. The geometric optimization of the satellite orbit before starting the mission is a key step for every space mission. Since satellite constellation design varies depending on the application, we have focused on the required geometric criteria for oceanography applications in a specified region. Here, the total number of specular points, their spatial distribution and the accuracy of their position are assumed to be sufficient for oceanography applications. Gleason's method is used to determine the position of specular points. We considered the 2-D lattice and 3-D lattice theory of flower constellation to survey whether a circular orbit or an elliptical one is suitable to improve the solution. Genetic algorithm is implemented to solve the problem. To check the visibility condition between the LEO and GPS satellites, the satellite initial state is propagated by a variable step size numerical integration method. Constellation orbit parameters achieved by optimization provide a better resolution and precession for the specular points in the study area of this research.

  15. Inter-system biases estimation in multi-GNSS relative positioning with GPS and Galileo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deprez, Cecile; Warnant, Rene

    2016-04-01

    The recent increase in the number of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) opens new perspectives in the field of high precision positioning. Particularly, the European Galileo program has experienced major progress in 2015 with the launch of 6 satellites belonging to the new Full Operational Capability (FOC) generation. Associated with the ongoing GPS modernization, many more frequencies and satellites are now available. Therefore, multi-GNSS relative positioning based on GPS and Galileo overlapping frequencies should entail better accuracy and reliability in position estimations. However, the differences between satellite systems induce inter-system biases (ISBs) inside the multi-GNSS equations of observation. Once these biases estimated and removed from the model, a solution involving a unique pivot satellite for the two considered constellations can be obtained. Such an approach implies that the addition of even one single Galileo satellite to the GPS-only model will strengthen it. The combined use of L1 and L5 from GPS with E1 and E5a from Galileo in zero baseline double differences (ZB DD) based on a unique pivot satellite is employed to resolve ISBs. This model removes all the satellite- and receiver-dependant error sources by differentiating and the zero baseline configuration allows atmospheric and multipath effects elimination. An analysis of the long-term stability of ISBs is conducted on various pairs of receivers over large time spans. The possible influence of temperature variations inside the receivers over ISB values is also investigated. Our study is based on the 5 multi-GNSS receivers (2 Septentrio PolaRx4, 1 Septentrio PolaRxS and 2 Trimble NetR9) installed on the roof of our building in Liege. The estimated ISBs are then used as corrections in the multi-GNSS observation model and the resulting accuracy of multi-GNSS positioning is compared to GPS and Galileo standalone solutions.

  16. GNSS applications and methods

    CERN Document Server

    Gleason, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Placing emphasis on applications development, this unique resource offers a highly practical overview of GNSS (global navigation satellite systems), including GPS. The applications presented in the book range from the traditional location applications to combining GNSS with other sensors and systems and into more exotic areas, such as remote sensing and space weather monitoring. Written by leading experts in the field, this book presents the fundamental underpinnings of GNSS and provides you with detailed examples of various GNSS applications. Moreover, the software included with the book cont

  17. The modeling and simulation of plasma sheath effect on GNSS system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhongguo; Liu, Jiangfan; Du, Yongxing; Xi, Xiaoli

    2015-11-01

    Plasma sheath can potentially degrade global navigation satellite system (GNSS) through signal attenuation as well as phase noise when a hypersonic vehicle reenters the Earth's atmosphere. Modeling and simulation method of GNSS system disturbed by plasma sheath is introduced in this paper by means of electromagnetic wave propagation theory combined with the satellite signal simulation technique. The transmission function of the plasma sheath with stratified model is derived utilizing scattering matrix method. The effects of the plasma sheath on GPS signal reception and positioning performance are examined. Experimental results are presented and discussed, partly supporting the validity of the analytical method proposed.

  18. Development of GNSS PWV information management system for very short-term weather forecast in the Korean Peninsula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Han-Earl; Yoon, Ha Su; Yoo, Sung-Moon; Cho, Jungho

    2017-04-01

    Over the past decade, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) was in the spotlight as a meteorological research tool. The Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI) developed a GNSS precipitable water vapor (PWV) information management system to apply PWV to practical applications, such as very short-term weather forecast. The system consists of a DPR, DRS, and TEV, which are divided functionally. The DPR processes GNSS data using the Bernese GNSS software and then retrieves PWV from zenith total delay (ZTD) with the optimized mean temperature equation for the Korean Peninsula. The DRS collects data from eighty permanent GNSS stations in the southern part of the Korean Peninsula and provides the PWV retrieved from GNSS data to a user. The TEV is in charge of redundancy of the DPR. The whole process is performed in near real-time where the delay is ten minutes. The validity of the GNSS PWV was proved by means of a comparison with radiosonde data. In the experiment of numerical weather prediction model, the GNSS PWV was utilized as the initial value of the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) model for heavy rainfall event. As a result, we found that the forecasting capability of the WRF is improved by data assimilation of GNSS PWV.

  19. Can space ties on board GNSS satellites replace terrestrial ties in the implementation of Terrestrial Reference Frames?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Sara; Zerbini, Susanna; Altamimi, Zuheir; Rebischung, Paul; Errico, Maddalena; Santi, Efisio

    2016-04-01

    The realization of Terrestrial Reference Frames (TRFs) must be periodically updated in order to account for newly acquired observations and for upgrades in data analysis procedures and/or combination techniques. Any innovative computation strategy should ameliorate the definition of the frame physical parameters, upon which a number of scientific applications critically rely. On the basis of the requirements of scientific cutting edge studies, the geodetic community has estimated that the present day challenge in the determination of TRFs is to provide a frame that is accurate and long-term stable at the level of 1 mm and 0.1 mm/y respectively. This work aims at characterizing the frame realized by a combination of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) and Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations via their co-location on board GNSS spacecrafts. In particular, it is established how such a frame compares to the traditional ITRF computation and what is the impact on the realization of the frame origin and scale. Four years of data from a global network encompassing about one hundred GNSS stations and all SLR sites have been analyzed. In order to ensure the highest possible consistency, the raw data of both techniques are treated with the same analysis Software (Bernese GNSS Software 5.2) following IERS2010 Conventions. Both weekly and long term solutions are carried out exploiting either the Bernese or the Combination and Analysis of Terrestrial Reference Frames (CATREF) Software packages. We present the results of a combination study involving GNSS data and SLR observations to the two LAGEOS and to the GNSS satellites equipped with retroreflector arrays. The latter type of measurements is currently not included in the computation of the official ITRF solutions. The assessment of the benefit that they could provide to the definition of the origin and scale of the ITRF is however worth investigating, as such data provide the potential for linking the GNSS and

  20. An observing system simulation experiment for climate monitoring with GNSS radio occultation data: Setup and test bed study

    OpenAIRE

    U. Foelsche; Kirchengast, G.; A. Steiner; Kornblueh, L.; Manzini, E.; L. Bengtsson

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability, high accuracy, all-weather capability, high vertical resolution, and global coverage of Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS) radio occultation ( RO) suggests it as a promising tool for global monitoring of atmospheric temperature change. With the aim to investigate and quantify how well a GNSS RO observing system is able to detect climate trends, we are currently performing an ( climate) observing system simulation experiment over the 25-year period 2001 to 2025...

  1. Determination of SLR station coordinates on the basis of tracking 45 GNSS satellites: benefits for future ITRF realizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sośnica, Krzysztof; Bury, Grzegorz; Zajdel, Radosław; Kaźmierski, Kamil; Drożdżewski, Mateusz

    2017-04-01

    The SLR station coordinates and SLR-derived Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) are typically derived on the basis of SLR tracking of four spherical geodetic satellites: two LAGEOS and two Etalons. Between 2014 and 2016, the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) initiated four intensive SLR tracking campaigns for Galileo and three campaigns devoted to tracking all GNSS spacecraft. As a result, the number of SLR observations and the number of tracked GNSS satellites have dramatically increased allowing for determining SLR station coordinates and ERPs solely on the basis of SLR tracking of GNSS satellites. This paper shows, for the first time, the solution in which the SLR station coordinates, geocenter motion, and ERPs are determined using the SLR observations to 26 GLONASS, 14 Galileo, 2 BeiDou IGSO, 2 BeiDou MEO, and 1 QZSS satellite. We compare the SLR station coordinate stability derived from GNSS-based results to the LAGEOS-only solution and from a combined 'SLR to GNSS+LAGEOS' solution. We address the issues related to the GNSS orbit determination using sparse SLR data and the issues related to handling range biases in the GNSS solutions. We found that the coordinate stability of those SLR stations which provide a large number of GNSS observations can remarkably be improved. The Length-of-day parameter can be derived from SLR-GNSS solutions with a much better accuracy than from the LAGEOS-only solutions. Finally, we show that the SLR tracking of GNSS satellites improves the consistency between SLR and GNSS solutions, and thus, can be beneficial for the future ITRF realizations.

  2. A closed-form method for single-point positioning with six satellites in dual-GNSS constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Yunlong; Huang, Qi; Ao, Yongcai; Li, Yun

    2016-12-01

    With the impact of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), dual-GNSS constellations are playing an increasingly significant role in positioning, navigation and timing (PNT) applications. Aiming at improving from the existing method, i.e., linearization, of solving the single-point positioning problem under a dual-GNSS, this paper develops a closed-form method for solving PNT problems in the case of six satellites. This method reduces the positioning problem to a simple mathematical problem of finding solutions to a quadratic equation, thereby needing only one receiver clock bias (RCB) as variable. By solving the RCB, the positioning information in three dimensions is obtained by utilizing a linear equation. Compared with the existing method, the closed-form method requires no initial position or iterations. This method thus provides a direct solution to single-point positioning. Further, how to check the uniqueness and the validity of the solutions is also derived. Experimental results verify the validity, applicability and efficiency of the proposed method.

  3. The Current Status of Research on GNSS-R Remote Sensing Technology in China and Future Development

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li Huang; Xia Qing; Yin Cong; Wan Wei

    2013-01-01

    .... In recent years, development of the navigation satellite remote sensing applications using GNSS as a external illuminator, it has been forming a new Global Navigation Satellite System METeorology (GNSS/MET...

  4. Kalman Filter-based Single-baseline GNSS Data Processing without Pivot Satellite Changing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Baocheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Single-baseline global navigation satellite system (GNSS data are able to be processed into a batch of parameters such as positions, timing information as well as atmospheric delays. The applications of relevance, therefore, consist of relative positioning, time and frequency transfer and so forth. To achieve real-time capability, these parameters are usually estimated by means of Kalman-filter. Moreover, the reliability of these parameters can be further strengthened by forming and then successfully fixing a set of independent double-differenced (DD integer ambiguities. For this purpose, the filter function model is commonly set up based on the DD observation equations (DD filter model. In order to preserve the continuity of the filter, DD filter model needs to explicitly refer to another pivot satellite once the previous one becomes invisible. This thereby implies that, before being predicted to the next epoch, the former filtered DD ambiguity vector has to be “mapped” with respect to the newly-defined pivot satellite. In addition to that, the estimated receiver phase clocks using DD filter model may soak up distinct between-receiver single-differenced (SD ambiguities belonging to different pivot satellites and would thereby be subject to apparent “integer jumps”. In this contribution, SD observation equations involving estimable DD ambiguity parameters are alternatively selected as the filter function model (SD filter model. Our analyses suggest that, both DD and SD filter models are equivalent in theory, but differ from each other as far as their implementations are concerned. Typically, for SD filter model, no effort should be made to map DD ambiguities, thus implying less intensive computational burden and better flexibility than DD filter model. At the same time, receiver phase clocks determined by SD filter model are free from “integer jumps” and thus are particularly beneficial for frequency transfer.

  5. IMPLEMENTATION OF AERONAUTICAL LOCAL SATELLITE AUGMENTATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojce Ilcev

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. This paper introduces development and implementation of new Local Satellite AugmentationSystem as an integration component of the Regional Satellite Augmentation System (RSAS employingcurrent and new Satellite Communications, Navigation and Surveillance (CNS for improvement of the AirTraffic Control (ATC and Air Traffic Management (ATM and for enhancement safety systems includingtransport security and control of flights in all stages, airport approaching, landing, departures and allmovements over airport surface areas. The current first generation of the Global Navigation Satellite SystemGNSS-1 applications are represented by fundamental military solutions for Position, Velocity and Time ofthe satellite navigation and determination systems such as the US GPS and Russian GLONASS (Former-USSR requirements, respectively. The establishment of Aeronautical CNS is also discussed as a part ofGlobal Satellite Augmentation Systems of GPS and GLONASS systems integrated with existing and futureRSAS and LSAS in airports areas. Specific influence and factors related to the Comparison of the Currentand New Aeronautical CNS System including the Integration of RSAS and GNSS solutions are discussedand packet of facts is determined to maximize the new satellite Automatic Dependent Surveillance System(ADSS and Special Effects of the RSAS Networks. The possible future integration of RSAS and GNSS andthe common proposal of the satellite Surface Movement Guidance and Control are presented in thechangeless ways as of importance for future enfacements of ATC and ATM for any hypothetical airportinfrastructure.Keywords: ADSS, ATC, ATM, CNS, GSAS, LRAS, RSAS, SMGC, Special Effects of RSAS.

  6. Performance analysis of IMU-augmented GNSS tracking systems for space launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Benjamin; Markgraf, Markus; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    European space launch operators consider the potential of GNSS (global navigation satellite system) as a promising novel means of localization for the purpose of range safety of launch vehicles like Ariane and Vega, since it is expected that recurring costs are lower and accuracy is higher than currently existing systems like radar tracking. Range safety requires continuous information about the position and velocity of the launch vehicle to quickly detect the occurrence of catastrophic events. However, GNSS outages due, for example, to high jerks at fairing and stage jettisons or other external interferences like (un-)intentional jamming cannot be precluded. The OCAM-G experiment on Ariane 5 flight VA219 has provided evidence that GNSS is capable of providing a highly accurate position and velocity solution during most of the flight, but that outages of several seconds do occur. To increase the continuity of a GNSS-based localization system, it is proposed that the GNSS receiver is augmented by an inertial measurement unit (IMU), which is able to output a position and velocity solution even during GNSS outages. Since these outages are expected to be short, a tactical- or even consumer-grade IMU is expected to be sufficient. In this paper, the minimum IMU performance that is required to bridge outages of up to 10 s, and thereby meeting the accuracy requirements of range safety, is determined by means of a thorough simulation study. The focus of the analysis is on current generation microelectromechanical system (MEMS)-based IMU, which is lightweight, low-cost, available commercially and has reached acceptable maturity in the last decade.

  7. Information content in reflected global navigation satellite system signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg, Per; Carlstrom, Anders

    2011-01-01

    The direct signals from satellites in global satellite navigation satellites systems (GNSS) as, GPS, GLONASS and GALILEO, constitute the primary source for positioning, navigation and timing from space. But also the reflected GNSS signals contain an important information content of signal travel...... times and the characteristics of the reflecting surfaces and structure. Ocean reflected signals from GNSS satellite systems reveal the mean height, the significant wave height and the roughness of the ocean. The estimated accuracy of the average surface height can be as low as 10 cm. For low elevations......, the signals reveal the incoherent scatter process at the reflection zone. By using open-loop high-precision GNSS receivers, it is possible to provide the in-phase and quadrature components of the signal at high sample rates, which enables investigation of the spectral signatures of the observations...

  8. An overview of GNSS remote sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Kegen, Yu; Rizos, Chris; Burrage, Derek; Dempster, Andrew; Zhang, Kefei; Markgraf, Markus

    2014-01-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals are always available, globally, and the signal structures are well known, except for those dedicated to military use. They also have some distinctive characteristics, including the use of L-band frequencies, which are particularly suited for remote sensing purposes. The idea of using GNSS signals for remote sensing - the atmosphere, oceans or Earth surface - was first proposed more than two decades ago. Since then, GNSS remote ...

  9. Multi-GNSS for Ionospheric Scintillation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Y.

    2015-12-01

    GNSS have been widely used for ionospheric monitoring. We anticipate over 160 GNSS satellites broadcasting 400 signals by 2023, nearly double the number today. With their well-defined signal structures, high spatial density and spectral diversity, GNSS offers low cost and distributed passive sensing of ionosphere effects. There are, however, many challenges to utilize GNSS resources to characterize and forecast ionospheric scintillation. Originally intended for navigation purposes, GNSS receivers are designed to filter out nuisance effects due to ionosphere effects. GNSS measurements are plagued with errors from multipath, oscillator jitters, processing artifacts, and neutral atmosphere effects. Strong scintillation events are often characterized by turbulent structures in ionosphere, causing simultaneous deep amplitude fading and abrupt carrier phase changes. The combined weak signal and high carrier dynamics imposes conflicting requirements for GNSS receiver design. Therefore, GNSS receivers often experience cycle slips and loss of lock of signals during strong scintillation events. High quality, raw GNSS signals bearing space weather signatures and robust receiver algorithms designed to capture these signatures are needed in order for GNSS to be a reliable and useful agent for scintillation monitoring and forecasting. Our event-driven, reconfigurable data collection system is designed to achieve this purpose. To date, our global network has collected ~150TB of raw GNSS data during space weather events. A suite of novel receiver processing algorithms has been developed by exploitating GNSS spatial, frequency, temporal, and constellation diversity to process signals experiencing challenging scintillation impact. The algorithms and data have advanced our understanding of scintillation impact on GNSS, lead to more robust receiver technologies, and enabled high spatial and temporal resolution depiction of ionosphere responses to solar and geomagnetic conditions. This

  10. High Precision GNSS Guidance for Field Mobile Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Jurišica

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System guidance for field mobile robots. Several GNSS systems and receivers, as well as multiple measurement methods and principles of GNSS systems are examined. We focus mainly on sources of errors and investigate diverse approaches for precise measuring and effective use of GNSS systems for real‐ time robot localization. The main body of the article compares two GNSS receivers and their measurement methods. We design, implement and evaluate several mathematical methods for precise robot localization.

  11. Global navigation satellite systems, inertial navigation, and integration

    CERN Document Server

    Grewal, Mohinder S; Bartone, Chris G

    2013-01-01

    An updated guide to GNSS, and INS, and solutions to real-world GNSS/INS problems with Kalman filtering Written by recognized authorities in the field, this third edition of a landmark work provides engineers, computer scientists, and others with a working familiarity of the theory and contemporary applications of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), Inertial Navigational Systems, and Kalman filters. Throughout, the focus is on solving real-world problems, with an emphasis on the effective use of state-of-the-art integration techniques for those systems, especially the application of Kal

  12. An Adaptive Low-Cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU Tightly-Coupled Integration System with Aiding Measurement in a GNSS Signal-Challenged Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qifan; Zhang, Hai; Li, You; Li, Zheng

    2015-09-18

    The main aim of this paper is to develop a low-cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU tightly-coupled integration system with aiding information that can provide reliable position solutions when the GNSS signal is challenged such that less than four satellites are visible in a harsh environment. To achieve this goal, we introduce an adaptive tightly-coupled integration system with height and heading aiding (ATCA). This approach adopts a novel redundant measurement noise estimation method for an adaptive Kalman filter application and also augments external measurements in the filter to aid the position solutions, as well as uses different filters to deal with various situations. On the one hand, the adaptive Kalman filter makes use of the redundant measurement system's difference sequence to estimate and tune noise variance instead of employing a traditional innovation sequence to avoid coupling with the state vector error. On the other hand, this method uses the external height and heading angle as auxiliary references and establishes a model for the measurement equation in the filter. In the meantime, it also changes the effective filter online based on the number of tracked satellites. These measures have increasingly enhanced the position constraints and the system observability, improved the computational efficiency and have led to a good result. Both simulated and practical experiments have been carried out, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at limiting the system errors when there are less than four visible satellites, providing a satisfactory navigation solution.

  13. An Adaptive Low-Cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU Tightly-Coupled Integration System with Aiding Measurement in a GNSS Signal-Challenged Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifan Zhou

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this paper is to develop a low-cost GNSS/MEMS-IMU tightly-coupled integration system with aiding information that can provide reliable position solutions when the GNSS signal is challenged such that less than four satellites are visible in a harsh environment. To achieve this goal, we introduce an adaptive tightly-coupled integration system with height and heading aiding (ATCA. This approach adopts a novel redundant measurement noise estimation method for an adaptive Kalman filter application and also augments external measurements in the filter to aid the position solutions, as well as uses different filters to deal with various situations. On the one hand, the adaptive Kalman filter makes use of the redundant measurement system’s difference sequence to estimate and tune noise variance instead of employing a traditional innovation sequence to avoid coupling with the state vector error. On the other hand, this method uses the external height and heading angle as auxiliary references and establishes a model for the measurement equation in the filter. In the meantime, it also changes the effective filter online based on the number of tracked satellites. These measures have increasingly enhanced the position constraints and the system observability, improved the computational efficiency and have led to a good result. Both simulated and practical experiments have been carried out, and the results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective at limiting the system errors when there are less than four visible satellites, providing a satisfactory navigation solution.

  14. GNSS Carrier Phase-based Attitude Determination: Estimation and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Attitude determination through the use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals is one of the many applications of satellite-based navigation. Multiple GNSS antennas installed on a given platform are used to provide orientation estimates, thus adding attitude information to the standard

  15. GNSS Carrier Phase-based Attitude Determination: Estimation and Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgi, G.

    2011-01-01

    Attitude determination through the use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals is one of the many applications of satellite-based navigation. Multiple GNSS antennas installed on a given platform are used to provide orientation estimates, thus adding attitude information to the standard

  16. GNSS/RFID Active Transponder Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Vojtech

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes a design of global navigation satellite system (GNSS/Radio frequency identification (RFID active transponder which is primarily designed for localization of objects as a part of localization system designated for efficient handling of situations with mass casualties. The precise localization is improved by differential GNSS. The block diagram of such GNSS/RFID active transponder is described including main operation procedures of the firmware. Measurement of the localization by algorithms of RTKLIB library and by algorithms of GNSS module is compared. Dynamic tests, i.e. GNSS/RFID active transponder placed in the moving car (50~kmph, and static tests, i.e. GNSS/RFID active transponder placed in the position for 15~min, are performed.

  17. GNSS Carrier Phase Integer Ambiguity Resolution with Camera and Satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Patrick

    2015-04-01

    Ambiguity Resolution is the key to high precision position and attitude determination with GNSS. However, ambiguity resolution of kinematic receivers becomes challenging in environments with substantial multipath, limited satellite availability and erroneous cycle slip corrections. There is a need for other sensors, e.g. inertial sensors that allow an independent prediction of the position. The change of the predicted position over time can then be used for cycle slip detection and correction. In this paper, we provide a method to improve the initial ambiguity resolution for RTK and PPP with vision-based position information. Camera images are correlated with geo-referenced aerial/ satellite images to obtain an independent absolute position information. This absolute position information is then coupled with the GNSS and INS measurements in an extended Kalman filter to estimate the position, velocity, acceleration, attitude, angular rates, code multipath and biases of the accelerometers and gyroscopes. The camera and satellite images are matched based on some characteristic image points (e.g. corners of street markers). We extract these characteristic image points from the camera images by performing the following steps: An inverse mapping (homogenous projection) is applied to transform the camera images from the driver's perspective to bird view. Subsequently, we detect the street markers by performing (a) a color transformation and reduction with adaptive brightness correction to focus on relevant features, (b) a subsequent morphological operation to enhance the structure recognition, (c) an edge and corner detection to extract feature points, and (d) a point matching of the corner points with a template to recognize the street markers. We verified the proposed method with two low-cost u-blox LEA 6T GPS receivers, the MPU9150 from Invensense, the ASCOS RTK corrections and a PointGrey camera. The results show very precise and seamless position and attitude

  18. Route strategy of satellite network in GNSS based on topology evolution law

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xianqing Yi; Zhenwei Hou; Tao Zhong; Yaohong Zhang; Zhili Sun

    2014-01-01

    As each type of satel ite network has different link features, its data transmission must be designed based on its link features to improve the efficiency of data transferring. The transmission of navigation integrated services information (NISI) in a global navigation satel ite system (GNSS) with inter-satel ite links (ISLs) is studied by taking the real situation of inter-satel ite communication links into account. An on-demand computing and buffering centralized route strategy is proposed based on dynamic grouping and the topology evolution law of the GNSS network within which the satel ite nodes are operated in the manner of dynamic grouping. Dynamic grouping is based on satel ites spatial relationships and the group role of the satel ite node changes by turns due to its spatial relationships. The route strategy provides significant advantages of high efficiency, low complexity, and flexi-ble configuration, by which the established GNSS can possess the features and capabilities of feasible deployment, efficient trans-mission, convenient management, structural invulnerability and flexible expansion.

  19. GNSS-based Road Charging Systems - Assessment of Vehicle Location Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Zabic, Martina; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2011-01-01

    En stigende efterspørgsel efter satellitbaserede kørselsafgiftssystemer er på vej i Europa. Satellitbaserede kørselsafgifter omfatter opkrævning af trafikanterne for deres vejforbrug ved at at lade køretøjerne bestemme deres position indenfor et givent afgiftsområde ved hjælp af Global Navigation Satellit Systemer (GNSS). Den forskning, der præsenteres i denne afhandling, beskæftiger sig med performanceniveauet samt de teknologiske udfordringer ved bestemmelse af køretøjets placering inden fo...

  20. Validation of satellite altimetry by kinematic GNSS in central East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Ludwig; Richter, Andreas; Fedorov, Denis V.; Eberlein, Lutz; Brovkov, Evgeny V.; Popov, Sergey V.; Knöfel, Christoph; Horwath, Martin; Dietrich, Reinhard; Matveev, Alexey Y.; Scheinert, Mirko; Lukin, Valery V.

    2017-05-01

    Ice-surface elevation profiles of more than 30 000 km in total length are derived from kinematic GNSS (GPS and the Russian GLONASS) observations on sledge convoy vehicles along traverses between Vostok Station and the East Antarctic coast. These profiles have accuracies between 4 and 9 cm. They are used to validate elevation data sets from both radar and laser satellite altimetry as well as four digital elevation models. A crossover analysis with three different processing versions of Envisat radar altimetry elevation profiles yields a clear preference for the relocation method over the direct method of slope correction and for threshold retrackers over functional fit algorithms. The validation of CryoSat-2 low-resolution mode and SARIn mode data sets documents the progress made from baseline B to C elevation products. ICESat laser altimetry data are demonstrated to be accurate to a few decimetres over a wide range of surface slopes. A crossover adjustment in the region of subglacial Lake Vostok combining ICESat elevation data with our GNSS profiles yields a new set of ICESat laser campaign biases and provides new, independent evidence for the stability of the ice-surface elevation above the lake. The evaluation of the digital elevation models reveals the benefits of combining laser and radar altimetry.

  1. Altimetry with GNSS-R interferometry: first proof of concept experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rius, A.; Nogués-Correig, O.; Ribó, S.; Cardellach, E.; Oliveras, S.; Valencia, E.; Park, H.; Tarongi, J.M.; Camps, A.; Van der Marel, H.; Van Bree, R.; Altena, B.; Martín-Neira, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R) concept was conceived as a means to densify radar altimeter measurements of the sea surface. Until now, the GNSS-R concept relied on open access to GNSS transmitted codes. Recently, it has been proposed that the ranging capability of the

  2. The affine constrained GNSS attitude model and its multivariate integer least-squares solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, P.J.G.

    2012-01-01

    A new global navigation satellite system (GNSS) carrier-phase attitude model and its solution are introduced in this contribution. This affine-constrained GNSS attitude model has the advantage that it avoids the computational complexity of the orthonormality-constrained GNSS attitude model, while it

  3. Snapshot Software Receiver for GNSS in Weak Signal Environments: An Innovative Approach for Galileo E5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrasco-Martos, S.; López-Risueño, G.; Jiménez-Baños, D.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning has turned out to be an enabler of Location-Based Services (LBS). This has motivated in recent years an increasing research activity on signal processing techniques for GNSS receivers. However, one main limitation faced by these GNSS receivers is

  4. Snapshot Software Receiver for GNSS in Weak Signal Environments: An Innovative Approach for Galileo E5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carrasco-Martos, S.; López-Risueño, G.; Jiménez-Baños, D.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) positioning has turned out to be an enabler of Location-Based Services (LBS). This has motivated in recent years an increasing research activity on signal processing techniques for GNSS receivers. However, one main limitation faced by these GNSS receivers is

  5. Altimetry with GNSS-R interferometry: first proof of concept experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rius, A.; Nogués-Correig, O.; Ribó, S.; Cardellach, E.; Oliveras, S.; Valencia, E.; Park, H.; Tarongi, J.M.; Camps, A.; Van der Marel, H.; Van Bree, R.; Altena, B.; Martín-Neira, M.

    2011-01-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R) concept was conceived as a means to densify radar altimeter measurements of the sea surface. Until now, the GNSS-R concept relied on open access to GNSS transmitted codes. Recently, it has been proposed that the ranging capability of the

  6. GNSS Reflectometry and Remote Sensing: New Objectives and Results

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Shuanggen; 10.1016/j.asr.2010.01.014.

    2010-01-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has been a very powerful and important contributor to all scientific questions related to precise positioning on Earth's surface, particularly as a mature technique in geodesy and geosciences. With the development of GNSS as a satellite microwave (L-band) technique, more and wider applications and new potentials are explored and utilized. The versatile and available GNSS signals can image the Earth's surface environments as a new, highly precise, continuous, all-weather and near-real-time remote sensing tool. The refracted signals from GNSS Radio Occultation satellites together with ground GNSS observations can provide the high-resolution tropospheric water vapor, temperature and pressure, tropopause parameters and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and electron density profile as well. The GNSS reflected signals from the ocean and land surface could determine the ocean height, wind speed and wind direction of ocean surface, soil moisture, ice and snow thick...

  7. The Impact of Satellite Time Group Delay and Inter-Frequency Differential Code Bias Corrections on Multi-GNSS Combined Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yulong; Zhou, Feng; Sun, Baoqi; Wang, Shengli; Shi, Bo

    2017-01-01

    We present quad-constellation (namely, GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) time group delay (TGD) and differential code bias (DCB) correction models to fully exploit the code observations of all the four global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) for navigation and positioning. The relationship between TGDs and DCBs for multi-GNSS is clearly figured out, and the equivalence of TGD and DCB correction models combining theory with practice is demonstrated. Meanwhile, the TGD/DCB correction models have been extended to various standard point positioning (SPP) and precise point positioning (PPP) scenarios in a multi-GNSS and multi-frequency context. To evaluate the effectiveness and practicability of broadcast TGDs in the navigation message and DCBs provided by the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX), both single-frequency GNSS ionosphere-corrected SPP and dual-frequency GNSS ionosphere-free SPP/PPP tests are carried out with quad-constellation signals. Furthermore, the author investigates the influence of differential code biases on GNSS positioning estimates. The experiments show that multi-constellation combination SPP performs better after DCB/TGD correction, for example, for GPS-only b1-based SPP, the positioning accuracies can be improved by 25.0%, 30.6% and 26.7%, respectively, in the N, E, and U components, after the differential code biases correction, while GPS/GLONASS/BDS b1-based SPP can be improved by 16.1%, 26.1% and 9.9%. For GPS/BDS/Galileo the 3rd frequency based SPP, the positioning accuracies are improved by 2.0%, 2.0% and 0.4%, respectively, in the N, E, and U components, after Galileo satellites DCB correction. The accuracy of Galileo-only b1-based SPP are improved about 48.6%, 34.7% and 40.6% with DCB correction, respectively, in the N, E, and U components. The estimates of multi-constellation PPP are subject to different degrees of influence. For multi-constellation combination SPP, the accuracy of single-frequency is slightly better than that of dual

  8. A nationwide adjustment of passive GNSS control for the U.S. National Spatial Reference System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, M. L.; Saleh, J.

    2012-12-01

    As part of continuing efforts to improve the National Spatial Reference System (NSRS), in June 2011 NOAA's National Geodetic Survey (NGS) completed a nationwide adjustment of "passive" control (i.e., physical survey monuments). The project was divided into five separate networks, each of which was performed as a simultaneous least-squares adjustment of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) vectors. To create the networks, 4267 individual survey projects were combined for a total of 80,872 unique stations connected by 424,711 GNSS vectors observed between April 1983 and December 2011. A Helmert blocking strategy was used to adjust the two large networks representing the coterminous U.S. The adjustment was constrained to current North American Datum of 1983 (NAD 83) coordinates of 1195 NGS Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS). The CORS network is a GNSS-based "active" control system and the geometric foundation of the NSRS. Constraining the adjustment to the CORS optimally aligned the GNSS passive control with the active control, providing a unified reference frame to serve the Nation's geometric positioning needs. The project yielded NAD 83 latitude, longitude, and ellipsoid heights at an epoch date of 2010.00 (January 1, 2010). The median station accuracy was 0.9 cm horizontal and 1.5 cm vertical (i.e., ellipsoid height) at the 95% confidence level. A number of technical issues were confronted in performing this project. One was that the networks were referenced to three different tectonic plates. Each of these tectonic plates is identified by a "datum tag" following the NAD 83 name: NAD 83(2011) is referenced to the North America plate; NAD 83(PA11) is referenced to the Pacific plate; and NAD 83(MA11) is referenced to the Mariana plate. In some cases, stations referenced to one plate were located on a different plate (e.g., stations in coastal California and the Caribbean were referenced to the North America plate). This was handled by modeling

  9. Determination of gravitational potential distribution over a geocentric quasi- sphere based on links between GRACE- and GNSS-type satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ziyu; Shen, Wen-Bin

    2017-04-01

    We provide a formulation of determining the Earth's gravitational potential distribution over a geocentric quasi-sphere (QS) that is constructed by a GRACE-type satellite (GTS), based on frequency signal transmission between the GTS and a cluster of GNSS satellites (CGS). By emitting and receiving frequency signals between the GTS and a GNSS satellite, we can determine the gravitational potential at the GTS orbit. For a near-polar GTS with height about 350 km above the geoid, we choose sufficient GNSS satellites to determine the gravitational potential at the GTS position. Simulation results show that the accuracy of the determined gravitational potential distribution over the QS can achieve centimeter level if (1) the accuracy of the given potentials at GDSs is about 1 cm level, and (2) optical atomic clocks with instability of 1*10E-18 are available. Our final purpose is to determine the Earth's external gravity field based on the potential distribution on the QS. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733301 and 2013CB733305) and NSFCs (grant Nos. 41174011, 41429401, 41210006, 41128003, 41021061)

  10. Some Notes on Interoperability of GNSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YANG Yuanxi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Compatibility and interoperability of GNSS are the hot research issues in international satellite navigation field. It is a requirement for integrated multi GNSS navigation and positioning. The basic concepts of the compatibility and interoperability are introduced and the trend of the interoperability among the GNSS providers is discussed. The status and problems of the frequency interoperability of GPS, BeiDou(BDS, GLONASS and Galileo are analyzed. It is pointed that the frequency interoperability problems will affect the manufacturers and multi GNSS users. The influences of the interoperability problems of the reference coordinate systems are not only resulted from the definitions and realizations of the reference coordinate systems but also from the maintenance and update strategies of the reference systems. The effects of the time datum interoperability and corresponding resolving strategies are also discussed. The influences of the interoperability problems of GNSS are summarized.

  11. An overview of GNSS remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kegen; Rizos, Chris; Burrage, Derek; Dempster, Andrew G.; Zhang, Kefei; Markgraf, Markus

    2014-12-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals are always available, globally, and the signal structures are well known, except for those dedicated to military use. They also have some distinctive characteristics, including the use of L-band frequencies, which are particularly suited for remote sensing purposes. The idea of using GNSS signals for remote sensing - the atmosphere, oceans or Earth surface - was first proposed more than two decades ago. Since then, GNSS remote sensing has been intensively investigated in terms of proof of concept studies, signal processing methodologies, theory and algorithm development, and various satellite-borne, airborne and ground-based experiments. It has been demonstrated that GNSS remote sensing can be used as an alternative passive remote sensing technology. Space agencies such as NASA, NOAA, EUMETSAT and ESA have already funded, or will fund in the future, a number of projects/missions which focus on a variety of GNSS remote sensing applications. It is envisaged that GNSS remote sensing can be either exploited to perform remote sensing tasks on an independent basis or combined with other techniques to address more complex applications. This paper provides an overview of the state of the art of this relatively new and, in some respects, underutilised remote sensing technique. Also addressed are relevant challenging issues associated with GNSS remote sensing services and the performance enhancement of GNSS remote sensing to accurately and reliably retrieve a range of geophysical parameters.

  12. SEA SURFACE ALTIMETRY BASED ON AIRBORNE GNSS SIGNAL MEASUREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the focus is on ocean surface altimetry using the signals transmitted from GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System satellites. A low-altitude airborne experiment was recently conducted off the coast of Sydney. Both a LiDAR experiment and a GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R experiment were carried out in the same aircraft, at the same time, in the presence of strong wind and rather high wave height. The sea surface characteristics, including the surface height, were derived from processing the LiDAR data. A two-loop iterative method is proposed to calculate sea surface height using the relative delay between the direct and the reflected GNSS signals. The preliminary results indicate that the results obtained from the GNSS-based surface altimetry deviate from the LiDAR-based results significantly. Identification of the error sources and mitigation of the errors are needed to achieve better surface height estimation performance using GNSS signals.

  13. Global navigation satellite system; Jisedai kokoho senjo system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, S.; Suga, S. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-05-01

    The safety of civil aviation relies on ground navigation aids. In areas where there are no ground aids and on oceanic air routes, aircraft must depend on their own navigation system. The predicted increase in civil aviation traffic in the near future will make it difficult for current navigation aids to support navigation in all phases of flights. To avoid this problem, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) is directing the establishment of standards for the global navigation satellite system (GNSS). GNSS employs navigation satellites, such as those of the global positioning system (GPS), to provide navigation capability throughout the world. In Japan, the Electronic Navigation Research Institute, the Ministry of Transport, and the Japan civil Aviation Promotion Foundation are carrying out research on this navigation system. Toshiba has been providing experimental equipment for this research. (author)

  14. Integer least-squares theory for the GNSS compass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, P.J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Global navigation satellite system (GNSS) carrier phase integer ambiguity resolution is the key to highprecision positioning and attitude determination. In this contribution, we develop new integer least-squares (ILS) theory for the GNSS compass model, together with efficient integer search strategi

  15. Integer least-squares theory for the GNSS compass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, P.J.G.

    2010-01-01

    Global navigation satellite system (GNSS) carrier phase integer ambiguity resolution is the key to highprecision positioning and attitude determination. In this contribution, we develop new integer least-squares (ILS) theory for the GNSS compass model, together with efficient integer search

  16. GNSS Positioning - Status and Features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmens, M.

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, GNSS receivers have scores – and often more than one hundred – of channels, enabling them to track GPS, Glonass, Galileo and Compass signals simultaneously. The whole workfl ow from satellite tracking to calculating the coordinates of the position in a preferred reference system can be con

  17. Advantages of Hybrid Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asim Bilajbegović

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In a decision-making situation, what kind of GPS equipment to purchase, one always has a dilemma, tobuy hybrid (GPS+GLONASS or only GPS receivers? In the case of completeness of the GLONASS satellite system, this dilemma probably would not have existed. The answer to this dilemma is given in the present paper, but for the constellation of the GLONASS satellites in summer 2006 (14 satellites operational. Due to the short operational period of these satellites (for example GLONASS-M, 5 years, and not launching new ones, at this moment (February 25, 2007, only 10 satellites are operational. For the sake of research and giving answers to these questions, about 252 RTK measurements have been done using (GPS and GNSS receivers, on points with different obstructions of horizon. Besides that, initialisation time has been investigated for both systems from about 480 measurements, using rover's antenna with metal cover, during a time interval of 0.5, 2 and 5 seconds. Moreover, accuracy, firmware declared accuracy and redundancy of GPS and GNSS RTK measurements have been investigating.  

  18. The changing world of global navigation satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dow, John M.; Neilan, Ruth E.; Higgins, Matt; Arias, Felicitas

    The world of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) has been changing very rapidly during the last years. New constellations are being developed in Europe (Galileo), India (IRNSS), Japan (QZNSS) and China (Compass), while both the US GPS and the Russian GLONASS programmes are engaged in very significant mediumto long-term improvements, which will make them even more valuable in the coming years to an ever wider range of civilian users. In addition, powerful regional augmentation systems are becoming (or have already become) operational, providing users with important real time information concerning the integrity of the signals being broadcast by those two systems: these include the US WAAS, the European EGNOS, the Japanese MSAS, the Indian GAGAN and others. Following a number of United Nations sponsored regional workshops, a report by an ad hoc UN "GNSS Action Team" and several preparatory meetings, the International Committee on GNSS (ICG) was established in December 2005 in Vienna, Austria. The ICG is an informal body with the main objective of promoting cooperation on matters of mutual interest related to civil satellite-based positioning, navigation, timing, and value-added services, as well as compatibility and interoperability among the GNSS systems. A further important objective is to encourage the use of GNSS to support sustainable development, particularly in the developing countries. The United Nations Office for Outer Space Affairs (UNOOSA) plays a key role in facilitating the work of the ICG. The members of the Committee are GNSS system providers, while international organisations representing users of GNSS can qualify for participation in the work of the Committee as associate members or observers. The interests of the space geodetic, mapping and timing communities are represented in particular through ICG associate membership of the IGS, IAG, FIG, IERS, while BIPM is an ICG observer. This paper will highlight the background of these developments

  19. Multi-system, multi-signal GNSS-reflectometry for sea level observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Johan; Haas, Rüdiger

    2014-05-01

    Information on sea level and its changes are important in connection to global change processes. For centuries sea level has been observed with coastal tide gauges and since some decades with satellite altimetry. Furthermore, during recent years also the application of GNSS-reflectometry for sea level observations has been developed. Various methods exist, using ground-based, airborne and space-borne systems, and using different analysis methods. We present results from a dedicated GNSS-based tide gauge installed at the Onsala Space Observatory at the Swedish west coast. This installation consists of two sets of commercially-off-the-shelf GNSS equipment, including geodetic-type choke-ring antennae and geodetic-type receivers. The two antennae are mounted on a beam extending in southward direction over the coastline. The antennae are aligned along the local vertical with one antenna facing toward zenith direction and the other facing toward nadir. The zenith-looking antenna is Right-Hand-Circular-Polarised (RHCP) while the nadir-looking antenna is Left-Hand-Circular-Polarised (LHCP). The zenith-looking antenna receives predominantly the direct RHCP satellite signals, while the nadir-looking antenna receives predominantly signals that are reflected off the sea surface and thus have changed polarisation to LHCP in the reflection process. The GNSS-receivers are connected to one antenna each and individually record multi-frequency signals of several GNSS. The recorded data can be analysed in different ways to derive information on the sea level and its variation. For example, data from both receivers can be analysed together applying geodetic-type phase-delay analysis with a single-difference and/or double-difference strategy. These analysis methods determine the baseline between the two antennae, which is proportional to the height of the installation above the sea surface. Another analysis method exploits the multipath oscillations in the recorded Signal

  20. A New Time Measurement Method Using a High-End Global Navigation Satellite System to Analyze Alpine Skiing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supej, Matej; Holmberg, Hans-Christer

    2011-01-01

    Accurate time measurement is essential to temporal analysis in sport. This study aimed to (a) develop a new method for time computation from surveyed trajectories using a high-end global navigation satellite system (GNSS), (b) validate its precision by comparing GNSS with photocells, and (c) examine whether gate-to-gate times can provide more…

  1. BeiDou Satellites Assistant Determination by Receiving Other GNSS Downlink Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GNSS’s orbit determinations always rely on ground station or intersatellite links (ISL. In the emergency of satellite-to-ground links and ISL break-off, BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS satellites cannot determine their orbits. In this paper, we propose to add a spaceborne annular beam antenna for receiving the global positioning system (GPS and global navigation satellite system (GLONASS signals; therefore, the BDS satellites may be capable of determining their orbits by GPS/GLONASS signals. Firstly, the spectrum selection, the power isolation, the range of Doppler frequency shift, and changing rate are taken into account for the feasibility. Specifically, the L2 band signals are chosen for receiving and processing in order to prevent the overlapping of the receiving and transmitting signals. Secondly, the minimum number of visible satellites (MNVS, carrier-to-noise ratio (C/N0, dilution of precision (GDOP, and geometric distance root-mean-square (gdrms are evaluated for acquiring the effective receiving antennas’ coverage ranges. Finally, the scheme of deploying 3 receiving antennas is proved to be optimal by analysis and simulations over the middle earth orbit (MEO, geostationary earth orbit (GEO, and the inclined geosynchronous satellite orbit (IGSO. The antennas’ structures and patterns are designed to draw a conclusion that installing GPS and GLONASS receivers on BDS satellites for emergent orbits determination is cost-effective.

  2. Performance of the High Sensitivity Open Source Multi-GNSS Assisted GNSS Reference Server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarwar, Ali; Rizos, Chris; Glennon, Eamonn

    2015-06-01

    The Open Source GNSS Reference Server (OSGRS) exploits the GNSS Reference Interface Protocol (GRIP) to provide assistance data to GPS receivers. Assistance can be in terms of signal acquisition and in the processing of the measurement data. The data transfer protocol is based on Extensible Mark-up Language (XML) schema. The first version of the OSGRS required a direct hardware connection to a GPS device to acquire the data necessary to generate the appropriate assistance. Scenarios of interest for the OSGRS users are weak signal strength indoors, obstructed outdoors or heavy multipath environments. This paper describes an improved version of OSGRS that provides alternative assistance support from a number of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The underlying protocol to transfer GNSS assistance data from global casters is the Networked Transport of RTCM (Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services) over Internet Protocol (NTRIP), and/or the RINEX (Receiver Independent Exchange) format. This expands the assistance and support model of the OSGRS to globally available GNSS data servers connected via internet casters. A variety of formats and versions of RINEX and RTCM streams become available, which strengthens the assistance provisioning capability of the OSGRS platform. The prime motivation for this work was to enhance the system architecture of the OSGRS to take advantage of globally available GNSS data sources. Open source software architectures and assistance models provide acquisition and data processing assistance for GNSS receivers operating in weak signal environments. This paper describes test scenarios to benchmark the OSGRSv2 performance against other Assisted-GNSS solutions. Benchmarking devices include the SPOT satellite messenger, MS-Based & MS-Assisted GNSS, HSGNSS (SiRFstar-III) and Wireless Sensor Networks Assisted-GNSS. Benchmarked parameters include the number of tracked satellites, the Time to Fix First (TTFF), navigation availability

  3. Deep Coupled Integration of CSAC and GNSS for Robust PNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; You, Zheng; Li, Bin; Zhou, Bin; Han, Runqi

    2015-09-11

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are the most widely used positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) technology. However, a GNSS cannot provide effective PNT services in physical blocks, such as in a natural canyon, canyon city, underground, underwater, and indoors. With the development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology, the chip scale atomic clock (CSAC) gradually matures, and performance is constantly improved. A deep coupled integration of CSAC and GNSS is explored in this thesis to enhance PNT robustness. "Clock coasting" of CSAC provides time synchronized with GNSS and optimizes navigation equations. However, errors of clock coasting increase over time and can be corrected by GNSS time, which is stable but noisy. In this paper, weighted linear optimal estimation algorithm is used for CSAC-aided GNSS, while Kalman filter is used for GNSS-corrected CSAC. Simulations of the model are conducted, and field tests are carried out. Dilution of precision can be improved by integration. Integration is more accurate than traditional GNSS. When only three satellites are visible, the integration still works, whereas the traditional method fails. The deep coupled integration of CSAC and GNSS can improve the accuracy, reliability, and availability of PNT.

  4. Deep Coupled Integration of CSAC and GNSS for Robust PNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS are the most widely used positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT technology. However, a GNSS cannot provide effective PNT services in physical blocks, such as in a natural canyon, canyon city, underground, underwater, and indoors. With the development of micro-electromechanical system (MEMS technology, the chip scale atomic clock (CSAC gradually matures, and performance is constantly improved. A deep coupled integration of CSAC and GNSS is explored in this thesis to enhance PNT robustness. “Clock coasting” of CSAC provides time synchronized with GNSS and optimizes navigation equations. However, errors of clock coasting increase over time and can be corrected by GNSS time, which is stable but noisy. In this paper, weighted linear optimal estimation algorithm is used for CSAC-aided GNSS, while Kalman filter is used for GNSS-corrected CSAC. Simulations of the model are conducted, and field tests are carried out. Dilution of precision can be improved by integration. Integration is more accurate than traditional GNSS. When only three satellites are visible, the integration still works, whereas the traditional method fails. The deep coupled integration of CSAC and GNSS can improve the accuracy, reliability, and availability of PNT.

  5. Preliminary Analysis of a Novel SAR Based Emergency System for Earth Orbit Satellites using Galileo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, E.K.A.; Helderweirt, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a preliminary analysis of a novel Search and Rescue (SAR) based emergency system for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellites using the Galileo Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It starts with a description of the space user SAR system including a concept description, mission ar

  6. Global GNSS processing based on the raw observation approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasser, Sebastian; Zehentner, Norbert; Mayer-Gürr, Torsten

    2017-04-01

    Many global navigation satellite system (GNSS) applications, e.g. Precise Point Positioning (PPP), require high-quality GNSS products, such as precise GNSS satellite orbits and clocks. These products are routinely determined by analysis centers of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The current processing methods of the analysis centers make use of the ionosphere-free linear combination to reduce the ionospheric influence. Some of the analysis centers also form observation differences, in general double-differences, to eliminate several additional error sources. The raw observation approach is a new GNSS processing approach that was developed at Graz University of Technology for kinematic orbit determination of low Earth orbit (LEO) satellites and subsequently adapted to global GNSS processing in general. This new approach offers some benefits compared to well-established approaches, such as a straightforward incorporation of new observables due to the avoidance of observation differences and linear combinations. This becomes especially important in view of the changing GNSS landscape with two new systems, the European system Galileo and the Chinese system BeiDou, currently in deployment. GNSS products generated at Graz University of Technology using the raw observation approach currently comprise precise GNSS satellite orbits and clocks, station positions and clocks, code and phase biases, and Earth rotation parameters. To evaluate the new approach, products generated using the Global Positioning System (GPS) constellation and observations from the global IGS station network are compared to those of the IGS analysis centers. The comparisons show that the products generated at Graz University of Technology are on a similar level of quality to the products determined by the IGS analysis centers. This confirms that the raw observation approach is applicable to global GNSS processing. Some areas requiring further work have been identified, enabling future

  7. PRIMA Platform capability for satellite missions in LEO and MEO (SAR, Optical, GNSS, TLC, etc.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, T.; L'Abbate, M.

    2016-12-01

    PRIMA (Piattaforma Riconfigurabile Italiana Multi Applicativa) is a multi-mission 3-axis stabilized Platform developed by Thales Alenia Space Italia under ASI contract.PRIMA is designed to operate for a wide variety of applications from LEO, MEO up to GEO and for different classes of satellites Platform Family. It has an extensive heritage in flight heritage (LEO and MEO Satellites already fully operational) in which it has successfully demonstrated the flexibility of use, low management costs and the ability to adapt to changing operational conditions.The flexibility and modularity of PRIMA provides unique capability to satisfy different Payload design and mission requirements, thanks to the utilization of recurrent adaptable modules (Service Module-SVM, Propulsion Module-PPM, Payload Module-PLM) to obtain mission dependent configuration. PRIMA product line development is continuously progressing, and is based on state of art technology, modular architecture and an Integrated Avionics. The aim is to maintain and extent multi-mission capabilities to operate in different environments (LEO to GEO) with different payloads (SAR, Optical, GNSS, TLC, etc.). The design is compatible with a wide range of European and US equipment suppliers, thus maximising cooperation opportunity. Evolution activities are mainly focused on the following areas: Structure: to enable Spacecraft configurations for multiple launch; Thermal Control: to guarantee thermal limits for new missions, more demanding in terms of environment and payload; Electrical: to cope with higher power demand (e.g. electrical propulsion, wide range of payloads, etc.) considering orbital environment (e.g. lighting condition); Avionics : AOCS solutions optimized on mission (LEO observation driven by agility and pointing, agility not a driver for GEO). Use of sensors and actuators tailored for specific mission and related environments. Optimised Propulsion control. Data Handling, SW and FDIR mission customization

  8. Quality Checking for Multi-GNSS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehne, Wolfgang; Mervart, Leos; Ruelke, Axel; Stuerze, Andrea; Weber, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Quality checking of GNSS observations has a long tradition within the international GNSS community. For example, the RINEX files provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS) and IAG sub-commissions dealing with GNSS have been routinely checked with the tool teqc (Translation, Editing and Quality Checking (Estey & Meertens, 1999)). Data Centres like the regional GNSS data centre at the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG) are relying on such tools. With upcoming new GNSS like BeiDou or Galileo and new regional systems like QZSS or IRNSS and growing number of Satellite-Based Augmentation Systems (SBAS), new signals and frequencies, and new formats like RTCM-MSM and RINEX 3 the need for flexible quality checking tools is arising. The IGS is keeping the pace with his initiative on multi-GNSS (MGEX) which is focusing on the use of the GNSS beyond the established GPS and GLONASS and with the establishment of a new working group on data quality control. Together with the Technical University of Prague (CTU) BKG has been developing the tool BKG Ntrip Client (BNC). Initially started as a tool for providing real-time navigational and observational data and derived products to the user BNC has been subsequently extended, e.g. by precise point positioning (PPP) and by post-processing capabilities. In the near past special features for editing and quality control have been established, e.g. for multipath analyses (MP) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In this presentation, we will demonstrate the various features of BNC for quality control. Examples especially for multi-GNSS data will be shown. Potential usage for the open GNSS community will be outlined. Some proposals for a unified ASCII output to facilitate usage of different software tools on quality checking will finalize the presentation.

  9. SNR and Standard Deviation of cGNSS-R and iGNSS-R Scatterometric Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Arroyo, Alberto; Querol, Jorge; Lopez-Martinez, Carlos; Zavorotny, Valery U; Park, Hyuk; Pascual, Daniel; Onrubia, Raul; Camps, Adriano

    2017-01-19

    This work addresses the accuracy of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS)-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) scatterometric measurements considering the presence of both coherent and incoherent scattered components, for both conventional GNSS-R (cGNSS-R) and interferometric GNSS-R (iGNSS-R) techniques. The coherent component is present for some type of surfaces, and it has been neglected until now because it vanishes for the sea surface scattering case. Taking into account the presence of both scattering components, the estimated Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) for both techniques is computed based on the detectability criterion, as it is done in conventional GNSS applications. The non-coherent averaging operation is considered from a general point of view, taking into account that thermal noise contributions can be reduced by an extra factor of 0.88 dB when using partially overlapped or partially correlated samples. After the SNRs are derived, the received waveform's peak variability is computed, which determines the system's capability to measure geophysical parameters. This theoretical derivations are applied to the United Kingdom (UK) TechDemoSat-1 (UK TDS-1) and to the future GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry on board the International Space Station (ISS) (GEROS-ISS) scenarios, in order to estimate the expected scatterometric performance of both missions.

  10. A collinearity diagnosis of the GNSS geocenter determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebischung, Paul; Altamimi, Zuheir; Springer, Tim

    2014-01-01

    The problem of observing geocenter motion from global navigation satellite system (GNSS) solutions through the network shift approach is addressed from the perspective of collinearity (or multicollinearity) among the parameters of a least-squares regression. A collinearity diagnosis, based on the notion of variance inflation factor, is therefore developed and allows handling several peculiarities of the GNSS geocenter determination problem. Its application reveals that the determination of all three components of geocenter motion with GNSS suffers from serious collinearity issues, with a comparable level as in the problem of determining the terrestrial scale simultaneously with the GNSS satellite phase center offsets. The inability of current GNSS, as opposed to satellite laser ranging, to properly sense geocenter motion is mostly explained by the estimation, in the GNSS case, of epoch-wise station and satellite clock offsets simultaneously with tropospheric parameters. The empirical satellite accelerations, as estimated by most Analysis Centers of the International GNSS Service, slightly amplify the collinearity of the geocenter coordinate, but their role remains secondary.

  11. Introducing Relativity in GNSS

    CERN Document Server

    Pascual-Sánchez, J F

    2005-01-01

    Nowadays, the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), working like global positioning systems, are the GPS and the GLONASS. They are based on a newtonian model and hence they are only operative when several relativistic effects are corrected. The most important relativistic effects (to order 1/c^2) are: the Einstein effect or gravitational violet shift of the frequency of the clock of the satellite (Equivalence principle of General Relativity) and the Doppler red shift of second order,due to the movement of the satellite(Special Relativity). On the other hand, in the next years the Galileo system will be constructed, copying the GPS System if there is not an alternative project. In this work, it will be also exposed that there is one alternative to the mere copy by means of the SYPOR project, using fully relativistic concepts. According to the SYPOR project, the Galileo system would be exact and without need of corrections.

  12. The GNSS Reflectometry Response to the Ocean Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Paul; Jelenak, Zorana; Soisuvarn, Seubson; Said, Faozi

    2016-04-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System - Reflectometry (GNSS-R) exploits signals of opportunity from the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). GNSS transmitters continuously transmit navigation signals at L-band toward the earth's surface. The scattered power reflected off the earth's surface can be sensed by specially designed GNSS-R receivers. The reflected signal can then be used to glean information about the surface of the earth, such as ocean surface roughness, snow depth, sea ice extent, and soil moisture. The use of GNSS-R for ocean wind retrievals was first demonstrated from aircraft. On July 8 2014, the TechDemoSat-1 satellite (TDS-1) was launched by Surrey Satellite Technology, Ltd as a technology risk reduction mission into sun-synchronous orbit. This paper investigates the GNSS-R measurements collected by the Space GNSS Receiver-Remote Sensing Instrument (SGR-ReSI) on board the TDS-1 satellite. The sensitivity of the SGR-ReSI measurements to the ocean surface winds and waves are characterized. The effects of sea surface temperature, wind direction, and rain are also investigated. The SGR-ReSI measurements exhibited sensitivity through the entire range of wind speeds sampled in this dataset, up to 35 m/s. A significant dependence on the larger waves was observed for winds 5 m/s. There appeared to be very little wind direction signal, and investigation of the rain impacts found no apparent sensitivity in the data. These results are shown through the analysis of global statistics and examination of a few case studies. This released SGR-ReSI dataset provided the first opportunity to comprehensively investigate the sensitivity of satellite-based GNSS-R measurements to various ocean surface parameters. The upcoming NASA's Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) satellite constellation will utilize a similar receiver to SGI-ReSI and thus this data provides valuable pre-launch knowledge for the CYGNSS mission.

  13. SNR and Standard Deviation of cGNSS-R and iGNSS-R Scatterometric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Alonso-Arroyo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the accuracy of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R scatterometric measurements considering the presence of both coherent and incoherent scattered components, for both conventional GNSS-R (cGNSS-R and interferometric GNSS-R (iGNSS-R techniques. The coherent component is present for some type of surfaces, and it has been neglected until now because it vanishes for the sea surface scattering case. Taking into account the presence of both scattering components, the estimated Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR for both techniques is computed based on the detectability criterion, as it is done in conventional GNSS applications. The non-coherent averaging operation is considered from a general point of view, taking into account that thermal noise contributions can be reduced by an extra factor of 0.88 dB when using partially overlapped or partially correlated samples. After the SNRs are derived, the received waveform’s peak variability is computed, which determines the system’s capability to measure geophysical parameters. This theoretical derivations are applied to the United Kingdom (UK TechDemoSat-1 (UK TDS-1 and to the future GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry on board the International Space Station (ISS (GEROS-ISS scenarios, in order to estimate the expected scatterometric performance of both missions.

  14. A High-Level Functional Architecture for GNSS-Based Road Charging Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabic, Martina

    2011-01-01

    Within recent years, GNSS-based road charging systems have been highly profiled on the policy makers’ agenda. These types of systems are however technically challenging and are considered one of the most complex types of charging systems. To understand the structure and behavior of such road...... charging systems, it is important to highlight the overall system architecture which is the framework that defines the basic functions and important concepts of the system. This paper presents a functional architecture for GNSS-based road charging systems based on the concepts of system engineering. First......, a short introduction is provided followed by a presentation of the system engineering methodology to illustrate how and why system architectures can be beneficial for GNSS-based road charging systems. Hereafter, a basic set of system functions is determined based on functional system requirements, which...

  15. Development of a GNSS Volcano Ash Plume Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Palo, S. E.; Larson, K. M.; Naik, S. R.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), broadcast signals continuously from mid Earth orbit at a frequency near 1.5GHz. Of the four GNSS constellations, GPS and GLONASS are complete with more than 55 satellites in total. While GNSS signals are intended for navigation and timing, they have also proved to be useful for remote sensing applications. Reflections of the GNSS signals have been used to sense soil moisture, snow depth, and wind speed while refraction of the signals through the atmosphere has provided data on the electron density in the ionosphere as well as water vapor and temperature in the troposphere. Now analysis at the University of Colorado has shown that the attenuation of GNSS signals by volcanic ash plumes can be used to measure the presence and structure of the ash plume. This discovery is driving development of a distributed GNSS sensor network to complement existing optical and radar based ash plume monitoring systems. A GNSS based sensing system operating in L-band is unaffected by weather conditions or time of day. Additionally, the use of an existing signal source greatly reduces the per sensor cost and complexity compared to a radar system. However since any one measurement using this method provides only the total attenuation between the GNSS satellite and the receiver, full tomographic imaging of a plume requires a large number of sensors observing over a diversity of geometries. This presentation will provide an overview of the ongoing development of the GNSS sensor system. Evaluation of low priced commercial GNSS receivers will be discussed, as well as details on the inter sensor network. Based on analysis of existing GPS receivers near volcanic vents, the baseline configuration for an ash plume monitoring network is a 1km spaced ring of receivers 5km from the vent updating every 5 seconds. Preliminary data from field tests will be presented to show the suitability of the sensor system for this configuration near an active volcano.

  16. GNSS-based positioning: Attacks and Countermeasures

    CERN Document Server

    Papadimitratos, P

    2010-01-01

    Increasing numbers of mobile computing devices, user-portable, or embedded in vehicles, cargo containers, or the physical space, need to be aware of their location in order to provide a wide range of commercial services. Most often, mobile devices obtain their own location with the help of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), integrating, for example, a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. Nonetheless, an adversary can compromise location-aware applications by attacking the GNSS-based positioning: It can forge navigation messages and mislead the receiver into calculating a fake location. In this paper, we analyze this vulnerability and propose and evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures. First, we consider replay attacks, which can be effective even in the presence of future cryptographic GNSS protection mechanisms. Then, we propose and analyze methods that allow GNSS receivers to detect the reception of signals generated by an adversary, and then reject fake locations calculated because of ...

  17. GNSS-R遥感国内外研究进展%GNSS Reflectometry:A Review of Theories and Empirical Applications in Ocean and Land Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万玮; 陈秀万; 李国平; 曾开祥

    2012-01-01

    全球导航卫星系统(Global Navigation Satellite System,GNSS)除传统的导航和定位功能外,其反射信号(Global Navigation Satellite Signal Reflectometry,GNSS-R)也可以被接收和利用,成为一种新型的遥感手段.本文对GNSS-R技术在海洋遥感和陆面遥感方面的研究进展进行评述,并从GNSS-R接收机、反演模型和星载GNSS-R试验3个方面阐述其关键技术,在此基础上提出GNSS-R研究中存在的问题及发展方向.%The versatile refracted, reflected and scattered signals of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) have been successfully demonstrated to sound the atmosphere,ionosphere.ocean,land surfaces and the cryosphere as a new remote sensing tool. The technique of GNSS Reflectotnetry(GNSS-R) involves making measurements the reflections of GNSS signal from the Earth. This paper presents an overview of the theories of GNSS Reflectometry and its empirical applications in ocean(ocean al-timetry,wind field,roughness,significant wave height,salinity,sea ice thickness,etc. ) and land surface(soil moisture,forest bi-omass.snow status,etc ). Furthermore,the key technologies of GNSS-R are reviewed including the design of special GNSS-R receivers and the construction of monitoring models. Finally,the existing problems and prospects for the near future in terms of experiment and application are analyzed.

  18. Numerical modeling of a Global Navigation Satellite System in a general relativistic framework

    CERN Document Server

    Delva, P; Cadez, A

    2010-01-01

    In this article we model a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in a Schwarzschild space-time, as a first approximation of the relativistic geometry around the Earth. The closed time-like and scattering light-like geodesics are obtained analytically, describing respectively trajectories of satellites and electromagnetic signals. We implement an algorithm to calculate Schwarzschild coordinates of a GNSS user who receives proper times sent by four satellites, knowing their orbital parameters; the inverse procedure is implemented to check for consistency. The constellation of satellites therefore realizes a geocentric inertial reference system with no \\emph{a priori} realization of a terrestrial reference frame. We show that the calculation is very fast and could be implemented in a real GNSS, as an alternative to usual post-Newtonian corrections. Effects of non-gravitational perturbations on positioning errors are assessed, and methods to reduce them are sketched. In particular, inter-links between satelli...

  19. CODE's five-system orbit and clock solution—the challenges of multi-GNSS data analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prange, Lars; Orliac, Etienne; Dach, Rolf; Arnold, Daniel; Beutler, Gerhard; Schaer, Stefan; Jäggi, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    This article describes the processing strategy and the validation results of CODE's MGEX (COM) orbit and satellite clock solution, including the satellite systems GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, and QZSS. The validation with orbit misclosures and SLR residuals shows that the orbits of the new systems Galileo, BeiDou, and QZSS are affected by modelling deficiencies with impact on the orbit scale (e.g., antenna calibration, Earth albedo, and transmitter antenna thrust). Another weakness is the attitude and solar radiation pressure (SRP) modelling of satellites moving in the orbit normal mode—which is not yet correctly considered in the COM solution. Due to these issues, we consider the current state COM solution as preliminary. We, however, use the long-time series of COM products for identifying the challenges and for the assessment of model-improvements. The latter is demonstrated on the example of the solar radiation pressure (SRP) model, which has been replaced by a more generalized model. The SLR validation shows that the new SRP model significantly improves the orbit determination of Galileo and QZSS satellites at times when the satellite's attitude is maintained by yaw-steering. The impact of this orbit improvement is also visible in the estimated satellite clocks—demonstrating the potential use of the new generation satellite clocks for orbit validation. Finally, we point out further challenges and open issues affecting multi-GNSS data processing that deserves dedicated studies.

  20. Detection of buried objects using reflected GNSS signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarpietro, Riccardo; De Mattia, Salvatore; Campanella, Maurizio; Pei, Yuekun; Savi, Patrizia

    2014-12-01

    The use of reflected Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals for sensing the Earth has been growing rapidly in recent years. This technique is founded on the basic principle of detecting GNSS signals after they have been reflected off the Earth's surface and using them to determine the properties of the reflecting surface remotely. This is the so-called GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) technique. In this paper, a new application regarding the detection of metallic buried objects is analyzed and it is validated through several experimental campaigns. Although the penetration depth of GNSS signals into the ground is not optimal and depends on the soil moisture, GNSS signals can likely interact approximately with the first 10 cm of the ground and therefore can be reflected back by any metallic object buried on the first terrain layer. A very light and low-cost GNSS receiver prototype based on a software-defined radio approach was developed. This receiver can be used as a payload on board small drones or unmanned aerial systems to detect metallic objects (mines or other explosive devices). A signal processing tool based on an open-loop GNSS signal acquisition strategy was developed. The results of two experiments which show the possibility of using GNSS-R signals to detect buried metallic objects and to provide an estimate of their dimensions are discussed.

  1. Comparison of Global Navigation Satellite System Devices on Speed Tracking in Road (TranSPORT Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Supej

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS are, in addition to being most widely used vehicle navigation method, becoming popular in sport-related tests. There is a lack of knowledge regarding tracking speed using GNSS, therefore the aims of this study were to examine under dynamic conditions: (1 how accurate technologically different GNSS measure speed and (2 how large is latency in speed measurements in real time applications. Five GNSSs were tested. They were fixed to a car’s roof-rack: a  smart phone, a wrist watch, a handheld device, a professional system for testing vehicles and a high-end Real Time Kinematics (RTK GNSS. The speed data were recorded and analyzed during rapid acceleration and deceleration as well as at steady speed. The study produced four main findings. Higher frequency and high quality GNSS receivers track speed at least at comparable accuracy to a vehicle speedometer. All GNSS systems measured maximum speed and movement at a constant speed well. Acceleration and deceleration have different level of error at different speeds. Low cost GNSS receivers operating at 1 Hz sampling rate had high latency (up to 2.16 s and are not appropriate for tracking speed in real time, especially during dynamic movements.

  2. GNSS reflectometry and remote sensing: New objectives and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Komjathy, Attila

    2010-07-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has been a very powerful and important contributor to all scientific questions related to precise positioning on Earth's surface, particularly as a mature technique in geodesy and geosciences. With the development of GNSS as a satellite microwave (L-band) technique, more and wider applications and new potentials are explored and utilized. The versatile and available GNSS signals can image the Earth's surface environments as a new, highly precise, continuous, all-weather and near-real-time remote sensing tool. The refracted signals from GNSS radio occultation satellites together with ground GNSS observations can provide the high-resolution tropospheric water vapor, temperature and pressure, tropopause parameters and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) and electron density profile as well. The GNSS reflected signals from the ocean and land surface could determine the ocean height, wind speed and wind direction of ocean surface, soil moisture, ice and snow thickness. In this paper, GNSS remote sensing applications in the atmosphere, oceans, land and hydrology are presented as well as new objectives and results discussed.

  3. Satellite Application for Disaster Management Information Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpanachi, George

    Abstract Satellites are becoming increasingly vital to modern day disaster management activities. Earth observation (EO) satellites provide images at various wavelengths that assist rapid-mapping in all phases of the disaster management cycle: mitigation of potential risks in a given area, preparedness for eventual disasters, immediate response to a disaster event, and the recovery/reconstruction efforts follo wing it. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) such as the Global Positioning System (GPS) assist all the phases by providing precise location and navigation data, helping manage land and infrastructures, and aiding rescue crews coordinate their search efforts. Effective disaster management is a complex problem, because it involves many parameters, which are usually not easy to measure and even identify: Analysis of current situation, planning, optimum resource management, coordination, controlling and monitoring current activities and making quick and correct decisions are only some of these parameters, whose complete list is very long. Disaster management information systems (DMIS) assist disaster management to analyse the situation better, make decisions and suggest further actions following the emergency plans. This requires not only fast and thorough processing and optimization abilities, but also real-time data provided to the DMIS. The need of DMIS for disaster’s real-time data can be satisfied by small satellites data utilization. Small satellites can provide up-to-data, plus a better media to transfer data. This paper suggests a rationale and a framework for utilization of small Satellite data by DMIS. DMIS should be used ‘’before’’, ‘’during’’ and ‘’after’’ the disasters. Data provided by the Small Satellites are almost crucial in any period of the disasters, because early warning can save lives, and satellite data may help to identify disasters before they occur. The paper also presents’ ‘when’’,

  4. Combining the Observations from Different GNSS (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dach, R.; Lutz, S.; Schaer, S.; Bock, H.; Jäggi, A.; Meindl, M.; Ostini, L.; Thaller, D.; Steinbach, A.; Beutler, G.; Steigenberger, P.

    2009-12-01

    For a very long time GPS has clearly dominated the use of GNSS measurements for scientific purposes. This picture is changing: we are moving from a GPS-only to a multi-GNSS world. This is, e.g., reflected by changing the meaning of the abbreviation IGS in March 2005 from International GPS to GNSS Service. The current situation can be described as follows: GPS has the leading role in the GNSS because it has provided a very stable satellite constellation over many years. Some of the currently active GPS satellites are nearly 15 years old. These old satellites are expected to be decommissioned within the next years. On the other hand, due to the increasing number of active GLONASS satellites and the improved density of multi-GNSS tracking stations in the IGS network, the quality of the GLONASS orbits has drastically improved during the last years. The European Galileo system is under development: currently two test satellites (GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B) are in orbit. The IOV (in-orbit-validation phase) will start soon. Also the first test satellites for the Chinese Compass system are in space. For the maximum benefit the observations of these GNSS will be processed in a combined multi-GNSS analysis in future. CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe) is a joint venture between the Astronomical Institute of the University Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland), the Federal Office of Topography (swisstopo, Wabern, Switzerland), the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG, Frankfurt am Main, Germany), and the Institut für Astronomische und Physikalische Geodäsie of the Technische Universität München (IAPG/TUM, Munich, Germany). It acts as one of the global analysis centers of the IGS and has started in May 2003 with a rigorous combined processing of GPS and GLONASS measurements for the final, rapid, and even ultra-rapid product lines. All contributions from CODE to the IGS are in fact multi-GNSS products -- the only exception is the satellite and receiver clock

  5. GEROS-ISS: Innovative GNSS reflectometry/occultation payload onboard the International Space Station for the Global Geodetic Observing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, J.; Andersen, O. B.; Beyerle, G.; Chapron, B.; Cardellach, E.; D'Addio, S.; Foerste, C.; Gommenginger, C.; Gruber, T.; Helm, A.; Hess, M.; Hoeg, P.; Jaeggi, A.; Jakowski, N.; Kern, M.; Lee, T.; Martin-Neira, M.; Montenbruck, O.; Pierdicca, N.; Rius, A.; Rothacher, M.; Shum, C.; Zuffada, C.

    2013-12-01

    In response to a European Space Agency (ESA) announcement of opportunity, the GEROS-ISS proposal was submitted and accepted by ESA to proceed to Phase A. GEROS-ISS is an innovative ISS experiment primarily focused on exploiting reflected signals of opportunity from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) at L-band to measure key parameters of ocean and land/ice surfaces. Secondary mission goals are global atmosphere and ionosphere observations using the GNSS radio occultation technique complementing other current satellite missions. GEROS-ISS will pioneer the exploitation of signals from Galileo and possibly other GNSS systems, for reflectometry and occultation, thereby improving the accuracy as well as the spatio-temporal resolution of the derived geophysical properties. GEROS-ISS will contribute to the long-term S.I. traceable observation of the variations of major climate components of the Earth System: Oceans/Hydrosphere, Cryosphere/Snow, Atmosphere/Ionosphere and solid Earth/landcover changes with innovative and complementary aspects compared to current Earth Observation satellite missions. Therefore, the data from GEROS-ISS allow for climate change related scientific studies addressing the challenges of ESA's Earth Observation strategy (SP 1304 The Changing Earth: New scientific challenges for ESA's living planet). GEROS-ISS will mainly provide mid- and low-latitude observations on submesoscale or longer oceanic variability with a focus on the coastal region, surface ocean currents, surface winds, wave heights and the vertical atmospheric temperature, water vapour and electron density structure for a period of at least ten years. These observations will lead to a better understanding of the climate system, including Rossby wave large-scale structures, ocean roughness and wind, eddy-current systems, fronts and coastal upwelling. GEROS-ISS takes advantage of the capacious infrastructure onboard the ISS, to potentially derive additional Earth's surface

  6. ADOP in closed form for a hierarchy of multi-frequency single-baseline GNSS models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odijk, D.; Teunissen, P.J.G.

    2008-01-01

    Successful carrier phase ambiguity resolution is the key to high-precision positioning with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The ambiguity dilution of precision (ADOP) is a well-known scalar measure which can be used to infer the strength of the GNSS model for carrier phase ambiguity reso

  7. Integrated GNSS attitude determination and positioning for direct geo-referencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadarajah, N.; Paffenholz, J.A.; Teunissen, P.J.G.

    2014-01-01

    Direct geo-referencing is an efficient methodology for the fast acquisition of 3D spatial data. It requires the fusion of spatial data acquisition sensors with navigation sensors, such as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In this contribution, we consider an integrated GNSS naviga

  8. Modes dégradés résultant de l'utilisation multi constellation du GNSS

    OpenAIRE

    Ouzeau, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has defined the concept of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), which corresponds to the set of systems allowing to perform satellite-based navigation while fulfilling ICAO requirements. The US Global Positioning Sysem (GPS) is a satellite-based navigation system which constitutes one of the components of the GNSS. Currently, this system broadcasts a civil signal, called L1 C/A, within an Aeronautical Radio Navigation Services (ARNS) ...

  9. 陆地车辆GNSS/MEMS惯性组合导航机体系约束算法研究%Body Frame Constraint for a GNSS/MEMS INS Integrated System in Land Vehicle Navigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华; 刘彤; 张继伟

    2013-01-01

    For global navigation satellite system(GNSS) and micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) inertial navigation system (INS) integrated system in land vehicle application,a particular constraint based on features of a vehicle's motion is setup on its body frame to improve the system performance.Body frame constraint limits the velocities along the plane perpendicular to the vehicle's moving direction to approximate zero,which accordingly introduces couple of additionally virtual measurements into the extended Kalman filter (EKF) that is typically applied for two systems fusion.Thanks to those virtual measurements,the EKF is able to keep its measurement updates even over GNSS signal outage period.The filter continuously produces error estimations and feedbacks during the absence of external observables from GNSS,whatever the vehicle's dynamics is.The field test indicates that the system accuracy of positioning can be improved by 75 % over 30 s GNSS outages and the accuracy of attitude and velocity is improved as well.%针对陆地车辆导航应用,基于速度特性建立了机体系约束用以提高卫星导航系统(GNSS)/微硅机械(MEMS)惯性组合导航系统的性能.该约束将与车体运动方向相垂直的平面上的线速度近似为0,从而增加了组合系统的扩展卡尔曼滤波时间上连续的两维虚拟观测量,卫星信号失效时可保持滤波器的量测更新,当无外部观测量且车辆处于动态情况下,滤波可持续估计与反馈.车载实验表明,组合系统在卫星信号失效30 s时,采用该算法可以将系统的定位精度提高约75%,姿态精度及速度精度也有相应的提高.

  10. LATENCY DETERMINATION AND COMPENSATION IN REAL-TIME GNSS/INS INTEGRATED NAVIGATION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. D. Solomon

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV technology is now commonplace in many defence and civilian environments. However, the high cost of owning and operating a sophisticated UAV has slowed their adoption in many commercial markets. Universities and research groups are actively experimenting with UAVs to further develop the technology, particularly for automated flying operations. The two main UAV platforms used are fixed-wing and helicopter. Helicopter-based UAVs offer many attractive features over fixed-wing UAVs, including vertical take-off, the ability to loiter, and highly dynamic flight. However the control and navigation of helicopters are significantly more demanding than those of fixed-wing UAVs and as such require a high bandwidth real-time Position, Velocity, Attitude (PVA navigation system. In practical Real-Time Navigation Systems (RTNS there are delays in the processing of the GNSS data prior to the fusion of the GNSS data with the INS measurements. This latency must be compensated for otherwise it degrades the solution of the navigation filter. This paper investigates the effect of latency in the arrival time of the GNSS data in a RTNS. Several test drives and flights were conducted with a low-cost RTNS, and compared with a high quality GNSS/INS solution. A technique for the real-time, automated and accurate estimation of the GNSS latency in low-cost systems was developed and tested. The latency estimates were then verified through cross-correlation with the time-stamped measurements from the reference system. A delayed measurement Extended Kalman Filter was then used to allow for the real-time fusing of the delayed measurements, and then a final system developed for on-the-fly measurement and compensation of GNSS latency in a RTNS.

  11. Latency Determination and Compensation in Real-Time Gnss/ins Integrated Navigation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, P. D.; Wang, J.; Rizos, C.

    2011-09-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology is now commonplace in many defence and civilian environments. However, the high cost of owning and operating a sophisticated UAV has slowed their adoption in many commercial markets. Universities and research groups are actively experimenting with UAVs to further develop the technology, particularly for automated flying operations. The two main UAV platforms used are fixed-wing and helicopter. Helicopter-based UAVs offer many attractive features over fixed-wing UAVs, including vertical take-off, the ability to loiter, and highly dynamic flight. However the control and navigation of helicopters are significantly more demanding than those of fixed-wing UAVs and as such require a high bandwidth real-time Position, Velocity, Attitude (PVA) navigation system. In practical Real-Time Navigation Systems (RTNS) there are delays in the processing of the GNSS data prior to the fusion of the GNSS data with the INS measurements. This latency must be compensated for otherwise it degrades the solution of the navigation filter. This paper investigates the effect of latency in the arrival time of the GNSS data in a RTNS. Several test drives and flights were conducted with a low-cost RTNS, and compared with a high quality GNSS/INS solution. A technique for the real-time, automated and accurate estimation of the GNSS latency in low-cost systems was developed and tested. The latency estimates were then verified through cross-correlation with the time-stamped measurements from the reference system. A delayed measurement Extended Kalman Filter was then used to allow for the real-time fusing of the delayed measurements, and then a final system developed for on-the-fly measurement and compensation of GNSS latency in a RTNS.

  12. Angle-of-Arrival Assisted GNSS Collaborative Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Yao, Zheng; Cui, Xiaowei; Lu, Mingquan

    2016-06-20

    For outdoor and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) challenged scenarios, collaborative positioning algorithms are proposed to fuse information from GNSS satellites and terrestrial wireless systems. This paper derives the Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) and algorithms for the angle-of-arrival (AOA)-assisted GNSS collaborative positioning. Based on the CRLB model and collaborative positioning algorithms, theoretical analysis are performed to specify the effects of various factors on the accuracy of collaborative positioning, including the number of users, their distribution and AOA measurements accuracy. Besides, the influences of the relative location of the collaborative users are also discussed in order to choose appropriate neighboring users, which is in favor of reducing computational complexity. Simulations and actual experiment are carried out with several GNSS receivers in different scenarios, and the results are consistent with theoretical analysis.

  13. GNSS Tsunami Warning System Augmentation for the Indo-Pacific Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrecque, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    The years since the devastating Banda Aceh Earthquake of December, 2004 have repeatedly inflicted the terrible loss of life and economic disruption from large earthquakes and resulting tsunamis upon Indo-Pacific coastal populations. The hardest hit populations are those closest to the earthquake source, a scenario for which most Indo-Pacific nations lack an adequate early warning system. Following the Banda Aceh Earthquake, GNSS based techniques were developed to provide accurate, timely, estimates of ground displacements, the modeling and monitoring of tsunami propagation. Major investments are also being made to deploy and upgrade existing GNSS constellations (GPS, GLONASS, Beidou, Galileo, GZSS, and IRNSS) by the end of this decade. There have also been significant investments in multi-GNSS ground networks and analysis centers that often provide measurements in real time. These multi-national investments now present the possibility for significant improvements to the Indo-Pacific region's tsunami warning. The development of GNSS based tsunami warning integrated with existing seismic based tsunami warning systems will provide a robust, accurate, timely, and cost effective network to provide effective warning for the Indo-Pacific coastal communities. The UN General Assembly has called for the sharing of geodetic data for the mitigation of natural hazards while the IUGG and IGS recommend the implementation of a GNSS based augmentation to the Tsunami Early Warning System. The same GNSS ground networks and constellations that support the Tsunami Early Warning network also provide Positioning, Navigation, and Timing and other benefits to these communities thereby insuring a sustainable and reliable capability.

  14. A hybrid data fusion method for GNSS/INS integration navigation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling; Li, Bofeng; Shen, Yunzhong; Li, Haojun

    2017-04-01

    Although DGNSS is widely used and PPP-GNSS is nowadays a viable precise positioning technology option, the major disadvantage of GNSS still remains: signal blockage due to obstructions in urban and built up environments, and extreme power attenuation of the signals when operated indoors. The combination of GNSS with other sensors, such as a self-contained inertial navigation system (INS), provides an ideal position and attitude determination solution which can not only mitigate the weakness of GNSS, but also bound the INS error that otherwise would grow with time when the INS operates alone. However, the navigation accuracy provided by GNSS/INS strongly depends on the quality and geometry of the GNSS observations, the quality of the INS technology used, and the integration model applied. There are two main types of coupled schemes for integration systems: loosely coupled integration and tightly coupled integration. In loosely coupled integration, position measurements are taken from both systems and combined optimally, usually in a Kalman filter. Tightly coupled integration directly combines the raw pseudorange or carrier phase measurements of GNSS with inertial measurements in an extended Kalman filter. The latter technique improves the ability to resolve ambiguities, i.e. allows a quicker recovery from outage events such as a loss of signal under vegetation. In recent years, tightly coupled differential carrier phase GNSS/INS integration has become popular, because it has the advantage of providing accurate position information even when GPS measurements are rank-deficient in stand-alone processing and is theoretically optimal in a filtering sense, especially in urban navigation applications. However, the heavier computational burden and sensor communication usually complicate the tightly coupled integration and reduce the system efficiency, compared with the loosely coupled integration. In this paper, it has been proved that the loosely coupled and tightly

  15. Simulation of GNSS Availability in Urban Environments Using a Panoramic Image Dataset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakpod Tongleamnak

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Performance of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS positioning in urban environments is hindered by poor satellite availability because there are many man-made and natural objects in urban environments that obstruct satellite signals. To evaluate the availability of GNSS in cities, this paper presents a software simulation of GNSS availability in urban areas using a panoramic image dataset from Google Street View. Photogrammetric image processing techniques are applied to reconstruct fisheye sky view images and detect signal obstacles. Two comparisons of the results from the simulation and real world observation in Bangkok and Tokyo are also presented and discussed for accuracy assessment.

  16. Calibrating coastal GNSS-R instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Johan; Haas, Rüdiger; Hobiger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Since 2011, a GNSS-R (Global Navigation Satellite System - Reflectometry) instrument for local sea level observations is operated at the Onsala Space Observatory (Löfgren et al., 2011). The Onsala Space Observatory is the Swedish geodetic fundamental station, located at the Swedish West Coast, and contributes to the Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) by a variety of geodetic and geophysical observations. The Onsala GNSS-R instrumentation consists of two GNSS antennas that are mounted back-to-back on a bar at the coastline extending over the open sea in southward direction. One of the antennas is upward oriented and receives the direct satellite signals, while the other antenna is downward oriented and receives the satellite signals that reflect off the sea surface. The antennas are connected to a commercial GNSS receiver each and data are recorded with sampling rate of up to 20 Hz. Satellite signals of several GNSS are received and are analysed with various different analysis strategies to provide sea level results with different temporal resolution and precision (Larson et al., 2013; Löfgren and Haas, 2014). Since the instrumentation uses GNSS signals, it is possible to derive both local sea level, i.e. relative to the coast, and absolute sea level, i.e. relative to the geocentre as realised by the GNSS. The bar carrying the two antennas can be placed in 10 different vertical positions covering a height difference of 2.5 m between the highest and lowest position. We present results from a calibration campaign of the Onsala GNSS-R instrumentation performed in 2014. During this several weeks long campaign the antennas were placed at different vertical positions for several days at each position. The recorded data are analysed with the different analysis strategies, and the results are compared to the results derived from the co-located tide gauge equipment. References - Löfgren J, Haas R, Scherneck H-G (2011). Three months of local sea-level derived from

  17. The Archimedes satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stuart C.; Shurvinton, William D.

    1992-03-01

    Archimedes is a satellite system conceived by the European Space Agency (ESA) to effectively serve the European market for Mobile Radio Services (MRS). This paper describes the requirements and technical design of the Archimedes satellite system. The underlying assumptions and trade-offs behind the design are detailed and the design is compared and contrasted against alternative design solutions, both technically and economically. A path forward for the development of the system is indicated.

  18. Response of Global Navigation Satellite System receivers to known shaking between 0.2 and 20 Hertz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langbein, John; Evans, John R.; Blume, Fredrick; Johanson, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, several technological advances have allowed Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers to have the capability to record displacements at high frequencies, with sampling rates approaching 100 samples per second (sps). In addition, communication and computer hardware and software have allowed various institutions, including the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), to retrieve, process, and display position changes recorded by a network of GNSS sites with small, less than 1-s delays between the time that the GNSS receiver records signals from a constellation of satellites and the time that the position is estimated (a method known as “real-time”). These improvements in hardware and software have allowed the USGS to process GNSS (or a subset of the GNSS, the Global Positioning System, GPS) data in real-time at 1 sps with the goal of determining displacements from earthquakes and volcanoes in real-time. However, the current set of GNSS equipment can record at rates of 100 sps, which allows the possibility of using this equipment to record earthquake displacements over the full range of frequencies that typically are recorded by acceleration and velocity transducers. The advantage of using GNSS to record earthquakes is that the displacement, rather than acceleration or velocity, is recorded, and for large earthquakes, the GNSS sensor stays on scale and will not distort the observations due to clipping of the signal at its highest amplitude. The direct observation of displacement is advantageous in estimating the size and spatial extent of the earthquake rupture. Otherwise, when using velocity or acceleration sensors, the displacements are determined by numerical integration of the observations, which can introduce significant uncertainty in the estimated displacements. However, GNSS technology can, at best, resolve displacements of a few millimeters, and for most earthquakes, their displacements are less than 1 mm. Consequently, to be useful

  19. Virtual Quake and Tsunami Squares: Scenario Earthquake and Tsunami Simulations for a Pacific Rim GNSS Tsunami Early Warning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, K.; Yoder, M. R.; Sachs, M. K.; Heien, E. M.; Donnellan, A.; Rundle, J. B.; Turcotte, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    Plans for the first operational prototype for a Pacific Rim Tsunami Early Warning (TEW) system utilizing real-time data from the Global Navigational Satellite System (GNSS) are now gaining momentum. The proposed Pacific Rim TEW prototype may resemble the Japanese Meteorological Society's early warning algorithms and use earthquake parameters rapidly determined from GPS data to select the most similar earthquake and tsunami scenario from a database of precomputed scenarios to guide alerts and disaster response. To facilitate the development of this Pacific Rim TEW system, we have integrated tsunami modeling capabilities into the earthquake simulator Virtual Quake (formerly Virtual California). We will present the first results from coupling the earthquake simulator output (seafloor displacements) with the tsunami modeling method called Tsunami Squares. Combining Virtual Quake and Tsunami Squares provides a highly scalable and flexible platform for producing catalogs of tsunami scenarios for a wide range of simulated subduction zone earthquakes.

  20. The low-cost GNSS GEOMON system for monitoring landslide displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demierre, Michel; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Folladore, Laurent; Boetzlé, Pierre; Martin, Jeanneret; Ferhat, Gilbert; Ulrich, Patrice

    2016-04-01

    Analysis of landslide hazard requires continuous and high frequency ground-based surface displacement monitoring at numerous locations. The low-cost GEOMON GNSS system, developped by Infrasurvey in collaboration with the research institutes HEIG-VD / Geomatics and HEIG-VD / MISC-DC, is currently tested experimentally in France by EOST (Ecole et Observatoire des Sciences de la Terre) for the French Landslide Observatory OMIV. The objective of this work is to present the technical solution of the GEOMON GNSS and the results of a field campaign performed during the summer 2015 at the Super-Sauze landslide (France) and at the Hohberg landslide (Switzerland). The GNSS GEOMON system is based on low-cost L1 receiver, the transmission of the phase observations by radio to a base station located outside of the landslide or stored internally on SD cards, and a rapid processing with the open source RTKLib processing software. The performance of the GNSS GEOMON system in real field monitoring conditions will be presented.

  1. Tracking Clouds with low cost GNSS chips aided by the Arduino platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Saji; Realini, Eugenio; Ishida, Shinya

    2016-04-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is a constellation of satellites that is used to provide geo-positioning services. Besides this application, the GNSS system is important for a wide range of scientific and civilian applications. For example, GNSS systems are routinely used in civilian applications such as surveying and scientific applications such as the study of crustal deformation. Another important scientific application of GNSS system is in meteorological research. Here it is mainly used to determine the total water vapour content of the troposphere, hereafter Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV). However, both GNSS receivers and software have prohibitively high price due to a variety of reasons. To overcome this somewhat artificial barrier we are exploring the use of low-cost GNSS receivers along with open source GNSS software for scientific research, in particular for GNSS meteorology research. To achieve this aim, we have developed a custom Arduino compatible data logging board that is able to operate together with a specific low-cost single frequency GNSS receiver chip from NVS Technologies AG. We have also developed an open-source software bundle that includes a new Arduino core for the Atmel324p chip, which is the main processor used in our custom logger. We have also developed software code that enables data collection, logging and parsing of the GNSS data stream. Additionally we have comprehensively evaluated the low power characteristics of the GNSS receiver and logger boards. Currently we are exploring the use of several openly source or free to use for research software to map GNSS delays to PWV. These include the open source goGPS (http://www.gogps-project.org/) and gLAB (http://gage.upc.edu/gLAB) and the openly available GAMIT software from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). We note that all the firmware and software developed as part of this project is available on an open source license.

  2. Soil Moisture Monitorization Using GNSS Reflected Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Egido, Alejandro; Caparrini, Marco; Martin, Cristina; Farres, Esteve; Banque, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    The use of GNSS signals as a source of opportunity for remote sensing applications, GNSS-R, has been a research area of interest for more than a decade. One of the possible applications of this technique is soil moisture monitoring. The retrieval of soil moisture with GNSS-R systems is based on the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to soil moisture. Higher concentrations of water in the soil yield a higher dielectric constant and reflectivity, which incurs in signals that reflect from the Earth surface with higher peak power. Previous investigations have demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to obtain high enough signal to noise ratios in order to sense small changes in surface reflectivity. Furthermore, these systems present some advantages with respect to others currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Upcoming satellite navigation systems, such as the European Galileo, will represent an excellent source of opportunity for soil moisture remote sensing for vario...

  3. High accuracy GNSS based navigation in GEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuano, Vincenzo; Shehaj, Endrit; Blunt, Paul; Botteron, Cyril; Farine, Pierre-André

    2017-07-01

    Although significant improvements in efficiency and performance of communication satellites have been achieved in the past decades, it is expected that the demand for new platforms in Geostationary Orbit (GEO) and for the On-Orbit Servicing (OOS) on the existing ones will continue to rise. Indeed, the GEO orbit is used for many applications including direct broadcast as well as communications. At the same time, Global Navigation Satellites System (GNSS), originally designed for land, maritime and air applications, has been successfully used as navigation system in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and its further utilization for navigation of geosynchronous satellites becomes a viable alternative offering many advantages over present ground based methods. Following our previous studies of GNSS signal characteristics in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), GEO and beyond, in this research we specifically investigate the processing of different GNSS signals, with the goal to determine the best navigation performance they can provide in a GEO mission. Firstly, a detailed selection among different GNSS signals and different combinations of them is discussed, taking into consideration the L1 and L5 frequency bands, and the GPS and Galileo constellations. Then, the implementation of an Orbital Filter is summarized, which adaptively fuses the GN1SS observations with an accurate orbital forces model. Finally, simulation tests of the navigation performance achievable by processing the selected combination of GNSS signals are carried out. The results obtained show an achievable positioning accuracy of less than one meter. In addition, hardware-in-the-loop tests are presented using a COTS receiver connected to our GNSS Spirent simulator, in order to collect real-time hardware-in-the-loop observations and process them by the proposed navigation module.

  4. A pseudolite-based positioning system for legacy GNSS receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chongwon; So, Hyoungmin; Lee, Taikjin; Kee, Changdon

    2014-03-27

    The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors.

  5. Global Navigation Satellite System Multipath Mitigation Using a Wave-Absorbing Shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Haiyan; Yang, Xuhai; Sun, Baoqi; Su, Hang

    2016-08-22

    Code multipath is an unmanaged error source in precise global navigation satellite system (GNSS) observation processing that limits GNSS positioning accuracy. A new technique for mitigating multipath by installing a wave-absorbing shield is presented in this paper. The wave-absorbing shield was designed according to a GNSS requirement of received signals and collected measurements to achieve good performance. The wave-absorbing shield was installed at the KUN1 and SHA1 sites of the international GNSS Monitoring and Assessment System (iGMAS). Code and carrier phase measurements of three constellations were collected on the dates of the respective installations plus and minus one week. Experiments were performed in which the multipath of the measurements obtained at different elevations was mitigated to different extents after applying the wave-absorbing shield. The results of an analysis and comparison show that the multipath was mitigated by approximately 17%-36% on all available frequencies of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), Global Positioning System (GPS), and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) satellites. The three-dimensional accuracies of BDS, GPS, and GLONASS single-point positioning (SPP) were, respectively, improved by 1.07, 0.63 and 0.49 m for the KUN1 site, and by 0.72, 0.79 and 0.73 m for the SHA1 site. Results indicate that the multipath of the original observations was mitigated by using the wave-absorbing shield.

  6. China's Meteorological Satellite Application System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jiashen

    2008-01-01

    @@ China's meteorological satellite program consists of five systems,namely the satellite system,the launch vehicle system,the launch center system,TT&C and the ground application system.The satellite system consists of FengYun (FY) polar orbiting series and FY geostationary series,which are launched by LM launch vehicles from Taiyan Satellite Launch Center (TSLC) and Xichang Satellite Launch Center (XSLC) respectively.

  7. The Potential for Observing African Weather with GNSS Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olalekan A. Isioye

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available When compared to the wide range of atmospheric sensing techniques, global navigation satellite system (GNSS offers the advantage of operating under all weather conditions, is continuous, with high temporal and spatial resolution and high accuracy, and has long-term stability. The utilisation of GNSS ground networks of continuous stations for operational weather and climate services is already in place in many nations in Europe, Asia, and America under different initiatives and organisations. In Africa, the situation appears to be different. The focus of this paper is to assess the conditions of the existing and anticipated GNSS reference network in the African region for meteorological applications. The technical issues related to the implementation of near-real-time (NRT GNSS meteorology are also discussed, including the data and network requirements for meteorological and climate applications. We conclude from this study that the African GNSS network is sparse in the north and central regions of the continent, with a dense network in the south and fairly dense network in the west and east regions of the continent. Most stations lack collocated meteorological sensors and other geodetic observing systems as called for by the GCOS Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN GNSS Precipitable Water Task Team and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO. Preliminary results of calculated zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD from the African GNSS indicate spatial variability and diurnal dependence of ZTD. To improve the density and geometry of the existing network, countries are urged to contribute more stations to the African Geodetic Reference Frame (AFREF program and a collaborative scheme between different organisations maintaining different GNSS stations on the continent is recommended. The benefit of using spaced based GNSS radio occultation (RO data for atmospheric sounding is highlighted and filling of geographical gaps from the station-based observation

  8. GNSS Remote Sensing at GFZ: Overview and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, Jens; Alshawaf, Fadwa; Arras, Christina; Asgarimehr, Milad; Dick, Galina; Heise, Stefan; Larson, Kristine; Li, Xingxing; Lu, Cuixian; Peraza, Luis; Ramatschi, Markus; Schmidt, Torsten; Schuh, Harald; Semmling, Maximilian; Simeonov, Tzvetan; Vey, Sibylle; Zus, Florian

    2017-04-01

    -time and multi-GNSS meteorology. In addition, climatological investigations are described to analyse long-term trends of the atmospheric water vapour over Germany but also as part of the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) of the WMO (World Meteorological Organization). Multipath data from standard GNSS receivers are used to derive information on soil moisture, vegetation and snow properties. This technique exhibits a large potential to get geophysical parameters for Earth surface monitoring from the existing global and regional GNSS networks. GFZ also applies dedicated GNSS receivers aboard flight and ship platforms to derive sea surface heights using the GNSS-R phase altimetry technique. Other research activities contribute to the preparation of satellite missions for geophysical GNSS-R applications on a global scale. The most prominent current example is the ESA mission GEROS-ISS for global sea surface monitoring.

  9. GNSS seismometer: Seismic phase recognition of real-time high-rate GNSS deformation waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhaosheng; Zhang, Rui; Liu, Gang; Jia, Zhige; Wang, Dijin; Zhou, Yu; Lin, Mu

    2016-12-01

    High-rate global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) can potentially be used as seismometers to capture short-period instantaneous dynamic deformation waves from earthquakes. However, the performance and seismic phase recognition of the GNSS seismometer in the real-time mode, which plays an important role in GNSS seismology, are still uncertain. By comparing the results of accuracy and precision of the real-time solution using a shake table test, we found real-time solutions to be consistent with post-processing solutions and independent of sampling rate. In addition, we analyzed the time series of real-time solutions for shake table tests and recent large earthquakes. The results demonstrated that high-rate GNSS have the ability to retrieve most types of seismic waves, including P-, S-, Love, and Rayleigh waves. The main factor limiting its performance in recording seismic phases is the widely used 1-Hz sampling rate. The noise floor also makes recognition of some weak seismic phases difficult. We concluded that the propagation velocities and path of seismic waves, macro characteristics of the high-rate GNSS array, spatial traces of seismic phases, and incorporation of seismographs are all useful in helping to retrieve seismic phases from the high-rate GNSS time series.

  10. Detection of GNSS Signals Propagation in Urban Canyos Using 3D City Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Pisova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents one of the solutions to the problem of multipath propagation and effects on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS signals in urban canyons. GNSS signals may reach a receiver not only through Line-of-Sight (LOS paths, but they are often blocked, reflected or diffracted from tall buildings, leading to unmodelled GNSS errors in position estimation. Therefore in order to detect and mitigate the impact of multipath, a new ray-tracing model for simulation of GNSS signals reception in urban canyons is proposed - based on digital 3D maps information, known positions of GNSS satellites and an assumed position of a receiver. The model is established and validated using experimental, as well as real data. It is specially designed for complex environments and situations where positioning with highest accuracy is required - a typical example is navigation for blind people.

  11. A Pseudolite-Based Positioning System for Legacy GNSS Receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongwon Kim

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The ephemeris data format of legacy GPS receivers is improper for positioning stationary pseudolites on the ground. Therefore, to utilize pseudolites for navigation, GPS receivers must be modified so that they can handle the modified data formats of the pseudolites. Because of this problem, the practical use of pseudolites has so far been limited. This paper proposes a pseudolite-based positioning system that can be used with unmodified legacy GPS receivers. In the proposed system, pseudolites transmit simulated GPS signals. The signals use standard GPS ephemeris data format and contain ephemeris data of simulated GPS satellites, not those of pseudolites. The use of the standard format enables the GPS receiver to process pseudolite signals without any modification. However, the position output of the GPS receiver is not the correct position in this system, because there are additional signal delays from each pseudolite to the receiver. A post-calculation process was added to obtain the correct receiver position using GPS receiver output. This re-estimation is possible because it is based on known information about the simulated signals, pseudolites, and positioning process of the GPS receiver. Simulations using generated data and live GPS data are conducted for various geometries to verify the proposed system. The test results show that the proposed system provides the desired user position using pseudolite signals without requiring any modifications to the legacy GPS receiver. In this initial study, a pseudolite-only indoor system was assumed. However, it can be expanded to a GPS-pseudolite system outdoors.

  12. GNSS信号接收机的构件初识──GNSS导航信号的收发问题之十%The Current Status and Development on Reifning GNSS Ephemeris by Means of Satellite Laser Ranging--Transmitting/receiving Issue(10) of GNSS Navigation Signals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘基余

    2015-01-01

    The GNSS signal receiver is GNSS user equipment for satellite navigation and the terminal equipment for realizing GNSS satellite navigation/positioning. It is the radio receiving equipment that is able to receive, process, track and measure the GNSS navigation signals. It has not only the common performance of the radio receiving equipments, but also the characteristic performance for acquiring, tracking and surveying the weak satellite signals of 3.5E-16W~2.5E-17W. For this reason the structural components of GNSS signal receivers must meet the needs to capture, track, and measure the GNSS signals.%GNSS信号接收机是GNSS导航卫星的用户设备,是实现GNSS卫星导航定位的终端仪器。它是一种能够接收、跟踪、变换和测量GNSS卫星导航定位信号的无线电接收设备,既具有常用无线电接收设备的共性,又具有捕获、跟踪和处理弱达3.5E-16W~2.5E-17W卫星微弱信号的特性。为此,GNSS信号接收机的构件必须满足这种捕获、跟踪和测量GNSS信号的需求。

  13. Global Navigation Satellite Systems Reflectometry as a Remote Sensing Tool for Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Egido

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The use of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS signals for remote sensing applications, generally referred to as GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R, is gaining increasing interest among the scientific community as a remote sensing tool for land applications. This paper describes a long term experimental campaign in which an extensive dataset of GNSS-R polarimetric measurements was acquired over a crop field from a ground-based stationary platform. Ground truth ancillary data were also continuously recorded during the whole experimental campaign. The duration of the campaign allowed to cover a full crop growing season, and as a consequence of seasonal rains on the experimental area, data could be recorded over a wide variety of soil conditions. This enabled a study on the effects of different land bio-geophysical parameters on GNSS scattered signals. It is shown that significant power variations in the measured GNSS reflected signals can be detected for different soil moisture and vegetation development conditions. In this work we also propose a technique based on the combination of the reflected signal’s polarizations in order to improve the integrity of the observables with respect to nuisance parameters such as soil roughness.

  14. MULTI-GNSS RECEIVER FOR AEROSPACE NAVIGATION AND POSITIONING APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Peres

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The upcoming Galileo system opens a wide range of new opportunities in the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS market. However, the characteristics of the future GNSS signals require the development of new GNSS receivers. In the frame of the REAGE project, DEIMOS and ISEL have developed a GNSS receiver targeted for aerospace applications, supporting current and future GPS L1 and Galileo E1 signals, based on commercial (or, in the furthest extent, industrial grade components. Although the REAGE project aimed at space applications, the REAGE receiver is also applicable to many terrestrial applications (ground or airborne, such as Georeferencing and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV navigation. This paper presents the architecture and features of the REAGE receiver, as well as some results of the validation campaign with GPS L1 and Galileo E1 signals.

  15. Calculating foraging area using gloal navigation satellite system (GNSS) technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjusting stocking rate to changing forage conditions is a critical part of pro-active range management. In general stocking rate approaches tend to assume more optimal landscape use patterns than will actually occur. Today we can monitor spatio-temporal landscape use on a 24/7 basis using animals...

  16. The inertial attitude augmentation for ambiguity resolution in SF/SE-GNSS attitude determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiancheng; Hu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jingyu; Li, Tao; Wang, Jinling; Wu, Meiping

    2014-06-26

    The Unaided Single Frequency/Single Epoch Global Navigation Satellite System (SF/SE GNSS) model is the most challenging scenario for ambiguity resolution in the GNSS attitude determination application. To improve the performance of SF/SE-GNSS ambiguity resolution without excessive cost, the Micro-Electro-Mechanical System Inertial Measurement Unit (MEMS-IMU) is a proper choice for the auxiliary sensor that carries out the inertial attitude augmentation. Firstly, based on the SF/SE-GNSS compass model, the Inertial Derived Baseline Vector (IDBV) is defined to connect the MEMS-IMU attitude measurement with the SF/SE-GNSS ambiguity search space, and the mechanism of inertial attitude augmentation is revealed from the perspective of geometry. Then, through the quantitative description of model strength by Ambiguity Dilution of Precision (ADOP), two ADOPs are specified for the unaided SF/SE-GNSS compass model and its inertial attitude augmentation counterparts, respectively, and a sufficient condition is proposed for augmenting the SF/SE-GNSS model strength with inertial attitude measurement. Finally, in the framework of an integer aperture estimator with fixed failure rate, the performance of SF/SE-GNSS ambiguity resolution with inertial attitude augmentation is analyzed when the model strength is varying from strong to weak. The simulation results show that, in the SF/SE-GNSS attitude determination application, MEMS-IMU can satisfy the requirements of ambiguity resolution with inertial attitude augmentation.

  17. Accuracy of Kinematic Positioning Using Global Satellite Navigation Systems under Forest Canopies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Kaartinen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A harvester enables detailed roundwood data to be collected during harvesting operations by means of the measurement apparatus integrated into its felling head. These data can be used to improve the efficiency of wood procurement and also replace some of the field measurements, and thus provide both less costly and more detailed ground truth for remote sensing based forest inventories. However, the positional accuracy of harvester-collected tree data is not sufficient currently to match the accuracy per individual trees achieved with remote sensing data. The aim in the present study was to test the accuracy of various instruments utilizing global satellite navigation systems (GNSS in motion under forest canopies of varying densities to enable us to get an understanding of the current state-of-the-art in GNSS-based positioning under forest canopies. Tests were conducted using several different combinations of GNSS and inertial measurement unit (IMU mounted on an all-terrain vehicle (ATV “simulating” a moving harvester. The positions of 224 trees along the driving route were measured using a total-station and real-time kinematic GPS. These trees were used as reference items. The position of the ATV was obtained using GNSS and IMU with an accuracy of 0.7 m (root mean squared error (RMSE for 2D positions. For the single-frequency GNSS receivers, the RMSE of real-time 2D GNSS positions was 4.2–9.3 m. Based on these results, it seems that the accuracy of novel single-frequency GNSS devices is not so dependent on forest conditions, whereas the performance of the tested geodetic dual-frequency receiver is very sensitive to the visibility of the satellites. When post-processing can be applied, especially when combined with IMU data, the improvement in the accuracy of the dual-frequency receiver was significant.

  18. On the Use of a Signal Quality Index Applying at Tracking Stage Level to Assist the RAIM System of a GNSS Receiver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardo, Mattia; Lo Presti, Letizia

    2016-07-02

    In this work, a novel signal processing method is proposed to assist the Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring (RAIM) module used in a receiver of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) to improve the integrity of the estimated position. The proposed technique represents an evolution of the Multipath Distance Detector (MPDD), thanks to the introduction of a Signal Quality Index (SQI), which is both a metric able to evaluate the goodness of the signal, and a parameter used to improve the performance of the RAIM modules. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Detection of weak frequency jumps for GNSS onboard clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xinming; Gong, Hang; Ou, Gang

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, a weak frequency jump detection method is developed for onboard clocks in global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). A Kalman filter is employed to facilitate the onboard real-time processing of atomic clock measurements, whose N-step prediction residuals are used to construct the weak frequency jump detector. Numerical simulations show that the method can successfully detect weak frequency jumps. The detection method proposed in this paper is helpful for autonomous integrity monitoring of GNSS satellite clocks, and can also be applied to other frequency anomalies with an appropriately modified detector.

  20. Contribución al diseño de GNSS-SDR, un receptor GNSS de código abierto

    OpenAIRE

    Esteve Elfau, Luis

    2013-01-01

    Diseño e implementación de varios bloques del software GNSS-SDR, un receptor de código abierto para utilizar como herramienta de estudio e investigación sobre los sistemas GNSS. [ANGLÈS] This project introduces GNSS-SDR, an open source Global Navigation Satellite System software-defined receiver. The lack of reconfigurability of current commercial-of-the-shelf receivers and the advent of new radionavigation signals and systems make software receivers an appealing approach to design new arc...

  1. Prototyping a GNSS-Based Passive Radar for UAVs: An Instrument to Classify the Water Content Feature of Lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, Micaela Troglia; Marucco, Gianluca; Pini, Marco; Ugazio, Sabrina; Falletti, Emanuela; Lo Presti, Letizia

    2015-11-10

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) broadcast signals for positioning and navigation, which can be also employed for remote sensing applications. Indeed, the satellites of any GNSS can be seen as synchronized sources of electromagnetic radiation, and specific processing of the signals reflected back from the ground can be used to estimate the geophysical properties of the Earth's surface. Several experiments have successfully demonstrated GNSS-reflectometry (GNSS-R), whereas new applications are continuously emerging and are presently under development, either from static or dynamic platforms. GNSS-R can be implemented at a low cost, primarily if small devices are mounted on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), which today can be equipped with several types of sensors for environmental monitoring. So far, many instruments for GNSS-R have followed the GNSS bistatic radar architecture and consisted of custom GNSS receivers, often requiring a personal computer and bulky systems to store large amounts of data. This paper presents the development of a GNSS-based sensor for UAVs and small manned aircraft, used to classify lands according to their soil water content. The paper provides details on the design of the major hardware and software components, as well as the description of the results obtained through field tests.

  2. Prototyping a GNSS-Based Passive Radar for UAVs: An Instrument to Classify the Water Content Feature of Lands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micaela Troglia Gamba

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS broadcast signals for positioning and navigation, which can be also employed for remote sensing applications. Indeed, the satellites of any GNSS can be seen as synchronized sources of electromagnetic radiation, and specific processing of the signals reflected back from the ground can be used to estimate the geophysical properties of the Earth’s surface. Several experiments have successfully demonstrated GNSS-reflectometry (GNSS-R, whereas new applications are continuously emerging and are presently under development, either from static or dynamic platforms. GNSS-R can be implemented at a low cost, primarily if small devices are mounted on-board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs, which today can be equipped with several types of sensors for environmental monitoring. So far, many instruments for GNSS-R have followed the GNSS bistatic radar architecture and consisted of custom GNSS receivers, often requiring a personal computer and bulky systems to store large amounts of data. This paper presents the development of a GNSS-based sensor for UAVs and small manned aircraft, used to classify lands according to their soil water content. The paper provides details on the design of the major hardware and software components, as well as the description of the results obtained through field tests.

  3. a Review on Legal Traceability of Gnss Measurements in the Malaysian Cadastral Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, J.; Shariff, N. S.; Omar, K. M.; Din, A. H. M.; Amin, Z. M.

    2016-09-01

    As the dependency on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in surveying has been growing over the years, the need for legal traceability of GNSS measurements has become a significant matter. In Malaysia, with the advent of the Malaysia Real-time Kinematic Network (MyRTKnet), GNSS surveying has revolutionised land survey and mapping. Correspondingly, the Department of Survey and Mapping Malaysia (DSMM) amended and published standard regulations and guidelines concerning cadastral survey, i.e., Cadastral Survey Regulations 2009, to include GNSS measurements. However, these regulations and guidelines has not comprehensively incorporated legal traceability of GNSS measurements; which is a prerequisite for cadastral surveys as it requires reliable and conclusive evidence for issues such as boundary disputes. The first objective of this paper is to review and discuss the legal traceability of GNSS measurements. Secondly, it will highlight the current practice and issues, i.e., with regard to legal traceability, within the present Malaysian cadastral regulation and guidelines, in relation to the prevalently adopted Network RTK (N-RTK) technique, GNSS instrument calibrations, and reference stations' accuracy. Lastly, a rudimentary best practice guideline for GNSS surveying in cadastral survey for Malaysia is proposed. It is expected that this paper will contribute to the implementation of a best practice guideline, which is inclusive of legal traceability of GNSS measurements, for the Malaysian cadastral practice.

  4. Analyses for a Modernized GNSS Radio Occultation Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griggs, Erin R.

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) is a remote sensing technique that exploits existing navigation signals to make global, real-time observations of the Earth's atmosphere. A specialized RO receiver makes measurements of signals originating from a transmitter onboard a GNSS spacecraft near the Earth's horizon. The radio wave is altered during passage through the Earth's atmosphere. The changes in the received signals are translated to the refractivity characteristics of the intervening medium, which enable the calculation of atmospheric pressure, temperature, and humidity. Current satellite missions employing GNSS RO have provided invaluable and timely information for weather and climate applications. Existing constellations of occultation satellites, however, are aging and producing fewer quality measurements. Replacement fleets of RO satellites are imperative to sustain and improve the global coverage and operational impact achieved by the current generation of RO satellites. This dissertation describes studies that facilitate the development of next generation RO receivers and satellite constellations. Multiple research efforts were conducted that aim to improve the quantity and quality of measurements made by a future satellite-based RO collection system. These studies range in magnitude and impact, and begin with a receiver development study using ground-based occultation data. Future RO constellations and collection opportunities were simulated and autonomous occultation prediction and scheduling capabilities were implemented. Finally, a comprehensive study was conducted to characterize the stability of the GNSS atomic frequency standards. Oscillator stability for a subset of satellites in the GNSS was found to be of insufficient quality at timescales relevant to RO collections and would degrade the atmospheric profiling capabilities of an RO system utilizing these signals. Recommendations for a high-rate clock correction network

  5. The Promise and Challenges of High Rate GNSS for Environmental Monitoring and Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBrecque, John

    2017-04-01

    The decadal vision Global Geodetic Observing System recognizes the potential of high rate real time GNSS for environmental monitoring. The GGOS initiated a program to advance GNSS real time high rate measurements to augment seismic and other sensor systems for earthquake and tsunami early warning. High rate multi-GNSS networks can provide ionospheric tomography for the detection and tracking of land, ocean and atmospheric gravity waves that can provide coastal warning of tsunamis induced by earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, severe weather and other catastrophic events. NASA has collaborated on a microsatellite constellation of GPS receivers to measure ocean surface roughness to improve severe storm tracking and a equatorial system of GPS occultation receivers to measure ionospheric and atmospheric dynamics. Systems such as these will be significantly enhanced by the availability of a four fold increase in GNSS satellite systems with new and enhanced signal structures and by the densification of regional multi-GNSS networks. These new GNSS capabilities will rely upon improved and cost effective communications infrastructure for a network of coordinated real time analysis centers with input to national warning systems. Most important, the implementation of these new real time GNSS capabilities will rely upon the broad international support for the sharing of real time GNSS much as is done in weather and seismic observing systems and as supported by the Committee of Experts on UN Global Geodetic Information Management (UNGGIM).

  6. Array-based GNSS Ionospheric Sensing: Estimability and Precision Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Array-based GNSS Ionospheric Sensing: Estimability and Precision Analyses PJG Teunissen1,2, A Khodabandeh1 and B Zhang1 1GNSS Research Centre, Curtin University, Perth, Australia 2Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands Introduction: The Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have proved to be an effective means of measuring the Earth's ionosphere. The well-known geometry-free linear combinations of the GNSS data serve as the input of an external ionospheric model to capture both the spatial and temporal characteristics of the ionosphere. Next to the slant ionospheric delays experienced by the GNSS antennas, the geometry-free combinations also contain additional unknown delays that are caused by the presence of the carrier-phase ambiguous cycles and/or the code instrumental delays. That the geometry-free combinations, without an external ionospheric model, cannot unbiasedly determine the slant ionospheric delays reveals the lack of information content in the GNSS data. Motivation and objectives: With the advent of modernized multi-frequency signals, one is confronted with many different combinations of the GNSS data that are capable of sensing the ionosphere. Owing to such diversity and the lack of information content in the GNSS data, various estimable ionospheric delays of different interpretations (and of different precision) can therefore be formed. How such estimable ionospheric delays should be interpreted and the extent to which they contribute to the precision of the unbiased slant ionosphere are the topics of this contribution. Approach and results: In this contribution, we apply S-system theory to study the estimability and precision of the estimable slant ionospheric delays that are measured by the multi-frequency GNSS data. Two different S-systems are presented, leading to two different estimable parameters of different precision: 1) the phase-driven ionospheric delays and 2) the code-driven ionospheric delays

  7. Integrated Satellite-HAP Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cianca, Ernestina; De Sanctis, Mauro; De Luise, Aldo

    2005-01-01

    for an efficient hybrid terrestrial-satellite communication system. Two integrated HAP-satellite scenarios are presented, in which the HAP is used to overcome some of the shortcomings of satellite- based communications. Moreover, it is shown that the integration of HAPs with satellite systems can be used......Thus far, high-altitude platform (HAP)-based systems have been mainly conceived as an alternative to satellites for complementing the terrestrial network. This article aims to show that HAP should no longer be seen as a competitor technology by investors of satellites, but as a key element...

  8. Preface: High-rate GNSS: Theory, methods and engineering/geophysical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Peiliang

    2017-06-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have revolutionized the science and engineering of positioning, timing and navigation and have become an indispensable means to rapidly obtain precise positioning-related information, profoundly affecting our daily life and infrastructure. With GNSS, the position of an object, either stationary or moving, can be determined anywhere, anytime and under any weather condition. In addition to providing a positioning and timing information service, GNSS are now also used to reconstruct physical properties of media through which GNSS signals travel. The utilization of additional GNSS systems such as the European Galileo and the Chinese Beidou (both expected to complete their final global constellations in 2020) will contribute to positioning/navigation science and engineering, provide more industrial opportunities and surely open more challenges.

  9. Simultaneous single epoch satellite clock modelling in Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thongtan, Thayathip

    In order to obtain high quality positions from navigation satellites, range errors have to be identified and either modelled or estimated. This thesis focuses on satellite clock errors, which are needed to be known because satellite clocks are not perfectly synchronised with navigation system time. A new approach, invented at UCL, for the simultaneous estimation, in a single epoch, of all satellite clock offsets within a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) from range data collected at a large number of globally distributed ground stations is presented. The method was originally tested using only data from a limited number of GPS satellites and ground stations. In this work a total of 50 globally distributed stations and the whole GPS constellation are used in order to investigate more fully the capabilities of the method, in terms of both accuracy and reliability. A number of different estimation models have been tested. These include those with different weighting schemes, those with and without tropospheric bias parameters and those that include assumptions regarding prior knowledge of satellite orbits. In all cases conclusions have been drawn based on formal error propagation theory. Accuracy has been assessed largely through the sizes of the predicted satellite clock standard deviations and, in the case of simultaneously estimating satellite positions, their error ellipsoids. Both internal and external reliability have been assessed as these are important contributors to integrity, something that is essential for many practical applications. It has been found that the accuracy and reliability of satellite clock offsets are functions of the number of known ground station clocks and distance from them, quality of orbits and quality of range measurement. Also the introduction of tropospheric zenith delay parameters into the model reduces both accuracy and reliability by amounts depending on satellite elevation angles. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  10. Applications of two-way satellite time and frequency transfer in the BeiDou navigation satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, ShanShi; Hu, XiaoGong; Liu, Li; Guo, Rui; Zhu, LingFeng; Chang, ZhiQiao; Tang, ChengPan; Gong, XiuQiang; Li, Ran; Yu, Yang

    2016-10-01

    A two-way satellite time and frequency transfer (TWSTFT) device equipped in the BeiDou navigation satellite system (BDS) can calculate clock error between satellite and ground master clock. TWSTFT is a real-time method with high accuracy because most system errors such as orbital error, station position error, and tropospheric and ionospheric delay error can be eliminated by calculating the two-way pseudorange difference. Another method, the multi-satellite precision orbit determination (MPOD) method, can be applied to estimate satellite clock errors. By comparison with MPOD clock estimations, this paper discusses the applications of the BDS TWSTFT clock observations in satellite clock measurement, satellite clock prediction, navigation system time monitor, and satellite clock performance assessment in orbit. The results show that with TWSTFT clock observations, the accuracy of satellite clock prediction is higher than MPOD. Five continuous weeks of comparisons with three international GNSS Service (IGS) analysis centers (ACs) show that the reference time difference between BeiDou time (BDT) and golbal positoning system (GPS) time (GPST) realized IGS ACs is in the tens of nanoseconds. Applying the TWSTFT clock error observations may obtain more accurate satellite clock performance evaluation in the 104 s interval because the accuracy of the MPOD clock estimation is not sufficiently high. By comparing the BDS and GPS satellite clock performance, we found that the BDS clock stability at the 103 s interval is approximately 10-12, which is similar to the GPS IIR.

  11. Quality assessment of multi-GNSS real-time orbits and clocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierski, Kamil; Sośnica, Krzysztof; Hadaś, Tomasz

    2017-04-01

    A continuously increasing number of satellites of Global Navigation Satellites Systems (GNSS) and their constant modernization allow improving the positioning accuracy and enables performing the GNSS measurements in challenging environments. The constant development of GNSS, among which GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou can be distinguished, contributes to improvements in GNSS usage in areas desired by common users or GNSS community. The Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS) has been established for tracking, collating and analyzing all available GNSS signals. Provided precise orbits and clocks do not allow users to process data in real-time due to the significant latency of provided products which may reach up to even 18 days. In order to satisfy needs of real-time users IGS Real-Time Service (RTS) was launched in 2013. The service is currently insufficient for Multi-GNSS applications as it provides products for GPS and GLONASS only. One of the publicly available real-time corrections for the all GNSS, including the new systems, are those provided by the Centre National d'etudes Spatiales (CNES). Presented works evaluate clocks and orbit corrections, i.e., the availability and quality of real-time products provided by CNES (mountpoint CLK93). As a decoder of the RTCM streams the BNC software v2.12 is used. All computations are performed using the GNSS-WARP software which is developed by Institute of Geodesy and Geoinformatics (IGG) at Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences (WUELS). The final products provided by the Center of Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE) are used for the evaluation of the real-time CNES orbits and clocks. Moreover, the Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data are employed as an independent way of the orbit quality assessment. The availability of the real-time corrections is at the level of about 90%, when excluding BeiDou, for which the availability is at the level of about 80%. The obtained results

  12. Cyber security with radio frequency interferences mitigation study for satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wei, Sixiao; Chen, Genshe; Tian, Xin; Shen, Dan; Pham, Khanh; Nguyen, Tien M.; Blasch, Erik

    2016-05-01

    Satellite systems including the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and the satellite communications (SATCOM) system provide great convenience and utility to human life including emergency response, wide area efficient communications, and effective transportation. Elements of satellite systems incorporate technologies such as navigation with the global positioning system (GPS), satellite digital video broadcasting, and information transmission with a very small aperture terminal (VSAT), etc. The satellite systems importance is growing in prominence with end users' requirement for globally high data rate transmissions; the cost reduction of launching satellites; development of smaller sized satellites including cubesat, nanosat, picosat, and femtosat; and integrating internet services with satellite networks. However, with the promising benefits, challenges remain to fully develop secure and robust satellite systems with pervasive computing and communications. In this paper, we investigate both cyber security and radio frequency (RF) interferences mitigation for satellite systems, and demonstrate that they are not isolated. The action space for both cyber security and RF interferences are firstly summarized for satellite systems, based on which the mitigation schemes for both cyber security and RF interferences are given. A multi-layered satellite systems structure is provided with cross-layer design considering multi-path routing and channel coding, to provide great security and diversity gains for secure and robust satellite systems.

  13. E-GEM- European GNSS-R Environmental Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, Nuno; Bandeiras, Jorge; Peres, Tiago; Silva, Pedro; Camps, Adriano; Carreno, Hugo; Cardellach, Estel; Capron, Bertrand; Fohannessen, Johnny; Danielson, Rick; Guerriero, Leila; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Sanchez, Nilda; Storvold, Rune; Wickert, Jens

    2016-08-01

    Earth Monitoring with GNSS signals is a promising novel area for Earth Observations systems. The increasing number of sources, together with the low level of requirements (power, size, budget, etc.) and possibility of using COTS hardware, makes these systems potentially very attractive for future space missions, making this a very attractive complementary technology to traditional active radar systems. Since the use of reflected GNSS signals was proposed in 1993, the number of research activities and scientific publications has been steadily increasing, especially in recent years, where the attention devoted to GNSS-R has increased exponentially after NASA has approved the first operational use of GNSS-R from space, the eight-satellite CYGNSS constellation.The European GNSS-R Earth Monitoring project (E- GEM, www.e-gem.eu), started in 2014, is an FP7 funded project which joins many of the European experts in the field of GNSS-R and involves ten of the top European institutions in this field. The goal of this project is quite ambitions, covering both instruments and scientific algorithms developments of for a number of applications.

  14. Use of global navigation satellite systems for monitoring deformations of water-development works

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaftan, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Geophysical Center (Russian Federation); Ustinov, A. V. [JSC Institut Gidropreoekt (Russian Federation)

    2013-05-15

    The feasibility of using global radio-navigation satellite systems (GNSS) to improve functional safety of high-liability water-development works - dams at hydroelectric power plants, and, consequently, the safety of the population in the surrounding areas is examined on the basis of analysis of modern publications. Characteristics for determination of displacements and deformations with use of GNSS, and also in a complex with other types of measurements, are compared. It is demonstrated that combined monitoring of deformations of the ground surface of the region, and engineering and technical structures is required to ensure the functional safety of HPP, and reliable metrologic assurance of measurements is also required to obtain actual characteristics of the accuracy and effectiveness of GNSS observations.

  15. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Fan, Shiwei; Wang, Feixue

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2016, held during 18th-20th May in Changsha, China. The theme of CSNC2016 is Smart Sensing, Smart Perception. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2016, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  16. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fan, Shiwei; Yu, Wenxian

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2017, held during 23th-25th May in Shanghai, China. The theme of CSNC2017 is Positioning, Connecting All. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2017, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  17. Investigation of ionospheric TEC over China based on GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Bo; Wan, Weixing; Yu, You; Hu, Lianhuan

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) is derived from 250 Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers over China. The GNSS TEC data are utilized to study the diurnal and day-to-day variability of ionosphere, ionospheric east-west differences and to construct regional ionospheric map. The GNSS-TEC curves clearly show sunrise and sunset enhancements in the diurnal variation. The peak value of TEC is lower in January 2015 than in May 2014. There is 2 h difference in the occurrence time of TEC maximum/minimum between May and January. Compared with the observations of Global Positioning System (GPS) and Global Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS), the measurements from the Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites of BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) clearly present the ionospheric day-to-day variability and east-west differences in a region with small longitude differences (3.52-11.31°). The east-west differences in TEC are more obvious in larger longitude differences at 11:30 local time on 23 January 2015. The maximum east-west difference in TEC is about 7 total electron content unit (TECU, 1 TECU = 1016 el m-2) in longitude difference of 11.31°. Our analysis shows that the TEC for east-west small longitude differences may be associated with the east-west gradient of geomagnetic declination. Based on 250 GNSS stations, a regional TEC map constructed by Kriging method can well capture the main spatial structure of ionosphere in China. A comparison between TEC maps obtained by Kriging method and provided by Jet Propulsion Laboratory displays that there are large deviations in the North of China, which is mainly caused by the difference in the number of used GNSS stations. In addition, comprehensive investigation presents that GNSS has more advantages over GPS and GLONASS in the ionosphere research over China.

  18. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaifei He

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component.

  19. GNSS Precise Kinematic Positioning for Multiple Kinematic Stations Based on A Priori Distance Constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kaifei; Xu, Tianhe; Förste, Christoph; Petrovic, Svetozar; Barthelmes, Franz; Jiang, Nan; Flechtner, Frank

    2016-04-01

    When applying the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) for precise kinematic positioning in airborne and shipborne gravimetry, multiple GNSS receiving equipment is often fixed mounted on the kinematic platform carrying the gravimetry instrumentation. Thus, the distances among these GNSS antennas are known and invariant. This information can be used to improve the accuracy and reliability of the state estimates. For this purpose, the known distances between the antennas are applied as a priori constraints within the state parameters adjustment. These constraints are introduced in such a way that their accuracy is taken into account. To test this approach, GNSS data of a Baltic Sea shipborne gravimetric campaign have been used. The results of our study show that an application of distance constraints improves the accuracy of the GNSS kinematic positioning, for example, by about 4 mm for the radial component.

  20. Cooperative and cognitive satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Chatzinotas, Symeon; De Gaudenzi, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Cooperative and Cognitive Satellite Systems provides a solid overview of the current research in the field of cooperative and cognitive satellite systems, helping users understand how to incorporate state-of-the-art communication techniques in innovative satellite network architectures to enable the next generation of satellite systems. The book is edited and written by top researchers and practitioners in the field, providing a comprehensive explanation of current research that allows users to discover future technologies and their applications, integrate satellite and terrestrial systems

  1. The management of scarce water resources using GNSS, InSAR and in-situ micro gravity measurements as monitoring tools

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wonnacott, R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available -based gravimetry. Modern digital gravimeters have quoted accuracies of less than 5 µgal and, as a rule of thumb, 3.1 µgal is equivalent to approximately 0.01 m difference in height. 3. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) 3.1 GNSS Field Measurements...

  2. The Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS) - Achievements, prospects and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montenbruck, Oliver; Steigenberger, Peter; Prange, Lars; Deng, Zhiguo; Zhao, Qile; Perosanz, Felix; Romero, Ignacio; Noll, Carey; Stürze, Andrea; Weber, Georg; Schmid, Ralf; MacLeod, Ken; Schaer, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Over the past five years, the International GNSS Service (IGS) has made continuous efforts to extend its service from GPS and GLONASS to the variety of newly established global and regional navigation satellite systems. This report summarizes the achievements and progress made in this period by the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX). The status and tracking capabilities of the IGS monitoring station network are presented and the multi-GNSS products derived from this resource are discussed. The achieved performance is assessed and related to the current level of space segment and user equipment characterization. While the performance of orbit and clock products for BeiDou, Galileo, and QZSS still lags behind the legacy GPS and GLONASS products, continued progress has been made since launch of the MGEX project and already enables use of the new constellations for precise point positioning, atmospheric research and other applications. Directions for further research are identified to fully integrate the new constellations into routine GNSS processing. Furthermore, the active support of GNSS providers is encouraged to assist the scientific community in the generation of fully competitive products for the new constellations.

  3. On User Algorithms for GNSS Precise Point Positioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Bakker, P.F.

    2016-01-01

    Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) processing method with the objective of providing high positioning accuracy without the need for a nearby base station or dense network of reference stations operated by the user. To reach this objective, PPP uses the ver

  4. GNSS data filtering optimization for ionospheric observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, G.; Spogli, L.; Cesaroni, C.; Sgrigna, V.; Alfonsi, L.; Aquino, M. H. O.

    2015-12-01

    In the last years, the use of GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) data has been gradually increasing, for both scientific studies and technological applications. High-rate GNSS data, able to generate and output 50-Hz phase and amplitude samples, are commonly used to study electron density irregularities within the ionosphere. Ionospheric irregularities may cause scintillations, which are rapid and random fluctuations of the phase and the amplitude of the received GNSS signals. For scintillation analysis, usually, GNSS signals observed at an elevation angle lower than an arbitrary threshold (usually 15°, 20° or 30°) are filtered out, to remove the possible error sources due to the local environment where the receiver is deployed. Indeed, the signal scattered by the environment surrounding the receiver could mimic ionospheric scintillation, because buildings, trees, etc. might create diffusion, diffraction and reflection. Although widely adopted, the elevation angle threshold has some downsides, as it may under or overestimate the actual impact of multipath due to local environment. Certainly, an incorrect selection of the field of view spanned by the GNSS antenna may lead to the misidentification of scintillation events at low elevation angles. With the aim to tackle the non-ionospheric effects induced by multipath at ground, in this paper we introduce a filtering technique, termed SOLIDIFY (Standalone OutLiers IDentIfication Filtering analYsis technique), aiming at excluding the multipath sources of non-ionospheric origin to improve the quality of the information obtained by the GNSS signal in a given site. SOLIDIFY is a statistical filtering technique based on the signal quality parameters measured by scintillation receivers. The technique is applied and optimized on the data acquired by a scintillation receiver located at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, in Rome. The results of the exercise show that, in the considered case of a noisy

  5. Differential GNSS and Vision-Based Tracking to Improve Navigation Performance in Cooperative Multi-UAV Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrella, Amedeo Rodi; Fasano, Giancarmine; Accardo, Domenico; Moccia, Antonio

    2016-12-17

    Autonomous navigation of micro-UAVs is typically based on the integration of low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers and Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based inertial and magnetic sensors to stabilize and control the flight. The resulting navigation performance in terms of position and attitude accuracy may not suffice for other mission needs, such as the ones relevant to fine sensor pointing. In this framework, this paper presents a cooperative UAV navigation algorithm that allows a chief vehicle, equipped with inertial and magnetic sensors, a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, and a vision system, to improve its navigation performance (in real time or in the post processing phase) exploiting formation flying deputy vehicles equipped with GPS receivers. The focus is set on outdoor environments and the key concept is to exploit differential GPS among vehicles and vision-based tracking (DGPS/Vision) to build a virtual additional navigation sensor whose information is then integrated in a sensor fusion algorithm based on an Extended Kalman Filter. The developed concept and processing architecture are described, with a focus on DGPS/Vision attitude determination algorithm. Performance assessment is carried out on the basis of both numerical simulations and flight tests. In the latter ones, navigation estimates derived from the DGPS/Vision approach are compared with those provided by the onboard autopilot system of a customized quadrotor. The analysis shows the potential of the developed approach, mainly deriving from the possibility to exploit magnetic- and inertial-independent accurate attitude information.

  6. A software radio approach to global navigation satellite system receiver design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akos, Dennis Matthew

    1997-12-01

    The software radio has been described as the most significant evolution in receiver design since the development of the superheterodyne concept in 1918. The software radio design philosophy is to position an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) as close to the antenna as possible and then process the samples using a combination of software and a programmable microprocessor. There are a number of important advantages to be gained through full exploitation of the software radio concept. The most notable include: (1) The removal of analog signal processing components and their associated nonlinear, temperature-based, and age-based performance characteristics. (2) A single antenna/front-end configuration can be used to receive and demodulate a variety of radio frequency (RF) transmissions. (3) The software radio provides the ultimate simulation/testing environment. Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) are the latest and most complex radionavigation systems in widespread use. The United States' Global Positioning System (GPS) and, to a lesser extent, the Russian Global Orbiting Navigation Satellite System (GLONASS) are being targeted for use as next generation aviation navigation systems. As a result, it is critical that a GNSS achieve the reliability and integrity necessary for use within the aerospace system. The receiver design is a key element in achieving the high standards required. This work presents the complete development of a GNSS software radio. A GNSS receiver front end has been constructed, based on the software radio design goals, and has been evaluated against the traditional design. Trade-offs associated with each implementation are presented along with experimental results. Novel bandpass sampling front end designs have been proposed, implemented and tested for the processing of multiple GNSS transmissions. Finally, every aspect of GNSS signal processing has been implemented in software from the necessary spread spectrum acquisition algorithms to

  7. The satellite based augmentation system – EGNOS for non-precision approach global navigation satellite system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej FELLNER

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available First in the Poland tests of the EGNOS SIS (Signal in Space were conducted on 5th October 2007 on the flight inspection with SPAN (The Synchronized Position Attitude Navigation technology at the Mielec airfield. This was an introduction to a test campaign of the EGNOS-based satellite navigation system for air traffic. The advanced studies will be performed within the framework of the EGNOS-APV project in 2011. The implementation of the EGNOS system to APV-I precision approach operations, is conducted according to ICAO requirements in Annex 10. Definition of usefulness and certification of EGNOS as SBAS (Satellite Based Augmentation System in aviation requires thorough analyses of accuracy, integrity, continuity and availability of SIS. Also, the project will try to exploit the excellent accuracy performance of EGNOS to analyze the implementation of GLS (GNSS Landing System approaches (Cat I-like approached using SBAS, with a decision height of 200 ft. Location of the EGNOS monitoring station Rzeszów, located near Polish-Ukrainian border, being also at the east border of planned EGNOS coverage for ECAC states is very useful for SIS tests in this area. According to current EGNOS programmed schedule, the project activities will be carried out with EGNOS system v2.2, which is the version released for civil aviation certification. Therefore, the project will allow demonstrating the feasibility of the EGNOS certifiable version for civil applications.

  8. Atmospheric remote sensing and applications from GNSS: Recent results and progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Shuanggen; Gurbuz, Gokhan; Akgul, Volkan

    2016-07-01

    The atmospheric delay is one of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) errors. Nowadays, the total zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) and ionospheric total electron content (TEC) can be precisely obtained from GNSS, which can be used for weather prediction and atmospheric research as well as space weather. In this paper, recent results and progress on atmospheric remote sensing and applications from GNSS are presented, including ocean tide models and mapping functions effects, high-order ionospheric delay correction, tropoapause variations, ionospheric climatology, seismo-atmospheric anomalies and characteristics. Finally, some possible mechanism on atmospheric anomalies and coupling processes are given and discussed as well as future challenges.

  9. Localization of an air target by means of GNSS-based multistatic radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmedov, Daulet Sh.; Raskaliyev, Almat S.

    2016-08-01

    The possibility of utilizing transmitters of opportunity for target detection, tracking and positioning is of great interest to the radar community. In particular the optional use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has lately triggered scientific research that has purpose to take advantage of this source of signal generation for passive radar. Number of studies have been conducted previously on development of GNSS-based bistatic and multistatic radars for detection and range estimation to the object located in the close atmosphere. To further enrich research in this area, we present a novel method for coordinate determination of the air target by means of the GNSS-based multistatic radar.

  10. Review of the state of the art and future prospects of the ground-based GNSS meteorology in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerova, Guergana; Jones, Jonathan; Douša, Jan; Dick, Galina; de Haan, Siebren; Pottiaux, Eric; Bock, Olivier; Pacione, Rosa; Elgered, Gunnar; Vedel, Henrik; Bender, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) have revolutionised positioning, navigation, and timing, becoming a common part of our everyday life. Aside from these well-known civilian and commercial applications, GNSS is now an established atmospheric observing system, which can accurately sense water vapour, the most abundant greenhouse gas, accounting for 60-70 % of atmospheric warming. In Europe, the application of GNSS in meteorology started roughly two decades ago, and today it is a well-established field in both research and operation. This review covers the state of the art in GNSS meteorology in Europe. The advances in GNSS processing for derivation of tropospheric products, application of GNSS tropospheric products in operational weather prediction and application of GNSS tropospheric products for climate monitoring are discussed. The GNSS processing techniques and tropospheric products are reviewed. A summary of the use of the products for validation and impact studies with operational numerical weather prediction (NWP) models as well as very short weather prediction (nowcasting) case studies is given. Climate research with GNSSs is an emerging field of research, but the studies so far have been limited to comparison with climate models and derivation of trends. More than 15 years of GNSS meteorology in Europe has already achieved outstanding cooperation between the atmospheric and geodetic communities. It is now feasible to develop next-generation GNSS tropospheric products and applications that can enhance the quality of weather forecasts and climate monitoring. This work is carried out within COST Action ES1206 advanced global navigation satellite systems tropospheric products for monitoring severe weather events and climate (GNSS4SWEC, http://gnss4swec.knmi.nl).

  11. Advancing Wetlands Mapping and Monitoring with GNSS Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Chew, Clara; Nghiem, Son V.; Shah, Rashmi; Podest, Erika; Bloom, A. Anthony; Koning, Alexandra; Small, Eric; Schimel, David; Reager, J. T.; Mannucci, Anthony; Williamson, Walton; Cardellach, Estel

    2016-08-01

    Wetland dynamics is crucial to address changes in both atmospheric methane (CH4) and terrestrial water storage. Yet, both spatial distribution and temporal variability of wetlands remain highly unconstrained despite the existence of remote sensing products from past and present satellite sensors. An innovative approach to mapping wetlands is offered by the Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R), which is a bistatic radar concept that takes advantage of the ever increasing number of GNSS transmitting satellites to yield many randomly distributed measurements with broad-area global coverage and rapid revisit time. Hence, this communication presents the science motivation for mapping of wetlands and monitoring of their dynamics, and shows the relevance of the GNSS-R technique in this context, relative to and in synergy with other existing measurement systems. Additionally, the communication discusses results of our data analysis on wetlands in the Amazon, specifically from the initial analysis of satellite data acquired by the TechDemoSat-1 mission launched in 2014. Finally, recommendations are provided for the design of a GNSS-R mission specifically to address wetlands science issues.

  12. Meteorological satellite systems

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Su-Yin

    2014-01-01

    “Meteorological Satellite Systems” is a primer on weather satellites and their Earth applications. This book reviews historic developments and recent technological advancements in GEO and polar orbiting meteorological satellites. It explores the evolution of these remote sensing technologies and their capabilities to monitor short- and long-term changes in weather patterns in response to climate change. Satellites developed by various countries, such as U.S. meteorological satellites, EUMETSAT, and Russian, Chinese, Japanese and Indian satellite platforms are reviewed. This book also discusses international efforts to coordinate meteorological remote sensing data collection and sharing. This title provides a ready and quick reference for information about meteorological satellites. It serves as a useful tool for a broad audience that includes students, academics, private consultants, engineers, scientists, and teachers.

  13. Code Single Point Positioning Using Nominal GNSS Constellations (Future Perception)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, A. M. A.

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have an endless number of applications in industry, science, military, transportation and recreation & sports. Two systems are currently in operation, namely GPS (the USA Global Positioning System) and GLONASS (the Russian GLObal NAvigation Satellite System), and a third is planned, the European satellite navigation system GALILEO. The potential performance improvements achievable through combining these systems could be significant and expectations are high. The need is inevitable to explore the future of positioning from different nominal constellations. In this research paper, Bernese 5.0 software could be modified to simulate and process GNSS observations from three different constellations (GPS, GLONASS and Galileo) using different combinations. This study presents results of code single point positioning for five stations using the three constellations and different combinations.

  14. Measuring sea surface height with a GNSS-Wave Glider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Maqueda, Miguel Angel; Penna, Nigel T.; Foden, Peter R.; Martin, Ian; Cipollini, Paolo; Williams, Simon D.; Pugh, Jeff P.

    2017-04-01

    A GNSS-Wave Glider is a novel technique to measure sea surface height autonomously using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). It consists of an unmanned surface vehicle manufactured by Liquid Robotics, a Wave Glider, and a geodetic-grade GNSS antenna-receiver system, with the antenna installed on a mast on the vehicle's deck. The Wave Glider uses the differential wave motion through the water column for propulsion, thus guaranteeing an, in principle, indefinite autonomy. Solar energy is collected to power all on-board instrumentation, including the GNSS system. The GNSS-Wave Glider was first tested in Loch Ness in 2013, demonstrating that the technology is capable of mapping geoid heights within the loch with an accuracy of a few centimetres. The trial in Loch Ness did not conclusively confirm the reliability of the technique because, during the tests, the state of the water surface was much more benign than would normally be expect in the open ocean. We now report on a first deployment of a GNSS-Wave Glider in the North Sea. The deployment took place in August 2016 and lasted thirteen days, during which the vehicle covered a distance of about 350 nautical miles in the north western North Sea off Great Britain. During the experiment, the GNSS-Wave Glider experienced sea states between 1 (0-0.1 m wave heights) and 5 (2.5-4 m wave heights). The GNSS-Wave Glider data, recorded at 5 Hz frequency, were analysed using a post-processed kinematic GPS-GLONASS precise point positioning (PPP) approach, which were quality controlled using double difference GPS kinematic processing with respect to onshore reference stations. Filtered with a 900 s moving-average window, the PPP heights reveal geoid patterns in the survey area that are very similar to the EGM2008 geoid model, thus demonstrating the potential use of a GNSS-Wave Glider for marine geoid determination. The residual of subtracting the modelled or measured marine geoid from the PPP signal combines information

  15. LiDAR Scan Matching Aided Inertial Navigation System in GNSS-Denied Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jingbin; Shi, Chuang; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-01-01

    A new scan that matches an aided Inertial Navigation System (INS) with a low-cost LiDAR is proposed as an alternative to GNSS-based navigation systems in GNSS-degraded or -denied environments such as indoor areas, dense forests, or urban canyons. In these areas, INS-based Dead Reckoning (DR) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technologies are normally used to estimate positions as separate tools. However, there are critical implementation problems with each standalone system. The drift errors of velocity, position, and heading angles in an INS will accumulate over time, and on-line calibration is a must for sustaining positioning accuracy. SLAM performance is poor in featureless environments where the matching errors can significantly increase. Each standalone positioning method cannot offer a sustainable navigation solution with acceptable accuracy. This paper integrates two complementary technologies—INS and LiDAR SLAM—into one navigation frame with a loosely coupled Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to use the advantages and overcome the drawbacks of each system to establish a stable long-term navigation process. Static and dynamic field tests were carried out with a self-developed Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) platform—NAVIS. The results prove that the proposed approach can provide positioning accuracy at the centimetre level for long-term operations, even in a featureless indoor environment. PMID:26184206

  16. LiDAR Scan Matching Aided Inertial Navigation System in GNSS-Denied Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jian; Chen, Yuwei; Niu, Xiaoji; Wang, Li; Chen, Liang; Liu, Jingbin; Shi, Chuang; Hyyppä, Juha

    2015-07-10

    A new scan that matches an aided Inertial Navigation System (INS) with a low-cost LiDAR is proposed as an alternative to GNSS-based navigation systems in GNSS-degraded or -denied environments such as indoor areas, dense forests, or urban canyons. In these areas, INS-based Dead Reckoning (DR) and Simultaneous Localization and Mapping (SLAM) technologies are normally used to estimate positions as separate tools. However, there are critical implementation problems with each standalone system. The drift errors of velocity, position, and heading angles in an INS will accumulate over time, and on-line calibration is a must for sustaining positioning accuracy. SLAM performance is poor in featureless environments where the matching errors can significantly increase. Each standalone positioning method cannot offer a sustainable navigation solution with acceptable accuracy. This paper integrates two complementary technologies-INS and LiDAR SLAM-into one navigation frame with a loosely coupled Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) to use the advantages and overcome the drawbacks of each system to establish a stable long-term navigation process. Static and dynamic field tests were carried out with a self-developed Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV) platform-NAVIS. The results prove that the proposed approach can provide positioning accuracy at the centimetre level for long-term operations, even in a featureless indoor environment.

  17. A comprehensive method for GNSS data quality determination to improve ionospheric data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minchan; Seo, Jiwon; Lee, Jiyun

    2014-08-14

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are now recognized as cost-effective tools for ionospheric studies by providing the global coverage through worldwide networks of GNSS stations. While GNSS networks continue to expand to improve the observability of the ionosphere, the amount of poor quality GNSS observation data is also increasing and the use of poor-quality GNSS data degrades the accuracy of ionospheric measurements. This paper develops a comprehensive method to determine the quality of GNSS observations for the purpose of ionospheric studies. The algorithms are designed especially to compute key GNSS data quality parameters which affect the quality of ionospheric product. The quality of data collected from the Continuously Operating Reference Stations (CORS) network in the conterminous United States (CONUS) is analyzed. The resulting quality varies widely, depending on each station and the data quality of individual stations persists for an extended time period. When compared to conventional methods, the quality parameters obtained from the proposed method have a stronger correlation with the quality of ionospheric data. The results suggest that a set of data quality parameters when used in combination can effectively select stations with high-quality GNSS data and improve the performance of ionospheric data analysis.

  18. A PRECISE, LOW-COST RTK GNSS SYSTEM FOR UAV APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Stempfhuber

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available High accuracy with real-time positioning of moving objects has been considered a standard task of engineering geodesy for 10 to 15 years. An absolute positioning accuracy of 1–3 cm is generally possible worldwide and is further used in many areas of machine guidance (machine control and guidance, and farming (precision farming as well as for various special applications (e.g. railway trolley, mining, etc.. The cost of the measuring instruments required for the use of geodetic L1/L2 receivers with a local reference station amounts to approximately USD 30,000 to 50,000. Therefore, dual frequency RTK GNSS receivers are not used in the mass market. Affordable GPS/GNSS modules have already reached the mass market in various areas such as mobile phones, car navigation, the leisure industry, etc. Kinematic real-time positioning applications with centimetre or decimetre levels could also evolve into a mass product. In order for this to happen, the costs for such systems must lie between USD 1,000 to 2,000. What exactly low-cost means is determined by the precise specifications of the given individual application. Several university studies in geodesy focus on the approach of high-accuracy positioning by means of single frequency receivers for static applications [e.g. GLABSCH et. al. 2009, SCHWIEGER and GLÄSER 2005, ALKAN 2010, REALINI et. al. 2010, KORTH and HOFMANN 2011]. Although intelligent approaches have been developed that compute a trajectory in the post-processing mode [REALINI et. al., 2010], at present, there are only a very few GNSS Low-Cost Systems that enable real-time processing. This approach to precise position determination by means of the computation of static raw data with single frequency receivers is currently being explored in a research project at the Beuth Hochschule für Technik Berlin – and is being further developed for kinematic applications. The project is embedded in the European Social Fund. It is a follow-up project

  19. Using GNSS for Tropospheric Wet Delay Estimation in Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousa, Ashraf; Aboualy, D. Nadia; Sharaf, Mohamed; Zahra, Hassan; Darag, Mohamed

    2016-07-01

    The tropospheric delay is a serious error source for positioning using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). Since the scientific applications of GNSS positioning such as crustal deformation studies and earthquakes prediction require high accuracy in positioning, analysis of tropospheric delay is necessary to improve GNSS positioning accuracy In this study data of ground based GNSS receivers are used to evaluate effect of the tropospheric delay in position determination accuracy. These data are also used to study the tropospheric delay characteristics. The GNSS data are for the year 2013, taken from 8 station from Egypt Permanent GNSS Network (EPGN) and 13 IGS stations. The GNSS data were processed using advanced GNSS software called Bernese V 5.0 (Dach et al., 2007). The data processing was performed by three different ways; using a tropospheric model, making estimation for the tropospheric zenith wet delay (ZWD) and ignoring the Troposphere totally. Different processing methods are used to illustrate how troposphere affect the coordinates accuracy. The ZWD daily, temporal and spatial variations are also studied here. The results show that the RMS of the coordinates is better in case of making estimation for the troposphere ZWD and bad in case of ignoring the troposphere. Also there is a correlation between the troposphere and the height component. The troposphere ZWD values have daily, temporal and spatial variation. Depending on time in the day, day in the year, geographic location of the station and how near it to water. The ZWD values also go upward from the start to the end of the year, also it shows good correlation with the water vapor content in the troposphere.

  20. JPL's GNSS Real-Time Earthquake and Tsunami (GREAT) Alert System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Sever, Yoaz; Miller, Mark; Vallisneri, Michele; Khachikyan, Robert; Meyer, Robert

    2017-04-01

    We describe recent developments to the GREAT Alert natural hazard monitoring service from JPL's Global Differential GPS (GDGPS) System. GREAT Alert provides real-time, 1 Hz positioning solutions for hundreds of GNSS tracking sites, from both global and regional networks, aiming to monitor ground motion in the immediate aftermath of earthquakes. We take advantage of the centralized data processing, which is collocated with the GNSS orbit determination operations of the GDGPS System, to combine orbit determination with large-scale point-positioning in a grand estimation scheme, and as a result realize significant improvement to the positioning accuracy compared to conventional stand-alone point positioning techniques. For example, the measured median site (over all sites) real-time horizontal positioning accuracy is 2 cm 1DRMS, and the median real-time vertical accuracy is 4 cm RMS. The GREAT Alert positioning service is integrated with automated global earthquake notices from the United States Geodetic Survey (USGS) to support near-real-time calculations of co-seismic displacements with attendant formal errors based both short-term and long-term error analysis for each individual site. We will show the millimeter-level resolution of co-seismic displacement can be achieved by this system. The co-seismic displacements, in turn, are fed into a JPL geodynamics and ocean models, that estimate the Earthquake magnitude and predict the potential tsunami scale.

  1. BeiDou inter-satellite-type bias evaluation and calibration for mixed receiver attitude determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadarajah, N.; Teunissen, P.J.G.; Raziq, N.

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese BeiDou system (BDS), having different types of satellites, is an important addition to the ever growing system of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). It consists of Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and Medium

  2. BeiDou inter-satellite-type bias evaluation and calibration for mixed receiver attitude determination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadarajah, N.; Teunissen, P.J.G.; Raziq, N.

    2013-01-01

    The Chinese BeiDou system (BDS), having different types of satellites, is an important addition to the ever growing system of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). It consists of Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and Medium Ea

  3. Navigation sensors and systems in GNSS degraded and denied environments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    George T. Schmidt

    2015-01-01

    Position, velocity, and timing (PVT) signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS) are used throughout the world but the availability and reliability of these signals in all environments has become a subject of concern for both civilian and military applications. This presentation sum-marizes recent advances in navigation sensor technology, including GPS, inertial, and other navi-gation aids that address these concerns. Also addressed are developments in sensor integration technology with several examples described, including the Bluefin-21 system mechanization.

  4. Navigation sensors and systems in GNSS degraded and denied environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George T. Schmidt

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Position, velocity, and timing (PVT signals from the Global Positioning System (GPS are used throughout the world but the availability and reliability of these signals in all environments has become a subject of concern for both civilian and military applications. This presentation summarizes recent advances in navigation sensor technology, including GPS, inertial, and other navigation aids that address these concerns. Also addressed are developments in sensor integration technology with several examples described, including the Bluefin-21 system mechanization.

  5. Progress Report on the GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height) Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, Y.; Ichikawa, K.; Akiyama, H.; Ebinuma, T.; Isoguchi, O.; Kimura, N.; Konda, M.; Kouguchi, N.; Tamura, H.; Tomita, H.; Yoshikawa, Y.; Waseda, T.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), such as GPS is a system of satellites that provide autonomous geo-spatial positioning with global coverage. It allows small electronic receivers to determine their location to high precision using radio signals transmitted from satellites, GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) involves making measurements from the reflections from the Earth of navigation signals from GNSS satellites. Reflected signals from sea surface are considered that those are useful to observe sea state and sea surface height. We have started a research program for GNSS-R applications on oceanographic observations under the contract with MEXT (Ministry of Education Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, JAPAN) and launched a Japanese research consortium, GROWTH (GNSS Reflectometry for Ocean Waves, Tides, and Height). It is aiming to evaluate the capabilities of GNSS-R observations for oceanographic phenomena with different time scales, such as ocean waves (1/10 to tens of seconds), tides (one or half days), and sea surface dynamic height (a few days to years). In situ observations of ocean wave spectrum, wind speed vertical profile, and sea surface height will be quantitatively compared with equivalent estimates from simultaneous GNSS-R measurements. The GROWTH project will utilize different types of observation platforms; marine observation towers (about 20 m height), multi-copters (about 100 to 150 m height), and much higher-altitude CYGNSS data. Cross-platform data, together with in situ oceanographic observations, will be compared after adequate temporal averaging that accounts differences of the footprint sizes and temporal and spatial scales of oceanographic phenomena. This paper will provide overview of the GROWTH project, preliminary test results, obtained by the multi-sensor platform at observation towers, suggest actual footprint sizes and identification of swell. Preparation status of a ground station which will be supplied to receive CYGNSS data

  6. Galileo satellite antenna modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steigenberger, Peter; Dach, Rolf; Prange, Lars; Montenbruck, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    The space segment of the European satellite navigation system Galileo currently consists of six satellites. Four of them belong to the first generation of In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites whereas the other two are Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites. High-precision geodetic applications require detailed knowledge about the actual phase center of the satellite and receiver antenna. The deviation of this actual phase center from a well-defined reference point is described by phase center offsets (PCOs) and phase center variations (PCVs). Unfortunately, no public information is available about the Galileo satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs, neither for the IOV, nor the FOC satellites. Therefore, conventional values for the IOV satellite antenna PCOs have been adopted for the Multi-GNSS experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The effect of the PCVs is currently neglected and no PCOs for the FOC satellites are available yet. To overcome this deficiency in GNSS observation modeling, satellite antenna PCOs and PCVs are estimated for the Galileo IOV satellites based on global GNSS tracking data of the MGEX network and additional stations of the legacy IGS network. Two completely independent solutions are computed with the Bernese and Napeos software packages. The PCO and PCV values of the individual satellites are analyzed and the availability of two different solutions allows for an accuracy assessment. The FOC satellites are built by a different manufacturer and are also equipped with another type of antenna panel compared to the IOV satellites. Signal transmission of the first FOC satellite has started in December 2014 and activation of the second satellite is expected for early 2015. Based on the available observations PCO estimates and, optionally PCVs of the FOC satellites will be presented as well. Finally, the impact of the new antenna model on the precision and accuracy of the Galileo orbit determination is analyzed.

  7. Statistical framework for estimating GNSS bias

    CERN Document Server

    Vierinen, Juha; Rideout, William C; Erickson, Philip J; Norberg, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    We present a statistical framework for estimating global navigation satellite system (GNSS) non-ionospheric differential time delay bias. The biases are estimated by examining differences of measured line integrated electron densities (TEC) that are scaled to equivalent vertical integrated densities. The spatio-temporal variability, instrumentation dependent errors, and errors due to inaccurate ionospheric altitude profile assumptions are modeled as structure functions. These structure functions determine how the TEC differences are weighted in the linear least-squares minimization procedure, which is used to produce the bias estimates. A method for automatic detection and removal of outlier measurements that do not fit into a model of receiver bias is also described. The same statistical framework can be used for a single receiver station, but it also scales to a large global network of receivers. In addition to the Global Positioning System (GPS), the method is also applicable to other dual frequency GNSS s...

  8. Multi-GNSS Orbit and Clock Combination: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsche, Mathias

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) a number of Analysis Centers (ACs) extended their software capabilities to process signals from the BeiDou, Galileo, and QZSS systems in addition to the well established systems GPS and GLONASS. Currently, the MGEX product portfolio covers precise satellite orbits and clocks, receiver clocks, signal biases, and Earth rotation parameters generated by the individual ACs. This presentation will provide an overview on the available AC-specific MGEX products. In addition, an introduction to a multi-GNSS orbit and clock combination procedure will be given. Finally, preliminary results from that multi-GNSS combination including a comparison with corresponding operational IGS products will be reported along with a discussion of the results.

  9. Detecting Volcanic Ash Plumes with GNSS Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainville, N.; Larson, K. M.; Palo, S. E.; Mattia, M.; Rossi, M.; Coltelli, M.; Roesler, C.; Fee, D.

    2016-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers are commonly placed near volcanic sites to measure ground deformation. In addition to the carrier phase data used to measure ground position, these receivers also record Signal to Noise ratio (SNR) data. Larson (2013) showed that attenuations in SNR data strongly correlate with ash emissions at a series of eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. This finding has been confirmed at eruptions for Tongariro, Mt Etna, Mt Shindake, and Sakurajima. In each of these detections, very expensive geodetic quality GNSS receivers were used. If low-cost GNSS instruments could be used instead, a networked array could be deployed and optimized for plume detection and tomography. The outputs of this sensor array could then be used by both local volcanic observatories and Volcano Ash Advisory Centers. Here we will describe progress in developing such an array. The sensors we are working with are intended for navigation use, and thus lack the supporting power and communications equipment necessary for a networked system. Reliably providing those features is major challenge for the overall sensor design. We have built prototypes of our Volcano Ash Plume Receiver (VAPR), with solar panels, lithium-ion batteries and onboard data storage for preliminary testing. We will present results of our field tests of both receivers and antennas. A second critical need for our array is a reliable detection algorithm. We have tested our algorithm on data from recent eruptions and have incorporated the noise characteristics of the low-cost GNSS receiver. We have also developed a simulation capability so that the receivers can be deployed to optimize vent crossing GNSS signals.

  10. Impact and mitigation of space weather effects on GNSS receiver performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreeja, V.

    2016-12-01

    It is well known that Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals suffer from a number of vulnerabilities, out of which a potential severe vulnerability is the effect of space weather. Space weather effects on the signals transmitted by GNSS include the effect of ionospheric perturbations and solar radio bursts. Intense solar radio bursts occurring in the L-band can impact the tracking performance of GNSS receivers located in the sunlit hemisphere of the Earth and are therefore a potential threat to safety-critical systems based on GNSS. Consequently monitoring these events is important for suitable warnings to be issued in support to related services and applications. On the other hand, the space weather effects leading to ionospheric perturbations on the GNSS signals are either due to dispersion or scintillation caused by plasma density irregularities. Scintillation can cause cycle slips and degrade the positioning accuracy in GNSS receivers. The high-latitude scintillation occurrence is known to correlate with changes in the solar and interplanetary conditions along with a consequential impact on GNSS receiver tracking performance. An assessment of the GNSS receiver tracking performance under scintillation can be analysed through the construction of receiver phase-locked loop (PLL) tracking jitter maps. These maps can offer a potentially useful tool to provide users with the prevailing tracking conditions under scintillation over a certain area and also be used to help mitigate the effects of scintillation on GNSS positioning. This paper reviews some of recent research results related to the impact and mitigation of space weather effects on GNSS receiver performance.

  11. Accuracy Performance Evaluation of Beidou Navigation Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.; Hu, Y. N.

    2017-03-01

    Accuracy is one of the key elements of the regional Beidou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) performance standard. In this paper, we review the definition specification and evaluation standard of the BDS accuracy. Current accuracy of the regional BDS is analyzed through the ground measurements and compared with GPS in terms of dilution of precision (DOP), signal-in-space user range error (SIS URE), and positioning accuracy. The Positioning DOP (PDOP) map of BDS around Chinese mainland is compared with that of GPS. The GPS PDOP is between 1.0-2.0 and does not vary with the user latitude and longitude, while the BDS PDOP varies between 1.5-5.0, and increases as the user latitude increases, and as the user longitude apart from 118°. The accuracies of the broadcast orbits of BDS are assessed by taking the precise orbits from International GNSS Service (IGS) as the reference, and by making satellite laser ranging (SLR) residuals. The radial errors of the BDS inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO) and medium orbit (MEO) satellites broadcast orbits are at the 0.5m level, which are larger than those of GPS satellites at the 0.2m level. The SLR residuals of geosynchronous orbit (GEO) satellites are 65.0cm, which are larger than those of IGSO, and MEO satellites, at the 50.0cm level. The accuracy of broadcast clock offset parameters of BDS is computed by taking the clock measurements of Two-way Satellite Radio Time Frequency Transfer as the reference. Affected by the age of broadcast clock parameters, the error of the broadcast clock offset parameters of the MEO satellites is the largest, at the 0.80m level. Finally, measurements of the multi-GNSS (MGEX) receivers are used for positioning accuracy assessment of BDS and GPS. It is concluded that the positioning accuracy of regional BDS is better than 10m at the horizontal component and the vertical component. The combined positioning accuracy of both systems is better than one specific system.

  12. Multiangle Bistatic SAR Imaging and Fusion Based on BeiDou-2 Navigation Satellite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Tao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (BSAR based on the Global Navigation Service System (GNSSBSAR uses navigation satellites as radar transmitters, which are low in cost. However, GNSS-BSAR images have poor resolution and low Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR. In this paper, a multiangle observation and data processing strategy are presented based on BeiDou-2 navigation satellite imagery, from which twenty-six BSAR images in different configurations are obtained. A region-based fusion algorithm using region of interest segmentation is proposed, and a high-quality fusion image is obtained. The results reveal that the multiangle imaging method can extend the applications of GNSS-BSAR.

  13. Precise Point Positioning Model Using Triple GNSS Constellations: GPS, Galileo and BeiDou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-12-01

    This paper introduces a comparison between dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) post-processing model, which combines the observations of three different GNSS constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou and real-time PPP model. A drawback of a single GNSS system such as GPS, however, is the availability of sufficient number of visible satellites in urban areas. Combining GNSS observations offers more visible satellites to users, which in turn is expected to enhance the satellite geometry and the overall positioning solution. However, combining several GNSS observables introduces additional biases, which require rigorous modelling, including the GNSS time offsets and hardware delays. In this paper, a GNSS post-processing PPPP model is developed using ionosphere-free linear combination. The additional biases of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou combination are accounted for through the introduction of a new unknown parameter, which is identified as the inter-system bias, in the PPP mathematical model. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS / Galileo / BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly inter-system bias. A total of four data sets at four IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the IGS-MGEX network are used to correct of the GPS, Galileo and BeiDou measurements. For the real-time PPP model the corrections of the satellites orbit and clock are obtained through the international GNSS service (IGS) real-time service (RTS). GPS and Galileo Observations are used for the GNSS RTS-IGS PPP model as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not available for BeiDou satellites. This paper provides the GNSS RTS-IGS PPP model using different satellite clock corrections namely: IGS01, IGC01, IGS01, and IGS03. All PPP models results of convergence time and positioning precision are compared to the traditional GPS-only PPP model. It is shown that combining

  14. BQC: A new multi-GNSS data quality checking toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Tang, G.; Imparato, D.; Cui, H.; Song, B.; Rizos, C.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-GNSS networks, for example M-GEX and iGMAS, are set up and grow quickly with the development of new navigation systems and multi-GNSS receivers. It is unavoidable that GNSS signals are deteriorated by several error sources. Thus GNSS network operators, data users and receiver designers all req

  15. BQC: A new multi-GNSS data quality checking toolkit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, H.; Tang, G.; Imparato, D.; Cui, H.; Song, B.; Rizos, C.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-GNSS networks, for example M-GEX and iGMAS, are set up and grow quickly with the development of new navigation systems and multi-GNSS receivers. It is unavoidable that GNSS signals are deteriorated by several error sources. Thus GNSS network operators, data users and receiver designers all

  16. Innovative Sea Surface Monitoring with GNSS-Reflectometry aboard ISS: Overview and Recent Results from GEROS-ISS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wickert, Jens; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Bandeiras, J.;

    GEROS-ISS (GEROS hereafter) stands for GNSS REflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry onboard the International Space Station. It is a scientific experiment, proposed to the European Space Agency (ESA)in 2011 for installation aboard the ISS. The main focus of GEROS is the dedicated use...... of signals from the currently available Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) for remote sensing of the System Earth with focus to Climate Change characterisation. The GEROS mission idea and the current status are briefly reviewed....

  17. WIFI AIDED INTEGRITY IMPROVEMENT IN MEMS INS/GNSS INTEGRATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘华; 刘彤

    2013-01-01

    The reliability of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) positioning degrades when satellite signals are interfered .Such degradation is hard to be deteced by a micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS) based inertial system(INS)/GNSS ,integrating navigation system with a conventional Kalman filtering ,which results in poten-tial integrity problem of the system .Hence ,an algorithm combining wireless fidelity (WiFi) signal with a federa-ted Kalman filter (FKF) is proposed to identify the system integrity in dense urban navigation .The criterion of the system integrity detection is created followed by the derivation of the integrity coefficient .The field test shows that integrity changes can be captured by applying WiFi ,and the maximum positioning error is reduced by 67% without compensation of inertial sensors in integrity deterioration .

  18. GNSS-based Road Charging Systems - Assessment of Vehicle Location Determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabic, Martina

    and undetected fault and failures generate significant legal or economic negative consequences. Any fault or failures that lead to incorrect charging may cause economic loss or provoke wrong legal decisions as the economic liability is associated to the legal aspects due to the repercussion of potential claims....... Previous trials and performance assessments of GNSS-based road charging systems have generally focused on the possibilities of the charging systems rather than on the impossibilities. Often it has not been clearly described which errors and shortages existed in the collected data, but instead they have...... just been excluded as invalid data prior to the assessments which then concluded that more focus should be placed on the errors occurred. Hence, it has been deliberate in this PhD research not to exclude faulty and incorrect data in the assessment. The results presented in this thesis are based on all...

  19. Precise Point Positioning Using Triple GNSS Constellations in Various Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afifi, Akram; El-Rabbany, Ahmed

    2016-05-28

    This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP) model, which combines the observations from three different global navigation satellite system (GNSS) constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Combining measurements from different GNSS systems introduces additional biases, including inter-system bias and hardware delays, which require rigorous modelling. Our model is based on the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD) linear combinations. BSSD linear combination cancels out some receiver-related biases, including receiver clock error and non-zero initial phase bias of the receiver oscillator. Forming the BSSD linear combination requires a reference satellite, which can be selected from any of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou systems. In this paper three BSSD scenarios are tested; each considers a reference satellite from a different GNSS constellation. Natural Resources Canada's GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets collected at four different IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment (IGS-MGEX) network are used to correct the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou measurements in the post-processing PPP mode. A real-time PPP solution is also obtained, which is referred to as RT-PPP in the sequel, through the use of the IGS real-time service (RTS) for satellite orbit and clock corrections. However, only GPS and Galileo observations are used for the RT-PPP solution, as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not presently available for BeiDou system. All post-processed and real-time PPP solutions are compared with the traditional un-differenced GPS-only counterparts. It is shown that combining the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou observations in the post-processing mode improves the PPP convergence

  20. Precise Point Positioning Using Triple GNSS Constellations in Various Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Afifi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new dual-frequency precise point positioning (PPP model, which combines the observations from three different global navigation satellite system (GNSS constellations, namely GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Combining measurements from different GNSS systems introduces additional biases, including inter-system bias and hardware delays, which require rigorous modelling. Our model is based on the un-differenced and between-satellite single-difference (BSSD linear combinations. BSSD linear combination cancels out some receiver-related biases, including receiver clock error and non-zero initial phase bias of the receiver oscillator. Forming the BSSD linear combination requires a reference satellite, which can be selected from any of the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou systems. In this paper three BSSD scenarios are tested; each considers a reference satellite from a different GNSS constellation. Natural Resources Canada’s GPSPace PPP software is modified to enable a combined GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou PPP solution and to handle the newly introduced biases. A total of four data sets collected at four different IGS stations are processed to verify the developed PPP model. Precise satellite orbit and clock products from the International GNSS Service Multi-GNSS Experiment (IGS-MGEX network are used to correct the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou measurements in the post-processing PPP mode. A real-time PPP solution is also obtained, which is referred to as RT-PPP in the sequel, through the use of the IGS real-time service (RTS for satellite orbit and clock corrections. However, only GPS and Galileo observations are used for the RT-PPP solution, as the RTS-IGS satellite products are not presently available for BeiDou system. All post-processed and real-time PPP solutions are compared with the traditional un-differenced GPS-only counterparts. It is shown that combining the GPS, Galileo, and BeiDou observations in the post-processing mode improves the

  1. A Feasibility Analysis of Land-Based SINS/GNSS Gravimetry for Groundwater Resource Detection in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Wei Chiang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The integration of the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System and Global Navigation Satellite System (SINS/GNSS has been implemented for land-based gravimetry and has been proven to perform well in estimating gravity. Based on the mGal-level gravimetry results, this research aims to construct and develop a land-based SINS/GNSS gravimetry device containing a navigation-grade Inertial Measurement Unit. This research also presents a feasibility analysis for groundwater resource detection. A preliminary comparison of the kinematic velocities and accelerations using multi-combination of GNSS data including Global Positioning System, Global Navigation Satellite System, and BeiDou Navigation Satellite System, indicates that three-system observations performed better than two-system data in the computation. A comparison of gravity derived from SINS/GNSS and measured using a relative gravimeter also shows that both agree reasonably well with a mean difference of 2.30 mGal. The mean difference between repeat measurements of gravity disturbance using SINS/GNSS is 2.46 mGal with a standard deviation of 1.32 mGal. The gravity variation because of the groundwater at Pingtung Plain, Taiwan could reach 2.72 mGal. Hence, the developed land-based SINS/GNSS gravimetry can sufficiently and effectively detect groundwater resources.

  2. A Feasibility Analysis of Land-Based SINS/GNSS Gravimetry for Groundwater Resource Detection in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Wei; Lin, Cheng-An; Kuo, Chung-Yen

    2015-09-29

    The integration of the Strapdown Inertial Navigation System and Global Navigation Satellite System (SINS/GNSS) has been implemented for land-based gravimetry and has been proven to perform well in estimating gravity. Based on the mGal-level gravimetry results, this research aims to construct and develop a land-based SINS/GNSS gravimetry device containing a navigation-grade Inertial Measurement Unit. This research also presents a feasibility analysis for groundwater resource detection. A preliminary comparison of the kinematic velocities and accelerations using multi-combination of GNSS data including Global Positioning System, Global Navigation Satellite System, and BeiDou Navigation Satellite System, indicates that three-system observations performed better than two-system data in the computation. A comparison of gravity derived from SINS/GNSS and measured using a relative gravimeter also shows that both agree reasonably well with a mean difference of 2.30 mGal. The mean difference between repeat measurements of gravity disturbance using SINS/GNSS is 2.46 mGal with a standard deviation of 1.32 mGal. The gravity variation because of the groundwater at Pingtung Plain, Taiwan could reach 2.72 mGal. Hence, the developed land-based SINS/GNSS gravimetry can sufficiently and effectively detect groundwater resources.

  3. A New GNSS Single-Epoch Ambiguity Resolution Method Based on Triple-Frequency Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengli Wang

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fast and reliable ambiguity resolution (AR has been a continuing challenge for real-time precise positioning based on dual-frequency Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS carrier phase observation. New GNSS systems (i.e., GPS modernization, BDS (BeiDou Navigation Satellite System, GLONASS (Global Navigation Satellite System, and Galileo will provide multiple-frequency signals. The GNSS multiple-constellation and multiple-frequency signals are expected to bring great benefits to AR. A new GNSS single-epoch AR method for a short-range baseline based on triple-frequency signals is developed in this study. Different from most GNSS multiple-constellation AR methods, this technique takes advantage of the triple-frequency signals and robust estimation as much as possible. In this technique, the double difference (DD AR of the triple-frequency observations is achieved in the first step. Second, the triple-frequency carrier phase observations with fixed ambiguities are used with the dual-frequency carrier phase observations to estimate their ambiguity. Finally, to realize reliable GNSS single-epoch AR, robust estimation is involved. The performance of the new technique is examined using 24 hours of GPS/GLONASS/BDS observation collected from a short-range baseline. The results show that single-epoch AR of the GNSS signals can be realized using this new technique. Moreover, the AR of BDS Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO satellites’ observations is easier than are those of the Medium Earth Orbit (MEO and Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO satellites’ observations.

  4. Differential GNSS and Vision-Based Tracking to Improve Navigation Performance in Cooperative Multi-UAV Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedeo Rodi Vetrella

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous navigation of micro-UAVs is typically based on the integration of low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers and Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS-based inertial and magnetic sensors to stabilize and control the flight. The resulting navigation performance in terms of position and attitude accuracy may not suffice for other mission needs, such as the ones relevant to fine sensor pointing. In this framework, this paper presents a cooperative UAV navigation algorithm that allows a chief vehicle, equipped with inertial and magnetic sensors, a Global Positioning System (GPS receiver, and a vision system, to improve its navigation performance (in real time or in the post processing phase exploiting formation flying deputy vehicles equipped with GPS receivers. The focus is set on outdoor environments and the key concept is to exploit differential GPS among vehicles and vision-based tracking (DGPS/Vision to build a virtual additional navigation sensor whose information is then integrated in a sensor fusion algorithm based on an Extended Kalman Filter. The developed concept and processing architecture are described, with a focus on DGPS/Vision attitude determination algorithm. Performance assessment is carried out on the basis of both numerical simulations and flight tests. In the latter ones, navigation estimates derived from the DGPS/Vision approach are compared with those provided by the onboard autopilot system of a customized quadrotor. The analysis shows the potential of the developed approach, mainly deriving from the possibility to exploit magnetic- and inertial-independent accurate attitude information.

  5. Differential GNSS and Vision-Based Tracking to Improve Navigation Performance in Cooperative Multi-UAV Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetrella, Amedeo Rodi; Fasano, Giancarmine; Accardo, Domenico; Moccia, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous navigation of micro-UAVs is typically based on the integration of low cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers and Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS)-based inertial and magnetic sensors to stabilize and control the flight. The resulting navigation performance in terms of position and attitude accuracy may not suffice for other mission needs, such as the ones relevant to fine sensor pointing. In this framework, this paper presents a cooperative UAV navigation algorithm that allows a chief vehicle, equipped with inertial and magnetic sensors, a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, and a vision system, to improve its navigation performance (in real time or in the post processing phase) exploiting formation flying deputy vehicles equipped with GPS receivers. The focus is set on outdoor environments and the key concept is to exploit differential GPS among vehicles and vision-based tracking (DGPS/Vision) to build a virtual additional navigation sensor whose information is then integrated in a sensor fusion algorithm based on an Extended Kalman Filter. The developed concept and processing architecture are described, with a focus on DGPS/Vision attitude determination algorithm. Performance assessment is carried out on the basis of both numerical simulations and flight tests. In the latter ones, navigation estimates derived from the DGPS/Vision approach are compared with those provided by the onboard autopilot system of a customized quadrotor. The analysis shows the potential of the developed approach, mainly deriving from the possibility to exploit magnetic- and inertial-independent accurate attitude information. PMID:27999318

  6. Analysis of Ionospheric Scintillation Characteristics in Sub-Antarctica Region with GNSS Data at Macquarie Island

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Jinling

    2017-01-01

    Ionospheric scintillation has a great impact on radio propagation and electronic system performance, thus is extensively studied currently. The influence of scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is particularly evident, making GNSS an effective medium to study characteristics of scintillation. Ionospheric scintillation varies greatly in relation with temporal and spatial distribution. In this paper, both temporal and spatial characteristics of scintillation are investigated based on Macquarie Island’s GNSS scintillation data collected from 2011 to 2015. Experiments demonstrate that occurrence rates of amplitude scintillation have a close relationship with solar activity, while phase scintillation is more likely to be generated by geomagnetic activity. In addition, scintillation distribution behaviors related to elevation and azimuth angles are statistically analyzed for both amplitude and phase scintillation. The proposed work is valuable for a deeper understanding of theoretical mechanisms of ionospheric scintillation in this region, and provides a reference for GNSS applications in certain regions around sub-Antarctica. PMID:28085087

  7. Developing a Robust, Interoperable GNSS Space Service Volume (SSV) for the Global Space User Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Frank H.; Parker, Joel J. K.; Welch, Bryan; Enderle, Werner

    2017-01-01

    For over two decades, researchers, space users, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) service providers, and international policy makers have been working diligently to expand the space-borne use of the Global Positioning System (GPS) and, most recently, to employ the full complement of GNSS constellations to increase spacecraft navigation performance. Space-borne Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) applications employing GNSS are now ubiquitous in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). GNSS use in space is quickly expanding into the Space Service Volume (SSV), the signal environment in the volume surrounding the Earth that enables real-time PNT measurements from GNSS systems at altitudes of 3000 km and above. To support the current missions and planned future missions within the SSV, initiatives are being conducted in the United States and internationally to ensure that GNSS signals are available, robust, and yield precise navigation performance. These initiatives include the Interagency Forum for Operational Requirements (IFOR) effort in the United States, to support GPS SSV signal robustness through future design changes, and the United Nations-sponsored International Committee on GNSS (ICG), to coordinate SSV development across all international GNSS constellations and regional augmentations. The results of these efforts have already proven fruitful, enabling new missions through radically improved navigation and timing performance, ensuring quick recovery from trajectory maneuvers, improving space vehicle autonomy and making GNSS signals more resilient from potential disruptions. Missions in the SSV are operational now and have demonstrated outstanding PNT performance characteristics; much better than what was envisioned less than a decade ago. The recent launch of the first in a series of US weather satellites will employ the use of GNSS in the SSV to substantially improve weather prediction and public-safety situational awareness of fast moving events, including

  8. The GNSS polarimetric radio-occultation technique to sense precipitation events: a new concept to be tested aboard PAZ Low Earth Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomás, Sergio; Oliveras, Santi; Cardellach, Estel; Rius, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    The Radio Occultation and Heavy Precipitation (ROHP) experiment, to be conducted aboard the Spanish PAZ satellite, consists of a radio occultation (RO) mission provided with dual-polarization capabilities. The research with polarimetric RO data has the goal of assessing the capabilities and limitations of this technique to infer profiles of heavy precipitation. The technique aims to provide vertical profiles of precipitation simultaneously to the vertical profiles of thermodynamic parameters (standard RO products) perfectly collocated both in space and time. If successful, the polarimetric RO will represent the first technique able to provide these complementary information on precipitation. This is a relevant input for studies on heavy and violent rainfall events, which being poorly represented by the current-generation of Numerical Weather Prediction and General Circulation Models appear to be difficult to forecast on all time-scales. The Low Earth Orbiter hosting this experiment, to be launched in 2013, will orbit at 500 km altitude in a near-Polar orbit. The Radio Occulation payload includes a RO GNSS receiver and a dual polarization (H/V) limb oriented antenna to capture the signals of setting GNSS transmitters. NOAA and UCAR participate in the ground-segment of the radiometric experiment to enable near-real time dissemination of the level-1 standard RO products. The space-based GNSS RO technique scans the atmosphere vertically at fine resolution (close to 300 meter in the troposphere) by precisely measure the delay between a GNSS transmitter and a GNSS receiver aboard a Low Earth Orbiter, when the former is setting below or rising above the Earth limb. The standard, thermodynamical, products are extracted from the excess delay induced by the atmosphere at different layers. This presentation will not focus on this well-established application, but a novel concept using polarimetry to also retrieve rain information. The precipitation-measurement principle is

  9. Multi-GNSS Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Shaery, A.; Zhang, S.; Lim, S.; Rizos, C.

    2012-04-01

    The multi-GNSS era has began attracting more attention with the declaration of full operational capability of GLONASS , with a 24 satellites being set to 'healthy' on December 8th 2011 (IAC, 2011). This means that GPS is no longer the only GNSS that provides global positioning coverage. This status brings benefits for GNSS users in areas (e.g. 'urban canyon' environments or in deep open cut mines) where the number of visible satellites is limited because of shadowing effects. In such areas adding more functioning satellites, which is one of the aiding solutions, becomes easier, at no extra cost. The inclusion of GLONASS observations in positioning solutions will increase the available number of satellites and thus positioning accuracy may improve as a result of enhanced overall satellite geometry. Such an aiding solution is increasingly attractive due to the successful revitalisation of GLONASS. Another motivation is the availability of improved GLONASS orbits from the IGS and individual analysis centres of the IGS. The increasing availability of receivers with GPS/GLONASS tracking capability on the market is an additional motive. Consequently, most networks of continuously operating reference stations (CORS) are now equipped with receivers that can track both GPS and GLONASS satellite signals, and therefore network-based positioning with combined GPS and GLONASS observations is possible. However, adding GLONASS observations to GPS is not a straight forward process. This is attributable to a few system differences in reference frames for time and coordinates, and in signal structures. The first two differences are easy to deal with using well-defined conversion and transformation parameters (El-Mowafy, 2001). However, signal structure differences have some implications. The mathematical modelling of combined GPS/GLONASS observations is not performed as in the case of GPS-alone. Special care should be paid to such integration. Not only is the software part affected

  10. The Rise of GNSS Reflectometry for Earth Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Li, Zhijin; Nghiem, Son V.; Lowe, Steve; Shah, Rashmi; Clarizia, Maria Paola; Cardellach, Estel

    2015-01-01

    The Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) reflectometry, i.e. GNSS-R, is a novel remote-sensing technique first published in that uses GNSS signals reflected from the Earth's surface to infer its surface properties such as sea surface height (SSH), ocean winds, sea-ice coverage, vegetation, wetlands and soil moisture, to name a few. This communication discusses the scientific value of GNSS-R to (a) furthering our understanding of ocean mesoscale circulation toward scales finer than those that existing nadir altimeters can resolve, and (b) mapping vegetated wetlands, an emerging application that might open up new avenues to map and monitor the planet's wetlands for methane emission assessments. Such applications are expected to be demonstrated by the availability of data from GEROS-ISS, an ESA experiment currently in phase A, and CyGNSS [3], a NASA mission currently in development. In particular, the paper details the expected error characteristics and the role of filtering played in the assimilation of these data to reduce the altimetric error (when averaging many measurements).

  11. Satellite Imagery Assisted Road-Based Visual Navigation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkova, A.; Gibbens, P. W.

    2016-06-01

    There is a growing demand for unmanned aerial systems as autonomous surveillance, exploration and remote sensing solutions. Among the key concerns for robust operation of these systems is the need to reliably navigate the environment without reliance on global navigation satellite system (GNSS). This is of particular concern in Defence circles, but is also a major safety issue for commercial operations. In these circumstances, the aircraft needs to navigate relying only on information from on-board passive sensors such as digital cameras. An autonomous feature-based visual system presented in this work offers a novel integral approach to the modelling and registration of visual features that responds to the specific needs of the navigation system. It detects visual features from Google Earth* build a feature database. The same algorithm then detects features in an on-board cameras video stream. On one level this serves to localise the vehicle relative to the environment using Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM). On a second level it correlates them with the database to localise the vehicle with respect to the inertial frame. The performance of the presented visual navigation system was compared using the satellite imagery from different years. Based on comparison results, an analysis of the effects of seasonal, structural and qualitative changes of the imagery source on the performance of the navigation algorithm is presented. * The algorithm is independent of the source of satellite imagery and another provider can be used

  12. Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, A.; Cerezo, F.; Fernandez, M.; Lomba, J.; Lopez, M.; Moreno, J.; Neira, A.; Quintana, C.; Torres, J.; Trigo, R.; Urena, J.; Vega, E.; Vez, E.

    2010-12-01

    The Spanish Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITyC) and the Ministry of Defense (MoD) signed an agreement in 2007 for the development of a "Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System" based, in first instance, on two satellites: a high resolution optical satellite, called SEOSAT/Ingenio, and a radar satellite based on SAR technology, called SEOSAR/Paz. SEOSAT/Ingenio is managed by MITyC through the Centre for the Development of Industrial Technology (CDTI), with technical and contractual support from the European Space Agency (ESA). HISDESA T together with the Spanish Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA, National Institute for Aerospace Technology) will be responsible for the in-orbit operation and the commercial operation of both satellites, and for the technical management of SEOSAR/Paz on behalf of the MoD. In both cases EADS CASA Espacio (ECE) is the prime contractor leading the industrial consortia. The ground segment development will be assigned to a Spanish consortium. This system is the most important contribution of Spain to the European Programme Global Monitoring for Environment and Security, GMES. This paper presents the Spanish Earth Observation Satellite System focusing on SEOSA T/Ingenio Programme and with special emphasis in the potential contribution to the ESA Third Party Missions Programme and to the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security initiative (GMES) Data Access.

  13. GNSS脆弱性环境仿真系统设计%Design on environment simulation system of GNSS vulnerability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严凯; 战兴群; 秦峰; 王启玮

    2013-01-01

    设计了一种GNSS脆弱性环境仿真系统,该系统提供包括GNSS信号传输全链路干扰(GNSS电磁干扰、大气电磁环境、空间链路故障)的综合仿真.该系统主要由空间系统故障模拟器、欺骗/阻塞干扰器、信号模拟器、软件接收机及相应大气模型软件组成.该系统可实现GNSS系统不同脆弱性干扰场景下的仿真测试,产生干扰射频信号输出.介绍了系统主要模块的设计方案,并利用相应模块进行实验分析与效果显示,实验证明了各模块的有效性,系统方案的可行性.%A set of simulation system of GNSS vulnerability environment, which provides integrated simulation of interference in GNSS signal transmission link, which includes GNSS electromagnetic interferences, atmospheric electromagnetic environment, fault in space link is designed. The system mainly consists fault simulator of space system, deception/barrage jamming devices, signal simulators related software of atmospheric model. The system realizes simulation test under interference scenes of the GNSS system different vulnerability, and generates interference RF signal output. Designs scheme of main system modules is focused on, experimental analysis and effect display is carried out using corresponding modules, experiments show that each module is effective, and the system scheme is feasible

  14. The Performance of a Tight Ins/gnss/photogrammetric Integration Scheme for Land Based MMS Applications in Gnss Denied Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Chien-Hsun; Chiang, Kai-Wei

    2016-06-01

    The early development of mobile mapping system (MMS) was restricted to applications that permitted the determination of the elements of exterior orientation from existing ground control. Mobile mapping refers to a means of collecting geospatial data using mapping sensors that are mounted on a mobile platform. Research works concerning mobile mapping dates back to the late 1980s. This process is mainly driven by the need for highway infrastructure mapping and transportation corridor inventories. In the early nineties, advances in satellite and inertial technology made it possible to think about mobile mapping in a different way. Instead of using ground control points as references for orienting the images in space, the trajectory and attitude of the imager platform could now be determined directly. Cameras, along with navigation and positioning sensors are integrated and mounted on a land vehicle for mapping purposes. Objects of interest can be directly measured and mapped from images that have been georeferenced using navigation and positioning sensors. Direct georeferencing (DG) is the determination of time-variable position and orientation parameters for a mobile digital imager. The most common technologies used for this purpose today are satellite positioning using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and inertial navigation using an Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU). Although either technology used along could in principle determine both position and orientation, they are usually integrated in such a way that the IMU is the main orientation sensor, while the GNSS receiver is the main position sensor. However, GNSS signals are obstructed due to limited number of visible satellites in GNSS denied environments such as urban canyon, foliage, tunnel and indoor that cause the GNSS gap or interfered by reflected signals that cause abnormal measurement residuals thus deteriorates the positioning accuracy in GNSS denied environments. This study aims at developing a

  15. THE PERFORMANCE OF A TIGHT INS/GNSS/PHOTOGRAMMETRIC INTEGRATION SCHEME FOR LAND BASED MMS APPLICATIONS IN GNSS DENIED ENVIRONMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-H. Chu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The early development of mobile mapping system (MMS was restricted to applications that permitted the determination of the elements of exterior orientation from existing ground control. Mobile mapping refers to a means of collecting geospatial data using mapping sensors that are mounted on a mobile platform. Research works concerning mobile mapping dates back to the late 1980s. This process is mainly driven by the need for highway infrastructure mapping and transportation corridor inventories. In the early nineties, advances in satellite and inertial technology made it possible to think about mobile mapping in a different way. Instead of using ground control points as references for orienting the images in space, the trajectory and attitude of the imager platform could now be determined directly. Cameras, along with navigation and positioning sensors are integrated and mounted on a land vehicle for mapping purposes. Objects of interest can be directly measured and mapped from images that have been georeferenced using navigation and positioning sensors. Direct georeferencing (DG is the determination of time-variable position and orientation parameters for a mobile digital imager. The most common technologies used for this purpose today are satellite positioning using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS and inertial navigation using an Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU. Although either technology used along could in principle determine both position and orientation, they are usually integrated in such a way that the IMU is the main orientation sensor, while the GNSS receiver is the main position sensor. However, GNSS signals are obstructed due to limited number of visible satellites in GNSS denied environments such as urban canyon, foliage, tunnel and indoor that cause the GNSS gap or interfered by reflected signals that cause abnormal measurement residuals thus deteriorates the positioning accuracy in GNSS denied environments. This study aims

  16. A New Mapping Function Based on GNSS-RO observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetto, Catia; Rosciano, Elisa; Vespe, Francesco; Vizziello, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    The coordinates of a static Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) station placed on the ground are estimated together with the delay suffered by the incoming satellite signals through the atmosphere. The tropospheric delay (TD) is shaped as the product of the zenith delay (ZTD) times a mapping function (MF) depending on the sine of elevation angles. In processing chain, ZTD is just estimated together with the coordinates; while the MF is modelled apart, in an independent way, by using atmospheric profiles retrieved with balloon observations ( RAOB) as done for the Niell MF (1996) or provided by climate or Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) models as in the Vienna MFs. The several space missions devoted to GNSS-RO (e.g. COSMIC-FORMOSAT, METOP, CHAMP, GRACE end others) are providing a huge amount of data which makes worthwhile to be attempted the reconstruction of a new mapping function based on such kind of data. Thus we have built the "Matera" MF ( MTMF) based just on GNSS-RO observations. The new MTMF will be applied to a network of EUREF GNSS stations in the Mediterranean area. Formal errors and repeatability of ZTD and coordinates estimated with the MTMF will be compared with those achieved applying other MF. In validation activities we plan to use the Bernese software.

  17. Advanced satellite communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Edward J.; Lie, Sen

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this research program was to develop an innovative advanced satellite receiver/demodulator utilizing surface acoustic wave (SAW) chirp transform processor and coherent BPSK demodulation. The algorithm of this SAW chirp Fourier transformer is of the Convolve - Multiply - Convolve (CMC) type, utilizing off-the-shelf reflective array compressor (RAC) chirp filters. This satellite receiver, if fully developed, was intended to be used as an on-board multichannel communications repeater. The Advanced Communications Receiver consists of four units: (1) CMC processor, (2) single sideband modulator, (3) demodulator, and (4) chirp waveform generator and individual channel processors. The input signal is composed of multiple user transmission frequencies operating independently from remotely located ground terminals. This signal is Fourier transformed by the CMC Processor into a unique time slot for each user frequency. The CMC processor is driven by a waveform generator through a single sideband (SSB) modulator. The output of the coherent demodulator is composed of positive and negative pulses, which are the envelopes of the chirp transform processor output. These pulses correspond to the data symbols. Following the demodulator, a logic circuit reconstructs the pulses into data, which are subsequently differentially decoded to form the transmitted data. The coherent demodulation and detection of BPSK signals derived from a CMC chirp transform processor were experimentally demonstrated and bit error rate (BER) testing was performed. To assess the feasibility of such advanced receiver, the results were compared with the theoretical analysis and plotted for an average BER as a function of signal-to-noise ratio. Another goal of this SBIR program was the development of a commercial product. The commercial product developed was an arbitrary waveform generator. The successful sales have begun with the delivery of the first arbitrary waveform generator.

  18. Coupled Integration of CSAC, MIMU, and GNSS for Improved PNT Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lin; You, Zheng; Liu, Tianyi; Shi, Shuai

    2016-05-12

    Positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT) is a strategic key technology widely used in military and civilian applications. Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are the most important PNT techniques. However, the vulnerability of GNSS threatens PNT service quality, and integrations with other information are necessary. A chip scale atomic clock (CSAC) provides high-precision frequency and high-accuracy time information in a short time. A micro inertial measurement unit (MIMU) provides a strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS) with rich navigation information, better real-time feed, anti-jamming, and error accumulation. This study explores the coupled integration of CSAC, MIMU, and GNSS to enhance PNT performance. The architecture of coupled integration is designed and degraded when any subsystem fails. A mathematical model for a precise time aiding navigation filter is derived rigorously. The CSAC aids positioning by weighted linear optimization when the visible satellite number is four or larger. By contrast, CSAC converts the GNSS observations to range measurements by "clock coasting" when the visible satellite number is less than four, thereby constraining the error divergence of micro inertial navigation and improving the availability of GNSS signals and the positioning accuracy of the integration. Field vehicle experiments, both in open-sky area and in a harsh environment, show that the integration can improve the positioning probability and accuracy.

  19. GNSS Buoy Array in the Ocean for Natural Hazard Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Yamamoto, S. I.; Iwakiri, N.; Toyoshima, M.; Koshikawa, N.; Motohashi, O.; Hashimoto, G.; Wada, A.

    2015-12-01

    The GNSS buoy system for tsunami early warning has been developed in Japan. The system has been implemented as a national wave monitoring system and its record was used to update the tsunami warning at the 3.11 Tohoku-oki earthquake. The lessons learned in this experience was that the buoys are placed only less than 20km from the coast, which was not far enough for effective evacuation of people. We thus tried to improve the system for putting the buoy much farther from the coast. First, we tried to implement, different from current baseline mode RTK-GPS, a real-time PPP analysis strategy for positioning. In addition, we tried to use a two-way satellite data transmission in contrast with current surface radio system. We have made a series of experiments for this purpose in 2013 and 2014. A buoy of about 40km south of Shikoku, southwest Japan, was used for this purpose. GEONET data were used to obtain precise orbits and clocks of satellites. Then, the information was transferred to the GNSS buoy using LEX signal of QZSS satellite system. The received information on the buoy were used for real-time PPP analysis for every second. The obtained buoy position was then transmitted to the ground base, through an engineering test satellite, ETS-VIII. The received data was then disseminated to public through the internet. Both filtered short-term and long-term waves, were separately shown on the webpage. The success of these experiments indicates that the GNSS buoy can be placed at least more than 1,500 km from the ground based tracking network. Given this success, we would now be able to deploy a new GNSS buoy array system in the wide ocean. An array in the ocean can be used for ionospheric and atmospheric research in the same region as well as tsunami or ocean bottom crustal deformation monitoring through an application to the GNSS-acoustic system. We are now designing a regional GNSS buoy array in the western Pacific as a synthetic natural hazard mitigation system.

  20. Evaluating a campaign GNSS velocity field derived from an online precise point positioning service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, L.; Silcock, D.; Choy, S.; Cas, R.; Ailleres, L.; Fournier, N.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional processing of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data using dedicated scientific software has provided the highest levels of positional accuracy, and has been used extensively in geophysical deformation studies. To achieve these accuracies a significant level of understanding and training is required, limiting their availability to the general scientific community. Various online GNSS processing services, now freely available, address some of these difficulties and allow users to easily process their own GNSS data and potentially obtain high quality results. Previous research into these services has focused on Continually Operating Reference Station (CORS) GNSS data. Less research exists on the results achievable with these services using large campaign GNSS data sets, which are inherently noisier than CORS data. Even less research exists on the quality of velocity fields derived from campaign GNSS data processed through online precise point positioning services. Particularly, whether they are suitable for geodynamic and deformation studies where precise and reliable velocities are needed. In this research, we process a very large campaign GPS data set (spanning 10 yr) with the online Jet Propulsion Laboratory Automated Precise Positioning Service. This data set is taken from a GNSS network specifically designed and surveyed to measure deformation through the central North Island of New Zealand. This includes regional CORS stations. We then use these coordinates to derive a horizontal and vertical velocity field. This is the first time that a large campaign GPS data set has been processed solely using an online service and the solutions used to determine a horizontal and vertical velocity field. We compared this velocity field to that of another well utilized GNSS scientific software package. The results show a good agreement between the CORS positions and campaign station velocities obtained from the two approaches. We discuss the implications

  1. Evaluating a campaign GNSS velocity field derived from an online precise point positioning service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, L.; Silcock, D.; Choy, S.; Cas, R.; Ailleres, L.; Fournier, N.

    2016-10-01

    Traditional processing of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data using dedicated scientific software has provided the highest levels of positional accuracy, and has been used extensively in geophysical deformation studies. To achieve these accuracies a significant level of understanding and training is required, limiting their availability to the general scientific community. Various online GNSS processing services, now freely available, address some of these difficulties and allow users to easily process their own GNSS data and potentially obtain high quality results. Previous research into these services has focused on Continually Operating Reference Station (CORS) GNSS data. Less research exists on the results achievable with these services using large campaign GNSS datasets, which are inherently noisier than CORS data. Even less research exists on the quality of velocity fields derived from campaign GNSS data processed through online PPP services. Particularly, whether they are suitable for geodynamic and deformation studies where precise and reliable velocities are needed. In this research, we process a very large campaign GPS dataset (spanning ten years) with the online Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Automated Precise Positioning Service (APPS) service. This dataset is taken from a GNSS network specifically designed and surveyed to measure deformation through the central North Island of New Zealand (NZ). This includes regional CORS stations. We then use these coordinates to derive a horizontal and vertical velocity field. This is the first time that a large campaign GPS dataset has been processed solely using an online service and the solutions used to determine a horizontal and vertical velocity field. We compared this velocity field to that of another well utilised GNSS scientific software package. The results show a good agreement between the CORS positions and campaign station velocities obtained from the two approaches. We discuss the

  2. Global Ionospheric Modelling using Multi-GNSS: BeiDou, Galileo, GLONASS and GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaodong; Zhang, Xiaohong; Xie, Weiliang; Zhang, Keke; Yuan, Yongqiang; Li, Xingxing

    2016-09-01

    The emergence of China’s Beidou, Europe’s Galileo and Russia’s GLONASS satellites has multiplied the number of ionospheric piercing points (IPP) offered by GPS alone. This provides great opportunities for deriving precise global ionospheric maps (GIMs) with high resolution to improve positioning accuracy and ionospheric monitoring capabilities. In this paper, the GIM is developed based on multi-GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo) observations in the current multi-constellation condition. The performance and contribution of multi-GNSS for ionospheric modelling are carefully analysed and evaluated. Multi-GNSS observations of over 300 stations from the Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) and International GNSS Service (IGS) networks for two months are processed. The results show that the multi-GNSS GIM products are better than those of GIM products based on GPS-only. Differential code biases (DCB) are by-products of the multi-GNSS ionosphere modelling, the corresponding standard deviations (STDs) are 0.06 ns, 0.10 ns, 0.18 ns and 0.15 ns for GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and Galileo, respectively in satellite, and the STDs for the receiver are approximately 0.2~0.4 ns. The single-frequency precise point positioning (SF-PPP) results indicate that the ionospheric modelling accuracy of the proposed method based on multi-GNSS observations is better than that of the current dual-system GIM in specific areas.

  3. Geocenter coordinates estimated from GNSS data as viewed by perturbation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meindl, Michael; Beutler, Gerhard; Thaller, Daniela; Dach, Rolf; Jäggi, Adrian

    2013-04-01

    Time series of geocenter coordinates were determined with data of two global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs), namely the U.S. GPS (Global Positioning System) and the Russian GLONASS (Global'naya Nawigatsionnaya Sputnikowaya Sistema). The data was recorded in the years 2008-2011 by a global network of 92 permanently observing GPS/GLONASS receivers. Two types of daily solutions were generated independently for each GNSS, one including the estimation of geocenter coordinates and one without these parameters.A fair agreement for GPS and GLONASS was found in the geocenter x- and y-coordinate series. Our tests, however, clearly reveal artifacts in the z-component determined with the GLONASS data. Large periodic excursions in the GLONASS geocenter z-coordinates of about 40 cm peak-to-peak are related to the maximum elevation angles of the Sun above/below the orbital planes of the satellite system and thus have a period of about 4 months (third of a year). A detailed analysis revealed that the artifacts are almost uniquely governed by the differences of the estimates of direct solar radiation pressure (SRP) in the two solution series (with and without geocenter estimation). A simple formula is derived, describing the relation between the geocenter z-coordinate and the corresponding parameter of the SRP. The effect can be explained by first-order perturbation theory of celestial mechanics. The theory also predicts a heavy impact on the GNSS-derived geocenter if once-per-revolution SRP parameters are estimated in the direction of the satellite's solar panel axis. Specific experiments using GPS observations revealed that this is indeed the case.Although the main focus of this article is on GNSS, the theory developed is applicable to all satellite observing techniques. We applied the theory to satellite laser ranging (SLR) solutions using LAGEOS. It turns out that the correlation between geocenter and SRP parameters is not a critical issue for the SLR solutions. The

  4. Refining the GPS Space Service Volume (SSV) and Building a Multi-GNSS SSV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Joel J. K.

    2017-01-01

    The GPS (Global Positioning System) Space Service Volume (SSV) was first defined to protect the GPS main lobe signals from changes from block to block. First developed as a concept by NASA in 2000, it has been adopted for the GPS III block of satellites, and is being used well beyond the current specification to enable increased navigation performance for key missions like GOES-R. NASA has engaged the US IFOR (Interagency Forum Operational Requirements) process to adopt a revised requirement to protect this increased and emerging use. Also, NASA is working through the UN International Committee on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) to develop an interoperable multi-GNSS SSV in partnership with all of the foreign GNSS providers.

  5. Rate-gyro-integral constraint for ambiguity resolution in GNSS attitude determination applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiancheng; Li, Tao; Wang, Jinling; Hu, Xiaoping; Wu, Meiping

    2013-06-21

    In the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) attitude determination, the constraints usually play a critical role in resolving the unknown ambiguities quickly and correctly. Many constraints such as the baseline length, the geometry of multi-baselines and the horizontal attitude angles have been used extensively to improve the performance of ambiguity resolution. In the GNSS/Inertial Navigation System (INS) integrated attitude determination systems using low grade Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), the initial heading parameters of the vehicle are usually worked out by the GNSS subsystem instead of by the IMU sensors independently. However, when a rotation occurs, the angle at which vehicle has turned within a short time span can be measured accurately by the IMU. This measurement will be treated as a constraint, namely the rate-gyro-integral constraint, which can aid the GNSS ambiguity resolution. We will use this constraint to filter the candidates in the ambiguity search stage. The ambiguity search space shrinks significantly with this constraint imposed during the rotation, thus it is helpful to speeding up the initialization of attitude parameters under dynamic circumstances. This paper will only study the applications of this new constraint to land vehicles. The impacts of measurement errors on the effect of this new constraint will be assessed for different grades of IMU and current average precision level of GNSS receivers. Simulations and experiments in urban areas have demonstrated the validity and efficacy of the new constraint in aiding GNSS attitude determinations.

  6. Tropospheric delay parameters from numerical weather models for multi-GNSS precise positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cuixian; Zus, Florian; Ge, Maorong; Heinkelmann, Robert; Dick, Galina; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2016-12-01

    The recent dramatic development of multi-GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) constellations brings great opportunities and potential for more enhanced precise positioning, navigation, timing, and other applications. Significant improvement on positioning accuracy, reliability, as well as convergence time with the multi-GNSS fusion can be observed in comparison with the single-system processing like GPS (Global Positioning System). In this study, we develop a numerical weather model (NWM)-constrained precise point positioning (PPP) processing system to improve the multi-GNSS precise positioning. Tropospheric delay parameters which are derived from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analysis are applied to the multi-GNSS PPP, a combination of four systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, and BeiDou. Observations from stations of the IGS (International GNSS Service) Multi-GNSS Experiments (MGEX) network are processed, with both the standard multi-GNSS PPP and the developed NWM-constrained multi-GNSS PPP processing. The high quality and accuracy of the tropospheric delay parameters derived from ECMWF are demonstrated through comparison and validation with the IGS final tropospheric delay products. Compared to the standard PPP solution, the convergence time is shortened by 20.0, 32.0, and 25.0 % for the north, east, and vertical components, respectively, with the NWM-constrained PPP solution. The positioning accuracy also benefits from the NWM-constrained PPP solution, which was improved by 2.5, 12.1, and 18.7 % for the north, east, and vertical components, respectively.

  7. Determination of External Forces in Alpine Skiing Using a Differential Global Navigation Satellite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erich Müller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In alpine ski racing the relationships between skier kinetics and kinematics and their effect on performance and injury-related aspects are not well understood. There is currently no validated system to determine all external forces simultaneously acting on skiers, particularly under race conditions and throughout entire races. To address the problem, this study proposes and assesses a method for determining skier kinetics with a single lightweight differential global navigation satellite system (dGNSS. The dGNSS kinetic method was compared to a reference system for six skiers and two turns each. The pattern differences obtained between the measurement systems (offset ± SD were −26 ± 152 N for the ground reaction force, 1 ± 96 N for ski friction and −6 ± 6 N for the air drag force. The differences between turn means were small. The error pattern within the dGNSS kinetic method was highly repeatable and precision was therefore good (SD within system: 63 N ground reaction force, 42 N friction force and 7 N air drag force allowing instantaneous relative comparisons and identification of discriminative meaningful changes. The method is therefore highly valid in assessing relative differences between skiers in the same turn, as well as turn means between different turns. The system is suitable to measure large capture volumes under race conditions.

  8. Integrity monitoring-based ratio test for GNSS integer ambiguity validation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, L.; Li, Z.; Yuan, H.; Wang, L.; Yanqing, H.

    2015-01-01

    The combination of multiple global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) is able to improve the accuracy and reliability, which is beneficial for navigation in safety–critical applications. Due to the relatively low accuracy of pseudorange observations, the single-epoch GNSS real-time kinematic (RTK)

  9. Hybrid Data Fusion and Tracking for Positioning with GNSS and 3GPP-LTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Mensing

    2010-01-01

    the ability of this approach to compensate the lack of satellites by additional TDOA measurements from a future 3GPP-LTE communications system. This paper analyzes the performance in a fairly realistic manner by taking into account ray-tracing simulations to generate a coherent environment for GNSS and 3GPP-LTE.

  10. Performance Improvement of Receivers Based on Ultra-Tight Integration in GNSS-Challenged Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Qin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultra-tight integration was first proposed by Abbott in 2003 with the purpose of integrating a global navigation satellite system (GNSS and an inertial navigation system (INS. This technology can improve the tracking performances of a receiver by reconfiguring the tracking loops in GNSS-challenged environments. In this paper, the models of all error sources known to date in the phase lock loops (PLLs of a standard receiver and an ultra-tightly integrated GNSS/INS receiver are built, respectively. Based on these models, the tracking performances of the two receivers are compared to verify the improvement due to the ultra-tight integration. Meanwhile, the PLL error distributions of the two receivers are also depicted to analyze the error changes of the tracking loops. These results show that the tracking error is significantly reduced in the ultra-tightly integrated GNSS/INS receiver since the receiver’s dynamics are estimated and compensated by an INS. Moreover, the mathematical relationship between the tracking performances of the ultra-tightly integrated GNSS/INS receiver and the quality of the selected inertial measurement unit (IMU is derived from the error models and proved by the error comparisons of four ultra-tightly integrated GNSS/INS receivers aided by different grade IMUs.

  11. Study of the Development of the Inter-Satellite Links in Foreign GNSS%国外卫星导航系统星间链路发展研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李龙龙; 耿国桐; 李作虎

    2016-01-01

    利用星间链路提升卫星导航系统性能已成为全球卫星导航系统的重要发展趋势之一。以GPS为代表的国外卫星导航系统都在积极发展星间链路。我国北斗卫星导航系统也将在新一代全球导航卫星上搭载星间链路,目前已开展在轨试验。通过国内外文献查阅和跟踪研究,系统梳理比较了GPS,GLONASS和Galileo三大全球系统已投入使用和正在论证的星间链路技术方案。在此基础上归纳了星间链路的发展特点与趋势:1)星间链路的设计不再局限于实现自主导航,更倾向于通过星地联合实现增强提升导航性能;2)星间链路的发展当前以高频段射频星间链路为主,激光星间链路是未来的发展方向;3)星间链路测距通信将主要采用时分多址体制。相关研究成果对我国北斗卫星导航系统星间链路的发展具有借鉴意义。%Taking advantage of inter-satellite links ISLs to enhance the performance of Global Navigation Satellite System GNSS has become one of the important trends. Foreign satellite navigation systems represented by GPS are allactively developing ISLs. The new generation worldwide BDS satellites will also be armed with ISLs which is already under in orbit validation. By means of literatures research and developments survey the ISLs solutions are reviewed and compared including those which have been put into use and those which are still under study. And on this basis the development trends and characteristics of ISLs are summarized which are that the development of ISLs is not only for autonomous navigation but also aimed at realizing the joint of constellation and ground seg-ment in order to improve the capability of GNSS that radio ISLs at higher frequency band is the major now and ISLs of laser will be the main direction of ISLs development in the future that inter-satellite ranging and inter-sat-ellite communication will use TDMA system. The research achievements can

  12. An Autonomous Reference Frame for Relativistic GNSS

    CERN Document Server

    Kostić, Uroš; Carloni, Sante; Delva, Pacôme; Gomboc, Andreja

    2014-01-01

    Current GNSS systems rely on global reference frames which are fixed to the Earth (via the ground stations) so their precision and stability in time are limited by our knowledge of the Earth dynamics. These drawbacks could be avoided by giving to the constellation of satellites the possibility of constituting by itself a primary and autonomous positioning system, without any a priori realization of a terrestrial reference frame. Our work shows that it is possible to construct such a system, an Autonomous Basis of Coordinates, via emission coordinates. Here we present the idea of the Autonomous Basis of Coordinates and its implementation in the perturbed space-time of Earth, where the motion of satellites, light propagation, and gravitational perturbations are treated in the formalism of general relativity.

  13. The Omninet mobile satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmasi, A.; Curry, W.

    Mobile Satellite System (MSS) design offering relatively low cost voice, data, and position location services to nonmetropolitan areas of North America is proposed. The system provides spectrally efficient multiple access and modulation techniques, and flexible user interconnection to public and private switched networks. Separate UHF and L-band satellites employing two 9.1 m unfurlable antennas each, achieve a 6048 channel capacity and utilize spot beams. Mobile terminals have modular design and employ 5 dBi omnidirectional antennas. Gateway stations (with two 5 m Ku-band antennas) and base stations (with a single 1.8 m Ku-band antenna) transmit terrestrial traffic to the satellite, where traffic is then transponded via an L-band or UHF downlink to mobile users. The Network Management Center uses two 5-m antennas and incorporates the Integrated-Adaptive Mobile Access Protocol to assure demand assignment of satellite capacity. Preliminary implementation of this low-risk system involves a mobile alphanumeric data service employing receive-only terminals at Ku-band projected for 1987, and plans for the launching of L-band receive-only packages as early as 1988.

  14. GNSS-R: Operational Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ruffini, G; Soulat, F; Taani, M; Caparrini, M

    2003-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of operational applications of GNSS-R, and describes Oceanpal, an inexpensive, all-weather, passive instrument for remote sensing of the ocean and other water surfaces. This instrument is based on the use of reflected signals emitted from GNSS, and it holds great potential for future applications thanks to the growing, long term GNSS infrastructure. The instrument exploits the fact that, at any given moment, several GNSS emitters are simultaneously in view, providing separated multiple scattering points with different geometries. Reflected signals are affected by surface roughness and motion (i.e., sea state, orbital motion, and currents), mean surface height and dielectric properties (i.e., salinity and pollution). Oceanpal is envisioned as an accurate, "dry" tide gauge and surface roughness monitoring system, and as an important element of a future distributed ocean remote sensing network concept.

  15. Georeferencing in Gnss-Challenged Environment: Integrating Uwb and Imu Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, C. K.; Koppanyi, Z.; Navratil, V.; Grejner-Brzezinska, D.

    2017-05-01

    Acquiring geospatial data in GNSS compromised environments remains a problem in mapping and positioning in general. Urban canyons, heavily vegetated areas, indoor environments represent different levels of GNSS signal availability from weak to no signal reception. Even outdoors, with multiple GNSS systems, with an ever-increasing number of satellites, there are many situations with limited or no access to GNSS signals. Independent navigation sensors, such as IMU can provide high-data rate information but their initial accuracy degrades quickly, as the measurement data drift over time unless positioning fixes are provided from another source. At The Ohio State University's Satellite Positioning and Inertial Navigation (SPIN) Laboratory, as one feasible solution, Ultra- Wideband (UWB) radio units are used to aid positioning and navigating in GNSS compromised environments, including indoor and outdoor scenarios. Here we report about experiences obtained with georeferencing a pushcart based sensor system under canopied areas. The positioning system is based on UWB and IMU sensor integration, and provides sensor platform orientation for an electromagnetic inference (EMI) sensor. Performance evaluation results are provided for various test scenarios, confirming acceptable results for applications where high accuracy is not required.

  16. GEOREFERENCING IN GNSS-CHALLENGED ENVIRONMENT: INTEGRATING UWB AND IMU TECHNOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Toth

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acquiring geospatial data in GNSS compromised environments remains a problem in mapping and positioning in general. Urban canyons, heavily vegetated areas, indoor environments represent different levels of GNSS signal availability from weak to no signal reception. Even outdoors, with multiple GNSS systems, with an ever-increasing number of satellites, there are many situations with limited or no access to GNSS signals. Independent navigation sensors, such as IMU can provide high-data rate information but their initial accuracy degrades quickly, as the measurement data drift over time unless positioning fixes are provided from another source. At The Ohio State University’s Satellite Positioning and Inertial Navigation (SPIN Laboratory, as one feasible solution, Ultra- Wideband (UWB radio units are used to aid positioning and navigating in GNSS compromised environments, including indoor and outdoor scenarios. Here we report about experiences obtained with georeferencing a pushcart based sensor system under canopied areas. The positioning system is based on UWB and IMU sensor integration, and provides sensor platform orientation for an electromagnetic inference (EMI sensor. Performance evaluation results are provided for various test scenarios, confirming acceptable results for applications where high accuracy is not required.

  17. On the Synergy of Airborne GNSS-R and Landsat 8 for Soil Moisture Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilda Sánchez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available While the synergy between thermal, optical, and passive microwave observations is well known for the estimation of soil moisture and vegetation parameters, the use of remote sensing sources based on the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS remains unexplored. During an airborne campaign performed in August 2014, over an agricultural area in the Duero basin (Spain, an innovative sensor developed by the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya-Barcelona Tech based on GNSS Reflectometry (GNSS-R was tested for soil moisture estimation. The objective was to evaluate the combined use of GNSS-R observations with a time-collocated Landsat 8 image for soil moisture retrieval under semi-arid climate conditions. As a ground reference dataset, an intensive field campaign was carried out. The Light Airborne Reflectometer for GNSS-R Observations (LARGO observations, together with optical, infrared, and thermal bands from Landsat 8, were linked through a semi-empirical model to field soil moisture. Different combinations of vegetation and water indices with LARGO subsets were tested and compared to the in situ measurements. Results showed that the joint use of GNSS-R reflectivity, water/vegetation indices and thermal maps from Landsat 8 not only allows capturing soil moisture spatial gradients under very dry soil conditions, but also holds great promise for accurate soil moisture estimation (correlation coefficients greater than 0.5 were obtained from comparison with in situ data.

  18. The Impact of Inter-Modulation Components on Interferometric GNSS-Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiqiang Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The interferometric Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (iGNSS-R exploits the full spectrum of the transmitted GNSS signal to improve the ranging performance for sea surface height applications. The Inter-Modulation (IM component of the GNSS signals is an additional component that keeps the power envelope of the composite signals constant. This extra component has been neglected in previous studies on iGNSS-R, in both modelling and instrumentation. This letter takes the GPS L1 signal as an example to analyse the impact of the IM component on iGNSS-R ocean altimetry, including signal-to-noise ratio, the altimetric sensitivity and the final altimetric precision. Analytical results show that previous estimates of the final altimetric precision were underestimated by a factor of 1 . 5 ∼ 1 . 7 due to the negligence of the IM component, which should be taken into account in proper design of the future spaceborne iGNSS-R altimetry missions.

  19. GNSS-R nonlocal sea state dependencies: Model and empirical verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen-Zhang, David D.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Ardhuin, Fabrice; Park, Jeonghwan

    2016-11-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R) is an active, bistatic remote sensing technique operating at L-band frequencies. GNSS-R signals scattered from a rough ocean surface are known to interact with longer surface waves than traditional scatterometery and altimetry signals. A revised forward model for GNSS-R measurements is presented which assumes an ocean surface wave spectrum that is forced by other sources than just the local near-surface winds. The model is motivated by recent spaceborne GNSS-R observations that indicate a strong scattering dependence on significant wave height, even after controlling for local wind speed. This behavior is not well represented by the most commonly used GNSS-R scattering model, which features a one-to-one relationship between wind speed and the mean-square-slope of the ocean surface. The revised forward model incorporates a third generation wave model that is skillful at representing long waves, an anchored spectral tail model, and a GNSS-R electromagnetic scattering model. In comparisons with the spaceborne measurements, the new model is much better able to reproduce the empirical behavior.

  20. Determination of the centre of mass kinematics in alpine skiing using differential global navigation satellite systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgien, Matthias; Spörri, Jörg; Chardonnens, Julien; Kröll, Josef; Limpach, Philippe; Müller, Erich

    2015-01-01

    In the sport of alpine skiing, knowledge about the centre of mass (CoM) kinematics (i.e. position, velocity and acceleration) is essential to better understand both performance and injury. This study proposes a global navigation satellite system (GNSS)-based method to measure CoM kinematics without restriction of capture volume and with reasonable set-up and processing requirements. It combines the GNSS antenna position, terrain data and the accelerations acting on the skier in order to approximate the CoM location, velocity and acceleration. The validity of the method was assessed against a reference system (video-based 3D kinematics) over 12 turn cycles on a giant slalom skiing course. The mean (± s) position, velocity and acceleration differences between the CoM obtained from the GNSS and the reference system were 9 ± 12 cm, 0.08 ± 0.19 m · s(-1) and 0.22 ± 1.28 m · s(-2), respectively. The velocity and acceleration differences obtained were smaller than typical differences between the measures of several skiers on the same course observed in the literature, while the position differences were slightly larger than its discriminative meaningful change. The proposed method can therefore be interpreted to be technically valid and adequate for a variety of biomechanical research questions in the field of alpine skiing with certain limitations regarding position.

  1. CSAC Characterization and Its Impact on GNSS Clock Augmentation Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Enric; Calero, David; Parés, M. Eulàlia

    2017-01-01

    Chip Scale Atomic Clocks (CSAC) are recently-developed electronic instruments that, when used together with a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receiver, help improve the performance of GNSS navigation solutions in certain conditions (i.e., low satellite visibility). Current GNSS receivers include a Temperature Compensated Cristal Oscillator (TCXO) clock characterized by a short-term stability (τ = 1 s) of 10−9 s that leads to an error of 0.3 m in pseudorange measurements. The CSAC can achieve a short-term stability of 2.5 × 10−12 s, which implies a range error of 0.075 m, making for an 87.5% improvement over TCXO. Replacing the internal TCXO clock of GNSS receivers with a higher frequency stability clock such as a CSAC oscillator improves the navigation solution in terms of low satellite visibility positioning accuracy, solution availability, signal recovery (holdover), multipath and jamming mitigation and spoofing attack detection. However, CSAC suffers from internal systematic instabilities and errors that should be minimized if optimal performance is desired. Hence, for operating CSAC at its best, the deterministic errors from the CSAC need to be properly modelled. Currently, this modelling is done by determining and predicting the clock frequency stability (i.e., clock bias and bias rate) within the positioning estimation process. The research presented in this paper aims to go a step further, analysing the correlation between temperature and clock stability noise and the impact of its proper modelling in the holdover recovery time and in the positioning performance. Moreover, it shows the potential of fine clock coasting modelling. With the proposed model, an improvement in vertical positioning precision of around 50% with only three satellites can be achieved. Moreover, an increase in the navigation solution availability is also observed, a reduction of holdover recovery time from dozens of seconds to only a few can be achieved. PMID:28216600

  2. CSAC Characterization and Its Impact on GNSS Clock Augmentation Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Fernández

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chip Scale Atomic Clocks (CSAC are recently-developed electronic instruments that, when used together with a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS receiver, help improve the performance of GNSS navigation solutions in certain conditions (i.e., low satellite visibility. Current GNSS receivers include a Temperature Compensated Cristal Oscillator (TCXO clock characterized by a short-term stability (τ = 1 s of 10−9 s that leads to an error of 0.3 m in pseudorange measurements. The CSAC can achieve a short-term stability of 2.5 × 10−12 s, which implies a range error of 0.075 m, making for an 87.5% improvement over TCXO. Replacing the internal TCXO clock of GNSS receivers with a higher frequency stability clock such as a CSAC oscillator improves the navigation solution in terms of low satellite visibility positioning accuracy, solution availability, signal recovery (holdover, multipath and jamming mitigation and spoofing attack detection. However, CSAC suffers from internal systematic instabilities and errors that should be minimized if optimal performance is desired. Hence, for operating CSAC at its best, the deterministic errors from the CSAC need to be properly modelled. Currently, this modelling is done by determining and predicting the clock frequency stability (i.e., clock bias and bias rate within the positioning estimation process. The research presented in this paper aims to go a step further, analysing the correlation between temperature and clock stability noise and the impact of its proper modelling in the holdover recovery time and in the positioning performance. Moreover, it shows the potential of fine clock coasting modelling. With the proposed model, an improvement in vertical positioning precision of around 50% with only three satellites can be achieved. Moreover, an increase in the navigation solution availability is also observed, a reduction of holdover recovery time from dozens of seconds to only a few can be achieved.

  3. Real-time Kinematic Positioning of INS Tightly Aided Multi-GNSS Ionospheric Constrained PPP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhouzheng; Shen, Wenbin; Zhang, Hongping; Niu, Xiaoji; Ge, Maorong

    2016-07-01

    Real-time Precise Point Positioning (PPP) technique is being widely applied for providing precise positioning services with the significant improvement on satellite precise products accuracy. With the rapid development of the multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (multi-GNSS), currently, about 80 navigation satellites are operational in orbit. Obviously, PPP performance is dramatically improved with all satellites compared to that of GPS-only PPP. However, the performance of PPP could be evidently affected by unexpected and unavoidable severe observing environments, especially in the dynamic applications. Consequently, we apply Inertial Navigation System (INS) to the Ionospheric-Constrained (IC) PPP to overcome such drawbacks. The INS tightly aided multi-GNSS IC-PPP model can make full use of GNSS and INS observations to improve the PPP performance in terms of accuracy, availability, continuity, and convergence speed. Then, a set of airborne data is analyzed to evaluate and validate the improvement of multi-GNSS and INS on the performance of IC-PPP.

  4. Double-Difference Carrier-Phase Network Solution Using Nominal Gnss Constellations (Future Perception)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farah, A. M. A.

    2008-01-01

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have an endless number of applications in industry, science, military, transportation and recreation & sports. Two systems are currently in operation namely GPS (the USA Global Positioning System) and GLONASS (the Russian GLObal NAvigation Satellite System), and a third is planned, the European satellite navigation system GALILEO. The potential performance improvements achievable through combining these systems could be significant and expectations are high. The need is inevitable to explore the future of positioning accuracy using different nominal constellations. In this research paper, Bernese 5.0 software could be modified to simulate and process GNSS observations from three different constellations (GPS, Glonass and Galileo) using different combinations. This study presents results of double-difference carrier-phase solution for five stations-network using the three constellations and different combinations.

  5. Precise positioning with current multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems: GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xingxing; Zhang, Xiaohong; Ren, Xiaodong; Fritsche, Mathias; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2015-02-09

    The world of satellite navigation is undergoing dramatic changes with the rapid development of multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs). At the moment more than 70 satellites are already in view, and about 120 satellites will be available once all four systems (BeiDou + Galileo + GLONASS + GPS) are fully deployed in the next few years. This will bring great opportunities and challenges for both scientific and engineering applications. In this paper we develop a four-system positioning model to make full use of all available observations from different GNSSs. The significant improvement of satellite visibility, spatial geometry, dilution of precision, convergence, accuracy, continuity and reliability that a combining utilization of multi-GNSS brings to precise positioning are carefully analyzed and evaluated, especially in constrained environments.

  6. GNSS-Reflectometry based water level monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckheinrich, Jamila; Schön, Steffen; Beyerle, Georg; Apel, Heiko; Semmling, Maximilian; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Due to climate changing conditions severe changes in the Mekong delta in Vietnam have been recorded in the last years. The goal of the German Vietnamese WISDOM (Water-related Information system for the Sustainable Development Of the Mekong Delta) project is to build an information system to support and assist the decision makers, planners and authorities for an optimized water and land management. One of WISDOM's tasks is the flood monitoring of the Mekong delta. Earth reflected L-band signals from the Global Navigation Satellite System show a high reflectivity on water and ice surfaces or on wet soil so that GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) could contribute to monitor the water level in the main streams of the Mekong delta complementary to already existing monitoring networks. In principle, two different GNSS-R methods exist: the code- and the phase-based one. As the latter being more accurate, a new generation of GORS (GNSS Occultation, Reflectometry and Scatterometry) JAVAD DELTA GNSS receiver has been developed with the aim to extract precise phase observations. In a two week lasting measurement campaign, the receiver has been tested and several reflection events at the 150-200 m wide Can Tho river in Vietnam have been recorded. To analyze the geometrical impact on the quantity and quality of the reflection traces two different antennas height were tested. To track separately the direct and the reflected signal, two antennas were used. To derive an average height of the water level, for a 15 min observation interval, a phase model has been developed. Combined with the coherent observations, the minimum slope has been calculated based on the Least- Squares method. As cycle slips and outliers will impair the results, a preprocessing of the data has been performed. A cycle slip detection strategy that allows for automatic detection, identification and correction is proposed. To identify outliers, the data snooping method developed by Baarda 1968 is used. In this

  7. Earthquake Related Variation of Total Electron Content in Ionosphere over Chinese Mainland Derived from Observations of a Nationwide GNSS Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Weijun

    2016-07-01

    Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) is a key national scientific infrastructure project carried out during 1997-2012 with 2 phases. The network is composed of 260 continuously observed GNSS stations (CORS) and 2081 campaign mode GNSS stations, with the main purpose to monitor the crustal movement, perceptible water vapor (PWV), total electron content (TEC), and many other tectonic and environmental elements around mainland China, by mainly using the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technology. Here, based on the GNSS data of 260 CORS of COMNOC for about 5 years, we investigated the characteristics of TEC in ionosphere over Chinese Mainland and discussed if there was any abnormal change of TEC before and after a big earthquake. our preliminary results show that it is hard to see any convincing precursor of TEC before a big earthquake. However, the huge energy released by a big earthquake can obviously disturb the TEC over meizoseismal area.

  8. Satellite navigation—Amazing technology but insidious risk: Why everyone needs to understand space weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hapgood, Mike

    2017-04-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are one of the technological wonders of the modern world. Popularly known as satellite navigation, these systems have provided global access to precision location and timing services and have thereby stimulated advances in industry and consumer services, including all forms of transport, telecommunications, financial trading, and even the synchronization of power grids. But this wonderful technology is at risk from natural phenomena in the form of space weather. GNSS signals experience a slight delay as they pass through the ionosphere. This delay varies with space weather conditions and is the most significant source of error for GNSS. Scientific efforts to correct these errors have stimulated billions of dollars of investment in systems that provide accurate correction data for suitably equipped GNSS receivers in a growing number of regions around the world. This accuracy is essential for GNSS use by aircraft and ships. Space weather also provides a further occasional but severe risk to GNSS: an extreme space weather event may deny access to GNSS as ionospheric scintillation scrambles the radio signals from satellites, and rapid ionospheric changes outstrip the ability of error correction systems to supply accurate corrections. It is vital that GNSS users have a backup for such occasions, even if it is only to hunker down and weather the storm.

  9. GNSS全球卫星导航系统发展概况及最新进展%The Development Outline and Latest Evolution of Global Navigation Satellite Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪龙蛰; 单庆晓

    2012-01-01

    随着卫星导航技术的不断进步,GNSS全球卫星导航系统得到了快速发展和广泛应用。概述了GNSS系统的发展历程及研究现状,介绍了目前全球四大卫星导航系统GPS、GLONASS、Galileo和COMPASS的概况与最新进展,讨论了GNSS系统未来的发展方向。%As the continuous advancement of satellite navigation technology, GNSS has a rapid development and broad applications. The history and current status of GNSS are sum marized, the outlines and latest evolutions of the four main GNSS systems. GPS, GLO NASS, Galileo and COMPASS are introduced, and the progress of GNSS in future is du cussed.

  10. Information maintenance of aircraft’s automatic control using GNSS system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. О. Ковалевський

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The variant of information maintenance of aircraft’s automatic control using satellite navigation system for providing landing approach and landing has been considered in this research. Calculation ratios for definition of coarse deviations have been given. Error statistics of determination of deviations have been investigated

  11. Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Conti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions will involve satellites with great autonomy and stringent pointing precision, requiring of the Attitude Control Systems (ACS with better performance than before, which is function of the control algorithms implemented on board computers. The difficulties for developing experimental ACS test is to obtain zero gravity and torque free conditions similar to the SCA operate in space. However, prototypes for control algorithms experimental verification are fundamental for space mission success. This paper presents the parameters estimation such as inertia matrix and position of mass centre of a Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator (SACSS, using algorithms based on least square regression and least square recursive methods. Simulations have shown that both methods have estimated the system parameters with small error. However, the least square recursive methods have performance more adequate for the SACSS objectives. The SACSS platform model will be used to do experimental verification of fundamental aspects of the satellite attitude dynamics and design of different attitude control algorithm.

  12. Influence of Ionospheric Irregularities on GNSS Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Tinin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We have used numerical simulation to study the effects of ionospheric irregularities on accuracy of global navigation satellite system (GNSS measurements, using ionosphere-free (in atmospheric research and geometry-free (in ionospheric research dual-frequency phase combinations. It is known that elimination of these effects from multifrequency GNSS measurements is handi-capped by diffraction effects during signal propagation through turbulent ionospheric plasma with the inner scale being smaller than the Fresnel radius. We demonstrated the possibility of reducing the residual ionospheric error in dual-frequency GNSS remote sensing in ionosphere-free combination by Fresnel inversion. The inversion parameter, the distance to the virtual screen, may be selected from the minimum of amplitude fluctuations. This suggests the possibility of improving the accuracy of GNSS remote sensing in meteorology. In the study of ionospheric disturbances with the aid of geometry-free combination, the Fresnel inversion eliminates only the third-order error. To eliminate the random TEC component which, like the measured average TEC, is the first-order correction, we should use temporal filtering (averaging.

  13. New GNSS tomography of the atmosphere method – proposal and testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Kačmařík

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper is focused on GNSS meteorology which is generally used for the determination of water vapour distribution in the atmosphere from GNSS measurements. Water vapour in the atmosphere is an important parameter which influences the state and development of the weather. At first, the paper presents basics of the GNSS meteorology and tomography of the atmosphere and subsequently introduces a new GNSS tomography method which doesn't require an extensive network of GNSS receivers, but uses only a few receivers situated in a line. After a theoretical concept describing this method and used mathematical background, the results from a real experiment are shown and discussed. Unfortunately the results indicate that presented method is not able to provide credible outputs. Possibly the main problem lies in an insufficient number of available signals from current global navigation satellite systems (GPS and GLONASS where the improvement could be expected after the start of Galileo and Compass. Potential ways how to improve the results without increasing the number of satellites are outlined in the last section.

  14. Imaging Algorithm for Bistatic SAR Based on GNSS Signal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Wei-ming

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper imaging processing method for Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (BiSAR utilizing navigation satellite is investigated. Considering the special problems of using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS signal to form SAR image, direct signal is used to estimate range migration parameters and range migration is corrected in azimuth time domain. Doppler sensitivity of phase-coded signal was solved by Doppler compensation. Through fitting the Doppler phase history with high-order polynomial, Doppler phase history is accurately approximated and azimuth compression is implemented by de-chirp processing. Through simulation and experimental data processing, the proposed method is verified.

  15. GLORI: a new airborne GNSS reflectometry instrument for land surface monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motte, Erwan; Fanise, Pascal; Zribi, Mehrez

    2015-10-01

    From the beginning of the 1990s, the use of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) reflected signals have been identified as a as source of opportunity for remote sensing applications. In the last two decades, the potential of the technique have been demonstrated for ocean and continental surfaces studies, and several applications have been proposed in the context of high availability of GNSS signals. The GNSS-R technique is generally based on the use of a passive receiver simultaneously acquiring the direct and reflected signals from various GNSS satellites to estimate geophysical parameters from the scattering surface. In the last years, several ground-based [2], [3], airborne [4] and space-borne [5]-[8] experiments have been proposed. The most considered application foreseen for GNSS-R is ocean altimetry for a precise determination of sea-surface heights as well as roughness and wind direction. For continental surfaces, because of direct relationship between surface permittivity and reflected signal, different approaches [6], [9], [10] have been proposed to estimate surface parameters (soil moisture, vegetation biomass, snow). Different observables have been proposed to analyze GNSS signals: the Delay-Doppler Map, the direct and reflected complex waveforms bistatic signal, the ratio between the direct and reflected waveform's peak time series (Interferometric Complex Field). In this context, the airborne instrument GLORI is proposed to demonstrate contribution of GNSS-R to estimate soil moisture over agricultural soils and biomass of forests or annual cultures. A secondary goal is the feasibility of centimeter-precision altimetry above continental water bodies. The second section describes the characteristics of GLORI instrument. The third section presents airborne campaigns realized over the south West of France and fourth sections discusses the first results. Conclusions are gathered in section 5.

  16. P-RANSAC: An Integrity Monitoring Approach for GNSS Signal Degraded Scenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaetano Castaldo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite navigation is critical in signal-degraded environments where signals are corrupted and GNSS systems do not guarantee an accurate and continuous positioning. In particular measurements in urban scenario are strongly affected by gross errors, degrading navigation solution; hence a quality check on the measurements, defined as RAIM, is important. Classical RAIM techniques work properly in case of single outlier but have to be modified to take into account the simultaneous presence of multiple outliers. This work is focused on the implementation of random sample consensus (RANSAC algorithm, developed for computer vision tasks, in the GNSS context. This method is capable of detecting multiple satellite failures; it calculates position solutions based on subsets of four satellites and compares them with the pseudoranges of all the satellites not contributing to the solution. In this work, a modification to the original RANSAC method is proposed and an analysis of its performance is conducted, processing data collected in a static test.

  17. Distribution of the GNSS-LEO occultation events over Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoniem, Ibrahim; Mousa, Ashraf El-Kutb; El-Fiky, Gamal

    2017-06-01

    The space-based GNSS RO technique is a promising tool for monitoring the Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere (Mousa et al., 2006). The current paper presents the distribution of the occultation events over Egypt using the operating LEO satellites and GNSS by its two operating systems. By the present research, Egypt could raise NWP Models efficiency by improving meteorological data quality. Twenty operating LEO missions (e.g. Argentinean SAC-C, European MetOp-A, German TerraSAR-X, Indian OceanSat-2, etc.) sent by different countries all over the world were used to derive the occultation events position through Egypt borders by receiving signal from the American global positioning system (GPS) and the Russian global navigation satellite system (GLONASS). Approximately 20,000 km Altitude satellites are transmitting enormous number of rays by the day to approximately 800 km satellites passing by the Earth atmosphere. Our mission is to derive all of these rays position (start and end) by calculating satellites position by the time, determine the rays in the occultation case and derive the atmosphere tangent point position for all occultating rays on the Earth surface (Occultation Events).

  18. Interoperability of satellite-based augmentation systems for aircraft navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Donghai

    The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) is pioneering a transformation of the national airspace system from its present ground based navigation and landing systems to a satellite based system using the Global Positioning System (GPS). To meet the critical safety-of-life aviation positioning requirements, a Satellite-Based Augmentation System (SBAS), the Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS), is being implemented to support navigation for all phases of flight, including Category I precision approach. The system is designed to be used as a primary means of navigation, capable of meeting the Required Navigation Performance (RNP), and therefore must satisfy the accuracy, integrity, continuity and availability requirements. In recent years there has been international acceptance of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), spurring widespread growth in the independent development of SBASs. Besides the FAA's WAAS, the European Geostationary Navigation Overlay Service System (EGNOS) and the Japan Civil Aviation Bureau's MTSAT-Satellite Augmentation System (MSAS) are also being actively developed. Although all of these SBASs can operate as stand-alone, regional systems, there is increasing interest in linking these SBASs together to reduce costs while improving service coverage. This research investigated the coverage and availability improvements due to cooperative efforts among regional SBAS networks. The primary goal was to identify the optimal interoperation strategies in terms of performance, complexity and practicality. The core algorithms associated with the most promising concepts were developed and demonstrated. Experimental verification of the most promising concepts was conducted using data collected from a joint international test between the National Satellite Test Bed (NSTB) and the EGNOS System Test Bed (ESTB). This research clearly shows that a simple switch between SBASs made by the airborne equipment is the most effective choice for achieving the

  19. First Observations of GNSS Ionospheric Scintillations From DemoGRAPE Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonsi, L.; Cilliers, P. J.; Romano, V.; Hunstad, I.; Correia, E.; Linty, N.; Dovis, F.; Terzo, O.; Ruiu, P.; Ward, J.; Riley, P.

    2016-10-01

    The Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia leads an international project funded by the Italian National Program for Antarctic Research, called Demonstrator of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Research and Application for Polar Environment (DemoGRAPE), in partnership with Politecnico di Torino, Istituto Superiore Mario Boella, and with South African National Space Agency and the Brazilian National Institute of Space Physics, as key collaborators. DemoGRAPE is a new prototype of support for the satellite navigation in Antarctica. Besides the scientific interest, the accuracy of satellite navigation in Antarctica is of paramount importance since there is always the danger that people and vehicles can fall into a crevasse during a snowstorm, when visibility is limited and travel is restricted to following specified routes using satellite navigation systems. The variability of ionospheric delay and ionospheric scintillation are two of the primary factors which affect the accuracy of satellite navigation. The project will provide a demonstrator of cutting edge technology for the empirical assessment of the ionospheric delay and ionospheric scintillations in the polar regions. The scope of the project includes new equipment for the recording and dissemination of GNSS data and products installed at the South African and Brazilian bases in Antarctica. The new equipment will facilitate the exchange of software and derived products via the Cloud computing technology infrastructure. The project portal is accessible at www.demogrape.net. We report the first Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signal scintillations observed in Antarctica.

  20. Use of GNSS Receivers in Phase-Ⅲ of China’s Lunar Exploration Program%GNSS 接收机在探月三期中的应用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闻长远; 蒋勇; 李东俊; 仇跃华; 王盾

    2015-01-01

    探月工程对飞行器导航系统的性能提出了更高要求,因而有必要研究 GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System,全球导航卫星系统)接收机在探月任务中的应用。以探月工程三期为应用需求,开展地-月-地转移过程中的 GNSS 接收机可用性分析、GNSS 信号特性分析;并针对低信噪比环境下的高灵敏度接收机系统应用进行设计,采用弱信号捕获算法和弱信号跟踪算法实现-175 dBW 的灵敏度;最终采用基于轨道动力学模型的卡尔曼滤波方法实现了 GNSS 自主定轨算法。仿真表明:GNSS 接收机在60000 km 以下的地-月转移和月-地转移弧段能够为探月飞行器提供100 m 以内位置精度的导航服务。%The use of GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System)receivers in lunar exploration missions is studied to meet higher requirements of China’s lunar exploration program on the performance of the spacecraft navigation system.Based on the application requirements of Phase-Ⅲ of China’s lunar exploration program,availability analy-sis of GNSS receivers and analysis of GNSS signal characteristics are done for GNSS receivers for the Earth-Moon-Earth transfer orbit.High sensitivity receiver systems are designed for low signal-to-noise operation environment and weak signal acquisition algorithms and weak signal tracking algorithms are used to achieve a sensitivity of -1 75 dBW.Finally,GNSS autonomous orbit determination algorithm is developed with Kalman filters based on orbit dy-namics models.Simulation results indicate that under the height of 60 000 km during the Earth-Moon and Moon-Earth transfer orbit phases,a GNSS receiver provides spacecraft with navigation service with a positioning accuracy of less than 100 m.

  1. The introduction to GNOS instrument for FY-3 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qifei

    2016-07-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Radio occultation (RO) has become a major atmospheric and ionospheric remote sensing technique and been widely used for numerical weather prediction and global climate monitoring applications. The first GNSS Occultation Sounder (GNOS) developed and manufactured by National Space Science Center (NSSC), Chinese Academy of Science is a RO payload, which has been onboard Fengyun-3 C (FY-3C) satellite and been launched on September 23, 2013. FY-3 series satellites are the Chinese second generation polar-orbiting meteorological satellites with sun-synchronous orbits. During RO events, the GNOS instruments measure the phase delay caused by the Earth's atmospheric and ionospheric refraction between the GNSS satellites and FY-3 satellites, as the relative position between the GNSS satellites and the FY-3 satellites varying, vertical profiles of RO observations (i.e. phase and amplitude) will be obtained, which can be used to derived the atmospheric and ionospheric physical properties such as press, temperature, humidity and ionospheric electron density. In my presentation, we present the characteristics of GNOS instruments for FY-3 series satellites and the result by the instrument in orbit. Firstly, we present the characteristics of GNOS instrument for FY-3C satellite and its precision of atmosphere occultation data. Additionally, we introduce the characteristics of GNOS instrument for FY-3D satellite which will be launched in 2016. Finally, we show the next generation GNOS instrument and its characteristics for the following FY-3 satellites.

  2. An Analysis of Displacement Measurements for Lisbon, Portugal Using Combined InSAR and GNSS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roque, D.; Simonetto, E.; Falcao, A. P.; Perissin, D.; Durand, F.; Morel, L.; Fonseca, A. M.; Polidori, L.

    2016-08-01

    Atmospheric effects are still a limitation to the application of InSAR techniques for displacement measurement. In this study, zenith total delay (ZTD) values derived from global navigation satellite system (GNSS) are used to correct interferograms from tropospheric effects. Displacement measurements are obtained from the corrected interferograms through a persistent scatterer interferometry approach. The influence of different interpolation methods on the construction of ZTD maps is tested through two different algorithms: cubic spline and ordinary kriging. Differences are observed between the cumulative displacement maps obtained with both interpolators, but atmospheric effects are still present, possibly due to the small number of available GNSS stations.

  3. GNSS-R Sea/Land and Sea/Ice Transition Dtetectiond from TDS-1 DDMs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavulli, D.; Frappart, F.; Darrozes, J.; Ramilien, G.; Nunziata, F.; Migliaccio, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) Reflectometry, GNSS-R, Delay-Doppler Maps (DDMs) are processed to provide added value products for imaging remote sensing. In particular, actual DDMs collected by the UK TechDemoSat- 1 sensor are processed in order to reconstruct the Normalized Radar Cross section field for marine scenarios including non homogeneous elements, i.e. sea/land and sea/ice transition. The result consists of a radar image of the observed scene able to complement data provided by sensors dedicated to imaging remote sensing.

  4. Estimating Zenith Tropospheric Delays from BeiDou Navigation Satellite System Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Sui

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The GNSS derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD plays today a very critical role in meteorological study and weather forecasts, as ZTDs of thousands of GNSS stations are operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Recently, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS was officially announced to provide operational services around China and its neighborhood and it was demonstrated to be very promising for precise navigation and positioning. In this contribution, we concentrate on estimating ZTD using BDS observations to assess its capacity for troposphere remote sensing. A local network which is about 250 km from Beijing and comprised of six stations equipped with GPS- and BDS-capable receivers is utilized. Data from 5 to 8 November 2012 collected on the network is processed in network mode using precise orbits and in Precise Point Positioning mode using precise orbits and clocks. The precise orbits and clocks are generated from a tracking network with most of the stations in China and several stations around the world. The derived ZTDs are compared with that estimated from GPS data using the final products of the International GNSS Service (IGS. The comparison shows that the bias and the standard deviation of the ZTD differences are about 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, which are very close to the differences of GPS ZTD estimated using different software packages.

  5. Estimating zenith tropospheric delays from BeiDou navigation satellite system observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Aigong; Xu, Zongqiu; Ge, Maorong; Xu, Xinchao; Zhu, Huizhong; Sui, Xin

    2013-04-03

    The GNSS derived Zenith Tropospheric Delay (ZTD) plays today a very critical role in meteorological study and weather forecasts, as ZTDs of thousands of GNSS stations are operationally assimilated into numerical weather prediction models. Recently, the Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) was officially announced to provide operational services around China and its neighborhood and it was demonstrated to be very promising for precise navigation and positioning. In this contribution, we concentrate on estimating ZTD using BDS observations to assess its capacity for troposphere remote sensing. A local network which is about 250 km from Beijing and comprised of six stations equipped with GPS- and BDS-capable receivers is utilized. Data from 5 to 8 November 2012 collected on the network is processed in network mode using precise orbits and in Precise Point Positioning mode using precise orbits and clocks. The precise orbits and clocks are generated from a tracking network with most of the stations in China and several stations around the world. The derived ZTDs are compared with that estimated from GPS data using the final products of the International GNSS Service (IGS). The comparison shows that the bias and the standard deviation of the ZTD differences are about 2 mm and 5 mm, respectively, which are very close to the differences of GPS ZTD estimated using different software packages.

  6. Can global navigation satellite system signals reveal the ecological attributes of forests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbin; Hyyppä, Juha; Yu, Xiaowei; Jaakkola, Anttoni; Liang, Xinlian; Kaartinen, Harri; Kukko, Antero; Zhu, Lingli; Wang, Yunsheng; Hyyppä, Hannu

    2016-08-01

    Forests have important impacts on the global carbon cycle and climate, and they are also related to a wide range of industrial sectors. Currently, one of the biggest challenges in forestry research is effectively and accurately measuring and monitoring forest variables, as the exploitation potential of forest inventory products largely depends on the accuracy of estimates and on the cost of data collection. A low-cost crowdsourcing solution is needed for forest inventory to collect forest variables. Here, we propose global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals as a novel type of observables for predicting forest attributes and show the feasibility of utilizing GNSS signals for estimating important attributes of forest plots, including mean tree height, mean diameter at breast height, basal area, stem volume and tree biomass. The prediction accuracies of the proposed technique were better in boreal forest conditions than those of the conventional techniques of 2D remote sensing. More importantly, this technique provides a novel, cost-effective way of collecting large-scale forest measurements in the crowdsourcing context. This technique can be applied by, for example, harvesters or persons hiking or working in forests because GNSS devices are widely used, and the field operation of this technique is simple and does not require professional forestry skills.

  7. Tropospheric Profiles of Total Refractivity Based on Numerical Weather Prediction Model and GNSS Data Using the Collocation Software COMEDIE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgan, K. I.; Rohm, W.; Bosy, J.; Geiger, A.; Hurter, F.

    2015-12-01

    The GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) signal propagation delay in neutral atmosphere can be described in terms of total refractivity which depends on the atmospheric parameters: air pressure, temperature and water vapor partial pressure. In this study we have reconstructed the total refractivity profiles over Poland using the least-squares collocation software COMEDIE (Collocation of Meteorological Data for Interpretation and Estimation of Tropospheric Pathdelays). Profiles were calculated from different combinations of data sets from following sources: meteorological parameters from Numerical Weather Prediction Model WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) or EUREF Permanent Network (EPN) stations and zenith total delay (ZTD) from ground-based GNSS products on ASG-EUPOS stations. The combinations of data sets included into this study are: 'WRF only', 'WRF/GNSS', 'WRF/GNSS/EPN' and 'GNSS only'. To find the data set with the best accuracy, profiles were compared with the reference radiosonde observations. The data set with the best accuracy is the combined 'WRF/GNSS' with mean bias close to 0 and standard deviation of 3 ppm. The data set 'WRF/GNSS/EPN' shows very similar accuracy so, there is no need to include the additional ground-based meteorological information from EPN stations. The data set 'GNSS only' shows much worse accuracy with the discrepancies at lower altitudes even at the level of -30 ppm. The data set 'WRF only' shows as good agreement with reference data as 'WRF/GNSS' in term of total refractivity, but when we calculated ZTD from all sets, we found that standard deviations from residuals are almost two times larger for the 'WRF only' dataset. We continue advancing the collocation algorithms, so the ZTD from the model can be useful as a priori troposphere information for example in PPP (Precise Point Positioning) technique.

  8. ITG: A New Global GNSS Tropospheric Correction Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yibin; Xu, Chaoqian; Shi, Junbo; Cao, Na; Zhang, Bao; Yang, Junjian

    2015-07-21

    Tropospheric correction models are receiving increasing attentions, as they play a crucial role in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Most commonly used models to date include the GPT2 series and the TropGrid2. In this study, we analyzed the advantages and disadvantages of existing models and developed a new model called the Improved Tropospheric Grid (ITG). ITG considers annual, semi-annual and diurnal variations, and includes multiple tropospheric parameters. The amplitude and initial phase of diurnal variation are estimated as a periodic function. ITG provides temperature, pressure, the weighted mean temperature (Tm) and Zenith Wet Delay (ZWD). We conducted a performance comparison among the proposed ITG model and previous ones, in terms of meteorological measurements from 698 observation stations, Zenith Total Delay (ZTD) products from 280 International GNSS Service (IGS) station and Tm from Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS) products. Results indicate that ITG offers the best performance on the whole.

  9. Undifferenced and single differenced GNSS noise analysis through a constrained baseline vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buist, P.J.; Imparato, D.

    2014-01-01

    GNSS noise characteristics can be obtained by short and zero baseline analysis, for both pseudorange and carrier phase measurements. Differencing observations from a GNSS satellite tracked by two GNSS receivers (connected to the same or different antennas) will explicitly eliminate common errors. I

  10. Network time and frequency transfer with GNSS receivers located in time laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerretto, Giancarlo; Perucca, Andrea; Tavella, Patrizia; Mozo, Alvaro; Piriz, Ricardo; Romay, Miguel

    2010-06-01

    In this paper we investigate a possible network solution, similar to the IGS analysis center solutions, that can be easily managed by a network of timing institutes to solve for all the clock differences (in addition to other quantities) in a unique system to understand the feasibility and the advantages of this approach in time and frequency transfer. The investigation is based on a suite of global navigation satellite system (GNSS) software products that allows the users to perform a wide range of calculations and analyses related to GNSS, from the evaluation of performances at the user level to the computation of precise GNSS orbits and clocks, including the calculation of precise receiver coordinates. The time and frequency transfer capabilities of the network solution (named ODTS) are evaluated and compared with PPP solutions as well as to other time transfer results.

  11. Evaluation of RTKLIB's Positioning Accuracy Using low-cost GNSS Receiver and ASG-EUPOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Wisniewski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on a comparison of different positioning methods provided by free and open source software (FOSS package called RTKLIB. The RTKLIB supports real-time and post-processed positioning. The most important modes of operation tested by the authors are Kinematic, Static, Fixed and Precise Point Positioning (PPP. The data for evaluation were obtained from low-cost Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receiver. The tested receiver was based on the u-blox's LEA-6T GNSS module. This receiver provides different types of information including raw carrier phase measurements. It gives the possibility for centimeter-level precision of positioning. As the supporting source of data ASG-EUPOS system was used. ASG-EUPOS is a Polish network of GNSS reference stations providing the real-time corrections and post processing services for the entire territory of Poland.

  12. Soil Moisture Monitoring Using GNSS-R Signals; First Experimental Results with the SAM Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egido, A.; Martin-Puig, C.; Felip, D.; Garcia, M.; Caparrini, M.; Farres, E.; Ruffini, G.

    2009-04-01

    Observing the Earth surface with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) reflected signals has become a noteworthy remote sensing technique for the scientific community. The growing interest in GNSS as a remote sensing tool is due to its global availability and the carrier frequencies used. In fact, L-band, in which all current and next-future Global Navigation Satellite Systems emit, is a portion of the electromagnetic spectrum that highly interacts with the natural medium and for this reason, the possible applications exploiting these signals are numerous. In addition, the large number of GNSS signals in space, and their steadily increasing quantity and quality predicts a promising future for this remote sensing technique. Among a wide variety of applications, soil moisture (SM) monitoring represents an important niche for GNSS-R. SM is a prime parameter for the surface hydrologic cycle since it drives the evapotranspiration and the heat storage capability of the soil, as well as determines the possibility of surface runoff after rainfalls. Despite the recognised environmental and commercial relevance of SM, providing such parameter over global and large scales remains a significant challenge. Sensors based on GNSS-R offer a suitable and efficient solution to this issue. The basis for the retrieval of SM with GNSS-R systems lays in the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to water content. The higher the concentration of water in the soil, the higher the dielectric constant and reflectivity, which affects signals that reflect from the Earth surface by increasing their peak power. Previous investigations, [1,2] demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to sense small changes in surface reflectivity, becoming a precedent for this promising research line. GNSS-R present various advantages with respect to others methods currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Firstly, as already mentioned, GNSS signals lie in L band, which

  13. Dependency of geodynamic parameters on the GNSS constellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scaramuzza, Stefano; Dach, Rolf; Beutler, Gerhard; Arnold, Daniel; Sušnik, Andreja; Jäggi, Adrian

    2017-07-01

    Significant differences in time series of geodynamic parameters determined with different Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) exist and are only partially explained. We study whether the different number of orbital planes within a particular GNSS contributes to the observed differences by analyzing time series of geocenter coordinates (GCCs) and pole coordinates estimated from several real and virtual GNSS constellations: GPS, GLONASS, a combined GPS/GLONASS constellation, and two virtual GPS sub-systems, which are obtained by splitting up the original GPS constellation into two groups of three orbital planes each. The computed constellation-specific GCCs and pole coordinates are analyzed for systematic differences, and their spectral behavior and formal errors are inspected. We show that the number of orbital planes barely influences the geocenter estimates. GLONASS' larger inclination and formal errors of the orbits seem to be the main reason for the initially observed differences. A smaller number of orbital planes may lead, however, to degradations in the estimates of the pole coordinates. A clear signal at three cycles per year is visible in the spectra of the differences between our estimates of the pole coordinates and the corresponding IERS 08 C04 values. Combinations of two 3-plane systems, even with similar ascending nodes, reduce this signal. The understanding of the relation between the satellite constellations and the resulting geodynamic parameters is important, because the GNSS currently under development, such as the European Galileo and the medium Earth orbit constellation of the Chinese BeiDou system, also consist of only three orbital planes.

  14. Economics of satellite communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Wilbur L.

    This paper is partly a tutorial, telling systematically how one goes about calculating the total annual costs of a satellite communications system, and partly the expression of some original ideas on the choice of parameters so as to minimize these costs. The calculation of costs can be divided into two broad categories. The first is technical and is concerned with estimating what particular equipment will cost and what will be the annual expense to maintain and operate it. One starts in the estimation of any new system by listing the principal items of equipment, such as satellites, earth stations of various sizes and functions, telemetry and tracking equipment and terrestrial interfaces, and then estimating how much each item will cost. Methods are presented for generating such estimates, based on a knowledge of the gross parameters, such as antenna size, coverage area, transmitter power and information rate. These parameters determine the system performance and it is usually possible, knowing them, to estimate the costs of the equipment rather well. Some formulae based on regression analyses are presented. Methods are then given for estimating closely related expenses, such as maintenance and operation, and then an approximate method is developed for estimating terrestrial interconnection costs. It is pointed out that in specific cases when tariff and geographical information are available, it is usually better to work with specific data, but nonetheless it is often desirable, especially in global system estimating, to approximate these interconnect costs without recourse to individual tariffs. The procedure results in a set of costs for the purchase of equipment and its maintenance, and a schedule of payments. Some payments will be incurred during the manufacture of the satellite and before any systems operation, but many will not be incurred until the system is no longer in use, e.g. incentives. In any case, with the methods presented in the first section, one

  15. 5th China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Jiao, Wenhai; Wu, Haitao; Lu, Mingquan

    2014-01-01

    China Satellite Navigation Conference (CSNC) 2014 Proceedings presents selected research papers from CSNC2014, held on 21-23 May in Nanjing, China. The theme of CSNC2014 is 'BDS Application: Innovation, Integration and Sharing'. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 9 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2014, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.  SUN Jiadong is the Chief Designer of the Compass/ BDS, and the Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS); JIAO Wenhai is a researcher at China Satellite Navigation Office; WU Haitao is a professor at Navigation Headquarters, CAS; LU Mingquan is a professor at Department of Electronic Engineering of Tsinghua University.

  16. An Adaptive Multipath Mitigation Filter for GNSS Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chung-Liang; Juang, Jyh-Ching

    2008-12-01

    Global navigation satellite system (GNSS) is designed to serve both civilian and military applications. However, the GNSS performance suffers from several errors, such as ionosphere delay, troposphere delay, ephemeris error, and receiver noise and multipath. Among these errors, the multipath is one of the most unpredictable error sources in high-accuracy navigation. This paper applies a modified adaptive filter to reduce code and carrier multipath errors in GPS. The filter employs a tap-delay line with an Adaline network to estimate the direction and the delayed-signal parameters. Then, the multipath effect is mitigated by subtracting the estimated multipath effects from the processed correlation function. The hardware complexity of the method is also compared with other existing methods. Simulation results show that the proposed method using field data has a significant reduction in multipath error especially in short-delay multipath scenarios.

  17. An Adaptive Multipath Mitigation Filter for GNSS Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyh-Ching Juang

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Global navigation satellite system (GNSS is designed to serve both civilian and military applications. However, the GNSS performance suffers from several errors, such as ionosphere delay, troposphere delay, ephemeris error, and receiver noise and multipath. Among these errors, the multipath is one of the most unpredictable error sources in high-accuracy navigation. This paper applies a modified adaptive filter to reduce code and carrier multipath errors in GPS. The filter employs a tap-delay line with an Adaline network to estimate the direction and the delayed-signal parameters. Then, the multipath effect is mitigated by subtracting the estimated multipath effects from the processed correlation function. The hardware complexity of the method is also compared with other existing methods. Simulation results show that the proposed method using field data has a significant reduction in multipath error especially in short-delay multipath scenarios.

  18. GNSS-based operational monitoring devices for forest logging operation chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondo Gallo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The first results of a new approach for implementing operational monitoring tool to control the performance of forest mechanisation chains are proposed and discussed. The solution is based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS tools that are the core of a datalogging system that, in combination with a specific inference-engine, is able to analyse process times, work distances, forward speeds, vehicle tracking and number of working cycles in forest operations. As a consequence the operational monitoring control methods could provide an evaluation of the efficiency of the investigated forest operations. The study has monitored the performance of a tower yarder with crane and processor-head, during logging operations. The field surveys consisted on the installation of the GNSS device directly on the forest equipment for monitoring its movements. Simultaneously the field survey considered the integration of the GNSS information with a time study of work elements based on the continuous time methods supported by a time study board. Additionally, where possible, the onboard computer of the forest machine was also used in order to obtain additional information to be integrated to the GNSS data and the time study. All the recorded GNSS data integrated with the work elements study were thus post-processed through GIS analysis. The preliminary overview about the application of this approach on harvesting operations has permitted to assess a good feasibility of the use of GNSS in the relief of operative times in high mechanised forest chains. Results showed an easy and complete identification of the different operative cycles and elementary operations phases, with a maximum difference between the two methodologies of 10.32%. The use of GNSS installed on forest equipment, integrated with the inferenceengine and also with an interface for data communication or data storage, will permit an automatic or semi-automatic operational monitoring, improving

  19. Use of real-time GNSS-RF data to characterize the swing movements of forestry equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryer M. Becker; Robert F. Keefe; Nathaniel M. Anderson

    2017-01-01

    The western United States faces significant forest management challenges after severe bark beetle infestations have led to substantial mortality. Minimizing costs is vital for increasing the feasibility of management operations in affected forests. Multi‐transmitter Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)‐radio frequencies (RF) technology has applications in the...

  20. Frame transformation and geoid undulation transfer to GNSS real time positions through the new RTCM 3.1 transformation messages

    OpenAIRE

    CAPILLA ROMA, RAQUEL; Martín Furones, Ángel Esteban; Anquela Julián, Ana Belén; Berné Valero, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Radio Technical Commission for Marine Services (RTCM) standardised messages play an important role in real time Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) applications such as navigation, positioning, civil engineering, surveying, and cartographic or cadastral production. One of the latest agreements on RTCM definitions contains the data fields for real time geodetic reference frame transformation and orthometric heights computation by received geoid undulations via internet pr...

  1. A New Multipath Mitigation Method for GNSS Receivers Based on an Antenna Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Rougerie

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The well-known Space-Alternating Generalized Expectation Maximisation (SAGE algorithm has been recently considered for multipath mitigation in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers. However, the implementation of SAGE in a GNSS receiver is a challenging issue due to the numerous number or parameters to be estimated and the important size of the data to be processed. A new implementation of the SAGE algorithm is proposed in this paper in order to reach the same efficiency with a reduced complexity. This paper focuses on the trade-off between complexity and performance thanks to the Cramer Rao bound derivation. Moreover, this paper shows how the proposed algorithm can be integrated with a classical GNSS tracking loop. This solution is thus a very promising approach for multipath mitigation.

  2. Decadal variations in atmospheric water vapor time series estimated using GNSS, ERA-Interim, and synoptic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshawaf, Fadwa; Dick, Galina; Heise, Stefan; Balidakis, Kyriakos; Schmidt, Torsten; Wickert, Jens

    2017-04-01

    Ground-based GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) have efficiently been used since the 1990s as a meteorological observing system. Recently scientists used GNSS time series of precipitable water vapor (PWV) for climate research although they may not be sufficiently long. In this work, we compare the trend estimated from GNSS time series with that estimated from European Center for Medium-RangeWeather Forecasts Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) data and meteorological measurements.We aim at evaluating climate evolution in Central Europe by monitoring different atmospheric variables such as temperature and PWV. PWV time series were obtained by three methods: 1) estimated from ground-based GNSS observations using the method of precise point positioning, 2) inferred from ERA-Interim data, and 3) determined based on daily surface measurements of temperature and relative humidity. The other variables are available from surface meteorological stations or received from ERA-Interim. The PWV trend component estimated from GNSS data strongly correlates (>70%) with that estimated from the other data sets. The linear trend is estimated by straight line fitting over 30 years of seasonally-adjusted PWV time series obtained using the meteorological measurements. The results show a positive trend in the PWV time series with an increase of 0.2-0.7 mm/decade with a mean standard deviations of 0.016 mm/decade. In this paper, we present the results at three GNSS stations. The temporal increment of the PWV correlates with the temporal increase in the temperature levels.

  3. Il posizionamento satellitare compie trent’anni: lo stato dell’arte del GNSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulvio Bernardini

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Satellite Positioning 30th anniversary: GNSS state of the artThis year marks the 30th anniversary of the Satellite Positioning system. In 1978 the United States launched the first ever experimental satellite which formed the basis for the first Global Positioning System, commonly referred to as GPS. The system has evolved over the years from strict military use to more commercial mainstream applications. Today GPS is used in varied independent projects in the GNSS universe.

  4. GNSS 软件接收机算法验证平台设计与实现%Design and Implementation of Algorithm Verification Platform for GNSS Software Receiver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏敬法

    2013-01-01

    GNSS receiver, for its real-time provision of height, latitude, longitudes and time, is now widely used in military and communication applications, and so it is of important application value to study the design and key techniques of GNSS software receiver. For test and verification of GNSS receiver algorithm, GNSS receiver verification platform is designed, and GNSS signal acquisition, tracking, measurement pre-processing and RAIM are emphatically studied. The experiment result indicates that this designed GNSS software algorithm verification platform, with high flexibility, good reconfiguration, and high position accuracy, could provide some reference for test and verification of various GNSS algorithms.%  全球卫星导航系统(GNSS,Global Navigation Satellite System)由于能够实时为用户提供时间,经纬度和海拔高度等导航信息,在军事、通讯和测量等领域已得到广泛的应用,因此研究 GNSS软件接收机的设计与关键技术具有重要应用价值。从 GNSS 接收机算法验证与测试的需求出发,设计了一种基于软件实现的 GNSS 接收机算法验证平台,重点研究了与该验证平台实现相关的高动态卫星导航信号捕获方法、跟踪、测量值预处理方法和接收机自体完好性监控(RAIM,Receiver Autonomous Integrity Monitoring)方法等关键技术。实际结果表明实现的 GNSS 软件接收机算法验证平台具有算法验证灵活,可重构性好、定位精度高等特点,可以为各种 GNSS 接收机算法的测试与验证提供参考。

  5. Innovative Remote Sensing: Flood Monitoring using GNSS Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckheinrich, Jamila; Hirrle, Angelika; Schön, Steffen; Beyerle, Georg; Semmling, Maximillian; Apel, Heiko; Wickert, Jens

    2014-05-01

    An increase of the intensity and frequency of extreme precipitation events are observed in the last decade due to climate changing conditions. Resulting floods pose significant socio-economic problems in areas like on the banks of the Mekong Delta with dense population. To quantify and predict the impact of these flooding events to the local population it is important to measure and understand the related hydrological processes. Satellite based altimetry offers water level measurements with high accuracy for oceans and very large rivers but typically with insufficient spatio-temporal resolution. The accuracy decreases in coastal areas. Water level gauging instruments offer a high accuracy and temporal resolution but for a single location only. However, the number of water level gauging stations worldwide is decreasing. GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) can fill the gap between these two measurement methods. Earth reflected L-band signals from the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) show a high reflectivity on water surfaces. This property is used to derive water level height changes. In principle two different GNSS-R altimetry methods exist: based on code or carrier phase observations. Our research activities focus on the phase-based altimetric application of GNSS-R. In March 2012, a two-week measurement campaign was conducted in Can Tho City, Vietnam within the WISDOM (Water related Information System for the sustainable Development Of the Mekong Delta) research project. Several reflection traces on the 150 m wide Can Tho River section are recorded with a dedicated GNSS-R receiver developed in cooperation between GFZ and JAVAD. To track the direct and the reflected signal separately, two antennas are used. The analysis of the recorded signals shows a superposition of the signal reflected by the water surface with other multipath signals. These occur due to the surrounding of the antennas (vegetation, buildings). To separate these different multipath signals and

  6. Global navigation satellite systems and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Madry, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Dr. Madry, one of the world's leading experts in the field, provides in a condensed form a quick yet comprehensive overview of satellite navigation. This book concisely addresses the latest technology, the applications, the regulatory issues, and the strategic implications of satellite navigation systems. This assesses the strengths and weaknesses of satellite navigation networks and review of all the various national systems now being deployed and the motivation behind the proliferation of these systems.

  7. Evaluation of the Suitability of GNSS Instruments as Proxy Tide Gauges in a Tsunami Early-Detection Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeberechts, J.; Leonard, L. J.; Lintern, G.; Insua, T. L.; Nykolaishen, L.

    2015-12-01

    The use of a coastally-located GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) instrument as a relatively high accuracy proxy tide gauge, by employing multipath reflection analysis of incoming signals, has been demonstrated in recent studies. Inversion of positional GNSS data (coseismic displacements) from networks of multiple instruments is currently used to constrain tsunamigenic sources for forecasting in existing tsunami early-warning systems. However, the GNSS multipath reflection method has not yet been directly applied in a tsunami-warning context. This technique employs reflected signals arriving at the GNSS antenna, which are generally discarded as 'noise' in standard positional measurements. The signal-to-noise ratio data encoded in standard RINEX data are analyzed, allowing computation of the vertical distance from the antenna to the water surface using multipath reflection theory. GNSS instruments can be co-located with pre-existing physical (analog) tide-gauge instruments to create a comparative baseline to evaluate the suitability of this technique in the field. Sea level time series derived from GNSS data are compared with time series recorded by analog instruments in order to establish a correlation and margin of error in typical use. With the aid of three test sites bordering the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada, we will assess whether tsunami wave amplitudes and periods can be determined in near real time with sufficient accuracy for use in tsunami detection and early warning. The ultimate goal of this work is to deploy GNSS instruments independently as tide gauges in locations where analog tide gauges are not practical. An expanded network of coastal GNSS instruments would also provide valuable positional data for crustal deformation analyses, especially in regions with current sparse networks such as the west coast of Canada.

  8. Introduction of a Photogrammetric Camera System for Rpas with Highly Accurate Gnss/imu Information for Standardized Workflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, T.; Geßner, M.; Meißner, H.; Przybilla, H. J.; Gerke, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present the evaluation of DLR's modular airborne camera system MACS-Micro for remotely piloted aircraft system (RPAS) with a maximum takeoff weight (MTOW) less than 5kg. The main focus is on standardized calibration and test procedures as well as on standardized photogrammetric workflows as a proof of feasibility for this aerial camera concept. The prototype consists of an industrial grade frame imaging camera and a compact GNSS/IMU solution which are operated by an embedded PC. The camera has been calibrated pre- and post- flight using a three dimensional test field. The validation of the latest prototype is done by a traditional photogrammetric evaluation of an aerial survey using 39 ground control points. The results, concerning geometric and radiometric features of the present system concept as well as the quality of the aero triangulation, fulfill many of the aimed keyspecifications.

  9. A New Approach for Improving Reliability of Personal Navigation Devices under Harsh GNSS Signal Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gérard Lachapelle

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In natural and urban canyon environments, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS signals suffer from various challenges such as signal multipath, limited or lack of signal availability and poor geometry. Inertial sensors are often employed to improve the solution continuity under poor GNSS signal quality and availability conditions. Various fault detection schemes have been proposed in the literature to detect and remove biased GNSS measurements to obtain a more reliable navigation solution. However, many of these methods are found to be sub-optimal and often lead to unavailability of reliability measures, mostly because of the improper characterization of the measurement errors. A robust filtering architecture is thus proposed which assumes a heavy-tailed distribution for the measurement errors. Moreover, the proposed filter is capable of adapting to the changing GNSS signal conditions such as when moving from open sky conditions to deep canyons. Results obtained by processing data collected in various GNSS challenged environments show that the proposed scheme provides a robust navigation solution without having to excessively reject usable measurements. The tests reported herein show improvements of nearly 15% and 80% for position accuracy and reliability, respectively, when applying the above approach.

  10. A new approach for improving reliability of personal navigation devices under harsh GNSS signal conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhital, Anup; Bancroft, Jared B; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2013-11-07

    In natural and urban canyon environments, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals suffer from various challenges such as signal multipath, limited or lack of signal availability and poor geometry. Inertial sensors are often employed to improve the solution continuity under poor GNSS signal quality and availability conditions. Various fault detection schemes have been proposed in the literature to detect and remove biased GNSS measurements to obtain a more reliable navigation solution. However, many of these methods are found to be sub-optimal and often lead to unavailability of reliability measures, mostly because of the improper characterization of the measurement errors. A robust filtering architecture is thus proposed which assumes a heavy-tailed distribution for the measurement errors. Moreover, the proposed filter is capable of adapting to the changing GNSS signal conditions such as when moving from open sky conditions to deep canyons. Results obtained by processing data collected in various GNSS challenged environments show that the proposed scheme provides a robust navigation solution without having to excessively reject usable measurements. The tests reported herein show improvements of nearly 15% and 80% for position accuracy and reliability, respectively, when applying the above approach.

  11. Characterisation of residual ionospheric errors in bending angles using GNSS RO end-to-end simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. L.; Kirchengast, G.; Zhang, K. F.; Norman, R.; Li, Y.; Zhang, S. C.; Carter, B.; Fritzer, J.; Schwaerz, M.; Choy, S. L.; Wu, S. Q.; Tan, Z. X.

    2013-09-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) is an innovative meteorological remote sensing technique for measuring atmospheric parameters such as refractivity, temperature, water vapour and pressure for the improvement of numerical weather prediction (NWP) and global climate monitoring (GCM). GNSS RO has many unique characteristics including global coverage, long-term stability of observations, as well as high accuracy and high vertical resolution of the derived atmospheric profiles. One of the main error sources in GNSS RO observations that significantly affect the accuracy of the derived atmospheric parameters in the stratosphere is the ionospheric error. In order to mitigate the effect of this error, the linear ionospheric correction approach for dual-frequency GNSS RO observations is commonly used. However, the residual ionospheric errors (RIEs) can be still significant, especially when large ionospheric disturbances occur and prevail such as during the periods of active space weather. In this study, the RIEs were investigated under different local time, propagation direction and solar activity conditions and their effects on RO bending angles are characterised using end-to-end simulations. A three-step simulation study was designed to investigate the characteristics of the RIEs through comparing the bending angles with and without the effects of the RIEs. This research forms an important step forward in improving the accuracy of the atmospheric profiles derived from the GNSS RO technique.

  12. Investigation of some selected strategies for multi-GNSS instantaneous RTK positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paziewski, Jacek; Wielgosz, Pawel

    2017-01-01

    It is clear that we can benefit from multi-constellation GNSS in precise relative positioning. On the other hand, it is still an open problem how to combine multi-GNSS signals in a single functional model. This study presents methodology and quality assessment of selected methods allowing for multi-GNSS observations combining in relative kinematic positioning using baselines up to tens of kilometers. In specific, this paper characterizes loose and tight integration strategies applied to the ionosphere and troposphere weighted model. Performance assessment of the established strategies was based on the analyses of the integer ambiguity resolution and rover coordinates' repeatability obtained in the medium range instantaneous RTK positioning with the use of full constellation dual frequency GPS and Galileo signals. Since full constellation of Galileo satellites is not yet available, the observational data were obtained from a hardware GNSS signal simulator using regular geodetic GNSS receivers. The results indicate on similar and high performance of the loose, and tight integration with calibrated receiver ISBs strategies. These approaches have undeniable advantage over single system positioning in terms of reliability of the integer ambiguity resolution as well as rover coordinate repeatability.

  13. Performance of ionospheric maps in support of long baseline GNSS kinematic positioning at low latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Sreeja, V.; Aquino, M.; Cesaroni, C.; Spogli, L.; Dodson, A.; De Franceschi, G.

    2016-05-01

    Ionospheric scintillation occurs mainly at high and low latitude regions of the Earth and may impose serious degradation on GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) functionality. The Brazilian territory sits on one of the most affected areas of the globe, where the ionosphere behaves very unpredictably, with strong scintillation frequently occurring in the local postsunset hours. The correlation between scintillation occurrence and sharp variations in the ionospheric total electron content (TEC) in Brazil is demonstrated in Spogli et al. (2013). The compounded effect of these associated ionospheric disturbances on long baseline GNSS kinematic positioning is studied in this paper, in particular when ionospheric maps are used to aid the positioning solution. The experiments have been conducted using data from GNSS reference stations in Brazil. The use of a regional TEC map generated under the CALIBRA (Countering GNSS high-Accuracy applications Limitations due to Ionospheric disturbances in BRAzil) project, referred to as CALIBRA TEC map (CTM), was compared to the use of the Global Ionosphere Map (GIM), provided by the International GNSS Service (IGS). Results show that the use of the CTM greatly improves the kinematic positioning solution as compared with that using the GIM, especially under disturbed ionospheric conditions. Additionally, different hypotheses were tested regarding the precision of the TEC values obtained from ionospheric maps, and its effect on the long baseline kinematic solution evaluated. Finally, this study compares two interpolation methods for ionospheric maps, namely, the Inverse Distance Weight and the Natural Neighbor.

  14. GNSS Vertical Coordinate Time Series Analysis Using Single-Channel Independent Component Analysis Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Wei; Dai, Wujiao; Santerre, Rock; Cai, Changsheng; Kuang, Cuilin

    2017-02-01

    Daily vertical coordinate time series of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations usually contains tectonic and non-tectonic deformation signals, residual atmospheric delay signals, measurement noise, etc. In geophysical studies, it is very important to separate various geophysical signals from the GNSS time series to truthfully reflect the effect of mass loadings on crustal deformation. Based on the independence of mass loadings, we combine the Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD) with the Phase Space Reconstruction-based Independent Component Analysis (PSR-ICA) method to analyze the vertical time series of GNSS reference stations. In the simulation experiment, the seasonal non-tectonic signal is simulated by the sum of the correction of atmospheric mass loading and soil moisture mass loading. The simulated seasonal non-tectonic signal can be separated into two independent signals using the PSR-ICA method, which strongly correlated with atmospheric mass loading and soil moisture mass loading, respectively. Likewise, in the analysis of the vertical time series of GNSS reference stations of Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC), similar results have been obtained using the combined EEMD and PSR-ICA method. All these results indicate that the EEMD and PSR-ICA method can effectively separate the independent atmospheric and soil moisture mass loading signals and illustrate the significant cause of the seasonal variation of GNSS vertical time series in the mainland of China.

  15. The Impact of Estimating High-Resolution Tropospheric Gradients on Multi-GNSS Precise Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Benefits from the modernized US Global Positioning System (GPS, the revitalized Russian GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS, and the newly-developed Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS and European Galileo, multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS has emerged as a powerful tool not only in positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT, but also in remote sensing of the atmosphere and ionosphere. Both precise positioning and the derivation of atmospheric parameters can benefit from multi-GNSS observations. In this contribution, extensive evaluations are conducted with multi-GNSS datasets collected from 134 globally-distributed ground stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX network in July 2016. The datasets are processed in six different constellation combinations, i.e., GPS-, GLONASS-, BDS-only, GPS + GLONASS, GPS + BDS, and GPS + GLONASS + BDS + Galileo precise point positioning (PPP. Tropospheric gradients are estimated with eight different temporal resolutions, from 1 h to 24 h, to investigate the impact of estimating high-resolution gradients on position estimates. The standard deviation (STD is used as an indicator of positioning repeatability. The results show that estimating tropospheric gradients with high temporal resolution can achieve better positioning performance than the traditional strategy in which tropospheric gradients are estimated on a daily basis. Moreover, the impact of estimating tropospheric gradients with different temporal resolutions at various elevation cutoff angles (from 3° to 20° is investigated. It can be observed that with increasing elevation cutoff angles, the improvement in positioning repeatability is decreased.

  16. The Impact of Estimating High-Resolution Tropospheric Gradients on Multi-GNSS Precise Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Li, Xingxing; Li, Weiwei; Chen, Wen; Dong, Danan; Wickert, Jens; Schuh, Harald

    2017-04-03

    Benefits from the modernized US Global Positioning System (GPS), the revitalized Russian GLObal NAvigation Satellite System (GLONASS), and the newly-developed Chinese BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) and European Galileo, multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) has emerged as a powerful tool not only in positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT), but also in remote sensing of the atmosphere and ionosphere. Both precise positioning and the derivation of atmospheric parameters can benefit from multi-GNSS observations. In this contribution, extensive evaluations are conducted with multi-GNSS datasets collected from 134 globally-distributed ground stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) network in July 2016. The datasets are processed in six different constellation combinations, i.e., GPS-, GLONASS-, BDS-only, GPS + GLONASS, GPS + BDS, and GPS + GLONASS + BDS + Galileo precise point positioning (PPP). Tropospheric gradients are estimated with eight different temporal resolutions, from 1 h to 24 h, to investigate the impact of estimating high-resolution gradients on position estimates. The standard deviation (STD) is used as an indicator of positioning repeatability. The results show that estimating tropospheric gradients with high temporal resolution can achieve better positioning performance than the traditional strategy in which tropospheric gradients are estimated on a daily basis. Moreover, the impact of estimating tropospheric gradients with different temporal resolutions at various elevation cutoff angles (from 3° to 20°) is investigated. It can be observed that with increasing elevation cutoff angles, the improvement in positioning repeatability is decreased.

  17. Integration of mobile satellite and cellular systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Elliott H.; Estabrook, Polly; Pinck, Deborah; Ekroot, Laura

    1993-01-01

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established. Users equipped for both cellular and satellite service can take advantage of a number of features made possible by such integration, including seamless handoff and universal roaming. To provide maximum benefit at lowest posible cost, the means by which these systems are integrated must be carefully considered. Mobile satellite hub stations must be configured to efficiently interface with cellular Mobile Telephone Switching Offices (MTSO's), and cost effective mobile units that provide both cellular and satellite capability must be developed.

  18. Contribution of GNSS CORS Infrastructure to the Mission of Modern Geodesy and Status of GNSS CORS in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalermchon Satirapod

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Geodesy is the science of measuring and mapping the geometry, orientation and gravity field of the Earth including the associated variations with time. Geodesy has also provided the foundation for high accuracy surveying and mapping. Modern Geodesy involves a range of space and terrestrial technologies that contribute to our knowledge of the solid earth, atmosphere and oceans. These technologies include: Global Positioning System/Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GPS/GNSS, Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR, Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI, Satellite Altimetry, Gravity Mapping Missions such as GRACE, CHAMP and GOCE, satelliteborne Differential Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (DInSAR, Absolute and Relative Gravimetry, and Precise Terrestrial Surveying (Levelling and Traversing. A variety of services have been established in recent years to ensure high accuracy and reliable geodetic products to support geoscientific research. The reference frame defined by Modern Geodesy is now the basis for most national and regional datums. Furthermore, the GPS/GNSS technology is a crucial geopositioning tool for both Geodesy and Surveying. There is therefore a blurring of the distinction between geodetic and surveying GPS/GNSS techniques, and increasingly the ground infrastructure of continuously operating reference stations (CORS receivers attempts to address the needs of both geodesists and other positioning professionals. Yet Geodesy is also striving to increase the level of accuracy by a factor of ten over the next decade in order to address the demands of “global change” studies. The Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS is an important component of the International Association of Geodesy. GGOS aims to integrate all geodetic observations in order to generate a consistent high quality set of geodetic parameters for monitoring the phenomena and processes within the “System Earth”. Integration implies the inclusion of all relevant

  19. The new DMT SAFEGUARD low-cost GNSS measuring system and its application in the field of geotechnical deformation and movement monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Daniel

    2017-04-01

    In the recent years an increasing awareness of geodetic measurement systems and their application for monitoring projects is clearly visible. With geodetic sensors it is possible to detect safety-related changes at monitoring objects with high temporal density, high accuracy and in a very reliable manner. Quality acquisitions, processing and storage of monitoring data as well as a professional on-site implementation are the most important requirements and challenges to contemporary systems in civil engineering, mining as well as oil and gas production. Monitoring measures provide important input for early warning, alarm, protection and verification of potential hazardous environments and therefore the risk management applied to projects have a significant influence. The implementation has to follow an optimization process incorporating necessary accuracy, reliability and economic efficiency. From the economical point of view the costs per observation point are crucial for most monitoring projects. Keeping in mind that the costs of classical high-end GNSS stations with a geodetic dual-frequency receiver is within the range of several 10,000 euro. Large monitoring networks with a high number of simultaneously observed points are very expensive and therefore eventually have to be cut back, substituted by compromising methods or totally withdrawn. A further development in the area of GNSS receivers could reduce this disadvantage. Within the last few years single-frequency receivers that record L1-signals of GPS/GLONASS and offer sub-centimeter positioning accuracies are increasingly offered on the market. The accuracy of GNSS measurements depends on many factors as the hardware itself as well as on external influences related to the measurement principals. The external influences can be strongly reduced or eliminated by appropriate measuring and processing methods. For a reliable monitoring system it is necessary that the results are comparable and consistent for each

  20. New Test Facilities For GNSS Testing And Dynamic Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trzuskowsky Andreas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available With Galileo, the European GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System starting early services in 2015, open-area-testing of applications which use the new positioning system gets more and more important. This contribution gives an overview on existing test sites like railGATE, automotiveGATE and seaGATE, it highlights the latest addition for dynamic calibration with geodetic precision and finally describes the testing regime of the BONUS project ANCHOR, where multiple test sites are used for maximum benefit in a maritime application.

  1. Application of GNSS meteorology for intense precipitation case studies in Bulgaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, Nadezhda; Guerova, Guergana; Stoycheva, Anastasiya

    2014-05-01

    One of the applications of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) Meteorology is to study intense precipitation events. Development of these applications is one of the tasks of working group two of the COST Action ES1206 Advanced Global Navigation Satellite Systems tropospheric products for monitoring severe weather events and climate (GNSS4SWEC). This work is a contribution to the COST Action ES1206 and targets the use of Integrated Water Vapour (IWV), derived with the GNSS Meteorology method, during convective events with heavy precipitation in Bulgaria. Twenty-two case studies were selected for 2012. For the analysis two-dimensional maps of the IWV distribution from GNSS and Meteosat are used. A case study on the 27 June 2012 shows a strong south north gradient of the water vapour on the Balkan Peninsula before the intrusion of cold and dry air. By using these techniques the passage of a cold front is timed on the 25 May 2012. The IWV peak is between 06:00 UTC and 12:00 UTC before the passage of the cold front at 18:00 UTC. Future work will be the use of NWP model (WRF)simulations and evaluate the model performance for the selected case studies for 2012.

  2. Performance analysis of GPS augmentation using Japanese Quasi-Zenith Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, F.; Kubo, N.; Yasuda, A.

    2004-01-01

    The current GPS satellite constellation provides limited availability and reliability for a country like Japan where mountainous terrain and urban canyons do not allow a clear skyline to the horizon. At present, the Japanese Quasi-Zenith Satellite System (QZSS) is under investigation through a government-private sector cooperation. QZSS is considered a multi-mission satellite system, as it is able to provide communication, broadcasting and positioning services for mobile users in a specified region with high elevation angle. The performance of a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) can be quantified by availability, accuracy, reliability and integrity. This paper focuses on availability, accuracy and reliability of GPS with and without augmentation using QZSS. The availability, accuracy and reliability of GPS only and augmented GPS using QZSS in the Asia-Pacific and Australian area is studied by software simulation. The simulation results are described by the number of visible satellites as a measure of availability, geometric dilution of precision as a measure of accuracy and minimal detectable bias, and bias-to-noise rate as a measure of reliability, with spatial and temporal variations. It is shown that QZSS does not only improve the availability and accuracy of GPS positioning, but also enhances the reliability of GPS positioning in Japan and its neighboring area.

  3. Multipath Estimation in Urban Environments from Joint GNSS Receivers and LiDAR Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández, Antonio J.; Fabio Dovis; David De Castro; Xin Chen; Khurram Ali

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, multipath error on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals in urban environments is characterized with the help of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements. For this purpose, LiDAR equipment and Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver implementing a multipath estimating architecture were used to collect data in an urban environment. This paper demonstrates how GPS and LiDAR measurements can be jointly used to model the environment and obtain robust receivers....

  4. Design of the American Mobile Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittiver, Charles

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the American Mobile Satellite Corporation (AMSC) Mobile Satellite System (MSS). A summary of the mobile satellite (MSAT) design and overall performance is provided. The design and components of both the forward link and return link transponders are described in detail. The design and operation of a unique hybrid matrix amplifier that offers flexible power distribution is outlined. The conceptual design and performance of three types of land mobile antennas are described.

  5. Integration of Mobil Satellite and Cellular Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, E. H.; Estabrook, P.; Pinck, D.; Ekroot, L.

    1993-01-01

    By integrating the ground based infrastructure component of a mobile satellite system with the infrastructure systems of terrestrial 800 MHz cellular service providers, a seamless network of universal coverage can be established.

  6. Outlier Detection in GNSS Pseudo-Range/Doppler Measurements for Robust Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zair, Salim; Le Hégarat-Mascle, Sylvie; Seignez, Emmanuel

    2016-04-22

    In urban areas or space-constrained environments with obstacles, vehicle localization using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data is hindered by Non-Line Of Sight (NLOS) and multipath receptions. These phenomena induce faulty data that disrupt the precise localization of the GNSS receiver. In this study, we detect the outliers among the observations, Pseudo-Range (PR) and/or Doppler measurements, and we evaluate how discarding them improves the localization. We specify a contrario modeling for GNSS raw data to derive an algorithm that partitions the dataset between inliers and outliers. Then, only the inlier data are considered in the localization process performed either through a classical Particle Filter (PF) or a Rao-Blackwellization (RB) approach. Both localization algorithms exclusively use GNSS data, but they differ by the way Doppler measurements are processed. An experiment has been performed with a GPS receiver aboard a vehicle. Results show that the proposed algorithms are able to detect the 'outliers' in the raw data while being robust to non-Gaussian noise and to intermittent satellite blockage. We compare the performance results achieved either estimating only PR outliers or estimating both PR and Doppler outliers. The best localization is achieved using the RB approach coupled with PR-Doppler outlier estimation.

  7. Outlier Detection in GNSS Pseudo-Range/Doppler Measurements for Robust Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Zair

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In urban areas or space-constrained environments with obstacles, vehicle localization using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS data is hindered by Non-Line Of Sight (NLOS and multipath receptions. These phenomena induce faulty data that disrupt the precise localization of the GNSS receiver. In this study, we detect the outliers among the observations, Pseudo-Range (PR and/or Doppler measurements, and we evaluate how discarding them improves the localization. We specify a contrario modeling for GNSS raw data to derive an algorithm that partitions the dataset between inliers and outliers. Then, only the inlier data are considered in the localization process performed either through a classical Particle Filter (PF or a Rao-Blackwellization (RB approach. Both localization algorithms exclusively use GNSS data, but they differ by the way Doppler measurements are processed. An experiment has been performed with a GPS receiver aboard a vehicle. Results show that the proposed algorithms are able to detect the ‘outliers’ in the raw data while being robust to non-Gaussian noise and to intermittent satellite blockage. We compare the performance results achieved either estimating only PR outliers or estimating both PR and Doppler outliers. The best localization is achieved using the RB approach coupled with PR-Doppler outlier estimation.

  8. Experimental millimeter-wave satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiaki; Shimada, Masaaki; Arimoto, Yoshinori; Shiomi, Tadashi; Kitazume, Susumu

    This paper describes an experimental system of millimeter-wave satellite communications via Japan's Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) and a plan of experiments. Two experimental missions are planned using ETS-VI millimeter-wave (43/38 GHz bands) transponder, considering the millimeter-wave characteristics such as large transmission capacity and possibility to construct a small earth station with a high gain antenna. They are a personal communication system and an inter-satellite communication system. Experimental system including the configuration and the fundamental functions of the onboard transponder and the outline of the experiments are presented.

  9. Satellite Sanitary Systems in Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letema, S.; Van Vliet, B.; Van Lier, J.B.

    2011-01-01

    Satellite sewage collection and treatment systems have been independently developed and managed in East African cities outside the centrally planned and sewered areas. A satellite approach is a promising provisioning option parallel to public sewerage for middle- and high-income residential areas, e

  10. Satellite Sanitary Systems in Kampala, Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Letema, S.C.; Vliet, van B.J.M.; Lier, van J.B.

    2012-01-01

    Satellite sewage collection and treatment systems have been independently developed and managed in East African cities outside the centrally planned and sewered areas. A satellite approach is a promising provisioning option parallel to public sewerage for middle- and high-income residential areas, e

  11. Precise GPS/GNSS Positioning Solution for Airborne Data Acquisition Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. G. Gerlach; D. Gondy

    2003-01-01

    The precise positioning of aircrafts during flights belongs to the great challenges with respect to the development of airborne data acquisition systems. Satellite positioning systems like GPS offers a unique capability for precise positioning but requires in depth knowledge of GPS in airborne applications, e.g.GPS for high dynamic application, integration of GPS with other sensors, dynamic behaviour of aircrafts or antenna location. For its positioning reference system of Flight Inspection systems Aerodata AG has developed a robust GPS carrier phase ambiguity solution P-DGPS, Precise Differential GPS combined with complementary sensors like INS, barometers, radio altimeters or laser altimeters as well as laser trackers. Using recorded data during the flight the algorithm offers also the capability to calculate more accurate positions in post-processing. The presented sensor fusion algorithm using GPS without differential corrections (SGPS, standalone GPS) offers a precise height reference solution for approach calibration based only on aircraft-based sensors. SGPS data are combined in post-processing with inertial, pressure, radio and laser altimeter data. Flight trials with a Bombardier "Global Express" at Braunschweig Airport on May 2002 shows the achieved accuracies of the height reference solution calculated by SGPS in comparison to P-DGPS. The SGPS solution for precise height calculation of special mission aircrafts provides accuracies in the order of 5 m and at the runway's threshold in the order of 30 cm.

  12. Integrated GNSS attitude determination and positioning for direct geo-referencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadarajah, Nandakumaran; Paffenholz, Jens-André; Teunissen, Peter J G

    2014-07-17

    Direct geo-referencing is an efficient methodology for the fast acquisition of 3D spatial data. It requires the fusion of spatial data acquisition sensors with navigation sensors, such as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. In this contribution, we consider an integrated GNSS navigation system to provide estimates of the position and attitude (orientation) of a 3D laser scanner. The proposed multi-sensor system (MSS) consists of multiple GNSS antennas rigidly mounted on the frame of a rotating laser scanner and a reference GNSS station with known coordinates. Precise GNSS navigation requires the resolution of the carrier phase ambiguities. The proposed method uses the multivariate constrained integer least-squares (MC-LAMBDA) method for the estimation of rotating frame ambiguities and attitude angles. MC-LAMBDA makes use of the known antenna geometry to strengthen the underlying attitude model and, hence, to enhance the reliability of rotating frame ambiguity resolution and attitude determination. The reliable estimation of rotating frame ambiguities is consequently utilized to enhance the relative positioning of the rotating frame with respect to the reference station. This integrated (array-aided) method improves ambiguity resolution, as well as positioning accuracy between the rotating frame and the reference station. Numerical analyses of GNSS data from a real-data campaign confirm the improved performance of the proposed method over the existing method. In particular, the integrated method yields reliable ambiguity resolution and reduces position standard deviation by a factor of about 0:8, matching the theoretical gain of √ 3/4 for two antennas on the rotating frame and a single antenna at the reference station.

  13. Integrated GNSS Attitude Determination and Positioning for Direct Geo-Referencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandakumaran Nadarajah

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Direct geo-referencing is an efficient methodology for the fast acquisition of 3D spatial data. It requires the fusion of spatial data acquisition sensors with navigation sensors, such as Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers. In this contribution, we consider an integrated GNSS navigation system to provide estimates of the position and attitude (orientation of a 3D laser scanner. The proposed multi-sensor system (MSS consists of multiple GNSS antennas rigidly mounted on the frame of a rotating laser scanner and a reference GNSS station with known coordinates. Precise GNSS navigation requires the resolution of the carrier phase ambiguities. The proposed method uses the multivariate constrained integer least-squares (MC-LAMBDA method for the estimation of rotating frame ambiguities and attitude angles. MC-LAMBDA makes use of the known antenna geometry to strengthen the underlying attitude model and, hence, to enhance the reliability of rotating frame ambiguity resolution and attitude determination. The reliable estimation of rotating frame ambiguities is consequently utilized to enhance the relative positioning of the rotating frame with respect to the reference station. This integrated (array-aided method improves ambiguity resolution, as well as positioning accuracy between the rotating frame and the reference station. Numerical analyses of GNSS data from a real-data campaign confirm the improved performance of the proposed method over the existing method. In particular, the integrated method yields reliable ambiguity resolution and reduces position standard deviation by a factor of about 0.8, matching the theoretical gain of 3/4 for two antennas on the rotating frame and a single antenna at the reference station.

  14. Real-Time GNSS Positioning Along Canada's Active Coastal Margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henton, J. A.; Dragert, H.; Lu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    High-rate, low-latency Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data are being refined for real-time applications to monitor and report motions related to large earthquakes in coastal British Columbia. Given the tectonic setting of Canada's west coast, specific goals for real-time regional geodetic monitoring are: (1) the collection of GNSS data with adequate station density to identify the deformation field for regional earthquakes with M>7.3; (2) the robust, continuous real-time analyses of GNSS data with a precision of 1-2 cm and a latency of less than 10s; and (3) the display of results with attending automated alarms and estimations of earthquake parameters. Megathrust earthquakes (M>8) are the primary targets for immediate identification, since the tsunamis they generate will strike the coast within 15 to 20 min. However, large (6.0displacements expected from various offshore events which allows an evaluation of the effectiveness of the current regional coverage. The present distribution and density of real-time sites is largely sufficient for aiding the timely estimation of size, location, and nature of a great (M>8) megathrust earthquake. However, current coverage is inadequate for the unambiguous identification of the same parameters for 7

  15. Application of Helmert Variance Component Based Adaptive Kalman Filter in Multi-GNSS PPP/INS Tightly Coupled Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouzheng Gao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The integration of the Global Positioning System (GPS and the Inertial Navigation System (INS based on Real-time Kinematic (RTK and Single Point Positioning (SPP technology have been applied as a powerful approach in kinematic positioning and attitude determination. However, the accuracy of RTK and SPP based GPS/INS integration mode will degrade visibly along with the increasing user-base distance and the quality of pseudo-range. In order to overcome such weaknesses, the tightly coupled integration between GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP and INS was proposed recently. Because of the rapid development of the multi-constellation Global Navigation Satellite System (multi-GNSS, we introduce the multi-GNSS into the tightly coupled integration of PPP and INS in this paper. Meanwhile, in order to weaken the impacts of the GNSS observations with low quality and the inaccurate state model on the performance of the multi-GNSS PPP/INS tightly coupled integration, the Helmert variance component estimation based adaptive Kalman filter is employed in the algorithm implementation. Finally, a set of vehicle-borne GPS + BeiDou + GLONASS and Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS INS data is analyzed to evaluate the performance of such algorithm. The statistics indicate that the performance of the multi-GNSS PPP/INS tightly coupled integration can be enhanced significantly in terms of both position accuracy and convergence time.

  16. Advanced tracking and data relay satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Daniel

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this communication satellite system are as follows: to provide NASA needs for satellite tracking and communications through the year 2012; to maintain and augment the current TDRS system when available satellite resources are expended in the latter part of the decade; to provide the necessary ground upgrade to support the augmented services; and to introduce new technology to reduce the system life cycle cost. It is concluded that no ATDRS spacecraft requirement for new modulation techniques, that data rate of 650 MBps is required, and that Space Station Freedom requirement is for 650 MBps data some time after the year 2000.

  17. EFFECTS OF OCEAN TIDE MODELS ON GNSS-ESTIMATED ZTD AND PWV IN TURKEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gurbuz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS observations can precisely estimate the total zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD and precipitable water vapour (PWV for weather prediction and atmospheric research as a continuous and all-weather technique. However, apart from GNSS technique itself, estimations of ZTD and PWV are subject to effects of geophysical models with large uncertainties, particularly imprecise ocean tide models in Turkey. In this paper, GNSS data from Jan. 1st to Dec. 31st of 2014 are processed at 4 co-located GNSS stations (GISM, DIYB, GANM, and ADAN with radiosonde from Turkish Met-Office along with several nearby IGS stations. The GAMIT/GLOBK software has been used to process GNSS data of 30-second sample using the Vienna Mapping Function and 10° elevation cut-off angle. Also tidal and non-tidal atmospheric pressure loadings (ATML at the observation level are also applied in GAMIT/GLOBK. Several widely used ocean tide models are used to evaluate their effects on GNSS-estimated ZTD and PWV estimation, such as IERS recommended FES2004, NAO99b from a barotropic hydrodynamic model, CSR4.0 obtained from TOPEX/Poseidon altimetry with the model FES94.1 as the reference model and GOT00 which is again long wavelength adjustments of FES94.1 using TOPEX/Poseidon data at 0.5 by 0.5 degree grid. The ZTD and PWV computed from radiosonde profile observations are regarded as reference values for the comparison and validation. In the processing phase, five different strategies are taken without ocean tide model and with four aforementioned ocean tide models, respectively, which are used to evaluate ocean tide models effects on GNSS-estimated ZTD and PWV estimation through comparing with co-located Radiosonde. Results showed that ocean tide models have greatly affected the estimation of the ZTD in centimeter level and thus the precipitable water vapour in millimeter level, respectively at stations near coasts. The ocean tide model FES2004 that is

  18. Rotation Matrix Method Based on Ambiguity Function for GNSS Attitude Determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingdong; Mao, Xuchu; Tian, Weifeng

    2016-06-08

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are well suited for attitude determination. In this study, we use the rotation matrix method to resolve the attitude angle. This method achieves better performance in reducing computational complexity and selecting satellites. The condition of the baseline length is combined with the ambiguity function method (AFM) to search for integer ambiguity, and it is validated in reducing the span of candidates. The noise error is always the key factor to the success rate. It is closely related to the satellite geometry model. In contrast to the AFM, the LAMBDA (Least-squares AMBiguity Decorrelation Adjustment) method gets better results in solving the relationship of the geometric model and the noise error. Although the AFM is more flexible, it is lack of analysis on this aspect. In this study, the influence of the satellite geometry model on the success rate is analyzed in detail. The computation error and the noise error are effectively treated. Not only is the flexibility of the AFM inherited, but the success rate is also increased. An experiment is conducted in a selected campus, and the performance is proved to be effective. Our results are based on simulated and real-time GNSS data and are applied on single-frequency processing, which is known as one of the challenging case of GNSS attitude determination.

  19. Reliability Growth Analysis of Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    obtained. In addition, the Cumulative Intensity Function ( CIF ) of a family of satellite systems was analyzed to assess its similarity to that of a...parameters are obtained. In addition, the Cumulative Intensity Function ( CIF ) of a family of satellite systems was analyzed to assess its similarity to that...System Figures 7a through 7i display the real CIF for a variety of GOES missions. These cumulative intensity functions have shapes similar to the

  20. Integer least-squares theory for the GNSS compass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teunissen, P. J. G.

    2010-07-01

    Global navigation satellite system (GNSS) carrier phase integer ambiguity resolution is the key to high-precision positioning and attitude determination. In this contribution, we develop new integer least-squares (ILS) theory for the GNSS compass model, together with efficient integer search strategies. It extends current unconstrained ILS theory to the nonlinearly constrained case, an extension that is particularly suited for precise attitude determination. As opposed to current practice, our method does proper justice to the a priori given information. The nonlinear baseline constraint is fully integrated into the ambiguity objective function, thereby receiving a proper weighting in its minimization and providing guidance for the integer search. Different search strategies are developed to compute exact and approximate solutions of the nonlinear constrained ILS problem. Their applicability depends on the strength of the GNSS model and on the length of the baseline. Two of the presented search strategies, a global and a local one, are based on the use of an ellipsoidal search space. This has the advantage that standard methods can be applied. The global ellipsoidal search strategy is applicable to GNSS models of sufficient strength, while the local ellipsoidal search strategy is applicable to models for which the baseline lengths are not too small. We also develop search strategies for the most challenging case, namely when the curvature of the non-ellipsoidal ambiguity search space needs to be taken into account. Two such strategies are presented, an approximate one and a rigorous, somewhat more complex, one. The approximate one is applicable when the fixed baseline variance matrix is close to diagonal. Both methods make use of a search and shrink strategy. The rigorous solution is efficiently obtained by means of a search and shrink strategy that uses non-quadratic, but easy-to-evaluate, bounding functions of the ambiguity objective function. The theory

  1. A new digital land mobile satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Philip

    A description is given of the different digital services planned to be carried over existing and planned mobile satellite systems. These systems are then compared with analog services in terms of bandwidth and power efficiency. This comparison provides the rationale for the establishment of a digital land mobile satellite service (DLMSS) to use frequencies that are currently available but not yet assigned to a domestic mobile satellite system in the United States. The focus here is on the expected advantages of digital transmission techniques in accommodating additional mobile satellite systems in this portion of the spectrum, and how such techniques can fully satisfy voice, data and facsimile mobile communications requirements in a cost effective manner. A description is given of the system architecture of the DMLSS service proposed by the Geostar Messaging Corporation (GMC) and the market potential of DLMSS.

  2. An integrated/hybrid D-GNSS/LORAN-C sensor combination as basis for a reliable and economic transport telematic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forst, C. [Wasser- und Schiffahrtsdirektion Nord, Kiel (Germany); Maurer, M. [MAN Technologie AG, Augsburg (Germany); Niklasch, N. [ViCon Engineering GmbH, Muenchen (Germany); Richert, W. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany)

    1999-07-01

    Systems like Vessel traffic services must be seen as critical infrastructure for the safety of navigation. Thus such systems should not be based on technology, that solely depends on a GNSS position determination sensor. A very high potential for an enhancement of accuracy and integrity for traffic management systems is seen in a hybrid receiver technology where GNSS, LORAN-C and Eurofix are combined. Such a combined receiver can be able to overcome the technical and institutional shortcomings. In this presentation an overview is given over the german Radionavigation Concept for Maritime Safety and some results of software and hardware design for an integrated receiver, based on a full digital processing software radio approach. (orig.)

  3. INS/CNS/GNSS integrated navigation technology

    CERN Document Server

    Quan, Wei; Gong, Xiaolin; Fang, Jiancheng

    2015-01-01

    This book not only introduces the principles of INS, CNS and GNSS, the related filters and semi-physical simulation, but also systematically discusses the key technologies needed for integrated navigations of INS/GNSS, INS/CNS, and INS/CNS/GNSS, respectively. INS/CNS/GNSS integrated navigation technology has established itself as an effective tool for precise positioning navigation, which can make full use of the complementary characteristics of different navigation sub-systems and greatly improve the accuracy and reliability of the integrated navigation system. The book offers a valuable reference guide for graduate students, engineers and researchers in the fields of navigation and its control. Dr. Wei Quan, Dr. Jianli Li, Dr. Xiaolin Gong and Dr. Jiancheng Fang are all researchers at the Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

  4. China's Meteorological Satellite Application System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Jiashen

    2008-01-01

    @@ (Continued) Applications In Global Environment And Natural Disaster Monitoring 1) Application in world crop yield estimation China is now one of the few nations in the world that can provide operational service with both GEO and polar-orbit meteorological satellites.

  5. Normalized GNSS interference pattern technique for altimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Kucwaj, Jean-Christophe; Botteron, Cyril; Reboul, Serge; Stienne, Georges; Leclère, Jérôme; Choquel, Jean-Bernard; Farine, Pierre-André; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2014-06-11

    It is well known that reflected signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) can be used for altimetry applications, such as monitoring of water levels and determining snow height. Due to the interference of these reflected signals and the motion of satellites in space, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measured at the receiver slowly oscillates. The oscillation rate is proportional to the change in the propagation path difference between the direct and reflected signals, which depends on the satellite elevation angle. Assuming a known receiver position, it is possible to compute the distance between the antenna and the surface of reflection from the measured oscillation rate. This technique is usually known as the interference pattern technique (IPT). In this paper, we propose to normalize the measurements in order to derive an alternative model of the SNR variations. From this model, we define a maximum likelihood estimate of the antenna height that reduces the estimation time to a fraction of one period of the SNR variation. We also derive the Cramér-Rao lower bound for the IPT and use it to assess the sensitivity of different parameters to the estimation of the antenna height. Finally, we propose an experimental framework, and we use it to assess our approach with real GPS L1 C/A signals.

  6. Normalized GNSS Interference Pattern Technique for Altimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Angel Ribot

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that reflected signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS can be used for altimetry applications, such as monitoring of water levels and determining snow height. Due to the interference of these reflected signals and the motion of satellites in space, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR measured at the receiver slowly oscillates. The oscillation rate is proportional to the change in the propagation path difference between the direct and reflected signals, which depends on the satellite elevation angle. Assuming a known receiver position, it is possible to compute the distance between the antenna and the surface of reflection from the measured oscillation rate. This technique is usually known as the interference pattern technique (IPT. In this paper, we propose to normalize the measurements in order to derive an alternative model of the SNR variations. From this model, we define a maximum likelihood estimate of the antenna height that reduces the estimation time to a fraction of one period of the SNR variation. We also derive the Cramér–Rao lower bound for the IPT and use it to assess the sensitivity of different parameters to the estimation of the antenna height. Finally, we propose an experimental framework, and we use it to assess our approach with real GPS L1 C/A signals.

  7. Alignments between galaxies, satellite systems and haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Shi; Frenk, Carlos S; Gao, Liang; Crain, Robert A; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The spatial distribution of the satellite populations of the Milky Way and Andromeda are puzzling in that they are nearly perpendicular to the disks of their central galaxies. To understand the origin of such configurations we study the alignment of the central galaxy, satellite system and dark matter halo in the largest of the "Evolution and Assembly of GaLaxies and their Environments" (EAGLE) simulation. We find that centrals and their satellite systems tend to be well aligned with their haloes, with a median misalignment angle of $33^{\\circ}$ in both cases. While the centrals are better aligned with the inner $10$ kpc halo, the satellite systems are better aligned with the entire halo indicating that satellites preferentially trace the outer halo. The central - satellite alignment is weak (median misalignment angle of $52^{\\circ}$) and we find that around $20\\%$ of systems have a misalignment angle larger than $78^{\\circ}$, which is the value for the Milky Way. The central - satellite alignment is a conseq...

  8. Simulation of space-borne tsunami detection using GNSS-Reflectometry applied to tsunamis in the Indian Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Stosius

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the German-Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System project GITEWS (Rudloff et al., 2009, a feasibility study on a future tsunami detection system from space has been carried out. The Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry (GNSS-R is an innovative way of using reflected GNSS signals for remote sensing, e.g. sea surface altimetry. In contrast to conventional satellite radar altimetry, multiple height measurements within a wide field of view can be made simultaneously. With a dedicated Low Earth Orbit (LEO constellation of satellites equipped with GNSS-R, densely spaced sea surface height measurements could be established to detect tsunamis. This simulation study compares the Walker and the meshed comb constellation with respect to their global reflection point distribution. The detection performance of various LEO constellation scenarios with GPS, GLONASS and Galileo as signal sources is investigated. The study concentrates on the detection performance for six historic tsunami events in the Indian Ocean generated by earthquakes of different magnitudes, as well as on different constellation types and orbit parameters. The GNSS-R carrier phase is compared with the PARIS or code altimetry approach. The study shows that Walker constellations have a much better reflection point distribution compared to the meshed comb constellation. Considering simulation assumptions and assuming technical feasibility it can be demonstrated that strong tsunamis with magnitudes (M ≥8.5 can be detected with certainty from any orbit altitude within 15–25 min by a 48/8 or 81/9 Walker constellation if tsunami waves of 20 cm or higher can be detected by space-borne GNSS-R. The carrier phase approach outperforms the PARIS altimetry approach especially at low orbit altitudes and for a low number of LEO satellites.

  9. Application of Genetic Control with Adaptive Scaling Scheme to Signal Acquisition in Global Navigation Satellite System Receiver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Nien Shou

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a genetic-based control scheme that not only utilizes evolutionary characteristics to find the signal acquisition parameters, but also employs an adaptive scheme to control the search space and avoid the genetic control converging to local optimal value so as to acquire the desired signal precisely and rapidly. Simulations and experiment results show that the proposed method can improve the precision of signal parameters and take less signal acquisition time than traditional serial search methods for global navigation satellite system (GNSS signals.

  10. On the short-term temporal variations of GNSS receiver differential phase biases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baocheng; Teunissen, Peter J. G.; Yuan, Yunbin

    2016-12-01

    As a first step towards studying the ionosphere with the global navigation satellite system (GNSS), leveling the phase to the code geometry-free observations on an arc-by-arc basis yields the ionospheric observables, interpreted as a combination of slant total electron content along with satellite and receiver differential code biases (DCB). The leveling errors in the ionospheric observables may arise during this procedure, which, according to previous studies by other researchers, are due to the combined effects of the code multipath and the intra-day variability in the receiver DCB. In this paper we further identify the short-term temporal variations of receiver differential phase biases (DPB) as another possible cause of leveling errors. Our investigation starts by the development of a method to epoch-wise estimate between-receiver DPB (BR-DPB) employing (inter-receiver) single-differenced, phase-only GNSS observations collected from a pair of receivers creating a zero or short baseline. The key issue for this method is to get rid of the possible discontinuities in the epoch-wise BR-DPB estimates, occurring when satellite assigned as pivot changes. Our numerical tests, carried out using Global Positioning System (GPS, US GNSS) and BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS, Chinese GNSS) observations sampled every 30 s by a dedicatedly selected set of zero and short baselines, suggest two major findings. First, epoch-wise BR-DPB estimates can exhibit remarkable variability over a rather short period of time (e.g. 6 cm over 3 h), thus significant from a statistical point of view. Second, a dominant factor driving this variability is the changes of ambient temperature, instead of the un-modelled phase multipath.

  11. Analysis of Tide Variation Monitored by GNSS-MR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Shuangcheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Precise monitoring of tide variation is the most of issues in the fields of Global Sea-level Observation System, ocean circulation and global climate change research. With the deepening research and rapid application of GNSS, GNSS-MR based on multipath has gradually become a new means of remote sensing for ground environment (vegetation, soil moisture, snow depth, sea level, volcano and so on with geodetic GNSS station. By analyzing the characteristics of the onshore GNSS SNR data which is caused by multipath, the inversion principle of GNSS-MR technology based on the SNR data to detect tide variation is given in this paper. The onshore GNSS station of SC02 which is located in Friday Harbor, Washington state of United States, are used to retrieve tide variation. The retrieval result is consistent with the tide gauge which is only 359m to the GNSS station. The bias is about 10cm, and the correlation coefficient is better than 0.98. Preliminary results show that GNSS-MR technology based on onshore CORS station to some extent could be real-time and continuously used to monitor the tide variation. What's more, onshore GNSS stations could be a powerful supplement for tide gauge and be used to extend GNSS application in marine remote sensing field.

  12. Satellite power system (SPS) initial insurance evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-09-01

    The beginning of a process to educate the insurance industry about the Satellite Power System is reported. The report is divided into three sections. In the first section a general history describes how space risks are being insured today. This is followed by an attempt to identify the major risks inherent to the SPS. The final section presents a general projection of insurance market reactions to the Satellite Power System.

  13. Analysis of global climate variability from homogenously reprocessed ground-based GNSS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Furqan; Hunegnaw, Addisu; Teferle, Felix Norman; Bingley, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The tropospheric delay information obtained through long-term homogenous reprocessing of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) observations can be used for climate change and variability analysis on a global scale. A reprocessed global dataset of GNSS-derived zenith total delay (ZTD) and position estimates, based on the network double differencing (DD) strategy and covering 1994-2012, has been recently produced at the University of Luxembourg using the Bernese GNSS Software 5.2 (BSW5.2) and the reprocessed products from the Centre for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE). The network of ground-based GNSS stations processed to obtain this dataset consists of over 400 globally distributed stations. The GNSS-derived ZTD has been validated by comparing it to that derived from reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF). After validation and quality control, the ZTD dataset obtained using the DD strategy has been used to investigate the inter-annual, seasonal and diurnal climate variability and trends in the tropospheric delay on various regional to global spatial scales. Precise point positioning (PPP) is a processing strategy for GNSS observations which is based on observations from a single station rather than a network of baselines and is therefore computationally more efficient than the DD strategy. However, the two processing strategies, i.e. DD and PPP, have their own strengths and weaknesses and could affect the solutions differently at different geographical locations. In order to explore the use of PPP strategy for climate monitoring, another experimental dataset covering a shorter period has been produced using the PPP strategy and compared to the DD based ZTD dataset.

  14. Tropospheric refractivity and zenith path delays from least-squares collocation of meteorological and GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgan, Karina; Hurter, Fabian; Geiger, Alain; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jarosław

    2016-08-01

    Precise positioning requires an accurate a priori troposphere model to enhance the solution quality. Several empirical models are available, but they may not properly characterize the state of troposphere, especially in severe weather conditions. Another possible solution is to use regional troposphere models based on real-time or near-real time measurements. In this study, we present the total refractivity and zenith total delay (ZTD) models based on a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data and ground-based meteorological observations. We reconstruct the total refractivity profiles over the western part of Switzerland and the total refractivity profiles as well as ZTDs over Poland using the least-squares collocation software COMEDIE (Collocation of Meteorological Data for Interpretation and Estimation of Tropospheric Pathdelays) developed at ETH Zürich. In these two case studies, profiles of the total refractivity and ZTDs are calculated from different data sets. For Switzerland, the data set with the best agreement with the reference radiosonde (RS) measurements is the combination of ground-based meteorological observations and GNSS ZTDs. Introducing the horizontal gradients does not improve the vertical interpolation, and results in slightly larger biases and standard deviations. For Poland, the data set based on meteorological parameters from the NWP Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and from a combination of the NWP model and GNSS ZTDs shows the best agreement with the reference RS data. In terms of ZTD, the combined NWP-GNSS observations and GNSS-only data set exhibit the best accuracy with an average bias (from all stations) of 3.7 mm and average standard deviations of 17.0 mm w.r.t. the reference GNSS stations.

  15. Tropospheric refractivity and zenith path delays from least-squares collocation of meteorological and GNSS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilgan, Karina; Hurter, Fabian; Geiger, Alain; Rohm, Witold; Bosy, Jarosław

    2017-02-01

    Precise positioning requires an accurate a priori troposphere model to enhance the solution quality. Several empirical models are available, but they may not properly characterize the state of troposphere, especially in severe weather conditions. Another possible solution is to use regional troposphere models based on real-time or near-real time measurements. In this study, we present the total refractivity and zenith total delay (ZTD) models based on a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) data and ground-based meteorological observations. We reconstruct the total refractivity profiles over the western part of Switzerland and the total refractivity profiles as well as ZTDs over Poland using the least-squares collocation software COMEDIE (Collocation of Meteorological Data for Interpretation and Estimation of Tropospheric Pathdelays) developed at ETH Zürich. In these two case studies, profiles of the total refractivity and ZTDs are calculated from different data sets. For Switzerland, the data set with the best agreement with the reference radiosonde (RS) measurements is the combination of ground-based meteorological observations and GNSS ZTDs. Introducing the horizontal gradients does not improve the vertical interpolation, and results in slightly larger biases and standard deviations. For Poland, the data set based on meteorological parameters from the NWP Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and from a combination of the NWP model and GNSS ZTDs shows the best agreement with the reference RS data. In terms of ZTD, the combined NWP-GNSS observations and GNSS-only data set exhibit the best accuracy with an average bias (from all stations) of 3.7 mm and average standard deviations of 17.0 mm w.r.t. the reference GNSS stations.

  16. GNSS baseret roadpricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lahrmann, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Notatet giver en vurdering af teknologi, afgiftsstrukturer, fiskale aspekter, snyd og overvågning som input til Trængselskommissionens arbejdsgruppe 6's arbejde med GNSS baseret roadpricing......Notatet giver en vurdering af teknologi, afgiftsstrukturer, fiskale aspekter, snyd og overvågning som input til Trængselskommissionens arbejdsgruppe 6's arbejde med GNSS baseret roadpricing...

  17. What can we achieve from multi-GNSS for seismological studies? A case study from combined GPS and GLONASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, J.

    2016-12-01

    In the next five years, we will be entering an era of multi-GNSS world where the altitude of about 20,000 km over the Earth will be populated by more than a hundred satellites that are capable of transmitting navigation signals on multiple frequency bands. As well recognized by the GNSS community, more GNSS satellites mean that we will have more observation redundancy in computing positions, and thus a higher reliability in navigation applications can be achieved. Moreover, modulating signals on multiple frequency bands, from a pure technical point of view, will speed up integer ambiguity resolution over long baselines, which is exceptionally useful for time-critical high-precision applications. In contrast, GNSS data are most treasured by seismologists as they can provide static offsets which can hardly be retrieved from seismic data. High-rate GNSS data can also capture 3D seismic waveforms with a centimeter level accuracy, which is great contributor to complement seismic networks, especially if the latter do not have an ideal azimuthal distribution, in recovering the rupture process of large earthquakes. As a result, high-rate GNSS in real time has be appreciated in earthquake and tsunami early warning. Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO) has established a prototype real-time GPS PPP (precise point positioning) system for the western US coast, which in combination with collocated accelerometer data can provide more reliable earthquake information than seismic only systems. At present, most GNSS stations that contribute to earthquake monitoring unfortunately collect only GPS data. It is not clear how GNSS data more than only GPS can benefit seismic analysis, and a number of people even think that GPS data have already been quite good enough for present earthquake studies. Since, GLONASS is the only global constellation (other than GPS) which can provide comparable positioning accuracy, we collected GPS/GLONASS data from the M7.83 2014 Iquique, Chile

  18. An SINS/GNSS Ground Vehicle Gravimetry Test Based on SGA-WZ02

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruihang Yu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In March 2015, a ground vehicle gravimetry test was implemented in eastern Changsha to assess the repeatability and accuracy of ground vehicle SINS/GNSS gravimeter—SGA-WZ02. The gravity system developed by NUDT consisted of a Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS, a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS remote station on test vehicle, a GNSS static master station on the ground, and a data logging subsystem. A south-north profile of 35 km along the highway in eastern Changsha was chosen and four repeated available measure lines were obtained. The average speed of a vehicle is 40 km/h. To assess the external ground gravity disturbances, precise ground gravity data was built by CG-5 precise gravimeter as the reference. Under relative smooth conditions, internal accuracy among repeated lines shows an average agreement at the level of 1.86 mGal for half wavelengths about 1.1 km, and 1.22 mGal for 1.7 km. The root-mean-square (RMS of difference between calculated gravity data and reference data is about 2.27 mGal/1.1 km, and 1.74 mGal/1.7 km. Not all of the noises caused by vehicle itself and experiments environments were eliminated in the primary results. By means of selecting reasonable filters and improving the GNSS observation conditions, further developments in ground vehicle gravimetry are promising.

  19. An SINS/GNSS Ground Vehicle Gravimetry Test Based on SGA-WZ02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ruihang; Cai, Shaokun; Wu, Meiping; Cao, Juliang; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-09-16

    In March 2015, a ground vehicle gravimetry test was implemented in eastern Changsha to assess the repeatability and accuracy of ground vehicle SINS/GNSS gravimeter-SGA-WZ02. The gravity system developed by NUDT consisted of a Strapdown Inertial Navigation System (SINS), a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) remote station on test vehicle, a GNSS static master station on the ground, and a data logging subsystem. A south-north profile of 35 km along the highway in eastern Changsha was chosen and four repeated available measure lines were obtained. The average speed of a vehicle is 40 km/h. To assess the external ground gravity disturbances, precise ground gravity data was built by CG-5 precise gravimeter as the reference. Under relative smooth conditions, internal accuracy among repeated lines shows an average agreement at the level of 1.86 mGal for half wavelengths about 1.1 km, and 1.22 mGal for 1.7 km. The root-mean-square (RMS) of difference between calculated gravity data and reference data is about 2.27 mGal/1.1 km, and 1.74 mGal/1.7 km. Not all of the noises caused by vehicle itself and experiments environments were eliminated in the primary results. By means of selecting reasonable filters and improving the GNSS observation conditions, further developments in ground vehicle gravimetry are promising.

  20. Monocular Camera/IMU/GNSS Integration for Ground Vehicle Navigation in Challenging GNSS Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Akos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Low-cost MEMS-based IMUs, video cameras and portable GNSS devices are commercially available for automotive applications and some manufacturers have already integrated such facilities into their vehicle systems. GNSS provides positioning, navigation and timing solutions to users worldwide. However, signal attenuation, reflections or blockages may give rise to positioning difficulties. As opposed to GNSS, a generic IMU, which is independent of electromagnetic wave reception, can calculate a high-bandwidth navigation solution, however the output from a self-contained IMU accumulates errors over time. In addition, video cameras also possess great potential as alternate sensors in the navigation community, particularly in challenging GNSS environments and are becoming more common as options in vehicles. Aiming at taking advantage of these existing onboard technologies for ground vehicle navigation in challenging environments, this paper develops an integrated camera/IMU/GNSS system based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF. Our proposed integration architecture is examined using a live dataset collected in an operational traffic environment. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed integrated system provides accurate estimations and potentially outperforms the tightly coupled GNSS/IMU integration in challenging environments with sparse GNSS observations.

  1. Monocular camera/IMU/GNSS integration for ground vehicle navigation in challenging GNSS environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Tianxing; Guo, Ningyan; Backén, Staffan; Akos, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    Low-cost MEMS-based IMUs, video cameras and portable GNSS devices are commercially available for automotive applications and some manufacturers have already integrated such facilities into their vehicle systems. GNSS provides positioning, navigation and timing solutions to users worldwide. However, signal attenuation, reflections or blockages may give rise to positioning difficulties. As opposed to GNSS, a generic IMU, which is independent of electromagnetic wave reception, can calculate a high-bandwidth navigation solution, however the output from a self-contained IMU accumulates errors over time. In addition, video cameras also possess great potential as alternate sensors in the navigation community, particularly in challenging GNSS environments and are becoming more common as options in vehicles. Aiming at taking advantage of these existing onboard technologies for ground vehicle navigation in challenging environments, this paper develops an integrated camera/IMU/GNSS system based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF). Our proposed integration architecture is examined using a live dataset collected in an operational traffic environment. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed integrated system provides accurate estimations and potentially outperforms the tightly coupled GNSS/IMU integration in challenging environments with sparse GNSS observations.

  2. Atmosphere model on the area of GBAS system for real-time GNSS and meteorological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosy, J.; Rohm, W.; Kaplon, J.; Sierny, J.; IGG WUE & LS; GNSS Meteorology Team

    2011-12-01

    Satellite altimetry over the last two decades has measured variations in geocentric sea level (GSL), relative to the Earth system center of mass, providing valuable data to test models of physical oceanography and the effects of global climate change. The societal impacts of sea level change however relate to variations in local sea level (LSL), relative to the land at the coast. Therefore, assessing the impacts of sea level change requires coastal measurements of vertical land motion (VLM). Indeed, ΔLSL = ΔGSL - ΔVLM, with subsidence mapping 1:1 into LSL. Measurements of secular coastal VLM also allow tide-gauge data to test models of GSL over the last century in some locations, which cannot be provided by satellite data. Here we use GPS geodetic data within 15 km of the US west coast to infer regional, secular VLM. A total of 89 GPS stations met the criteria that time series span >4.5 yr, and do not have obvious non-linear variation, as may be caused by local instability. VLM rates for the GPS stations are derived in the secular reference frame ITRF2008, which aligns with the Earth system center of mass to ×0.5 mm/yr. We find that regional VLM has different behavior north and south of the Mendocino Triple Junction (MTJ). The California coast has a coherent regional pattern of subsidence averaging 0.5 mm/yr, with an increasing trend to the north. This trend generally matches GIA model predictions. Around San Francisco Bay, the observed coastal subsidence of 1.0 mm/yr coherently decreases moving away from the Pacific Ocean to very small subsidence on the east shores of the bay. This gradient is likely caused by San Andreas-Hayward Fault tectonics, and possibly by differential surface loading across the bay and Sacramento-San Joachim River Delta. Thus in addition to the trend in subsidence from GIA going northward along the California coast, tectonics may also play a role where the plate boundary fault system approaches the coast. In contrast, we find that VLM

  3. Simulation of software-based GNSS digital iF signal%GNSS数字中频信号软件模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阙锋; 邓振淼

    2013-01-01

    全球导航卫星系统(GNSS)信号软件模拟器能够根据需要,方便灵活地模拟出接收机收到的导航信号,可为GNSS导航算法的测试、评估以及接收机的研发测试提供一种高效的方法.对基于软件架构的GNSS数字中频信号模拟技术进行研究.首先分析了导航信号中出现的各种误差信号,然后给出整个系统的设计架构,最后分别运用GNSS软件接收机和硬件接收机对模拟信号进行验证.结果表明GNSS数字中频信号软件模拟的信号可以用标准的GNSS接收机进行正常接收和定位,可以用于GNSS接收机的研发测试.%Software-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signal simulator can simulate navigation signals received by receivers conveniently and flexibly according to needs, which provides an effective way for both GNSS navigation algorithm test & evaluation and receiver development & test. This paper studies the simulation of software-based GNSS digital IF signal. First the various errors that appear in navigation signal are analyzed, and then the architecture of the entire simulation system is proposed. Finally the accuracy of the simulated signal is verified via GNSS software receiver and hardware receiver respectively. The results show that the signal generated by GNSS digital IF signal simulator can be received and positioned by standard GNSS receiver, and can be used in GNSS receiver development and test.

  4. Study of ionospheric scintillation characteristics in Australia with GNSS during 2011-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Yang; Wang, Jinling; Zhang, Chunxi; Zhu, Yanbo

    2017-06-01

    Ionospheric scintillation has a great impact on radio propagation and electronic system performance, thus is extensively studied currently. The influence of ionospheric scintillation on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is particularly evident, making GNSS an effective method to study characteristics of scintillation. In this paper, spatial-temporal statistical features of ionospheric scintillation are intensively studied based on GNSS scintillation data provided by Space Weather Service (SWS) in Australia. Most scintillation data are measured by observation stations in Australia region during 2011-2015. A data processing and analyzing framework is proposed to investigate scintillation features in this paper. General pictures of amplitude scintillation activities observed at different stations are first explored. It is found that scintillation activity presents a manifest seasonal variation at most stations during the researched time spans. The probabilities of amplitude scintillation of different intensities are also evaluated. In the experiment to investigate signal amplitude distributions, Nakagami-m and α-μ distribution models are applied to describe the measured amplitude distribution curves. The result shows that the α-μ model provides a more approximate description for the measured distributions. Kurtosis and information entropy are also calculated to further verify this conclusion. The proposed study is of great significance for a better understanding of ionospheric scintillation in the region of Australia, and for discovering the effects of scintillation on GNSS signals.

  5. GNSS related periodic signals in coordinate time-series from Precise Point Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, K. E.; Teferle, F. N.; Hunegnaw, A.; Dach, R.

    2017-03-01

    In Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) coordinate time-series unrecognized errors and unmodelled (periodic) effects may bias nonlinear motions induced by geophysical signals. Hence, understanding and mitigating these errors is vital to reducing biases and on revealing subtle geophysical signals. To assess the nature of periodic signals in coordinate time-series Precise Point Positioning (PPP) solutions for the period 2008-2015 are generated. The solutions consider Global Positioning System (GPS), GLObalnaya NAvigatsionnaya Sputnikovaya Sistema (GLONASS) or combined GPS+GLONASS (GNSS) observations. We assess the periodic signals of station coordinates computed using the combined International GNSS Service (IGS) and four of its Analysis Centers (ACs) products. Furthermore, we make use of different filtering methods to investigate the sources of the periodic signals. A faint fortnightly signal in our PPP solution based on Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) products and the existence of an 8 d period for those ACs generating combined GPS+GLONASS products are the main features in the GPS-only solutions. The existence of the 8 d period in the GPS-only solution indicates that GPS orbits computed in a combined GNSS solution contain GLONASS-specific signals. The GLONASS-only solution shows highly elevated powers at the third draconitic harmonic (˜120 d period), at the 8 d period and its harmonics (4 d, 2.67 d) besides the well-known annual, semi-annual and other draconitic harmonics. We show that the GLONASS constellation gaps before December 2011 contribute to the power at some of the frequencies. However, the well-known fortnightly signal in GPS-only solutions is not discernible in the GLONASS-only solution. The combined GNSS solution contains periodic signals from both systems, with most of the powers being reduced when compared to the single-GNSS solutions. A 52 per cent reduction for the horizontal components and a 36 per cent reduction for the vertical component

  6. Odyssey, an optimized personal communications satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusch, Roger J.

    Personal communications places severe demands on service providers and transmission facilities. Customers are not satisfied with the current levels of service and want improvements. Among the characteristics that users seek are: lower service rates, hand held convenience, acceptable time delays, ubiquitous service, high availability, reliability, and high quality. The space industry is developing commercial space systems for providing mobile communications to personal telephones. Provision of land mobile satellite service is fundamentally different from the fixed satellite service provided by geostationary satellites. In fixed service, the earth based antennas can depend on a clear path from user to satellite. Mobile users in a terrestrial environment commonly encounter blockage due to vegetation, terrain or buildings. Consequently, high elevation angles are of premium value. TRW studied the issues and concluded that a Medium Earth Orbit constellation is the best solution for Personal Communications Satellite Service. TRW has developed Odyssey, which uses twelve satellites in medium altitude orbit to provide personal communications satellite service. The Odyssey communications system projects a multibeam antenna pattern to the Earth. The attitude control system orients the satellites to ensure constant coverage of land mass and coastal areas. Pointing can be reprogrammed by ground control to ensure optimized coverage of the desired service areas. The payload architecture features non-processing, "bent pipe" transponders and matrix amplifiers to ensure dynamic power delivery to high demand areas. Circuit capacity is 3000 circuits per satellite. Each satellite weighs 1917 kg (4226 pounds) at launch and the solar arrays provide 3126 Watts of power. Satellites are launched in pairs on Ariane, Atlas, or other vehicles. Each satellite is placed in a circular orbit at an altitude of 10,354 km. There are three orbit planes inclined at 55° to the equatorial plane

  7. Streaming GNSS Data over the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebhard, H.; Weber, G.; Dettmering, D.; Groeschel, M.

    2003-04-01

    Due to the increased capacity of the Internet, applications which transfer continuous data-streams by IP-packages, such as Internet Radio or Internet Video-on-Demand, have become well-established services. Growing mobile IP-Networks like GSM, GPRS, EDGE, or UMTS furthermore allow the mobile use of these real-time services. Compared to Multimedia applications, the bandwidth required for streaming GNSS data is relatively small. As a consequence, the global Internet can be used for the real-time collection and exchange of GNSS data, as well as for broadcasting derived differential products. Introducing the real time streaming of GNSS data via Internet as a professional service is demanding with respect to network transparency, network security, program stability, access control, remote administration, scalability and client simplicity. This paper will discuss several possible technical solutions: Unicast vs. IP-Multicast, TCP vs. UDP, Client/Server vs. Client/Server/Splitter technologies. Based on this discussion, a novel HTTP-based technique for streaming GNSS data to mobile clients over the Internet is introduced. It allows simultaneous access of a large number of PDAs, Laptops, or GNSS receivers to a broadcasting host via Mobile IP-Networks. The technique establishes a format called "Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol" (Ntrip), due to its main application being the dissemination of differential GNSS corrections in the popular RTCM-104 streaming format. Sufficient precision is obtained if data are not older than a few seconds. As the RTCM standard is used worldwide, most GNSS receivers accept it. This paper also focuses on system, implementation, and availability aspects of Ntrip-based differential GNSS services. The Ntrip components (NtripSources, NtripServers, NtripCaster, NtripClients) will be introduced, and software implementations will be described.

  8. Sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of atmospheric water vapor using GNSS and InSAR observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heublein, Marion; Alshawaf, Fadwa; Zhu, Xiao Xiang; Hinz, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the 3D distribution of water vapor in the atmosphere is a key element for weather forecasting and climate research. On the other hand, as water vapor causes a delay in the microwave signal propagation within the atmosphere, a precise determination of water vapor is required for accurate positioning and deformation monitoring using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR). However, due to its high variability in time and space, the atmospheric water vapor distribution is difficult to model. Since GNSS meteorology was introduced about twenty years ago, it has increasingly been used as a geodetic technique to generate maps of 2D Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV). Moreover, several approaches for 3D tomographic water vapor reconstruction from GNSS-based estimates using the simple least squares adjustment were presented. In this poster, we present an innovative and sophisticated Compressive Sensing (CS) concept for sparsity-driven tomographic reconstruction of 3D atmospheric wet refractivity fields using data from GNSS and InSAR. The 2D zenith wet delay (ZWD) estimates are obtained by a combination of point-wise estimates of the wet delay using GNSS observations and partial InSAR wet delay maps. These ZWD estimates are aggregated to derive realistic wet delay input data of 100 points as if corresponding to 100 GNSS sites within an area of 100 km × 100 km in the test region of the Upper Rhine Graben. The made-up ZWD values can be mapped into different elevation and azimuth angles. Using the Cosine transform, a sparse representation of the wet refractivity field is obtained. In contrast to existing tomographic approaches, we exploit sparsity as a prior for the regularization of the underdetermined inverse system. The new aspects of this work include both the combination of GNSS and InSAR data for water vapor tomography and the sophisticated CS estimation. The accuracy of the estimated 3D water

  9. A Space Based Solar Power Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, J. M.; Polling, D.; Ustamujic, F.; Yaldiz, R.; et al.

    2002-01-01

    (SPoTS) supplying other satellites with energy. SPoTS is due to be commercially viable and operative in 2020. of Technology designed the SPoTS during a full-time design period of six weeks as a third year final project. The team, organized according to the principles of systems engineering, first conducted a literature study on space wireless energy transfer to select the most suitable candidates for use on the SPoTS. After that, several different system concepts have been generated and evaluated, the most promising concept being worked out in greater detail. km altitude. Each SPoTS satellite has a 50m diameter inflatable solar collector that focuses all received sunlight. Then, the received sunlight is further redirected by means of four pointing mirrors toward four individual customer satellites. A market-analysis study showed, that providing power to geo-stationary communication satellites during their eclipse would be most beneficial. At arrival at geo-stationary orbit, the focused beam has expended to such an extent that its density equals one solar flux. This means that customer satellites can continue to use their regular solar arrays during their eclipse for power generation, resulting in a satellite battery mass reduction. the customer satellites in geo-stationary orbit, the transmitted energy beams needs to be pointed with very high accuracy. Computations showed that for this degree of accuracy, sensors are needed, which are not mainstream nowadays. Therefore further research must be conducted in this area in order to make these high-accuracy-pointing systems commercially attractive for use on the SPoTS satellites around 2020. Total 20-year system lifetime cost for 18 SPoT satellites are estimated at approximately USD 6 billion [FY2001]. In order to compete with traditional battery-based satellite power systems or possible ground based wireless power transfer systems the price per kWh for the customer must be significantly lower than the present one

  10. Space Weather Observations by GNSS Radio Occultation: From FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC to FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S; Pedatella, Nicholas; Anthes, Richard A; Mannucci, Anthony J; Straus, Paul R; Liu, Jann-Yenq

    2014-01-01

    The joint Taiwan-United States FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) mission, hereafter called COSMIC, is the first satellite constellation dedicated to remotely sense Earth's atmosphere and ionosphere using a technique called Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO). The occultations yield abundant information about neutral atmospheric temperature and moisture as well as space weather estimates of slant total electron content, electron density profiles, and an amplitude scintillation index, S4. With the success of COSMIC, the United States and Taiwan are moving forward with a follow-on RO mission named FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (COSMIC-2), which will ultimately place 12 satellites in orbit with two launches in 2016 and 2019. COSMIC-2 satellites will carry an advanced Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) RO receiver that will track both GPS and Russian Global Navigation Satellite System signals, with capability for eventually tracking other GNSS signals from the Chinese BeiDou and European Galileo system, as well as secondary space weather payloads to measure low-latitude plasma drifts and scintillation at multiple frequencies. COSMIC-2 will provide 4–6 times (10–15X in the low latitudes) the number of atmospheric and ionospheric observations that were tracked with COSMIC and will also improve the quality of the observations. In this article we focus on COSMIC/COSMIC-2 measurements of key ionospheric parameters. PMID:26213514

  11. Operational Modal Analysis of Bridge Structures with Data from GNSS/Accelerometer Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chunbao; Lu, Huali; Zhu, Jinsong

    2017-02-23

    Real-time dynamic displacement and acceleration responses of the main span section of the Tianjin Fumin Bridge in China under ambient excitation were tested using a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) dynamic deformation monitoring system and an acceleration sensor vibration test system. Considering the close relationship between the GNSS multipath errors and measurement environment in combination with the noise reduction characteristics of different filtering algorithms, the researchers proposed an AFEC mixed filtering algorithm, which is an combination of autocorrelation function-based empirical mode decomposition (EMD) and Chebyshev mixed filtering to extract the real vibration displacement of the bridge structure after system error correction and filtering de-noising of signals collected by the GNSS. The proposed AFEC mixed filtering algorithm had high accuracy (1 mm) of real displacement at the elevation direction. Next, the traditional random decrement technique (used mainly for stationary random processes) was expanded to non-stationary random processes. Combining the expanded random decrement technique (RDT) and autoregressive moving average model (ARMA), the modal frequency of the bridge structural system was extracted using an expanded ARMA_RDT modal identification method, which was compared with the power spectrum analysis results of the acceleration signal and finite element analysis results. Identification results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm is applicable to analyze the dynamic displacement monitoring data of real bridge structures under ambient excitation and could identify the first five orders of the inherent frequencies of the structural system accurately. The identification error of the inherent frequency was smaller than 6%, indicating the high identification accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Furthermore, the GNSS dynamic deformation monitoring method can be used to monitor dynamic displacement and identify the modal

  12. Operational Modal Analysis of Bridge Structures with Data from GNSS/Accelerometer Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunbao Xiong

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Real-time dynamic displacement and acceleration responses of the main span section of the Tianjin Fumin Bridge in China under ambient excitation were tested using a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS dynamic deformation monitoring system and an acceleration sensor vibration test system. Considering the close relationship between the GNSS multipath errors and measurement environment in combination with the noise reduction characteristics of different filtering algorithms, the researchers proposed an AFEC mixed filtering algorithm, which is an combination of autocorrelation function-based empirical mode decomposition (EMD and Chebyshev mixed filtering to extract the real vibration displacement of the bridge structure after system error correction and filtering de-noising of signals collected by the GNSS. The proposed AFEC mixed filtering algorithm had high accuracy (1 mm of real displacement at the elevation direction. Next, the traditional random decrement technique (used mainly for stationary random processes was expanded to non-stationary random processes. Combining the expanded random decrement technique (RDT and autoregressive moving average model (ARMA, the modal frequency of the bridge structural system was extracted using an expanded ARMA_RDT modal identification method, which was compared with the power spectrum analysis results of the acceleration signal and finite element analysis results. Identification results demonstrated that the proposed algorithm is applicable to analyze the dynamic displacement monitoring data of real bridge structures under ambient excitation and could identify the first five orders of the inherent frequencies of the structural system accurately. The identification error of the inherent frequency was smaller than 6%, indicating the high identification accuracy of the proposed algorithm. Furthermore, the GNSS dynamic deformation monitoring method can be used to monitor dynamic displacement and identify the

  13. Soil Moisture Remote Sensing with GNSS-R at the Valencia Anchor Station. The SOMOSTA (Soil Moisture Station) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the SOMOSTA (Soil Moisture Monitoring Station) experiment on soil moisture monitoring byGlobal Navigation Satellite System Reflected signals(GNSS-R) at the Valencia Anchor Station is introduced. L-band microwaves have very good advantages in soil moisture remote sensing, for being unaffected by clouds and the atmosphere, and for the ability to penetrate vegetation. During this experimental campaign, the ESA GNSS-R Oceanpal antenna was installed on the same tower as the ESA ELBARA-II passive microwave radiometer, both measuring instruments having similar field of view. This experiment is fruitfully framed within the ESA - China Programme of Collaboration on GNSS-R. The GNSS-R instrument has an up-looking antenna for receiving direct signals from satellites, and two down-looking antennas for receiving LHCP (left-hand circular polarisation) and RHCP (right-hand circular polarisation) reflected signals from the soil surface. We could collect data from the three different antennas through the two channels of Oceanpal and, in addition, calibration could be performed to reduce the impact from the differing channels. Reflectivity was thus measured and soil moisture could be retrieved by the L- MEB (L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere) model considering the effect of vegetation optical thickness and soil roughness. By contrasting GNSS-R and ELBARA-II radiometer data, a negative correlation existed between reflectivity measured by GNSS-R and brightness temperature measured by the radiometer. The two parameters represent reflection and absorption of the soil. Soil moisture retrieved by both L-band remote sensing methods shows good agreement. In addition, correspondence with in-situ measurements and rainfall is also good.

  14. Valutazione dell'apporto della costellazione GLONASS nel posizionamento NRTK con ricevitori GNSS geodetici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gino Dardanelli

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Il potenziamento della costellazione satellitare GLONASS consente oggi di disporre di un sistema che ha raggiunto defacto la piena operatività fornendo un contributo importante in qualsiasi rilievo, soprattutto in presenza di ostruzionialla visibilità satellitare. Questo lavoro riporta i risultati di alcuni test di posizionamento effettuati con ricevitorigeodetici GNSS di ultima generazione di diverse case costruttrici al fine di valutare l'apporto che la costellazioneGLONASS può dare ai rilievi NRTK (Network Real Time Kinematic in condizioni di geometria satellitare GPS critica.Evaluation of the contribution of the GLONASS constellation in GNSS geodetic positioning with NRTKThe strengthening of the GLONASS satellite constellation can now have a system that has achieved de facto full operation by providing an important contribution to any survey, especially in the presence of obstructions to satellite visibility. This paper reports the results of some tests carried out using positioning geodetic GNSS receivers with the latest generation of different manufacturers in order to assess the contribution that the GLONASS constellation can give to NRTK (Network Real Time Kinematic survey in GPS satellite geometry critical conditions.

  15. Assessment of the near real-time GNSS zenith total delay estimated from different solutions using different orbit and clock products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, T.; Lidberg, M.; Johansson, J. M.; Ridal, M.; Jivall, L.; Kempe, C.

    2016-12-01

    Due to the fact that there is a big lack of humidity observations in the meteorological observing system, usage of ground-based GNSS data to provide the near real-time (NRT) zenith total delay (ZTD) is important for operational meteorology. The accuracy of the NRT GNSS ZTD is highly dependent on the quality of the real-time satellite orbits and clock products used for the data processing. Therefore, the effect of real-time satellite orbits and clock errors on the NRT GNSS ZTD estimates is necessary to investigate. Since March, 2016, Lantmäteriet (Swedish Mapping, Cadastre and Land Registration Authority) became one of the analysis centres contributing NRT GNSS ZTDs to the E-GVAP program. Currently we are processing the GNSS data obtained from around 680 stations in Sweden, Finland, Denmark, and Norway. The NRT GNSS ZTDs are estimated using two different solutions: network and precise point positioning (PPP). The network solution is running by Bernese (V5.2) using the CODE ultra-rapid orbits product. The PPP solutions are running by the GIPSY-OASIS (V6.2) using two different satellite orbits and clock products. One is using the IGS provided real-time products. The other is using the JPL ultra-rapid products which however has a longer latency (over one hour). The NTR ZTDs from all three solutions will be assessed with respect to the ones estimated using the IGS final satellite orbits and clock product in terms of accuracy and precision.

  16. Satellite and lunar laser ranging in infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courde, Clement; Torre, Jean-Marie; Samain, Etienne; Martinot-Lagarde, Gregoire; Aimar, Mourad; Albanese, Dominique; Maurice, Nicolas; Mariey, Hervé; Viot, Hervé; Exertier, Pierre; Fienga, Agnes; Viswanathan, Vishnu

    2017-05-01

    We report on the implementation of a new infrared detection at the Grasse lunar laser ranging station and describe how infrared telemetry improves the situation. We present our first results on the lunar reflectors and show that infrared detection permits us to densify the observations and allows measurements during the new and the full moon periods. We also present the benefit obtained on the ranging of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) satellites and on RadioAstron which have a very elliptic orbit.

  17. Multiple Gate Delay Tracking Structures for GNSS Signals and Their Evaluation with Simulink, SystemC, and VHDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Hurskainen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate delay tracking in multipath environments is one of the prerequisites of modern GNSS receivers. Several solutions have been proposed in the literature, both feedback and feedforward. However, this topic is still under active research focus, especially for mass-market receivers, where selection of lowcomplexity, nonpatented methods is preferred. Among the most encountered delay tracking structures implemented in today's receivers, we have the narrow correlator and the double-delta correlators. Both are heavily covered by various patents. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new, generic structure, called multiple gate delay (MGD structure, which covers also the patented correlators but offers much more flexibility in the design process. We show how the design parameters of such a structure can be optimized, we argue the performance of this structure via detailed simulation results based on various simulators, such as Matlab/Simulink-based tool, GRANADA, and we test the implementation feasibility of MGD structures on actual devices, via SystemC and FPGA prototyping. One of the main advantages of the proposed structure is its high degree of flexibility, which allows the designer to choose among, to the authors' knowledge, nonpatented solutions with delay tracking accuracy comparable with that of the current state-of-art trackers.

  18. Retrieval of sea surface winds under hurricane conditions from GNSS-R observations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JING Cheng; YANG Xiaofeng; MA Wentao; YU Yang; DONG Di; LI Ziwei; XU Cong

    2016-01-01

    Reflected signals from global navigation satellite systems (GNSSs) have been widely acknowledged as an important remote sensing tool for retrieving sea surface wind speeds. The power of GNSS reflectometry (GNSS-R) signals can be mapped in delay chips and Doppler frequency space to generate delay Doppler power maps (DDMs), whose characteristics are related to sea surface roughness and can be used to retrieve wind speeds. However, the bistatic radar cross section (BRCS), which is strongly related to the sea surface roughness, is extensively used in radar. Therefore, a bistatic radar cross section (BRCS) map with a modified BRCS equation in a GNSS-R application is introduced. On the BRCS map, three observables are proposed to represent the sea surface roughness to establish a relationship with the sea surface wind speed. Airborne Hurricane Dennis (2005) GNSS-R data are then used. More than 16 000 BRCS maps are generated to establish GMFs of the three observables. Finally, the proposed model and classic one-dimensional delay waveform (DW) matching methods are compared, and the proposed model demonstrates a better performance for the high wind speed retrievals.

  19. Time-domain Statistics of the Electromagnetic Bias in GNSS-Reflectometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ghavidel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Global Navigation Satellite Systems-Reflectometry (GNSS-R is an emerging remote sensing technique that uses navigation signals reflected on the Earth’s surface as sources of opportunity for scatterometry and altimetry. The time-domain statistics of the electromagnetic bias in GNSS-R altimetry are investigated to assess the residual electromagnetic bias after averaging during the dwell time (as long as 100 s. A three-dimensional time-evolving sea surface is generated using Elfouhaily’s ocean surface height spectrum and spreading function. This surface is illuminated by a right hand circular polarization electromagnetic wave at L-band. Then, the scattered waves are computed using the Physical Optics method under the Kirchhoff Approximation. The electromagnetic bias is estimated using a numerical technique previously validated at C- and Ku-bands, and then extrapolated at L-band. Montecarlo simulations for different sea surface realizations consecutive in time are performed so as to analyze the electromagnetic bias statistics up to the 4PthP order moments. Histograms and distribution of the time domain electromagnetic bias are also used for statistical interpretation. All statistical descriptors confirmed that the electromagnetic bias has a non-Gaussian behavior. This study is important to assess the residual electromagnetic bias in future GNSS-R altimetry missions, such as the “GNSS Reflectometry, Radio Occultation and Scatterometry on board the International Space Station” experiment onboard the International Space Station.

  20. Comparing the results of PSInSAR and GNSS on slow motion landslides, Koyulhisar, Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Ozgur Hastaoglu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous methods used nowadays to monitor landslide movements. Of these methods, Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR are the ones that are most commonly used. In this study, the amounts of movements acquired via these two methods were compared and relations between them were analysed. The Koyulhisar landslide region was selected as the field of study. In this study, 10 Envisat images of the region taken between 2006 and 2008 were evaluated using Persistent Scatterers Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (PSInSAR technique and annual velocity values at the direction of line of slight at PS points were obtained for the region of interest. The velocity values were then obtained from PSInSAR results and compared with those obtained from six periods of GNSS measurements that were performed between April 2007 and November 2008 on Koyulhisar Landslide area after which the relationship between the two was analysed. Two different movement models from GNSS and PSInSAR results were fit to the landslide region. The velocity values estimated from these movement models for the region were compared and correlation between them was determined. As a conclusion, a high correlation of r = 0.84 was determined between the models obtained from nine GNSS points, except one point at the city centre, and PSInSAR.

  1. Comparison of GNSS integrated water vapor and NWM reanalysis data over Central and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Laura Isabel; Natali, Maria Paula; Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Integrated water vapor (IWV) derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and Numerical Weather Models (NWM) reanalysis data were compared in order to assess the consistency between the different datasets over the extended geographical region of Central and South America. The analysis was performed for the seven years period between 2007 and 2013. We analyzed two different NWM: the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF) reanalysis data (ERA Interim) and the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The statistical analysis of the differences was performed in 110 GNSS sites (GPS + GLONASS), although the most interesting results came from the 73 sites which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, and it is characterized by large temporal variability of the integrated total humidity content. Moreover, the scarce coverage of operational radio sounding stations is noticeable in large areas of the selected region; hence the contribution of IWV-GNSS is essential to improve the weather understanding. Considering that the atmospheric water vapor has a highly variable and complex distribution which knowledge is essential for weather prediction and local meteorological studies. This study aims to provide IWV-GNSS observations able to be assimilated by operational weather centers, for both prediction and simulation, as well for improving regional modeling.

  2. Atmospheric polarimetric effects on GNSS radio occultations: the ROHP-PAZ field campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padullés, R.; Cardellach, E.; de la Torre Juárez, M.; Tomás, S.; Turk, F. J.; Oliveras, S.; Ao, C. O.; Rius, A.

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the first experimental observations showing that hydrometeors induce polarimetric signatures in global navigation satellite system (GNSS) signals. This evidence is relevant to the PAZ low Earth orbiter, which will test the concept and applications of polarimetric GNSS radio occultation (RO) (i.e. ROs obtained with a dual-polarization antenna). A ground field campaign was carried out in preparation for PAZ to verify the theoretical sensitivity studies on this concept (Cardellach et al., 2015). The main aim of the campaign is to identify and understand the factors that might affect the polarimetric GNSS observables. Studied for the first time, GNSS signals measured with two polarimetric antennas (H, horizontal, and V, vertical) are shown to discriminate between heavy rain events by comparing the measured phase difference between the H and V phase delays (ΔΦ) in different weather scenarios. The measured phase difference indicates higher dispersion under rain conditions. When individual events are examined, significant increases in ΔΦ occur when the radio signals cross rain cells. Moreover, the amplitude of such a signal is much higher than the theoretical prediction for precipitation; thus, other sources of polarimetric signatures have been explored and identified. Modelling of other hydrometeors, such as melting particles and ice crystals, have been proposed to explain the obtained measurements, with good agreement in more than 90 % of the cases.

  3. Analysis of Multi-Antenna GNSS Receiver Performance under Jamming Attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niranjana Vagle

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Although antenna array-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers can be used to mitigate both narrowband and wideband electronic interference sources, measurement distortions induced by array processing methods are not suitable for high precision applications. The measurement distortions have an adverse effect on the carrier phase ambiguity resolution, affecting the navigation solution. Depending on the array attitude information availability and calibration parameters, different spatial processing methods can be implemented although they distort carrier phase measurements in some cases. This paper provides a detailed investigation of the effect of different array processing techniques on array-based GNSS receiver measurements and navigation performance. The main novelty of the paper is to provide a thorough analysis of array-based GNSS receivers employing different beamforming techniques from tracking to navigation solution. Two beamforming techniques, namely Power Minimization (PM and Minimum Power Distortionless Response (MPDR, are being investigated. In the tracking domain, the carrier Doppler, Phase Lock Indicator (PLI, and Carrier-to-Noise Ratio (C/N0 are analyzed. Pseudorange and carrier phase measurement distortions and carrier phase position performance are also evaluated. Performance analyses results from simulated GNSS signals and field tests are provided.

  4. Analysis of Multi-Antenna GNSS Receiver Performance under Jamming Attacks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagle, Niranjana; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2016-11-17

    Although antenna array-based Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers can be used to mitigate both narrowband and wideband electronic interference sources, measurement distortions induced by array processing methods are not suitable for high precision applications. The measurement distortions have an adverse effect on the carrier phase ambiguity resolution, affecting the navigation solution. Depending on the array attitude information availability and calibration parameters, different spatial processing methods can be implemented although they distort carrier phase measurements in some cases. This paper provides a detailed investigation of the effect of different array processing techniques on array-based GNSS receiver measurements and navigation performance. The main novelty of the paper is to provide a thorough analysis of array-based GNSS receivers employing different beamforming techniques from tracking to navigation solution. Two beamforming techniques, namely Power Minimization (PM) and Minimum Power Distortionless Response (MPDR), are being investigated. In the tracking domain, the carrier Doppler, Phase Lock Indicator (PLI), and Carrier-to-Noise Ratio (C/N₀) are analyzed. Pseudorange and carrier phase measurement distortions and carrier phase position performance are also evaluated. Performance analyses results from simulated GNSS signals and field tests are provided.

  5. Accuracy improvement techniques in Precise Point Positioning method using multiple GNSS constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileios Psychas, Dimitrios; Delikaraoglou, Demitris

    2016-04-01

    The future Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS), including modernized GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou, offer three or more signal carriers for civilian use and much more redundant observables. The additional frequencies can significantly improve the capabilities of the traditional geodetic techniques based on GPS signals at two frequencies, especially with regard to the availability, accuracy, interoperability and integrity of high-precision GNSS applications. Furthermore, highly redundant measurements can allow for robust simultaneous estimation of static or mobile user states including more parameters such as real-time tropospheric biases and more reliable ambiguity resolution estimates. This paper presents an investigation and analysis of accuracy improvement techniques in the Precise Point Positioning (PPP) method using signals from the fully operational (GPS and GLONASS), as well as the emerging (Galileo and BeiDou) GNSS systems. The main aim was to determine the improvement in both the positioning accuracy achieved and the time convergence it takes to achieve geodetic-level (10 cm or less) accuracy. To this end, freely available observation data from the recent Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) of the International GNSS Service, as well as the open source program RTKLIB were used. Following a brief background of the PPP technique and the scope of MGEX, the paper outlines the various observational scenarios that were used in order to test various data processing aspects of PPP solutions with multi-frequency, multi-constellation GNSS systems. Results from the processing of multi-GNSS observation data from selected permanent MGEX stations are presented and useful conclusions and recommendations for further research are drawn. As shown, data fusion from GPS, GLONASS, Galileo and BeiDou systems is becoming increasingly significant nowadays resulting in a position accuracy increase (mostly in the less favorable East direction) and a large reduction of convergence

  6. Modeling and Quantitative Analysis of GNSS/INS Deep Integration Tracking Loops in High Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalong Ban

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available To meet the requirements of global navigation satellite systems (GNSS precision applications in high dynamics, this paper describes a study on the carrier phase tracking technology of the GNSS/inertial navigation system (INS deep integration system. The error propagation models of INS-aided carrier tracking loops are modeled in detail in high dynamics. Additionally, quantitative analysis of carrier phase tracking errors caused by INS error sources is carried out under the uniform high dynamic linear acceleration motion of 100 g. Results show that the major INS error sources, affecting the carrier phase tracking accuracy in high dynamics, include initial attitude errors, accelerometer scale factors, gyro noise and gyro g-sensitivity errors. The initial attitude errors are usually combined with the receiver acceleration to impact the tracking loop performance, which can easily cause the failure of carrier phase tracking. The main INS error factors vary with the vehicle motion direction and the relative position of the receiver and the satellites. The analysis results also indicate that the low-cost micro-electro mechanical system (MEMS inertial measurement units (IMU has the ability to maintain GNSS carrier phase tracking in high dynamics.

  7. Accuracy analysis of continuous deformation monitoring using BeiDou Navigation Satellite System at middle and high latitudes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Weiping; Xi, Ruijie; Chen, Hua; Xiao, Yugang

    2017-02-01

    As BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) has been operational in the whole Asia-Pacific region, it means a new GNSS system with a different satellite orbit structure will become available for deformation monitoring in the future. Conversely, GNSS deformation monitoring data are always processed with a regular interval to form displacement time series for deformation analysis, where the interval can neither be too long from the time perspective nor too short from the precision of determined displacements angle. In this paper, two experimental platforms were designed, with one being at mid-latitude and another at higher latitude in China. BDS data processing software was also developed for investigating the accuracy of continuous deformation monitoring using current in-orbit BDS satellites. Data over 20 days at both platforms were obtained and were processed every 2, 4 and 6 h to generate 3 displacement time series for comparison. The results show that with the current in-orbit BDS satellites, in the mid-latitude area it is easy to achieve accuracy of 1 mm in horizontal component and 2-3 mm in vertical component; the accuracy could be further improved to approximately 1 mm in both horizontal and vertical directions when combined BDS/GPS measurements are employed. At higher latitude, however, the results are not as good as expected due to poor satellite geometry, even the 6 h solutions could only achieve accuracy of 4-6 and 6-10 mm in horizontal and vertical components, respectively, which implies that it may not be applicable to very high-precision deformation monitoring at high latitude using the current BDS. With the integration of BDS and GPS observations, however, in 4-h session, the accuracy can achieve 2 mm in horizontal component and 4 mm in vertical component, which would be an optimal choice for high-accuracy structural deformation monitoring at high latitude.

  8. Verifying command sequences for satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, James F., III; Ramanna, Sheela

    1992-10-01

    We present a formal basis for the design of a Checker used in validating safe schedules and in selecting error recovery schedules for satellite control systems. This design includes a high-level specification of Checker behavior and properties (called flight rules) of safe schedules. Specifications are written in Timed Linear Logic (TLL). Validation of schedules is performed in terms of real-time telemetry and deduction system proof rules. Telemetry (state information for satellite subsystems) serves as input to the Checker. Detection of violation of a flight rule by the Checker results in the selection of a contingency plan (error recovery schedule). The Checker is illustrated in terms of the TOPEX/Poseidon Oceanographic Satellite System.

  9. Research on Improving Positioning Precision of SINS/GNSS Integrated Navigation System%提高SINS/GNSS组合导航系统定位精度的方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王健

    2014-01-01

    单纯依赖单一的导航手段难满足高精度的导航需求,因此,将捷联惯性导航系统(SINS)、全球卫星导航系统(GNSS)有效组合,实现优势互补。SINS/GNSS 组合导航系统的数据处理一般采用卡尔曼滤波实现,当组合导航系统模型足够准确时,滤波性能较好,当导航系统模型存在误差或发生变化时,新的量测值对滤波估计值的修正作用下降,而旧的量测值的修正作用相对上升,从而导致滤波精度下降。针对上述问题,基于集中式卡尔曼滤波结构的SINS/GNSS组合导航系统,本文提出一种新方法,新方法在梯度方向上进行估计迭代,从而修正模型误差对滤波精度的影响,提高导航定位精度。实验结果表明,当导航系统模型和量测方程存在误差或发生变化时,新方法仍可以为导航系统提供有效的定位精度,满足高空长航时系统需求。%Relying on a single method of navigation is difficult to meet the high precision requirement. Thus, the strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS) and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) integrated with complementary advantages can better meet the performance requirement. The SINS/GNSS integrated navigation system usually uses the Kalman filter to realize the data processing. When the integrated navigation system model is accurate enough, the filtering performance is good; when the navigation system model has error or change, the correction function of new measurement decrease, but the old measurement increase relatively. In order to solve the above problem, based on the SINS/GNSS integrated navigation system with the centralized Kalman filtering structure, this paper presents a new method which can process the data by estimation iterating on the gradient direction, correct the model error and improve the navigation positioning precision. The experimental results show that the new method can provide effective

  10. Loose and Tight GNSS/INS Integrations: Comparison of Performance Assessed in Real Urban Scenarios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Gianluca; Pini, Marco; Marucco, Gianluca

    2017-01-29

    Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSSs) remain the principal mean of positioning in many applications and systems, but in several types of environment, the performance of standalone receivers is degraded. Although many works show the benefits of the integration between GNSS and Inertial Navigation Systems (INSs), tightly-coupled architectures are mainly implemented in professional devices and are based on high-grade Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). This paper investigates the performance improvements enabled by the tight integration, using low-cost sensors and a mass-market GNSS receiver. Performance is assessed through a series of tests carried out in real urban scenarios and is compared against commercial modules, operating in standalone mode or featuring loosely-coupled integrations. The paper describes the developed tight-integration algorithms with a terse mathematical model and assesses their efficacy from a practical perspective.

  11. Global Navigation Satellite System Software Defined Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Hein, Guenter W., Thomas Pany, Stefan Wallner, and Jong-Hoon Won. “Plat- forms for a Future GNSS Receiver”. 1(2):56–62, March 2006. 18. Hong , Jin Seok...Applications, 2008. ISSSTA ’08., 32–36. Aug. 2008. 24. Qingxi, Zeng, Wang Qing, Pan Shuguo, and Li Chuanjun. “A GPS L1 Software Receiver Implementation on a...COUNT). 26. Sun, Chih -Cheng and Shau-Shiun Jan. “GNSS signal acquisition and tracking using a parallel approach”. Position Location and Navigation

  12. A relativistic and autonomous navigation satellite system

    CERN Document Server

    Delva, Pacôme; Kostić, Uros; Carloni, Sante

    2011-01-01

    A relativistic positioning system has been proposed by Bartolom\\'e Coll in 2002. Since then, several group developed this topic with different approaches. I will present a work done in collaboration with Ljubljana University and the ESA Advanced Concepts Team. We developed a concept, Autonomous Basis of Coordinates, in order to take advantage of the full autonomy of a satellite constellation for navigation and positioning, by means of satellite inter-links. I will present the advantages of this new paradigm and a number of potential application for reference systems, geophysics and relativistic gravitation.

  13. The GNSS-R Eddy Experiment II: L-band and Optical Speculometry for Directional Sea-Roughness Retrieval from Low Altitude Aircraft

    CERN Document Server

    Germain, O; Soulat, F; Caparrini, M; Chapron, B; Silvestrin, P

    2003-01-01

    We report on the retrieval of directional sea-roughness (the full directional mean square slope, including MSS, direction and isotropy) through inversion of Global Navigation Satellite System Reflections (GNSS-R) and SOlar REflectance Speculometry (SORES)data collected during an experimental flight at 1000 m. The emphasis is on the utilization of the entire Delay-Doppler Map (for GNSS-R) or Tilt Azimuth Map (for SORES) in order to infer these directional parameters. Obtained estimations are analyzed and compared to Jason-1 measurements and the ECMWF numerical weather model.

  14. Smart Device-Supported BDS/GNSS Real-Time Kinematic Positioning for Sub-Meter-Level Accuracy in Urban Location-Based Services

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Liang; LI Zishen; Zhao, Jiaojiao; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Zhiyu; Yuan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Using mobile smart devices to provide urban location-based services (LBS) with sub-meter-level accuracy (around 0.5 m) is a major application field for future global navigation satellite system (GNSS) development. Real-time kinematic (RTK) positioning, which is a widely used GNSS-based positioning approach, can improve the accuracy from about 10–20 m (achieved by the standard positioning services) to about 3–5 cm based on the geodetic receivers. In using the smart devices to achieve positioni...

  15. Performance of low-cost GNSS receiver for landslides monitoring: test and results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Cina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Italy is deeply afflicted by geo-hydrological risk, where a predominant part of its area is under risk.Recently, advanced research and sensors have played an important role in realizing automatic systems for landslide monitoring and to alerting. The cost of these systems, considering all parts, limits their use and the cost of each sensor influences the investment. Geodetic global navigation satellite system (GNSS receivers, which are commonly used to realize these activities, are an appropriate example; however, their costs are quite high.The aim of this research was to test the actual performance of a mass-market GNSS receiver, with the purpose of verifying if such type of sensors can be used for landslide monitoring. In particular, the benefits due to the coupling between mass-market receivers and products offered by a network of GNSS permanent stations (e.g. Virtual RINEX have been investigated.To verify the capability of these sensors to detect a deformation, under the minimum deformation detectable point of view, a special slide was built, in order to conduct a dedicated test. The support was moved both in horizontal and vertical directions with high precision, with purpose to detect correctly a three-dimensional movement.Tests were carried out considering the dependence of some factors: the most important are the acquisition time and the distance from the GNSS reference station. Interesting is the use of virtual reference station based on GNSS network, as a reference station: the performance achieved using Virtual RINEX for the control of movements and deformations are analysed. The accuracy and precision of movement determination were evaluated and compared, for each test, considering the different factors. The tests and results are described in this contribution.

  16. Benchmark campaign and case study episode in central Europe for development and assessment of advanced GNSS tropospheric models and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douša, Jan; Dick, Galina; Kačmařík, Michal; Brožková, Radmila; Zus, Florian; Brenot, Hugues; Stoycheva, Anastasia; Möller, Gregor; Kaplon, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Initial objectives and design of the Benchmark campaign organized within the European COST Action ES1206 (2013-2017) are described in the paper. This campaign has aimed to support the development and validation of advanced Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) tropospheric products, in particular high-resolution and ultra-fast zenith total delays (ZTDs) and tropospheric gradients derived from a dense permanent network. A complex data set was collected for the 8-week period when several extreme heavy precipitation episodes occurred in central Europe which caused severe river floods in this area. An initial processing of data sets from GNSS products and numerical weather models (NWMs) provided independently estimated reference parameters - zenith tropospheric delays and tropospheric horizontal gradients. Their provision gave an overview about the product similarities and complementarities, and thus a potential for improvements of a synergy in their optimal exploitations in future. Reference GNSS and NWM results were intercompared and visually analysed using animated maps. ZTDs from two reference GNSS solutions compared to global ERA-Interim reanalysis resulted in accuracy at the 10 mm level in terms of the root mean square (rms) with a negligible overall bias, comparisons to Global Forecast System (GFS) forecasts showed accuracy at the 12 mm level with the overall bias of -5 mm and, finally, comparisons to mesoscale ALADIN-CZ forecast resulted in accuracy at the 8 mm level with a negligible total bias. The comparison of horizontal tropospheric gradients from GNSS and NWM data demonstrated a very good agreement among independent solutions with negligible biases and an accuracy of about 0.5 mm. Visual comparisons of maps of zenith wet delays and tropospheric horizontal gradients showed very promising results for future exploitations of advanced GNSS tropospheric products in meteorological applications, such as severe weather event monitoring and weather nowcasting

  17. Research on Key Technologies and Methods of GNSS Precise Data Processing%GNSS精密数据处理关键技术和方法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甄冬松; 谭智

    2014-01-01

    全球卫星导航系统(GNSS)是所有在轨工作卫星导航定位系统的总称,包括GPS、GLONASS、Galileo、北斗在内的全球星座、区域星座及相关的星基增强系统。本文介绍了GNSS精密数据处理的关键技术及相关方法,阐述了一些基本的数据处理模型,并对GNSS数据精密处理模型进行了阐述,最后对GNSS未来发展趋势进行了展望。%Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) is the general term of all the on-orbit satellite navigation and positioning systems, including GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, global constellation including Beidou, regional constellation and the related satellite based augmentation system. This paper introduces the key technologies and methods of GNSS precise data processing, presents some basic data processing models, introduces the GNSS precise data processing model, and finally prospects the future development trend of GNSS.

  18. CODE's new solar radiation pressure model for GNSS orbit determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, D.; Meindl, M.; Beutler, G.; Dach, R.; Schaer, S.; Lutz, S.; Prange, L.; Sośnica, K.; Mervart, L.; Jäggi, A.

    2015-08-01

    The Empirical CODE Orbit Model (ECOM) of the Center for Orbit Determination in Europe (CODE), which was developed in the early 1990s, is widely used in the International GNSS Service (IGS) community. For a rather long time, spurious spectral lines are known to exist in geophysical parameters, in particular in the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERPs) and in the estimated geocenter coordinates, which could recently be attributed to the ECOM. These effects grew creepingly with the increasing influence of the GLONASS system in recent years in the CODE analysis, which is based on a rigorous combination of GPS and GLONASS since May 2003. In a first step we show that the problems associated with the ECOM are to the largest extent caused by the GLONASS, which was reaching full deployment by the end of 2011. GPS-only, GLONASS-only, and combined GPS/GLONASS solutions using the observations in the years 2009-2011 of a global network of 92 combined GPS/GLONASS receivers were analyzed for this purpose. In a second step we review direct solar radiation pressure (SRP) models for GNSS satellites. We demonstrate that only even-order short-period harmonic perturbations acting along the direction Sun-satellite occur for GPS and GLONASS satellites, and only odd-order perturbations acting along the direction perpendicular to both, the vector Sun-satellite and the spacecraft's solar panel axis. Based on this insight we assess in the third step the performance of four candidate orbit models for the future ECOM. The geocenter coordinates, the ERP differences w. r. t. the IERS 08 C04 series of ERPs, the misclosures for the midnight epochs of the daily orbital arcs, and scale parameters of Helmert transformations for station coordinates serve as quality criteria. The old and updated ECOM are validated in addition with satellite laser ranging (SLR) observations and by comparing the orbits to those of the IGS and other analysis centers. Based on all tests, we present a new extended ECOM which

  19. Multipath estimation in urban environments from joint GNSS receivers and LiDAR sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Khurram; Chen, Xin; Dovis, Fabio; De Castro, David; Fernández, Antonio J

    2012-10-30

    In this paper, multipath error on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals in urban environments is characterized with the help of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) measurements. For this purpose, LiDAR equipment and Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver implementing a multipath estimating architecture were used to collect data in an urban environment. This paper demonstrates how GPS and LiDAR measurements can be jointly used to model the environment and obtain robust receivers. Multipath amplitude and delay are estimated by means of LiDAR feature extraction and multipath mitigation architecture. The results show the feasibility of integrating the information provided by LiDAR sensors and GNSS receivers for multipath mitigation.

  20. The combined geodetic network adjusted on the reference ellipsoid – a comparison of three functional models for GNSS observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadaj Roman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The adjustment problem of the so-called combined (hybrid, integrated network created with GNSS vectors and terrestrial observations has been the subject of many theoretical and applied works. The network adjustment in various mathematical spaces was considered: in the Cartesian geocentric system on a reference ellipsoid and on a mapping plane. For practical reasons, it often takes a geodetic coordinate system associated with the reference ellipsoid. In this case, the Cartesian GNSS vectors are converted, for example, into geodesic parameters (azimuth and length on the ellipsoid, but the simple form of converted pseudo-observations are the direct differences of the geodetic coordinates. Unfortunately, such an approach may be essentially distorted by a systematic error resulting from the position error of the GNSS vector, before its projection on the ellipsoid surface. In this paper, an analysis of the impact of this error on the determined measures of geometric ellipsoid elements, including the differences of geodetic coordinates or geodesic parameters is presented. Assuming that the adjustment of a combined network on the ellipsoid shows that the optimal functional approach in relation to the satellite observation, is to create the observational equations directly for the original GNSS Cartesian vector components, writing them directly as a function of the geodetic coordinates (in numerical applications, we use the linearized forms of observational equations with explicitly specified coefficients. While retaining the original character of the Cartesian vector, one avoids any systematic errors that may occur in the conversion of the original GNSS vectors to ellipsoid elements, for example the vector of the geodesic parameters. The problem is theoretically developed and numerically tested. An example of the adjustment of a subnet loaded from the database of reference stations of the ASG-EUPOS system was considered for the preferred functional

  1. The combined geodetic network adjusted on the reference ellipsoid - a comparison of three functional models for GNSS observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadaj, Roman

    2016-12-01

    The adjustment problem of the so-called combined (hybrid, integrated) network created with GNSS vectors and terrestrial observations has been the subject of many theoretical and applied works. The network adjustment in various mathematical spaces was considered: in the Cartesian geocentric system on a reference ellipsoid and on a mapping plane. For practical reasons, it often takes a geodetic coordinate system associated with the reference ellipsoid. In this case, the Cartesian GNSS vectors are converted, for example, into geodesic parameters (azimuth and length) on the ellipsoid, but the simple form of converted pseudo-observations are the direct differences of the geodetic coordinates. Unfortunately, such an approach may be essentially distorted by a systematic error resulting from the position error of the GNSS vector, before its projection on the ellipsoid surface. In this paper, an analysis of the impact of this error on the determined measures of geometric ellipsoid elements, including the differences of geodetic coordinates or geodesic parameters is presented. Assuming that the adjustment of a combined network on the ellipsoid shows that the optimal functional approach in relation to the satellite observation, is to create the observational equations directly for the original GNSS Cartesian vector components, writing them directly as a function of the geodetic coordinates (in numerical applications, we use the linearized forms of observational equations with explicitly specified coefficients). While retaining the original character of the Cartesian vector, one avoids any systematic errors that may occur in the conversion of the original GNSS vectors to ellipsoid elements, for example the vector of the geodesic parameters. The problem is theoretically developed and numerically tested. An example of the adjustment of a subnet loaded from the database of reference stations of the ASG-EUPOS system was considered for the preferred functional model of the GNSS

  2. A native IP satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudelka, O.; Schmidt, M.; Ebert, J.; Schlemmer, H.; Kastner-Puschl, S.; Riedler, W.

    2004-08-01

    ≪ In the framework of ESA's ARTES-5 program the Institute of Applied Systems Technology (Joanneum Research) in cooperation with the Department of Communications and Wave Propagation has developed a novel meshed satellite communications system which is optimised for Internet traffic and applications (L*IP—Local Network Interconnection via Satellite Systems Using the IP Protocol Suite). Both symmetrical and asymmetrical connections are supported. Bandwidth on demand and guaranteed quality of service are key features of the system. A novel multi-frequency TDMA access scheme utilises efficient methods of IP encapsulation. In contrast to other solutions it avoids legacy transport network techniques. While the DVB-RCS standard is based on ATM or MPEG transport cells, the solution of the L*IP system uses variable-length cells which reduces the overhead significantly. A flexible and programmable platform based on Linux machines was chosen to allow the easy implementation and adaptation to different standards. This offers the possibility to apply the system not only to satellite communications, but provides seamless integration with terrestrial fixed broadcast wireless access systems. The platform is also an ideal test-bed for a variety of interactive broadband communications systems. The paper describes the system architecture and the key features of the system.

  3. Multi-year GNSS monitoring of atmospheric IWV over Central and South America for climate studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Clara Eugenia; Mendoza, Luciano Pedro Oscar; Fernández, Laura Isabel; Natali, María Paula; Meza, Amalia Margarita; Francisco Moirano, Juan

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric water vapour has been acknowledged as an essential climate variable. Weather prediction and hazard assessment systems benefit from real-time observations, whereas long-term records contribute to climate studies. Nowadays, ground-based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) products have become widely employed, complementing satellite observations over the oceans. Although the past decade has seen a significant development of the GNSS infrastructure in Central and South America, its potential for atmospheric water vapour monitoring has not been fully exploited. With this in mind, we have performed a regional, 7-year-long and homogeneous analysis, comprising 136 GNSS tracking stations, obtaining high-rate and continuous observations of column-integrated water vapour and troposphere zenith total delay. As a preliminary application for this data set, we have estimated local water vapour trends, their significance, and their relation with specific climate regimes. We have found evidence of drying at temperate regions in South America, at a rate of about 2 % per decade, while a slow moistening of the troposphere over tropical regions is also weakly suggested by our results. Furthermore, we have assessed the regional performance of the empirical model GPT2w to blindly estimate troposphere delays. The model reproduces the observed mean delays fairly well, including their annual and semi-annual variations. Nevertheless, a long-term evaluation has shown systematical biases, up to 20 mm, probably inherited from the underlying atmospheric reanalysis. Additionally, the complete data set has been made openly available as supplementary material.

  4. Multi-GNSS and Multi-frequency SNR Multipath Reflectometry of Snow Depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabibi, S.; Geremia-Nievinski, F.; van Dam, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global Navigation Satellite System multipath reflectometry (GNSS-MR) uses ground-based signals of opportunity to retrieve snow depth at an intermediate space scale. This technique is based on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the simultaneously received direct (line-of-sight) and coherently ground reflected signals. In this contribution, forward and inverse modeling of SNR observations is presented for GLONASS-MR, extending GPS-MR to multiple GNSS. The coupling of the surface and antenna responses from short-delay near-grazing incidence multipath from CDMA and FDMA satellite navigation systems are simulated using an electromagnetic forward model. The inverse model is used to estimate parameter corrections responsible for observation residuals to estimate snow depth. The correlation between snow depth retrievals using GPS L2C signal and GLONASS R2-C/A signal is excellent, with r2 value of 0.990. In a related approach, dual-frequency SNR-based GNSS-MR, which is based on linear combination of SNR observables, is used to estimate snow depth. This ionospheric delay free method synthesizes longer carrier wavelengths ("widelaning" or delta-k) to isolate the direct power contribution in environmental retrievals.

  5. Dataworks for GNSS: Software for Supporting Data Sharing and Federation of Geodetic Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boler, F. M.; Meertens, C. M.; Miller, M. M.; Wier, S.; Rost, M.; Matykiewicz, J.

    2015-12-01

    Continuously-operating Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) networks are increasingly being installed globally for a wide variety of science and societal applications. GNSS enables Earth science research in areas including tectonic plate interactions, crustal deformation in response to loading by tectonics, magmatism, water and ice, and the dynamics of water - and thereby energy transfer - in the atmosphere at regional scale. The many individual scientists and organizations that set up GNSS stations globally are often open to sharing data, but lack the resources or expertise to deploy systems and software to manage and curate data and metadata and provide user tools that would support data sharing. UNAVCO previously gained experience in facilitating data sharing through the NASA-supported development of the Geodesy Seamless Archive Centers (GSAC) open source software. GSAC provides web interfaces and simple web services for data and metadata discovery and access, supports federation of multiple data centers, and simplifies transfer of data and metadata to long-term archives. The NSF supported the dissemination of GSAC to multiple European data centers forming the European Plate Observing System. To expand upon GSAC to provide end-to-end, instrument-to-distribution capability, UNAVCO developed Dataworks for GNSS with NSF funding to the COCONet project, and deployed this software on systems that are now operating as Regional GNSS Data Centers as part of the NSF-funded TLALOCNet and COCONet projects. Dataworks consists of software modules written in Python and Java for data acquisition, management and sharing. There are modules for GNSS receiver control and data download, a database schema for metadata, tools for metadata handling, ingest software to manage file metadata, data file management scripts, GSAC, scripts for mirroring station data and metadata from partner GSACs, and extensive software and operator documentation. UNAVCO plans to provide a cloud VM

  6. Compact and broadband circularly polarized ring antenna with wide beam-width for multiple global navigation satellite systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Hong-Lin; Hu Bin-Jie; Zhang Xiu-Yin

    2012-01-01

    A compact and broadband circularly polarized (CP) annular ring antenna with wide beam-width is proposed for multiple global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) in the L1 band.The annular ring is excited by two modified L-probes with quadrature phase difference.It has a 36.3% 10-dB return loss bandwidth and a 13% 3-dB axial ratio bandwidth,because of the orthogonal L-probes with 90° phase difference.The measured peak gain of the antenna is 3.9 dBic.It can detect the satellites at lower elevation as its half power beam-width (HPBW) is 113° in both the x-z and y-z planes,achieving a cross-polarization level of larger than 25 dB.Noticeably,the antenna achieves 89% size reduction compared with the conventional half wavelength patch antennas.It can be used in hand-held navigation devices of multiple GNSS such as COMPASS,Galileo,GPS and GLONASS.

  7. Multi-GNSS precise point positioning (MGPPP) using raw observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Teng; Yuan, Yunbin; Zhang, Baocheng; Wang, Ningbo; Tan, Bingfeng; Chen, Yongchang

    2017-03-01

    A joint-processing model for multi-GNSS (GPS, GLONASS, BDS and GALILEO) precise point positioning (PPP) is proposed, in which raw code and phase observations are used. In the proposed model, inter-system biases (ISBs) and GLONASS code inter-frequency biases (IFBs) are carefully considered, among which GLONASS code IFBs are modeled as a linear function of frequency numbers. To get the full rank function model, the unknowns are re-parameterized and the estimable slant ionospheric delays and ISBs/IFBs are derived and estimated simultaneously. One month of data in April, 2015 from 32 stations of the International GNSS Service (IGS) Multi-GNSS Experiment (MGEX) tracking network have been used to validate the proposed model. Preliminary results show that RMS values of the positioning errors (with respect to external double-difference solutions) for static/kinematic solutions (four systems) are 6.2 mm/2.1 cm (north), 6.0 mm/2.2 cm (east) and 9.3 mm/4.9 cm (up). One-day stabilities of the estimated ISBs described by STD values are 0.36 and 0.38 ns, for GLONASS and BDS, respectively. Significant ISB jumps are identified between adjacent days for all stations, which are caused by the different satellite clock datums in different days and for different systems. Unlike ISBs, the estimated GLONASS code IFBs are quite stable for all stations, with an average STD of 0.04 ns over a month. Single-difference experiment of short baseline shows that PPP ionospheric delays are more precise than traditional leveling ionospheric delays.

  8. China Satellite Navigation Conference (CSNC) 2012 Proceedings : The 3rd China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fan, Shiwei

    2012-01-01

    Proceedings of the 3rd China Satellite Navigation Conference (CSNC2012) presents selected research papers from CSNC2012, held on 15-19 May in Guanzhou, China. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou system especially. They are divided into 9 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2012, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BeiDou system and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications. SUN Jiadong is the Chief Designer of the Compass/BeiDou system, and the Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences; LIU Jingnan is a professor at Wuhan University, and the Academician of Chinese Academy of Engineering; YANG Yuanxi is a professor at China National Administration of GNSS and Applications, and the Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences; FAN Shiwei öis a researcher on satellite navigation.

  9. Neptunian Satellites observed with Keck AO system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchis, F.; Urata, R.; de Pater, I.; Gibbard, S.; Hammel, H. B.; Berthier, J.

    2004-05-01

    The Neptunian system was observed on 9 different nights between July 2002 and October 2003 with the 10-m Keck telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, and its facility instrument NIRC2 coupled with the Adaptive Optics system. Data were recorded in J (1.2μ m), and H (2.2μ m) bands. The angular resolution achieved on a one-minute integration time image is 0.50 arcsec, corresponding to a spatial resolution of 1100 km. The images display small structures such as the rings (de Pater et al. 2004), clouds in the atmosphere (Gibbard et al. 2003), and inner satellites, mainly Proteus, Larissa, Galatea, Despina, and Thalassa. On the 40 images, the positions and intensities of the satellites detected were accurately measured fitting the signal with a gaussian profile. The center of Neptune was obtained by fitting the disk position with an ellipse. After correcting for the detector distortion, we compared the satellite positions with the predicted ones delivered by several ephemerides. We used the JPL (NEP016 + NEP022 + DE405) and two IMCCE ephemerides, an old version (VSOP87+Owen et al., 1991) and a more recent one (DE405+Le Guyader et al., 1993). All cases, we confirmed the presence of an apparent shift between the predicted and the observed positions. Table 1 (see http://astron.berkeley.edu/ fmarchis/Science/Neptune/Satellites/) summarizes the mean distance of the shift for satellites most frequently observed and the various ephemerides. In this presentation, we will report the positions of the satellites, and present their color and possible photometric variations derived from the observations. This work has been partially supported by the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Adaptive Optics, managed by the University of California at Santa Cruz under cooperative agreement No. AST - 9876783.

  10. A New Reassigned Spectrogram Method in Interference Detection for GNSS Receivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kewen; Jin, Tian; Yang, Dongkai

    2015-09-02

    Interference detection is very important for Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. Current work on interference detection in GNSS receivers has mainly focused on time-frequency (TF) analysis techniques, such as spectrogram and Wigner-Ville distribution (WVD), where the spectrogram approach presents the TF resolution trade-off problem, since the analysis window is used, and the WVD method suffers from the very serious cross-term problem, due to its quadratic TF distribution nature. In order to solve the cross-term problem and to preserve good TF resolution in the TF plane at the same time, in this paper, a new TF distribution by using a reassigned spectrogram has been proposed in interference detection for GNSS receivers. This proposed reassigned spectrogram method efficiently combines the elimination of the cross-term provided by the spectrogram itself according to its inherent nature and the improvement of the TF aggregation property achieved by the reassignment method. Moreover, a notch filter has been adopted in interference mitigation for GNSS receivers, where receiver operating characteristics (ROCs) are used as metrics for the characterization of interference mitigation performance. The proposed interference detection method by using a reassigned spectrogram is evaluated by experiments on GPS L1 signals in the disturbing scenarios in comparison to the state-of-the-art TF analysis approaches. The analysis results show that the proposed interference detection technique effectively overcomes the cross-term problem and also keeps good TF localization properties, which has been proven to be valid and effective to enhance the interference Sensors 2015, 15 22168 detection performance; in addition, the adoption of the notch filter in interference mitigation has shown a significant acquisition performance improvement in terms of ROC curves for GNSS receivers in jamming environments.

  11. A regional GNSS-VTEC model over Nigeria using neural networks: A novel approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Okoh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A neural network model of the Global Navigation Satellite System – vertical total electron content (GNSS-VTEC over Nigeria is developed. A new approach that has been utilized in this work is the consideration of the International Reference Ionosphere's (IRI's critical plasma frequency (foF2 parameter as an additional neuron for the network's input layer. The work also explores the effects of using various other input layer neurons like disturbance storm time (DST and sunspot number. All available GNSS data from the Nigerian Permanent GNSS Network (NIGNET were used, and these cover the period from 2011 to 2015, for 14 stations. Asides increasing the learning accuracy of the networks, the inclusion of the IRI's foF2 parameter as an input neuron is ideal for making the networks to learn long-term solar cycle variations. This is important especially for regions, like in this work, where the GNSS data is available for less than the period of a solar cycle. The neural network model developed in this work has been tested for time-varying and spatial performances. The latest 10% of the GNSS observations from each of the stations were used to test the forecasting ability of the networks, while data from 2 of the stations were entirely used for spatial performance testing. The results show that root-mean-squared-errors were generally less than 8.5 TEC units for all modes of testing performed using the optimal network. When compared to other models, the model developed in this work was observed to reduce the prediction errors to about half those of the NeQuick and the IRI model.

  12. Statistical characterization of Strong and Mid Solar Flares and Sun EUV rate monitoring with GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte-Moreno, Enric; Hernandez-Pajares, Manuel; Garcia-Rigo, Alberto; Beniguel, Yannick; Orus-Perez, Raul; Prieto-Cerdeira, Roberto; Schlueter, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    The global network of permanent Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers has become an useful and affordable way of monitoring the Solar EUV flux rate, especially -for the time being- in the context of Major and Mid geoeffective intensity Solar Flares (M. Hernandez-Pajares et al., Space Weather, doi:10.1029/2012SW000826, 2012). In fact the maturity of this technique (GNSS Solar FLAre Indicator, GSFLAI) has allowed to incorporate it in operational real-time (RT) conditions, thanks to the availability of global GNSS datastreams from the RT International GNSS Network (M. Caissy et al, GPS World, June 1, 2012), and performed in the context of the MONITOR and MONITOR2 ESA-funded projects (Y. Beniguel et al., NAVITEC Proc., 978-1-4673-2011-5 IEEE, 2012). The main goal of this presentation is to summarize a detailed recent study of the statistical properties of Solar Flares (E. Monte and M. Hernandez-Pajares, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1002/2014JA020206, 2014) by considering the GNSS proxy of EUV rate (GSFLAI parameter) computed independently each 30 seconds during the whole last solar cycle. An statistical model has been characterized that explains the empirical results such as (a) the persistence and presence of bursts of solar flares and (b) their long tail peak values of the solar flux variation, which can be characterized by: (1) A fractional Brownian model for the long-term dependence, and (2), a power law distribution for the time series extreme values. Finally, an update of the Solar Flares' occurrence during the recent months of Solar Activity, gathered in RT within MONITOR2 project, will close the paper.

  13. GNSS space-time interference mitigation and attitude determination in the presence of interference signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshmand, Saeed; Jahromi, Ali Jafarnia; Broumandan, Ali; Lachapelle, Gérard

    2015-05-26

    The use of Space-Time Processing (STP) in Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) applications is gaining significant attention due to its effectiveness for both narrowband and wideband interference suppression. However, the resulting distortion and bias on the cross correlation functions due to space-time filtering is a major limitation of this technique. Employing the steering vector of the GNSS signals in the filter structure can significantly reduce the distortion on cross correlation functions and lead to more accurate pseudorange measurements. This paper proposes a two-stage interference mitigation approach in which the first stage estimates an interference-free subspace before the acquisition and tracking phases and projects all received signals into this subspace. The next stage estimates array attitude parameters based on detecting and employing GNSS signals that are less distorted due to the projection process. Attitude parameters enable the receiver to estimate the steering vector of each satellite signal and use it in the novel distortionless STP filter to significantly reduce distortion and maximize Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR). GPS signals were collected using a six-element antenna array under open sky conditions to first calibrate the antenna array. Simulated interfering signals were then added to the digitized samples in software to verify the applicability of the proposed receiver structure and assess its performance for several interference scenarios.

  14. A novel method for low-cost MIMU aiding GNSS attitude determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yingdong; Mao, Xuchu; Tian, Weifeng

    2016-07-01

    Global navigation satellite systems (GNSS) are well suited for attitude determination. In most cases, the success rate of the initialization is always a difficult problem, especially the single-frequency measurement model of the double-difference carrier phase. The main reason for this is excessively large noise error that arises in the measurement of the double-difference carrier phase. When the geometric relations of the equations are not good, the difference between the residual error of the optimal solution and that of the suboptimal solution is not very obvious. In this study, we design a smoothing model based on MEMS. The noise error of the measurement of the double-difference carrier phase is suppressed and smoothed via this model. It is designed to reduce the initialization time and improve the success rate of the solution. In addition, we propose a new method based on the rotation matrix to resolve the attitude angle. This method produces a better performance in reducing computation time and selecting satellites. The condition of the baseline length is combined with the ambiguity function method (AFM) to search for integer ambiguity, and this method is validated in reducing the span of candidates. The experiment is conducted in a selected campus, and the performance is proved to be effective. Our results are based on simulated and real-time GNSS data and are applied on single-frequency processing, which is known as one of the challenging cases of GNSS attitude determination.

  15. Real-time monitoring for fast deformations using GNSS low-cost receivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bellone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Landslides are one of the major geo-hazards which have constantly affected Italy especially over the last few years. In fact 82% of the Italian territory is affected by this phenomenon which destroys the environment and often causes deaths: therefore it is necessary to monitor these effects in order to detect and prevent these risks. Nowadays, most of this type of monitoring is carried out by using traditional topographic instruments (e.g. total stations or satellite techniques such as global navigation satellite system (GNSS receivers. The level of accuracy obtainable with these instruments is sub-centimetrical in post-processing and centimetrical in real-time; however, the costs are very high (many thousands of euros. The rapid diffusion of GNSS networks has led to an increase of using mass-market receivers for real-time positioning. In this paper, the performances of GNSS mass-market receiver are reported with the aim of verifying if this type of sensor can be used for real-time landslide monitoring: for this purpose a special slide was used for simulating a landslide, since it enabled us to give manual displacements thanks to a micrometre screw. These experiments were also carried out by considering a specific statistical test (a modified Chow test which enabled us to understand if there were any displacements from a statistical point of view in real time. The tests, the algorithm and results are reported in this paper.

  16. Analysis of local ionospheric variability based on SVD and MDS at low-latitude GNSS stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabbakuti, J. R. K. Kumar; Devanaboyina, Venkata Ratnam; Kanchumarthi, S. Ramesh

    2016-06-01

    Investigation of ionospheric anomalies during equatorial and low latitude is of major concern for modeling and global navigation satellite system (GNSS) applications. Total electron content (TEC) varies with the ionospheric conditions, which will lead to the errors in the global positioning system (GPS) measurements. It is therefore a method that is necessary to characterize the ionospheric anomalies for satellite-based navigation systems. In this study, characterization of ionospheric variations based on the singular value decomposition (SVD) and classical multidimensional scaling (MDS) methods was studied. The yearly and daily variations are decomposed from the GPS-TEC, international reference ionosphere (IRI) 2007 and IRI 2012 models TEC over the three low-latitude GNSS stations located at Koneru Lakshmaiah University (KLU-Guntur), Hyderabad and Bangalore, respectively. From the results, it is found that there is a strong correlation between GPS-TEC and IRI models. The correlation coefficient for the first three singular values is more than 0.86. From this, it is possible to reconstruct more than 85 % of the variability contained in global GPS-derived VTEC data (for year 2013) by using only the first three modes. The semiannual variation has maximum value during March-April and September-October and has minimum value during June-July. It is observed that the annual variations have maximum value in summer and minimum value in winter, and the amplitudes decrease with increasing latitude. Further, opposite latitudinal asymmetry among annual and semiannual variations for three GNSS stations is noticed. SVD and MDS methods clearly show time-varying characteristics and the absence of the winter anomaly at low-latitude GNSS stations.

  17. Data-Adaptive Detection of Transient Deformation in GNSS Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calais, E.; Walwer, D.; Ghil, M.

    2014-12-01

    Dense Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) networks have recently been developed in actively deforming regions and elsewhere. Their operation is leading to a rapidly increasing amount of data, and position time series are now routinely provided by several high-quality services. These networks often capture transient-deformation features of geophysical origin that are difficult to separate from the background noise or from seasonal residuals in the time series. In addition, because of the very large number of stations now available, it has become impossible to systematically inspect each time series and visually compare them at all neighboring sites. In order to overcome these limitations, we adapt Multichannel Singular Spectrum Analysis (M-SSA), a method derived from the analysis of dynamical systems, to the spatial and temporal analysis of GNSS position time series in dense networks. We show that this data-adaptive method — previously applied to climate, bio-medical and macro-economic indicators — allows us to extract spatio-temporal features of geophysical interest from GPS time series without a priori knowledge of the system's dynamics or of the data set's noise characteristics. We illustrate our results with examples from seasonal signals in Alaska and from micro-inflation/deflation episodes at an Aleutian-arc volcano.

  18. Severe and localized GNSS scintillation at the poleward edge of the nightside auroral oval during intense substorm aurora

    CERN Document Server

    van der Meeren, Christer; Lorentzen, Dag A; Rietveld, Michael T; Clausen, Lasse B N

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we study how GPS, GLONASS, and Galileo navigation signals are compromised by strong irregularities causing severe phase scintillation ($\\mathit{\\sigma }_{\\phi }$ > 1) in the nightside high-latitude ionosphere during a substorm on 3 November 2013. Substorm onset and a later intensification coincided with polar cap patches entering the auroral oval to become auroral blobs. Using Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) receivers and optical data, we show severe scintillation driven by intense auroral emissions in the line of sight between the receiver and the satellites. During substorm expansion, the area of scintillation followed the intense poleward edge of the auroral oval. The intense auroral emissions were colocated with polar cap patches (blobs). The patches did not contain strong irregularities, neither before entering the auroral oval nor after the aurora had faded. Signals from all three GNSS constellations were similarly affected by the irregularities. Furthermore, two receivers space...

  19. Estimation of transmitter and receiver code biases using concurrent GNSS and ionosonde measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapundjiev, Danislav; Stankov, Stan; Verhulst, Tobias

    2016-07-01

    The total electron content (TEC) is an important ionospheric characteristic used extensively in ionosphere / space research and in various positioning / navigation applications based on Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals. TEC calculations using dual-frequency GNSS receivers is the norm nowadays but, for calculation of the absolute TEC, the correct estimation of the Differential Code Biases (DCB) is crucial. Various methods for estimation of these biases are currently in use and most of them make several (rather strong) assumptions concerning the ionosphere structure and state which do not necessarily represent the real situation. In this presentation we explore the opportunities offered by the modern high-resolution digital ionosonde measurements to deduce key ionospheric properties / parameters in order to develop a new algorithm for real-time DCB estimation and evaluate its performance.

  20. InSAR datum connection using GNSS-augmented radar transponders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Pooja; der Marel, Hans van; van Leijen, Freek; Samiei-Esfahany, Sami; Klees, Roland; Hanssen, Ramon

    2017-06-01

    Deformation estimates from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) are relative: they form a `free' network referred to an arbitrary datum, e.g. by assuming a reference point in the image to be stable. However, some applications require `absolute' InSAR estimates, i.e. expressed in a well-defined terrestrial reference frame, e.g. to compare InSAR results with those of other techniques. We propose a methodology based on collocated InSAR and Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) measurements, achieved by rigidly attaching phase-stable millimetre-precision compact active radar transponders to GNSS antennas. We demonstrate this concept through a simulated example and practical case studies in the Netherlands.

  1. Station velocities from a permanent GNSS network in the Eastern Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzak, Matthias; Mitterschiffthaler, Philipp; Stangl, Günter

    2017-04-01

    The APOS network of permanent GNSS stations consists of more than 80 sites covering the Austrian territory and its surrounding area. A comprehensive analysis of this network is performed and station velocities are derived using the Bernese GNSS Software. Coordinate time series from satellite system offer the possibility to study the geophysical setting in that region. The results indicate a NE-migration of the boundary zone between the Eastern Alps and Pannonian Basin, probably indirectly caused by the Adriatic Microplate as well as a slight northern migration of the Alpine Zone, probably caused directly by the Adriatic Microplate, ending in the Northern Alpine foreland. A minor up movement of the Alpine Zone, possibly caused by post-glacial uplift, and slight sinking in the forelands, potentially caused by water reduction in the ground of sediments, can be identified.

  2. A Novel General Imaging Formation Algorithm for GNSS-Based Bistatic SAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Hong-Cheng; Wang, Peng-Bo; Chen, Jie; Liu, Wei; Ge, LinLin; Yang, Wei

    2016-02-26

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS)-based bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) recently plays a more and more significant role in remote sensing applications for its low-cost and real-time global coverage capability. In this paper, a general imaging formation algorithm was proposed for accurately and efficiently focusing GNSS-based bistatic SAR data, which avoids the interpolation processing in traditional back projection algorithms (BPAs). A two-dimensional point target spectrum model was firstly presented, and the bulk range cell migration correction (RCMC) was consequently derived for reducing range cell migration (RCM) and coarse focusing. As the bulk RCMC seriously changes the range history of the radar signal, a modified and much more efficient hybrid correlation operation was introduced for compensating residual phase errors. Simulation results were presented based on a general geometric topology with non-parallel trajectories and unequal velocities for both transmitter and receiver platforms, showing a satisfactory performance by the proposed method.

  3. Bayesian signal processing techniques for GNSS receivers: from multipath mitigation to positioning

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Aquesta tesi gira al voltant del disseny de receptors per a sistemes globals de navegació per satèl·lit (Global Navigation Satellite Systems, GNSS). El terme GNSS fa referència a tots aquells sistemes de navegació basats en una constel·lació de satèl·lits que emeten senyals de navegació útils per a posicionament. El més popular és l'americà GPS, emprat globalment. Els esforços d'Europa per a tenir un sistema similar veuran el seu fruit en un futur proper, el sistema s'anomena Galileo. Altres...

  4. Networks for Autonomous Formation Flying Satellite Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoblock, Eric J.; Konangi, Vijay K.; Wallett, Thomas M.; Bhasin, Kul B.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of three communications networks to support autonomous multi-spacecraft formation flying systems is presented. All systems are comprised of a ten-satellite formation arranged in a star topology, with one of the satellites designated as the central or "mother ship." All data is routed through the mother ship to the terrestrial network. The first system uses a TCP/lP over ATM protocol architecture within the formation the second system uses the IEEE 802.11 protocol architecture within the formation and the last system uses both of the previous architectures with a constellation of geosynchronous satellites serving as an intermediate point-of-contact between the formation and the terrestrial network. The simulations consist of file transfers using either the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) or the Simple Automatic File Exchange (SAFE) Protocol. The results compare the IF queuing delay, and IP processing delay at the mother ship as well as application-level round-trip time for both systems, In all cases, using IEEE 802.11 within the formation yields less delay. Also, the throughput exhibited by SAFE is better than FTP.

  5. Debris flow cartography using differential GNSS and Theodolite measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaradze, Giorgi; Guinau, Marta; Calvet, Jaume; Furdada, Gloria; Victoriano, Ane; Génova, Mar; Suriñach, Emma

    2016-04-01

    The presented results form part of a CHARMA project, which pursues a broad objective of reducing damage caused by uncontrolled mass movements, such as rockfalls, snow avalanches and debris flows. Ultimate goal of the project is to contribute towards the establishment of new scientific knowledge and tools that can help in the design and creation of early warning systems. Here we present the specific results that deal with the application of differential GNSS and classical geodetic (e.g. theodolite) methods for mapping debris and torrential flows. Specifically, we investigate the Portainé stream located in the Pallars Sobirà region of Catalonia (Spain), in the eastern Pyrenees. In the last decade more than ten debris-flow type phenomena have affected the region, causing considerable economic losses. Since early 2014, we have conducted several field campaigns within the study area, where we have employed a multi-disciplinary approach, consisting of geomorphological, dendro-chronological and geodetic methods, in order to map the river bed and reconstruct the history of the extreme flooding and debris flow events. Geodetic studies included several approaches, using the classical and satellite based methods. The former consisted of angle and distance measurements between the Geodolite 502 total station and the reflecting prisms placed on top of the control points located within the riverbed. These type of measurements are precise, although present several disadvantages such as the lack of absolute coordinates that makes the geo-referencing difficult, as well as a relatively time-consuming process that involves two persons. For this reason, we have also measured the same control points using the differential GNSS system, in order to evaluate the feasibility of replacing the total station measurements with the GNSS. The latter measuring method is fast and can be conducted by one person. However, the fact that the study area is within the riverbed, often below the trees

  6. Communications satellite system for Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegl, W.; Laufenberg, W.

    1980-09-01

    Earlier established requirement estimations were improved upon by contacting African administrations and organizations. An enormous demand is shown to exist for telephony and teletype services in rural areas. It is shown that educational television broadcasting should be realized in the current African transport and communications decade (1978-1987). Radio broadcasting is proposed in order to overcome illiteracy and to improve educational levels. The technical and commercial feasibility of the system is provided by computer simulations which demonstrate how the required objectives can be fulfilled in conjunction with ground networks.

  7. Navigation Performance of Global Navigation Satellite Systems in the Space Service Volume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Dale A.

    2013-01-01

    GPS has been used for spacecraft navigation for many years center dot In support of this, the US has committed that future GPS satellites will continue to provide signals in the Space Service Volume center dot NASA is working with international agencies to obtain similar commitments from other providers center dot In support of this effort, I simulated multi-constellation navigation in the Space Service Volume In this presentation, I extend the work to examine the navigational benefits and drawbacks of the new constellations center dot A major benefit is the reduced geometric dilution of precision (GDOP). I show that there is a substantial reduction in GDOP by using all of the GNSS constellations center dot The increased number of GNSS satellites broadcasting does produce mutual interference, raising the noise floor. A near/far signal problem can also occur where a nearby satellite drowns out satellites that are far away. - In these simulations, no major effect was observed Typically, the use of multi-constellation GNSS navigation improves GDOP by a factor of two or more over GPS alone center dot In addition, at the higher altitudes, four satellite solutions can be obtained much more often center dot This show the value of having commitments to provide signals in the Space Service Volume Besides a commitment to provide a minimum signal in the Space Service Volume, detailed signal gain information is useful for mission planning center dot Knowledge of group and phase delay over the pattern would also reduce the navigational uncertainty

  8. Application of GNSS-RTK derived topographical maps for rapid environmental monitoring: a case study of Jack Finnery Lake (Perth, Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloderer, Glen; Bingham, Matthew; Awange, Joseph L; Fleming, Kevin M

    2011-09-01

    In environmental monitoring, environmental impact assessments and environmental audits, topographical maps play an essential role in providing a means by which the locations of sampling sites may be selected, in assisting with the interpretation of physical features, and in indicating the impact or potential impact on an area due to changes in the system being monitored (e.g., spatially changing features such as wetlands). Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are hereby presented as a rapid method for monitoring spatial changes to support environmental monitoring decisions and policies. To validate the GNSS-based method, a comparison is made of results from a small-scale topographic survey using radio-based real-time kinematic GNSS (GNSS-RTK) and total station survey methods at Jack Finnery Lake, Perth, Australia. The accuracies achieved by the total station in this study were 2 cm horizontally and 6 cm vertically, while the GNSS-RTK also achieved an accuracy of 2 cm horizontally, but only 28 cm vertically. While the GNSS-RTK measurements were less accurate in the height component compared to those from the total station method, it is still capable of achieving accuracies sufficient for a topographic map at a scale of 1:1,750 that could support environmental monitoring tasks such as identifying spatial changes in small water bodies or wetlands. The time taken to perform the survey using GNSS-RTK, however, was much shorter compared to the total station method, thereby making it quite suitable for monitoring spatial changes within an environmental context, e.g., dynamic mining activities that require rapid surveys and the updating of the monitored data at regular intervals.

  9. Issues on Multi-polarization of GNSS-R for Passive Radar Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Wei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available GNSS Reflectometry (GNSS-R is a currently developed remote sensing technology which belongs to the passive radar domain. This paper aims to deal with some issues on multi-polarization of GNSS-R technology. Four different polarization patterns of the received GNSS-R signal are discussed, including rl, rr, rv, rh. For each polarization, formulas for calculating the surface reflectivity (Γ using dielectric constant (ε and satellite elevation angle (θ are derivated. The rationality of these formulas is validated using data from a ground-based GNSS-R soil moisture experiment. The results of this research can provide references for further GNSS-R research, including simulation, experiment design, model development and data processing.

  10. GNSS-Derived Water Vapour for Riyadh from SOLA IGS Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maghrabi, Abdullrahman; Alothman, Abdulaziz; Fernandes, Rui; Aodah, Souad

    2017-04-01

    Water vapor is the most abundant and highly variable component of the important gases in the atmosphere. It influences many physical and thermodynamical processes in the atmosphere and plays an important role in the hydrological cycle and has effects on our climate and weather systems. Water vapour affects the electromagnetic radiation through the atmosphere, which is of significance in fields of astronomy, radar, communications and remote sensing. Precipitable water vapor (PWV) is the amount of water obtained if all the water vapor in the atmosphere were to be compressed to the point at which it condenses into liquid. PWV is difficult to measure adequately due to its variable distribution both spatially and temporally. Most of the current techniques (e.g., radiosondes or satellites) are only available at few locations and not continuously (few observations per day at most). However, in the last decades, GPS observations have been proven to accurately measure the ZTD (Zenith Tropospheric Delay) at high frequencies (normally every 5 minutes) above the station. This quantity can be converted to PWV if temperature and pressure is know at the station location. In early 2004, King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) established a GPS network for geodetic and geophysical applications to contribute to the International GNSS Service IGS. In this study, we will present the first PWV measurements obtained from Global Navigation Satellite System GNSS receiver at the Solar Village (SOLA), 60 km from Riyadh. GNSS observations for the period between 2004-2006 are used to study the daily and seasonal variations of ZTD, and consequently of PWV in SOLA. In addition, we also compare the GNSS-derived PWV with sunphotometer and radiosonde estimates at SOLA in order to evaluate the compatibility of these techniques in a dry climate as the one in Riyadh.

  11. Predictability of GNSS signal observations in support of Space Situational Awareness using passive radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, M. S.; Lambert, A.; Benson, C.

    2015-07-01

    GNSS signals have been proposed as emitters of opportunity to enhance Space Situational Awareness (SSA) by tracking small items of space debris using bistatic radar. Although the scattered GNSS signal levels from small items of space debris are incredibly low, the dynamic disturbances of the observed object are very small, and the phase of the scattered signals is well behaved. It is therefore plausible that coherent integration periods on the order of many minutes could be achieved. However, even with long integration periods, very large receiver arrays with extensive, but probably viable, processing are required to recover the scattered signal. Such large arrays will be expensive, and smaller more affordable arrays will collect insufficient signal power to detect the small objects (relative to wavelength) that are necessary to maintain the necessary phase coherency. The investments necessary to build a large receiver array are unlikely without substantial risk reduction. Pini and Akos have previously reported on use of very large radio telescopes to analyse the short-term modulation performance of GNSS satellite signals. In this work we report on tracking of GPS satellites with a radio-astronomy VLBI antenna system to assess the stability of the observed GPS signal over a time period indicative of that proposed for passive radar. We also confirm some of the processing techniques that may be used in both demonstrations and the final system. We conclude from the limited data set that the signal stability when observed by a high-gain tracking antenna and compared against a high quality, low phase-noise clock is excellent, as expected. We conclude by framing further works to reduce risk for a passive radar SSA capability using GNSS signals. http://www.ignss.org/Conferences/PastConferencePapers/2015ConferencePastPapers/2015PeerReviewedPapers/tabid/147/Default.aspx

  12. Testing GNSS ionosphere models based on the position domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orus-Perez, Raul; Rovira, Adria

    2017-04-01

    As is well know, the ionosphere is one of the main contributors to the navigation error of single-frequency users. Currently, there are many models available for correcting the ionosphere delay. Thus, the different GNSS provide its own ionosphere corrections in the Signal-in-Space as for instance, NeQuick G for Galileo or Klobuchar for GPS. Other sources for ionosphere corrections are the Satellite Based Augmentation Systems (i.e. EGNOS or WAAS), Global Ionospheric Maps (i.e. provided by IGS), regional maps and even climatological models, like NeQuick or IRI. With this large variety of models, there have been a lot of efforts to define a suitable strategy to test the accuracy of the different models. Usually, this testing has been done by computing a "reference ionosphere", using all kind of GNSS techniques, using ionosonde data or using altimeter data. These techniques are not bias free and they may raise questions on which is the absolute accuracy they achieve. In order to complement these tests, a new methodology has been developed to test ionosphere models for GNSS. This methodology is based on the position domain, modeling the observables on each frequency with geodetic accuracy, and then to combine the obtained least square solutions to determine the ionosphere error. The results of the testing for different GIMs from IGS and different Signal-in-Space models (GPS, Galileo, and EGNOS) will be presented for 2 years of the last Solar Maximum with more than 40 receivers worldwide. The weaknesses and strengths of the new methodology will also be shown to get a comprehensive idea of its capabilities.

  13. Accelerometers for Precise GNSS Orbit Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugentobler, Urs; Schlicht, Anja

    2016-07-01

    The solar radiation pressure is the largest non-gravitational acceleration on GNSS satellites limiting the accuracy of precise orbit models. Other non-gravitational accelerations may be thrusts for station keeping maneuvers. Accelerometers measure the motion of a test mass that is shielded against satellite surface forces with respect to a cage that is rigidly connected to the satellite. They can thus be used to measure these difficult-to-model non-gravitational accelerations. Accelerometers however typically show correlated noise as well as a drift of the scaling factors converting measured voltages to accelerations. The scaling thus needs to be regularly calibrated. The presented study is based on several simulated scenarios including orbit determination of accelerometer-equipped Galileo satellites. It shall evaluate different options on how to accommodate accelerometer measurements in the orbit integrator, indicate to what extent currently available accelerometers can be used to improve the modeling of non-gravitational accelerations on GNSS satellites for precise orbit determination, and assess the necessary requirements for an accelerometer that can serve this purpose.

  14. Creation of the new industry-standard space test of laser retroreflectors for the GNSS and LAGEOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agnello, S.; Delle Monache, G. O.; Currie, D. G.; Vittori, R.; Cantone, C.; Garattini, M.; Boni, A.; Martini, M.; Lops, C.; Intaglietta, N.; Tauraso, R.; Arnold, D. A.; Pearlman, M. R.; Bianco, G.; Zerbini, S.; Maiello, M.; Berardi, S.; Porcelli, L.; Alley, C. O.; McGarry, J. F.; Sciarretta, C.; Luceri, V.; Zagwodzki, T. W.

    2011-03-01

    We built a new experimental apparatus (the “Satellite/lunar laser ranging Characterization Facility”, SCF) and created a new test procedure (the SCF-Test) to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of cube corner laser retroreflectors in space for industrial and scientific applications. The primary goal of these innovative tools is to provide critical design and diagnostic capabilities for Satellites Laser Ranging (SLR) to Galileo and other GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) constellations. The capability will allow us to optimize the design of GNSS laser retroreflector payloads to maximize ranging efficiency, to improve signal-to-noise conditions in daylight and to provide pre-launch validation of retroreflector performance under laboratory-simulated space conditions. Implementation of new retroreflector designs being studied will help to improve GNSS orbits, which will then increase the accuracy, stability, and distribution of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF), to provide better definition of the geocenter (origin) and the scale (length unit).Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the SLR retroreflector payload under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator. The apparatus includes infrared cameras for non-invasive thermometry, thermal control and real-time movement of the payload to experimentally simulate satellite orientation on orbit with respect to both solar illumination and laser interrogation beams. These unique capabilities provide experimental validation of the space segment for SLR and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR).We used the SCF facility and the SCF-Test to perform a comprehensive, non-invasive space characterization of older generation, back-coated retroreflectors of the GIOVE-A and -B (Galileo In-Orbit Validation Elements) and the GPS-35

  15. Design of a CMOS multi-mode GNSS receiver VCO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Qiang; Zhuang Yiqi; Yin Yue; Li Zhenrong

    2012-01-01

    A voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) with dual stages of accumulation mode varactors for a multimode global navigation satellite system (GNSS) application,which adopts sigma-delta fractional-N technology in the synthesizer,is presented.The structure is selected to optimize the frequency coverage and tuning linearity,based on a general analysis of the parasitic capacitance in the coarse tuning switch bank cells,which cover the global positioning system (GPS) and Beidou (BD) bands.The VCO implemented in the 0.18 μm CMOS process can cover the GPS L1,BD B1,B2 and B3 bands with sufficient margin,and exhibits low phase noise by using this tuning curve linearization technique.The equalized Kvco characteristic behavior further offers a wide voltage tuning range and improves the stability of the closed loop.

  16. GNSS 测量与数据处理》讲座式授课改革与实践%Reform and Practice of the Teaching-Lecture Responsibility System on GNSS Surveying and Data-Processing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘智敏; 于胜文; 张凯华; 郝建录

    2013-01-01

    随着测绘就业市场对高校测绘毕业生的综合素质和创新能力要求的提高,进行测绘工程专业教学改革势在必行。GNSS测量与数据处理课程进行了讲座责任制的课程改革试点,讲座责任制是实现“以学生为主体,以工程项目为主线,以教师为主导,以能力培养为目标”的教学改革授课模式,通过教学改革方案实施、考试制度改革和学生问卷调查,得到了有益结论和改进措施。%When Geomatics university graduates were remanded to higher comprehensive quality and innovation ability by the employment market ,Geomatics engineering professional reform became imperative .The reform of teaching-lecture responsibility system was imple-mented on GNSS surveying and data processing ,The aims on"the university student as main body ,the teacher as led , project as main-line ,in order to increase capability"were realized by teaching-lecture responsibility system .Through teaching reform program ,the examina-tion system reform and student questionnaires , the useful conclusions and improvement measures were obtained .

  17. Technology for a quasi-GSO satellite communications system

    OpenAIRE

    Katagi, T.; Yonezawa, R.; Chiba, I.; Urasaki, S.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, a satellite communications system using a Quasi Geostationary Satellite Orbit (Quasi-GSO) is proposed. A 24-hour period Quasi-GSO system could give high quality communication to high latitude regions with its satellites observed from earth stations having high elevation angles. In this paper, a system concept and a deployable flat antenna with light weight antenna elements are described proposing it to be a good candidate for mobile communications satellite use.

  18. The NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volz, Stephen; Maier, Mark; Di Pietro, David

    2016-01-01

    NOAA is beginning a study, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study, to plan for the future operational environmental satellite system that will follow GOES and JPSS, beginning about 2030. This is an opportunity to design a modern architecture with no pre-conceived notions regarding instruments, platforms, orbits, etc. The NSOSA study will develop and evaluate architecture alternatives to include partner and commercial alternatives that are likely to become available. The objectives will include both functional needs and strategic characteristics (e.g., flexibility, responsiveness, sustainability). Part of this study is the Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG), which is being commissioned by NESDIS. The SPRWG is charged to assess new or existing user needs and to provide relative priorities for observational needs in the context of the future architecture. SPRWG results will serve as input to the process for new foundational (Level 0 and Level 1) requirements for the next generation of NOAA satellites that follow the GOES-R, JPSS, DSCOVR, Jason-3, and COSMIC-2 missions.

  19. The Method to Obtain Position Using Gnss and Rfid for Realization of Indoor and Outdoor Seamless Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shikada, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Takeuchi, S.

    2012-07-01

    To obtain indoor positioning by using GPS (GNSS) satellite is difficult now. Additionally it is difficult to obtain high accuracy outdoor position when GPS receiver cannot find four or more GPS satellites in the viewing field of sky. The Japanese Government executed a new law NSDI (National Spatial Data Infrastructure) for a spatial information society on May 30, 2007. In this law, everybody can know positional information in real time, anytime and anywhere. In addition, it is necessary to use satellite positioning for realization of seamless positioning, and to promote ubiquitous network technology. Realization of advanced geospatial information society will achieve by creating condition which can obtain positional information anytime and anywhere. However, those technologies have not been established yet. Our laboratory conducted seamless positioning experiment to verify whether it can obtain position seamlessly by using VRS-GPS (Virtual Reference System-GPS) ,QZSS(LEX signal) and RFID (Radio Frequency Identification) for realizing an advanced spatial information society. Especially, QZSS was launched in 2010 by JAXA and is satellite system taken by a combination of multi orbit plane and each satellite deployed to appear constantly 1 satellite near the zenith in Japan. We are joining the demonstration experiment of a part of Hokuriku area in Japan at 5th to 9th in March and 23th to 27th in April 2012. In this paper we described advanced spatial information society will realize by a combination of GPS(GNSS),RFID and QZSS.

  20. Incoherent correlator system for satellite orientation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouris, Aristodemos; Young, Rupert C. D.; Chatwin, Christopher R.; Birch, Philip M.

    2002-03-01

    An incoherent correlator configuration is proposed and experimentally demonstrated that is capable of recognizing star patterns. The device may thus be employed for the orientation and navigation of a satellite or spacecraft. The correlator employs starlight directly and requires no laser or input spatial light modulator for operation. The filter is constructed form an array of mirrors that may be individually appropriately tilted so as recognize a particular star arrangement. The only other components of the system are a converging lens and CCD array detector. The device is capable of determining the pointing direction and rotation of a satellite or space vehicle. Experimental results employing the mirror array device illuminated with a point source early to simulate starlight are presented.

  1. Design of an aircraft landing system using dual-frequency GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konno, Hiroyuki

    There is a strong demand for new all-weather navigation aids to support aircraft precision approach and landing. The Federal Aviation Administration's Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) is one such navigation aid that uses the Global Positioning System (GPS) to estimate aircraft location. LAAS is required to provide very high levels of accuracy, integrity, continuity, and availability, and the integrity requirement of one undetected navigation failure in a billion approaches has been a critical challenge in the design of this system. Tremendous efforts have developed methods to guarantee integrity for various potential anomalies that might threaten LAAS-aided landing. Currently, almost all these risks are mitigated by existing methods. One issue that remains is the risk due to ionosphere anomalies. This dissertation introduces novel integrity algorithms for ionosphere anomalies that take advantage of GPS modernization---undergoing changes in the GPS system that enhance civil user capabilities. This modernization includes adding new GPS civil signals, and these signals make possible multiple-frequency techniques. This research focuses on two types of dual-frequency carrier-smoothing methods---Divergence-Free Smoothing and Ionosphere-Free Smoothing---and develops integrity algorithms for ionosphere anomalies using these methods. Simulations show that the first algorithm, using Ionosphere-Free Smoothing, can achieve 96% to 99.9% availability at best over a broad region of the Conterminous United States (CONUS). This level of availability is unacceptably low for practical use. However, a benefit is that the resulting availability is not a function of the ionosphere condition. The second algorithm, based on Divergence-Free Smoothing, is shown by simulations to achieve more than 99.9% availability over more than 70% of CONUS under nominal ionosphere conditions. However, it has the potential to completely lose availability under severe ionosphere conditions. Taking

  2. GEROS-ISS: Innovative Ocean Remote Sensing using GNSS Reflectometry onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickert, Jens; Andersen, Ole; Beyerle, Georg; Chapron, Bertrand; Cardellach, Estel; Gommenginger, Christine; Hoeg, Per; Jäggi, Adrian; Jakowski, Norbert; Kern, Michael; Lee, Tony; Martin-Neira, Manuel; Pierdicca, Nazzareno; Shum, Ck; Zuffada, Cinzia

    2014-05-01

    In response to an European Space Agency (ESA) announcement of opportunity the GEROS-ISS (GEROS hereafter) proposal was submitted in 2011 and accepted by ESA to proceed to Phase A. GEROS-ISS is an innovative ISS experiment primarily focused on exploiting reflected signals of opportunity from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) at L-band to measure key parameters of ocean surfaces. Secondary mission goals are remote sensing of land/ice surface parameters and global atmosphere and ionosphere observations using the GNSS radio occultation technique. GEROS will pioneer the exploitation of signals from Galileo and possibly other GNSS systems (GLONASS, QZSS, Beidou), for reflectometry and occultation, thereby improving the accuracy as well as the spatio-temporal resolution of the derived geophysical properties. GEROS will contribute to the long-term S.I. traceable observation of the variations of major climate components of the Earth System: Oceans/Hydrosphere, Cryosphere/Snow, Atmosphere/Ionosphere and solid Earth/landcover changes with innovative and complementary aspects compared to current Earth Observation satellite missions. GEROS will mainly provide mid- and low-latitude observations on submesoscale or longer oceanic variability with a focus on the coastal region, surface ocean currents, surface winds, wave heights for a period of at least ten years. These observations will lead to a better understanding of the climate system. GEROS takes advantage of the capacious infrastructure onboard the ISS for the payload setup. GEROS also provides a sensor calibration/validation option for other upcoming satellite missions including ISS-RapidScatt, CYGNSS and FormoSAT-7/COSMIC-II. The definition of the GEROS mission and system requirements was completed end of 2013 and the industrial phase A studies are expected to start in early 2014. We overview the GEROS mission and review the status of the experiment.

  3. Real-Time seismic waveforms monitoring with BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) observations for the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, T.

    2015-12-01

    Nowadays more and more high-rate Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) data become available in real time, which provide more opportunities to monitor the seismic waveforms. China's GNSS, BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS), has already satisfied the requirement of stand-alone precise positioning in Asia-Pacific region with 14 in-orbit satellites, which promisingly suggests that BDS could be applied to the high-precision earthquake monitoring as GPS. In the present paper, real-time monitoring of seismic waveforms using BDS measurements is assessed. We investigate a so-called "variometric" approach to measure real-time seismic waveforms with high-rate BDS observations. This approach is based on time difference technique and standard broadcast products which are routinely available in real time. The 1HZ BDS data recorded by Beidou Experimental Tracking Stations (BETS) during the 2015 Mw 7.8 Nepal earthquake is analyzed. The results indicate that the accuracies of velocity estimation from BDS are 2-3 mm/s in horizontal components and 8-9 mm/s in vertical component, respectively, which are consistent with GPS. The seismic velocity waveforms during earthquake show good agreement between BDS and GPS. Moreover, the displacement waveforms is reconstructed by an integration of velocity time series with trend removal. The displacement waveforms with the accuracy of 1-2 cm are derived by comparing with post-processing GPS precise point positioning (PPP).

  4. GNSS Radio Occultation Observations as a data source for Ionospheric Assimilation: COSMIC-1 & COSMIC-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, X.; Schreiner, W. S.; Kuo, Y. H.

    2014-12-01

    Since the pioneer GPS/MET mission, low Earth orbit (LEO) based global navigation satellite system (GNSS) Radio Occultation (RO) technique has been a powerful technique in ionosphere monitoring. After that, many LEO satellites were launched with RO payload, include: CHAMP , GRACE, SAC-C/D, COSMIC, C/NOFS, Metop-A/B, TerraSAR-X/TanDEM-X, and etc. COSMIC was the first constellation of satellites dedicated primarily to RO and delivering RO data in near real time. Currently in UCAR CDAAC, we process most of these missions' RO data for the community. Due to the success of COSMIC mission, a follow on mission called COSMIC-2 will be launched in 2016 and 2018, respectively. The COSMIC-2 RO data will be 4-6 times of COSMIC due to the doubled satellite and GNSS signals. In this paper we will describe: (1) Data process and quality in UCAR/CDAAC; (2) Ionospheric data assimilation results based on COSMIC data; (3) OSSE study for COSMIC-2.

  5. Technology, Implementation and Policy Issues for the Modernisation of GPS and its Role in a GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Keith D.

    1998-09-01

    This and the following six papers were selected from the many papers presented at the 9th World Congress of the International Association of Institutes of Navigation (IAIN) held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 17-21 November 1997.During the past several years, a number of important investigations, policy initiatives and national commitments relating to the future of GPS, GLONASS and their augmentations have occurred. Substantive and on-going studies of the character and configuration of a Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) have also been evaluated worldwide, especially by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). These efforts have been principally directed toward the definition of near- and far-term GNSS implementations that meet the needs and concerns of the international community. This paper briefly reviews some of the investigations and addresses, in particular, the concerns and requirements that may affect the future capabilities and the dual (civil/military) character of GPS. The main issues relating to the modernisation of GPS and its subsequent transition to a component of a GNSS with a viable international character are presented. These include a discussion of new signal structure options, certain changes in operating frequencies, increased signal power levels, other system alternatives and their potential impact on system performance. International issues are briefly addressed, including future performance capabilities, assurance of service, economic participation and benefit, reasonable cost, standards and international participation.

  6. A Real-Time Interference Monitoring Technique for GNSS Based on a Twin Support Vector Machine Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wutao; Huang, Zhigang; Lang, Rongling; Qin, Honglei; Zhou, Kai; Cao, Yongbin

    2016-03-04

    Interferences can severely degrade the performance of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) receivers. As the first step of GNSS any anti-interference measures, interference monitoring for GNSS is extremely essential and necessary. Since interference monitoring can be considered as a classification problem, a real-time interference monitoring technique based on Twin Support Vector Machine (TWSVM) is proposed in this paper. A TWSVM model is established, and TWSVM is solved by the Least Squares Twin Support Vector Machine (LSTWSVM) algorithm. The interference monitoring indicators are analyzed to extract features from the interfered GNSS signals. The experimental results show that the chosen observations can be used as the interference monitoring indicators. The interference monitoring performance of the proposed method is verified by using GPS L1 C/A code signal and being compared with that of standard SVM. The experimental results indicate that the TWSVM-based interference monitoring is much faster than the conventional SVM. Furthermore, the training time of TWSVM is on millisecond (ms) level and the monitoring time is on microsecond (μs) level, which make the proposed approach usable in practical interference monitoring applications.

  7. Establishing a method of short-term rainfall forecasting based on GNSS-derived PWV and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yibin; Shan, Lulu; Zhao, Qingzhi

    2017-09-29

    Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) can effectively retrieve precipitable water vapor (PWV) with high precision and high-temporal resolution. GNSS-derived PWV can be used to reflect water vapor variation in the process of strong convection weather. By studying the relationship between time-varying PWV and rainfall, it can be found that PWV contents increase sharply before raining. Therefore, a short-term rainfall forecasting method is proposed based on GNSS-derived PWV. Then the method is validated using hourly GNSS-PWV data from Zhejiang Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) network of the period 1 September 2014 to 31 August 2015 and its corresponding hourly rainfall information. The results show that the forecasted correct rate can reach about 80%, while the false alarm rate is about 66%. Compared with results of the previous studies, the correct rate is improved by about 7%, and the false alarm rate is comparable. The method is also applied to other three actual rainfall events of different regions, different durations, and different types. The results show that the method has good applicability and high accuracy, which can be used for rainfall forecasting, and in the future study, it can be assimilated with traditional weather forecasting techniques to improve the forecasted accuracy.

  8. A Real-Time Interference Monitoring Technique for GNSS Based on a Twin Support Vector Machine Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wutao Li

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Interferences can severely degrade the performance of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS receivers. As the first step of GNSS any anti-interference measures, interference monitoring for GNSS is extremely essential and necessary. Since interference monitoring can be considered as a classification problem, a real-time interference monitoring technique based on Twin Support Vector Machine (TWSVM is proposed in this paper. A TWSVM model is established, and TWSVM is solved by the Least Squares Twin Support Vector Machine (LSTWSVM algorithm. The interference monitoring indicators are analyzed to extract features from the interfered GNSS signals. The experimental results show that the chosen observations can be used as the interference monitoring indicators. The interference monitoring performance of the proposed method is verified by using GPS L1 C/A code signal and being compared with that of standard SVM. The experimental results indicate that the TWSVM-based interference monitoring is much faster than the conventional SVM. Furthermore, the training time of TWSVM is on millisecond (ms level and the monitoring time is on microsecond (μs level, which make the proposed approach usable in practical interference monitoring applications.

  9. System implementation for Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, J. E.; Woerner, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    A description is presented of the instrument system which is needed for the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System (ERBSS). The system is to be composed of instruments on two of NOAA's near-polar sun-synchronous Tiros-N/NOAA A through G series of operational satellites and on a NASA midinclination satellite of the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) type referred to as ERBS-A/AEM. The Tiros-N/NOAA satellites will be in nominal 833 km altitude circular orbits with orbital inclinations of 98 deg. The AEM satellite will be in a circular orbit with an inclination of approximately 56 deg and a nominal altitude of 600 km. Each satellite will carry wide field-of-view (WFOV) and medium field-of-view (MFOV) sensors, a sensor for measuring the solar constant, and a narrow field-of-view (NFOV) cross-track scanner. The conceptual design of the W/MFOV instrument is discussed along with the conceptual design of the scanner.

  10. Relativistic Time Transfer for Inter-Satellite Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi

    2016-04-01

    Inter-Satellite links (ISLs) will be an important technique for a global navigation satellite system (GNSS) in the future. Based on the principles of general relativity, the time transfer in an ISL is modeled and the algorithm for onboard computation is described. It is found, in general, satellites with circular orbits and identical semi-major axes can benefit inter-satellite time transfer by canceling out terms associated with the transformations between the proper times and the Geocentric Coordinate Time. For a GPS-like GNSS, the Shapiro delay is as large as 0.1 nano-second when the ISL passes at the limb of the Earth. However, in more realistic cases, this value will decrease to about 50 pico-second.

  11. Integration of Kinect and Low-Cost Gnss for Outdoor Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaria, D.; Pinto, L.; Reguzzoni, M.; Rossi, L.

    2016-06-01

    Since its launch on the market, Microsoft Kinect sensor has represented a great revolution in the field of low cost navigation, especially for indoor robotic applications. In fact, this system is endowed with a depth camera, as well as a visual RGB camera, at a cost of about 200. The characteristics and the potentiality of the Kinect sensor have been widely studied for indoor applications. The second generation of this sensor has been announced to be capable of acquiring data even outdoors, under direct sunlight. The task of navigating passing from an indoor to an outdoor environment (and vice versa) is very demanding because the sensors that work properly in one environment are typically unsuitable in the other one. In this sense the Kinect could represent an interesting device allowing bridging the navigation solution between outdoor and indoor. In this work the accuracy and the field of application of the new generation of Kinect sensor have been tested outdoor, considering different lighting conditions and the reflective properties of the emitted ray on different materials. Moreover, an integrated system with a low cost GNSS receiver has been studied, with the aim of taking advantage of the GNSS positioning when the satellite visibility conditions are good enough. A kinematic test has been performed outdoor by using a Kinect sensor and a GNSS receiver and it is here presented.

  12. Availability of GNSS for Road Pricing in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anna B. O.; Zabic, Martina; Overø, H. M.

    2005-01-01

    /Galileo receivers will change the situation. With a 3D city model of Copenhagen, a Galileo simulator, and a raytracing algorithm, an analysis of the GNSS availability in the streets of Copenhagen was carried out. The analysis is focusing on the number of visible satellites and the HDOP. The results show...

  13. Insensitivity of GNSS to geocenter motion through the network shift approach (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebischung, P.; Altamimi, Z.; Springer, T.

    2013-12-01

    As a satellite-based technique, GNSS should be sensitive to motions of the Earth's center of mass (CM) with respect to the Earth's crust. In theory, the weekly solutions of the Analysis Centers of the International GNSS Service (IGS ACs) should indeed have the "instantaneous" CM as their origin, and the net translations between the weekly AC frames and a secular frame such as ITRF2008 should thus approximate the non-linear motion of CM with respect to the Earth's center of figure. However, the comparison of the AC translation time series with each other, with SLR geocenter estimates or with geophysical models reveals that this way of observing geocenter motion with GNSS currently gives unreliable results. We addressed the problem of observing geocenter motion with GNSS through this network shift approach from the perspective of collinearity (or multicollinearity) among the parameters of a least-squares regression. A collinearity diagnosis, based on the notion of variance inflation factor, was therefore developed and allows handling several peculiarities of the GNSS geocenter determination problem. Its application reveals that the determination of all three components of geocenter motion with GNSS suffers from serious collinearity issues, with a comparable level as in the problem of determining the terrestrial scale simultaneously with the GNSS satellite phase center offsets. We show that the inability of current GNSS, as opposed to Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR), to properly sense geocenter motion is mostly explained by the estimation, in the GNSS case, of epoch-wise station and satellite clock offsets simultaneously with tropospheric parameters. The empirical satellite accelerations, as estimated by most IGS ACs, slightly amplify the collinearity of the Z geocenter coordinate, but their role remains secondary.

  14. Monitoring and evaluation algorithm of GNSS signal in space availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ershen; Zhang, Qing; Tong, Gang; Qu, Pingping; Pang, Tao

    2017-02-01

    In civil aviation and other navigation application fields, the availability of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) in Signal in Space (SIS) is a key indicator to evaluate the performance. In this paper, the SIS availability of Global Positioning System (GPS) and BeiDou Navigation Satellite System (BDS) are evaluated and analyzed. The model of satellite availability algorithm is constructed based on the Markov process, with its reliability investigated. Moreover, the evaluation algorithm of constellation availability is developed. Based on the evaluation models, the performance of GPS SIS and BDS SIS is evaluated by using the measured data, respectively. Combined with the availability standard of GPS Standard Positioning Service (SPS) performance standards and BDS Signal In Space Interface Control Document (Version 2.0), the proposed evaluation models of SIS availability are effective and the performance of GPS SIS and BDS SIS conform the availability of performance standards, respectively. Meanwhile, the results are instructive for the study of the availability performance monitoring and the evaluation of global BDS.

  15. Assimilation of GNSS radio occultation observations in GRAPES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y.; Xue, J.

    2014-07-01

    This paper reviews the development of the global navigation satellite system (GNSS) radio occultation (RO) observations assimilation in the Global/Regional Assimilation and PrEdiction System (GRAPES) of China Meteorological Administration, including the choice of data to assimilate, the data quality control, the observation operator, the tuning of observation error, and the results of the observation impact experiments. The results indicate that RO data have a significantly positive effect on analysis and forecast at all ranges in GRAPES not only in the Southern Hemisphere where conventional observations are lacking but also in the Northern Hemisphere where data are rich. It is noted that a relatively simple assimilation and forecast system in which only the conventional and RO observation are assimilated still has analysis and forecast skill even after nine months integration, and the analysis difference between both hemispheres is gradually reduced with height when compared with NCEP (National Centers for Enviromental Prediction) analysis. Finally, as a result of the new onboard payload of the Chinese FengYun-3 (FY-3) satellites, the research status of the RO of FY-3 satellites is also presented.

  16. Atmospheric water vapor monitoring from local GNSS networks: comparisons of GNSS data adjustment strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capponi, Martina; Fermi, Alessandro; Monti Guarnieri, Andrea; Realini, Eugenio; Venuti, Giovanna

    2016-04-01

    Since many years GNSS has been regarded by the meteorological community as one of the systems for atmospheric water vapor remote sensing. Time series of GNSS wet delays are estimated as by-products of accurate positioning. Their assimilation into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models is being investigated at both research and operational levels, although typically at coarse space resolutions (e.g. few tens of km). A dedicated use of this system for water vapor monitoring at higher resolutions is still under investigation. Ad hoc networks have been designed and implemented to collect data at a high spatial resolution (station inter-distances of 1-10 km), to have an insight into the spatial distribution of GNSS derived wet delays and/or into the impact of such information on high resolution NWP models. Within this research framework the paper reports the comparisons carried out between ZWD time series obtained from the data collected by an Italian and a Japanese dense networks of permanent geodetic GNSS receivers. Tropospheric delays have been estimated by applying different data adjustment strategies: relative positioning and PPP (precise point positioning). For this last strategy two different solutions have been analyzed and compared: the Bernese software batch solution, and the RTNet software Kalman filter solution. Assessment of the results were performed against IGS GNSS delays as well as by comparison with radiosonde-derived precipitable water vapor (PWV).

  17. Analysis of GNSS integrity requirements for road user charging applications

    OpenAIRE

    Salós, Daniel; Macabiau, Christophe; Martineau, Anaïs; Bonhoure, Bernard; Kubrak, Damien

    2010-01-01

    International audience; GNSS-based Road User Charging (RUC) systems are particularly interesting because of their flexibility and reduced roadside infrastructure. At present, truck toll collection systems based on GPS receivers installed on the vehicles are already deployed in German and Slovak motorways. Reliability of road tolling systems is fundamental in order to limit the loss of revenue because of undercharging and the user claims because of overcharging. Consequently, GNSS integrity mo...

  18. IGS Real-time Resources Supporting Multi-GNSS Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Georg; Mervart, Leos; Stöcker, Dirk; Neumaier, Peter; Söhne, Wolfgang; Stürze, Andrea

    2013-04-01

    The International GNSS Service (IGS) recently started with a real-time service disseminating orbit and clock corrections over the Internet. It is mainly based on observations collected from the IGS real-time tracking network processed by a number for Analysis Centers. To support the IGS Multi-GNSS Experiment (M-GEX), a growing number of involved stations also observe Galileo, QZSS and BeiDou in addition to GPS and GLONASS. The intention is to enable and further develop the real-time estimation of satellite orbits and clocks from all systems as well as using all of them in applications like real-time Precise Point Positioning (PPP). Recently a new RTCM-3 standard has been recommended to transport streams carrying observations from (modernized) GPS, GLONASS and Galileo satellites. A stream format supporting QZSS and BeiDou has been drafted. A new RINEX-3 standard is under development which allows archiving all observation types from all the new systems for post processing purposes. This presentation focuses on IGS resources for real-time conversion of observations in proprietary raw formats to the new open RTCM-3 stream and RINEX-3 file standards. So-called High Precision Multiple Signal Message (HP MSM) streams are produced and disseminated via Ntrip broadcaster under the umbrella of IGS. A high-rate RINEX-3 archive saves 1 Hz observation files as converted from MSM streams. RINEX-3 file editing, concatenation and quality check is enabled with the BKG Ntrip Client (BNC) software developed under GNU GPL supporting GPS, GLONASS, Galileo, BeiDou, QZSS and SBAS.

  19. Wavelet Analysis for Investigation of Precise Gnss Solutions' Credibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Klos, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This publication presents the results of searching short-term oscillations of the ASG network sites using wavelet transform. Polish Active Geodetic Network (ASG-EUPOS) is the multifunctional precise satellite positioning system established by the Head Office of Geodesy and Cartography in 2008. The adjusted network consisted of over 130 stations from Poland and neighbouring countries. The period covered observations gathered from June 2008 to July 2010. The method of processing elaborated in the CAG (Centre of Applied Geomatics, Warsaw Military University of Technology), which is one of the 17 EPN LAC (EUREF Permanent Network Local Analysis Centre) acting now in Europe, established at the end of 2009, is similar with the official one used in EPN. It is based on the Bernese 5.0 software, but the difference to the EPN's solutions lies in the resolution of resulting coordinates. In the presented research the 1-hour sampling rate with 3-hour windowing (66% of correlation) is applied. This allows us to make the interpretations concerning short period information in GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) coordinates series. Analyses using FFT and least squares (tidal) gave very coherent results and confirmed several millimetres diurnal and sub-diurnal oscillations. Wavelet analysis is aimed at the investigation of credibility of the precise GNSS solutions in terms of changes of the amplitude of oscillations in time. As a result of this study the changes in the amplitude of oscillations at diurnal and sub-diurnal frequency bands were obtained. These could be caused by the artificial modulations of the near-by frequencies, but also some geophysical signals could be clearly distinguished. Additionally the comparison of Continuous Wavelet Transforms of near stations (three pairs from ASG-EUPOS network) was performed. This comparison showed different behaviour of oscillations of residual coordinates, mainly due to the different thermal response or artefacts related to the

  20. Design of a High Sensitivity GNSS receiver for Lunar missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Luciano; Dovis, Fabio; Silva, João S.; da Silva, Pedro F.; Lopes, Hugo D.

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the design of a satellite navigation receiver architecture tailored for future Lunar exploration missions, demonstrating the feasibility of using Global Navigation Satellite Systems signals integrated with an orbital filter to achieve such a scope. It analyzes the performance of a navigation solution based on pseudorange and pseudorange rate measurements, generated through the processing of very weak signals of the Global Positioning System (GPS) L1/L5 and Galileo E1/E5 frequency bands. In critical scenarios (e.g. during manoeuvres) acceleration and attitude measurements from additional sensors complementing the GNSS measurements are integrated with the GNSS measurement to match the positioning requirement. A review of environment characteristics (dynamics, geometry and signal power) for the different phases of a reference Lunar mission is provided, focusing on the stringent requirements of the Descent, Approach and Hazard Detection and Avoidance phase. The design of High Sensitivity acquisition and tracking schemes is supported by an extensive simulation test campaign using a software receiver implementation and navigation results are validated by means of an end-to-end software simulator. Acquisition and tracking of GPS and Galileo signals of the L1/E1 and L5/E5a bands was successfully demonstrated for Carrier-to-Noise density ratios as low as 5-8 dB-Hz. The proposed navigation architecture provides acceptable performances during the considered critical phases, granting position and velocity errors below 61.4 m and 3.2 m/s, respectively, for the 99.7% of the mission time.

  1. Technical comparison of several global mobile satellite communications systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comparetto, Gary M.

    The era of satellite-based mobile satellite communications (MSC) systems started with the first MARISAT satellite which was launched into a geostationary orbit over the Pacific Ocean in 1976 to provide communications between ships and shore stations. The combination of high cost and unacceptably large equipment has kept the space-based MSC systems from appealing to the wider market of personal mobile communications. The progress made over the last ten years, however, in digital voice processing, satellite technology, and component miniaturization has resulted in the viability of satellite-based mobile satellite communications systems to meet the growing market in personal mobile communications using handsets similar to those currently in use with land-based cellular systems. Three of the more mature LEO/MEO satellite systems are addressed in this paper including GLOBALSTAR, Iridium, and Odyssey. The system architectures of each system are presented along with a description of the satellite and user handset designs and the multiaccess techniques employed. It will be shown that, although a number of similarities exist among the system addressed, each system is unique in a variety of significant design areas. It is concluded that the technical feasibility of satellite-based mobile satellite communications systems seems to be secure. It will be challenging, however, for the vendors to actually develop and deploy these systems in a cost effective, timely, and reliable way that meets a continually evolving set of requirements based upon a rapidly changing technology base.

  2. Optimal Release Control of Companion Satellite System Using Electromagnetic Forces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zengwen Xu,Peng Shi; Yushan Zhao∗

    2015-01-01

    Electromagnetic forces generated by the inter⁃action of component satellites can be used to release companion satellites. Optimal release trajectories for companion satellite system using inter⁃electromagnetic forces were investigated. Firstly, nonlinear relative motion dynamic equations of a two⁃craft electromagnetic companion satellite system were derived in spatial polar coordinates. Then principles of electromagnetic satellite formation flying were introduced. Secondly, the characteristics of the electromagnetic companion satellites release were analyzed and optimal release trajectories of companion satellites using electromagnetic forces were obtained using Gauss pseudospectral method. Three performance criteria were chosen as minimum time, minimum acceleration of the separation distance and minimum control acceleration. Finally, three release examples including expansion along separation distance, rotation in orbital plane and stable formation reconfiguration were given to demonstrate the feasibility of this method. Results indicated that the release trajectories can converge to optimal solutions effectively and the concept of release companion satellites using electromagnetic forces is practicable.

  3. GNSS多系统基线解算中的病态性分析与评价%Analysis and valuation of ill-condition in baseline solution of GNSS multi-system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王胜利; 王庆; 高旺; 潘树国

    2013-01-01

    Aiming at the different situations of satellites orbital altitude and angular velocity in GNSS (global navigation satellite system) multi-system,the ill-condition in baseline solution was analyzed and evaluated combined with the analysis theory on ill-conditioned system.First,the effect of illcondition on the solution of parameters was analyzed.Then,form the viewpoint of satellites' angular velocities,the ill-condition in independent baseline solution of the GPS (global positioning system),GLONASS (global navigation satellite system) and BDS (Beidou navigation satellite system) under different baseline-length data was studied by using the condition-number method.Finally,the illcondition in multi-system integration was valuated.The experimental results show that the GLONASS satellites run fastest,so the ill-condition is the weakest and the coefficient matrix structure is the best.However,the ill-condition of the current BDS which mainly consists of high-orbit satellites is the strongest.Besides,the ill-condition in baseline solution is not related with the baseline length.For multi-system integration,the coefficient matrix structure is not obviously affected by the serious ill-condition of the BDS,which is conducive to the fast convergence of ambiguities resolution in baseline solution of the BDS.%针对各GNSS系统中不同的卫星轨道高度和运行角速度,结合病态性系统分析理论,对GNSS多系统基线解算中的病态性进行了分析和评价.首先,分析了病态性对参数求解的影响;然后,从卫星运动的角速度出发,采用条件数法对GPS,GLONASS以及北斗区域导航系统在独立解算不同长度基线中的病态性进行了对比研究;最后,对多系统融合之后模糊度解算过程中的病态性进行了评价.实验结果表明,GLONASS卫星运动的角速度最快,基线解算过程的病态性最弱,系数矩阵结构最好;以高轨卫星为主的北斗系统的病态性则最强.此外,基线解算过程

  4. National Satellite Forest Monitoring systems for REDD+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonckheere, I. G.

    2012-12-01

    Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD) is an effort to create a financial value for the carbon stored in forests, offering incentives for developing countries to reduce emissions from forested lands and invest in low-carbon paths to sustainable development. "REDD+" goes beyond deforestation and forest degradation, and includes the role of conservation, sustainable management of forests and enhancement of forest carbon stocks. In the framework of getting countries ready for REDD+, the UN-REDD Programme assists developing countries to prepare and implement national REDD+ strategies. For the monitoring, reporting and verification, FAO supports the countries to develop national satellite forest monitoring systems that allow for credible measurement, reporting and verification (MRV) of REDD+ activities. These are among the most critical elements for the successful implementation of any REDD+ mechanism. The UN-REDD Programme through a joint effort of FAO and Brazil's National Space Agency, INPE, is supporting countries to develop cost- effective, robust and compatible national monitoring and MRV systems, providing tools, methodologies, training and knowledge sharing that help countries to strengthen their technical and institutional capacity for effective MRV systems. To develop strong nationally-owned forest monitoring systems, technical and institutional capacity building is key. The UN-REDD Programme, through FAO, has taken on intensive training together with INPE, and has provided technical help and assistance for in-country training and implementation for national satellite forest monitoring. The goal of the support to UN-REDD pilot countries in this capacity building effort is the training of technical forest people and IT persons from interested REDD+ countries, and to set- up the national satellite forest monitoring systems. The Brazilian forest monitoring system, TerraAmazon, which is used as a basis for this initiative, allows

  5. Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will contribute the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the restructured National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). As such, JPSS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the ground processing component of both Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) replacement, previously known as the Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS), managed by the Department of Defense (DoD). The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS), and consists of a Command, Control, and Communications Segment (C3S) and an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). Both segments are developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS). The C3S currently flies the Suomi National Polar Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite and transfers mission data from Suomi NPP and between the ground facilities. The IDPS processes Suomi NPP satellite data to provide Environmental Data Records (EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. When the JPSS-1 satellite is launched in early 2017, the responsibilities of the C3S and the IDPS will be expanded to support both Suomi NPP and JPSS-1. The JPSS CGS currently provides data processing for Suomi NPP, generating multiple terabytes per day across over two dozen environmental data products; that workload will be multiplied by two when the JPSS-1 satellite is

  6. A method to improve the utilization of GNSS observation for water vapor tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y. B.; Zhao, Q. Z.; Zhang, B.

    2016-01-01

    Existing water vapor tomographic methods use Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) signals penetrating the entire research area while they do not consider signals passing through its sides. This leads to the decreasing use of observed satellite signals and allows for no signals crossing from the bottom or edge areas especially for those voxels in research areas of interest. Consequently, the accuracy of the tomographic results for the bottom of a research area, and the overall reconstructed accuracy do not reach their full potential. To solve this issue, an approach which uses GPS data with both signals that pass the side and top of a research area is proposed. The advantages of proposed approach include improving the utilization of existing GNSS observations and increasing the number of voxels crossed by satellite signals. One point should be noted that the proposed approach needs the support of radiosonde data inside the tomographic region. A tomographic experiment was implemented using observed GPS data from the Continuously Operating Reference System (CORS) Network of Zhejiang Province, China. The comparison of tomographic results with data from a radiosonde shows that the root mean square error (RMS), bias, mean absolute error (MAE), and standard deviation (SD) of the proposed approach are superior to those of the traditional method.

  7. System architecture for the Canadian interim mobile satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariatmadar, M.; Gordon, K.; Skerry, B.; Eldamhougy, H.; Bossler, D.

    1988-05-01

    The system architecture for the Canadian Interim Mobile Satellite Service (IMSS) which is planned for commencement of commercial service in late 1989 is reviewed. The results of an associated field trial program which was carried out to determine the limits of coverage and the preliminary performance characteristics of the system are discussed.

  8. Improvement of GNSS Carrier Phase Accuracy Using MEMS Accelerometer-Aided Phase-Locked Loops for Earthquake Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tisheng Zhang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available When strong earthquake occurs, global navigation satellite systems (GNSS measurement errors increase significantly. Combined strategies of GNSS/accelerometer data can estimate better precision in displacement, but are of no help to carrier phase measurement. In this paper, strong-motion accelerometer-aided phase-locked loops (PLLs are proposed to improve carrier phase accuracy during strong earthquakes. To design PLLs for earthquake monitoring, the amplitude-frequency characteristics of the strong earthquake signals are studied. Then, the measurement errors of PLLs before and after micro electro mechanical systems (MEMS accelerometer aiding are analyzed based on error models. Furthermore, tests based on a hardware simulator and a shake table are carried out. Results show that, with MEMS accelerometer aiding, the carrier phase accuracy of the PLL decreases little under strong earthquakes, which is consistent with the models analysis.

  9. Satellite power system (SPS) public outreach experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, S.R.

    1980-12-01

    To improve the results of the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program, an outreach experiment was conducted. Three public interest groups participated: the L-5 Society (L-5), Citizen's Energy Project (CEP), and the Forum for the Advancement of Students in Science and Technology (FASST). Each group disseminated summary information about SPS to approximately 3000 constituents with a request for feedback on the SPS concept. The objectives of the outreach were to (1) determine the areas of major concern relative to the SPS concept, and (2) gain experience with an outreach process for use in future public involvement. Due to the combined efforts of all three groups, 9200 individuals/organizations received information about the SPS concept. Over 1500 receipients of this information provided feedback. The response to the outreach effort was positive for all three groups, suggesting that the effort extended by the SPS Project Division to encourage an information exchange with the public was well received. The general response to the SPS differed with each group. The L-5 position is very much in favor of SPS; CEP is very much opposed and FASST is relatively neutral. The responses are analyzed, and from the responses some questions and answers about the satellite power system are presented in the appendix. (WHK)

  10. GNSS Software Receiver for UAVs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Daniel Madelung; Jakobsen, Jakob; von Benzon, Hans-Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the current activities of GPS/GNSS Software receiver development at DTU Space. GNSS Software receivers have received a great deal of attention in the last two decades and numerous implementations have already been presented. DTU Space has just recently started development of ...... of our own GNSS software-receiver targeted for mini UAV applications, and we will in in this paper present our current progress and briefly discuss the benefits of Software Receivers in relation to our research interests....

  11. Testing a new multivariate GNSS carrier phase attitude determination method for remote sensing platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Gabriele; Teunissen, Peter J. G.; Verhagen, Sandra; Buist, Peter J.

    2010-07-01

    GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems)-based attitude determination is an important field of study, since it is a valuable technique for the orientation estimation of remote sensing platforms. To achieve highly accurate angular estimates, the precise GNSS carrier phase observables must be employed. However, in order to take full advantage of the high precision, the unknown integer ambiguities of the carrier phase observables need to be resolved. This contribution presents a GNSS carrier phase-based attitude determination method that determines the integer ambiguities and attitude in an integral manner, thereby fully exploiting the known body geometry of the multi-antennae configuration. It is shown that this integral approach aids the ambiguity resolution process tremendously and strongly improves the capacity of fixing the correct set of integer ambiguities. In this contribution, the challenging scenario of single-epoch, single-frequency attitude determination is addressed. This guarantees a total independence from carrier phase slips and losses of lock, and it also does not require any a priori motion model for the platform. The method presented is a multivariate constrained version of the popular LAMBDA method and it is tested on data collected during an airborne remote sensing campaign.

  12. Estimation of The Scale Factor For Short Observing Session Duration In GNSS Positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan Dogan, Ali; Erdogan, Bahattin

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, users prefer Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) technique rather than traditional techniques for geodetic applications. Accuracy of GNNS observations depends on several parameters such as surveying method, data processing strategy and software. GNSS observations are generally processed by using academic software or commercial software. Commercial software can provide solution up to 20-25 km baseline length. Moreover, academic software is preferred for scientific researches as monitoring of the movements of manmade structures or plate tectonic that are required high accurate point positioning. However, academic software gives optimistic results in terms of positioning accuracy. This situation causes wrong interpretations for important decision in deformation analysis. Therefore, the variance-covariance (VCV) matrices that are obtained from academic software should be scaled. In this study, the estimation of the scaling factor was carried out for short observing session duration in GNSS positioning. Baselines whose lengths ranging from 8 km to 268 km and session durations between 60 min and 180 min were processed using Bernese v5.2 with single baseline strategy. According to initial results, a significant dependence based on baseline lengths cannot be determined. Moreover, the results show that scaling factor changes depending on the session duration. Keywords: Relative Positioning, Short Observing Session Duration, Scale Factor, Bernese

  13. Improving GNSS-R sea level determination through inverse modeling of SNR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strandberg, Joakim; Hobiger, Thomas; Haas, Rüdiger

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a new method for retrieving sea surface heights from Global Navigation Satellite Systems reflectometry (GNSS-R) data by inverse modeling of SNR observations from a single geodetic receiver. The method relies on a B-spline representation of the temporal sea level variations in order to account for its continuity. The corresponding B-spline coefficients are determined through a nonlinear least squares fit to the SNR data, and a consistent choice of model parameters enables the combination of multiple GNSS in a single inversion process. This leads to a clear increase in precision of the sea level retrievals which can be attributed to a better spatial and temporal sampling of the reflecting surface. Tests with data from two different coastal GNSS sites and comparison with colocated tide gauges show a significant increase in precision when compared to previously used methods, reaching standard deviations of 1.4 cm at Onsala, Sweden, and 3.1 cm at Spring Bay, Tasmania.

  14. GNSS-ISR data fusion: General framework with application to the high-latitude ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeter, Joshua; Hirsch, Michael; Lind, Frank; Coster, Anthea; Erickson, Philip; Pankratius, Victor

    2016-03-01

    A mathematical framework is presented for the fusion of electron density measured by incoherent scatter radar (ISR) and total electron content (TEC) measured using global navigation satellite systems (GNSS). Both measurements are treated as projections of an unknown density field (for GNSS-TEC the projection is tomographic; for ISR the projection is a weighted average over a local spatial region) and discrete inverse theory is applied to obtain a higher fidelity representation of the field than could be obtained from either modality individually. The specific implementation explored herein uses the interpolated ISR density field as initial guess to the combined inverse problem, which is subsequently solved using maximum entropy regularization. Simulations involving a dense meridional network of GNSS receivers near the Poker Flat ISR demonstrate the potential of this approach to resolve sub-beam structure in ISR measurements. Several future directions are outlined, including (1) data fusion using lower level (lag product) ISR data, (2) consideration of the different temporal sampling rates, (3) application of physics-based regularization, (4) consideration of nonoptimal observing geometries, and (5) use of an ISR simulation framework for optimal experiment design.

  15. Effect of solar radio bursts on GNSS signal reception over Europe for the period 1999-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Jean-Marie; Bergeot, Nicolas; Marqué, Christophe; Aerts, Wim; Bruyninx, Carine

    2015-04-01

    Intense solar radio bursts (SRB) emitted at L-band frequencies can affect the carrier-to-noise C/N0 ratio of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signals by increasing the background noise. Such space weather events can consequently decrease the quality of GNSS-based results especially for kinematic high-precision positioning. It is thus important to develop a method capable to detect such events in near real time on a wide area. For this purpose, the ROB-IONO software was adapted for analysing the effect of SRB on the dense EUREF Permanent GNSS Network (EPN). First, S1 and S2 raw data extracted from RINEX files were converted into the C/N0 unit (dB.Hz) taking into account manufacturer corrections. Then, the differences (ΔC/N0) between all these C/N0observables and their medians of the 7 previous satellite ground track repeat cycles, i.e. their normal quiet state, were computed. The mean of all these well-calibrated ΔC/N0values from different GNSS receivers and satellites offer at each epoch a reliable metric to detect and quantify the impact of a SRB. We investigated the degradation of GPS and GLONASS C/N0 on the entire EPN during 10 intense SRBs occurring at daylight over Europe between 1999 and 2013. The analysis shows that: (1) GPS and GLONASS ΔC/N0 agree at the 0.1±0.2dB.Hz level; (2) The standard deviation of the mean ΔC/N0of the EPN GNSS receivers is below 1dB.Hz 96% of the time, and below 0.6dB.Hz 76% of the time; (3) maximum ΔC/N0 degradation occurs at the epoch of maximum solar peak flux delivered by the solar ground observatories; (4) C/N0 degradation becomes larger with increasing solar zenithal angle. Consequently, the ROB-IONO software is capable to detect the degradation of GNSS signal reception over Europe due to SRBs. In addition, by taking advantage of the increasing number of EPN stations delivering C/N0 data since 2005, even less intense SRB events can now be detected. Finally, the developed method can be completely applied in near

  16. Remote Sensing of Tropical Cyclones: Applications from Microwave Radiometry and Global Navigation Satellite System Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mary

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are important to observe, especially over the course of their lifetimes, most of which is spent over the ocean. Very few in situ observations are available. Remote sensing has afforded researchers and forecasters the ability to observe and understand TCs better. Every remote sensing platform used to observe TCs has benefits and disadvantages. Some remote sensing instruments are more sensitive to clouds, precipitation, and other atmospheric constituents. Some remote sensing instruments are insensitive to the atmosphere, which allows for unobstructed observations of the ocean surface. Observations of the ocean surface, either of surface roughness or emission can be used to estimate ocean surface wind speed. Estimates of surface wind speed can help determine the intensity, structure, and destructive potential of TCs. While there are many methods by which TCs are observed, this thesis focuses on two main types of remote sensing techniques: passive microwave radiometry and Global Navigation Satellite System reflectometry (GNSS-R). First, we develop and apply a rain rate and ocean surface wind speed retrieval algorithm for the Hurricane Imaging Radiometer (HIRAD). HIRAD, an airborne passive microwave radiometer, operates at C-band frequencies, and is sensitive to rain absorption and emission, as well as ocean surface emission. Motivated by the unique observing geometry and high gradient rain scenes that HIRAD typically observes, a more robust rain rate and wind speed retrieval algorithm is developed. HIRAD's observing geometry must be accounted for in the forward model and retrieval algorithm, if high rain gradients are to be estimated from HIRAD's observations, with the ultimate goal of improving surface wind speed estimation. Lastly, TC science data products are developed for the Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS). The CYGNSS constellation employs GNSS-R techniques to estimate ocean surface wind speed in all precipitating

  17. SAW based systems for mobile communications satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peach, R. C.; Miller, N.; Lee, M.

    1993-01-01

    Modern mobile communications satellites, such as INMARSAT 3, EMS, and ARTEMIS, use advanced onboard processing to make efficient use of the available L-band spectrum. In all of these cases, high performance surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices are used. SAW filters can provide high selectivity (100-200 kHz transition widths), combined with flat amplitude and linear phase characteristics; their simple construction and radiation hardness also makes them especially suitable for space applications. An overview of the architectures used in the above systems, describing the technologies employed, and the use of bandwidth switchable SAW filtering (BSSF) is given. The tradeoffs to be considered when specifying a SAW based system are analyzed, using both theoretical and experimental data. Empirical rules for estimating SAW filter performance are given. Achievable performance is illustrated using data from the INMARSAT 3 engineering model (EM) processors.

  18. Single-baseline RTK GNSS Positioning for Hydrographic Surveying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin Alkan, Reha; Murat Ozulu, I.; Ilçi, Veli; Kahveci, Muzaffer

    2015-04-01

    Positioning with GNSS technique can be carried out in two ways, absolute and relative. It has been possible to reach a few meters absolute point positioning accuracies in real time after disabling SA permanently in May 2000. Today, accuracies obtainable from absolute point positioning using code observations are not sufficient for most surveying applications. Thus to meet higher accuracy requirements, differential methods using single or dual frequency geodetic-grade GNSS receivers that measure carrier phase have to be used. However, this method requires time-cost field and office works and if the measurement is not carried out with conventional RTK method, user needs a GNSS data processing software to estimate the coordinates. If RTK is used, at least two or more GNSS receivers are required, one as a reference and the other as a rover. Moreover, the distance between the receivers must not exceed 15-20 km in order to be able to rapidly and reliably resolve the carrier phase ambiguities. On the other hand, based on the innovations and improvements in satellite geodesy and GNSS modernization studies occurred within the last decade, many new positioning methods and new approaches have been developed. One of them is Network-RTK (or commonly known as CORS) and the other is Single-baseline RTK. These methods are widely used for many surveying applications in many countries. The user of the system can obtain his/her position within a few cm level of accuracy in real-time with only a single GNSS receiver that has Network RTK (CORS) capability. When compared with the conventional differential and RTK methods, this technique has several significant advantages as it is easy to use and it produces accurate, cost-effective and rapid solutions. In Turkey, establishment of a multi-base RTK network was completed and opened for civilian use in 2009. This network is called CORS-TR and consists of 146 reference stations having about 80-100 km interstation distances. It is possible

  19. Global Ocean Surveillance With Electronic Intelligence Based Satellite System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatramanan, Haritha

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this proposal is to design our own ELINT based satellite system to detect and locate the target by using satellite Trilateration Principle. The target position can be found by measuring the radio signals arrived at three satellites using Time Difference of Arrival(TDOA) technique. To locate a target it is necessary to determine the satellite position. The satellite motion and its position is obtained by using Simplified General Perturbation Model(SGP4) in MATLAB. This SGP4 accepts satellite Two Line Element(TLE) data and returns the position in the form of state vectors. These state vectors are then converted into observable parameters and then propagated in space. This calculations can be done for satellite constellation and non - visibility periods can be calculated. Satellite Trilateration consists of three satellites flying in formation with each other. The satellite constellation design consists of three satellite