WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite soil moisture

  1. Satellite observed preferential states in soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilasa, Luis U.; De Jeu, Richard A. M.; Dolman, Han A. J.; Wang, Guojie

    2013-04-01

    This study presents observational evidence for the existence of preferential states in soil moisture content. Recently there has been much debate about the existence, location and explanations for preferential states in soil moisture. A number of studies have provided evidence either in support or against the hypothesis of a positive feedback mechanism between soil moisture and subsequent precipitation in certain regions. Researchers who support the hypothesis that preferential states in soil moisture holds information about land atmosphere feedback base their theory on the impact of soil moisture on the evaporation process. Evaporation recycles moisture to the atmosphere and soil moisture has a direct impact on the supply part of this process but also on the partitioning of the available energy for evaporation. According to this theory, the existence of soil moisture bimodality can be used as an indication of possible land-atmosphere feedbacks, to be compared with model simulations of soil moisture feedbacks. On the other hand, other researchers argue that seasonality in the meteorological conditions in combination with the non-linearity of soil moisture response alone can induce bimodality. In this study we estimate the soil moisture bimodality at a global scale as derived from the recently available 30+ year ESA Climate Change Initative satellite soil moisture dataset. An Expectation-Maximization iterative algorithm is used to find the best Gaussian Mixture Model, pursuing the highest likelihood for soil moisture bimodality. With this approach we mapped the regions where bi-modal probability distribution of soil moisture appears for each month for the period between 1979-2010. These bimodality areas are analyzed and compared to maps of model simulations of soil moisture feedbacks. The areas where more than one preferential state exists compare surprisingly well with the map of land-atmosphere coupling strength from model simulations. This approach might

  2. Estimating Soil Moisture from Satellite Microwave Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; VandeGriend, A. A.; deJeu, R.; deVries, J.; Seyhan, E.

    1998-01-01

    Cooperative research in microwave remote sensing between the Hydrological Sciences Branch of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Earth Sciences Faculty of the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam began with the Botswana Water and Energy Balance Experiment and has continued through a series of highly successful International Research Programs. The collaboration between these two research institutions has resulted in significant scientific achievements, most notably in the area of satellite-based microwave remote sensing of soil moisture. The Botswana Program was the first joint research initiative between these two institutions, and provided a unique data base which included historical data sets of Scanning Multifrequency Microwave Radiometer (SN4NM) data, climate information, and extensive soil moisture measurements over several large experimental sites in southeast Botswana. These data were the basis for the development of new approaches in physically-based inverse modelling of soil moisture from satellite microwave observations. Among the results from this study were quantitative estimates of vegetation transmission properties at microwave frequencies. A single polarization modelling approach which used horizontally polarized microwave observations combined with monthly composites of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was developed, and yielded good results. After more precise field experimentation with a ground-based radiometer system, a dual-polarization approach was subsequently developed. This new approach realized significant improvements in soil moisture estimation by satellite. Results from the Botswana study were subsequently applied to a desertification monitoring study for the country of Spain within the framework of the European Community science research programs EFEDA and RESMEDES. A dual frequency approach with only microwave data was used for this application. The Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) was calculated from 37 GHz data

  3. Validation of SMOS Satellite Soil Moisture Products over Tropical Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanniah, Kasturi; Siang, Kang Chuen

    2016-07-01

    Calibration and validation (cal/val) activities on Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite derived soil moisture products has been conducted worldwide since the data has become available but not over the tropical region . This study focuses on the installation of a soil moisture data collection network over an agricultural site in a tropical region in Peninsular Malaysia, and the validation of SMOS soil moisture products. The in-situ data over one year period was analysed and validation of SMOS Soil Moisture products with these in-situ data was conducted.Bias and root mean square errors (RMSE) were computed between SMOS soil moisture products and the in-situ surface soil moisture collected at the satellite passing time (6 am and 6 pm local time). Due to the known limitations of SMOS soil moisture retrieval over vegetated areas with vegetation water content higher than 5 kgm-2, overestimation of SMOS soil moisture products to in-situ data was noticed in this study. The bias is ranging from 0.064 to 0.119 m3m-3 and the RMSE is from 0.090 to 0.158 m3m-3, when both ascending and descending data were validated. This RMSE was found to be similar to a number of studies conducted previously at different regions. However a wet bias was found during the validation, while previous validation activities at other regions showed dry biases. The result of this study is useful to support the continuous development and improvement of SMOS soil moisture retrieval model, aims to produce soil moisture products with higher accuracy, especially in the tropical region.

  4. De-noising of microwave satellite soil moisture time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun-Hsu; Ryu, Dongryeol; Western, Andrew; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    The use of satellite soil moisture data for scientific and operational hydrologic, meteorological and climatological applications is advancing rapidly due to increasing capability and temporal coverage of current and future missions. However evaluation studies of various existing remotely-sensed soil moisture products from these space-borne microwave sensors, which include AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer) on Aqua satellite, SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) mission and ASCAT (Advanced Scatterometer) on MetOp-A satellite, found them to be significantly different from in-situ observations, showing large biases and different dynamic ranges and temporal patterns (e.g., Albergel et al., 2012; Su et al., 2012). Moreover they can have different error profiles in terms of bias, variance and correlations and their performance varies with land surface characteristics (Su et al., 2012). These severely impede the effort to use soil moisture retrievals from multiple sensors concurrently in land surface modelling, cross-validation and multi-satellite blending. The issue of systematic errors present in data sets should be addressed prior to renormalisation of the data for blending and data assimilation. Triple collocation estimation technique has successfully yielded realistic error estimates (Scipal et al., 2008), but this method relies on availability of large number of coincident data from multiple independent satellite data sets. In this work, we propose, i) a conceptual framework for distinguishing systematic periodic errors in the form of false spectral resonances from non-systematic errors (stochastic noise) in remotely-sensed soil moisture data in the frequency domain; and ii) the use of digital filters to reduce the variance- and correlation-related errors in satellite data. In this work, we focus on the VUA-NASA (Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam with NASA) AMSR-E, CATDS (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales, CNES) SMOS and TUWIEN (Vienna University of

  5. Validation and Upscaling of Soil Moisture Satellite Products in Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandric, I.; Diamandi, A.; Oana, N.; Saizu, D.; Vasile, C.; Lucaschi, B.

    2016-06-01

    The study presents the validation of SMOS soil moisture satellite products for Romania. The validation was performed with in-situ measurements spatially distributed over the country and with in-situ measurements concentrated in on small area. For country level a number of 20 stations from the national meteorological observations network in Romania were selected. These stations have in-situ measurements for soil moisture in the first 5 cm of the soil surface. The stations are more or less distributed in one pixel of SMOS, but it has the advantage that covers almost all the country with a wide range of environmental conditions. Additionally 10 mobile soil moisture measurements stations were acquired and installed. These are spatially concentrated in one SMOS pixel in order to have a more detailed validation against the soil type, soil texture, land surface temperature and vegetation type inside one pixel. The results were compared and analyzed for each day, week, season, soil type, and soil texture and vegetation type. Minimum, maximum, mean and standard deviation were extracted and analyzed for each validation criteria and a hierarchy of those were performed. An upscaling method based on the relations between soil moisture, land surface temperature and vegetation indices was tested and implemented. The study was financed by the Romanian Space Agency within the framework of ASSIMO project http://assimo.meteoromania.ro.

  6. Soil moisture variability across different scales in an Indian watershed for satellite soil moisture product validation

    KAUST Repository

    Singh, Gurjeet

    2016-05-05

    Strategic ground-based sampling of soil moisture across multiple scales is necessary to validate remotely sensed quantities such as NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) product. In the present study, in-situ soil moisture data were collected at two nested scale extents (0.5 km and 3 km) to understand the trend of soil moisture variability across these scales. This ground-based soil moisture sampling was conducted in the 500 km2 Rana watershed situated in eastern India. The study area is characterized as sub-humid, sub-tropical climate with average annual rainfall of about 1456 mm. Three 3x3 km square grids were sampled intensively once a day at 49 locations each, at a spacing of 0.5 km. These intensive sampling locations were selected on the basis of different topography, soil properties and vegetation characteristics. In addition, measurements were also made at 9 locations around each intensive sampling grid at 3 km spacing to cover a 9x9 km square grid. Intensive fine scale soil moisture sampling as well as coarser scale samplings were made using both impedance probes and gravimetric analyses in the study watershed. The ground-based soil moisture samplings were conducted during the day, concurrent with the SMAP descending overpass. Analysis of soil moisture spatial variability in terms of areal mean soil moisture and the statistics of higher-order moments, i.e., the standard deviation, and the coefficient of variation are presented. Results showed that the standard deviation and coefficient of variation of measured soil moisture decreased with extent scale by increasing mean soil moisture. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract is permitted for personal use only.

  7. Predicting root zone soil moisture with soil properties and satellite near-surface moisture data across the conterminous United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, D.; Manfreda, S.; Keller, K.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2017-03-01

    Satellite-based near-surface (0-2 cm) soil moisture estimates have global coverage, but do not capture variations of soil moisture in the root zone (up to 100 cm depth) and may be biased with respect to ground-based soil moisture measurements. Here, we present an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) hydrologic data assimilation system that predicts bias in satellite soil moisture data to support the physically based Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship (SMAR) infiltration model, which estimates root zone soil moisture with satellite soil moisture data. The SMAR-EnKF model estimates a regional-scale bias parameter using available in situ data. The regional bias parameter is added to satellite soil moisture retrievals before their use in the SMAR model, and the bias parameter is updated continuously over time with the EnKF algorithm. In this study, the SMAR-EnKF assimilates in situ soil moisture at 43 Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) monitoring locations across the conterminous U.S. Multivariate regression models are developed to estimate SMAR parameters using soil physical properties and the moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) evapotranspiration data product as covariates. SMAR-EnKF root zone soil moisture predictions are in relatively close agreement with in situ observations when using optimal model parameters, with root mean square errors averaging 0.051 [cm3 cm-3] (standard error, s.e. = 0.005). The average root mean square error associated with a 20-fold cross-validation analysis with permuted SMAR parameter regression models increases moderately (0.082 [cm3 cm-3], s.e. = 0.004). The expected regional-scale satellite correction bias is negative in four out of six ecoregions studied (mean = -0.12 [-], s.e. = 0.002), excluding the Great Plains and Eastern Temperate Forests (0.053 [-], s.e. = 0.001). With its capability of estimating regional-scale satellite bias, the SMAR-EnKF system can predict root zone soil moisture over broad extents and has

  8. Multiyear monitoring of soil moisture over Iran through satellite and reanalysis soil moisture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Abdolaziz; Golian, Saeed; Brocca, Luca

    2016-06-01

    Soil moisture (SM) plays a fundamental role for many hydrological applications including water resources, drought analysis, agriculture, and climate variability and extremes. SM is not measured in most parts of Iran and limited measurements do not meet sufficient temporal and spatial resolution. Hence, due to ease of operation, their global coverage and demonstrated accuracy, use of remote sensing SM products is almost the only way for deriving SM information in Iran. In the present research, surface SM (SSM) datasets at six subregions of Iran with different climate conditions were extracted from two satellite-based passive (SMOSL3) and active + passive (ESA CCI SM) microwave observations, and two reanalysis (ERA-Interim and ERA-Interim/Land) products. Time series of averaged monthly mean SSM products and in situ ground precipitation and temperature measurements were derived for each subregion. Results revealed that, generally, all SSM products were in good agreement with each other with correlation coefficients higher than 0.5. The better agreement was found in the Northeast and Southwest region with average correlation values equal to 0.88 and 0.91, respectively. It should be noted that the SSM datasets are characterized by different periods and lengths. Hence, results should be assessed with cautious. Moreover, most SSM products have strong correlations with maximum, minimum and average temperature as well as with total monthly precipitation. Also, trend analysis showed no trend for time series of monthly SSM over all subregions in the two periods 1980-1999 and 2000-2014. The only exceptions were the Southeast subregion for ERA-Interim and Center and Northwest subregions for the ESA CCI SM for which a negative trend was detected for the period 2000-2014. Finally, the Standardized Soil Moisture Index (SSI) calculated from ERA-Interim, ERA-I/Land and ESA CCI SM datasets showed that the Center and Southeast regions suffered from the most severe and longest

  9. Correcting Errors in Catchment-Scale Satellite Rainfall Accumulation Using Microwave Satellite Soil Moisture Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, D.; Crow, W. T.

    2011-12-01

    Streamflow forecasting in the poorly gauged or ungauged catchments is very difficult mainly due to the absence of the input forcing data for forecasting models. This challenge poses a threat to human safety and industry in the areas where proper warning system is not provided. Currently, a number of studies are in progress to calibrate streamflow models without relying on ground observations as an effort to construct a streamflow forecasting systems in the ungauged catchments. Also, recent advances in satellite altimetry and innovative application of the optical has enabled mapping streamflow rate and flood extent in the remote areas. In addition, remotely sensed hydrological variables such as the real-time satellite precipitation data, microwave soil moisture retrievals, and surface thermal infrared observations have the great potential to be used as a direct input or signature information to run the forecasting models. In this work, we evaluate a real-time satellite precipitation product, TRMM 3B42RT, and correct errors of the product using the microwave satellite soil moisture products over 240 catchments in Australia. The error correction is made by analyzing the difference between output soil moisture of a simple model forced by the TRMM product and the satellite retrievals of soil moisture. The real-time satellite precipitation products before and after the error correction are compared with the daily gauge-interpolated precipitation data produced by the Australian Bureau of Meteorology. The error correction improves overall accuracy of the catchment-scale satellite precipitation, especially the root mean squared error (RMSE), correlation, and the false alarm ratio (FAR), however, only a marginal improvement is observed in the probability of detection (POD). It is shown that the efficiency of the error correction is affected by the surface vegetation density and the annual precipitation of the catchments.

  10. An inversion method for retrieving soil moisture information from satellite altimetry observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebbing, Bernd; Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen; Braakmann-Folgmann, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture represents an important component of the terrestrial water cycle that controls., evapotranspiration and vegetation growth. Consequently, knowledge on soil moisture variability is essential to understand the interactions between land and atmosphere. Yet, terrestrial measurements are sparse and their information content is limited due to the large spatial variability of soil moisture. Therefore, over the last two decades, several active and passive radar and satellite missions such as ERS/SCAT, AMSR, SMOS or SMAP have been providing backscatter information that can be used to estimate surface conditions including soil moisture which is proportional to the dielectric constant of the upper (few cm) soil layers . Another source of soil moisture information are satellite radar altimeters, originally designed to measure sea surface height over the oceans. Measurements of Jason-1/2 (Ku- and C-Band) or Envisat (Ku- and S-Band) nadir radar backscatter provide high-resolution along-track information (~ 300m along-track resolution) on backscatter every ~10 days (Jason-1/2) or ~35 days (Envisat). Recent studies found good correlation between backscatter and soil moisture in upper layers, especially in arid and semi-arid regions, indicating the potential of satellite altimetry both to reconstruct and to monitor soil moisture variability. However, measuring soil moisture using altimetry has some drawbacks that include: (1) the noisy behavior of the altimetry-derived backscatter (due to e.g., existence of surface water in the radar foot-print), (2) the strong assumptions for converting altimetry backscatters to the soil moisture storage changes, and (3) the need for interpolating between the tracks. In this study, we suggest a new inversion framework that allows to retrieve soil moisture information from along-track Jason-2 and Envisat satellite altimetry data, and we test this scheme over the Australian arid and semi-arid regions. Our method consists of: (i

  11. Global Soil Moisture from the Aquarius/SAC-D Satellite: Description and Initial Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindlish, Rajat; Jackson, Thomas; Cosh, Michael; Zhao, Tianjie; O'Neil, Peggy

    2015-01-01

    Aquarius satellite observations over land offer a new resource for measuring soil moisture from space. Although Aquarius was designed for ocean salinity mapping, our objective in this investigation is to exploit the large amount of land observations that Aquarius acquires and extend the mission scope to include the retrieval of surface soil moisture. The soil moisture retrieval algorithm development focused on using only the radiometer data because of the extensive heritage of passive microwave retrieval of soil moisture. The single channel algorithm (SCA) was implemented using the Aquarius observations to estimate surface soil moisture. Aquarius radiometer observations from three beams (after bias/gain modification) along with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction model forecast surface temperatures were then used to retrieve soil moisture. Ancillary data inputs required for using the SCA are vegetation water content, land surface temperature, and several soil and vegetation parameters based on land cover classes. The resulting global spatial patterns of soil moisture were consistent with the precipitation climatology and with soil moisture from other satellite missions (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System and Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity). Initial assessments were performed using in situ observations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture Little Washita and Little River watershed soil moisture networks. Results showed good performance by the algorithm for these land surface conditions for the period of August 2011-June 2013 (rmse = 0.031 m(exp 3)/m(exp 3), Bias = -0.007 m(exp 3)/m(exp 3), and R = 0.855). This radiometer-only soil moisture product will serve as a baseline for continuing research on both active and combined passive-active soil moisture algorithms. The products are routinely available through the National Aeronautics and Space Administration data archive at the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

  12. Satellite remote sensing applications for surface soil moisture monitoring: A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lingli WANG; John J.QU

    2009-01-01

    Surface soil moisture is one of the crucial variables in hydrological processes, which influences the exchange of water and energy fluxes at the land surface/ atmosphere interface. Accurate estimate of the spatial and temporal variations of soil moisture is critical for numerous environmental studies. Recent technological advances in satellite remote sensing have shown that soil moisture can be measured by a variety of remote sensing techniques,each with its own strengths and weaknesses. This paper presents a comprehensive review of the progress in remote sensing of soil moisture, with focus on technique approaches for soil moisture estimation from optical,thermal, passive microwave, and active microwave measurements. The physical principles and the status of current retrieval methods are summarized. Limitations existing in current soil moisture estimation algorithms and key issues that have to be addressed in the near future are also discussed.

  13. Evaluation of satellite soil moisture products over Norway using ground-based observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesfeller, A.; Lahoz, W. A.; Jeu, R. A. M. de; Dorigo, W.; Haugen, L. E.; Svendby, T. M.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    In this study we evaluate satellite soil moisture products from the advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT) and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) over Norway using ground-based observations from the Norwegian water resources and energy directorate. The ASCAT data are produced using the change detection approach of Wagner et al. (1999), and the AMSR-E data are produced using the VUA-NASA algorithm (Owe et al., 2001, 2008). Although satellite and ground-based soil moisture data for Norway have been available for several years, hitherto, such an evaluation has not been performed. This is partly because satellite measurements of soil moisture over Norway are complicated owing to the presence of snow, ice, water bodies, orography, rocks, and a very high coastline-to-area ratio. This work extends the European areas over which satellite soil moisture is validated to the Nordic regions. Owing to the challenging conditions for soil moisture measurements over Norway, the work described in this paper provides a stringent test of the capabilities of satellite sensors to measure soil moisture remotely. We show that the satellite and in situ data agree well, with averaged correlation (R) values of 0.72 and 0.68 for ASCAT descending and ascending data vs in situ data, and 0.64 and 0.52 for AMSR-E descending and ascending data vs in situ data for the summer/autumn season (1 June-15 October), over a period of 3 years (2009-2011). This level of agreement indicates that, generally, the ASCAT and AMSR-E soil moisture products over Norway have high quality, and would be useful for various applications, including land surface monitoring, weather forecasting, hydrological modelling, and climate studies. The increasing emphasis on coupled approaches to study the earth system, including the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere, will benefit from the availability of validated and improved soil moisture satellite datasets, including those

  14. Evaluation of soil and vegetation response to drought using SMOS soil moisture satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piles, Maria; Sánchez, Nilda; Vall-llossera, Mercè; Ballabrera, Joaquim; Martínez, Justino; Martínez-Fernández, José; Camps, Adriano; Font, Jordi

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture plays an important role in determining the likelihood of droughts and floods that may affect an area. Knowledge of soil moisture distribution as a function of time and space is highly relevant for hydrological, ecological and agricultural applications, especially in water-limited or drought-prone regions. However, measuring soil moisture is challenging because of its high variability; point-scale in-situ measurements are scarce being remote sensing the only practical means to obtain regional- and global-scale soil moisture estimates. The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is the first satellite mission ever designed to measuring the Earth's surface soil moisture at near daily time scales with levels of accuracy previously not attained. Since its launch in November 2009, significant efforts have been dedicated to validate and fine-tune the retrieval algorithms so that SMOS-derived soil moisture estimates meet the standards required for a wide variety of applications. In this line, the SMOS Barcelona Expert Center (BEC) is distributing daily, monthly, and annual temporal averages of 0.25-deg global soil moisture maps, which have proved useful for assessing drought and water-stress conditions. In addition, a downscaling algorithm has been developed to combine SMOS and NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data into fine-scale (stress conditions. In previous research, SMOS-derived Soil Moisture Anomalies (SSMA), calculated in a ten-day basis, were shown to be in close relationship with well-known drought indices (the Standardized Precipitation Index and the Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index). In this work, SSMA have been calculated for the period 2010-2013 in representative arid, semi-arid, sub-humid and humid areas across global land biomes. The SSMA reflect the cumulative precipitation anomalies and is known to provide 'memory' in the climate and hydrological system; the water retained in the soil

  15. Soil Moisture Retrieval Using Reflected Signals of BeiDou GEO Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZOU Wenbo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a method of continuous long-term soil moisture measurement using signals from BeiDou GEO satellites. It also presents the soil moisture inversion model as well as the relevant signal processing steps. Moreover, a land-based experiment is carried out to verify its validity. This method adopts the dual-antenna Global Navigation Satellite System Reflection (GNSS-R mode to receive and process direct signal from BeiDou GEO satellites and reflected signal from soil. Based on signal synchronization, the reflectivity of soil can be calculated according to the extracted signal power values. And then, the soil moisture can be obtained in light of the inversion model. By taking singals from BeiDou GEO satellites, not only the positioning calculation step of general GNSS-R data processing can be ignored, but also a continuous long-term observation of soil moisture for fixed area can be realized. Experiment results based on the method above show a good continuity in both time and magnitude. They are also highly consistent with reference values and the root mean square error equals to 0.049. Compared with BeiDou IGSO and GPS MEO satellites, BeiDou GEO satellites can present a better performance in soil moisture retrieval.

  16. Potential and limitations of multidecadal satellite soil moisture observations for selected climate model evaluation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Loew

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is an essential climate variable (ECV of major importance for land–atmosphere interactions and global hydrology. An appropriate representation of soil moisture dynamics in global climate models is therefore important. Recently, a first multidecadal, observation-based soil moisture dataset has become available that provides information on soil moisture dynamics from satellite observations (ECVSM, essential climate variable soil moisture. The present study investigates the potential and limitations of this new dataset for several applications in climate model evaluation. We compare soil moisture data from satellite observations, reanalysis and simulations from a state-of-the-art land surface model and analyze relationships between soil moisture and precipitation anomalies in the different dataset. Other potential applications like model parameter optimization or model initialization are not investigated in the present study. In a detailed regional study, we show that ECVSM is capable to capture well the interannual and intraannual soil moisture and precipitation dynamics in the Sahelian region. Current deficits of the new dataset are critically discussed and summarized at the end of the paper to provide guidance for an appropriate usage of the ECVSM dataset for climate studies.

  17. Developing an improved soil moisture dataset by blending passive and active microwave satellite-based retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Liu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Combining information derived from satellite-based passive and active microwave sensors has the potential to offer improved retrievals of surface soil moisture variations at global scales. Here we propose a technique to take advantage of retrieval characteristics of passive (AMSR-E and active (ASCAT microwave satellite estimates over sparse-to-moderately vegetated areas to obtain an improved soil moisture product. To do this, absolute soil moisture values from AMSR-E and relative soil moisture derived from ASCAT are rescaled against a reference land surface model date set using a cumulative distribution function (CDF matching approach. While this technique imposes the bias of the reference to the rescaled satellite products, it adjusts both satellite products to the same range and almost preserves the correlation between satellite products and in situ measurements. Comparisons with in situ data demonstrated that over the regions where the correlation coefficient between rescaled AMSR-E and ASCAT is above 0.65 (hereafter referred to as transitional regions, merging the different satellite products together increases the number of observations while minimally changing the accuracy of soil moisture retrievals. These transitional regions also delineate the boundary between sparsely and moderately vegetated regions where rescaled AMSR-E and ASCAT are respectively used in the merged product. Thus the merged product carries the advantages of better spatial coverage overall and increased number of observations particularly for the transitional regions. The combination approach developed in this study has the potential to be applied to existing microwave satellites as well as to new microwave missions. Accordingly, a long-term global soil moisture dataset can be developed and extended, enhancing basic understanding of the role of soil moisture in the water, energy and carbon cycles.

  18. A dynamic approach for evaluating coarse scale satellite soil moisture products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Loew

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Validating coarse scale remote sensing soil moisture products requires a comparison of gridded data to point-like ground measurements. The necessary aggregation of in situ measurements to the footprint scale of a satellite sensor (>100 km2 introduces uncertainties in the validation of the satellite soil moisture product. Observed differences between the satellite product and in situ data are therefore partly attributable to these aggregation uncertainties. The present paper investigates different approaches to disentangle the error of the satellite product from the uncertainties associated to the up-scaling of the reference data. A novel approach is proposed, which allows for the quantification of the remote sensing soil moisture error using a temporally adaptive technique. It is shown that the point-to-area sampling error can be estimated within 0.0084 [m3/m3].

  19. The impacts of assimilating satellite soil moisture into a rainfall-runoff model in a semi-arid catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture plays a key role in runoff generation processes. As a result, the assimilation of soil moisture observations into rainfall-runoff models is increasingly being investigated. Given the scarcity of ground-based in situ measurements, satellite soil moisture observations offer a valuable da...

  20. Combined evaluation of optical and microwave satellite dataset for soil moisture deficit estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Islam, Tanvir; Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Gupta, Manika; Gupta, Dileep Kumar; Kumar, Pradeep

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable responsible for water and energy exchanges from land surface to the atmosphere (Srivastava et al., 2014). On the other hand, Soil Moisture Deficit (or SMD) can help regulating the proper use of water at specified time to avoid any agricultural losses (Srivastava et al., 2013b) and could help in preventing natural disasters, e.g. flood and drought (Srivastava et al., 2013a). In this study, evaluation of Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) and soil moisture from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites are attempted for prediction of Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD). Sophisticated algorithm like Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) is used for prediction of SMD using the MODIS and SMOS dataset. The benchmark SMD estimated from Probability Distributed Model (PDM) over the Brue catchment, Southwest of England, U.K. is used for all the validation. The performances are assessed in terms of Nash Sutcliffe Efficiency, Root Mean Square Error and the percentage of bias between ANFIS simulated SMD and the benchmark. The performance statistics revealed a good agreement between benchmark and the ANFIS estimated SMD using the MODIS dataset. The assessment of the products with respect to this peculiar evidence is an important step for successful development of hydro-meteorological model and forecasting system. The analysis of the satellite products (viz. SMOS soil moisture and MODIS LST) towards SMD prediction is a crucial step for successful hydrological modelling, agriculture and water resource management, and can provide important assistance in policy and decision making. Keywords: Land Surface Temperature, MODIS, SMOS, Soil Moisture Deficit, Fuzzy Logic System References: Srivastava, P.K., Han, D., Ramirez, M.A., Islam, T., 2013a. Appraisal of SMOS soil moisture at a catchment scale in a temperate maritime climate. Journal of Hydrology 498, 292-304. Srivastava, P.K., Han, D., Rico

  1. Assimilation of Satellite Based Soil Moisture Data in the National Weather Service's Flash Flood Guidance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, D.; Lakhankar, T.; Cosgrove, B.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change and variability increases the probability of frequency, timing, intensity, and duration of flood events. After rainfall, soil moisture is the most important factor dictating flash flooding, since rainfall infiltration and runoff are based on the saturation of the soil. It is difficult to conduct ground-based measurements of soil moisture consistently and regionally. As such, soil moisture is often derived from models and agencies such as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Weather Service (NOAA/NWS) use proxy estimates of soil moisture at the surface in order support operational flood forecasting. In particular, a daily national map of Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) is produced that is based on surface soil moisture deficit and threshold runoff estimates. Flash flood warnings are issued by Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and are underpinned by information from the Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) system operated by the River Forecast Centers (RFCs). This study analyzes the accuracy and limitations of the FFG system using reported flash flood cases in 2010 and 2011. The flash flood reports were obtained from the NWS Storm Event database for the Arkansas-Red Basin RFC (ABRFC). The current FFG system at the ABRFC provides gridded flash flood guidance (GFFG) System using the NWS Hydrology Laboratory-Research Distributed Hydrologic Model (HL-RDHM) to translate the upper zone soil moisture to estimates of Soil Conservation Service Curve Numbers. Comparison of the GFFG and real-time Multi-sensor Precipitation Estimator derived Quantitative Precipitation Estimate (QPE) for the same duration and location were used to analyze the success of the system. Improved flash flood forecasting requires accurate and high resolution soil surface information. The remote sensing observations of soil moisture can improve the flood forecasting accuracy. The Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites are two

  2. Developing an improved soil moisture dataset by blending passive and active microwave satellite-based retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Y. Liu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Combining information derived from satellite-based passive and active microwave sensors has the potential to offer improved estimates of surface soil moisture at global scale. We develop and evaluate a methodology that takes advantage of the retrieval characteristics of passive (AMSR-E and active (ASCAT microwave satellite estimates to produce an improved soil moisture product. First, volumetric soil water content (m3 m−3 from AMSR-E and degree of saturation (% from ASCAT are rescaled against a reference land surface model data set using a cumulative distribution function matching approach. While this imposes any bias of the reference on the rescaled satellite products, it adjusts them to the same range and preserves the dynamics of original satellite-based products. Comparison with in situ measurements demonstrates that where the correlation coefficient between rescaled AMSR-E and ASCAT is greater than 0.65 ("transitional regions", merging the different satellite products increases the number of observations while minimally changing the accuracy of soil moisture retrievals. These transitional regions also delineate the boundary between sparsely and moderately vegetated regions where rescaled AMSR-E and ASCAT, respectively, are used for the merged product. Therefore the merged product carries the advantages of better spatial coverage overall and increased number of observations, particularly for the transitional regions. The combination method developed has the potential to be applied to existing microwave satellites as well as to new missions. Accordingly, a long-term global soil moisture dataset can be developed and extended, enhancing basic understanding of the role of soil moisture in the water, energy and carbon cycles.

  3. Soil moisture and evapotranspiration of wetlands vegetation habitats retrieved from satellite images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowska-Zielinska, K.; Budzynska, M.; Kowalik, W.; Turlej, K.

    2010-08-01

    The research has been carried out in Biebrza Ramsar Convention test site situated in the N-E part of Poland. Data from optical and microwave satellite images have been analysed and compared to the detailed soil-vegetation ground truth measurements conducted during the satellite overpasses. Satellite data applied for the study include: ENVISAT.ASAR, ENVISAT.MERIS, ALOS.PALSAR, ALOS.AVNIR-2, ALOS.PRISM, TERRA.ASTER, and NOAA.AVHRR. Optical images have been used for classification of wetlands vegetation habitats and vegetation surface roughness expressed by LAI. Also, heat fluxes have been calculated using NOAA.AVHRR data and meteorological data. Microwave images have been used for the assessment of soil moisture. For each of the classified wetlands vegetation habitats the relationship between soil moisture and backscattering coefficient has been examined, and the best combination of microwave variables (wave length, incidence angle, polarization) has been used for mapping and monitoring of soil moisture. The results of this study give possibility to improve models of water cycle over wetlands ecosystems by adding information about soil moisture and surface heat fluxes derived from satellite images. Such information is very essential for better protection of the European sensitive wetland ecosystems. ENVISAT and ALOS images have been obtained from ESA for AO ID 122 and AOALO.3742 projects.

  4. Employing satellite retrieved soil moisture for parameter estimation of the hydrologic model mHM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zink, Matthias; Mai, Juliane; Rakovec, Oldrich; Schrön, Martin; Kumar, Rohini; Schäfer, David; Samaniego, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological models are usually calibrated against observed streamflow at the catchment outlet and thus they are conditioned by an integral catchment signal. Rakovec et al. 2016 (JHM) recently demonstrated that constraining model parameters against river discharge is a necessary, but not a sufficient condition. Such a procedure ensures the fulfillment of the catchment's water balance but can lead to high predictive uncertainties of model internal states, like soil moisture, or a lack in spatial representativeness of the model. However, some hydrologic applications, as e.g. soil drought monitoring and prediction, rely on this information. Within this study we propose a framework in which the mesoscale Hydrologic Model (mHM) is calibrated with soil moisture retrievals from various sources. The aim is to condition the model on soil moisture (SM), while preserving good performance in streamflow estimation. We identify the most appropriate objective functions by conducting synthetic experiments. The best objective function is determined based on: 1) deviation between synthetic and simulated soil moisture, 2) nonparametric comparison of SM fields (e.g. copulas), and 3) by euclidian distance of model parameters, which is zero if the parameters of the synthetic data are recovered. Those objective functions performing best are used to calibrate mHM against different satellite soil moisture products, e.g. ESA-CCI, H-SAF, and in situ observations. This procedure is tested in three distinct European basins (upper Sava, Neckar, and upper Guadalquivir basin) ranging from snow domination to semi arid climatic conditions. Results obtained with the synthetic experiment indicate that objective functions focusing on the temporal dynamics of SM are preferable to objective functions aiming at spatial patterns or catchment averages. Since the deviation of soil moisture fields (1) and their copulas (2) don't lead to conclusive results, the decision of the best performing objective

  5. Validation of a 30+ year soil moisture record from multi-satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jeu, R.; Dorigo, W.; Wagner, W.; Chung, D.; Parinussa, R.; van der Werf, G.; Liu, Y.; Mittelbach, H.; Hirschi, M.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the ESA Climate Change Initiative soil moisture project a 30+ year consistent soil moisture dataset is currently in development by harmonizing retrievals from both passive and active microwave satellite observations. The harmonization of these datasets incorporates the advantage of both microwave techniques and spans the entire period from 1978 onwards. A statistical methodology based on scaling, ranking and blending was developed to address differences in sensor specifications to create one consistent dataset. A soil moisture dataset provided by a land surface model (GLDAS-1-Noah) was used to scale the different satellite-based products to the same range. The blending of the active and passive datasets was based on their respective performance, which is closely related to vegetation cover. While this approach imposes the absolute values of the land surface model dataset to the final product, it preserves the relative dynamics (e.g., seasonality, inter-annual variations) and trends of the original satellite derived retrievals. Different validation methods were performed to quantify the skill of the various soil moisture datasets at different temporal and spatial scales. In situ data from the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) were used to calculate the local correlation (both Pearson and Spearman) and Root Mean Square Difference between ground observations and the satellite retrievals for different climate regimes. In addition a triple collocation analysis was applied on the passive and active satellite products in order to analyze the error structures at a global scale for the different sensors. Furthermore, indirect proxies like tree ring width data were used to study the consistency of the inter-annual variability within the 30+ year dataset. The combination of these techniques revealed a strong dynamical behavior in data quality in both time and space. In the future this additional information on error dynamics could be used to further

  6. Error sources in passive and active microwave satellite soil moisture over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of a long-term climate record of soil moisture (SM) involves combining historic and present satellite-retrieved SM data sets. This in turn requires a consistent characterization and deep understanding of the systematic differences and errors in the individual data sets, which vary due to...

  7. Dual assimilation of satellite soil moisture to improve flood prediction in ungauged catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper explores the use of active and passive satellite soil moisture products for improving stream flow prediction within 4 large (>5,000km2) semi-arid catchments. We use the probability distributed model (PDM) under a data-scarce scenario and aim at correcting two key controlling factors in th...

  8. Evaluating global trends (1988-2010) in harmonized multi-satellite surface soil moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorigo, W.A.; Jeu, de R.A.M.; Chung, D.; Parinussa, R.M.; Liu, Y.; Wagner, W.; Fernandez-Prieto, D.

    2012-01-01

    [1] Global trends in a new multi-satellite surface soil moisture dataset were analyzed for the period 1988–2010. 27% of the area covered by the dataset showed significant trends (p = 0.05). Of these, 73% were negative and 27% positive. Subtle drying trends were found in the Southern US, central Sout

  9. Stand-alone error characterisation of microwave satellite soil moisture using a Fourier method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Error characterisation of satellite-retrieved soil moisture (SM) is crucial for maximizing their utility in research and applications in hydro-meteorology and climatology. Error characteristics can provide insights for retrieval development and validation, and inform suitable strategies for data fus...

  10. Assessment of soil moisture fields from imperfect climate models with uncertain satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Schumann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate that global satellite products can be used to evaluate climate model soil moisture predictions but conclusions should be drawn with care. The quality of a limited area climate model (LAM was compared to a general circulation model (GCM using soil moisture data from two different Earth observing satellites within a model validation scheme that copes with the presence of uncertain data. Results showed that in the face of imperfect models and data, it is difficult to investigate the quality of current land surface schemes in simulating hydrology accurately. Nevertheless, a LAM provides, in general, a better representation of spatial patterns and dynamics of soil moisture. However, in months when data uncertainty is higher, particularly in colder months and in periods when vegetation cover and soil moisture are out of phase (e.g. August in the case of Western Europe, it is not possible to draw firm conclusions about model acceptability. Our work indicates that a higher resolution LAM has more benefits to soil moisture prediction than are due to the resolution alone and can be attributed to an overall intensification of the hydrological cycle relative to the GCM.

  11. Satellite Based Soil Moisture Product Validation Using NOAA-CREST Ground and L-Band Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Campo, C.; Temimi, M.; Lakhankar, T.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture content is among most important physical parameters in hydrology, climate, and environmental studies. Many microwave-based satellite observations have been utilized to estimate this parameter. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is one of many remotely sensors that collects daily information of land surface soil moisture. However, many factors such as ancillary data and vegetation scattering can affect the signal and the estimation. Therefore, this information needs to be validated against some "ground-truth" observations. NOAA - Cooperative Remote Sensing and Technology (CREST) center at the City University of New York has a site located at Millbrook, NY with several insitu soil moisture probes and an L-Band radiometer similar to Soil Moisture Passive and Active (SMAP) one. This site is among SMAP Cal/Val sites. Soil moisture information was measured at seven different locations from 2012 to 2015. Hydra probes are used to measure six of these locations. This study utilizes the observations from insitu data and the L-Band radiometer close to ground (at 3 meters height) to validate and to compare soil moisture estimates from AMSR2. Analysis of the measurements and AMSR2 indicated a weak correlation with the hydra probes and a moderate correlation with Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS probes). Several differences including the differences between pixel size and point measurements can cause these discrepancies. Some interpolation techniques are used to expand point measurements from 6 locations to AMSR2 footprint. Finally, the effect of penetration depth in microwave signal and inconsistencies with other ancillary data such as skin temperature is investigated to provide a better understanding in the analysis. The results show that the retrieval algorithm of AMSR2 is appropriate under certain circumstances. This validation algorithm and similar study will be conducted for SMAP mission. Keywords: Remote Sensing, Soil

  12. Simulation of large-scale soil water systems using groundwater data and satellite based soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Complex concepts for the physically correct depiction of dominant processes in the hydrosphere are increasingly at the forefront of hydrological modelling. Many scientific issues in hydrological modelling demand for additional system variables besides a simulation of runoff only, such as groundwater recharge or soil moisture conditions. Models that include soil water simulations are either very simplified or require a high number of parameters. Against this backdrop there is a heightened demand of observations to be used to calibrate the model. A reasonable integration of groundwater data or remote sensing data in calibration procedures as well as the identifiability of physically plausible sets of parameters is subject to research in the field of hydrology. Since this data is often combined with conceptual models, the given interfaces are not suitable for such demands. Furthermore, the application of automated optimisation procedures is generally associated with conceptual models, whose (fast) computing times allow many iterations of the optimisation in an acceptable time frame. One of the main aims of this study is to reduce the discrepancy between scientific and practical applications in the field of hydrological modelling. Therefore, the soil model DYVESOM (DYnamic VEgetation SOil Model) was developed as one of the primary components of the hydrological modelling system PANTA RHEI. DYVESOMs structure provides the required interfaces for the calibrations made at runoff, satellite based soil moisture and groundwater level. The model considers spatial and temporal differentiated feedback of the development of the vegetation on the soil system. In addition, small scale heterogeneities of soil properties (subgrid-variability) are parameterized by variation of van Genuchten parameters depending on distribution functions. Different sets of parameters are operated simultaneously while interacting with each other. The developed soil model is innovative regarding concept

  13. Satellite microwave estimates of soil moisture and applications for desertification studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, Manfred; Van de Griend, Adriaan A.; de Jeu, Richard A.; de Vries, Jorrit; Seyhan, E.

    1998-12-01

    Based on a series of studies conducted in Botswana and preliminary results from an ongoing study in Spain, developments in microwave remote sensing by satellite which can be used to monitor near real-time surface moisture and also study long term soil moisture climatology are described. A progression of methodologies beginning with single polarization studies and leading to both dual polarization and multiple frequency techniques are described. Continuing analysis of a nine year data set of satellite-derived surface moisture in Spain is ongoing. Preliminary results from this study appear to provide some evidence of long term decertification in certain parts of this region. The methodologies developed during these investigations can be applied to other regions, and have the potential for providing modelers with extended data sets of independently derived surface moisture for simulation and validation studies, and climate change studies at the global scale.

  14. Estimating soil moisture from satellite microwave observations: Past and ongoing projects, and relevance to GCIP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owe, M.; Van de Griend, A. A.; de Jeu, R.; de Vries, J. J.; Seyhan, E.; Engman, E. T.

    1999-08-01

    On the basis of a series of studies conducted in Botswana and preliminary results from an ongoing study in Spain, developments in microwave remote sensing by satellite, which can be used to monitor near-real-time surface moisture and also study long-term soil moisture climatology, are described. A progression of methodologies beginning with single-polarization studies and leading to both dual polarization and multiple frequency techniques are described. Continuing analysis of a 9 year data set of satellite-derived surface moisture in Spain is ongoing. Preliminary results from this study appear to provide some evidence of long-term desertification in certain parts of this region. The methodologies developed during these investigations can be applied easily to other regions such as the GCIP area and could provide useful databases for simulation and validation studies. Additionally, they have strong potential for global applications such as climate change studies.

  15. Assimilation of Satellite Soil Moisture observation with the Particle Filter-Markov Chain Monte Carlo and Geostatistical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradkhani, Hamid; Yan, Hongxiang

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture simulation and prediction are increasingly used to characterize agricultural droughts but the process suffers from data scarcity and quality. The satellite soil moisture observations could be used to improve model predictions with data assimilation. Remote sensing products, however, are typically discontinuous in spatial-temporal coverages; while simulated soil moisture products are potentially biased due to the errors in forcing data, parameters, and deficiencies of model physics. This study attempts to provide a detailed analysis of the joint and separate assimilation of streamflow and Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) surface soil moisture into a fully distributed hydrologic model, with the use of recently developed particle filter-Markov chain Monte Carlo (PF-MCMC) method. A geostatistical model is introduced to overcome the satellite soil moisture discontinuity issue where satellite data does not cover the whole study region or is significantly biased, and the dominant land cover is dense vegetation. The results indicate that joint assimilation of soil moisture and streamflow has minimal effect in improving the streamflow prediction, however, the surface soil moisture field is significantly improved. The combination of DA and geostatistical approach can further improve the surface soil moisture prediction.

  16. Advantages of using satellite soil moisture estimates over precipitation products to assess regional vegetation water availability and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tiexi

    2017-04-01

    To improve the understanding of water-vegetation relationships, direct comparative studies assessing the utility of satellite remotely sensed soil moisture, gridded precipitation products, and land surface model output are needed. A case study was investigated for a water-limited, lateral inflow receiving area in northeastern Australia during December 2008 to May 2009. In January 2009, monthly precipitation showed strong positive anomalies, which led to strong positive soil moisture anomalies. The precipitation anomalies disappeared within a month. In contrast, the soil moisture anomalies persisted for months. Positive anomalies of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) appeared in February, in response to water supply, and then persisted for several months. In addition to these temporal characteristics, the spatial patterns of NDVI anomalies were more similar to soil moisture patterns than to those of precipitation and land surface model output. The long memory of soil moisture mainly relates to the presence of clay-rich soils. Modeled soil moisture from four of five global land surface models failed to capture the memory length of soil moisture and all five models failed to present the influence of lateral inflow. This case study indicates that satellite-based soil moisture is a better predictor of vegetation water availability than precipitation in environments having a memory of several months and thus is able to persistently affect vegetation dynamics. These results illustrate the usefulness of satellite remotely sensed soil moisture in ecohydrology studies. This case study has the potential to be used as a benchmark for global land surface model evaluations. The advantages of using satellite remotely sensed soil moisture over gridded precipitation products are mainly expected in lateral-inflow and/or clay-rich regions worldwide.

  17. Optimizing operational water management with soil moisture data from Sentinel-1 satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezij, Michiel; Augustijn, Denie; Hendriks, Dimmie; Hulscher, Suzanne

    2016-04-01

    In the Netherlands, regional water authorities are responsible for management and maintenance of regional water bodies. Due to socio-economic developments (e.g. agricultural intensification and on-going urbanisation) and an increase in climate variability, the pressure on these water bodies is growing. Optimization of water availability by taking into account the needs of different users, both in wet and dry periods, is crucial for sustainable developments. To support timely and well-directed operational water management, accurate information on the current state of the system as well as reliable models to evaluate water management optimization measures are essential. Previous studies showed that the use of remote sensing data (for example soil moisture data) in water management offers many opportunities (e.g. Wanders et al. (2014)). However, these data are not yet used in operational applications at a large scale. The Sentinel-1 satellites programme offers high spatiotemporal resolution soil moisture data (1 image per 6 days with a spatial resolution of 10 by 10 m) that are freely available. In this study, these data will be used to improve the Netherlands Hydrological Instrument (NHI). The NHI consists of coupled models for the unsaturated zone (MetaSWAP), groundwater (iMODFLOW) and surface water (Mozart and DM). The NHI is used for scenario analyses and operational water management in the Netherlands (De Lange et al., 2014). Due to the lack of soil moisture data, the unsaturated zone model is not yet thoroughly validated and its output is not used by regional water authorities for decision-making. Therefore, the newly acquired remotely sensed soil moisture data will be used to improve the skill of the MetaSWAP-model and the NHI as whole. The research will focus among other things on the calibration of soil parameters by comparing model output (MetaSWAP) with the remotely sensed soil moisture data. Eventually, we want to apply data-assimilation to improve

  18. Toward the Estimation of Surface Soil Moisture Content Using Geostationary Satellite Data over Sparsely Vegetated Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Leng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on a novel bare surface soil moisture (SSM retrieval model developed from the synergistic use of the diurnal cycles of land surface temperature (LST and net surface shortwave radiation (NSSR (Leng et al. 2014. “Bare Surface Soil Moisture Retrieval from the Synergistic Use of Optical and Thermal Infrared Data”. International Journal of Remote Sensing 35: 988–1003., this paper mainly investigated the model’s capability to estimate SSM using geostationary satellite observations over vegetated area. Results from the simulated data primarily indicated that the previous bare SSM retrieval model is capable of estimating SSM in the low vegetation cover condition with fractional vegetation cover (FVC ranging from 0 to 0.3. In total, the simulated data from the Common Land Model (CoLM on 151 cloud-free days at three FLUXNET sites that with different climate patterns were used to describe SSM estimates with different underlying surfaces. The results showed a strong correlation between the estimated SSM and the simulated values, with a mean Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of 0.028 m3·m−3 and a coefficient of determination (R2 of 0.869. Moreover, diurnal cycles of LST and NSSR derived from the Meteosat Second Generation (MSG satellite data on 59 cloud-free days were utilized to estimate SSM in the REMEDHUS soil moisture network (Spain. In particular, determination of the model coefficients synchronously using satellite observations and SSM measurements was explored in detail in the cases where meteorological data were not available. A preliminary validation was implemented to verify the MSG pixel average SSM in the REMEDHUS area with the average SSM calculated from the site measurements. The results revealed a significant R2 of 0.595 and an RMSE of 0.021 m3·m−3.

  19. Combining satellite observations to develop a global soil moisture product for near-real-time applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enenkel, Markus; Reimer, Christoph; Dorigo, Wouter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Pfeil, Isabella; Parinussa, Robert; De Jeu, Richard

    2016-10-01

    The soil moisture dataset that is generated via the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) of the European Space Agency (ESA) (ESA CCI SM) is a popular research product. It is composed of observations from 10 different satellites and aims to exploit the individual strengths of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) sensors, thereby providing surface soil moisture estimates at a spatial resolution of 0.25°. However, the annual updating cycle limits the use of the ESA CCI SM dataset for operational applications. Therefore, this study proposes an adaptation of the ESA CCI product for daily global updates via satellite-derived near-real-time (NRT) soil moisture observations. In order to extend the ESA CCI SM dataset from 1978 to present we use NRT observations from the Advanced Scatterometer on-board the two MetOp satellites and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 on-board GCOM-W. Since these NRT observations do not incorporate the latest algorithmic updates, parameter databases and intercalibration efforts, by nature they offer a lower quality than reprocessed offline datasets. In addition to adaptations of the ESA CCI SM processing chain for NRT datasets, the quality of the NRT datasets is a main source of uncertainty. Our findings indicate that, despite issues in arid regions, the new CCI NRT dataset shows a good correlation with ESA CCI SM. The average global correlation coefficient between CCI NRT and ESA CCI SM (Pearson's R) is 0.80. An initial validation with 40 in situ observations in France, Spain, Senegal and Kenya yields an average R of 0.58 and 0.49 for ESA CCI SM and CCI NRT, respectively. In summary, the CCI NRT product is nearly as accurate as the existing ESA CCI SM product and, therefore, of significant value for operational applications such as drought and flood forecasting, agricultural index insurance or weather forecasting.

  20. Demonstrating soil moisture remote sensing with observations from the UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Clara; Shah, Rashmi; Zuffada, Cinzia; Hajj, George; Masters, Dallas; Mannucci, Anthony J.

    2016-04-01

    The ability of spaceborne Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) bistatic radar receivers to sense changes in soil moisture is investigated using observations from the low Earth orbiting UK TechDemoSat-1 satellite (TDS-1). Previous studies using receivers on aircraft or towers have shown that ground-reflected GNSS signals are sensitive to changes in soil moisture, though the ability to sense this variable from space has yet to be quantified. Data from TDS-1 show a 7 dB sensitivity of reflected signals to temporal changes in soil moisture. If the effects of surface roughness and vegetation on the reflected signals can be quantified, spaceborne GNSS bistatic radar receivers could provide soil moisture on relatively small spatial and temporal scales.

  1. Soil moisture on Polish territory - comparison of satellite and ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojek, Edyta; Łukowski, Mateusz; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Bogusław

    2014-05-01

    Assessment of water resources due to changing climatic conditions in time and space is still very uncertain. The territory of Poland has a limited resource of waters, occasionally resulting in small agricultural droughts. From the other side intense rainfalls, floods or run-offs, causing soil erosion are observed. Therefore, it is important to predict and prevent of this adverse phenomena. Huge spatial variability of soil moisture does not allow for accurate estimation of its distribution using ground-based measurements. SMOS soil moisture data are quite much inherently consistent in time and space, but their validation is still a challenge for further use in the climate and hydrology studies. This is the motivation for the research: to examine soil moisture from SMOS and ground based stations of the SWEX network held over eastern Poland. The presented results are related to changes of the soil moisture on regional scales for Poland in the period 2010-2013. Some results with SMOS L2 data are extended on continental scales for Europe. Time series from ground and satellite SMOS data sources were compared by regression methods. The region of Poland indicates clearly some genetic spatial distributions in weekly averaged values. In continental scales, the country territory contrasts evidently to Lithuania and in Polesie, and indicates seasonal cycling observed in archives and well known traditional records. The central part of Poland is repeatedly susceptible on droughts with soil moisture values ranging from about 0.02 to 0.20 m3 m-3. SMOS data allows on creating systematic drought data for Poland and watching annual changes, and differences to other drought services kept on national scales for agricultural purposes. We bound that drought susceptibility to the content of sand clay components and the land use there. Lack of rainfall in the late 2011 summer, caused a significant deficit of water in soil moisture content (below 0.05 m3 m-3) throughout the entire country

  2. The influence of regional surface soil moisture anomalies on forest fires in Siberia observed from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, A.; Balzter, H.; George, C.

    2009-10-01

    Forest fires are frequent in the Siberian taiga and are predicted to increase in frequency as a result of increased fire risk under drought conditions, and prolonged fire seasons caused by climate change. There is, however, some uncertainty as to the extent to which drought influences forest fire frequency at a regional scale. Here, we present an analysis of satellite derived soil moisture anomaly data from ERS-1/2 (ERS: Earth Resources Satellite) scatterometer data and burned area maps from MODIS/AVHRR/ATSR (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer/Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer/Along-Track Scanning Radiometer) over Central Siberia for the years 1992-2000. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship of remotely sensed soil moisture deviations from the long-term mean and fire within the boreal biome on a sub-continental scale. Results show that wet surface soil moisture conditions limit the extent of burned area. They can prevent the outbreak of fires but the magnitude of a negative (dry) deviation does not determine the maximum size of fire affected areas. It is known from the literature, however, that an ignition is more likely to occur under low surface wetness conditions, such as those that we observed during July and August in both permafrost and non-permafrost regions. Although the burned area under drier conditions in July is lowest over non-permafrost, the actual number of fires is as high as over continuous permafrost. Approximately 80% of all events occurred under such conditions during that month. The fire size was below 50 km2 under moist conditions. Larger burned areas have in general not been detected when the surface wetness deviation exceeded +5%.

  3. An Assessment of the Capabilities of the ERS Satellites' Active Microwave Instruments for Monitoring Soil Moisture Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Blyth

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The launch of the European Remote sensing Satellite (ERS-1 in July 1991 represented an important turning point in the development of Earth observation as it was the first of a series of satellites which would carry high resolution active microwave (radar sensors which could operate through the thickest cloudeover and provide continuity of data for at least a decade. This was of particular relevance to hydrological applications, such as soil moisture monitoring, which generally require frequent satellite observations to monitor changes in state. ERS-1 and its successor ERS-2 carry the active microwave instrument (AMI which operates in 3 modes (synthetic aperture radar, wind scatterometer and wave seatterometer together with the radar altimeter which may all be useful for the observation of soil moisture. This paper assesses the utility of these sensors through a comprehensive review of work in this field. Two approaches to soil moisture retrieval are identified: 1 inversion modelling, where the physical effects of vegetation and soil roughness on radar backscatter are quantified through the use of multi-frequency and/or multi-polarization sensors and 2 change detection where these effects are normalized through frequent satellite observation, the residual effects being attributed to short-term changes in soil moisture. Both approaches will be better supported by the future European Envisat-l satellite which will provide both multi-polarization SAR and low resolution products which should facilitate more frequent temporal observation.

  4. Multi-site assimilation of a terrestrial biosphere model (BETHY) using satellite derived soil moisture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mousong; Sholze, Marko

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the importance of soil moisture data on assimilation of a terrestrial biosphere model (BETHY) for a long time period from 2010 to 2015. Totally, 101 parameters related to carbon turnover, soil respiration, as well as soil texture were selected for optimization within a carbon cycle data assimilation system (CCDAS). Soil moisture data from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) product was derived for 10 sites representing different plant function types (PFTs) as well as different climate zones. Uncertainty of SMOS soil moisture data was also estimated using triple collocation analysis (TCA) method by comparing with ASCAT dataset and BETHY forward simulation results. Assimilation of soil moisture to the system improved soil moisture as well as net primary productivity(NPP) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) when compared with soil moisture derived from in-situ measurements and fluxnet datasets. Parameter uncertainties were largely reduced relatively to prior values. Using SMOS soil moisture data for assimilation of a terrestrial biosphere model proved to be an efficient approach in reducing uncertainty in ecosystem fluxes simulation. It could be further used in regional an global assimilation work to constrain carbon dioxide concentration simulation by combining with other sources of measurements.

  5. Error characterization of microwave satellite soil moisture data sets using fourier analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Soil moisture is a key geophysical variable in hydrological and meteorological processes. Accurate and current observations of soil moisture over mesoscale to global scales as inputs to hydrological, weather and climate modelling will benefit the predictability and understanding of these p...

  6. Estimation of soil moisture-thermal infrared emissivity relation in arid and semi-arid environments using satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazia Blasi, Maria; Masiello, Guido; Serio, Carmine; Venafra, Sara; Liuzzi, Giuliano; Dini, Luigi

    2016-04-01

    The retrieval of surface parameters is very important for various aspects concerning the climatological and meteorological context. At this purpose surface emissivity represents one of the most important parameters useful for different applications such as the estimation of climate changes and land cover features. It is known that thermal infrared (TIR) emissivity is affected by soil moisture, but there are very few works in literature on this issue. This study is aimed to analyze and find a relation between satellite soil moisture data and TIR emissivity focusing on arid and semi-arid environments. These two parameters, together with the land surface temperature, are fundamental for a better understanding of the physical phenomena implied in the soil-atmosphere interactions and the surface energy balance. They are also important in several fields of study, such as climatology, meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. In particular, there are several studies stating a correlation between soil moisture and the emissivity at 8-9 μm in desertic soils, which corresponds to the quartz Reststrahlen, a feature which is typical of sandy soils. We investigated several areas characterized by arid or semi-arid environments, focusing our attention on the Dahra desert (Senegal), and on the Negev desert (Israel). For the Dahra desert we considered both in situ, provided by the International Soil Moisture Network, and satellite soil moisture data, from ASCAT and AMSR-E sensors, for the whole year 2011. In the case of the Negev desert soil moisture data are derived from ASCAT observations and we computed a soil moisture index from a temporal series of SAR data acquired by the Cosmo-SkyMed constellation covering a period of six months, from June 2015 to November 2015. For both cases soil moisture data were related to the retrieved TIR emissivity from the geostationary satellite SEVIRI in three different spectral channels, at 8.7 μm, 10.8 μm and 12 μm. A Kalman filter physical

  7. An overview of neural network applications for soil moisture retrieval from radar satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, E.; Paloscia, S.; Pettinato, S.

    2014-10-01

    Frequent and spatially distributed measurements of soil moisture (SMC), at different spatial scales, are advisable for all applications related to the environmental disciplines, such as climatology, meteorology, hydrology and agriculture. Satellite sensors operating in the low part of microwave spectrum are very suitable for this purpose, and their signals can be directly related to the moisture content of the observed surfaces, provided that all the contributions from soil and vegetation to the measured signal are properly accounted for. Among the algorithms used for the retrieval of SMC from both active (i.e. Synthetic Aperture Radar, SAR or real aperture radars) and passive (radiometers) microwave sensors, the artificial neural networks (ANN) represent the best compromise between accuracy and computation speed. ANN based algorithms have been developed at IFAC, and adapted to several radar and radiometric satellite sensors, in order to generate SMC products at different spatial resolutions, varying from hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers. These algorithms, which use the ANN techniques for inverting theoretical and semi-empirical models, such as Advanced Integral Equation (AIEM), Oh models, and Radiative transfer Theory (RTT), have been adapted to the C-band acquisitions from SAR (Envisat/ASAR) and real aperture radar (ASCAT) and to the X-band SAR acquisitions of Cosmo-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X. Moreover, a specific ANN algorithm has also been implemented for the L-band active and passive acquisitions of the incoming SMAP mission. The latter satellite will carry onboard simultaneously one radar and one radiometer operating at the same frequency, but with different spatial resolutions (3 and 40 km, respectively). Large datasets of co-located satellite acquisitions and direct SMC measurements on several test sites located worldwide have been used along with simulations derived from forward electromagnetic models for setting up, training and validating these

  8. Improving Flood Prediction By the Assimilation of Satellite Soil Moisture in Poorly Monitored Catchments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Garreton, C. D.; Ryu, D.; Western, A. W.; Crow, W. T.; Su, C. H.; Robertson, D. E.

    2014-12-01

    Flood prediction in poorly monitored catchments is among the greatest challenges faced by hydrologists. To address this challenge, an increasing number of studies in the last decade have explored methods to integrate various existing observations from ground and satellites. One approach in particular, is the assimilation of satellite soil moisture (SM-DA) into rainfall-runoff models. The rationale is that satellite soil moisture (SSM) can be used to correct model soil water states, enabling more accurate prediction of catchment response to precipitation and thus better streamflow. However, there is still no consensus on the most effective SM-DA scheme and how this might depend on catchment scale, climate characteristics, runoff mechanisms, model and SSM products used, etc. In this work, an operational SM-DA scheme was set up in the poorly monitored, large (>40,000 km2), semi-arid Warrego catchment situated in eastern Australia. We assimilated passive and active SSM products into the probability distributed model (PDM) using an ensemble Kalman filter. We explored factors influencing the SM-DA framework, including relatively new techniques to remove model-observation bias, estimate observation errors and represent model errors. Furthermore, we explored the advantages of accounting for the spatial distribution of forcing and channel routing processes within the catchment by implementing and comparing lumped and semi-distributed model setups. Flood prediction is improved by SM-DA (Figure), with a 30% reduction of the average root-mean-squared difference of the ensemble prediction, a 20% reduction of the false alarm ratio and a 40% increase of the ensemble mean Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency. SM-DA skill does not significantly change with different observation error assumptions, but the skill strongly depends on the observational bias correction technique used, and more importantly, on the performance of the open-loop model before assimilation. Our findings imply that proper

  9. Smart Irrigation From Soil Moisture Forecast Using Satellite And Hydro -Meteorological Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbari, Chiara; Mancini, Marco; Ravazzani, Giovanni; Ceppi, Alessandro; Salerno, Raffaele; Sobrino, Josè

    2017-04-01

    Increased water demand and climate change impacts have recently enhanced the need to improve water resources management, even in those areas which traditionally have an abundant supply of water. The highest consumption of water is devoted to irrigation for agricultural production, and so it is in this area that efforts have to be focused to study possible interventions. The SIM project funded by EU in the framework of the WaterWorks2014 - Water Joint Programming Initiative aims at developing an operational tool for real-time forecast of crops irrigation water requirements to support parsimonious water management and to optimize irrigation scheduling providing real-time and forecasted soil moisture behavior at high spatial and temporal resolutions with forecast horizons from few up to thirty days. This study discusses advances in coupling satellite driven soil water balance model and meteorological forecast as support for precision irrigation use comparing different case studies in Italy, in the Netherlands, in China and Spain, characterized by different climatic conditions, water availability, crop types and irrigation techniques and water distribution rules. Herein, the applications in two operative farms in vegetables production in the South of Italy where semi-arid climatic conditions holds, two maize fields in Northern Italy in a more water reach environment with flood irrigation will be presented. This system combines state of the art mathematical models and new technologies for environmental monitoring, merging ground observed data with Earth observations. Discussion on the methodology approach is presented, comparing for a reanalysis periods the forecast system outputs with observed soil moisture and crop water needs proving the reliability of the forecasting system and its benefits. The real-time visualization of the implemented system is also presented through web-dashboards.

  10. Using Sentinel-1 and Landsat 8 satellite images to estimate surface soil moisture content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mexis, Philippos-Dimitrios; Alexakis, Dimitrios D.; Daliakopoulos, Ioannis N.; Tsanis, Ioannis K.

    2016-04-01

    Nowadays, the potential for more accurate assessment of Soil Moisture (SM) content exploiting Earth Observation (EO) technology, by exploring the use of synergistic approaches among a variety of EO instruments has emerged. This study is the first to investigate the potential of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) (Sentinel-1) and optical (Landsat 8) images in combination with ground measurements to estimate volumetric SM content in support of water management and agricultural practices. SAR and optical data are downloaded and corrected in terms of atmospheric, geometric and radiometric corrections. SAR images are also corrected in terms of roughness and vegetation with the synergistic use of Oh and Topp models using a dataset consisting of backscattering coefficients and corresponding direct measurements of ground parameters (moisture, roughness). Following, various vegetation indices (NDVI, SAVI, MSAVI, EVI, etc.) are estimated to record diachronically the vegetation regime within the study area and as auxiliary data in the final modeling. Furthermore, thermal images from optical data are corrected and incorporated to the overall approach. The basic principle of Thermal InfraRed (TIR) method is that Land Surface Temperature (LST) is sensitive to surface SM content due to its impact on surface heating process (heat capacity and thermal conductivity) under bare soil or sparse vegetation cover conditions. Ground truth data are collected from a Time-domain reflectometer (TRD) gauge network established in western Crete, Greece, during 2015. Sophisticated algorithms based on Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) and Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) approaches are used to explore the statistical relationship between backscattering measurements and SM content. Results highlight the potential of SAR and optical satellite images to contribute to effective SM content detection in support of water resources management and precision agriculture. Keywords: Sentinel-1, Landsat 8, Soil

  11. Estimating irrigated areas from satellite and model soil moisture data over the contiguous US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaussinger, Felix; Dorigo, Wouter; Gruber, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    Information about irrigation is crucial for a number of applications such as drought- and yield management and contributes to a better understanding of the water-cycle, land-atmosphere interactions as well as climate projections. Currently, irrigation is mainly quantified by national agricultural statistics, which do not include spatial information. The digital Global Map of Irrigated Areas (GMIA) has been the first effort to quantify irrigation at the global scale by merging these statistics with remote sensing data. Also, the MODIS-Irrigated Agriculture Dataset (MirAD-US) was created by merging annual peak MODIS-NDVI with US county level irrigation statistics. In this study we aim to map irrigated areas by confronting time series of various satellite soil moisture products with soil moisture from the ERA-Interim/Land reanalysis product. We follow the assumption that irrigation signals are not modelled in the reanalysis product, nor contributing to its forcing data, but affecting the spatially continuous remote sensing observations. Based on this assumption, spatial patterns of irrigation are derived from differences between the temporal slopes of the modelled and remotely sensed time series during the irrigation season. Results show that a combination of ASCAT and ERA-Interim/Land show spatial patterns which are in good agreement with the MIrAD-US, particularly within the Mississippi Delta, Texas and eastern Nebraska. In contrast, AMSRE shows weak agreements, plausibly due to a higher vegetation dependency of the soil moisture signal. There is no significant agreement to the MIrAD-US in California, which is possibly related to higher crop-diversity and lower field sizes. Also, a strong signal in the region of the Great Corn Belt is observed, which is generally not outlined as an irrigated area. It is not yet clear to what extent the signal obtained in the Mississippi Delta is related to re-reflection effects caused by standing water due to flood or furrow

  12. A novel approach to validate satellite soil moisture retrievals using precipitation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karthikeyan, L.; Kumar, D. Nagesh

    2016-10-01

    A novel approach is proposed that attempts to validate passive microwave soil moisture retrievals using precipitation data (applied over India). It is based on the concept that the expectation of precipitation conditioned on soil moisture follows a sigmoidal convex-concave-shaped curve, the characteristic of which was recently shown to be represented by mutual information estimated between soil moisture and precipitation. On this basis, with an emphasis over distribution-free nonparametric computations, a new measure called Copula-Kernel Density Estimator based Mutual Information (CKDEMI) is introduced. The validation approach is generic in nature and utilizes CKDEMI in tandem with a couple of proposed bootstrap strategies, to check accuracy of any two soil moisture products (here Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-EOS sensor's Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam-NASA (VUAN) and University of Montana (MONT) products) using precipitation (India Meteorological Department) data. The proposed technique yields a "best choice soil moisture product" map which contains locations where any one of the two/none of the two/both the products have produced accurate retrievals. The results indicated that in general, VUA-NASA product has performed well over University of Montana's product for India. The best choice soil moisture map is then integrated with land use land cover and elevation information using a novel probability density function-based procedure to gain insight on conditions under which each of the products has performed well. Finally, the impact of using a different precipitation (Asian Precipitation-Highly-Resolved Observational Data Integration Towards Evaluation of Water Resources) data set over the best choice soil moisture product map is also analyzed. The proposed methodology assists researchers and practitioners in selecting the appropriate soil moisture product for various assimilation strategies at both basin and continental scales.

  13. Application of satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature in the regional soil moisture simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. K. Shi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available As the satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature is sensitive to land surface soil moisture (SM and SM is a basic output variable in model simulation, it is of great significance to use the brightness temperature data to improve SM numerical simulation. In this paper, the theory developed by Yan et al. (2004 about the relationship between satellite microwave remote sensing polarization index and SM was used to estimate the land surface SM from AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth Observing System brightness temperature data. With consideration of land surface soil texture, surface roughness, vegetation optical thickness, and the AMSR-E monthly SM products, the regional daily land surface SM was estimated over the eastern part of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The results show that the estimated SM is lower than the ground measurements and the NCEP (American National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis data at the Maqu Station (33.85° N, 102.57° E and the Tanglha Station (33.07° N, 91.94° E, but its regional distribution is reasonable and somewhat better than that from the daily AMSR-E SM product, and its temporal variation shows a quick response to the ground daily precipitations. Furthermore, in order to improve the simulating ability of the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting model to land surface SM, the estimated SM was assimilated into the Noah land surface model by the Newtonian relaxation (NR method. The results indicate that, by fine tuning of the quality factor in NR method, the simulated SM values are improved most in desert area, followed by grassland, shrub and grass mixed zone. At temporal scale, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values between simulated and observed SM are decreased 0.03 and 0.07 m3/m3 by using the NR method in the Maqu Station and the Tanglha Station, respectively.

  14. Regional vegetation water effects on satellite soil moisture estimations for West Africa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Friesen, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    Soil moisture information is a vital parameter for water resources planning and food production. In particular for West Africa, where income largely depends on rainfed agriculture, reliable information on available soil water is required for modeling and prediction. Over large areas and, specificall

  15. SOIL moisture data intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Yann; Rodriguez-Frenandez, Nemesio; Al-Yaari, Amen; Parens, Marie; Molero, Beatriz; Mahmoodi, Ali; Mialon, Arnaud; Richaume, Philippe; Bindlish, Rajat; Mecklenburg, Susanne; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre

    2016-04-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity satellite (SMOS) was launched in November 2009 and started delivering data in January 2010. Subsequently, the satellite has been in operation for over 6 years while the retrieval algorithms from Level 1 to Level 2 underwent significant evolutions as knowledge improved. Other approaches for retrieval at Level 2 over land were also investigated while Level 3 and 4 were initiated. In this présentation these improvements are assessed by inter-comparisons of the current Level 2 (V620) against the previous version (V551) and new products either using neural networks or Level 3. In addition a global evaluation of different SMOS soil moisture (SM) products is performed comparing products with those of model simulations and other satellites (AMSR E/ AMSR2 and ASCAT). Finally, all products were evaluated against in situ measurements of soil moisture (SM). The study demonstrated that the V620 shows a significant improvement (including those at level1 improving level2)) with respect to the earlier version V551. Results also show that neural network based approaches can yield excellent results over areas where other products are poor. Finally, global comparison indicates that SMOS behaves very well when compared to other sensors/approaches and gives consistent results over all surfaces from very dry (African Sahel, Arizona), to wet (tropical rain forests). RFI (Radio Frequency Interference) is still an issue even though detection has been greatly improved while RFI sources in several areas of the world are significantly reduced. When compared to other satellite products, the analysis shows that SMOS achieves its expected goals and is globally consistent over different eco climate regions from low to high latitudes and throughout the seasons.

  16. Satellite-based soil moisture validation and field experiments; Skylab to SMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture remote sensing has reached a level of maturity that is now limited primarily by technology and funding. This is a result of extensive research and development that began in earnest in the 1970s and by the late 1990s had provided the basis and direction needed to support two dedicated s...

  17. Calibration of a large-scale hydrological model using satellite-based soil moisture and evapotranspiration products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. López López

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A considerable number of river basins around the world lack sufficient ground observations of hydro-meteorological data for effective water resources assessment and management. Several approaches can be developed to increase the quality and availability of data in these poorly gauged or ungauged river basins; among them, the use of Earth observations products has recently become promising. Earth observations of various environmental variables can be used potentially to increase knowledge about the hydrological processes in the basin and to improve streamflow model estimates, via assimilation or calibration. The present study aims to calibrate the large-scale hydrological model PCRaster GLOBal Water Balance (PCR-GLOBWB using satellite-based products of evapotranspiration and soil moisture for the Moroccan Oum er Rbia River basin. Daily simulations at a spatial resolution of 5  ×  5 arcmin are performed with varying parameters values for the 32-year period 1979–2010. Five different calibration scenarios are inter-compared: (i reference scenario using the hydrological model with the standard parameterization, (ii calibration using in situ-observed discharge time series, (iii calibration using the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM actual evapotranspiration time series, (iv calibration using ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI surface soil moisture time series and (v step-wise calibration using GLEAM actual evapotranspiration and ESA CCI surface soil moisture time series. The impact on discharge estimates of precipitation in comparison with model parameters calibration is investigated using three global precipitation products, including ERA-Interim (EI, WATCH Forcing methodology applied to ERA-Interim reanalysis data (WFDEI and Multi-Source Weighted-Ensemble Precipitation data by merging gauge, satellite and reanalysis data (MSWEP. Results show that GLEAM evapotranspiration and ESA CCI soil moisture may be used for model

  18. Calibration of a large-scale hydrological model using satellite-based soil moisture and evapotranspiration products

    Science.gov (United States)

    López López, Patricia; Sutanudjaja, Edwin H.; Schellekens, Jaap; Sterk, Geert; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2017-06-01

    A considerable number of river basins around the world lack sufficient ground observations of hydro-meteorological data for effective water resources assessment and management. Several approaches can be developed to increase the quality and availability of data in these poorly gauged or ungauged river basins; among them, the use of Earth observations products has recently become promising. Earth observations of various environmental variables can be used potentially to increase knowledge about the hydrological processes in the basin and to improve streamflow model estimates, via assimilation or calibration. The present study aims to calibrate the large-scale hydrological model PCRaster GLOBal Water Balance (PCR-GLOBWB) using satellite-based products of evapotranspiration and soil moisture for the Moroccan Oum er Rbia River basin. Daily simulations at a spatial resolution of 5 × 5 arcmin are performed with varying parameters values for the 32-year period 1979-2010. Five different calibration scenarios are inter-compared: (i) reference scenario using the hydrological model with the standard parameterization, (ii) calibration using in situ-observed discharge time series, (iii) calibration using the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) actual evapotranspiration time series, (iv) calibration using ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) surface soil moisture time series and (v) step-wise calibration using GLEAM actual evapotranspiration and ESA CCI surface soil moisture time series. The impact on discharge estimates of precipitation in comparison with model parameters calibration is investigated using three global precipitation products, including ERA-Interim (EI), WATCH Forcing methodology applied to ERA-Interim reanalysis data (WFDEI) and Multi-Source Weighted-Ensemble Precipitation data by merging gauge, satellite and reanalysis data (MSWEP). Results show that GLEAM evapotranspiration and ESA CCI soil moisture may be used for model calibration resulting in

  19. Correcting satellite-based precipitation products from SMOS soil moisture data assimilation using two models of different complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román-Cascón, Carlos; Pellarin, Thierry; Gibon, François

    2017-04-01

    Real-time precipitation information at the global scale is quite useful information for many applications. However, satellite-based precipitation products in real time are known to be biased from real values observed in situ. On the other hand, the information about precipitation contained in soil moisture data can be very useful to improve precipitation estimation, since the evolution of this variable is highly influenced by the amount of rainfall at a certain area after a rain event. In this context, the soil moisture data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is used to correct the precipitation provided by real-time satellite-based products such as CMORPH, TRMM-3B42RT or PERSIANN. In this work, we test an assimilation algorithm based on the data assimilation of SMOS measurements in two models of different complexity: a simple hydrological model (Antecedent Precipitation Index (API)) and a state-of-the-art complex land-surface model (Surface Externalisée (SURFEX)). We show how the assimilation technique, based on a particle filter method, leads to the improvement of correlation and root mean squared error (RMSE) of precipitation estimates, with slightly better results for the simpler (and less expensive computationally) API model. This methodology has been evaluated for six years in ten sites around the world with different features, showing the limitations of the methodology in regions affected by mountainous terrain or by high radio-frequency interferences (RFI), which notably affect the quality of the soil moisture retrievals from brightness temperatures by SMOS. The presented results are promising for a potential near-real time application at the global scale.

  20. Soil moisture deficit estimation using satellite multi-angle brightness temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei; Dai, Qiang

    2016-08-01

    Accurate soil moisture information is critically important for hydrological modelling. Although remote sensing soil moisture measurement has become an important data source, it cannot be used directly in hydrological modelling. A novel study based on nonlinear techniques (a local linear regression (LLR) and two feedforward artificial neural networks (ANNs)) is carried out to estimate soil moisture deficit (SMD), using the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) multi-angle brightness temperatures (Tbs) with both horizontal (H) and vertical (V) polarisations. The gamma test is used for the first time to determine the optimum number of Tbs required to construct a reliable smooth model for SMD estimation, and the relationship between model input and output is achieved through error variance estimation. The simulated SMD time series in the study area is from the Xinanjiang hydrological model. The results have shown that LLR model is better at capturing the interrelations between SMD and Tbs than ANNs, with outstanding statistical performances obtained during both training (NSE = 0.88, r = 0.94, RMSE = 0.008 m) and testing phases (NSE = 0.85, r = 0.93, RMSE = 0.009 m). Nevertheless, both ANN training algorithms (radial BFGS and conjugate gradient) have performed well in estimating the SMD data and showed excellent performances compared with those derived directly from the SMOS soil moisture products. This study has also demonstrated the informative capability of the gamma test in the input data selection for model development. These results provide interesting perspectives for data-assimilation in flood-forecasting.

  1. Multi-Temporal Evaluation of Soil Moisture and Land Surface Temperature Dynamics Using in Situ and Satellite Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Pablos

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture (SM is an important component of the Earth’s surface water balance and by extension the energy balance, regulating the land surface temperature (LST and evapotranspiration (ET. Nowadays, there are two missions dedicated to monitoring the Earth’s surface SM using L-band radiometers: ESA’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS and NASA’s Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP. LST is remotely sensed using thermal infrared (TIR sensors on-board satellites, such as NASA’s Terra/Aqua MODIS or ESA & EUMETSAT’s MSG SEVIRI. This study provides an assessment of SM and LST dynamics at daily and seasonal scales, using 4 years (2011–2014 of in situ and satellite observations over the central part of the river Duero basin in Spain. Specifically, the agreement of instantaneous SM with a variety of LST-derived parameters is analyzed to better understand the fundamental link of the SM–LST relationship through ET and thermal inertia. Ground-based SM and LST measurements from the REMEDHUS network are compared to SMOS SM and MODIS LST spaceborne observations. ET is obtained from the HidroMORE regional hydrological model. At the daily scale, a strong anticorrelation is observed between in situ SM and maximum LST (R ≈ − 0.6 to −0.8, and between SMOS SM and MODIS LST Terra/Aqua day (R ≈ − 0.7. At the seasonal scale, results show a stronger anticorrelation in autumn, spring and summer (in situ R ≈ − 0.5 to −0.7; satellite R ≈ − 0.4 to −0.7 indicating SM–LST coupling, than in winter (in situ R ≈ +0.3; satellite R ≈ − 0.3 indicating SM–LST decoupling. These different behaviors evidence changes from water-limited to energy-limited moisture flux across seasons, which are confirmed by the observed ET evolution. In water-limited periods, SM is extracted from the soil through ET until critical SM is reached. A method to estimate the soil critical SM is proposed. For REMEDHUS, the critical SM is estimated to be ∼0

  2. Varying applicability of four different satellite-derived soil moisture products to global gridded crop model evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Toru; Iizumi, Toshichika; Okada, Masashi; Nishimori, Motoki; Grünwald, Thomas; Prueger, John; Cescatti, Alessandro; Korres, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Marius; Carrara, Arnaud; Loubet, Benjamin; Ceschia, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-derived daily surface soil moisture products have been increasingly available, but their applicability to global gridded crop model (GGCM) evaluation is unclear. This study compares four different soil moisture products with the flux tower site observation at 18 cropland sites across the world where either of maize, soybean, rice and wheat is grown. These products include the first and second versions of Climate Change Initiative Soil Moisture (CCISM-1 and CCISM-2) datasets distributed by the European Space Agency and two different AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System)-derived soil moisture datasets, separately provided by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (AMSRE-J) and U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (AMSRE-N). The comparison demonstrates varying reliability of these products in representing major characteristics of temporal pattern of cropland soil moisture by product and crop. Possible reasons for the varying reliability include the differences in sensors, algorithms, bands and criteria used when estimating soil moisture. Both the CCISM-1 and CCISM-2 products appear the most reliable for soybean- and wheat-growing area. However, the percentage of valid data of these products is always lower than other products due to relatively strict criteria when merging data derived from multiple sources, although the CCISM-2 product has much more data with valid retrievals than the CCISM-1 product. The reliability of the AMSRE-J product is the highest for maize- and rice-growing areas and comparable to or slightly lower than the CCISM products for soybean- and wheat-growing areas. The AMSRE-N is the least reliable in most location-crop combinations. The reliability of the products for rice-growing area is far lower than that of other upland crops likely due to the extensive use of irrigation and patch distribution of rice paddy in the area examined here. We conclude that the CCISM-1, CCISM-2 and AMSRE

  3. Improved large-scale hydrological modelling through the assimilation of streamflow and downscaled satellite soil moisture observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    López López, Patricia; Wanders, Niko; Schellekens, Jaap; Renzullo, Luigi J.; Sutanudjaja, Edwin H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2016-07-01

    The coarse spatial resolution of global hydrological models (typically >  0.25°) limits their ability to resolve key water balance processes for many river basins and thus compromises their suitability for water resources management, especially when compared to locally tuned river models. A possible solution to the problem may be to drive the coarse-resolution models with locally available high-spatial-resolution meteorological data as well as to assimilate ground-based and remotely sensed observations of key water cycle variables. While this would improve the resolution of the global model, the impact of prediction accuracy remains largely an open question. In this study, we investigate the impact of assimilating streamflow and satellite soil moisture observations on the accuracy of global hydrological model estimations, when driven by either coarse- or high-resolution meteorological observations in the Murrumbidgee River basin in Australia. To this end, a 0.08° resolution version of the PCR-GLOBWB global hydrological model is forced with downscaled global meteorological data (downscaled from 0.5° to 0.08° resolution) obtained from the WATCH Forcing Data methodology applied to ERA-Interim (WFDEI) and a local high-resolution, gauging-station-based gridded data set (0.05°). Downscaled satellite-derived soil moisture (downscaled from ˜  0.5° to 0.08° resolution) from the remote observation system AMSR-E and streamflow observations collected from 23 gauging stations are assimilated using an ensemble Kalman filter. Several scenarios are analysed to explore the added value of data assimilation considering both local and global meteorological data. Results show that the assimilation of soil moisture observations results in the largest improvement of the model estimates of streamflow. The joint assimilation of both streamflow and downscaled soil moisture observations leads to further improvement in streamflow simulations (20 % reduction in RMSE). Furthermore

  4. The international soil moisture network: A data hosting facility for global in situ soil moisture measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    In situ measurements of soil moisture are invaluable for calibrating and validating land surface models and satellite-based soil moisture retrievals. In addition, long-term time series of in situ soil moisture measurements themselves can reveal trends in the water cycle related to climate or land co...

  5. Combining satellite observations to develop a daily global soil moisture product for a wide range of applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enenkel, M.; Reimer, C.; Dorigo, W.; Wagner, W.; Pfeil, I.; Parinussa, R.; De Jeu, R.

    2015-11-01

    The soil moisture dataset that is generated via the Climate Change Initiative (CCI) of the European Space Agency (ESA) (ESA CCI SM) is a popular research product. It is composed of observations from nine different satellites and aims to exploit the individual strengths of active (radar) and passive (radiometer) sensors, thereby providing surface soil moisture estimates at a spatial resolution of 0.25°. However, the annual updating cycle limits the use of the ESA CCI SM dataset for operational applications. Therefore, this study proposes an adaptation of the ESA CCI processing chain for daily global updates via satellite-derived near real-time (NRT) soil moisture observations. In order to extend the ESA CCI SM dataset from 1978 to present we use NRT observations from the Advanced SCATterometer on-board the MetOp satellites and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 on-board GCOM-W. Since these NRT observations do not incorporate the latest algorithmic updates, parameter databases, and intercalibration efforts, by nature they offer a lower quality than reprocessed offline datasets. Our findings indicate that, despite issues in arid regions, the new "CCI NRT" dataset shows a good correlation with ESA CCI SM. The average global correlation coefficient between CCI NRT and ESA CCI SM (Pearson's R) is 0.8. An initial validation with 40 in-situ observations in France, Kenya, Senegal and Kenya yields an average R of 0.58 and 0.49 for ESA CCI SM and CCI NRT respectively. In summary, the CCI NRT dataset is getting ready for operational use, supporting applications such as drought and flood monitoring, weather forecasting or agricultural applications.

  6. Combining satellite observations to develop a daily global soil moisture product for a wide range of applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Enenkel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The soil moisture dataset that is generated via the Climate Change Initiative (CCI of the European Space Agency (ESA (ESA CCI SM is a popular research product. It is composed of observations from nine different satellites and aims to exploit the individual strengths of active (radar and passive (radiometer sensors, thereby providing surface soil moisture estimates at a spatial resolution of 0.25°. However, the annual updating cycle limits the use of the ESA CCI SM dataset for operational applications. Therefore, this study proposes an adaptation of the ESA CCI processing chain for daily global updates via satellite-derived near real-time (NRT soil moisture observations. In order to extend the ESA CCI SM dataset from 1978 to present we use NRT observations from the Advanced SCATterometer on-board the MetOp satellites and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 on-board GCOM-W. Since these NRT observations do not incorporate the latest algorithmic updates, parameter databases, and intercalibration efforts, by nature they offer a lower quality than reprocessed offline datasets. Our findings indicate that, despite issues in arid regions, the new "CCI NRT" dataset shows a good correlation with ESA CCI SM. The average global correlation coefficient between CCI NRT and ESA CCI SM (Pearson's R is 0.8. An initial validation with 40 in-situ observations in France, Kenya, Senegal and Kenya yields an average R of 0.58 and 0.49 for ESA CCI SM and CCI NRT respectively. In summary, the CCI NRT dataset is getting ready for operational use, supporting applications such as drought and flood monitoring, weather forecasting or agricultural applications.

  7. An inter-comparison of soil moisture data products from satellite remote sensing and a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Li; Hain, Christopher R.; Zhan, Xiwu; Anderson, Martha C.

    2016-06-01

    Significant advances have been achieved in generating soil moisture (SM) products from satellite remote sensing and/or land surface modeling with reasonably good accuracy in recent years. However, the discrepancies among the different SM data products can be considerably large, which hampers their usage in various applications. The bias of one SM product from another is well recognized in the literature. Bias estimation and spatial correction methods have been documented for assimilating satellite SM product into land surface and hydrologic models. Nevertheless, understanding the characteristics of each of these SM data products is required for many applications where the most accurate data products are desirable. This study inter-compares five SM data products from three different sources with each other, and evaluates them against in situ SM measurements over 14-year period from 2000 to 2013. Specifically, three microwave (MW) satellite based data sets provided by ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI) (CCI-merged, -active and -passive products), one thermal infrared (TIR) satellite based product (ALEXI), and the Noah land surface model (LSM) simulations. The in-situ SM measurements are collected from the North American Soil Moisture Database (NASMD), which involves more than 600 ground sites from a variety of networks. They are used to evaluate the accuracies of these five SM data products. In general, each of the five SM products is capable of capturing the dry/wet patterns over the study period. However, the absolute SM values among the five products vary significantly. SM simulations from Noah LSM are more stable relative to the satellite-based products. All TIR and MW satellite based products are relatively noisier than the Noah LSM simulations. Even though MW satellite based SM retrievals have been predominantly used in the past years, SM retrievals of the ALEXI model based on TIR satellite observations demonstrate skills equivalent to all the MW satellite

  8. Combined use of optical and radar satellite data for the monitoring of irrigation and soil moisture of wheat crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fieuzal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to get a better understanding of radar signal over irrigated wheat fields and to assess the potentialities of radar observations for the monitoring of soil moisture. Emphasis is put on the use of high spatial and temporal resolution satellite data (Envisat/ASAR and Formosat-2. Time series of images were collected over the Yaqui irrigated area (Mexico throughout one agricultural season from December 2007 to May 2008, together with measurements of soil and vegetation characteristics and agricultural practices. The comprehensive analysis of these data indicates that the sensitivity of the radar signal to vegetation is masked by the variability of soil conditions. On-going irrigated areas can be detected all over the wheat growing season. The empirical algorithm developed for the retrieval of topsoil moisture from Envisat/ASAR images takes advantage of the Formosat-2 instrument capabilities to monitor the seasonality of wheat canopies. This monitoring is performed using dense time series of images acquired by Formosat-2 to set up the SAFY vegetation model. Topsoil moisture estimates are not reliable at the timing of plant emergence and during plant senescence. Estimates are accurate from tillering to grain filling stages with an absolute error about 9% (0.09 m3 m−3, 35% in relative value. This result is attractive since topsoil moisture is estimated at a high spatial resolution (i.e. over subfields of about 5 ha for a large range of biomass water content (from 5 and 65 t ha−1 independently from the viewing angle of ASAR acquisition (incidence angles IS1 to IS6.

  9. CPC Soil Moisture

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The monthly data set consists of a file containing 1/2 degree monthly averaged soil moisture water height equivalents for the globe from 1948 onwards. Values are...

  10. Inferring Land Surface Model Parameters for the Assimilation of Satellite-Based L-Band Brightness Temperature Observations into a Soil Moisture Analysis System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2012-01-01

    The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite mission provides global measurements of L-band brightness temperatures at horizontal and vertical polarization and a variety of incidence angles that are sensitive to moisture and temperature conditions in the top few centimeters of the soil. These L-band observations can therefore be assimilated into a land surface model to obtain surface and root zone soil moisture estimates. As part of the observation operator, such an assimilation system requires a radiative transfer model (RTM) that converts geophysical fields (including soil moisture and soil temperature) into modeled L-band brightness temperatures. At the global scale, the RTM parameters and the climatological soil moisture conditions are still poorly known. Using look-up tables from the literature to estimate the RTM parameters usually results in modeled L-band brightness temperatures that are strongly biased against the SMOS observations, with biases varying regionally and seasonally. Such biases must be addressed within the land data assimilation system. In this presentation, the estimation of the RTM parameters is discussed for the NASA GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, which is based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and the Catchment land surface model. In the GEOS-5 land data assimilation system, soil moisture and brightness temperature biases are addressed in three stages. First, the global soil properties and soil hydraulic parameters that are used in the Catchment model were revised to minimize the bias in the modeled soil moisture, as verified against available in situ soil moisture measurements. Second, key parameters of the "tau-omega" RTM were calibrated prior to data assimilation using an objective function that minimizes the climatological differences between the modeled L-band brightness temperatures and the corresponding SMOS observations. Calibrated parameters include soil roughness parameters, vegetation structure parameters

  11. Assimilation of leaf area index and surface soil moisture satellite observations into the SIM hydrological model over France

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbairn, David; Calvet, Jean-Christophe; Mahfouf, Jean-Francois; Barbu, Alina

    2016-04-01

    Hydrological models have a variety of uses, including flood and drought prediction and water management. The SAFRAN-ISBA-MODCOU (SIM) hydrological model consists of three stages: An atmospheric analysis (SAFRAN) over France, which forces a land surface model (ISBA-A-gs), which then provides drainage and runoff inputs to a hydrological model (MODCOU). The river discharge from MODCOU is validated using observed river discharge over France. Data assimilation (DA) combines a short model forecast from the past with observations to improve the estimate of the model state. The ISBA-A-gs representation of soil moisture and its influence by vegetation can be improved by assimilating surface soil moisture (SSM) and leaf area index (LAI) observations respectively. The Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) on board the MetOP satellite measures a low-frequency microwave signal, which is used to retrieve daily SSM over France. The SPOT-VGT sensor observes LAI over France at a temporal frequency of about 10 days. The Simplified Extended Kalman (SEKF) filter combines the model and observed variables by weighting them according to their respective accuracies. Although the SEKF makes incorrect linear assumptions, past experiments have shown that it improves on the model estimates of SSM and LAI. However, due to nonlinearities in the land surface model, improvements in SSM and LAI do not imply improved soil moisture fluxes (drainage, runoff and evapotranspiration). This study indirectly examines the impact of the SEKF on the soil moisture fluxes using the MODCOU hydrological model. The ISBA-A-gs model appears to underestimate the LAI for grasslands in winter and spring, which results in an underestimation (overestimation) of evapotranspiration (drainage and runoff). The excess water flowing into the rivers and aquifers contributes to an overestimation of the MODCOU discharge. Assimilating LAI observations slightly increases the LAI analysis in winter and spring and therefore reduces the

  12. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Model and Satellite Based Soil Moisture Estimations for Assessing Coupling Hot Spots in the Southern La Plata Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruscantini, C. A.; Karszenbaum, H.; Ruscica, R. C.; Spennemann, P.; Salvia, M.; Sorensson, A. A.; Grings, F. M.; Saulo, C.

    2015-12-01

    The southern La Plata Basin, located in southeastern South America (SESA), a region of great importance because of its hydrological characteristics, the fact that it has the largest population density and is one of the most productive regions in terms of agriculture, cattle raising and industry of the continent, has been identified as a strong hotspot between soil moisture (SM) and the atmosphere by different regional studies. Among them, Ruscica et al. (2014, Atmos. Sci. Let, Int. J. Climatol.), and Spennemann et al. (2015, Int. J. Climatol.) show, through different modeling approaches, the presence of strong soil moisture-precipitation and evapotranspiration interactions during austral summer in SESA, revealing similar hotspots. Nevertheless these studies have diverse limitations related to model assumptions and to vegetation parameterizations, as well as the lack of observational data for the evaluation of models performance (Ferguson and Wood, 2011, J. of Hydrometeorology). On the other hand, in the last decade several instruments on board satellites are providing soil moisture products globally and in a continuous way. A recent work by Grings et al. (2015, IEEE JSTARS, in press), done over the Pampas Plains in SESA showed characteristic soil moisture patterns that follow the Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) under extreme wet and dry conditions In order to deepen and overcome some of the mentioned model limitations, this work adds satellite soil moisture and vegetation products in the spatio-temporal analysis of the regions of strong soil moisture-atmosphere interactions. The main objectives and related outcomes are: the verification of already identified regions where soil moisture anomalies may have an influence on subsequent precipitation, evapotranspiration and temperature anomalies, and the study of their seasonal characteristics and land cover influences.

  13. Soil Moisture Data Assimilation in a Hydrological Model: A Case Study in Belgium Using Large-Scale Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Baguis

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we focus on the assimilation of satellite observations for Surface Soil Moisture (SSM in a hydrological model. The satellite data are produced in the framework of the EUMETSAT project H-SAF and are based on measurements with the Advanced radar Scatterometer (ASCAT, embarked on the Meteorological Operational satellites (MetOp. The product generated with these measurements has a horizontal resolution of 25 km and represents the upper few centimeters of soil. Our approach is based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter technique (EnKF, where observation and model uncertainties are taken into account, implemented in a conceptual hydrological model. The analysis is carried out in the Demer catchment of the Scheldt River Basin in Belgium, for the period from June 2013–May 2016. In this context, two methodological advances are being proposed. First, the generation of stochastic terms, necessary for the EnKF, of bounded variables like SSM is addressed with the aid of specially-designed probability distributions, so that the bounds are never exceeded. Second, bias due to the assimilation procedure itself is removed using a post-processing technique. Subsequently, the impact of SSM assimilation on the simulated streamflow is estimated using a series of statistical measures based on the ensemble average. The differences from the control simulation are then assessed using a two-dimensional bootstrap sampling on the ensemble generated by the assimilation procedure. Our analysis shows that data assimilation combined with bias correction can improve the streamflow estimations or, at a minimum, produce results statistically indistinguishable from the control run of the hydrological model.

  14. Soil Moisture Monitorization Using GNSS Reflected Signals

    CERN Document Server

    Egido, Alejandro; Caparrini, Marco; Martin, Cristina; Farres, Esteve; Banque, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    The use of GNSS signals as a source of opportunity for remote sensing applications, GNSS-R, has been a research area of interest for more than a decade. One of the possible applications of this technique is soil moisture monitoring. The retrieval of soil moisture with GNSS-R systems is based on the variability of the ground dielectric properties associated to soil moisture. Higher concentrations of water in the soil yield a higher dielectric constant and reflectivity, which incurs in signals that reflect from the Earth surface with higher peak power. Previous investigations have demonstrated the capability of GPS bistatic scatterometers to obtain high enough signal to noise ratios in order to sense small changes in surface reflectivity. Furthermore, these systems present some advantages with respect to others currently used to retrieve soil moisture. Upcoming satellite navigation systems, such as the European Galileo, will represent an excellent source of opportunity for soil moisture remote sensing for vario...

  15. Improving soil moisture simulation to support Agricultural Water Resource Management using Satellite-based water cycle observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manika; Bolten, John; Lakshmi, Venkat

    2016-04-01

    Efficient and sustainable irrigation systems require optimization of operational parameters such as irrigation amount which are dependent on the soil hydraulic parameters that affect the model's accuracy in simulating soil water content. However, it is a scientific challenge to provide reliable estimates of soil hydraulic parameters and irrigation estimates, given the absence of continuously operating soil moisture and rain gauge network. For agricultural water resource management, the in-situ measurements of soil moisture are currently limited to discrete measurements at specific locations, and such point-based measurements do not represent the spatial distribution at a larger scale accurately, as soil moisture is highly variable both spatially and temporally (Wang and Qu 2009). In the current study, flood irrigation scheme within the land surface model is triggered when the root-zone soil moisture deficit reaches below a threshold of 25%, 50% and 75% with respect to the maximum available water capacity (difference between field capacity and wilting point) and applied until the top layer is saturated. An additional important criterion needed to activate the irrigation scheme is to ensure that it is irrigation season by assuming that the greenness vegetation fraction (GVF) of the pixel exceed 0.40 of the climatological annual range of GVF (Ozdogan et al. 2010). The main hypothesis used in this study is that near-surface remote sensing soil moisture data contain useful information that can describe the effective hydrological conditions of the basin such that when appropriately inverted, it would provide field capacity and wilting point soil moisture, which may be representative of that basin. Thus, genetic algorithm inverse method is employed to derive the effective parameters and derive the soil moisture deficit for the root zone by coupling of AMSR-E soil moisture with the physically based hydrological model. Model performance is evaluated using MODIS

  16. Downscaling Satellite Data for Predicting Catchment-scale Root Zone Soil Moisture with Ground-based Sensors and an Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, H.; Baldwin, D. C.; Smithwick, E. A. H.

    2015-12-01

    Predicting root zone (0-100 cm) soil moisture (RZSM) content at a catchment-scale is essential for drought and flood predictions, irrigation planning, weather forecasting, and many other applications. Satellites, such as the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP), can estimate near-surface (0-5 cm) soil moisture content globally at coarse spatial resolutions. We develop a hierarchical Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF) data assimilation modeling system to downscale satellite-based near-surface soil moisture and to estimate RZSM content across the Shale Hills Critical Zone Observatory at a 1-m resolution in combination with ground-based soil moisture sensor data. In this example, a simple infiltration model within the EnKF-model has been parameterized for 6 soil-terrain units to forecast daily RZSM content in the catchment from 2009 - 2012 based on AMSRE. LiDAR-derived terrain variables define intra-unit RZSM variability using a novel covariance localization technique. This method also allows the mapping of uncertainty with our RZSM estimates for each time-step. A catchment-wide satellite-to-surface downscaling parameter, which nudges the satellite measurement closer to in situ near-surface data, is also calculated for each time-step. We find significant differences in predicted root zone moisture storage for different terrain units across the experimental time-period. Root mean square error from a cross-validation analysis of RZSM predictions using an independent dataset of catchment-wide in situ Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurements ranges from 0.060-0.096 cm3 cm-3, and the RZSM predictions are significantly (p State Integrated Hydrologic Modeling (PIHM) system. Uncertainty estimates are significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to cross validation error during wet and dry conditions, but more so in dry summer seasons. Developing an EnKF-model system that downscales satellite data and predicts catchment-scale RZSM content is especially timely, given the anticipated

  17. Monitoring and Characterizing Seasonal Drought, Water Supply Pattern and Their Impact on Vegetation Growth Using Satellite Soil Moisture Data, GRACE Water Storage and In-situ Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, G.; Velicogna, I.; Kimball, J. S.; Kim, Y.; Colliander, A.; Njoku, E. G.

    2015-12-01

    We combine soil moisture (SM) data from AMSR-E, AMSR-2 and SMAP, terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes from GRACE, in-situ groundwater measurements and atmospheric moisture data to delineate and characterize the evolution of drought and its impact on vegetation growth. GRACE TWS provides spatially continuous observations of total terrestrial water storage changes and regional drought extent, persistence and severity, while satellite derived soil moisture estimates provide enhanced delineation of plant-available soil moisture. Together these data provide complementary metrics quantifying available plant water supply. We use these data to investigate the supply changes from water components at different depth in relation to satellite based vegetation metrics, including vegetation greenness (NDVI) measures from MODIS and related higher order productivity (GPP) before, during and following the major drought events observed in the continental US for the past 14 years. We observe consistent trends and significant correlations between monthly time series of TWS, SM, NDVI and GPP. We study how changes in atmosphere moisture stress and coupling of water storage components at different depth impact on the spatial and temporal correlation between TWS, SM and vegetation metrics. In Texas, we find that surface SM and GRACE TWS agree with each other in general, and both capture the underlying water supply constraints to vegetation growth. Triggered by a transit increase in precipitation following the 2011 hydrological drought, vegetation productivity in Texas shows more sensitivity to surface SM than TWS. In the Great Plains, the correspondence between TWS and vegetation productivity is modulated by temperature-induced atmosphere moisture stress and by the coupling between surface soil moisture and groundwater through irrigation.

  18. Improving flood prediction by the assimilation of satellite soil moisture in poorly monitored catchments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flood prediction in poorly monitored catchments is among the greatest challenges faced by hydrologists. To address this challenge, an increasing number of studies in the last decade have explored methods to integrate various existing observations from ground and satellites. One approach in particula...

  19. Active-Layer Soil Moisture Content Regional Variations in Alaska and Russia by Ground-Based and Satellite-Based Methods, 2002 Through 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muskett, Reginald; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Cable, William; Kholodov, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture is a vital physical parameter of the active-layer in permafrost environments, and associated biological and geophysical processes operative at the microscopic to hemispheric spatial scales and at hourly to multidecadal time scales. While in-situ measurements can give the highest quality of information on a site-specific basis, the vast permafrost terrains of North America and Eurasia require space-based techniques for assessments of cause and effect and long-term changes and impacts from the changes of permafrost and the active-layer. Satellite-based 6.925 and 10.65 GHz sensor algorithmic retrievals of soil moisture by Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - Earth Observation System (AMSR-E) onboard NASA-Aqua and follow-on AMSR2 onboard JAXA-Global Change Observation Mission - Water-1 are ongoing since July 2002. Accurate land-surface temperature and vegetation parameters are critical to the success of passive microwave algorithmic retrieval schemes. Strategically located soil moisture measurements are needed for spatial and temporal co-location evaluation and validation of the space-based algorithmic estimates. We compare on a daily basis ground-based (subsurface-probe) 50- and 70-MHz radio-frequency soil moisture measurements with NASA- and JAXA-algorithmic retrieval passive microwave retrievals. We find improvements in performance of the JAXA-algorithm (AMSR-E reprocessed and AMSR2 ongoing) relative to the earlier NASA-algorithm version. In the boreal forest regions accurate land-surface temperatures and vegetation parameters are still needed for algorithmic retrieval success. Over the period of AMSR-E retrievals we find evidence of at the high northern latitudes of growing terrestrial radio-frequency interference in the 10.65 GHz channel soil moisture content. This is an important error source for satellite-based active and passive microwave remote sensing soil moisture retrievals in Arctic regions that must be addressed. Ref: Muskett, R

  20. A synergistic approach for soil moisture estimation using modified Dubois model with dual-polarized SAR and optical satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanabalan, P.; Vidhya, R.

    2016-05-01

    This paper discusses about an estimation of soil moisture in agricultural region using SAR data with the use of HH and HV polarization. In this study the semi empirical approach derived by Dubois et al (1) was modified to work using (σdegHH) and σ°VV) so that soil moisture can be obtained for the larger area extent. The optical remote sensing is helps to monitor changes in vegetation biomass and canopy cover surface reflectance by using NDVI and LAI from which the site suitability from different land use/land cover are identified. The second use involves retrieve the backscattering coefficient valuesσ°) derived from SAR for soil moisture studies. In SAR techniques, the relative surface roughness can be directly estimate using surface roughness derivation empirical algorithms. The mid incidence angle is used to overcome the incidence angle effect and it worked successfully to this study. The modified Dubois Model (MDM) in combination with The Topp's et al (2) model is used to retrieve soil moisture. These two models have equations (HH, VV) and two independent variables i.e. root mean square height (s) and dielectric constant (epsilon). The linear regression analysis is performed and the surface roughness derived from SAR is well correlated with ground surface roughness having the value of (r2 = 0.69). By using the dielectric constant (epsilon) the modified Dubois model in combination with Topp's model are performed and the soil moisture is derived from SAR having value of (r2 = 0.60). Thus, the derived model is having good scope for soil moisture monitoring with present availability of SAR datasets.

  1. Soil Moisture Drought Monitoring and Forecasting Using Satellite and Climate Model Data over Southwestern China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuejun; Tang, Qiuhong; Liu, Xingcai; Leng, Guoyong; Li, Zhe

    2017-01-01

    Real-time monitoring and predicting drought development with several months in advance is of critical importance for drought risk adaptation and mitigation. In this paper, we present a drought monitoring and seasonal forecasting framework based on the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model over Southwest China (SW). The satellite precipitation data are used to force VIC model for near real-time estimate of land surface hydrologic conditions. As initialized with satellite-aided monitoring, the climate model-based forecast (CFSv2_VIC) and ensemble streamflow prediction (ESP)-based forecast (ESP_VIC) are both performed and evaluated through their ability in reproducing the evolution of the 2009/2010 severe drought over SW. The results show that the satellite-aided monitoring is able to provide reasonable estimate of forecast initial conditions (ICs) in a real-time manner. Both of CFSv2_VIC and ESP_VIC exhibit comparable performance against the observation-based estimates for the first month, whereas the predictive skill largely drops beyond 1-month. Compared to ESP_VIC, CFSv2_VIC shows better performance as indicated by the smaller ensemble range. This study highlights the value of this operational framework in generating near real-time ICs and giving a reliable prediction with 1-month ahead, which has great implications for drought risk assessment, preparation and relief.

  2. Development and Assessment of the Sand Dust Prediction Model by Utilizing Microwave-Based Satellite Soil Moisture and Reanalysis Datasets in East Asian Desert Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunglok Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For several decades, satellite-based microwave sensors have provided valuable soil moisture monitoring in various surface conditions. We have first developed a modeled aerosol optical depth (AOD dataset by utilizing Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2, and the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS soil moisture datasets in order to estimate dust outbreaks over desert areas of East Asia. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer- (MODIS- based AOD products were used as reference datasets to validate the modeled AOD (MA. The SMOS-based MA (SMOS-MA dataset showed good correspondence with observed AOD (R-value: 0.56 compared to AMSR2- and GLDAS-based MA datasets, and it overestimated AOD compared to observed AOD. The AMSR2-based MA dataset was found to underestimate AOD, and it showed a relatively low R-value (0.35 with respect to observed AOD. Furthermore, SMOS-MA products were able to simulate the short-term AOD trends, having a high R-value (0.65. The results of this study may allow us to acknowledge the utilization of microwave-based soil moisture datasets for investigation of near-real time dust outbreak predictions and short-term dust outbreak trend analysis.

  3. Characterizing Seasonal Drought, Water Supply Pattern and Their Impact on Vegetation Growth Using Satellite Soil Moisture Data, GRACE Water Storage and Precipitation Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, G.; Velicogna, I.; Kimball, J. S.; Du, J.; Kim, Y.; Njoku, E. G.; Colliander, A.

    2016-12-01

    We combine soil moisture (SM) data from AMSR-E, AMSR-2 and SMAP, terrestrial water storage (TWS) changes from GRACE and precipitation measurements from GPCP to delineate and characterize drought and water supply pattern and its impact on vegetation growth. GRACE TWS provides spatially continuous observations of total terrestrial water storage changes and regional drought extent, persistence and severity, while satellite derived soil moisture estimates provide enhanced delineation of plant-available soil moisture. Together these data provide complementary metrics quantifying available plant water supply and have important implications for water resource management. We use these data to investigate the supply changes from different water components in relation to satellite based vegetation productivity metrics from MODIS, before, during and following the major drought events observed in the continental US during the past 13 years. We observe consistent trends and significant correlations between monthly time series of TWS, SM, and vegetation productivity. In Texas and surrounding semi-arid areas, we find that the spatial pattern of the vegetation-moisture relation follows the gradient in mean annual precipitation. In Texas, GRACE TWS and surface SM show strong coupling and similar characteristic time scale in relatively normal years, while during the 2011 onward hydrological drought, GRACE TWS manifests a longer time scale than that of surface SM, implying stronger drought persistence in deeper water storage. In the Missouri watershed, we find a spatially varying vegetation-moisture relationship where in the drier northwestern portion of the basin, the inter-annual variability in summer vegetation productivity is closely associated with changes in carry-on GRACE TWS from spring, whereas in the moist southeastern portion of the basin, summer precipitation is the dominant controlling factor on vegetation growth.

  4. Soil Moisture Spatial Patterns in a Uniform Paulownia Tree Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil moisture spatial patterns have been studied at length in agricultural fields and pasture/rangelands as part of the USDA soil moisture satellite validation program, but recent research has begun to address the distribution of soil beneath a forest canopy. Forests cover a significant portion of ...

  5. Evaluation of HCMM satellite data for estuarine tidal circulation patterns and thermal inertia soil moisture measurements. [Delaware Bay, Cooper River, and the Potomac River estuaries; Luverne, Minnesota, soil moisture, and water temperature of Lake Anna, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesnet, D. R.; Mcginnis, D. F., Jr. (Principal Investigator); Matson, M.; Pritchard, J. A.

    1981-01-01

    Digital thermal maps of the Cooper River (SC) and the Potomac River estuaries were prepared from heat capacity mapping radiometer (HCMR) tapes. Tidal phases were correctly interpreted and verified. Synoptic surface circulation patterns were charted by location thermal fronts and water mass boundaries within the estuaries. Thermal anomalies were detected adjacent of a conventional power plant on the Potomac. Under optimum conditions, estuaries as small as the Cooper River can be monitored for generalized thermal/tidal circulation patterns by the HCMM-type IR sensors. The HCMM thermal inertia approach to estimating soil moisture at the Luverne (MN) test site was found to be unsatisfactory as a NESS operational satellite technique because of cloud cover interference. Thermal-IR data show similar structure of the Baltimore and Washington heat islands when compared to NOAA AVHRR thermal-IR data. Thermal anomalies from the warm water discharge water of a nuclear power plant were mapped in Lake Anna, Virginia.

  6. Contributions of Precipitation and Soil Moisture Observations to the Skill of Soil Moisture Estimates in a Land Data Assimilation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Liu, Qing; Bindlish, Rajat; Cosh, Michael H.; Crow, Wade T.; deJeu, Richard; DeLannoy, Gabrielle J. M.; Huffman, George J.; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions of precipitation and soil moisture observations to the skill of soil moisture estimates from a land data assimilation system are assessed. Relative to baseline estimates from the Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), the study investigates soil moisture skill derived from (i) model forcing corrections based on large-scale, gauge- and satellite-based precipitation observations and (ii) assimilation of surface soil moisture retrievals from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E). Soil moisture skill is measured against in situ observations in the continental United States at 44 single-profile sites within the Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) for which skillful AMSR-E retrievals are available and at four CalVal watersheds with high-quality distributed sensor networks that measure soil moisture at the scale of land model and satellite estimates. The average skill (in terms of the anomaly time series correlation coefficient R) of AMSR-E retrievals is R=0.39 versus SCAN and R=0.53 versus CalVal measurements. The skill of MERRA surface and root-zone soil moisture is R=0.42 and R=0.46, respectively, versus SCAN measurements, and MERRA surface moisture skill is R=0.56 versus CalVal measurements. Adding information from either precipitation observations or soil moisture retrievals increases surface soil moisture skill levels by IDDeltaR=0.06-0.08, and root zone soil moisture skill levels by DeltaR=0.05-0.07. Adding information from both sources increases surface soil moisture skill levels by DeltaR=0.13, and root zone soil moisture skill by DeltaR=0.11, demonstrating that precipitation corrections and assimilation of satellite soil moisture retrievals contribute similar and largely independent amounts of information.

  7. Assessing the impact of the 2015/2016 El Niño event on multi-satellite soil moisture over the Southern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorigo, Wouter; Bauer-Marschallinger, Bernhard; Depoorter, Mathieu; Miralles, Diego

    2016-04-01

    In the past, El Niño has severely invigorated drought conditions over large parts of the Southern Hemisphere causing enormous ecological and socio-economic damage (e.g., agricultural loss, water scarcity, bush fires). Accurate assessments of its impacts are therefore crucial for improving seasonal predictions that can help to prevent and mitigate these consequences. However, the impact of El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on drought conditions over land are not yet well understood, partly because of the difficulty of linking sea surface temperature anomalies to regional precipitation anomalies over land, partly because it is not straightforward to disentangle the ENSO signal from other seasonal and climate variability in the data. Here, we present a new statistical method for assessing the impact of ENSO on drought conditions over land, based on the relationship between the NINO3.4 ENSO index and ESA CCI long-term satellite observations of soil moisture. The new method is able to clearly separate the ENSO signal from other short-term and long-term variability in the soil moisture data, both in time and space. In the presentation we will show how the recent 2015/2016 El Niño has affected soil moisture in the Southern Hemisphere. In addition, we will show how the statistical method can be coupled to ENSO forecasts to predict the impact of future El Niño events on drought conditions up to 9 months ahead.

  8. Satellite Retrieval of Soil Moisture:An Overview%卫星遥感反演土壤水分研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈书林; 刘元波; 温作民

    2012-01-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable influencing a variety of land surface processes.Accurate estimation of spatio-temporally distributed soil moisture is one of the challenging issues in quantitative remote sensing.This paper briefly describes the major algorithms for retrieving soil moisture using optical,passive-microwave and active-microwave remote sensing,or their combinations.The optical algorithms have relatively low accuracy of retrieval,but good spatial and temporal resolutions.The typical algorithms include the Index-based approach and the soil thermal inertia-based approach.The passive-microwave algorithms have relative high accuracy but low spatial resolutions.It can be grouped into the retrieval approaches for soil moisture only and the approaches for relevant parameters in addition to soil moisture.The active-microwave algorithms have generally high accuracy with a high spatial resolution.The algorithms can be divided into three classes: empirical,physical and semi-empirical approaches.In addition,a number of algorithms have been proposed,which combines in particular optical,passive-microwave,or active-microwave data.Because the algorithms often combine the advantages of the multi-sensors,they can achieve a high accuracy with a good spatial resolution.With the achievement of retrieval techniques,several global soil moisture data sets have been generated.The widely used data sets include the European Remote Sensing satellites/ Meteorological Operational satellite programme(ERS/MetOp) data sets,the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS(AMSR-E) data sets,and the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity(SMOS) data sets.The ERS/MetOp data sets provides global soil moisture data with a spatial resolution of 25-km so far since July,1991,retrieved from the TU-Wien approach using C-band microwave data.The AMSR-E data sets provides global soil moisture data with a spatial resolution of 25-km for the period from June,2002 to September,2011,retrieved from the Land

  9. Large Scale Evaluation of AMSR-E Soil Moisture Products Based on Ground Soil Moisture Network Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhier, C.; de Rosnay, P.; Richaume, P.; Kerr, Y.; Rudiger, C.; Boulet, G.; Walker, J. P.; Mougin, E.; Ceschia, E.; Calvet, J.

    2007-05-01

    This paper presents an evaluation of AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS) soil moisture products, based on a comparison with three ground soil moisture networks. The selected ground sites are representative of various climatic, hydrologic and environmental conditions in temperate and semi-arid areas. They are located in the south-west of France, south-east of Australia and the Gourma region of the Sahel. These sites were respectively implemented in the framework of the projects SMOSREX (Surface Monitoring Of Soil Reservoir Experiment), SASMAS/GoREx (Scaling and Assimilation of Soil Moisture and Streamflow in the Goulburn River Experimental catchment) and AMMA (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). In all cases, the arrangement of the soil moisture measuring sites was specifically designed to address the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture in the context of the preparation of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity) project. For the purpose of this study, 25km AMSR-E products were used, including brightness temperatures at 6.9 and 10.7 GHz, and derived soil moisture. The study is focused on the year 2005. It is based on ground soil moisture network measurements from 4 stations for SMOSREX extended to the SUDOUEST project of CESBIO, 12 stations for GoRex, and 4 stations for AMMA. Temporal and spatial features of soil moisture variability and stability is a critical issue to be addressed for remotely sensed soil moisture validation. While ground measurements provide information on soil moisture dynamics at local scale and high temporal resolution (hourly), satellite measurements are sparser in time (up to several days), but cover a larger region (25km x 25km for AMSR-E). First, a statistical analysis, including mean relative difference and Spearman rank, is conducted for the three soil moisture networks. This method is mainly based on the approach proposed by Cosh et al. (2004) for the purpose of the use of ground networks for

  10. Passive microwave soil moisture research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T.; Oneill, P. E.; Wang, J. R.

    1986-01-01

    During the four years of the AgRISTARS Program, significant progress was made in quantifying the capabilities of microwave sensors for the remote sensing of soil moisture. In this paper, a discussion is provided of the results of numerous field and aircraft experiments, analysis of spacecraft data, and modeling activities which examined the various noise factors such as roughness and vegetation that affect the interpretability of microwave emission measurements. While determining that a 21-cm wavelength radiometer was the best single sensor for soil moisture research, these studies demonstrated that a multisensor approach will provide more accurate soil moisture information for a wider range of naturally occurring conditions.

  11. Early Soil Moisture Field Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmugge, T.

    2008-12-01

    Before the large scale field experiments described in the call for papers, there were a number of experiments devoted to a single parameter, e.g. soil moisture. In the early 1970's, before the launch of the first microwave radiometer by NASA, there were a number of aircraft experiments to determine utility of these sensors for land observations. For soil moisture, these experiments were conducted in southwestern United States over irrigated agricultural areas which could provide a wide range of moisture conditions on a given day. The radiometers covered the wavelength range from 0.8 to 21 cm. These experiments demonstrated that it is possible to observe soil moisture variations remotely using a microwave radiometer with a sensitivity of about 3 K / unit of soil moisture. The results also showed that the longer wavelengths were better, with a radiometer at the 21 cm wavelength giving the best results. These positive results led to the development of Push Broom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR) and the Electrically Scanned Thinned Array Radiometer (ESTAR) instruments at the 21-cm wavelength. They have been used extensively in the large-scale experiments such as HAPEX-MOBILHY, FIFE, Monsoon90, SMEX, etc. The multi-beam nature of these instruments makes it possible to obtain more extensive coverage and thus to map spatial variations of surface soil moisture. Examples of the early results along with the more recent soil moisture maps will be presented.

  12. A Quasi-Global Approach to Improve Day-Time Satellite Surface Soil Moisture Anomalies through the Land Surface Temperature Input

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Parinussa

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Passive microwave observations from various spaceborne sensors have been linked to the soil moisture of the Earth’s surface layer. A new generation of passive microwave sensors are dedicated to retrieving this variable and make observations in the single theoretically optimal L-band frequency (1–2 GHz. Previous generations of passive microwave sensors made observations in a range of higher frequencies, allowing for simultaneous estimation of additional variables required for solving the radiative transfer equation. One of these additional variables is land surface temperature, which plays a unique role in the radiative transfer equation and has an influence on the final quality of retrieved soil moisture anomalies. This study presents an optimization procedure for soil moisture retrievals through a quasi-global precipitation-based verification technique, the so-called Rvalue metric. Various land surface temperature scenarios were evaluated in which biases were added to an existing linear regression, specifically focusing on improving the skills to capture the temporal variability of soil moisture. We focus on the relative quality of the day-time (01:30 pm observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observing System (AMSR-E, as these are theoretically most challenging due to the thermal equilibrium theory, and existing studies indicate that larger improvements are possible for these observations compared to their night-time (01:30 am equivalent. Soil moisture data used in this study were retrieved through the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM, and in line with theory, both satellite paths show a unique and distinct degradation as a function of vegetation density. Both the ascending (01:30 pm and descending (01:30 am paths of the publicly available and widely used AMSR-E LPRM soil moisture products were used for benchmarking purposes. Several scenarios were employed in which the land surface temperature input for

  13. Satellite-observed changes in vegetation sensitivities to surface soil moisture and total water storage variations since the 2011 Texas drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Geruo; Velicogna, Isabella; Kimball, John S.; Du, Jinyang; Kim, Youngwook; Colliander, Andreas; Njoku, Eni

    2017-05-01

    We combine soil moisture (SM) data from AMSR-E and AMSR-2, and changes in terrestrial water storage (TWS) from time-variable gravity data from GRACE to delineate and characterize the evolution of drought and its impact on vegetation growth. GRACE-derived TWS provides spatially continuous observations of changes in overall water supply and regional drought extent, persistence and severity, while satellite-derived SM provides enhanced delineation of shallow-depth soil water supply. Together these data provide complementary metrics quantifying available plant water supply. We use these data to investigate the supply changes from water components at different depths in relation to satellite-based enhanced vegetation index (EVI) and gross primary productivity (GPP) from MODIS and solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) from GOME-2, during and following major drought events observed in the state of Texas, USA and its surrounding semiarid area for the past decade. We find that in normal years the spatial pattern of the vegetation-moisture relationship follows the gradient in mean annual precipitation. However since the 2011 hydrological drought, vegetation growth shows enhanced sensitivity to surface SM variations in the grassland area located in central Texas, implying that the grassland, although susceptible to drought, has the capacity for a speedy recovery. Vegetation dependency on TWS weakens in the shrub-dominated west and strengthens in the grassland and forest area spanning from central to eastern Texas, consistent with changes in water supply pattern. We find that in normal years GRACE TWS shows strong coupling and similar characteristic time scale to surface SM, while in drier years GRACE TWS manifests stronger persistence, implying longer recovery time and prolonged water supply constraint on vegetation growth. The synergistic combination of GRACE TWS and surface SM, along with remote-sensing vegetation observations provides new insights into drought impact on

  14. Evaluation of three different data fusion approaches that uses satellite soil moisture from different passive microwave sensors to construct one consistent climate record

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Schalie, Robin; de Jeu, Richard; Kerr, Yann; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Rodríguez-Fernández, Nemesio; Al-Yaari, Amen; Drusch, Matthias; Mecklenburg, Susanne; Dolman, Han

    2016-04-01

    Datasets that are derived from satellite observations are becoming increasingly important for measuring key parameters of the Earth's climate and are therefore crucial in research on climate change, giving the opportunity to researchers to detect anomalies and long-term trends globally. One of these key parameters is soil moisture (SM), which has a large impact on water, energy and biogeochemical cycles worldwide. A long-term SM data record from active and passive microwave satellite observations was developed as part of ESA's Climate Change Initiative (ESA-CCI-SM, http://www.esa-soilmoisture-cci.org/). Currently the dataset covers a period from 1978 to 2014 and is updated regularly, observations from a several microwave satellites including: ERS-1, ERS-2, METOP-A, Nimbus 7 SMMR, DMSP SSM/I, TRMM TMI, Aqua AMSRE, Coriolis WindSat, and GCOM-W1 AMSR2. In 2009, ESA launched the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS, Kerr et al., 2010) mission, carrying onboard a unique L-band radiometer, but its SM retrievals are not yet part of this dataset. Due to the different radiometric characteristics of SMOS, integrating SMOS into the ESA-CCI-SM dataset is not straight forward. Therefore several approaches have been tested to fuse soil moisture retrievals from SMOS and AMSRE, which currently forms the basis of the passive microwave part within ESA-CCI-SM project. These approaches are: 1. A Neural Network Fusion approach (Rodríguez-Fernández et al., 2015), 2. A regression approach (Wigneron et al., 2004; Al-Yaari et al., 2015) and 3. A radiative transfer based approach, using the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (Van der Schalie et al., 2016). This study evaluates the three different approaches and tests their skills against multiple datasets, including MERRA-Land, ERA-Interim/Land, the current ESA-CCI-SM v2.2 and in situ measurements from the International Soil Moisture Network and present a recommendation for the potential integration of SMOS soil moisture into the ESA

  15. Evaluating the utility of satellite soil moisture retrievals over irrigated areas and the ability of land data assimilation methods to correct for unmodeled processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. V.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Santanello, J. A.; Reichle, R. H.; Draper, C. S.; Koster, R. D.; Nearing, G.; Jasinski, M. F.

    2015-11-01

    Earth's land surface is characterized by tremendous natural heterogeneity and human-engineered modifications, both of which are challenging to represent in land surface models. Satellite remote sensing is often the most practical and effective method to observe the land surface over large geographical areas. Agricultural irrigation is an important human-induced modification to natural land surface processes, as it is pervasive across the world and because of its significant influence on the regional and global water budgets. In this article, irrigation is used as an example of a human-engineered, often unmodeled land surface process, and the utility of satellite soil moisture retrievals over irrigated areas in the continental US is examined. Such retrievals are based on passive or active microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, WindSat and the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT). The analysis suggests that the skill of these retrievals for representing irrigation effects is mixed, with ASCAT-based products somewhat more skillful than SMOS and AMSR2 products. The article then examines the suitability of typical bias correction strategies in current land data assimilation systems when unmodeled processes dominate the bias between the model and the observations. Using a suite of synthetic experiments that includes bias correction strategies such as quantile mapping and trained forward modeling, it is demonstrated that the bias correction practices lead to the exclusion of the signals from unmodeled processes, if these processes are the major source of the biases. It is further shown that new methods are needed to preserve the observational information about unmodeled processes during data assimilation.

  16. Evaluating the Utility of Satellite Soil Moisture Retrievals over Irrigated Areas and the Ability of Land Data Assimilation Methods to Correct for Unmodeled Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, S. V.; Peters-Lidard, C. D.; Santanello, J. A.; Reichle, R. H.; Draper, C. S.; Koster, R. D.; Nearing, G.; Jasinski, M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Earth's land surface is characterized by tremendous natural heterogeneity and human-engineered modifications, both of which are challenging to represent in land surface models. Satellite remote sensing is often the most practical and effective method to observe the land surface over large geographical areas. Agricultural irrigation is an important human-induced modification to natural land surface processes, as it is pervasive across the world and because of its significant influence on the regional and global water budgets. In this article, irrigation is used as an example of a human-engineered, often unmodeled land surface process, and the utility of satellite soil moisture retrievals over irrigated areas in the continental US is examined. Such retrievals are based on passive or active microwave observations from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission, WindSat and the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT). The analysis suggests that the skill of these retrievals for representing irrigation effects is mixed, with ASCAT-based products somewhat more skillful than SMOS and AMSR2 products. The article then examines the suitability of typical bias correction strategies in current land data assimilation systems when unmodeled processes dominate the bias between the model and the observations. Using a suite of synthetic experiments that includes bias correction strategies such as quantile mapping and trained forward modeling, it is demonstrated that the bias correction practices lead to the exclusion of the signals from unmodeled processes, if these processes are the major source of the biases. It is further shown that new methods are needed to preserve the observational information about unmodeled processes during data assimilation.

  17. Nematode survival in relation to soil moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    Established nematode populations are very persistent in the soil. It is known that they need sufficient soil moisture for movement, feeding and reproduction (fig. 5), and that there are adverse soil moisture conditions which they cannot survive. The influence of soil moisture on survival of nematode

  18. Nematode survival in relation to soil moisture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, W.R.

    1973-01-01

    Established nematode populations are very persistent in the soil. It is known that they need sufficient soil moisture for movement, feeding and reproduction (fig. 5), and that there are adverse soil moisture conditions which they cannot survive. The influence of soil moisture on survival

  19. A Novel Bias Correction Method for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Soil Moisture: Retrieval Ensembles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyoung Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bias correction is a very important pre-processing step in satellite data assimilation analysis, as data assimilation itself cannot circumvent satellite biases. We introduce a retrieval algorithm-specific and spatially heterogeneous Instantaneous Field of View (IFOV bias correction method for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS soil moisture. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first paper to present the probabilistic presentation of SMOS soil moisture using retrieval ensembles. We illustrate that retrieval ensembles effectively mitigated the overestimation problem of SMOS soil moisture arising from brightness temperature errors over West Africa in a computationally efficient way (ensemble size: 12, no time-integration. In contrast, the existing method of Cumulative Distribution Function (CDF matching considerably increased the SMOS biases, due to the limitations of relying on the imperfect reference data. From the validation at two semi-arid sites, Benin (moderately wet and vegetated area and Niger (dry and sandy bare soils, it was shown that the SMOS errors arising from rain and vegetation attenuation were appropriately corrected by ensemble approaches. In Benin, the Root Mean Square Errors (RMSEs decreased from 0.1248 m3/m3 for CDF matching to 0.0678 m3/m3 for the proposed ensemble approach. In Niger, the RMSEs decreased from 0.14 m3/m3 for CDF matching to 0.045 m3/m3 for the ensemble approach.

  20. Relationships between GPP, Satellite Measures of Greenness and Canopy Water Content with Soil Moisture in Mediterranean-Climate Grassland and Oak Savanna

    OpenAIRE

    Shishi Liu; Chadwick, Oliver A.; Roberts,Dar.A.; Chris J. Still

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the impact of soil moisture on gross primary production (GPP), chlorophyll content, and canopy water content represented by remotely sensed vegetation indices (VIs) in an open grassland and an oak savanna in California. We found for the annual grassland that GPP late in the growing season was controlled by the declining soil moisture, but there was a 10–20-day lag in the response of GPP to soil moisture. However, during the early and middle part of the growing season, solar ra...

  1. Drought monitoring with soil moisture active passive (SMAP) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashok; Vu, Tue; Veettil, Anoop Valiya; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-09-01

    Recent launch of space-borne systems to estimate surface soil moisture may expand the capability to map soil moisture deficit and drought with global coverage. In this study, we use Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil moisture geophysical retrieval products from passive L-band radiometer to evaluate its applicability to forming agricultural drought indices. Agricultural drought is quantified using the Soil Water Deficit Index (SWDI) based on SMAP and soil properties (field capacity and available water content) information. The soil properties are computed using pedo-transfer function with soil characteristics derived from Harmonized World Soil Database. The SMAP soil moisture product needs to be rescaled to be compatible with the soil parameters derived from the in situ stations. In most locations, the rescaled SMAP information captured the dynamics of in situ soil moisture well and shows the expected lag between accumulations of precipitation and delayed increased in surface soil moisture. However, the SMAP soil moisture itself does not reveal the drought information. Therefore, the SMAP based SWDI (SMAP_SWDI) was computed to improve agriculture drought monitoring by using the latest soil moisture retrieval satellite technology. The formulation of SWDI does not depend on longer data and it will overcome the limited (short) length of SMAP data for agricultural drought studies. The SMAP_SWDI is further compared with in situ Atmospheric Water Deficit (AWD) Index. The comparison shows close agreement between SMAP_SWDI and AWD in drought monitoring over Contiguous United States (CONUS), especially in terms of drought characteristics. The SMAP_SWDI was used to construct drought maps for CONUS and compared with well-known drought indices, such as, AWD, Palmer Z-Index, sc-PDSI and SPEI. Overall the SMAP_SWDI is an effective agricultural drought indicator and it provides continuity and introduces new spatial mapping capability for drought monitoring. As an

  2. Misrepresentation and amendment of soil moisture in conceptual hydrological modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    Although many conceptual models are very effective in simulating river runoff, their soil moisture schemes are generally not realistic in comparison with the reality (i.e., getting the right answers for the wrong reasons). This study reveals two significant misrepresentations in those models through a case study using the Xinanjiang model which is representative of many well-known conceptual hydrological models. The first is the setting of the upper limit of its soil moisture at the field capacity, due to the 'holding excess runoff' concept (i.e., runoff begins on repletion of its storage to the field capacity). The second is neglect of capillary rise of water movement. A new scheme is therefore proposed to overcome those two issues. The amended model is as effective as its original form in flow modelling, but represents more logically realistic soil water processes. The purpose of the study is to enable the hydrological model to get the right answers for the right reasons. Therefore, the new model structure has a better capability in potentially assimilating soil moisture observations to enhance its real-time flood forecasting accuracy. The new scheme is evaluated in the Pontiac catchment of the USA through a comparison with satellite observed soil moisture. The correlation between the XAJ and the observed soil moisture is enhanced significantly from 0.64 to 0.70. In addition, a new soil moisture term called SMDS (Soil Moisture Deficit to Saturation) is proposed to complement the conventional SMD (Soil Moisture Deficit).

  3. Calibration and validation of the COSMOS rover for surface soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mobile COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS) rover may be useful for validating satellite-based estimates of near surface soil moisture, but the accuracy with which the rover can measure 0-5 cm soil moisture has not been previously determined. Our objectives were to calibrate and va...

  4. Measurement of soil moisture using gypsum blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Dela, B.

    the building. Consequently, measuring the moisture of the surrounding soil is of great importance for detecting the source of moisture in a building. Up till now, information has been needed to carry out individual calibrations for the different types of gypsum blocks available on the market and to account......For the past 50 years, gypsum blocks have been used to determine soil moisture content. This report describes a method for calibrating gypsum blocks for soil moisture measurements. Moisture conditions inside a building are strongly influenced by the moisture conditions in the soil surrounding...

  5. Measurement of soil moisture using gypsum blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Dela, B.

    For the past 50 years, gypsum blocks have been used to determine soil moisture content. This report describes a method for calibrating gypsum blocks for soil moisture measurements. Moisture conditions inside a building are strongly influenced by the moisture conditions in the soil surrounding...... the building. Consequently, measuring the moisture of the surrounding soil is of great importance for detecting the source of moisture in a building. Up till now, information has been needed to carry out individual calibrations for the different types of gypsum blocks available on the market and to account...

  6. Modeling soil moisture memory in savanna ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gou, S.; Miller, G. R.

    2011-12-01

    Antecedent soil conditions create an ecosystem's "memory" of past rainfall events. Such soil moisture memory effects may be observed over a range of timescales, from daily to yearly, and lead to feedbacks between hydrological and ecosystem processes. In this study, we modeled the soil moisture memory effect on savanna ecosystems in California, Arizona, and Africa, using a system dynamics model created to simulate the ecohydrological processes at the plot-scale. The model was carefully calibrated using soil moisture and evapotranspiration data collected at three study sites. The model was then used to simulate scenarios with various initial soil moisture conditions and antecedent precipitation regimes, in order to study the soil moisture memory effects on the evapotranspiration of understory and overstory species. Based on the model results, soil texture and antecedent precipitation regime impact the redistribution of water within soil layers, potentially causing deeper soil layers to influence the ecosystem for a longer time. Of all the study areas modeled, soil moisture memory of California savanna ecosystem site is replenished and dries out most rapidly. Thus soil moisture memory could not maintain the high rate evapotranspiration for more than a few days without incoming rainfall event. On the contrary, soil moisture memory of Arizona savanna ecosystem site lasts the longest time. The plants with different root depths respond to different memory effects; shallow-rooted species mainly respond to the soil moisture memory in the shallow soil. The growing season of grass is largely depended on the soil moisture memory of the top 25cm soil layer. Grass transpiration is sensitive to the antecedent precipitation events within daily to weekly timescale. Deep-rooted plants have different responses since these species can access to the deeper soil moisture memory with longer time duration Soil moisture memory does not have obvious impacts on the phenology of woody plants

  7. The Sodankylä in situ soil moisture observation network: an example application of ESA CCI soil moisture product evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikonen, Jaakko; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Smolander, Tuomo; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Bircher, Simone; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2016-04-01

    During the last decade there has been considerable development in remote sensing techniques relating to soil moisture retrievals over large areas. Within the framework of the European Space Agency's (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI) a new soil moisture product has been generated, merging different satellite-based surface soil moisture based products. Such remotely sensed data need to be validated by means of in situ observations in different climatic regions. In that context, a comprehensive, distributed network of in situ measurement stations gathering information on soil moisture, as well as soil temperature, has been set up in recent years at the Finnish Meteorological Institute's (FMI) Sodankylä Arctic research station. The network forms a calibration and validation (CAL-VAL) reference site and is used as a tool to evaluate the validity of satellite retrievals of soil properties. In this paper we present the Sodankylä CAL-VAL reference site soil moisture observation network, its instrumentation as well as its areal representativeness over the study area and the region in general as a whole. As an example of data utilization, comparisons of spatially weighted average top-layer soil moisture observations between the years 2012 and 2014 against ESA CCI soil moisture data product estimates are presented and discussed. The comparisons were made against a single ESA CCI data product pixel encapsulating most of the Sodankylä CAL-VAL network sites. Comparisons are made with daily averaged and running weekly averaged soil moisture data as well as through application of an exponential soil moisture filter. The overall achieved correlation between the ESA CCI data product and in situ observations varies considerably (from 0.479 to 0.637) depending on the applied comparison perspective. Similarly, depending on the comparison perspective used, inter-annual correlation comparison results exhibit even more pronounced variation, ranging from 0.166 to 0.840.

  8. The L-band PBMR measurements of surface soil moisture in FIFE. [First International satellite land surface climatology project Field Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James R.; Shiue, James C.; Schmugge, Thomas J.; Engman, Edwin T.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center's L-band pushbroom microwave radiometer (PBMR) aboard the NASA C-130 aircraft was used to map surface soil moisture at and around the Konza Prairie Natural Research Area in Kansas during the four intensive field campaigns of FIFE in May-October 1987. There was a total of 11 measurements was made when soils were known to be saturated. This measurement was used for the calibration of the vegetation effect on the microwave absorption. Based on this calibration, the data from other measurements on other days were inverted to generate the soil moisture maps. Good agreement was found when the estimated soil moisture values were compared to those independently measured on the ground at a number of widely separated locations. There was a slight bias between the estimated and measured values, the estimated soil moisture on the average being lower by about 1.8 percent. This small bias, however, was accounted for by the difference in time of the radiometric measurements and the soil moisture ground sampling.

  9. Soil moisture mapping for aquarius

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquarius is the first satellite to provide both passive and active L-band observations of the Earth. In addition, the instruments on Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-D (SAC-D) provide complementary information for analysis and retrieval algorithms. Our research focuses on the retrieval of soil m...

  10. Soil Moisture Remote Sensing using GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, Clara

    Ground-reflected Global Positioning System (GPS) signals can be used opportunistically to infer changes in land-surface characteristics surrounding a GPS monument. GPS satellites transmit at L-band, and at microwave frequencies the permittivity of the ground surface changes primarily due to its moisture content. Temporal changes in ground-reflected GPS signals are thus indicative of temporal changes in the moisture content surrounding a GPS antenna. The interference pattern of the direct and reflected GPS signal for a single satellite track is recorded in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) data. Alternating constructive and destructive interference as the satellite passes over the antenna results in a noisy oscillating wave at low satellite elevation angles, from which the phase, amplitude, and frequency (or reflector height) can be calculated. Here, an electrodynamic model that simulates SNR data is validated against field observations. The model is then used to show that temporal changes in these SNR metrics may be used to estimate changes in surface soil moisture in the top 5 cm of the soil column. Results show that changes in SNR phase are best correlated with changes in soil moisture, with an approximately linear slope. Surface roughness decreases the sensitivity of SNR phase to soil moisture, though the effect is not significant for small roughness values (moisture is to be estimated using phase data. An algorithm is presented that uses modeled relationships between canopy parameters and SNR metrics to remove seasonal vegetation effects from the phase time series, from which soil moisture time series may be estimated. Results indicate that this algorithm can successfully estimate surface soil moisture with an RMSE of 0.05 cm3 cm-3 or lower for many of the antennas that comprise the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) network.

  11. Upscaling In Situ Soil Moisture Observations to Pixel Averages with Spatio-Temporal Geostatistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghao Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Validation of satellite-based soil moisture products is necessary to provide users with an assessment of their accuracy and reliability and to ensure quality of information. A key step in the validation process is to upscale point-scale, ground-based soil moisture observations to satellite-scale pixel averages. When soil moisture shows high spatial heterogeneity within pixels, a strategy which captures the spatial characteristics is essential for the upscaling process. In addition, temporal variation in soil moisture must be taken into account when measurement times of ground-based and satellite-based observations are not the same. We applied spatio-temporal regression block kriging (STRBK to upscale in situ soil moisture observations collected as time series at multiple locations to pixel averages. STRBK incorporates auxiliary information such as maps of vegetation and land surface temperature to improve predictions and exploits the spatio-temporal correlation structure of the point-scale soil moisture observations. In addition, STRBK also quantifies the uncertainty associated with the upscaled soil moisture which allows bias detection and significance testing of satellite-based soil moisture products. The approach is illustrated with a real-world application for upscaling in situ soil moisture observations for validating the Polarimetric L-band Multi-beam Radiometer (PLMR retrieved soil moisture product in the Heihe Water Allied Telemetry Experimental Research experiment (HiWATER. The results show that STRBK yields upscaled soil moisture predictions that are sufficiently accurate for validation purposes. Comparison of the upscaled predictions with PLMR soil moisture observations shows that the root-mean-squared error of the PLMR soil moisture product is about 0.03 m3·m−3 and can be used as a high-resolution soil moisture product for watershed-scale soil moisture monitoring.

  12. A Framework for Assessing Soil Moisture Deficit and Crop Water Stress at Multiple Space and Time Scales Under Climate Change Scenarios Using Model Platform, Satellite Remote Sensing, and Decision Support System

    KAUST Repository

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    2016-11-03

    Better understanding of water cycle at different space–time scales would be a key for sustainable water resources, agricultural production, and ecosystems health in the twenty-first century. Efficient agricultural water management is necessary for sustainability of the growing global population. This warrants better predictive tools for aridity (based on precipitation, temperature, land use, and land cover), root zone (~top 1 m) soil moisture deficit, and crop water stress at farm, county, state, region, and national level, where decisions are made to allocate and manage the water resources. It will provide useful strategies for not only efficient water use but also for reducing potential risk of crop failure due to agricultural drought. Leveraging heavily on ongoing multiscale hydrologic modeling, data assimilation, soil moisture dynamics, and inverse model development research activities, and ongoing Land Data Assimilation (LDAS) and National Climate Assessment (NCA) indexing efforts we are developing a drought assessment framework. The drought assessment platform includes: (1) developing disaggregation methods for extracting various field-scale (1-km or less) climate indicators from the (SMOS, VIIRS, SMAP, AMSR-2) satellite / LDAS-based soil moisture in conjunction with a multimodel simulation–optimization approach using ensemble of Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer, SVAT (Noah, CLM, VIC, Mosaic in LIS) models; (2) predicting farm/field-scale long-term root zone soil moisture status under various land management and climate scenarios for the past decades in hindcast mode and for the next decades in forecast mode across the USA using effective land surface parameters and meteorological input from Global Circulation Model (GCM) outputs; (3) assessing the potential risk of agricultural drought at different space–time scales across the USA based on predicted root zone soil moisture; and (4) evaluating various water management and cropping practices (e

  13. Impact of SMOS soil moisture data assimilation on NCEP-GFS forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, X.; Zheng, W.; Meng, J.; Dong, J.; Ek, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil moisture is one of the few critical land surface state variables that have long memory to impact the exchanges of water, energy and carbon between the land surface and atmosphere. Accurate information about soil moisture status is thus required for numerical weather, seasonal climate and hydrological forecast as well as for agricultural production forecasts, water management and many other water related economic or social activities. Since the successful launch of ESA's soil moisture ocean salinity (SMOS) mission in November 2009, about 2 years of soil moisture retrievals has been collected. SMOS is believed to be the currently best satellite sensors for soil moisture remote sensing. Therefore, it becomes interesting to examine how the collected SMOS soil moisture data are compared with other satellite-sensed soil moisture retrievals (such as NASA's Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer -AMSR-E and EUMETSAT's Advanced Scatterometer - ASCAT)), in situ soil moisture measurements, and how these data sets impact numerical weather prediction models such as the Global Forecast System of NOAA-NCEP. This study implements the Ensemble Kalman filter in GFS to assimilate the AMSR-E, ASCAT and SMOS soil moisture observations after a quantitative assessment of their error rate based on in situ measurements from ground networks around contiguous United States. in situ soil moisture measurements from ground networks (such as USDA Soil Climate Analysis network - SCAN and NOAA's U.S. Climate Reference Network -USCRN) are used to evaluate the GFS soil moisture simulations (analysis). The benefits and uncertainties of assimilating the satellite data products in GFS are examined by comparing the GFS forecasts of surface temperature and rainfall with and without the assimilations. From these examinations, the advantages of SMOS soil moisture data products over other satellite soil moisture data sets will be evaluated. The next step toward operationally assimilating soil moisture

  14. A soil moisture climatology of Illinois

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollinger, S.E.; Isard, S.A. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States) Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Ten years of soil moisture measurements (biweekly from March through September and monthly during winter) within the top 1 m of soil at 17 grass-covered sites across Illinois are analyzed to provide a climatology of soil moisture for this important Midwest agricultural region. Soil moisture measurements were obtained with neutron probes that were calibrated for each site. Measurement errors are dependent upon the volumetric water content with errors less than 20 percent when soil moisture is above 0 percent of soil volume. Single point errors in moisture measurements from the top 1 m of soil range from 6 percent to 13 percent when volumetric soil moisture is 30 percent of soil volume. The average depletion in moisture between winter and summer over the 10-year period for the top 2 m of soil in Illinois was 72.3 mm. Three-quarters of this decrease occurred above 0.5 m and only 5 percent occurred between the 1.0-m and 2.0-m depths. The average moisture decrease between winter and summer during a wet year (1985) and a drought year (1988) in the top 2 m of soil was 64 percent and 204 percent of the average for the 10-year period, respectively. Seasonal means in soil moisture averaged for the state show the effects of different seasons and soil types on soil moisture. In the winter and spring a latitudinal gradient exists with the wetter soils in the southern part of the state. During summer and autumn there is a longitudinal gradient with the wetter soils in the eastern half of the state. The longitudinal gradient is closely associated with the depth of loess deposits.

  15. Combining satellite radar altimetry, SAR surface soil moisture and GRACE total storage changes for model calibration and validation in a large ungauged catchment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milzow, Christian; Krogh, Pernille Engelbredt; Bauer-Gottwein, Peter

    2010-01-01

    hundred meters; and (iii) Temporal changes of the Earth’s gravity field recorded by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) caused by total water storage changes in the catchment. The SSM data are compared to simulated moisture conditions in the top soil layer. They cannot be used for model...

  16. Response of grassland ecosystems to prolonged soil moisture deficit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Morgan A.; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo E.; Barnes, Mallory L.; Hottenstein, John D.; Moran, M. Susan

    2014-05-01

    species assemblage. The magnitude of change was related to the precipitation regime, where grasslands in hyper-arid and humid regimes were least likely to be affected by prolonged soil moisture deficit, and semiarid and mesic grasslands were most likely to be impacted, depending on the duration of the deficit. These results were applied to a large grassland region in Australia with soil moisture estimates from the European Space Agency (ESA) Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) sensor to demonstrate the continental-scale potential of this application with satellite measurements. These results are even more relevant for application with the higher-resolution NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) products to be available in 2015.

  17. Field scale spatio-temporal soil moisture variability for trafficability and crop water availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Coleen; van der Ploeg, Martine; Ritsema, Coen

    2016-04-01

    Spatio-temporal patterns of soil moisture have been studied mostly for inputs in land surface models for weather and climate predictions. Remote sensing techniques for estimation of soil moisture have been explored because of the good spatial coverage at different scales. Current available satellite data provide surface soil moisture as microwave systems only measure soil moisture content up to 5cm soil depth. The OWAS1S project will focus on estimation of soil moisture from freely available Sentinel-1 datasets for operational water management in agricultural areas. As part of the project, it is essential to develop spatio-temporal methods to estimate root zone soil moisture from surface soil moisture. This will be used for crop water availability and trafficability in selected agricultural fields in the Netherlands. A network of single capacitance sensors installed per field will provide continuous measurements of soil moisture in the study area. Ground penetrating radar will be used to measure soil moisture variability within a single field for different time periods. During wetter months, optimal conditions for traffic will be assessed using simultaneous soil strength and soil moisture measurements. Towards water deficit periods, focus is on the relation (or the lack thereof) between surface soil moisture and root zone soil moisture to determine the amount of water for crops. Spatio-temporal distribution will determine important physical controls for surface and root zone soil moisture and provide insights for root-zone soil moisture. Existing models for field scale soil-water balance and data assimilation methods (e.g. Kalman filter) will be combined to estimate root zone soil moisture. Furthermore, effects of root development on soil structure and soil hydraulic properties and subsequent effects on trafficability and crop water availability will be investigated. This research project has recently started, therefore we want to present methods and framework of

  18. Predicting root zone soil moisture using surface data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfreda, S.; Brocca, L.; Moramarco, T.; Melone, F.; Sheffield, J.; Fiorentino, M.

    2012-04-01

    In recent years, much effort has been given to monitoring of soil moisture from satellite remote sensing. These tools represent an extraordinary source of information for hydrological applications, but they only provide information on near-surface soil moisture. In the present work, we developed a new formulation for the estimation of the soil moisture in the root zone based on the measured value of soil moisture at the surface. The method derives from a simplified form of the soil water balance equation and for this reason all parameters adopted are physically consistent. The formulation provides a closed form of the relationship between the root zone soil moisture and the surface soil moisture with a limited number of parameters, such as: the ratio between the depth of the surface layer and the deeper layer, the water loss coefficient, and the field capacity. The method has been tested using modeled soil moisture obtained from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). The NLDAS is a multi-institution partnership aimed at developing a retrospective data set, using available atmospheric and land surface meteorological observations to compute the land surface hydrological budget. The NLDAS database was extremely useful for the scope of the present research since it provides simulated data over an extended area with different climatic and physical condition and moreover it provides soil moisture data averaged over different depths. In particular, we used values in the top 10 cm and 100 cm layers. One year of simulation was used to test the ability of the developed method to describe soil moisture fluctuation in the 100cm layer over the entire NLDAS domain. The method was adopted by calibrating one of its three parameters and defining the remaining two based on physical characteristics of the site (using the potential evapotranspiration and ratio between the first and the second soil layer depth). In general, the method performed better than

  19. Response of spectral vegetation indices to soil moisture in grasslands and shrublands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Ji, L.; Wylie, B.K.

    2011-01-01

    The relationships between satellite-derived vegetation indices (VIs) and soil moisture are complicated because of the time lag of the vegetation response to soil moisture. In this study, we used a distributed lag regression model to evaluate the lag responses of VIs to soil moisture for grasslands and shrublands at Soil Climate Analysis Network sites in the central and western United States. We examined the relationships between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-derived VIs and soil moisture measurements. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Normalized Difference Water Index (NDWI) showed significant lag responses to soil moisture. The lag length varies from 8 to 56 days for NDVI and from 16 to 56 days for NDWI. However, the lag response of NDVI and NDWI to soil moisture varied among the sites. Our study suggests that the lag effect needs to be taken into consideration when the VIs are used to estimate soil moisture. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  20. Uneven moisture patterns in water repellent soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, L.W.; Ritsema, C.J.

    1996-01-01

    In the Netherlands, water-repellent soils are widespread and they often show irregular moisture patterns, which cause accelerated transport of water and solutes to the groundwater and surface water. Under grass cover, spatial variability in soil moisture content is high owing to fingered flow; in ar

  1. A technique for estimating spatial sampling errors in coarse-scale soil moisture estimates derived from point-scale observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The validation of satellite surface soil moisture retrievals requires the spatial aggregation of point-scale ground soil moisture measurements up to coarse resolution satellite footprint scales (>10 km). In regions containing a limited number of ground measurements per satellite footprint, a large c...

  2. Hysteresis of soil temperature under different soil moisture and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... temperature under three soil moisture and two fertilizer levels in solar greenhouse .... temperature is governed by the one-dimensional heat conduction equation in the soil, and the soil temperature varied sinusoidally. We.

  3. Retrospective Analog Year Analyses Using NASA Satellite Precipitation and Soil Moisture Data to Improve USDA's World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, William; Shannon, Harlan; Mladenova, Iliana; Fang, Fan

    2010-01-01

    A primary goal of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is to expand markets for U.S. agricultural products and support global economic development. The USDA World Agricultural Outlook Board (WAOB) supports this goal by coordinating monthly World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE) for the U.S. and major foreign producing countries. Because weather has a significant impact on crop progress, conditions, and production, WAOB prepares frequent agricultural weather assessments, in a GIS-based, Global Agricultural Decision Support Environment (GLADSE). The main goal of this project, thus, is to improve WAOB's estimates by integrating NASA remote sensing soil moisture observations and research results into GLADSE (See diagram below). Soil moisture is currently a primary data gap at WAOB.

  4. Remote Sensing of Soil Moisture Using Airborne Hyperspectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Baumgardner, M. F., Silva, L. F., Biehl, L. L., and E. R. Stoner, 1985, "The Reflec- tance Properties of Soils," Advances in Agronomy , 38:1-44...retrieval algorithms for the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) on the Aqua satellite. AMSR-E is a passive... Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer Soil Moisture Products," IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 48(12):4256- 4272. Jackson, T. J

  5. Field-Scale Soil Moisture Sensing Using GPS Reflections: Description of the PBO H2O Soil Moisture Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, C. C.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.

    2014-12-01

    Data from NSF's EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and similar GPS networks worldwide, can be used to monitor the terrestrial water cycle. GPS satellites transmit L-band microwave signals, which are affected by water at Earth's surface. GPS signals take two paths: (1) the "direct" signal travels from the satellite to the antenna; (2) the "reflected" signal interacts with the Earth's surface before travelling to the antenna. The direct signal is used by geophysicists to measure position of the antenna, while the effects of reflected signals are generally ignored. Recently, our group has developed a technique to retrieve terrestrial water cycle variables from GPS reflections. The sensing footprint is intermediate in scale between in situ and remote sensing observations. Soil moisture, snow depth, and an index of vegetation water content are estimated from data collected at over 400 PBO sites. The products are updated daily and are available online. This presentation provides a description of the soil moisture product. Near-surface soil moisture is estimated at more than 100 sites in the PBO H2O network. At each site, a geodetic-quality GPS antenna records the interference pattern between the direct and ground-reflected GPS signals in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) interferograms. The ground-reflected GPS signal is altered by changes in the permittivity of the ground surface, which is primarily a function of its water content. Temporal changes in the SNR interferogram, primarily its phase, are indicative of changes in soil moisture. SNR phase data are converted to soil moisture using relationships determined using an electrodynamic model. Soil moisture is not retrieved when there is snow or significant vegetation (> ~1 kg m-2 of vegetation water), as both affect SNR phase. When there is moderate vegetation, a correction is applied to the phase data before conversion to soil moisture. The effect of vegetation on SNR phase and the exact relationship between SNR

  6. On-irrigator pasture soil moisture sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng-Choon Tan, Adrian; Richards, Sean; Platt, Ian; Woodhead, Ian

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we presented the development of a proximal soil moisture sensor that measured the soil moisture content of dairy pasture directly from the boom of an irrigator. The proposed sensor was capable of soil moisture measurements at an accuracy of  ±5% volumetric moisture content, and at meter scale ground area resolutions. The sensor adopted techniques from the ultra-wideband radar to enable measurements of ground reflection at resolutions that are smaller than the antenna beamwidth of the sensor. An experimental prototype was developed for field measurements. Extensive field measurements using the developed prototype were conducted on grass pasture at different ground conditions to validate the accuracy of the sensor in performing soil moisture measurements.

  7. Crop yield monitoring in the Sahel using root zone soil moisture anomalies derived from SMOS soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibon, François; Pellarin, Thierry; Alhassane, Agali; Traoré, Seydou; Baron, Christian

    2017-04-01

    West Africa is greatly vulnerable, especially in terms of food sustainability. Mainly based on rainfed agriculture, the high variability of the rainy season strongly impacts the crop production driven by the soil water availability in the soil. To monitor this water availability, classical methods are based on daily precipitation measurements. However, the raingauge network suffers from the poor network density in Africa (1/10000km2). Alternatively, real-time satellite-derived precipitations can be used, but they are known to suffer from large uncertainties which produce significant error on crop yield estimations. The present study proposes to use root soil moisture rather than precipitation to evaluate crop yield variations. First, a local analysis of the spatiotemporal impact of water deficit on millet crop production in Niger was done, from in-situ soil moisture measurements (AMMA-CATCH/OZCAR (French Critical Zone exploration network)) and in-situ millet yield survey. Crop yield measurements were obtained for 10 villages located in the Niamey region from 2005 to 2012. The mean production (over 8 years) is 690 kg/ha, and ranges from 381 to 872 kg/ha during this period. Various statistical relationships based on soil moisture estimates were tested, and the most promising one (R>0.9) linked the 30-cm soil moisture anomalies from mid-August to mid-September (grain filling period) to the crop yield anomalies. Based on this local study, it was proposed to derive regional statistical relationships using 30-cm soil moisture maps over West Africa. The selected approach was to use a simple hydrological model, the Antecedent Precipitation Index (API), forced by real-time satellite-based precipitation (CMORPH, PERSIANN, TRMM3B42). To reduce uncertainties related to the quality of real-time rainfall satellite products, SMOS soil moisture measurements were assimilated into the API model through a Particular Filter algorithm. Then, obtained soil moisture anomalies were

  8. Advances in Research on Soil Moisture by Microwave Remote Sensing in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Dongsheng; ZHAO Kai; GUAN Zhi

    2007-01-01

    Soil moisture is an important factor in global hydrologic circulation and plays a significant role in the research of hydrology, climatology, and agriculture. Microwave remote sensing is less limited by climate and time, and can measure in large scale. With these characteristics, this technique becomes an effective tool to measure soil moisture. Since the 1980s, Chinese researchers have investigated the soil moisture using microwave instruments. The active remote sensors are characteristic of high spatial resolution, thus with launch of a series of satellites, active microwave remote sensing of soil moisture will be emphasized. The passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture has a long research history, and its retrieval algorithms were developed well, so it is an important tool to retrieve large scale moisture information from satellite data in the future.

  9. Snow cover and soil moisture in mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, N.; Lehning, M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter of the climate system. It constrains evapotranspiration of plants and it functions as a storage of water, giving it an economic value, e.g. for agriculture. Furthermore, soil moisture is an important factor for predicting flood risk. In mountainous areas with a seasonal snow cover, the spatial distribution of snow depth is strongly influencing the spatial variation of soil moisture. To assess potential flooding situations during snow melt and rain on snow events in particular but for any heavy precipitation event in the mountains, it is important to understand the influence of the snow cover on soil status with respect to liquid and solid water. Only if this is known, the reaction of the soil i.e. amount of runoff, storage or melt, on additional water input can be assessed. For an operational assessment of the soil moisture state in the Swiss Alps at 140 measurement sites for snow and avalanche forecasting (IMIS network), the SNOWPACK model has been extended with a soil module, solving the Richards equation for the matrix flow. The modelling is validated with vertical profile measurements of soil moisture at meteorological stations in an Alpine catchment near Davos, Switzerland. It was found that the combination of a physical based snowpack model with a Richards equation solver seems to provide an adequate description of soil moisture fluctuations, especially in near surface layers. Soil moisture fluctuations, both measured and modelled, are strongly reduced when a snow cover is present. The measurements also revealed a strong increase in soil moisture, accompanied by a daily cycle in soil moisture during snow melt, extending down to 120cm depth. When soil properties from literature were assumed for the soil type in the vertical profile, the daily cycle in the model during snow melt was restricted mainly to the top layers, while observations show also a reaction in deeper layers. These observations are consistent with the

  10. From the sprinkler to satellite: Combining fixed and mobile cosmic-ray neutron probes for realtime multiscale monitoring of soil moisture in agricultural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, T. E.; Avery, W. A.; Finkenbiner, C. E.

    2015-12-01

    Approximately 40% of global food production comes from irrigated agriculture. With the increasing demand for food even greater pressures will be placed on water resources within these systems. In this work we aimed to characterize the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture at various scales by combining fixed and roving cosmic-ray neutron probes at four study sites across an East-West precipitation gradient overtopping the High Plains Aquifer (HPA). Each of the four study sites consisted of coarse scale mapping of the entire ~12 by 12 km domain and detailed mapping of 1 quarter section (0.8 by 0.8 km) agricultural field. By using a simplistic data merging technique we are able to produce a statistical daily soil moisture product at a variety of key spatial scales in support of irrigation water management technology: the individual sprinkler (~102 m2) for variable rate irrigation, the individual pie slice (~103 m2) for variable speed irrigation, and the quarter section (0.64 km2) for uniform rate irrigation. In addition, we are able to provide a daily soil moisture product over the 144 km2 study area at a variety of key remote sensing scales 1, 9, and 144 km2. These products can be used to support SMAP/SMOS through calibration, validation, and value addition by statistical downscaling. Future work could include larger scale monitoring in support of GRACE total water storage calculations in the HPA or other key groundwater resource locations by incorporating existing COSMOS sites or establishment of new networks.

  11. Radar for Measuring Soil Moisture Under Vegetation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Mahta; Moller, Delwyn; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Rahmat-Samii, Yahya

    2004-01-01

    A two-frequency, polarimetric, spaceborne synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system has been proposed for measuring the moisture content of soil as a function of depth, even in the presence of overlying vegetation. These measurements are needed because data on soil moisture under vegetation canopies are not available now and are necessary for completing mathematical models of global energy and water balance with major implications for global variations in weather and climate.

  12. Comparison of temporal trends from multiple soil moisture data sets and precipitation: The implication of irrigation on regional soil moisture trend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jianxiu; Gao, Quanzhou; Wang, Sheng; Su, Zhenrong

    2016-06-01

    In this study, soil moisture trend during 1996-2010 in China was analyzed based on three soil moisture data sets, namely microwave-based multi-satellite surface soil moisture product released from European Space Agency's Climate Change Initiative (ESA CCI), ERA-Interim/Land reanalysis, and in-situ measurements collected from the nationwide agro-meteorological network. Taking the in-situ soil moisture as reference, it is found that ESA CCI generally captured soil moisture trend more accurately than ERA-Interim/Land did. From the spatial distribution of trend analysis results, it is seen that significant decreasing trend for summer soil moisture in northwestern China and northern Inner Mongolia, as well as the significant increasing trend for autumn soil moisture in northern China were identified by both ESA CCI and ERA-Interim/Land. This is in alignment with results from gauge-based precipitation provided by Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research (IGSNRR) and satellite-based precipitation from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). However, disagreements in derived trends between ESA CCI, ERA-Interim/Land and IGSNRR were observed in the southwest and north of China, especially in major irrigation regions, such as the oases in northern Xinjiang and large areas in Sichuan province. Prominent difference between soil moisture and precipitation exhibited in the extensively irrigated Huang-Huai-Hai Plain. The spatial coincidence between significantly wetting areas (identified by ESA CCI) and heavily irrigated areas, as well as the grid-based Student's t-test sampling from various irrigation levels revealed that the observed discrepancy was caused by massive anthropogenic interference in this region. Results indicate that, for regions with great magnitude of human interference, modules considering actual irrigation practice are crucial for successful modeling of soil moisture and capturing the long-term trend. Furthermore, results could

  13. Soil moisture estimation with limited soil characterization for decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanzy, A.; Richard, G.; Boizard, H.; Défossez, P.

    2009-04-01

    Many decisions in agriculture are conditional to soil moisture. For instance in wet conditions, farming operations as soil tillage, organic waste spreading or harvesting may lead to degraded results and/or induce soil compaction. The development of a tool that allows the estimation of soil moisture is useful to help farmers to organize their field work in a context where farm size tends to increase as well as the need to optimize the use of expensive equipments. Soil water transfer models simulate soil moisture vertical profile evolution. These models are highly sensitive to site dependant parameters. A method to implement the mechanistic soil water and heat flow model (the TEC model) in a context of limited information (soil texture, climatic data, soil organic carbon) is proposed [Chanzy et al., 2008]. In this method the most sensitive model inputs were considered i.e. soil hydraulic properties, soil moisture profile initialization and the lower boundary conditions. The accuracy was estimated by implementing the method on several experimental cases covering a range of soils. Simulated soil moisture results were compared to soil moisture measurements. The obtained accuracy in surface soil moisture (0-30 cm) was 0.04 m3/m3. When a few soil moisture measurements are available (collected for instance by the farmer using a portable moisture sensor), significant improvement in soil moisture accuracy is obtained by assimilating the results into the model. Two assimilation strategies were compared and led to comparable results: a sequential approach, where the measurement were used to correct the simulated moisture profile when measurements are available and a variational approach which take moisture measurements to invert the TEC model and so retrieve soil hydraulic properties of the surface layer. The assimilation scheme remains however heavy in terms of computing time and so, for operational purposed fast code should be taken to simulate the soil moisture as with the

  14. Soil Moisture Remote Sensing with GNSS-R at the Valencia Anchor Station. The SOMOSTA (Soil Moisture Station) Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the SOMOSTA (Soil Moisture Monitoring Station) experiment on soil moisture monitoring byGlobal Navigation Satellite System Reflected signals(GNSS-R) at the Valencia Anchor Station is introduced. L-band microwaves have very good advantages in soil moisture remote sensing, for being unaffected by clouds and the atmosphere, and for the ability to penetrate vegetation. During this experimental campaign, the ESA GNSS-R Oceanpal antenna was installed on the same tower as the ESA ELBARA-II passive microwave radiometer, both measuring instruments having similar field of view. This experiment is fruitfully framed within the ESA - China Programme of Collaboration on GNSS-R. The GNSS-R instrument has an up-looking antenna for receiving direct signals from satellites, and two down-looking antennas for receiving LHCP (left-hand circular polarisation) and RHCP (right-hand circular polarisation) reflected signals from the soil surface. We could collect data from the three different antennas through the two channels of Oceanpal and, in addition, calibration could be performed to reduce the impact from the differing channels. Reflectivity was thus measured and soil moisture could be retrieved by the L- MEB (L-band Microwave Emission of the Biosphere) model considering the effect of vegetation optical thickness and soil roughness. By contrasting GNSS-R and ELBARA-II radiometer data, a negative correlation existed between reflectivity measured by GNSS-R and brightness temperature measured by the radiometer. The two parameters represent reflection and absorption of the soil. Soil moisture retrieved by both L-band remote sensing methods shows good agreement. In addition, correspondence with in-situ measurements and rainfall is also good.

  15. Effect of soil moisture on chlorine deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, John; Eichler, Jeffery; Hare, Christopher; Henley, Michael

    2014-02-28

    The effect of soil moisture on chlorine (Cl(2)) deposition was examined in laboratory chamber experiments at high Cl(2) exposures by measuring the concentration of chloride (Cl(-)) in soil columns. Soil mixtures with varying amounts of clay, sand, and organic matter and with moisture contents up to 20% (w/w) were exposed to ≈3×10(4)ppm Cl(2) vapor. For low water content soils, additional water increased the reaction rate as evidenced by higher Cl(-) concentration at higher soil moisture content. Results also showed that the presence of water restricted transport of Cl(2) into the soil columns and caused lower overall deposition of Cl(2) in the top 0.48-cm layer of soil when water filled ≈60% or more of the void space in the column. Numerical solutions to partial differential equations of Fick's law of diffusion and a simple rate law for Cl(2) reaction corroborated conclusions derived from the data. For the soil mixtures and conditions of these experiments, moisture content that filled 30-50% of the available void space yielded the maximum amount of Cl(2) deposition in the top 0.48cm of soil. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. Spatial variability and its scale dependency of observed and modeled soil moisture under different climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Li

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Past studies on soil moisture spatial variability have been mainly conducted in catchment scales where soil moisture is often sampled over a short time period. Because of limited climate and weather conditions, the observed soil moisture often exhibited smaller dynamic ranges which prevented the complete revelation of soil moisture spatial variability as a function of mean soil moisture. In this study, spatial statistics (mean, spatial variability and skewness of in situ soil moisture measurements (from a continuously monitored network across the US, modeled and satellite retrieved soil moisture obtained in a warm season (198 days were examined at large extent scales (>100 km over three different climate regions. The investigation on in situ measurements revealed that their spatial moments strongly depend on climates, with distinct mean, spatial variability and skewness observed in each climate zone. In addition, an upward convex shape, which was revealed in several smaller scale studies, was observed for the relationship between spatial variability of in situ soil moisture and its spatial mean across dry, intermediate, and wet climates. These climate specific features were vaguely or partially observable in modeled and satellite retrieved soil moisture estimates, which is attributed to the fact that these two data sets do not have climate specific and seasonal sensitive mean soil moisture values, in addition to lack of dynamic ranges. From the point measurements to satellite retrievals, soil moisture spatial variability decreased in each climate region. The three data sources all followed the power law in the scale dependency of spatial variability, with coarser resolution data showing stronger scale dependency than finer ones. The main findings from this study are: (1 the statistical distribution of soil moisture depends on spatial mean soil moisture values and thus need to be derived locally within any given area; (2 the boundedness of soil

  17. Towards an integrated soil moisture drought monitor for East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Anderson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Drought in East Africa is a recurring phenomenon with significant humanitarian impacts. Given the steep climatic gradients, topographic contrasts, general data scarcity, and, in places, political instability that characterize the region, there is a need for spatially distributed, remotely derived monitoring systems to inform national and international drought response. At the same time, the very diversity and data scarcity that necessitate remote monitoring also make it difficult to evaluate the reliability of these systems. Here we apply a suite of remote monitoring techniques to characterize the temporal and spatial evolution of the 2010–2011 Horn of Africa drought. Diverse satellite observations allow for evaluation of meteorological, agricultural, and hydrological aspects of drought, each of which is of interest to different stakeholders. Focusing on soil moisture, we apply triple collocation analysis (TCA to three independent methods for estimating soil moisture anomalies to characterize relative error between products and to provide a basis for objective data merging. The three soil moisture methods evaluated include microwave remote sensing using the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth Observing System (AMSR-E sensor, thermal remote sensing using the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI surface energy balance algorithm, and physically-based land surface modeling using the Noah land surface model. It was found that the three soil moisture monitoring methods yield similar drought anomaly estimates in areas characterized by extremely low or by moderate vegetation cover, particularly during the below-average 2011 long rainy season. Systematic discrepancies were found, however, in regions of moderately low vegetation cover and high vegetation cover, especially during the failed 2010 short rains. The merged, TCA-weighted soil moisture composite product takes advantage of the relative strengths of each method, as judged by the

  18. Towards an integrated soil moisture drought monitor for East Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. B. Anderson

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Drought in East Africa is a recurring phenomenon with significant humanitarian impacts. Given the steep climatic gradients, topographic contrasts, general data scarcity, and, in places, political instability that characterize the region, there is a need for spatially distributed, remotely derived monitoring systems to inform national and international drought response. At the same time, the very diversity and data scarcity that necessitate remote monitoring also make it difficult to evaluate the reliability of these systems. Here we apply a suite of remote monitoring techniques to characterize the temporal and spatial evolution of the 2010–2011 Horn of Africa drought. Diverse satellite observations allow for evaluation of meteorological, agricultural, and hydrological aspects of drought, each of which is of interest to different stakeholders. Focusing on soil moisture, we apply triple collocation analysis (TCA to three independent methods for estimating soil moisture anomalies to characterize relative error between products and to provide a basis for objective data merging. The three soil moisture methods evaluated include microwave remote sensing using the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth Observing System (AMSR-E sensor, thermal remote sensing using the Atmosphere-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI surface energy balance algorithm, and physically based land surface modeling using the Noah land surface model. It was found that the three soil moisture monitoring methods yield similar drought anomaly estimates in areas characterized by extremely low or by moderate vegetation cover, particularly during the below-average 2011 long rainy season. Systematic discrepancies were found, however, in regions of moderately low vegetation cover and high vegetation cover, especially during the failed 2010 short rains. The merged, TCA-weighted soil moisture composite product takes advantage of the relative strengths of each method, as judged by the

  19. On the identification of representative in situ soil moisture monitoring stations for the validation of SMAP soil moisture products in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Mei Sun; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Monerris, Alessandra; Rüdiger, Christoph; Jackson, Thomas J.

    2016-06-01

    The high spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture complicates the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture products using in situ monitoring stations. Therefore, a standard methodology for selecting the most representative stations for the purpose of validating satellites and land surface models is essential. Based on temporal stability and geostatistical studies using long-term soil moisture records, intensive ground measurements and airborne soil moisture products, this study investigates the representativeness of soil moisture monitoring stations within the Yanco study area for the validation of NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) products at 3 km for radar, 9 km for radar-radiometer and 36 km for radiometer pixels. This resulted in the identification of a number of representative stations according to the different scales. Although the temporal stability method was found to be suitable for identifying representative stations, stations based on the mean relative difference (MRD) were not necessarily the most representative of the areal average. Moreover, those identified from standard deviation of the relative difference (SDRD) may be dry-biased. It was also found that in the presence of heterogeneous land use, stations should be weighted based on proportions of agricultural land. Airborne soil moisture products were also shown to provide useful a priori information for identifying representative locations. Finally, recommendations are made regarding the design of future networks for satellite validation, and specifically the most representative stations for the Yanco area.

  20. Temporal Dynamics of Soil Moisture Variability at the Landscape Scale: Implications for Land Surface Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.

    2001-12-01

    Meteorological and hydrological forecasting models share soil moisture as a critical boundary condition. Partitioning of received energy at the land surface depends directly on this variable, as does the partitioning of rainfall into its possible routes over and through the soil. In Land Surface Models (LSMs) the temporal dynamic of soil moisture spatial variability is a fundamental issue in large-scale flux predictions. From remote sensing observations soil moisture values are averaged in the horizontal over rather large regions (pixels). The averaging areas will be getting even larger as we move from aircraft mounted sensors to satellite mounting. These data are to be used ultimately to estimate spatial averages of other processes that depend on soil moisture, such as, runoff generation, drainage, evaporation, sensible heat fluxes, crop yield, microbial activity, etc. Consequently, the LSMs have to predict spatial averaged flux over large region from average values of the soil moisture. But soil moisture variances affect flux predictions, which depend nonlinearly on soil moisture, because many of the other processes possess distinct threshold aspects to their nonlinear dependence on soil moisture. Through application of well-developed Reynolds averaging rules from fluid mechanics to the equation of Richards and Darcy-Buckingham, we write a conservation equation for the horizontal variance of soil moisture. And, through closure arguments, we are able to describe the individual terms that produce and destroy spatial variance through time in terms of the mean soil moisture state and other observable system properties such as vegetation and soil properties variability. Finally, we calculate land surface fluxes from second order Taylor expansion, using our soil moisture variance closure model, and the other observable system properties. In this work, we demonstrate significant improvements in land surface large-scale flux predictions using the proposed soil moisture

  1. Temporal Dynamics of Soil Moisture Variability: Implications For Land Surface Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.

    Meteorological and hydrological forecasting models share soil moisture as a critical boundary condition. Partitioning of received energy at the land surface depends di- rectly on this variable, as does the partitioning of rainfall into its possible routes over and through the soil. In Land Surface Models (LSMs) the temporal dynamic of soil moisture spatial variability is a fundamental issue in large-scale flux predictions. From remote sensing observations soil moisture values are averaged in the horizontal over rather large regions (pixels). The averaging areas will be getting even larger as we move from aircraft mounted sensors to satellite mounting. These data are to be used ultimately to estimate spatial averages of other processes that depend on soil moisture, such as, runoff generation, drainage, evaporation, sensible heat fluxes, crop yield, mi- crobial activity, etc. Consequently, the LSMs have to predict spatial averaged flux over large region from average values of the soil moisture. But soil moisture variances af- fect flux predictions, which depend nonlinearly on soil moisture, because many of the other processes possess distinct threshold aspects to their nonlinear dependence on soil moisture. Through application of well-developed Reynolds averaging rules from fluid mechanics to the equation of Richards and Darcy-Buckingham, we write a con- servation equation for the horizontal variance of soil moisture. And, through closure arguments, we are able to describe the individual terms that produce and destroy spa- tial variance through time in terms of the mean soil moisture state and other observable system properties such as vegetation and soil properties variability. Finally, we calcu- late land surface fluxes from second order Taylor expansion, using our soil moisture variance closure model, and the other observable system properties. In this work, we demonstrate significant improvements in land surface large-scale flux predictions us- ing the proposed

  2. NIR-red spectral space based new method for soil moisture monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN ZhiMing; QIN QiMing; GHULAN Abduwasit; WANG DongDong

    2007-01-01

    Drought is a complex natural disaster that occurs frequently. Soil moisture has been the main issue in remote monitoring of drought events as the most direct and important variable describing the drought. Spatio-temporal distribution and variation of soil moisture evidently affect surface evapotranspiration, agricultural water demand, etc. In this paper, a new simple method for soil moisture monitoring is developed using near-infrared versus red (NIR-red) spectral reflectance space. First, NIR-red spectral reflectance space is established using atmospheric and geometric corrected ETM+ data, which is manifested by a triangle shape, in which different surface covers have similar spatial distribution rules. Next, the model of soil moisture monitoring by remote sensing (SMMRS) is developed on the basis of the distribution characteristics of soil moisture in the NIR-red spectral reflectance space. Then, the SMMRS model is validated by comparison with field measured soil moisture data at different depths. The results showed that satellite estimated soil moisture by SMMRS is highly accordant with field measured data at 5 cm soil depth and average soil moisture at 0―20 cm soil depths, correlation coefficients are 0.80 and 0.87, respectively. This paper concludes that, being simple and effective, the SMMRS model has great potential to estimate surface moisture conditions.

  3. NIR-red spectral space based new method for soil moisture monitoring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GHULAN; Abduwasit

    2007-01-01

    Drought is a complex natural disaster that occurs frequently. Soil moisture has been the main issue in remote monitoring of drought events as the most direct and important variable describing the drought. Spatio-temporal distribution and variation of soil moisture evidently affect surface evapotranspiration, agricultural water demand, etc. In this paper, a new simple method for soil moisture monitoring is de- veloped using near-infrared versus red (NIR-red) spectral reflectance space. First, NIR-red spectral reflectance space is established using atmospheric and geometric corrected ETM+ data, which is manifested by a triangle shape, in which different surface covers have similar spatial distribution rules. Next, the model of soil moisture monitoring by remote sensing (SMMRS) is developed on the basis of the distribution characteristics of soil moisture in the NIR-red spectral reflectance space. Then, the SMMRS model is validated by comparison with field measured soil moisture data at different depths. The results showed that satellite estimated soil moisture by SMMRS is highly accordant with field measured data at 5 cm soil depth and average soil moisture at 0―20 cm soil depths, correlation coef- ficients are 0.80 and 0.87, respectively. This paper concludes that, being simple and effective, the SMMRS model has great potential to estimate surface moisture conditions.

  4. Soil moisture needs in earth sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1992-01-01

    The author reviews the development of passive and active microwave techniques for measuring soil moisture with respect to how the data may be used. New science programs such as the EOS, the GEWEX Continental-Scale International Project (GCIP) and STORM, a mesoscale meteorology and hydrology project, will have to account for soil moisture either as a storage in water balance computations or as a state variable in-process modeling. The author discusses future soil moisture needs such as frequency of measurement, accuracy, depth, and spatial resolution, as well as the concomitant model development that must proceed concurrently if the development in microwave technology is to have a major impact in these areas.

  5. Improving terrestrial evaporation estimates over continental Australia through assimilation of SMOS soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, B.; Miralles, D.; Lievens, H.; Fernández-Prieto, D.; Verhoest, N. E. C.

    2016-06-01

    Terrestrial evaporation is an essential variable in the climate system that links the water, energy and carbon cycles over land. Despite this crucial importance, it remains one of the most uncertain components of the hydrological cycle, mainly due to known difficulties to model the constraints imposed by land water availability on terrestrial evaporation. The main objective of this study is to assimilate satellite soil moisture observations from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission into an existing evaporation model. Our over-arching goal is to find an optimal use of satellite soil moisture that can help to improve our understanding of evaporation at continental scales. To this end, the Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM) is used to simulate evaporation fields over continental Australia for the period September 2010-December 2013. SMOS soil moisture observations are assimilated using a Newtonian Nudging algorithm in a series of experiments. Model estimates of surface soil moisture and evaporation are validated against soil moisture probe and eddy-covariance measurements, respectively. Finally, an analogous experiment in which Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) soil moisture is assimilated (instead of SMOS) allows to perform a relative assessment of the quality of both satellite soil moisture products. Results indicate that the modelled soil moisture from GLEAM can be improved through the assimilation of SMOS soil moisture: the average correlation coefficient between in situ measurements and the modelled soil moisture over the complete sample of stations increased from 0.68 to 0.71 and a statistical significant increase in the correlations is achieved for 17 out of the 25 individual stations. Our results also suggest a higher accuracy of the ascending SMOS data compared to the descending data, and overall higher quality of SMOS compared to AMSR-E retrievals over Australia. On the other hand, the effect of soil moisture data

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Moisture Effect on Black Soil Reflectance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Huan-Jun; ZHANG Yuan-Zhi; ZHANG Xin-Le; ZHANG Bai; SONG Kai-Shan; WANG Zong-Ming; TANG Na

    2009-01-01

    Several studies have demonstrated that soil reflectance decreases with increasing soil moisture content,or increases when the soil moisture reaches a certain content;however,there are few analyses on the quantitative relationship between soil reflectance and its moisture,especially in the case of black soils in northeast China.A new moisture adjusting method was developed to obtain soil reflectance with a smaller moisture interval to describe the quantitative relationship between soil reflectance and moisture.For the soil samples with moisture contents ranging from air-dry to saturated,the changes in soil reflectance with soil moisture can be depicted using a cubic equation.Both moisture threshold (MT) and moisture inflexion (MI) of soil reflectance can also be determined by the equation.When the moisture range was smaller than MT,soil reflectance can be simulated with a linear model.However,for samples with different soil organic matter (OM),the parameters of the linear model varied regularly with the OM content.Based on their relationship,the soil moisture can be estimated from soil reflectance in the black soil region.

  7. Where did my wifi go? Measuring soil moisture using wifi signal strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hut, Rolf; de Jeu, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture is tricky to measure. Currently soil moisture is measured at small footprints using probes and other field devices, or at large footprints using satellites. Promising developments in measuring soil moisture are using fiber optic cables for measurements along a line, or using cosmos rays for field scale measurements. In this demonstration we present a low cost alternative to measure soil moisture at footprints of a few square meters. We use a wifi hotspot and a wifi dongle, both mounted in a cantenna for beam forming. We aim the hotspot on a piece of soil and put the dongle in the path of the reflection. By logging the signal strength of the wifi netwerk, we have a proxy for soil moisture. A first proof of concept is presented.

  8. Using machine learning to produce near surface soil moisture estimates from deeper in situ records at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) locations: Analysis and applications to AMSR-E satellite validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface soil moisture is critical parameter for understanding the energy flux at the land atmosphere boundary. Weather modeling, climate prediction, and remote sensing validation are some of the applications for surface soil moisture information. The most common in situ measurement for these purpo...

  9. Inference of Soil Hydrologic Parameters from Soil Moisture Monitoring Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, D. G.; Seyfried, M. S.; McNamara, J. P.; Hwang, K.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important control on hydrologic function, as it governs flux through the soil and responds to and determines vertical fluxes from and to the atmosphere, groundwater recharge and lateral fluxes through the soil. Most physically based hydrologic models require parameters to represent soil physical properties governing flow and retention of vadose water. The presented analysis compares four methods of objective analysis to determine field capacity, plant extraction limit (or permanent wilting point) and field saturated soil moisture content from decadal records of volumetric water content. These values are found as either data attractors or limits in the VWC records and may vary with interannual moisture availability. Results are compared to values from pedotransfer functions and discussed in terms of historic methods of measurement in soil physics.

  10. Using high-resolution soil moisture modelling to assess the uncertainty of microwave remotely sensed soil moisture products at the correct spatial and temporal support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanders, N.; Karssenberg, D.; Bierkens, M. F. P.; Van Dam, J. C.; De Jong, S. M.

    2012-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in the hydrological cycle and important in hydrological modelling. When assimilating soil moisture into flood forecasting models, the improvement of forecasting skills depends on the ability to accurately estimate the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture content throughout the river basin. Space-borne remote sensing may provide this information with a high temporal and spatial resolution and with a global coverage. Currently three microwave soil moisture products are available: AMSR-E, ASCAT and SMOS. The quality of these satellite-based products is often assessed by comparing them with in-situ observations of soil moisture. This comparison is however hampered by the difference in spatial and temporal support (i.e., resolution, scale), because the spatial resolution of microwave satellites is rather low compared to in-situ field measurements. Thus, the aim of this study is to derive a method to assess the uncertainty of microwave satellite soil moisture products at the correct spatial support. To overcome the difference in support size between in-situ soil moisture observations and remote sensed soil moisture, we used a stochastic, distributed unsaturated zone model (SWAP, van Dam (2000)) that is upscaled to the support of different satellite products. A detailed assessment of the SWAP model uncertainty is included to ensure that the uncertainty in satellite soil moisture is not overestimated due to an underestimation of the model uncertainty. We simulated unsaturated water flow up to a depth of 1.5m with a vertical resolution of 1 to 10 cm and on a horizontal grid of 1 km2 for the period Jan 2010 - Jun 2011. The SWAP model was first calibrated and validated on in-situ data of the REMEDHUS soil moisture network (Spain). Next, to evaluate the satellite products, the model was run for areas in the proximity of 79 meteorological stations in Spain, where model results were aggregated to the correct support of the satellite

  11. Soil moisture sensors based on metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Kitić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper novel miniature metamaterial-based soil moisture sensors are presented. The sensors are based on resonant-type metamaterials and employ split-ring resonators (SRR, spiral resonators and fractal SRRs to achieve small dimensions, high sensitivity, and compatibility with standard planar fabrication technologies. All these features make the proposedsensors suitable for deployment in agriculture for precise mapping of soil humidity.

  12. Soil moisture and temperature algorithms and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture has matured over the past decade as a result of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) program of JAXA. This program has resulted in improved algorithms that have been supported by rigorous validation. Access to the products and the valida...

  13. Estimating Subcanopy Soil Moisture with RADAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, M.; Saatchi, S.; Cuenca, R. H.

    1998-01-01

    The subcanopy soil moisture of a boreal old jack pine forest is estimated using polarimetric L- and P-band AIRSAR data. Model simulations have shown that for this stand, the principal scattering mechanism responsible for radar backscatter is the double-bounce mechanism between the tree trunks and the ground.

  14. An ensemble Kalman filter dual assimilation of thermal infrared and microwave satellite observations of soil moisture into the Noah land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Christopher R.; Crow, Wade T.; Anderson, Martha C.; Mecikalski, John R.

    2012-11-01

    Studies that have assimilated remotely sensed soil moisture (SM) into land surface models (LSMs) have generally focused on retrievals from microwave (MW) sensors. However, retrievals from thermal infrared (TIR) sensors have also been shown to add unique information, especially where MW sensors are not able to provide accurate retrievals (due to, e.g., dense vegetation). In this study, we examine the assimilation of a TIR product based on surface evaporative flux estimates from the Atmosphere Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model and the MW-based VU Amsterdam NASA surface SM product generated with the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM). A set of data assimilation experiments using an ensemble Kalman filter are performed over the contiguous United States to assess the impact of assimilating ALEXI and LPRM SM retrievals in isolation and together in a dual-assimilation case. The relative skill of each assimilation case is assessed through a data denial approach where a LSM is forced with an inferior precipitation data set. The ability of each assimilation case to correct for precipitation errors is quantified by comparing with a simulation forced with a higher-quality precipitation data set. All three assimilation cases (ALEXI, LPRM, and Dual assimilation) show relative improvements versus the open loop (i.e., reduced RMSD) for surface and root zone SM. In the surface zone, the dual assimilation case provides the largest improvements, followed by the LPRM case. However, the ALEXI case performs best in the root zone. Results from the data denial experiment are supported by comparisons between assimilation results and ground-based SM observations from the Soil Climate Analysis Network.

  15. A new data assimilation approach for improving runoff prediction using remotely-sensed soil moisture retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. T. Crow

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of recent studies have focused on enhancing runoff prediction via the assimilation of remotely-sensed surface soil moisture retrievals into a hydrologic model. The majority of these approaches have viewed the problem from purely a state or parameter estimation perspective in which remotely-sensed soil moisture estimates are assimilated to improve the characterization of pre-storm soil moisture conditions in a hydrologic model, and consequently, its simulation of runoff response to subsequent rainfall. However, recent work has demonstrated that soil moisture retrievals can also be used to filter errors present in satellite-based rainfall accumulation products. This result implies that soil moisture retrievals have potential benefit for characterizing both antecedent moisture conditions (required to estimate sub-surface flow intensities and subsequent surface runoff efficiencies and storm-scale rainfall totals (required to estimate the total surface runoff volume. In response, this work presents a new sequential data assimilation system that exploits remotely-sensed surface soil moisture retrievals to simultaneously improve estimates of both pre-storm soil moisture conditions and storm-scale rainfall accumulations. Preliminary testing of the system, via a synthetic twin data assimilation experiment based on the Sacramento hydrologic model and data collected from the Model Parameterization Experiment, suggests that the new approach is more efficient at improving stream flow predictions than data assimilation techniques focusing solely on the constraint of antecedent soil moisture conditions.

  16. Soil and Moisture Plan : 1971 - 1980 : Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Soil and Moisture Plan for Agassiz NWR provides an overview of the Refuge, a description of soil and moisture problems, and proposed solutions to these...

  17. Optimizing Soil Moisture Sampling Locations for Validation Networks for SMAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshani, E.; Berg, A. A.; Lindsay, J.

    2013-12-01

    Soil Moisture Active Passive satellite (SMAP) is scheduled for launch on Oct 2014. Global efforts are underway for establishment of soil moisture monitoring networks for both the pre- and post-launch validation and calibration of the SMAP products. In 2012 the SMAP Validation Experiment, SMAPVEX12, took place near Carman Manitoba, Canada where nearly 60 fields were sampled continuously over a 6 week period for soil moisture and several other parameters simultaneous to remotely sensed images of the sampling region. The locations of these sampling sites were mainly selected on the basis of accessibility, soil texture, and vegetation cover. Although these criteria are necessary to consider during sampling site selection, they do not guarantee optimal site placement to provide the most efficient representation of the studied area. In this analysis a method for optimization of sampling locations is presented which combines the state-of-art multi-objective optimization engine (non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, NSGA-II), with the kriging interpolation technique to minimize the number of sampling sites while simultaneously minimizing the differences between the soil moisture map resulted from the kriging interpolation and soil moisture map from radar imaging. The algorithm is implemented in Whitebox Geospatial Analysis Tools, which is a multi-platform open-source GIS. The optimization framework is subject to the following three constraints:. A) sampling sites should be accessible to the crew on the ground, B) the number of sites located in a specific soil texture should be greater than or equal to a minimum value, and finally C) the number of sampling sites with a specific vegetation cover should be greater than or equal to a minimum constraint. The first constraint is implemented into the proposed model to keep the practicality of the approach. The second and third constraints are considered to guarantee that the collected samples from each soil texture categories

  18. Developing a dual assimilation approach for thermal infrared and passive microwave soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Christopher Ryan

    Soil moisture plays a vital role in the partitioning of sensible and latent heat fluxes in the surface energy budget and the lack of a dense spatial and temporal network of ground-based observations provides a challenge to the initialization of the true soil moisture state in numerical weather prediction simulations. The retrieval of soil moisture using observations from both satellite-based thermal-infrared (TIR) and passive microwave (PM) sensors has been developed (Anderson et al., 2007; Hain et al., 2009; Jackson, 1993; Njoku et al., 2003). The ability of the TIR and microwave observations to diagnose soil moisture conditions within different layers of the soil profile provides an opportunity to use each in a synergistic data assimilation approach towards the goal of diagnosing the true soil moisture state from surface to root-zone. TIR and PM retrievals of soil moisture are compared to soil moisture estimates provided by a retrospective Land Information System (LIS) simulation using the NOAH LSM during the time period of 2003--2008. The TIR-based soil moisture product is provided by a retrieval of soil moisture associated with surface flux estimates from the Atmosphere-Land-Exchange-Inversion (ALEXI) model (Anderson et al., 1997; Mecikalski et al., 1999; Hain et al., 2009). The PM soil moisture retrieval is provided by the Vrijie Universiteit Amsterdam (VUA)-NASA surface soil moisture product. The VUA retrieval is based on the findings of Owe et al. (2001; 2008) using the Land Surface Parameter model (LPRM), which uses one dual polarized channel (6.925 or 10.65 GHz) for a dual-retrieval of surface soil moisture and vegetation water content. In addition, retrievals of ALEXI (TIR) and AMSR-E (PM) soil moisture are assimilated within the Land Information System using the NOAH LSM. A series of data assimilation experiments is completed with the following configuration: (a) no assimilation, (b) only ALEXI soil moisture, (c) only AMSR-E soil moisture, and (d) ALEXI

  19. First soil moisture values from SMOS over a Sahelian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhier, Claire; Kerr, Yann; de Rosnay, Patricia; Pellarin, Thierry; Grippa, Manuela

    2010-05-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial variable which influences the land surface processes. Numerous studies shown microwaves at low frequency are particularly performed to access to soil moisture values. SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity), launched the November 2th 2009, is the first space mission dedicated to soil moisture observations. Before SMOS, several soil moisture products were provided, based on active or passive microwaves measurements. Gruhier et al. (2010) analyse five of them over a Sahelian area. The results show that the range of volumetric soil moisture values obtained over Sahel is drastically different depending on the remote sensing approach used to produce soil moisture estimates. Although microwave bands currently available are not optimal, some products are in very good agreement with ground data. The main goal of this study is to introduce the first soil moisture maps from SMOS over West Africa. A first analyse of values over a Sahelian region is investigated. The study area is located in Gourma region in Mali. This site has been instrumented in the context of the AMMA project (African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis) and was specifically designed to address the validation of remotely sensed soil moisture. SMOS soil moisture values was analysed with ground knowledge and placed in the context of previous soil moisture products. The high sensitivity of the L-band used by SMOS should provide very accurate soil moisture values.

  20. Soil surface moisture estimation over a semi-arid region using ENVISAT ASAR radar data for soil evaporation evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zribi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper proposes a method for the evaluation of soil evaporation, using soil moisture estimations based on radar satellite measurements. We present firstly an approach for the estimation and monitoring of soil moisture in a semi-arid region in North Africa, using ENVISAT ASAR images, over two types of vegetation covers. The first mapping process is dedicated solely to the monitoring of moisture variability related to rainfall events, over areas in the "non-irrigated olive tree" class of land use. The developed approach is based on a simple linear relationship between soil moisture and the backscattered radar signal normalised at a reference incidence angle. The second process is proposed over wheat fields, using an analysis of moisture variability due to both rainfall and irrigation. A semi-empirical model, based on the water-cloud model for vegetation correction, is used to retrieve soil moisture from the radar signal. Moisture mapping is carried out over wheat fields, showing high variability between irrigated and non-irrigated wheat covers. This analysis is based on a large database, including both ENVISAT ASAR and simultaneously acquired ground-truth measurements (moisture, vegetation, roughness, during the 2008–2009 vegetation cycle. Finally, a semi-empirical approach is proposed in order to relate surface moisture to the difference between soil evaporation and the climate demand, as defined by the potential evaporation. Mapping of the soil evaporation is proposed.

  1. Upscaling of soil moisture measurements in NW Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraris, Stefano; Canone, Davide; Previati, Maurizio; Brunod, Christian; Ratto, Sara; Cauduro, Marco

    2015-04-01

    There is large mismatch in spatial scale between the climate and meteorological model grid, and the scale of soil and vegetation measurements. Remote sensing data can help to fit the model scale, but they cannot provide rootzone data. In this work some soil moisture datasets are analysed for the sake of providing larger scale estimation of soil moisture and water and energy fluxes. The first dataset refers to a plain site near Torino, where measurements are taken since 1997 (Baudena et al., 2012), and a mountain site close to the town. The second one is a dataset in the mountains of Valle d'Aosta (Brocca et al., 2013), where 4 years of data are available. The use of digital elevation models and vegetation maps is shown in this work. Some soil processes (e.g. Whalley et al., 2012) are usually disregarded, but in this work their possible impact is considered. References L. Brocca, A. Tarpanelli, T. Moramarco, F. Melone, S.M. Ratto, M. Cauduro, S. Ferraris, N. Berni, F. Ponziani, W. Wagner, T. Melzer (2013). Soil Moisture Estimation in Alpine Catchments through Modeling and Satellite Observations VADOSE ZONE JOURNAL, vol. 8-2, p. 1-10, doi:10.2136/vzj2012.0102 M. Baudena, I. Bevilacqua, D. Canone, S. Ferraris, M. Previati, A. Provenzale (2012). Soil water dynamics at a midlatitude test site: Field measurements and box modeling approaches. JOURNAL OF HYDROLOGY, vol. 414-415, p. 329-340, ISSN: 0022-1694, doi: 10.1016/j.jhydrol.2011.11.009 W.R. Whalley, G.P. Matthews, S. Ferraris (2012). The effect of compaction and shear deformation of saturated soil on hydraulic conductivity. SOIL & TILLAGE RESEARCH, vol. 125, p. 23-29, ISSN: 0167-1987

  2. Siberian forest fires and soil moisture anomalies observed with C-band scatterometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, A.; Balzter, H.; George, C.

    2009-12-01

    Forest fires are frequent in the Siberian taiga and are predicted to increase in frequency as a result of increased fire risk under drought conditions caused by climate change. There is, however, some uncertainty as to the extent to which drought influences forest fire frequency. Both, forest fires and drought conditions can be observed with satellite data. Here, we present an analyses of satellite-derived soil moisture anomaly data (ERS-1/2 scatterometer) and burned area maps (AVHRR/ATSR) over central Siberia for the years 1992-2000. Monthly mean soil moisture deviations were compared to the number of fire scars and the burned area. Results show that above average surface soil moisture conditions limit the possible burned area. The magnitude of a negative deviation does not determine the maximum size of by fire affected areas. More than 50% of area is burned under below average surface soil moisture condition in July and 80% in August.

  3. Improving Simulated Soil Moisture Fields Through Assimilation of AMSR-E Soil Moisture Retrievals with an Ensemble Kalman Filter and a Mass Conservation Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bailing; Toll, David; Zhan, Xiwu; Cosgrove, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Model simulated soil moisture fields are often biased due to errors in input parameters and deficiencies in model physics. Satellite derived soil moisture estimates, if retrieved appropriately, represent the spatial mean of soil moisture in a footprint area, and can be used to reduce model bias (at locations near the surface) through data assimilation techniques. While assimilating the retrievals can reduce model bias, it can also destroy the mass balance enforced by the model governing equation because water is removed from or added to the soil by the assimilation algorithm. In addition, studies have shown that assimilation of surface observations can adversely impact soil moisture estimates in the lower soil layers due to imperfect model physics, even though the bias near the surface is decreased. In this study, an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with a mass conservation updating scheme was developed to assimilate the actual value of Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) soil moisture retrievals to improve the mean of simulated soil moisture fields by the Noah land surface model. Assimilation results using the conventional and the mass conservation updating scheme in the Little Washita watershed of Oklahoma showed that, while both updating schemes reduced the bias in the shallow root zone, the mass conservation scheme provided better estimates in the deeper profile. The mass conservation scheme also yielded physically consistent estimates of fluxes and maintained the water budget. Impacts of model physics on the assimilation results are discussed.

  4. Microwave Soil Moisture Retrieval Under Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, P.; Lang, R.; Kurum, M.; Joseph, A.; Jackson, T.; Cosh, M.

    2008-01-01

    Soil moisture is recognized as an important component of the water, energy, and carbon cycles at the interface between the Earth's surface and atmosphere. Current baseline soil moisture retrieval algorithms for microwave space missions have been developed and validated only over grasslands, agricultural crops, and generally light to moderate vegetation. Tree areas have commonly been excluded from operational soil moisture retrieval plans due to the large expected impact of trees on masking the microwave response to the underlying soil moisture. Our understanding of the microwave properties of trees of various sizes and their effect on soil moisture retrieval algorithms at L band is presently limited, although research efforts are ongoing in Europe, the United States, and elsewhere to remedy this situation. As part of this research, a coordinated sequence of field measurements involving the ComRAD (for Combined Radar/Radiometer) active/passive microwave truck instrument system has been undertaken. Jointly developed and operated by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and George Washington University, ComRAD consists of dual-polarized 1.4 GHz total-power radiometers (LH, LV) and a quad-polarized 1.25 GHz L band radar sharing a single parabolic dish antenna with a novel broadband stacked patch dual-polarized feed, a quad-polarized 4.75 GHz C band radar, and a single channel 10 GHz XHH radar. The instruments are deployed on a mobile truck with an 19-m hydraulic boom and share common control software; real-time calibrated signals, and the capability for automated data collection for unattended operation. Most microwave soil moisture retrieval algorithms developed for use at L band frequencies are based on the tau-omega model, a simplified zero-order radiative transfer approach where scattering is largely ignored and vegetation canopies are generally treated as a bulk attenuating layer. In this approach, vegetation effects are parameterized by tau and omega, the microwave

  5. Validation of two gridded soil moisture products over India with in-situ observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, C. K.; George, John P.; Lodh, Abhishek; Maurya, Devesh Kumar; Mallick, Swapan; Rajagopal, E. N.; Mohandas, Saji

    2016-07-01

    Surface level soil moisture from two gridded datasets over India are evaluated in this study. The first one is the UK Met Office (UKMO) soil moisture analysis produced by a land data assimilation system based on Extended Kalman Filter method (EKF), which make use of satellite observation of Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) soil wetness index as well as the screen level meteorological observations. Second dataset is a satellite soil moisture product, produced by National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC) using passive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 measurements. In-situ observations of soil moisture from India Meteorological Department (IMD) are used for the validation of the gridded soil moisture products. The difference between these datasets over India is minimum in the non-monsoon months and over agricultural regions. It is seen that the NRSC data is slightly drier (0.05%) and UKMO soil moisture analysis is relatively wet during southwest monsoon season. Standard AMSR-2 satellite soil moisture product is used to compare the NRSC and UKMO products. The standard AMSR-2 and UKMO values are closer in monsoon season and AMSR-2 soil moisture is higher than UKMO in all seasons. NRSC and AMSR-2 showed a correlation of 0.83 (significant at 0.01 level). The probability distribution of IMD soil moisture observation peaks at 0.25 m3/m3, NRSC at 0.15 m3/m3, AMSR-2 at 0.25 m3/m3 and UKMO at 0.35 m3/m3 during June-September period. Validation results show UKMO analysis has better correlation with in-situ observations compared to the NRSC and AMSR-2 datasets. The seasonal variation in soil moisture is better represented in UKMO analysis. Underestimation of soil moisture during monsoon season over India in NRSC data suggests the necessity of incorporating the actual vegetation for a better soil moisture retrieval using passive microwave sensors. Both products have good agreement over bare soil, shrubs and grassland compared to needle leaf tree, broad leaf tree and

  6. Soil moisture variations in remotely sensed and reanalysis datasets during weak monsoon conditions over central India and central Myanmar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Sourabh; Kar, Sarat C.; Sharma, Anu Rani

    2017-07-01

    Variation of soil moisture during active and weak phases of summer monsoon JJAS (June, July, August, and September) is very important for sustenance of the crop and subsequent crop yield. As in situ observations of soil moisture are few or not available, researchers use data derived from remote sensing satellites or global reanalysis. This study documents the intercomparison of soil moisture from remotely sensed and reanalyses during dry spells within monsoon seasons in central India and central Myanmar. Soil moisture data from the European Space Agency (ESA)—Climate Change Initiative (CCI) has been treated as observed data and was compared against soil moisture data from the ECMWF reanalysis-Interim (ERA-I) and the climate forecast system reanalysis (CFSR) for the period of 2002-2011. The ESA soil moisture correlates rather well with observed gridded rainfall. The ESA data indicates that soil moisture increases over India from west to east and from north to south during monsoon season. The ERA-I overestimates the soil moisture over India, while the CFSR soil moisture agrees well with the remotely sensed observation (ESA). Over Myanmar, both the reanalysis overestimate soil moisture values and the ERA-I soil moisture does not show much variability from year to year. Day-to-day variations of soil moisture in central India and central Myanmar during weak monsoon conditions indicate that, because of the rainfall deficiency, the observed (ESA) and the CFSR soil moisture values are reduced up to 0.1 m3/m3 compared to climatological values of more than 0.35 m3/m3. This reduction is not seen in the ERA-I data. Therefore, soil moisture from the CFSR is closer to the ESA observed soil moisture than that from the ERA-I during weak phases of monsoon in the study region.

  7. Impacts of soil moisture content on visual soil evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmet-Booth, Jeremy; Forristal, Dermot; Fenton, Owen; Bondi, Giulia; Creamer, Rachel; Holden, Nick

    2017-04-01

    Visual Soil Examination and Evaluation (VSE) techniques offer tools for soil quality assessment. They involve the visual and tactile assessment of soil properties such as aggregate size and shape, porosity, redox morphology, soil colour and smell. An increasing body of research has demonstrated the reliability and utility of VSE techniques. However a number of limitations have been identified, including the potential impact of soil moisture variation during sampling. As part of a national survey of grassland soil quality in Ireland, an evaluation of the impact of soil moisture on two widely used VSE techniques was conducted. The techniques were Visual Evaluation of Soil Structure (VESS) (Guimarães et al., 2011) and Visual Soil Assessment (VSA) (Shepherd, 2009). Both generate summarising numeric scores that indicate soil structural quality, though employ different scoring mechanisms. The former requires the assessment of properties concurrently and the latter separately. Both methods were deployed on 20 sites across Ireland representing a range of soils. Additional samples were taken for soil volumetric water (θ) determination at 5-10 and 10-20 cm depth. No significant correlation was observed between θ 5-10 cm and either VSE technique. However, VESS scores were significantly related to θ 10-20 cm (rs = 0.40, sig = 0.02) while VSA scores were not (rs = -0.33, sig = 0.06). VESS and VSA scores can be grouped into quality classifications (good, moderate and poor). No significant mean difference was observed between θ 5-10 cm or θ 10-20 cm according to quality classification by either method. It was concluded that VESS scores may be affected by soil moisture variation while VSA appear unaffected. The different scoring mechanisms, where the separate assessment and scoring of individual properties employed by VSA, may limit soil moisture effects. However, moisture content appears not to affect overall structural quality classification by either method. References

  8. A New Approach in Downscaling Microwave Soil Moisture Product using Machine Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Peyman; Yan, Hongxiang; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Understating the soil moisture pattern has significant impact on flood modeling, drought monitoring, and irrigation management. Although satellite retrievals can provide an unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution of soil moisture at a global-scale, their soil moisture products (with a spatial resolution of 25-50 km) are inadequate for regional study, where a resolution of 1-10 km is needed. In this study, a downscaling approach using Genetic Programming (GP), a specialized version of Genetic Algorithm (GA), is proposed to improve the spatial resolution of satellite soil moisture products. The GP approach was applied over a test watershed in United States using the coarse resolution satellite data (25 km) from Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer - EOS (AMSR-E) soil moisture products, the fine resolution data (1 km) from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation index, and ground based data including land surface temperature, vegetation and other potential physical variables. The results indicated the great potential of this approach to derive the fine resolution soil moisture information applicable for data assimilation and other regional studies.

  9. Trends and Scales of Observed Soil Moisture Variations in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new soil moisture dataset from direct gravimetric measurements within the top 50-cm soil layers at 178 soil moisture stations in China covering the period 1981 1998 are used to study the long-term and seasonal trends of soil moisture variations, as well as estimate the temporal and spatial scales of soil moisture for different soil layers. Additional datasets of precipitation and temperature difference between land surface and air (TDSA) are analyzed to gain further insight into the changes of soil moisture. There are increasing trends for the top 10 cm, but decreasing trends for the top 50 cm of soil layers in most regions. Trends in precipitation appear to dominantly influence trends in soil moisture in both cases. Seasonal variation of soil moisture is mainly controlled by precipitation and evaporation, and in some regions can be affected by snow cover in winter. Timescales of soil moisture variation are roughly 1-3 months and increase with soil depth.Further influences of TDSA and precipitation on soil moisture in surface layers, rather than in deeper layers,cause this phenomenon. Seasonal variations of temporal scales for soil moisture are region-dependent and consistent in both layer depths. Spatial scales of soil moisture range from 200-600 km, with topography also having an affect on these. Spatial scales of soil moisture in plains are larger than in mountainous areas. In the former, the spatial scale of soil moisture follows the spatial patterns of precipitation and evaporation,whereas in the latter, the spatial scale is controlled by topography.

  10. AMSR-E-Based soil moisture retrieval algorithms and transferability to AMSR2

    Science.gov (United States)

    The launch of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on NASA’s Earth Observing System Aqua satellite (AMSR-E) in June of 2002 has led to major advancements in the routine global mapping of soil moisture. The wide availability of AMSR-E data has promoted development of a number of global soil mo...

  11. Use of Soil Moisture Variability in Artificial Neural Network Retrieval of Soil Moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert Veenendaal

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Passive microwave remote sensing is one of the most promising techniques for soil moisture retrieval. However, the inversion of soil moisture from brightness temperature observations is not straightforward, as it is influenced by numerous factors such as surface roughness, vegetation cover, and soil texture. Moreover, the relationship between brightness temperature, soil moisture and the factors mentioned above is highly non-linear and ill-posed. Consequently, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs have been used to retrieve soil moisture from microwave data, but with limited success when dealing with data different to that from the training period. In this study, an ANN is tested for its ability to predict soil moisture at 1 km resolution on different dates following training at the same site for a specific date. A novel approach that utilizes information on the variability of soil moisture, in terms of its mean and standard deviation for a (sub region of spatial dimension up to 40 km, is used to improve the current retrieval accuracy of the ANN method. A comparison between the ANN with and without the use of the variability information showed that this enhancement enables the ANN to achieve an average Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of around 5.1% v/v when using the variability information, as compared to around 7.5% v/v without it. The accuracy of the soil moisture retrieval was further improved by the division of the target site into smaller regions down to 4 km in size, with the spatial variability of soil moisture calculated from within the smaller region used in the ANN. With the combination of an ANN architecture of a single hidden layer of 20 neurons and the dual-polarized brightness temperatures as input, the proposed use of variability and sub-region methodology achieves an average retrieval accuracy of 3.7% v/v. Although this accuracy is not the lowest as comparing to the research in this field, the main contribution is the ability of ANN in

  12. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Barron; Moran, M. Susan; Escobar, Vanessa; Brown, Molly E.

    2014-05-01

    The launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission in 2014 will provide global soil moisture and freeze-thaw measurements at moderate resolution (9 km) with latency as short as 24 hours. The resolution, latency and global coverage of SMAP products will enable new applications in the fields of weather, climate, drought, flood, agricultural production, human health and national security. To prepare for launch, the SMAP mission has engaged more than 25 Early Adopters. Early Adopters are users who have a need for SMAP-like soil moisture or freeze-thaw data, and who agreed to apply their own resources to demonstrate the utility of SMAP data for their particular system or model. In turn, the SMAP mission agreed to provide Early Adopters with simulated SMAP data products and pre-launch calibration and validation data from SMAP field campaigns, modeling, and synergistic studies. The applied research underway by Early Adopters has provided fundamental knowledge of how SMAP data products can be scaled and integrated into users' policy, business and management activities to improve decision-making efforts. This presentation will cover SMAP applications including weather and climate forecasting, vehicle mobility estimation, quantification of greenhouse gas emissions, management of urban potable water supply, and prediction of crop yield. The presentation will end with a discussion of potential international applications with focus on the ESA/CEOS TIGER Initiative entitled "looking for water in Africa", the United Nations (UN) Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) which carries a specific mandate focused on Africa, the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) which lists soil moisture as an Essential Climate Variable (ECV), and the UN Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) which reported a food and nutrition crisis in the Sahel.

  13. NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, K.; Thurman, S.; Edelstein, W.; Spencer, M.; Chen, Gun-Shing; Underwood, M.; Njoku, E.; Goodman, S.; Jai, Benhan

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, one of the first-tier missions recommended by the 2007 U.S. National Research Council Committee on Earth Science and Applications from Space, was confirmed in May 2012 by NASA to proceed into Implementation Phase (Phase C) with a planned launch in October 2014. SMAP will produce high-resolution and accurate global maps of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state using data from a non-imaging synthetic aperture radar and a radiometer, both operating at L-band. Major challenges addressed by the observatory design include: (1) achieving global coverage every 2-3 days with a single observatory; (2) producing both high resolution and high accuracy soil moisture data, including through moderate vegetation; (3) using a mesh reflector antenna for L-band radiometry; (4) minimizing science data loss from terrestrial L-band radio frequency interference; (5) designing fault protection that also minimizes science data loss; (6) adapting planetary heritage avionics to meet SMAP's unique application and data volume needs; (7) ensuring observatory electromagnetic compatibility to avoid degrading science; (8) controlling a large spinning instrument with a small spacecraft; and (9) accommodating launch vehicle selection late in the observatory's development lifecycle.

  14. Traditional and microirrigation with stochastic soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vico, Giulia; Porporato, Amilcare

    2010-03-01

    Achieving a sustainable use of water resources, in view of the increased food and biofuel demand and possible climate change, will require optimizing irrigation, a highly nontrivial task given the unpredictability of rainfall and the numerous soil-plant-atmosphere interactions. Here we theoretically analyze two different irrigation schemes, a traditional scheme, consisting of the application of fixed water volumes that bring soil moisture to field capacity, and a microirrigation scheme supplying water continuously in order to avoid plant water stress. These two idealized irrigation schemes are optimal in the sense that they avoid crop water stress while minimizing water losses by percolation and runoff. Furthermore, they cover the two extremes cases of continuous and fully concentrated irrigation. For both irrigation schemes, we obtain exact solutions of the steady state soil moisture probability density function with random timing and amounts of rainfall. We also give analytical expressions for irrigation frequency and volumes under different rainfall regimes, evaporative demands, and soil types. We quantify the excess volumes required by traditional irrigation, mostly lost in runoff and deep infiltration, as a function of climate, soil, and vegetation parameters.

  15. Impact of varying storm intensity and extended dry periods on grassland soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hottenstein, John D.; Ponce-Campos, Guillermo E.; Moran, M. Susan

    2014-05-01

    Intra-annual precipitation patterns are expected to shift toward more intense storms and longer dry periods due to changes in climate within the next decades. Using MODIS satellite-derived plant growth data from 2000-2012, this study quantified the relationship between extreme precipitation patterns, annual soil moisture, and plant growth at nine grassland sites across the southern United States. Across all sites, total precipitation was strongly linked to surface soil moisture (at 5-cm depth), and in turn, soil moisture was strongly related to MODIS-based estimates of above-ground net primary production (ANPP). In fact, soil moisture was a better predictor of ANPP than was total precipitation. Results showed a fundamental difference in the response to altered precipitation patterns between mesic and semiarid grasslands. Soil moisture in mesic grasslands decreased with an increase of high-intensity storms, and semi-arid grassland soil moisture decreased with longer dry periods. This was explained in relation to general climate patterns in these two precipitation regimes. The soil moisture at mesic sites tends to reside closer to field capacity than soil moisture at semiarid sites. So, for semiarid sites, storm events of any size will impact soil moisture; whereas for mesic sites, high intensity storms result in greater runoff than low intensity storms, and less impact on soil moisture. In this field study, the length of consecutive dry days (CDD) had a significant impact on soil moisture only at semiarid sites. This was attributed to the fact that the variation in length of CDD was naturally low at mesic sites and not variable year-to-year, in contrast to the high variability of CDD at semiarid sites. For semiarid sites, long periods of CDD decreased the mean annual soil moisture regardless of the total precipitation throughout the year. Our decision to use soil moisture measured at 5-cm depth was largely based on the fact that the currently orbiting Soil Moisture

  16. Comparison of NOAA-CREST Soil Moisture Measurements with SMOS Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzi, H.; Forbes, A.

    2014-12-01

    In October 2014, the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission (SMAP) will launch into a near-polar and sun- synchronous orbit. SMAP includes the first 3 KM resolution product, by both radar and radiometer sensors which will transmit useful information concentrating on the global measurements of soil moisture and freeze/thaw cycles. NOAA- CREST (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration- Cooperative Remote Sensing Science and Technology) deploys a series of in-situ devices into the soil, and an L-BAND Radiometer close to the site ground at the Cary Institute in Millbrook, NY. The site is important for future validation of SMAP mission. Comparing mathematical and ground based remote sensing of soil moisture is beneficial to ensure the accuracy of the measurements. The focus of this research is to analyze and compare soil moisture from ESA- SMOS (Europe Space Agency- Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity) mission and the Cary Institute's soil moisture measurements within the same time period, and location. In the interest of establishing superb authentication; comparing SMOS and ground measurements will justify the accuracy of the newly launch satellite. Discrepancies can be found between field point measurement and relatively large footprint of SMOS, which affects comparison and validation. Several techniques and statistical methods will provide a more meaningful comparison to analyze soil moisture data. The results of this project will help to provide a useful method to compare the NOAA-CREST soil moisture measurements and SMAP measurements. In conclusion, the SMAP advance technology will provide more accurate feedback for modeling numerical weather and climate models. Keywords: Soil Moisture, Precipitation, CREST-SMART, Cary Institute, In-situ, Remote Sensors Accurate Soil Moisture Data, Millbrook, N.Y., CATDS, Hydrology is the branch of science concerning properties of earth's water especially its movement in relation to land. SMOS MIRAS, SMAP, Sensors (Underground)

  17. Evaluating the Utility of Remotely-Sensed Soil Moisture Retrievals for Operational Agricultural Drought Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolten, John D.; Crow, Wade T.; Zhan, Xiwu; Jackson, Thomas J.; Reynolds,Curt

    2010-01-01

    Soil moisture is a fundamental data source used by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) International Production Assessment Division (IPAD) to monitor crop growth stage and condition and subsequently, globally forecast agricultural yields. Currently, the USDA IPAD estimates surface and root-zone soil moisture using a two-layer modified Palmer soil moisture model forced by global precipitation and temperature measurements. However, this approach suffers from well-known errors arising from uncertainty in model forcing data and highly simplified model physics. Here we attempt to correct for these errors by designing and applying an Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) data assimilation system to integrate surface soil moisture retrievals from the NASA Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR-E) into the USDA modified Palmer soil moisture model. An assessment of soil moisture analysis products produced from this assimilation has been completed for a five-year (2002 to 2007) period over the North American continent between 23degN - 50degN and 128degW - 65degW. In particular, a data denial experimental approach is utilized to isolate the added utility of integrating remotely-sensed soil moisture by comparing EnKF soil moisture results obtained using (relatively) low-quality precipitation products obtained from real-time satellite imagery to baseline Palmer model runs forced with higher quality rainfall. An analysis of root-zone anomalies for each model simulation suggests that the assimilation of AMSR-E surface soil moisture retrievals can add significant value to USDA root-zone predictions derived from real-time satellite precipitation products.

  18. A Citizen Science Soil Moisture Sensor to Support SMAP Calibration/Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podest, E.; Das, N. N.

    2016-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite mission was launched in Jan. 2015 and is currently acquiring global measurements of soil moisture in the top 5 cm of the soil every 3 days. SMAP has partnered with the GLOBE program to engage students from around the world to collect in situ soil moisture and help validate SMAP measurements. The current GLOBE SMAP soil moisture protocol consists in collecting a soil sample, weighing, drying and weighing it again in order to determine the amount of water in the soil. Preparation and soil sample collection can take up to 20 minutes and drying can take up to 3 days. We have hence developed a soil moisture measurement device based on Arduino-like microcontrollers along with off-the-shelf and homemade sensors that are accurate, robust, inexpensive and quick and easy to use so that they can be implemented by the GLOBE community and citizen scientists alike. This talk will discuss building, calibration and validation of the soil moisture measuring device and assessing the quality of the measurements collected. This work was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  19. Spatial and temporal variability of soil electrical conductivity related to soil moisture

    OpenAIRE

    José Paulo Molin; Gustavo Di Chiacchio Faulin

    2013-01-01

    Soil electrical conductivity (ECa) is a soil quality indicator associated to attributes interesting to site-specific soil management such as soil moisture and texture. Soil ECa provides information that helps guide soil management decisions, so we performed spatial evaluation of soil moisture in two experimental fields in two consecutive years and modeled its influence on soil ECa. Soil ECa, moisture and clay content were evaluated by statistical, geostatistical and regression analyses. Semiv...

  20. Rainfall estimation from soil moisture data: crash test for SM2RAIN algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Luca; Albergel, Clement; Massari, Christian; Ciabatta, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso; de Rosnay, Patricia

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture governs the partitioning of mass and energy fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere and, hence, it represents a key variable for many applications in hydrology and earth science. In recent years, it was demonstrated that soil moisture observations from ground and satellite sensors contain important information useful for improving rainfall estimation. Indeed, soil moisture data have been used for correcting rainfall estimates from state-of-the-art satellite sensors (e.g. Crow et al., 2011), and also for improving flood prediction through a dual data assimilation approach (e.g. Massari et al., 2014; Chen et al., 2014). Brocca et al. (2013; 2014) developed a simple algorithm, called SM2RAIN, which allows estimating rainfall directly from soil moisture data. SM2RAIN has been applied successfully to in situ and satellite observations. Specifically, by using three satellite soil moisture products from ASCAT (Advanced SCATterometer), AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for Earth Observation) and SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity); it was found that the SM2RAIN-derived rainfall products are as accurate as state-of-the-art products, e.g., the real-time version of the TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) product. Notwithstanding these promising results, a detailed study investigating the physical basis of the SM2RAIN algorithm, its range of applicability and its limitations on a global scale has still to be carried out. In this study, we carried out a crash test for SM2RAIN algorithm on a global scale by performing a synthetic experiment. Specifically, modelled soil moisture data are obtained from HTESSEL model (Hydrology Tiled ECMWF Scheme for Surface Exchanges over Land) forced by ERA-Interim near-surface meteorology. Afterwards, the modelled soil moisture data are used as input into SM2RAIN algorithm for testing weather or not the resulting rainfall estimates are able to reproduce ERA-Interim rainfall data. Correlation, root

  1. Assimilation of neural network soil moisture in land surface models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Fernandez, Nemesio; de Rosnay, Patricia; Albergel, Clement; Aires, Filipe; Prigent, Catherine; Kerr, Yann; Richaume, Philippe; Muñoz-Sabater, Joaquin; Drusch, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    In this study a set of land surface data assimilation (DA) experiments making use of satellite derived soil moisture (SM) are presented. These experiments have two objectives: (1) to test the information content of satellite remote sensing of soil moisture for numerical weather prediction (NWP) models, and (2) to test a simplified assimilation of these data through the use of a Neural Network (NN) retrieval. Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) data were used. The SMOS soil moisture dataset was obtained specifically for this project training a NN using SMOS brightness temperatures as input and using as reference for the training European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) H-TESSEL SM fields. In this way, the SMOS NN SM dataset has a similar climatology to that of the model and it does not present a global bias with respect to the model. The DA experiments are computed using a surface-only Land Data Assimilation System (so-LDAS) based on the HTESSEL land surface model. This system is very computationally efficient and allows to perform long surface assimilation experiments (one whole year, 2012). SMOS NN SM DA experiments are compared to ASCAT SM DA experiments. In both cases, experiments with and without 2 m air temperature and relative humidity DA are discussed using different observation errors for the ASCAT and SMOS datasets. Seasonal, geographical and soil-depth-related differences between the results of those experiments are presented and discussed. The different SM analysed fields are evaluated against a large number of in situ measurements of SM. On average, the SM analysis gives in general similar results to the model open loop with no assimilation even if significant differences can be seen for specific sites with in situ measurements. The sensitivity to observation errors to the SM dataset slightly differs depending on the networks of in situ measurements, however it is relatively low for the tests

  2. Capacitive Soil Moisture Sensor for Plant Watering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Thomas; Kamm, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    How can you realize a water saving and demand-driven plant watering device? To achieve this you need a sensor, which precisely detects the soil moisture. Designing such a sensor is the topic of this poster. We approached this subject with comparing several physical properties of water, e.g. the conductivity, permittivity, heat capacity and the soil water potential, which are suitable to detect the soil moisture via an electronic device. For our project we have developed a sensor device, which measures the soil moisture and provides the measured values for a plant watering system via a wireless bluetooth 4.0 network. Different sensor setups have been analyzed and the final sensor is the result of many iterative steps of improvement. In the end we tested the precision of our sensor and compared the results with theoretical values. The sensor is currently being used in the Botanical Garden of the Friedrich-Alexander-University in a long-term test. This will show how good the usability in the real field is. On the basis of these findings a marketable sensor will soon be available. Furthermore a more specific type of this sensor has been designed for the EU:CROPIS Space Project, where tomato plants will grow at different gravitational forces. Due to a very small (15mm x 85mm x 1.5mm) and light (5 gramm) realisation, our sensor has been selected for the space program. Now the scientists can monitor the water content of the substrate of the tomato plants in outer space and water the plants on demand.

  3. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) Product Specification Document

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, Rolf H.; Ardizzone, Joseph V.; Kim, Gi-Kong; Lucchesi, Robert A.; Smith, Edmond B.; Weiss, Barry H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the Product Specification Document (PSD) for Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture (L4_SM) data for the Science Data System (SDS) of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) project. The L4_SM data product provides estimates of land surface conditions based on the assimilation of SMAP observations into a customized version of the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) land data assimilation system (LDAS). This document applies to any standard L4_SM data product generated by the SMAP Project. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will enhance the accuracy and the resolution of space-based measurements of terrestrial soil moisture and freeze-thaw state. SMAP data products will have a noteworthy impact on multiple relevant and current Earth Science endeavors. These include: Understanding of the processes that link the terrestrial water, the energy and the carbon cycles, Estimations of global water and energy fluxes over the land surfaces, Quantification of the net carbon flux in boreal landscapes Forecast skill of both weather and climate, Predictions and monitoring of natural disasters including floods, landslides and droughts, and Predictions of agricultural productivity. To provide these data, the SMAP mission will deploy a satellite observatory in a near polar, sun synchronous orbit. The observatory will house an L-band radiometer that operates at 1.40 GHz and an L-band radar that operates at 1.26 GHz. The instruments will share a rotating reflector antenna with a 6 meter aperture that scans over a 1000 km swath.

  4. Prediction of Root Zone Soil Moisture using Remote Sensing Products and In-Situ Observation under Climate Change Scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Panda, R. K.; Mohanty, B.

    2015-12-01

    Prediction of root zone soil moisture status at field level is vital for developing efficient agricultural water management schemes. In this study, root zone soil moisture was estimated across the Rana watershed in Eastern India, by assimilation of near-surface soil moisture estimate from SMOS satellite into a physically-based Soil-Water-Atmosphere-Plant (SWAP) model. An ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) technique coupled with SWAP model was used for assimilating the satellite soil moisture observation at different spatial scales. The universal triangle concept and artificial intelligence techniques were applied to disaggregate the SMOS satellite monitored near-surface soil moisture at a 40 km resolution to finer scale (1 km resolution), using higher spatial resolution of MODIS derived vegetation indices (NDVI) and land surface temperature (Ts). The disaggregated surface soil moisture were compared to ground-based measurements in diverse landscape using portable impedance probe and gravimetric samples. Simulated root zone soil moisture were compared with continuous soil moisture profile measurements at three monitoring stations. In addition, the impact of projected climate change on root zone soil moisture were also evaluated. The climate change projections of rainfall were analyzed for the Rana watershed from statistically downscaled Global Circulation Models (GCMs). The long-term root zone soil moisture dynamics were estimated by including a rainfall generator of likely scenarios. The predicted long term root zone soil moisture status at finer scale can help in developing efficient agricultural water management schemes to increase crop production, which lead to enhance the water use efficiency.

  5. The ASCAT Soil Moisture Product: A Review of its Specifications, Validation Results, and Emerging Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Wagner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Many physical, chemical and biological processes taking place at the land surface are strongly influenced by the amount of water stored within the upper soil layers. Therefore, many scientific disciplines require soil moisture observations for developing, evaluating and improving their models. One of these disciplines is meteorology where soil moisture is important due to its control on the exchange of heat and water between the soil and the lower atmosphere. Soil moisture observations may thus help to improve the forecasts of air temperature, air humidity and precipitation. However, until recently, soil moisture observations had only been available over a limited number of regional soil moisture networks. This has hampered scientific progress as regards the characterisation of land surface processes not just in meteorology but many other scientific disciplines as well. Fortunately, in recent years, satellite soil moisture data have increasingly become available. One of the freely available global soil moisture data sets is derived from the backscatter measurements acquired by the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT that is a C-band active microwave remote sensing instrument flown on board of the Meteorological Operational (METOP satellite series. ASCAT was designed to observe wind speed and direction over the oceans and was initially not foreseen for monitoring soil moisture over land. Yet, as argued in this review paper, the characteristics of the ASCAT instrument, most importantly its wavelength (5.7 cm, its high radiometric accuracy, and its multiple-viewing capabilities make it an attractive sensor for measuring soil moisture. Moreover, given the operational status of ASCAT, and its promising long-term prospects, many geoscientific applications might benefit from using ASCAT soil moisture data. Nonetheless, the ASCAT soil moisture product is relatively complex, requiring a good understanding of its properties before it can be successfully used in

  6. Precipitation estimation using L-band and C-band soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Brocca, Luca; Crow, Wade T.; Burgin, Mariko S.; De Lannoy, Gabrielle J. M.

    2016-09-01

    An established methodology for estimating precipitation amounts from satellite-based soil moisture retrievals is applied to L-band products from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite missions and to a C-band product from the Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) mission. The precipitation estimates so obtained are evaluated against in situ (gauge-based) precipitation observations from across the globe. The precipitation estimation skill achieved using the L-band SMAP and SMOS data sets is higher than that obtained with the C-band product, as might be expected given that L-band is sensitive to a thicker layer of soil and thereby provides more information on the response of soil moisture to precipitation. The square of the correlation coefficient between the SMAP-based precipitation estimates and the observations (for aggregations to ˜100 km and 5 days) is on average about 0.6 in areas of high rain gauge density. Satellite missions specifically designed to monitor soil moisture thus do provide significant information on precipitation variability, information that could contribute to efforts in global precipitation estimation.

  7. Evaluation of MODIS NDVI and NDWI for vegetation drought monitoring using Oklahoma Mesonet soil moisture data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y.; Hunt, E.; Wardlow, B.; Basara, J.B.; Brown, J.F.; Verdin, J.P.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of the relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices (normalized difference vegetation index and normalized difference water index) and soil moisture improves our understanding of how these indices respond to soil moisture fluctuations. Soil moisture deficits are ultimately tied to drought stress on plants. The diverse terrain and climate of Oklahoma, the extensive soil moisture network of the Oklahoma Mesonet, and satellite-derived indices from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) provided an opportunity to study correlations between soil moisture and vegetation indices over the 2002-2006 growing seasons. Results showed that the correlation between both indices and the fractional water index (FWI) was highly dependent on land cover heterogeneity and soil type. Sites surrounded by relatively homogeneous vegetation cover with silt loam soils had the highest correlation between the FWI and both vegetation-related indices (r???0.73), while sites with heterogeneous vegetation cover and loam soils had the lowest correlation (r???0.22). Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Evaluating the Potential Use of Remotely-Sensed and Model-Simulated Soil Moisture for Agricultural Drought Risk Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hongxiang; Moradkhani, Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Current two datasets provide spatial and temporal resolution of soil moisture at large-scale: the remotely-sensed soil moisture retrievals and the model-simulated soil moisture products. Drought monitoring using remotely-sensed soil moisture is emerging, and the soil moisture simulated using land surface models (LSMs) have been used operationally to monitor agriculture drought in United States. Although these two datasets yield important drought information, their drought monitoring skill still needs further quantification. This study provides a comprehensive assessment of the potential of remotely-sensed and model-simulated soil moisture data in monitoring agricultural drought over the Columbia River Basin (CRB), Pacific Northwest. Two satellite soil moisture datasets were evaluated, the LPRM-AMSR-E (unscaled, 2002-2011) and ESA-CCI (scaled, 1979-2013). The USGS Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) is used to simulate the soil moisture from 1979-2011. The drought monitoring skill is quantified with two indices: drought area coverage (the ability of drought detection) and drought severity (according to USDM categories). The effects of satellite sensors (active, passive), multi-satellite combined, length of climatology, climate change effect, and statistical methods are also examined in this study.

  9. Capability of meteorological drought indices for detecting soil moisture droughts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devanmini Halwatura

    2017-08-01

    New hydrological insights for the region: For three typical soil types and climate zones in Eastern Australia, and for two soil profiles, we have found a significant correlation between the indices and soil moisture droughts detected by Hydrus-1D. The failure rates and false alarm rates for detecting the simulated soil moisture droughts were generally below 50% for both indices and both soil profiles (the Reconnaissance Drought Index at Melbourne was the only exception. However, the complexity of Hydrus-1D and the uncertainty associated with the available, regionalised soil water retention curves encourage using the indices over Hydrus-1D in absence of appropriate soil moisture monitoring data.

  10. Estimation of Soil Moisture Profile using a Simple Hydrology Model and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soman, Vishwas V.; Crosson, William L.; Laymon, Charles; Tsegaye, Teferi

    1998-01-01

    Soil moisture is an important component of analysis in many Earth science disciplines. Soil moisture information can be obtained either by using microwave remote sensing or by using a hydrologic model. In this study, we combined these two approaches to increase the accuracy of profile soil moisture estimation. A hydrologic model was used to analyze the errors in the estimation of soil moisture using the data collected during Huntsville '96 microwave remote sensing experiment in Huntsville, Alabama. Root mean square errors (RMSE) in soil moisture estimation increase by 22% with increase in the model input interval from 6 hr to 12 hr for the grass-covered plot. RMSEs were reduced for given model time step by 20-50% when model soil moisture estimates were updated using remotely-sensed data. This methodology has a potential to be employed in soil moisture estimation using rainfall data collected by a space-borne sensor, such as the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite, if remotely-sensed data are available to update the model estimates.

  11. Synergies of the European Microwave Remote Sensing Missions SMOS and ASCAT for Monitoring Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scipal, K.; Wagner, W.

    2003-04-01

    The lack of global soil moisture observations is one of the most glaring and pressing deficiencies in current research activities of related fields, from climate monitoring and ecological applications to the quantification of biogeophysical fluxes. This has implications for important issues of the international political agenda like managing global water resources, securing food production and studying climate change. Currently it is held that only microwave remote sensing offers the potential to produce reliable global scale soil moisture information economically. Recognising the urgent need for a soil moisture mission several international initiatives are planning satellite missions dedicated to monitor the global hydrological cycle among them two European microwave satellites. ESA is planning to launch the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Mission SMOS, in 2006. SMOS will measure soil moisture over land and ocean salinity over the oceans. The mission rests on a passive microwave sensor (radiometer) operated in L-band which is currently believed to hold the largest potential for soil moisture retrieval. One year before (2005) EUMETSAT will launch the Meteorological Operational satellite METOP which carries the active microwave system Advanced Scatterometer ASCAT on board. ASCAT has been designed to retrieve winds over the oceans but recent research has established its capability to retrieve soil moisture. Although currently it is hold that, using active microwave techniques, the effect of surface roughness dominates that of soil moisture (while the converse is true for radiometers), the ERS scatterometer was successfully used to derive global soil moisture information at a spatial resolution of 50 km with weekly to decadal temporal resolution. The quality of the soil moisture products have been assessed by independent experts in several pilot projects funded by the European Space Agency. There is evidence to believe that both missions will provide a flow of

  12. Remote sensing of vegetation and soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, J. A.; Shin, R. T. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    Progress in the investigation of problems related to the remote sensing of vegetation and soil moisture is reported. Specific topics addressed include: (1) microwave scattering from periodic surfaces using a rigorous modal technique; (2) combined random rough surface and volume scattering effects; (3) the anisotropic effects of vegetation structures; (4) the application of the strong fluctuation theory to the the study of electromagnetic wave scattering from a layer of random discrete scatterers; and (5) the investigation of the scattering of a plane wave obliquely incident on a half space of densely distributed spherical dielectric scatterers using a quantum mechanical potential approach.

  13. Evaluation of gravimetric ground truth soil moisture data collected for the agricultural soil moisture experiment, 1978 Colby, Kansas, aircraft mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, L. M.; Phinney, D. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Soil moisture data acquired to support the development of algorithms for estimating surface soil moisture from remotely sensed backscattering of microwaves from ground surfaces are presented. Aspects of field uniformity and variability of gravimetric soil moisture measurements are discussed. Moisture distribution patterns are illustrated by frequency distributions and contour plots. Standard deviations and coefficients of variation relative to degree of wetness and agronomic features of the fields are examined. Influence of sampling depth on observed moisture content an variability are indicated. For the various sets of measurements, soil moisture values that appear as outliers are flagged. The distribution and legal descriptions of the test fields are included along with examinations of soil types, agronomic features, and sampling plan. Bulk density data for experimental fields are appended, should analyses involving volumetric moisture content be of interest to the users of data in this report.

  14. Using GPS Interferometric Reflectometry to estimate soil moisture and vegetation water content fluctuations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, C. C.; Small, E. E.; Larson, K. M.; Braun, J. J.; Shreve, C. M.

    2010-12-01

    High-precision GPS receivers can be used to estimate fluctuations in near surface soil moisture, snow and vegetation water content. This approach, referred to as GPS-Interferometric Reflectometry (GPS-IR), relates precise changes in the geometry of reflected GPS signals to observe soil moisture and snow while simultaneously using signal attenuation and diffuse scattering to infer changes in vegetative state. Previous remote sensing research has shown that microwave signals (e.g., L-band) are optimal for measuring hydrologic variables, such as soil moisture, and because GPS satellites transmit similar signals, they can be useful for sensing water in the environment. In addition, standard GPS antenna configurations that are used in NSF's Plate Boundary Observatory network yield sensing footprints of ~1000 m2. Given this sensitivity, hundreds of GPS receivers that exist in the U.S. could be used to provide near-real time estimates of soil moisture and vegetation water content for satellite validation, drought monitoring and related studies. A significant obstacle to using L-band (or similar) signals for remote sensing is differentiating the effects of soil moisture and vegetation on the retrieval of hydrologic variables. This same challenge exists when using GPS-IR data. We have established nine research sites with identical GPS and hydrologic infrastructure to study this problem. These sites span a wide range of soil, vegetation, and climate types. In addition to daily GPS and hourly soil moisture data, we have collected weekly vegetation water content samples at all sites. Our data demonstrate that soil moisture fluctuations can be estimated from GPS-IR records when vegetation water content is low (moisture and vegetation signals and quantifying errors in our retrieval algorithm.

  15. Calibration of Soil Moisture Measurement Using Pr2 Moisture Meter and Gravimetric-Based Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olotu Yahaya

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The research study strongly focused on creating strong mechanism for measuring and evaluating soil moisture content comparing PR2 capacitance moisture meter and gravimetric approach. PR2 moisture meter shows a better performance accuracy of ± 6%; 0.06 m 3 /m 3 and intercept a0 =1.8; indicating the field is heavy clay. It measures to 1000 mm depth with high precision; while realistic result could not be obtained from gravimetric method at this measuring depth. Therefore, effective soil moisture measuring, monitoring and evaluation can be achieved with PR2 moisture meter.

  16. Agricultural Drought Assessment In Latin America Based On A Standardized Soil Moisture Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrao, Hugo; Russo, Simone; Sepulcre, Guadalupe; Barbosa, Paulo

    2013-12-01

    We propose a relatively simple, spatially invariant and probabilistic year-round Standardized Soil Moisture Index (SSMI) that is designed to estimate drought conditions from satellite imagery data. The SSMI is based on soil moisture content alone and is defined as the number of standard deviations that the observed moisture at a given location and timescale deviates from the long- term normal conditions. Specifically, the SSMI is computed by fitting a non-parametric probability distribution function to historical soil moisture records and then trans- forming it into a normal distribution with a mean of zero and standard deviation of one. Negative standard normal values indicate dry conditions and positive values indicate wet conditions. To evaluate the applicability of the SSMI, we fitted empirical and normal cumulative distribution functions (ECDF and nCDF) to 32-years of averaged soil moisture amounts derived from the Essential Climate Variable (ECV) Soil Moisture (SM) dataset, and compared the root-mean-squared errors of residuals. SM climatology was calculated on a 0.25° grid over Latin America at timescales of 1, 3, 6, and 12 months for the long-term period of 1979-2010. Results show that the ECDF fits better the soil moisture data than the nCDF at all timescales and that the negative SSMI values computed with the non-parametric estimator accurately identified the temporal and geographic distribution of major drought events that occurred in the study area.

  17. Modelling soil moisture at SMOS scale by use of a SVAT model over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission is to deliver global fields of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity using L-band (1.4 GHz radiometry. Within the context of the preparation for this mission over land, the Valencia Anchor Station experimental site, in Spain, was chosen to be one of the main test sites in Europe for the SMOS Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities. Ground and meteorological measurements over the area are used as the input of a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT model, SURFEX (Externalized Surface-module ISBA (Interactions between Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere so as to simulate the surface soil moisture. The calibration as well as the validation of the ISBA model was made using in situ soil moisture measurements. It is shown that a good consistency was reached when point comparisons between simulated and in situ soil moisture measurements were made. In order to obtain an accurate soil moisture mapping over the Valencia Anchor Station (50×50 km2 area, a spatialization method has been applied. To validate the approach, a comparison with remote sensing data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on Earth observing System (AMSR-E and from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-Scat was performed. Despite the fact that AMSR-E surface soil moisture product is not reproducing accurately the absolute values, it provides trustworthy information on surface soil moisture temporal variability. However, during the vegetation growing season the signal is perturbed. By using the polarization ratio a better agreement is obtained. ERS-Scat soil moisture products were also used to be compared with the simulated spatialized soil moisture. The seasonal variations were well reproduced. However, the lack of soil moisture data over the area (45 observations for one year was a limit into completely understanding the soil moisture variability.

  18. Soil Moisture Data Assimilation in Soil Water Flow Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Guber, A.; Jacques, D.; Pan, F.; van Genuchten, M.; Cady, R. E.; Nicholson, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    Soil water flow modeling has multiple applications. This modeling is based on simplifications stemming from both conceptual uncertainty and lack of detailed knowledge about parameters. Modern soil moisture sensors can provide detailed information about changes in soil water content in time and with depth. This information can be used for data assimilation in soil water flow modeling. The ensemble Kalman filter appears to be an appropriate method for that. Earlier we demonstrated ensemble simulations of soil water flow by using sets of pedotransfer functions (empirical relationships between soil hydraulic properties and soil basic properties, such as particle size distribution, bulk density, organic carbon content, etc.). The objective of this work was to apply the data assimilation with the ensemble Kalman filter to soil water flow modeling, using soil water content monitoring with TDR probes and an ensemble of soil water flow models parameterized with different pedotransfer functions. Experiments were carried out at the Bekkevoort site, Belgium. Sixty time domain reflectometry (TDR) probes with two rods) were installed along the trench in loamy soil at 12 locations with 50-cm horizontal spacing at five depths (15, 35, 55, 75, and 95 cm). Water content and weather parameters were monitored for one year with 15 min frequency. Soil water flow was simulated using the HYDRUS6 software. Mean daily means of water contents at the observation depths were the measurements used in data assimilation. Eighteen pedotransfer functions for water retention and one for hydraulic conductivity were applied to generate ensembles to evaluate the uncertainty in simulation results, whereas the replicated measurements at each of measurement depths were used to characterize the uncertainty in data. Data assimilation appeared to be very efficient. Even assimilating measurements at a single depth provided substantial improvement in simulations at other observation depths. Results on

  19. Developing a Soil Moisture Index for California Grasslands from Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flamme, H. E.; Roberts, D. A.; Miller, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key environmental factor controlling vegetation diversity and productivity, evaporation, transpiration, and rainfall runoff. Despite the contribution of soil moisture to ecological productivity, the hydrologic cycle, and erosion, it is currently not being monitored as accurately or as frequently as other environmental factors. Traditional soil moisture monitoring techniques rely on in situ measurements, which become costly when evaluating areas of unevenly distributed soil characteristics and varying topography. Alternatively, satellite remote sensing, such as passive microwave from SMAP, can provide soil moisture but only at very coarse spatial resolutions. Imagery from the Airborne Visible / Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) has the potential to allow better spatial and temporal monitoring of soil moisture. This study established a relationship between plant available water and hyperspectral reflectance via linear regressions of data from 2013-2015 for two grassland field sites: 1) near Santa Barbara, California, at Coal Oil Point Reserve (COPR) and 2) Airstrip station (AIRS) at UC Santa Barbara's Sedgwick Reserve near Santa Ynez, California. Volumetric soil moisture measurements at 10 cm and 20 cm depths were provided by meteorological stations situated in COPR and AIRS while reflectance data were extracted from AVIRIS. We found strong correlations between plant available water and bands centered at wavelengths 704 nm and 831 nm, which we used to create Hyperspectral Soil Moisture Index (HSMI): 0.38((ρ831-ρ704)/(ρ831+ρ704))-0.02. HSMI demonstrated a coefficient of determination (R2) of 0.71 for linear regressions of reflectance versus plant available water with a lag time of 28 days. We applied HSMI to the AIRS and COPR grasslands for 2011 AVIRIS scenes. Plant available water values predicted by HSMI were 0.039 higher at AIRS and 0.048 higher at COPR than the field measurements at the sites. Differences in grass species, soil

  20. On the Synergy of Airborne GNSS-R and Landsat 8 for Soil Moisture Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilda Sánchez

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available While the synergy between thermal, optical, and passive microwave observations is well known for the estimation of soil moisture and vegetation parameters, the use of remote sensing sources based on the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS remains unexplored. During an airborne campaign performed in August 2014, over an agricultural area in the Duero basin (Spain, an innovative sensor developed by the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya-Barcelona Tech based on GNSS Reflectometry (GNSS-R was tested for soil moisture estimation. The objective was to evaluate the combined use of GNSS-R observations with a time-collocated Landsat 8 image for soil moisture retrieval under semi-arid climate conditions. As a ground reference dataset, an intensive field campaign was carried out. The Light Airborne Reflectometer for GNSS-R Observations (LARGO observations, together with optical, infrared, and thermal bands from Landsat 8, were linked through a semi-empirical model to field soil moisture. Different combinations of vegetation and water indices with LARGO subsets were tested and compared to the in situ measurements. Results showed that the joint use of GNSS-R reflectivity, water/vegetation indices and thermal maps from Landsat 8 not only allows capturing soil moisture spatial gradients under very dry soil conditions, but also holds great promise for accurate soil moisture estimation (correlation coefficients greater than 0.5 were obtained from comparison with in situ data.

  1. Operational Mapping of Soil Moisture Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Data: Application to the Touch Basin (France

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean François Desprats

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture is a key parameter in different environmental applications, suchas hydrology and natural risk assessment. In this paper, surface soil moisture mappingwas carried out over a basin in France using satellite synthetic aperture radar (SARimages acquired in 2006 and 2007 by C-band (5.3 GHz sensors. The comparisonbetween soil moisture estimated from SAR data and in situ measurements shows goodagreement, with a mapping accuracy better than 3%. This result shows that themonitoring of soil moisture from SAR images is possible in operational phase. Moreover,moistures simulated by the operational Météo-France ISBA soil-vegetation-atmospheretransfer model in the SIM-Safran-ISBA-Modcou chain were compared to radar moistureestimates to validate its pertinence. The difference between ISBA simulations and radarestimates fluctuates between 0.4 and 10% (RMSE. The comparison between ISBA andgravimetric measurements of the 12 March 2007 shows a RMSE of about 6%. Generally,these results are very encouraging. Results show also that the soil moisture estimatedfrom SAR images is not correlated with the textural units defined in the European Soil Geographical Database (SGDBE at 1:1000000 scale. However, dependence was observed between texture maps and ISBA moisture. This dependence is induced by the use of the texture map as an input parameter in the ISBA model. Even if this parameter is very important for soil moisture estimations, radar results shown that the textural map scale at 1:1000000 is not appropriate to differentiate moistures zones.

  2. Soil moisture patterns in a northern coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas F. McLintock

    1959-01-01

    The trend of soil moisture during the growing season, the alternate wetting from rainfall and drying during clear weather, determines the amount of moisture available for tree growth and also fixes, in part, the environment for root growth. In much of the northern coniferous region both moisture content and root environment are in turn affected by the hummock-and-...

  3. Characteristics and performance of L-band radar-based soil moisture retrievals using Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) synthetic aperture radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Johnson, J. T.; Moghaddam, M.; Tsang, L.; Colliander, A.

    2016-12-01

    Surface soil moisture of the top 5-cm was estimated at 3-km spatial resolution using L-band dual-copolarized Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data that mapped the globe every three days from mid-April to early July, 2015. Radar observations of soil moisture offer the advantage of high spatial resolution, but have been challenging in the past due to the complicating factors of surface roughness and vegetation scattering. In this work, physically-based forward models of radar scattering for individual vegetation types are inverted using a time-series approach to retrieve soil moisture while correcting for the effects of roughness and dynamic vegetation. The predictions of the forward models used agree with SMAP measurements to within 0.5 dB unbiased-RMSE (root mean square error, ubRMSE) and -0.05 dB (bias). The forward models further allow the mechanisms of radar scattering to be examined to identify the sensitivity of radar scattering to soil moisture. Global patterns of the soil moistures retrieved by the algorithm generally match well with those from other satellite sensors. However biases exist in dry regions, and discrepancies are found in thick vegetation areas. The retrievals are compared with in situ measurements of soil moisture in locations characterized as cropland, grassland, and woody vegetation. Terrain slopes, subpixel heterogeneity, tillage practices, and vegetation growth influence the retrievals, but are largely corrected by the retrieval processes. Soil moisture retrievals agree with the in-situ measurements at 0.052 m3/m3 ubRMSE, -0.015 m3/m3 bias, and a correlation of 0.50. These encouraging retrieval results demonstrate the feasibility of a physically-based time-series retrieval with L-band SAR data for characterizing soil moisture over diverse conditions of soil moisture, surface roughness, and vegetation types. The findings are important for future L-band radar missions with frequent revisits that permit time

  4. Divergent surface and total soil moisture projections under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Alexis; Sheffield, Justin; Milly, Paul C.D.

    2017-01-01

    Land aridity has been projected to increase with global warming. Such projections are mostly based on off-line aridity and drought metrics applied to climate model outputs but also are supported by climate-model projections of decreased surface soil moisture. Here we comprehensively analyze soil moisture projections from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5, including surface, total, and layer-by-layer soil moisture. We identify a robust vertical gradient of projected mean soil moisture changes, with more negative changes near the surface. Some regions of the northern middle to high latitudes exhibit negative annual surface changes but positive total changes. We interpret this behavior in the context of seasonal changes in the surface water budget. This vertical pattern implies that the extensive drying predicted by off-line drought metrics, while consistent with the projected decline in surface soil moisture, will tend to overestimate (negatively) changes in total soil water availability.

  5. effect of soil moisture on trace elements concentrations using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    H. Sahraoui and M. Hachicha

    2017-01-01

    Jan 1, 2017 ... produced by the water influence moisture content and corrected ... Previous studies indicated that PXRF analysis was capable of detecting soil trace elements ..... determination of some heavy metals in soil using an x-ray ...

  6. An integrated GIS application system for soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Di; Shen, Runping; Huang, Xiaolong; Shi, Chunxiang

    2014-11-01

    The gaps in knowledge and existing challenges in precisely describing the land surface process make it critical to represent the massive soil moisture data visually and mine the data for further research.This article introduces a comprehensive soil moisture assimilation data analysis system, which is instructed by tools of C#, IDL, ArcSDE, Visual Studio 2008 and SQL Server 2005. The system provides integrated service, management of efficient graphics visualization and analysis of land surface data assimilation. The system is not only able to improve the efficiency of data assimilation management, but also comprehensively integrate the data processing and analysis tools into GIS development environment. So analyzing the soil moisture assimilation data and accomplishing GIS spatial analysis can be realized in the same system. This system provides basic GIS map functions, massive data process and soil moisture products analysis etc. Besides,it takes full advantage of a spatial data engine called ArcSDE to effeciently manage, retrieve and store all kinds of data. In the system, characteristics of temporal and spatial pattern of soil moiture will be plotted. By analyzing the soil moisture impact factors, it is possible to acquire the correlation coefficients between soil moisture value and its every single impact factor. Daily and monthly comparative analysis of soil moisture products among observations, simulation results and assimilations can be made in this system to display the different trends of these products. Furthermore, soil moisture map production function is realized for business application.

  7. Estimating daily root-zone soil moisture in snow-dominated regions using an empirical soil moisture diagnostic equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feifei; Nieswiadomy, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Soil moisture in snow-dominated regions has many important applications including evapotranspiration estimation, flood forecasting, water resource and ecosystem services management, weather prediction and climate modeling, and quantification of denudation processes. A simple and robust empirical approach to estimate root-zone soil moisture in snow-dominated regions using a soil moisture diagnostic equation that incorporates snowfall and snowmelt processes is suggested and tested. A five-water-year dataset (10/1/2010-9/30/2015) of daily precipitation, air temperature, snow water equivalent and soil moistures at three depths (i.e., 5 cm, 20 cm, and 50 cm) at each of 12 Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL) sites across Utah (37.583°N-41.883°N, 110.183°W-112.9°W), is applied to test the proposed method. The first three water years are designated as the parameter-estimation period (PEP) and the last two water years are chosen as the model-testing period (MTP). Applying the estimated soil moisture loss function parameters and other empirical parameters in the soil moisture diagnostic equation in the PEP, soil moistures in three soil columns (0-5 cm, 0-20 cm, and 0-50 cm) are estimated in the MTP. The relatively accurate soil moisture estimations compared to the observations at 12 SNOTEL sites (RMSE ⩽ 6.23 (%V/V), average RMSE = 4.28 (%V/V), correlation coefficient ⩾0.75, average correlation coefficient =0.89, the Nash-Sutcliffe efficient coefficient Ec ⩾ 0.24, average Ec = 0.72) indicate that the soil moisture diagnostic equation is capable of accurately estimating soil moisture in snow-dominated regions after the snowfall and snowmelt processes are included in the soil moisture diagnostic equation.

  8. Evaluation of microwaves soil moisture products based on two years of ground measurements over a Sahelian region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhier, C.; de Rosnay, P.; Kerr, Y.; Kergoat, L.

    2008-12-01

    Microwaves remote sensing is a promising approach to measure soil moisture values and variations. Soil moisture is a very important variable which strongly interacts with soil-vegetation-atmosphere fluxes. This is particularly true in Sahelian region with monsoon climatic system. From active or passive microwaves measurements of backscatter coefficients or brightness temperatures, soil moisture products are derived. Soil moisture products evaluation is essential to improve algorithm and inform users on the products quality (eg quality of soil moisture products variability or absolutes). This study aims to evaluate and to intercompare five soil moisture products from active and passive microwaves sensors. The study is performed for 2005-2006, for a 1 x 3 degrees longitude-latitude window located in Sahel (14-17N and 0-1W). In addition an accurate validation is conducted for specific locations based on ground measurements available in this region. It uses the Gourma (Mali) soil moisture measurements network installed in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) program. The soil moisture network has been organized in order to validate remotely sensed soil moisture for the future Soil Moisture an Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. Three stations located on sandy dune systems have been selected according to their location along the North-South climatic gradient. They provide continuous soil moisture measurements at 15-minute time step and at 5-cm depth for 2005-2006. Five soil moisture products provided by three different sensors are considered. 1) From the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on Earth Observing System (AMSR-E), two soil moisture products are used: the National Snow and Ice Data Center product and the Amsterdam University product. 2) From the Wind Scatterometer, on European Remote Sensing (ERS) satellite, two soil moisture products are evaluated: the Vienna University of Technology and the Zribi et al 2007 products. 3) The

  9. Assimilating soil moisture into an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacke, Tobias; Hagemann, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    Several modelling studies reported potential impacts of soil moisture anomalies on regional climate. In particular for short prediction periods, perturbations of the soil moisture state may result in significant alteration of surface temperature in the following season. However, it is not clear yet whether or not soil moisture anomalies affect climate also on larger temporal and spatial scales. In an earlier study, we showed that soil moisture anomalies can persist for several seasons in the deeper soil layers of a land surface model. Additionally, those anomalies can influence root zone moisture, in particular during explicitly dry or wet periods. Thus, one prerequisite for predictability, namely the existence of long term memory, is evident for simulated soil moisture and might be exploited to improve climate predictions. The second prerequisite is the sensitivity of the climate system to soil moisture. In order to investigate this sensitivity for decadal simulations, we implemented a soil moisture assimilation scheme into the Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). The assimilation scheme is based on a simple nudging algorithm and updates the surface soil moisture state once per day. In our experiments, the MPI-ESM is used which includes model components for the interactive simulation of atmosphere, land and ocean. Artificial assimilation data is created from a control simulation to nudge the MPI-ESM towards predominantly dry and wet states. First analyses are focused on the impact of the assimilation on land surface variables and reveal distinct differences in the long-term mean values between wet and dry state simulations. Precipitation, evapotranspiration and runoff are larger in the wet state compared to the dry state, resulting in an increased moisture transport from the land to atmosphere and ocean. Consequently, surface temperatures are lower in the wet state simulations by more than one Kelvin. In terms of spatial pattern

  10. Validation of the GCOM-W SCA and JAXA soil moisture algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satellite-based remote sensing of soil moisture has matured over the past decade as a result of the Global Climate Observing Mission-Water (GCOM-W) program of JAXA. This program has resulted in improved algorithms that have been supported by rigorous validation. Access to the products and the valida...

  11. A comparison between two algorithms for the retrieval of soil moisture using AMSR-E data

    Science.gov (United States)

    A comparison between two algorithms for estimating soil moisture with microwave satellite data was carried out by using the datasets collected on the four Agricultural Research Service (ARS) watershed sites in the US from 2002 to 2009. These sites collectively represent a wide range of ground condit...

  12. Inference of Soil Hydrologic Parameters from Electronic Soil Moisture Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, David G.; Seyfried, Mark S.; McNamara, James P.; Hwang, Kyotaek

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is an important control on hydrologic function, as it governs vertical fluxes from and to the atmosphere, groundwater recharge and lateral fluxes through the soil. Historically, the traditional model parameters of saturation, field capacity and permanent wilting point have been determined by laboratory methods. This approach is challenged by issues of scale, boundary conditions and soil disturbance. We develop and compare four methods to determine values of field saturation, field capacity, plant extraction limit and initiation of plant water stress from long term in-situ monitoring records of TDR-measured volumetric water content (Q). The monitoring sites represent a range of soil textures, soil depths, effective precipitation and plant cover types in a semi-arid climate. The Q records exhibit attractors (high frequency values) that correspond to field capacity and the plant extraction limit at both annual and longer time scales, but the field saturation values vary by year depending on seasonal wetness in the semi-arid setting. The analysis for five sites in two watersheds is supported by comparison to values determined by a common pedotransfer function and measured soil characteristic curves. Frozen soil is identified as a complicating factor for the analysis and users are cautioned to filter data by temperature, especially for near surface soils.

  13. The global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Kaighin A.; Alemohammad, Seyed Hamed; Akbar, Ruzbeh; Konings, Alexandra G.; Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-01-01

    Surface soil moisture has a direct impact on food security, human health and ecosystem function. It also plays a key role in the climate system, and the development and persistence of extreme weather events such as droughts, floods and heatwaves. However, sparse and uneven observations have made it difficult to quantify the global distribution and dynamics of surface soil moisture. Here we introduce a metric of soil moisture memory and use a full year of global observations from NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive mission to show that surface soil moisture--a storage believed to make up less than 0.001% of the global freshwater budget by volume, and equivalent to an, on average, 8-mm thin layer of water covering all land surfaces--plays a significant role in the water cycle. Specifically, we find that surface soil moisture retains a median 14% of precipitation falling on land after three days. Furthermore, the retained fraction of the surface soil moisture storage after three days is highest over arid regions, and in regions where drainage to groundwater storage is lowest. We conclude that lower groundwater storage in these regions is due not only to lower precipitation, but also to the complex partitioning of the water cycle by the surface soil moisture storage layer at the land surface.

  14. Enhancing agricultural forecasting using SMOS surface soil moisture retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the onset of data availability from the ESA Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission (Kerr and Levine, 2008) and the expected 2015 launch of the NASA Soil Moisture Active and Passive (SMAP) mission (Entekhabi et al., 2010), the next five years should see a significant expansion in our ab...

  15. On bimodality in warm season soil moisture observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, A.J.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Troch, P.A.A.

    2005-01-01

    It has recently been suggested that the bimodality in warm season soil moisture observations in Illinois is evidence of a soil moisture-precipitation feedback. Other studies however provide little evidence for a strong feedback in this region. Here we show that seasonality in the meteorological cond

  16. Evaluating ESA CCI soil moisture in East Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Amy; Shukla, Shraddhanand; Arsenault, Kristi R.; Wang, Shugong; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Verdin, James P.

    2016-06-01

    To assess growing season conditions where ground based observations are limited or unavailable, food security and agricultural drought monitoring analysts rely on publicly available remotely sensed rainfall and vegetation greenness. There are also remotely sensed soil moisture observations from missions like the European Space Agency (ESA), Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) and NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP); however, these time series are still too short to conduct studies that demonstrate the utility of these data for operational applications, or to provide historical context for extreme wet or dry events. To promote the use of remotely sensed soil moisture in agricultural drought and food security monitoring, we evaluate the quality of a 30+ year time series of merged active-passive microwave soil moisture from the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI-SM) over East Africa. Compared to the Normalized Difference Vegetation index (NDVI) and modeled soil moisture products, we find substantial spatial and temporal gaps in the early part of the CCI-SM record, with adequate data coverage beginning in 1992. From this point forward, growing season CCI-SM anomalies are well correlated (R > 0.5) with modeled soil moisture, and in some regions, NDVI. We use pixel-wise correlation analysis and qualitative comparisons of seasonal maps and time series to show that remotely sensed soil moisture can inform remote drought monitoring that has traditionally relied on rainfall and NDVI in moderately vegetated regions.

  17. Climate variability effects on spatial soil moisture dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teuling, A.J.; Hupet, F.; Uijlenhoet, R.; Troch, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the role of interannual climate variability on spatial soil moisture variability dynamics for a field site in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. Observations were made during 3 years under intermediate (1999), wet (2000), and extremely dry conditions (2003). Soil moisture variability dynamics

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of soil electrical conductivity related to soil moisture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Paulo Molin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Soil electrical conductivity (ECa is a soil quality indicator associated to attributes interesting to site-specific soil management such as soil moisture and texture. Soil ECa provides information that helps guide soil management decisions, so we performed spatial evaluation of soil moisture in two experimental fields in two consecutive years and modeled its influence on soil ECa. Soil ECa, moisture and clay content were evaluated by statistical, geostatistical and regression analyses. Semivariogram models, adjusted for soil moisture, had strong spatial dependence, but the relationship between soil moisture and soil ECa was obtained only in one of the experimental fields, where soil moisture and clay content range was higher. In this same field, coefficients of determinations between soil moisture and clay content were above 0.70. In the second field, the low soil moisture and clay content range explain the absence of a relationship between soil ECa and soil moisture. Data repetition over the years, suggested that ECa is a qualitative indicator in areas with high spatial variability in soil texture.

  19. Continuous data assimilation for downscaling large-footprint soil moisture retrievals

    KAUST Repository

    Altaf, M. U.

    2016-01-01

    Soil moisture is a key component of the hydrologic cycle, influencing processes leading to runoff generation, infiltration and groundwater recharge, evaporation and transpiration. Generally, the measurement scale for soil moisture is found to be different from the modeling scales for these processes. Reducing this mismatch between observation and model scales in necessary for improved hydrological modeling. An innovative approach to downscaling coarse resolution soil moisture data by combining continuous data assimilation and physically based modeling is presented. In this approach, we exploit the features of Continuous Data Assimilation (CDA) which was initially designed for general dissipative dynamical systems and later tested numerically on the incompressible Navier-Stokes equation, and the Benard equation. A nudging term, estimated as the misfit between interpolants of the assimilated coarse grid measurements and the fine grid model solution, is added to the model equations to constrain the model’s large scale variability by available measurements. Soil moisture fields generated at a fine resolution by a physically-based vadose zone model (HYDRUS) are subjected to data assimilation conditioned upon coarse resolution observations. This enables nudging of the model outputs towards values that honor the coarse resolution dynamics while still being generated at the fine scale. Results show that the approach is feasible to generate fine scale soil moisture fields across large extents, based on coarse scale observations. Application of this approach is likely in generating fine and intermediate resolution soil moisture fields conditioned on the radiometer-based, coarse resolution products from remote sensing satellites.

  20. Airborne gamma radiation measurements of soil moisture during FIFE: Activities and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Eugene L.

    1992-01-01

    Soil moisture measurements were obtained during the summer of 1987 and 1989 near Manhattan, Kansas, using the National Weather Service (NWS) airborne gamma radiation system. A network of 24 flight lines were established over the research area. Airborne surveys were flown daily during two intensive field campaigns. The data collected was sufficient to modify the NWS standard operational method for estimating soil moisture for the Field Experiment (FIFE) flight lines. The average root mean square error of the soil moisture estimates for shorter FIFE flight lines was found to be 2.5 percent, compared with a reported value of 3.9 percent for NWS flight lines. Techniques were developed to compute soil moisture estimates for portions of the flight lines. Results of comparisons of the airborne gamma radiation soil moisture estimates with those obtained using the NASA Pushbroom Microwave Radiation (PBMR) system and hydrological model are presented. The airborne soil moisture measurements, and real averages computed using all remotely sensed and ground data, have been in support of the research of the many FIFE investigators whose overall goal was the upscale integration of models and the application of satellite remote sensing.

  1. Using machine learning to produce near surface soil moisture estimates from deeper in situ records at U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) locations: Analysis and applications to AMSR-E satellite validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopersmith, Evan J.; Cosh, Michael H.; Bell, Jesse E.; Boyles, Ryan

    2016-12-01

    Surface soil moisture is a critical parameter for understanding the energy flux at the land atmosphere boundary. Weather modeling, climate prediction, and remote sensing validation are some of the applications for surface soil moisture information. The most common in situ measurement for these purposes are sensors that are installed at depths of approximately 5 cm. There are however, sensor technologies and network designs that do not provide an estimate at this depth. If soil moisture estimates at deeper depths could be extrapolated to the near surface, in situ networks providing estimates at other depths would see their values enhanced. Soil moisture sensors from the U.S. Climate Reference Network (USCRN) were used to generate models of 5 cm soil moisture, with 10 cm soil moisture measurements and antecedent precipitation as inputs, via machine learning techniques. Validation was conducted with the available, in situ, 5 cm resources. It was shown that a 5 cm estimate, which was extrapolated from a 10 cm sensor and antecedent local precipitation, produced a root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) of 0.0215 m3/m3. Next, these machine-learning-generated 5 cm estimates were also compared to AMSR-E estimates at these locations. These results were then compared with the performance of the actual in situ readings against the AMSR-E data. The machine learning estimates at 5 cm produced an RMSE of approximately 0.03 m3/m3 when an optimized gain and offset were applied. This is necessary considering the performance of AMSR-E in locations characterized by high vegetation water contents, which are present across North Carolina. Lastly, the application of this extrapolation technique is applied to the ECONet in North Carolina, which provides a 10 cm depth measurement as its shallowest soil moisture estimate. A raw RMSE of 0.028 m3/m3 was achieved, and with a linear gain and offset applied at each ECONet site, an RMSE of 0.013 m3/m3 was possible.

  2. Soil moisture responses to vapour pressure deficit in polytunnel-grown tomato under soil moisture triggered irrigation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodchild, Martin; Kühn, Karl; Jenkins, Dick

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this work has been to investigate soil-to-atmosphere water transport in potted tomato plants by measuring and processing high-resolution soil moisture data against the environmental driver of vapour pressure deficit (VPD). Whilst many researchers have successfully employed sap flow sensors to determine water uptake by roots and transport through the canopy, the installation of sap flow sensors is non-trivial. This work presents an alternative method that can be integrated with irrigation controllers and data loggers that employ soil moisture feedback which can allow water uptake to be evaluated against environmental drivers such as VPD between irrigation events. In order to investigate water uptake against VPD, soil moisture measurements were taken with a resolution of 2 decimal places - and soil moisture, air temperature and relative humidity measurements were logged every 2 minutes. Data processing of the soil moisture was performed in an Excel spread sheet where changes in water transport were derived from the rate of change of soil moisture using the Slope function over 5 soil moisture readings. Results are presented from a small scale experiment using a GP2-based irrigation controller and data logger. Soil moisture feedback is provided from a single SM300 soil moisture sensor in order to regulate the soil moisture level and to assess the water flow from potted tomato plants between irrigation events. Soil moisture levels were set to avoid drainage water losses. By determining the rate of change in soil moisture between irrigation events, over a 16 day period whilst the tomato plant was in flower, it has been possible to observe very good correlation between soil water uptake and VPD - illustrating the link between plant physiology and environmental conditions. Further data is presented for a second potted tomato plant where the soil moisture level is switched between the level that avoids drainage losses and a significantly lower level. This data

  3. Estimating soil moisture distribution using polarimetric airborne SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadono, Takeo; Qong, Muhtar; Wakabayashi, Hiroyuki; Shimada, Masanobu; Shi, Jiancheng

    2000-12-01

    The goal of this study is to develop an algorithm for estimating the surface soil moisture and surface roughness using polarimetric Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data. In this study, an algorithm was applied to polarimetric airborne SAR data to estimate distributions of surface soil moisture and roughness. To validate the estimated soil moisture, we simultaneously conducted an experiment in October 1999 in Tsukuba Science City, Ibaragi Prefecture of Japan. Surface soil moisture was obtained by the Time- Domain Reflectometry (TDR) method, and the horizontal profiles of the land surface height were measured by a comb- style instrument for calculating the surface roughness parameters in test sites. Because the problem is site- specific and depends upon the measurement accuracy of both the ground truth data, the SAR system including speckle noise, and the effects of vegetation and artificial constructions, such as buildings, houses, roads, and roadside trees, the comparison results did not agree well with measured and inferred soil moisture.

  4. COSMOS: The COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zreda

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Area-average soil moisture at the sub-kilometer scale is needed but until the advent of the cosmic-ray method (Zreda et al., 2008, it was difficult to measure. This new method is now being implemented routinely in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (or COSMOS. The stationary cosmic-ray soil moisture probe (sometimes called "neutronavka" measures the neutrons that are generated by cosmic rays within air and soil, moderated by mainly hydrogen atoms located primarily in soil water, and emitted to the atmosphere where they mix instantaneously at a scale of hundreds of meters and whose density is inversely correlated with soil moisture. COSMOS has already deployed 53 of the eventual 500 neutronavkas distributed mainly in the USA, each generating a time series of average soil moisture over its hectometer horizontal footprint, with similar networks coming into existence around the world. This paper is written to serve a community need to better understand this novel method and the COSMOS project. We describe the cosmic-ray soil moisture measurement method, the instrument and its calibration, the design, data processing and dissemination used in COSMOS, and give example time series of soil moisture obtained from COSMOS probes.

  5. COSMOS: the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Zreda

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The newly-developed cosmic-ray method for measuring area-average soil moisture at the hectometer horizontal scale is being implemented in the COsmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (or the COSMOS. The stationary cosmic-ray soil moisture probe measures the neutrons that are generated by cosmic rays within air and soil and other materials, moderated by mainly hydrogen atoms located primarily in soil water, and emitted to the atmosphere where they mix instantaneously at a scale of hundreds of meters and whose density is inversely correlated with soil moisture. The COSMOS has already deployed more than 50 of the eventual 500 cosmic-ray probes, distributed mainly in the USA, each generating a time series of average soil moisture over its horizontal footprint, with similar networks coming into existence around the world. This paper is written to serve a community need to better understand this novel method and the COSMOS project. We describe the cosmic-ray soil moisture measurement method, the instrument and its calibration, the design, data processing and dissemination used in the COSMOS project, and give example time series of soil moisture obtained from COSMOS probes.

  6. Spectrum properties analysis of different soil moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shenghui; Hu, Bo; Lin, Fan

    2009-10-01

    Soil moisture content is one of the most important factors in soil business. The basic of detecting soil moisture content using remote sensing technology is to analyze the relationship between soil moisture content and emissivity. In this paper, based on the analysis of spectrum collection and processing by a portable spectrometer, a set of measure schemes were first established which can accurately measure the reflectivity and emissivity of soil spectrum with different moisture content in near-infrared and thermal infrared bands. Then we selected different bare soil areas as the areas for survey, and studied the relationship of different moisture content and the spectrum curve in the soil both of the same kind and of different kind (like the soil whose structure has been modified caused by the change of organic matter contents or soil particle size). Finally, we emphasized on the quantitative relationship between soil reflectivity & emissivity and soil moisture content using the test data, and establish a model depicting the quantitative relationship above in near-infrared and thermal infrared bands.

  7. Calculating crop water requirement satisfaction in the West Africa Sahel with remotely sensed soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Amy; Gregory J. Husak,; Molly Brown,; Mark Carroll,; Funk, Christopher C.; Soni Yatheendradas,; Kristi Arsenault,; Christa Peters-Lidard,; Verdin, James

    2015-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission will provide soil moisture data with unprecedented accuracy, resolution, and coverage, enabling models to better track agricultural drought and estimate yields. In turn, this information can be used to shape policy related to food and water from commodity markets to humanitarian relief efforts. New data alone, however, do not translate to improvements in drought and yield forecasts. New tools will be needed to transform SMAP data into agriculturally meaningful products. The objective of this study is to evaluate the possibility and efficiency of replacing the rainfall-derived soil moisture component of a crop water stress index with SMAP data. The approach is demonstrated with 0.1°-resolution, ~10-day microwave soil moisture from the European Space Agency and simulated soil moisture from the Famine Early Warning Systems Network Land Data Assimilation System. Over a West Africa domain, the approach is evaluated by comparing the different soil moisture estimates and their resulting Water Requirement Satisfaction Index values from 2000 to 2010. This study highlights how the ensemble of indices performs during wet versus dry years, over different land-cover types, and the correlation with national-level millet yields. The new approach is a feasible and useful way to quantitatively assess how satellite-derived rainfall and soil moisture track agricultural water deficits. Given the importance of soil moisture in many applications, ranging from agriculture to public health to fire, this study should inspire other modeling communities to reformulate existing tools to take advantage of SMAP data.

  8. Continuous data assimilation for downscaling large-footprint soil moisture retrievals

    KAUST Repository

    Altaf, M. U.

    2016-09-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial component of the hydrologic cycle, significantly influencing runoff, infiltration, recharge, evaporation and transpiration processes. Models characterizing these processes require soil moisture as an input, either directly or indirectly. Better characterization of the spatial variability of soil moisture leads to better predictions from hydrologic/climate models. In-situ measurements have fine resolution, but become impractical in terms of coverage over large extents. Remotely sensed data have excellent spatial coverage extents, but suffer from poorer spatial and temporal resolution. We present here an innovative approach to downscaling coarse resolution soil moisture data by combining data assimilation and physically based modeling. In this approach, we exploit the features of Continuous Data Assimilation (CDA). A nudging term, estimated as the misfit between interpolants of the assimilated coarse grid measurements and the fine grid model solution, is added to the model equations to constrain the model’s large scale variability by available measurements. Soil moisture fields generated at a fine resolution by a physically-based vadose zone model (e.g., HYDRUS) are subjected to data assimilation conditioned upon the coarse resolution observations. This enables nudging of the model outputs towards values that honor the coarse resolution dynamics while still being generated at the fine scale. The large scale features of the model output are constrained to the observations, and as a consequence, the misfit at the fine scale is reduced. The advantage of this approach is that fine resolution soil moisture maps can be generated across large spatial extents, given the coarse resolution data. The data assimilation approach also enables multi-scale data generation which is helpful to match the soil moisture input data to the corresponding modeling scale. Application of this approach is likely in generating fine and intermediate resolution soil

  9. GNSSProbe, penetrating GNSS signals for measuring soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Francisco; Navarro, Victor; Reppucci, Antonio; Mollfulleda, Antonio; Balzter, Heiko; Nicolas-Perea, Virginia; Kissick, Lucy

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture content (SMC) is an essential parameter from both a scientific and economical point of view. On one hand, it is key for the understanding of hydrological. Secondly, it is a most relevant parameter for agricultural activities and water management. Wide research has been done in this field using different sensors, spanning different parts of the measured electromagnetic spectrum, leading thus several methodologies to estimate soil moisture content. However complying with requirements in terms of accuracy and spatial resolution is still a major challenge. A novel approach based on the measurement of GNSS signals penetrating a soil volume is proposed here. This model relates soil moisture content to the measured soil transmissivity, and attenuation coefficient, which are a function of the soil characteristics (i.e soil moisture content, soit type, soil temperature, etc). A preliminary experiment has been performed to demonstrate the validity of this technique, where the signal received by a GNSS-R L1/E1 RHCP antenna buried at 5, 10, and 15 cm below the surface, was compared to the one received by a GNSS-R L1/E1 RHCP antenna with clear sky visibility. Preliminary results show agreement with theoretical results based on transmissivity and with previous campaigns performed where the soil moisture were collected at two different depths (5 and 15 cm). Details related to the GNSS soil moisture modeling, instrument preparation, measurement campaign, data processing and main results will be presented at the conference.

  10. Influence of Soil Moisture on Soil Gas Vapor Concentration for Vapor Intrusion

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G.; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models have been widely used in analyzing the effects of various environmental factors in the vapor intrusion process. Soil moisture content is one of the key factors determining the subsurface vapor concentration profile. This manuscript considers the effects of soil moisture profiles on the soil gas vapor concentration away from any surface capping by buildings or pavement. The “open field” soil gas vapor concentration profile is observed to be sensitive to the soil moisture di...

  11. Evaluation of random cascade hierarchical and statistical arrangement model in disaggregation of SMOS soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, M.; Magagi, R.; Goita, K.

    2013-12-01

    Soil moisture is an important parameter in hydrology that can be derived from remote sensing. In different studies, it was shown that optical-thermal, active and passive microwave remote sensing data can be used for soil moisture estimation. However, the most promising approach to estimate soil moisture in large areas is passive microwave radiometry. Global estimation of soil moisture is now operational by using remote sensing techniques. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-Earth Observing System Sensor (AMSR-E) and Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) passive microwave radiometers that were lunched on 2002 and 2009 respectively along with the upcoming Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) satellite that was planned to be lunched in the time frame of 2014-2015 make remote sensing to be more useful in soil moisture estimation. However, the spatial resolutions of AMSR-E, SMOS and SMAP are 60 km, 40 km and 10 km respectively. These very low spatial resolutions can not show the temporal and spatial variability of soil moisture in field or small scales. So, using disaggregation methods is required to efficiently using the passive microwave derived soil moisture information in different scales. The low spatial resolutions of passive microwave satellites can be improved by using disaggregation methods. Random Cascade (RC) model (Over and Gupta, 1996) is used in this research to downscale the 40 km resolution of SMOS satellite. By using this statistical method, the SMOS soil moisture resolutions are improved to 20 km, 10 km, 5 km and 2.5 km, respectively. The data that were measured during Soil Moisture Active Passive Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) field campaign are used to do the experiments. Totally the ground data and SMOS images that were obtained during 13 different days from 7-June-2012 to 13-July-2012 are used. By comparison with ground soil moisture, it is observed that the SMOS soil moisture is underestimated for all the images and so bias amounts

  12. An empirical standardized soil moisture index for agricultural drought assessment from remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrão, Hugo; Russo, Simone; Sepulcre-Canto, Guadalupe; Barbosa, Paulo

    2016-06-01

    We propose a simple, spatially invariant and probabilistic year-round Empirical Standardized Soil Moisture Index (ESSMI) that is designed to classify soil moisture anomalies from harmonized multi-satellite surface data into categories of agricultural drought intensity. The ESSMI is computed by fitting a nonparametric empirical probability density function (ePDF) to historical time-series of soil moisture observations and then transforming it into a normal distribution with a mean of zero and standard deviation of one. Negative standard normal values indicate dry soil conditions, whereas positive values indicate wet soil conditions. Drought intensity is defined as the number of negative standard deviations between the observed soil moisture value and the respective normal climatological conditions. To evaluate the performance of the ESSMI, we fitted the ePDF to the Essential Climate Variable Soil Moisture (ECV SM) v02.0 data values collected in the period between January 1981 and December 2010 at South-Central America, and compared the root-mean-square-errors (RMSE) of residuals with those of beta and normal probability density functions (bPDF and nPDF, respectively). Goodness-of-fit results attained with time-series of ECV SM values averaged at monthly, seasonal, half-yearly and yearly timescales suggest that the ePDF provides triggers of agricultural drought onset and intensity that are more accurate and precise than the bPDF and nPDF. Furthermore, by accurately mapping the occurrence of major drought events over the last three decades, the ESSMI proved to be spatio-temporal consistent and the ECV SM data to provide a well calibrated and homogenized soil moisture climatology for the region. Maize, soybean and wheat crop yields in the region are highly correlated (r > 0.82) with cumulative ESSMI values computed during the months of critical crop growing, indicating that the nonparametric index of soil moisture anomalies can be used for agricultural drought

  13. A Comprehensive Laboratory Study to Improve Ground Truth Calibration of Remotely Sensed Near-Surface Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babaeian, E.; Tuller, M.; Sadeghi, M.; Sheng, W.; Jones, S. B.

    2016-12-01

    Optical satellite and airborne remote sensing (RS) have been widely applied for characterization of large-scale surface soil moisture distributions. However, despite the excellent spatial resolution of RS data, the electromagnetic radiation within the optical bands (400-2500 nm) penetrates the soil profile only to a depth of a few millimeters; hence obtained moisture estimates are limited to the soil surface region. Furthermore, moisture sensor networks employed for ground truth calibration of RS observations commonly exhibit very limited spatial resolution, which consequently leads to significant discrepancies between RS and ground truth observations. To better understand the relationship between surface and near-surface soil moisture, we employed a benchtop hyperspectral line-scan imaging system to generate high resolution surface reflectance maps during evaporation from soil columns filled with source soils covering a wide textural range and instrumented with a novel time domain reflectometry (TDR) sensor array that allows monitoring of near surface moisture at 0.5-cm resolution. A recently developed physical model for surface soil moisture predictions from shortwave infrared reflectance was applied to estimate surface soil moisture from surface reflectance and to explore the relationship between surface and near-surface moisture distributions during soil drying. Preliminary results are very promising and their applicability for ground truth calibration of RS observations will be discussed.

  14. Soil moisture initialization effects in the Indian monsoon system

    OpenAIRE

    Asharaf, S.; A. Dobler; Ahrens, B.

    2011-01-01

    Towards the goal to understand the role of land-surface processes over the Indian sub-continent, a series of soil-moisture sensitivity simulations have been performed using a non-hydrostatic regional climate model COSMO-CLM. The experiments were driven by the lateral boundary conditions provided by the ERA-Interim (ECMWF) reanalysis. The simulation results show that the pre-monsoonal soil moisture has a significant influence on the monsoonal precipitation. Both, positive and negative soil-moi...

  15. Is Regional Root Reinforcement Controlled by Soil Moisture Variability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, T.; Ford, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    Climate change will alter the amount, type (i.e., snow vs. rain), and timing of precipitation that controls many hazardous Earth surface processes, including debris flows. Most GCMs agree that as climate warms the frequency of extreme precipitation will increase across the globe. Debris flow events triggered by heavy precipitation will likely also increase. Precipitation also affects the resistance to debris flow initiation by controlling belowground plant hydraulic architecture (e.g. root frequency, diameter distribution, tensile strength). Quantifying the links between precipitation, below ground properties, and the processes that initiate debris flows are therefore critical to understanding future hazard. To explore these links, we conducted a field experiment in the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory by excavating 12 soil pits (~1 m3), from two topographies (noses, hollows), and two tree species (Liriodendron tulipifera and Betula lenta). For each species and topography, we collected all biomass from five soil depths and measured soil moisture at 30, 60, and 90cm depth. For each depth we also measured root tensile strength, root cellulose content. Where we collected soil moisture data, we also measured root and soil hydraulic conductivity. Our data show a link between soil moisture content and root biomass distribution; root biomass is more evenly distributed through the soil column in hollows compared to noses. This relationship is consistent with the hypothesis that more consistent soil moisture in hollows allows plant roots to access resources from deeper within the soil column. This physiologic control has a significant effect on root cohesion, with trees on noses (or lower average soil moisture) providing greater root cohesion close to the surface, but considerably less cohesion at depth. Root tensile strength correlated with local daily soil moisture rather than the long term differences represented by noses and hollows. Daily soil moisture affected the amount

  16. Validation of two gridded soil moisture products over India with in-situ observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C K Unnikrishnan; John P George; Abhishek Lodh; Devesh Kumar Maurya; Swapan Mallick; E N Rajagopal; Saji Mohandas

    2016-07-01

    Surface level soil moisture from two gridded datasets over India are evaluated in this study. The firstone is the UK Met Office (UKMO) soil moisture analysis produced by a land data assimilation systembased on Extended Kalman Filter method (EKF), which make use of satellite observation of AdvancedScatterometer (ASCAT) soil wetness index as well as the screen level meteorological observations. Seconddataset is a satellite soil moisture product, produced by National Remote Sensing Centre (NRSC) usingpassive microwave Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 measurements. In-situ observations ofsoil moisture from India Meteorological Department (IMD) are used for the validation of the gridded soilmoisture products. The difference between these datasets over India is minimum in the non-monsoonmonths and over agricultural regions. It is seen that the NRSC data is slightly drier (0.05%) and UKMOsoil moisture analysis is relatively wet during southwest monsoon season. Standard AMSR-2 satellitesoil moisture product is used to compare the NRSC and UKMO products. The standard AMSR-2 andUKMO values are closer in monsoon season and AMSR-2 soil moisture is higher than UKMO in allseasons. NRSC and AMSR-2 showed a correlation of 0.83 (significant at 0.01 level). The probabilitydistribution of IMD soil moisture observation peaks at 0.25 m^3/m^3, NRSC at 0.15 m^3/m^3, AMSR-2 at0.25 m3/m3 and UKMO at 0.35 m^3/m^3 during June–September period. Validation results show UKMOanalysis has better correlation with in-situ observations compared to the NRSC and AMSR-2 datasets.The seasonal variation in soil moisture is better represented in UKMO analysis. Underestimation of soilmoisture during monsoon season over India in NRSC data suggests the necessity of incorporating theactual vegetation for a better soil moisture retrieval using passive microwave sensors. Both productshave good agreement over bare soil, shrubs and grassland compared to needle leaf tree, broad leaf treeand urban land

  17. Exploiting optical E.O. data for soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Katja; D'Urso, Guido; Palladino, Mario; Vuolo, Francesco

    2008-10-01

    In the context of agricultural applications, the knowledge of soil moisture availability is an essential aspect for irrigation management. The microwave waveband region (SAR) has been primarily used to estimate soil moisture from Earth Observation (E.O.) data. However, the optical domain (0.4 - 2.5 μm) may as well offer the possibility to get information about soil moisture since an overall decrease of soil reflectance corresponds to increasing surface soil water content. Data from two different experiments (ESA SPARC and AgriSAR) have been exploited aiming at estimating soil moisture from optical E.O. data by using the radiative transfer model PROSAILH. A soil scale factor (α) was introduced into the model and estimated using a LUT inversion technique. Relatively high negative relationships between the α-factor and the measured soil water content (up to R2 = 0.73) could be found for several crop types with low vegetation cover. The results of this study indicate the potential to retrieve surface soil moisture information from optical E.O. data for similar soil types. The method gives the advantage of retrieving simultaneously soil and canopy characteristics from the same E.O. data sources by using a physical method of parameter estimation.

  18. The influence of soil moisture deficits on Australian heatwaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, N.; Kala, J.; Alexander, L. V.

    2016-06-01

    Several regions of Australia are projected to experience an increase in the frequency, intensity and duration of heatwaves (HWs) under future climate change. The large-scale dynamics of HWs are well understood, however, the influence of soil moisture deficits—due for example to drought—remains largely unexplored in the region. Using the standardised precipitation evapotranspiration index, we show that the statistical responses of HW intensity and frequency to soil moisture deficits at the peak of the summer season are asymmetric and occur mostly in the lower and upper tails of the probability distribution, respectively. For aspects of HWs related to intensity, substantially greater increases are experienced at the 10th percentile when antecedent soil moisture is low (mild HWs get hotter). Conversely, HW aspects related to longevity increase much more strongly at the 90th percentile in response to low antecedent soil moisture (long HWs get longer). A corollary to this is that in the eastern and northern parts of the country where HW-soil moisture coupling is evident, high antecedent soil moisture effectively ensures few HW days and low HW temperatures, while low antecedent soil moisture ensures high HW temperatures but not necessarily more HW days.

  19. Retrieving pace in vegetation growth using precipitation and soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohoulande Djebou, D. C.; Singh, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    The complexity of interactions between the biophysical components of the watershed increases the challenge of understanding water budget. Hence, the perspicacity of the continuum soil-vegetation-atmosphere's functionality still remains crucial for science. This study targeted the Texas Gulf watershed and evaluated the behavior of vegetation covers by coupling precipitation and soil moisture patterns. Growing season's Normalized Differential Vegetation Index NDVI for deciduous forest and grassland were used over a 23 year period as well as precipitation and soil moisture data. The role of time scales on vegetation dynamics analysis was appraised using both entropy rescaling and correlation analysis. This resulted in that soil moisture at 5 cm and 25cm are potentially more efficient to use for vegetation dynamics monitoring at finer time scale compared to precipitation. Albeit soil moisture at 5 cm and 25 cm series are highly correlated (R2>0.64), it appeared that 5 cm soil moisture series can better explain the variability of vegetation growth. A logarithmic transformation of soil moisture and precipitation data increased correlation with NDVI for the different time scales considered. Based on a monthly time scale we came out with a relationship between vegetation index and the couple soil moisture and precipitation [NDVI=a*Log(% soil moisture)+b*Log(Precipitation)+c] with R2>0.25 for each vegetation type. Further, we proposed to assess vegetation green-up using logistic regression model and transinformation entropy using the couple soil moisture and precipitation as independent variables and vegetation growth metrics (NDVI, NDVI ratio, NDVI slope) as the dependent variable. The study is still ongoing and the results will surely contribute to the knowledge in large scale vegetation monitoring. Keywords: Precipitation, soil moisture, vegetation growth, entropy Time scale, Logarithmic transformation and correlation between soil moisture and NDVI, precipitation and

  20. Relating Soil Moisture to TRMMPR Backscatter in Southern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puri, S.; Stephen, H.; Ahmad, S.

    2009-12-01

    Soil Moisture is an important variable in hydrological cycle. It plays a vital role in agronomy, meteorology, and hydrology. In spite of being an important variable, soil moisture measuring stations are sparse. This is due to high cost involved in the installation of dense network of measuring stations required to map a comprehensive spatio-temporal behavior of soil moisture. Hence, there is a need to develop an alternate method to measure soil moisture. This research relates soil moisture (SM) to backscatter (σ°) obtained from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Precipitation Radar (TRMMPR) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) obtained from Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer. SM data is obtained from Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN). σ° measurements are normalized at an incidence angle of 10° at which it has the highest sensitivity to SM. An empirical model that relates SM to normalized σ° and NDVI is developed. NDVI takes into account the different vegetation densities. The relationship between model variables is approximated to be linear. The model is applied to data from 1998 to 2008 where 75% of the data is used for calibration and the remaining 25% for validation. Figure 1 shows the comparison of observed and modeled soil moisture for a site with low vegetation. Even though the model underestimates the soil moisture content, it captures the signal well and produces peaks similar to the observed soil moisture. The model performs well with a correlation of 0.71 and root mean square error of 4.0%. The accuracy of the model depends on vegetation density. Table 1 summarizes the model performance for different vegetation densities. The model performance decreases with the increase in vegetation as the leaves in the vegetation canopy attenuate the incident microwaves which reduces the penetration depth and subsequently the sensitivity to soil moisture. This research provides a new insight into the microwave remote sensing of soil

  1. Synergistic method for boreal soil moisture and soil freeze retrievals using active and passive microwave instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolander, Tuomo; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Schwank, Mike; Pulliainen, Jouni

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture and soil freezing are important for diverse hydrological, biogeochemical, and climatological applications. They affect surface energy balance, surface and subsurface water flow, and exchange rates of carbon with the atmosphere. Soil freezing controls important biogeochemical processes, like photosynthetic activity of plants and microbial activity within soils. Permafrost covers approximately 24% of the land surface in the Northern Hemisphere and seasonal freezing occurs on approximately 51% of the area. The retrieval method presented is based on an inversion technique and applies a semiempirical backscattering model that describes the dependence of radar backscattering of forest as a function of stem volume, soil permittivity, the extinction coefficient of forest canopy, surface roughness, incidence angle, and radar frequency. It gives an estimate of soil permittivity using active microwave measurements. Applying a Bayesian assimilation scheme, it is also possible to use other soil permittivity retrievals to regulate this estimate to combine for example low resolution passive observations with high resolution active observations for a synergistic retrieval. This way the higher variance in the active retrieval can be constricted with the passive retrieval when at the same time the spatial resolution of the product is improved compared to the passive-only retrieval. The retrieved soil permittivity estimate can be used to detect soil freeze/thaw state by considering the soil to be frozen when the estimate is below a threshold value. The permittivity retrieval can also be used to estimate the relative moisture of the soil. The method was tested using SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) measurements from ENVISAT ASAR instrument for the years 2010-2012 and from Sentinel-1 satellite for the years 2015-2016 in Sodankylä area in Northern Finland. The synergistic method was tested combining the SAR measurements with a SMOS (Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity) radiometer

  2. The Effects of Wildfire on Soil Moisture Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanarek, M.; Cardenas, M.

    2013-12-01

    Moisture dynamics in the critical zone have significant implications for a variety of hydrologic processes, from water availability to plants to infiltration and groundwater recharge rates. These processes are perturbed by events such as wildfires, which may have long-lasting impacts. In September 2011, the most destructive wildfire in Texas history occurred in and around Bastrop State Park, which was significantly affected; thus we take advantage of a rare opportunity to study soil moisture under such burned conditions. A 165 m long transect bridging burned and unburned areas was established within the 'Lost Pines' of the park. Soil moisture and soil temperature were monitored and estimated using a variety of methods, including 2D electrical resistivity imaging (using dipole-dipole and Schlumberger configurations), surface permittivity measurements (ThetaProbe), permittivity-based soil moisture profiling (PR2 profile probes), and installation of thermistors. Field measurements were collected at approximately one-month intervals to study temporal and seasonal effects on soil moisture and temperature in this area. Greater soil moisture and lower resistivity were found near the surface at the heavily burned end of the transect, where trees have been largely killed by the fire and grasses now dominate, and very low near-surface soil moisture and higher resistivity were found at the opposite end, which is still populated by pine trees. These variations can likely be attributed to the vegetative variations between the two ends of the transect, with trees consuming more water at one end and the ground cover of grasses and mosses consuming less water and helping reduce evaporation at the burned end. Higher clay content at the burned end of the transect could also be a factor in greater soil moisture retention there. Given the higher moisture content throughout the soil profile at the heavily burned end of the transect, this could be an indication of greater infiltration

  3. Modeling and Mapping Soil Moisture of Plateau Pasture Using RADARSAT-2 Imagery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Chai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate soil moisture retrieval of a large area in high resolution is significant for plateau pasture. The object of this paper is to investigate the estimation of volumetric soil moisture in vegetated areas of plateau pasture using fully polarimetric C-band RADARSAT-2 SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar images. Based on the water cloud model, Chen model, and Dubois model, we proposed two developed algorithms for soil moisture retrieval and validated their performance using experimental data. We eliminated the effect of vegetation cover by using the water cloud model and minimized the effect of soil surface roughness by solving the Dubois equations. Two experimental campaigns were conducted in the Qinghai Lake watershed, northeastern Tibetan Plateau in September 2012 and May 2013, respectively, with simultaneous satellite overpass. Compared with the developed Chen model, the predicted soil moisture given by the developed Dubois model agreed better with field measurements in terms of accuracy and stability. The RMSE, R2, and RPD value of the developed Dubois model were (5.4, 0.8, 1.6 and (3.05, 0.78, 1.74 for the two experiments, respectively. Validation results indicated that the developed Dubois model, needing a minimum of prior information, satisfied the requirement for soil moisture inversion in the study region.

  4. Measurement of daily spectral soil albedo over France from MODIS and MSG: comparison with soil moisture derived from ASCAT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Roujean, J. L.; Kaptue, A.; Carrer, D.; Lafont, S.; Parrens, M.; Szczypta, C.; Calvet, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Surface albedo determines the partition of energy between land surface and atmosphere, which is a crucial parameter for climate studies. In particular, consistency of coarse scale soil background albedo data set is required to improve the radiative scheme in land surface modeling. As an important component of land surface, soil albedo depends on soil moisture, soil roughness, mineral content, tillage, etc. It can change rapidly at hourly or daily basis, revealing the variation of the state variables, particularly soil moisture. Over dense vegetation areas, radiation interactions exist between the soil background and the bottom of canopy, which adds to the difficulty to yield a clear separation between the respective soil and vegetation attributes. With the advent of a new-generation of Earth observing sensor systems, consistent sets of surface albedo products are regularly distributed at global and regional scales within expected accuracy, particularly MODIS and SEVIRI, which provides the potential of generating soil albedo from satellite observations. The objective of this study is to derive soil background albedo from MODIS and SEVIRI data sets over France. A procedure was developed to derive a MODIS albedo on a daily basis in combining TERRA and AQUA observations and in considering the MODIS BRDF model at the appropriate dates. A novel 1D radiative transfer approach is applied to disentangle soil background albedo and vegetation albedo by using the albedo and LAI data sets of MODIS and SEVIRI. This background albedo from satellite observations is made evolving with the use of a Kalman filter approach. In order to generate a predictive model, temporal trajectories of soil background albedo are extracted for each soil mapping unit and further clustered into several clusters by using k-mean method. The temporal coherence of the resulting soil background albedos was assessed with satellite and in-situ rainfall and soil moisture observations. It comes out that the

  5. The role of soil moisture on the coevolution of soil and vegetation in mountain grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoldi, Giacomo; Claudia, Notarnicola; Brenner, Johannes; Castelli, Mariapina; Greifeneder, Felix; Niedrist, Georg; Seeber, Julia; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2016-04-01

    One of the key variables controlling the organization of vegetation and the coevolution of soils and landforms is soil moisture content (SMC). For this reason, understanding the controls on the spatial and temporal patterns of SMC is essential to predict how perturbations in vegetation and climate will affect mountain ecosystem functioning. In this contribution, we focus on the dynamic of surface SMC of water-limited alpine grasslands in the Long Term Ecological Research area Mazia Valley in the European Alps. We analyze the impacts of different land managements (meadows versus pastures) and its relationships with climate and topography. The area has been equipped since 2009 with a network of more than 20 stations, measuring SMC and climatic variables and with two eddy-covariance stations, measuring surface fluxes over meadows and pastures. Monthly biomass production data have been collected and detailed soil and spatial soil moisture surveys are available. Moreover, high spatial resolution SMC maps have been derived from satellites Synthetic Aperture Radar Radar (SAR) images (Sentinel 1 and RADARSAT2 images). Both ground surveys and remote sensing observations show persistent landscape-level patterns. Meadows, in general located in flatter areas, tend to be wetter. This leads to higher vegetation productivity and to the development of soils with higher water holding capacity, thus to a positive feedback on SMC. In contrast, pastures, located on steeper slopes with lower vegetation density and higher soil erosion, tend to be drier, leading to a negative feedback on SMC and soil development. This co-evolution of land cover and SMC leads therefore to persistent spatial patterns. In order to understand quantitatively such linked interactions, a sensitivity analysis has been performed with the GEOtop hydrological model. Results show how both abiotic (mainly slope and elevation) and anthropogenic (irrigation and soil management) factors exert a significant control on

  6. Predicting Soil Moisture in the Field from Amplitude Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kayssi, A. W.

    2009-04-01

    Measurements of amplitude temperature and soil moisture content of sandy loam and silty clay loam soils were conducted in Al-Mada'in Research Station south of Baghdad during the period from the 1st of February to the 30th of April, 2004. Exponential regression relations were developed between amplitude temperature and volumetric moisture content for soil depths of 0.5, 3.0, 7.5 and 15cm below surface, which was highly significant (R2>0.96). A good linear regression between measured and predicted soil moisture contents was deduced for each depth (r>0.97). Soil moisture content was successfully predicted from the regression line when amplitude temperature was known.

  7. A downscaling approach for SMOS land observations: evaluation of high-resolution soil moisture maps over the Iberian Peninsula

    OpenAIRE

    Piles Guillem, Maria; Sanchez, Nilda; Vall-Llossera Ferran, Mercedes Magdalena; Camps Carmona, Adriano José; Martinez Fernandez, Jose; Martinez, Justino; González Gambau, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    The ESA's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission is the first satellite devoted to measure the Earth's surface soil moisture. It has a spatial resolution of similar to 40 km and a 3-day revisit. In this paper, a downscaling algorithm is presented as a new ability to obtain multiresolution soil moisture estimates from SMOS using visible-to-infrared remotely sensed observations. This algorithm is applied to combine 2 years of SMOS and MODIS Terra/Aqua data over the Iberian Peninsula in...

  8. Is soil moisture initialization important for seasonal to decadal predictions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacke, Tobias; Hagemann, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    The state of soil moisture can can have a significant impact on regional climate conditions for short time scales up to several months. However, focusing on seasonal to decadal time scales, it is not clear whether the predictive skill of global a Earth System Model might be enhanced by assimilating soil moisture data or improving the initial soil moisture conditions with respect to observations. As a first attempt to provide answers to this question, we set up an experiment to investigate the life time (memory) of extreme soil moisture states in the coupled land-atmosphere model ECHAM6-JSBACH, which is part of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology's Earth System Model (MPI-ESM). This experiment consists of an ensemble of 3 years simulations which are initialized with extreme wet and dry soil moisture states for different seasons and years. Instead of using common thresholds like wilting point or critical soil moisture, the extreme states were extracted from a reference simulation to ensure that they are within the range of simulated climate variability. As a prerequisite for this experiment, the soil hydrology in JSBACH was improved by replacing the bucket-type soil hydrology scheme with a multi-layer scheme. This new scheme is a more realistic representation of the soil, including percolation and diffusion fluxes between up to five separate layers, the limitation of bare soil evaporation to the uppermost soil layer and the addition of a long term water storage below the root zone in regions with deep soil. While the hydrological cycle is not strongly affected by this new scheme, it has some impact on the simulated soil moisture memory which is mostly strengthened due to the additional deep layer water storage. Ensemble statistics of the initialization experiment indicate perturbation lengths between just a few days up to several seasons for some regions. In general, the strongest effects are seen for wet initialization during northern winter over cold and humid

  9. APPLICATION ON FY -3A SATELLITE DATA TO MONITOR SOIL MOISTURE IN TIlE SOURCE OF THE THREE RIVERS IN QINGHAI PROVINCE%FY-3a卫星数据在青海省三江源区土壤水分监测中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娟

    2012-01-01

    MERSI boarded on the new generation polar olution channel that improves inversional capability on orbit meteorological satellite FY - 3 a has 250 meters res- ground objects in China. This study based on 250 meters resolution satellite data and vegetation water supply index built soil moisture monitoring model in the source of the three rivers in Qinghai province. The relationship of vegetation water supply and soil moisture was verified by using surface conventional observation soil moisture data. The results showed: Soil moisture on remote sens- ing retrieval and observation data coincided rather well, when vegetation index is 0.3 - 0.5.%中国新一代极轨气象卫星FY-3a,搭载的中分辨率光谱成像仪(MER$I)具有5个250m分辨率通道,进一步加强了对地表地物的反演能力。本研究利用FY-3a250m分辨率卫星资料,采用植被供水指数法,建立了青海省三江源区土壤水分监测模型,利用气象部门地面常规监测点土壤水分资料,验证了植被供水指数与土壤水分之间的关系,从验证结果看:当植被指数为0.3~0.5时,遥感反演出的土壤水分值与实测值较为接近。

  10. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bircher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology HOBE. For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified: for the Decagon 5TE apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger non-linearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankyl

  11. Soil moisture sensor calibration for organic soil surface layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bircher, Simone; Andreasen, Mie; Vuollet, Johanna; Vehviläinen, Juho; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Jonard, François; Weihermüller, Lutz; Zakharova, Elena; Wigneron, Jean-Pierre; Kerr, Yann H.

    2016-04-01

    This paper's objective is to present generic calibration functions for organic surface layers derived for the soil moisture sensors Decagon ECH2O 5TE and Delta-T ThetaProbe ML2x, using material from northern regions, mainly from the Finnish Meteorological Institute's Arctic Research Center in Sodankylä and the study area of the Danish Center for Hydrology (HOBE). For the Decagon 5TE sensor such a function is currently not reported in the literature. Data were compared with measurements from underlying mineral soils including laboratory and field measurements. Shrinkage and charring during drying were considered. For both sensors all field and lab data showed consistent trends. For mineral layers with low soil organic matter (SOM) content the validity of the manufacturer's calibrations was demonstrated. Deviating sensor outputs in organic and mineral horizons were identified. For the Decagon 5TE, apparent relative permittivities at a given moisture content decreased for increased SOM content, which was attributed to an increase of bound water in organic materials with large specific surface areas compared to the studied mineral soils. ThetaProbe measurements from organic horizons showed stronger nonlinearity in the sensor response and signal saturation in the high-level data. The derived calibration fit functions between sensor response and volumetric water content hold for samples spanning a wide range of humus types with differing SOM characteristics. This strengthens confidence in their validity under various conditions, rendering them highly suitable for large-scale applications in remote sensing and land surface modeling studies. Agreement between independent Decagon 5TE and ThetaProbe time series from an organic surface layer at the Sodankylä site was significantly improved when the here-proposed fit functions were used. Decagon 5TE data also well-reflected precipitation events. Thus, Decagon 5TE network data from organic surface layers at the Sodankylä and

  12. Impacts of Soil Moisture Content and Vegetation on Shear Strength of Unsaturated Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yong-hong; ZHANG Jian-guo; ZHANG Jian-hui; LIU Shu-zhen; WANG Cheng-hua; XIAO Qing-hua

    2005-01-01

    It is analyzed that the impacts of vegetation type and soil moisture content on shear strength of unsaturated soil through direct shearing tests for various vegetation types, different soil moisture contents and different-depth unsaturated soil. The results show that the cohesion of unsaturated soil changes greatly, and the friction angle changes a little with soil moisture content. It is also shown that vegetation can improve shear strength of unsaturated soil, which therefore provides a basis that vegetation can reinforce soil and protect slopes.

  13. Analog modeling of transient moisture flow in unsaturated soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wind, G.P.

    1979-01-01

    Hydraulic and electronic analog models are developed for the simulation of moisture flow and accumulation in unsaturated soil. The analog models are compared with numerical models and checked with field observations. Application of soil physical knowledge on a soil technological problem by means of

  14. Application of HEC-HMS in a Cold Region Watershed and Use of RADARSAT-2 Soil Moisture in Initializing the Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan A. K. M. Bhuiyan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an assessment of the applicability of using RADARSAT-2-derived soil moisture data in the Hydrologic Modelling System developed by the Hydrologic Engineering Center (HEC-HMS for flood forecasting with a case study in the Sturgeon Creek watershed in Manitoba, Canada. Spring flooding in Manitoba is generally influenced by both winter precipitation and soil moisture conditions in the fall of the previous year. As a result, the soil moisture accounting (SMA and the temperature index algorithms are employed in the simulation. Results from event and continuous simulations of HEC-HMS show that the model is suitable for flood forecasting in Manitoba. Soil moisture data from the Manitoba Agriculture field survey and RADARSAT-2 satellite were used to set the initial soil moisture for the event simulations. The results confirm the benefit of using satellite data in capturing peak flows in a snowmelt event. A sensitivity analysis of SMA parameters, such as soil storage, maximum infiltration, soil percolation, maximum canopy storage and tension storage, was performed and ranked to determine which parameters have a significant impact on the performance of the model. The results show that the soil moisture storage was the most sensitive parameter. The sensitivity analysis of initial soil moisture in a snowmelt event shows that cumulative flow and peak flow are highly influenced by the initial soil moisture setting of the model. Therefore, there is a potential to utilize RADARSAT-2-derived soil moisture for hydrological modelling in other snow-dominated Manitoba watersheds.

  15. Soil Albedo in Relation to Soil Color, Moisture and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adan Fimbres

    Land surface albedo is the ratio of reflected to incident solar radiation. It is a function of several surface parameters including soil color, moisture, roughness and vegetation cover. A better understanding of albedo and how it changes in relation to variations in these parameters is important in order to help improve our ability to model the effects of land surface modifications on climate. The objectives of this study were (1) To determine empirical relationships between smooth bare soil albedo and soil color, (2) To develop statistical relationships between albedo and ground-based thematic mapper (TM) measurements of spectral reflectances, (3) To determine how increased surface roughness caused by tillage reduces bare soil albedo and (4) To empirically relate albedo with TM data and other physical characteristics of mixed grass/shrubland sites at Walnut Gulch Watershed. Albedos, colors and spectral reflectances were measured by Eppley pyranometer, Chroma Meter CR-200 and a Spectron SE-590, respectively. Measurements were made on two field soils (Gila and Pima) at the Campus Agricultural Center (CAC), Tucson, AZ. Soil surface roughness was measured by a profile meter developed by the USDA/ARS. Additional measurements were made at the Maricopa Agricultural Center (MAC) for statistical model testing. Albedos of the 15 smooth, bare soils (plus silica sand) were determined by linear regression to be highly correlated (r^2 = 0.93, p > 0.01) with color values for both wet and dry soil conditions. Albedos of the same smooth bare soils were also highly correlated (r^2>=q 0.86, p > 0.01) with spectral reflectances. Testing of the linear regression equations relating albedo to soil color and spectral reflectances using the data from MAC showed a high correlation. A general nonlinear relationship given by y = 8.366ln(x) + 37.802 r^2 = 0.71 was determined between percent reduction in albedo (y) and surface roughness index (x) for wet and dry Pima and Gila field soils

  16. Determining soil moisture and soil properties in vegetated areas by assimilating soil temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; Ochsner, Tyson E.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-06-01

    This study addresses two critical barriers to the use of Passive Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) for large-scale, high-resolution monitoring of soil moisture. In recent research, a particle batch smoother (PBS) was developed to assimilate sequences of temperature data at two depths into Hydrus-1D to estimate soil moisture as well as soil thermal and hydraulic properties. However, this approach was limited to bare soil and assumed that the cable depths were perfectly known. In order for Passive DTS to be more broadly applicable as a soil hydrology research and remote sensing soil moisture product validation tool, it must be applicable in vegetated areas. To address this first limitation, the forward model (Hydrus-1D) was improved through the inclusion of a canopy energy balance scheme. Synthetic tests were used to demonstrate that without the canopy energy balance scheme, the PBS estimated soil moisture could be even worse than the open loop case (no assimilation). When the improved Hydrus-1D model was used as the forward model in the PBS, vegetation impacts on the soil heat and water transfer were well accounted for. This led to accurate and robust estimates of soil moisture and soil properties. The second limitation is that, cable depths can be highly uncertain in DTS installations. As Passive DTS uses the downward propagation of heat to extract moisture-related variations in thermal properties, accurate estimates of cable depths are essential. Here synthetic tests were used to demonstrate that observation depths can be jointly estimated with other model states and parameters. The state and parameter results were only slightly poorer than those obtained when the cable depths were perfectly known. Finally, in situ temperature data from four soil profiles with different, but known, soil textures were used to test the proposed approach. Results show good agreement between the observed and estimated soil moisture, hydraulic properties, thermal properties, and

  17. Downscaling soil moisture using multisource data in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Ru; Wang, Hui-Lin; You, Jia-jun; Wang, Ying; Shen, Xiao-ji; Gao, Wei; Wang, Yi-nan; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Zhe; Quaye-Ballardd, Jonathan Arthur; Chen, Yuehong

    2016-10-01

    Soil moisture plays an important role in the water cycle within the surface ecosystem and it is the basic condition for the growth and development of plants. Currently, the spatial resolution of most soil moisture data from remote sensing ranges from ten to several tens of kilometres whilst those observed in situ and simulated for watershed hydrology, ecology, agriculture, weather and drought research are generally less than 1 kilometre. Therefore, the existing coarse resolution remotely sensed soil moisture data needs to be down-scaled. In this paper, a universal soil moisture downscaling model through stepwise regression with moving window suitable for large areas and multi temporal has been established. Datasets comprise land surface, brightness temperature, precipitation, soil and topographic parameters from high resolution data, and active/passive microwave remotely sensed soil moisture data from Essential Climate Variables (ECV_SM) with 25 km spatial resolution were used. With this model, a total of 288 soil moisture maps of 1 km resolution from the first ten-day of January 2003 to the last tenth-day of December 2010 were derived. The in situ observations were used to validate the down-scaled ECV_SM for different land cover and land use types and seasons. In addition, various errors comparative analysis was also carried out for the down-scaled ECV_SM and original one. In general, the down-scaled soil moisture for different land cover and land use types is consistent with the in situ observations. The accuracy is relatively high in autumn and winter. The validation results show that downscaled soil moisture can be improved not only on spatial resolution, but also on estimation accuracy.

  18. Assimilation of SMOS brightness temperatures or soil moisture retrievals into a land surface model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lannoy, Gabriëlle J. M.; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2016-12-01

    Three different data products from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are assimilated separately into the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5) to improve estimates of surface and root-zone soil moisture. The first product consists of multi-angle, dual-polarization brightness temperature (Tb) observations at the bottom of the atmosphere extracted from Level 1 data. The second product is a derived SMOS Tb product that mimics the data at a 40° incidence angle from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission. The third product is the operational SMOS Level 2 surface soil moisture (SM) retrieval product. The assimilation system uses a spatially distributed ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) with seasonally varying climatological bias mitigation for Tb assimilation, whereas a time-invariant cumulative density function matching is used for SM retrieval assimilation. All assimilation experiments improve the soil moisture estimates compared to model-only simulations in terms of unbiased root-mean-square differences and anomaly correlations during the period from 1 July 2010 to 1 May 2015 and for 187 sites across the US. Especially in areas where the satellite data are most sensitive to surface soil moisture, large skill improvements (e.g., an increase in the anomaly correlation by 0.1) are found in the surface soil moisture. The domain-average surface and root-zone skill metrics are similar among the various assimilation experiments, but large differences in skill are found locally. The observation-minus-forecast residuals and analysis increments reveal large differences in how the observations add value in the Tb and SM retrieval assimilation systems. The distinct patterns of these diagnostics in the two systems reflect observation and model errors patterns that are not well captured in the assigned EnKF error parameters. Consequently, a localized optimization of the EnKF error parameters is needed to further improve Tb or SM retrieval

  19. Correlation Between Soil Moisture and Dust Emissions: An Investigation for Global Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrickson, Carley; Tan, Qian

    2017-01-01

    This work is using the newly available NASA SMAP soil moisture measurement data to evaluate its impact on the atmospheric dust emissions. Dust is an important component of atmospheric aerosols, which affects both climate and air quality. In this work, we focused on semi-desert regions, where dust emissions show seasonal variations due to soil moisture changes, i.e. in Sahel of Africa. We first identified three Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites in the Sahel (IER_Cinzana, Banizoumbou, and Zinder_Airport). We then utilized measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine mode fraction, size distribution, and single-scattering albedo and its wave-length dependence to select dust plumes from the available measurements We matched the latitude and longitude of the AERONET station to the corresponding SMAP data cell in the years 2015 and 2016, and calculated their correlation coefficient. Additionally, we looked at the correlation coefficient with a three-day and a five-day shift to check the impact of soil moisture on dust plumes with some time delay. Due to the arid nature of Banizoumbou and Zinder_Airport, no correlation was found to exist between local soil moisture and dust aerosol load. While IER_Cinzana had soil moisture levels above the satellite threshold of 0.02cm3/cm3, R-value approaching zero indicated no presence of a correlation. On the other hand, Ilorin demonstrated a significant negative correlation between aerosol optical depth and soil moisture. When isolating the analysis to Ilorin's dry season, a negative correlation of -0.593 was the largest dust-isolated R-value recorded, suggesting that soil moisture is driven the dust emission in this semi-desert region during transitional season.

  20. Enhancing the USDA Global Crop Assessment Decision Support System Using SMAP Soil Moisture Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolten, J. D.; Mladenova, I. E.; Crow, W. T.; Reynolds, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Foreign Agricultural Services (FAS) is a subdivision of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) that is in charge with providing information on current and expected crop supply and demand estimates. Knowledge of the amount of water in the root zone is an essential source of information for the crop analysts as it governs the crop development and crop growth, which in turn determine the end-of-season yields. USDA FAS currently relies on root zone soil moisture (RZSM) estimates generated using the modified two-layer Palmer Model (PM). PM is a simple water-balance hydrologic model that is driven by daily precipitation observations and minimum and maximum temperature data. These forcing data are based on ground meteorological station measurements from the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and gridded weather data from the former U.S. Air Force Weather Agency (AFWA), currently called U.S. Air Force 557th Weather Wing. The PM was extended by adding a data assimilation (DA) unit that provides the opportunity to routinely ingest satellite-based soil moisture observations. This allows us to adjust for precipitation-related inaccuracies and enhance the quality of the PM soil moisture estimates. The current operational DA system is based on a 1-D Ensample Kalman Filter approach and relies on observations obtained from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity Mission (SMOS). Our talk will demonstrate the value of assimilating two satellite products (i.e. a passive and active) and discuss work that is done in preparation for ingesting soil moisture observations from the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission.

  1. Quasi-quantitative relationship between soil moisture and polarization characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Qiao; SUN Xiaobing; LI Ya'nan; QIAO Yanli

    2010-01-01

    Besides amplitude, frequency and phase, the polarization is another basic property of the electromagnetic wave. In the remote sensing field, the polarization is mainly applied in active detection systems of radar and iidar. This paper presents the quantitative relationship between soil moisture and polarization signatures in a certain type of soil in a farm. And this relationship is expected to be introduced on agriculture and hydrology ultimately. The experiments were performed both in the laboratory and the field. Soil samples with different moisture contents were measured at three wavebands on visible spectrum,and at several viewing angles in the plane of incidence. The polarization signature was indicated by the multi-band and multi-angle degree of linear polarization (DOLP) in this paper. The soil moisture were divided into five levels according to the properties of DOLP curves, namely, the quasi-quantitative relationship between soil moisture and its polarization signature were established. The percentages of soil moisture of the five levels are:≤10%, 10%-20%, 20%-40%, 40%-56% and >56%,respectively. Although this division for soil moisture is on a rather large scale, it will meet the precision of application agricultural and hydrologic remote sensing.

  2. Evaluating Soil Moisture Status Using an e-Nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Bieganowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of distinguishing different soil moisture levels by electronic nose (e-nose was studied. Ten arable soils of various types were investigated. The measurements were performed for air-dry (AD soils stored for one year, then moistened to field water capacity and finally dried within a period of 180 days. The volatile fingerprints changed during the course of drying. At the end of the drying cycle, the fingerprints were similar to those of the initial AD soils. Principal component analysis (PCA and artificial neural network (ANN analysis showed that e-nose results can be used to distinguish soil moisture. It was also shown that different soils can give different e-nose signals at the same moistures.

  3. [Priming Effects of Soil Moisture on Soil Respiration Under Different Tillage Practices].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Liang, Ai-zhen; Zhang, Xiao-ping; Chen, Sheng-long; Sun, Bing-jie; Liu, Si-yi

    2016-03-15

    In the early stage of an incubation experiment, soil respiration has a sensitive response to different levels of soil moisture. To investigate the effects of soil moisture on soil respiration under different tillage practices, we designed an incubation trial using air-dried soil samples collected from tillage experiment station established on black soils in 2001. The tillage experiment consisted of no-tillage (NT), ridge tillage (RT), and conventional tillage (CT). According to field capacity (water-holding capacity, WHC), we set nine moisture levels including 30%, 60%, 90%, 120%, 150%, 180%, 210%, 240%, 270% WHC. During the 22-day short-term incubation, soil CO₂ emission was measured. In the early stage of incubation, the priming effects occurred under all tillage practices. There were positive correlations between soil respiration and soil moisture. In addition to drought and flood conditions, soil CO₂ fluxes followed the order of NT > RT > CT. We fitted the relationship between soil moisture and soil CO₂ fluxes under different tillage practices. In the range of 30%-270% WHC, soil CO₂ fluxes and soil moisture fitted a quadratic regression equation under NT, and linear regression equations under RT and CT. Under the conditions of 30%-210% WHC of both NT and RT, soil CO₂ fluxes and soil moisture were well fitted by the logarithmic equation with fitting coefficient R² = 0.966 and 0.956, respectively.

  4. Modelling soil moisture at SMOS scale by use of a SVAT model over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the SMOS (Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity mission is to deliver global fields of surface soil moisture and sea surface salinity using L-band (1.4 GHz radiometry. Within the context of the Science preparation for SMOS, the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS experimental site, in Spain, was chosen to be one of the main test sites in Europe for Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities. In this framework, the paper presents an approach consisting in accurately simulating a whole SMOS pixel by representing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the soil moisture fields over the wide VAS surface (50×50 km2. Ground and meteorological measurements over the area are used as the input of a Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT model, SURFEX (Externalized Surface - module ISBA (Interactions between Soil-Biosphere-Atmosphere to simulate the spatial and temporal distribution of surface soil moisture. The calibration as well as the validation of the ISBA model are performed using in situ soil moisture measurements. It is shown that a good consistency is reached when point comparisons between simulated and in situ soil moisture measurements are made.

    Actually, an important challenge in remote sensing approaches concerns product validation. In order to obtain an representative soil moisture mapping over the Valencia Anchor Station (50×50 km2 area, a spatialization method is applied. For verification, a comparison between the simulated spatialized soil moisture and remote sensing data from the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer on Earth observing System (AMSR-E and from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS-SCAT is performed. Despite the fact that AMSR-E surface soil moisture product is not reproducing accurately the absolute values, it provides trustworthy information on surface soil moisture temporal variability. However, during the vegetation growing season the signal is perturbed. By using the

  5. SMAP Level 4 Surface and Root Zone Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichle, R.; De Lannoy, G.; Liu, Q.; Ardizzone, J.; Kimball, J.; Koster, R.

    2017-01-01

    The SMAP Level 4 soil moisture (L4_SM) product provides global estimates of surface and root zone soil moisture, along with other land surface variables and their error estimates. These estimates are obtained through assimilation of SMAP brightness temperature observations into the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) land surface model. The L4_SM product is provided at 9 km spatial and 3-hourly temporal resolution and with about 2.5 day latency. The soil moisture and temperature estimates in the L4_SM product are validated against in situ observations. The L4_SM product meets the required target uncertainty of 0.04 m(exp. 3)m(exp. -3), measured in terms of unbiased root-mean-square-error, for both surface and root zone soil moisture.

  6. Special soil & moisture report : Quivira National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report is a summary of 18 months of soil and moisture work accomplished on the 7,000 acres of land purchased for Quivira National Wildlife Refuge to date...

  7. Estimating soil moisture using the Danish polarimetric SAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiankang, Ji; Thomsen, A.; Skriver, Henning

    1995-01-01

    The results of applying data from the Danish polarimetric SAR (EMISAR) to estimate soil moisture for bare fields are presented. Fully calibrated C-band SAR images for hh, vv and cross polarizations have been used in this study. The measured surface roughness data showed that classical roughness...... autocorrelation functions (Gaussian and Exponential) were not able to fit natural surfaces well. A Gauss-Exp hybrid model which agreed better with the measured data has been proposed. Theoretical surface scattering models (POM, IEM), as well as an empirical model for retrieval of soil moisture and surface rms...... height from coand cross-polarized ratio, have been examined, but the results are less satisfactory. As soil moisture response to backscattering coefficient σo is mainly coupled to surface roughness effect for bare fields, a bilinear model coupling volumetric soil moisture mv and surface rms height σ...

  8. Soil Moisture for Western Russia and The Ukraine

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset, DSI-6411 is comprised of soil moisture data and the accompanying information for the agricultural regions of Western Russia (west of ~ 60E) and The...

  9. New DEMs may stimulate significant advancements in remote sensing of soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Matt; Fatland, Dennis R.

    From Napoleon's defeat at Waterloo to increasing corn yields in Kansas to greenhouse gas flux in the Arctic, the importance of soil moisture is endemic to world affairs and merits the considerable attention it receives from the scientific community. This importance can hardly be overstated, though it often goes unstated.Soil moisture is one of the key variables in a variety of broad areas critical to the conduct of societies' economic and political affairs and their well-being; these include the health of agricultural crops, global climate dynamics, military trafficability planning, and hazards such as flooding and forest fires. Unfortunately the in situ measurement of the spatial distribution of soil moisture on a watershed-scale is practically impossible. And despite decades of international effort, a satellite remote sensing technique that can reliably measure soil moisture with a spatial resolution of meters has not yet been identified or implemented. Due to the lack of suitable measurement techniques and, until recently digital elevation models (DEMs), our ability to understand and predict soil moisture dynamics through modeling has largely remained crippled from birth [Grayson and Bloschl, 200l].

  10. Modeling the Soil Moisture Parametrization in a Snow Dominated Mountainous Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikine, Daniel; Sensoy, Aynur; Sorman, Arda

    2016-04-01

    The study quantifies the effects of both the soil moisture accounting and the temperature index in the event based as well as the continuous simulation of a model in a snow dominated basin. Physically based watershed model parameters are required to reproduce the historical flows and forecast the stream flows. This study demonstrates that parameterization of hydrological model is a favorable approach to perform forecasting because it employs the relationship of the calibrated model parameters and those of the watershed's physical properties. With this consideration, the temperature index (degree-day) snowmelt and the soil moisture accounting models within the Hydrologic Engineering Center's hydrologic modeling system (HEC-HMS) are applied to the Upper Euphrates watershed. The versatile 14-parameter soil moisture accounting (SMA) algorithm is utilized for a better simulation and parameterization of the watershed. The methodology was exemplified by performing various independent simulations using the meteorological data and the observed stream discharges. The soil moisture parameters were calibrated and modified according to their statistical relationships with the land use for the 2002 - 2008 period, the obtained parameter set are then validated for the 2009 - 2012 period. Model outputs are evaluated in comparison to satellite derived soil moisture and snow water equivalent data. Deterministic Numerical Weather Prediction data are used together with the conceptual model to forecast runoff for the melting period of the year 2015.

  11. Mapping surface soil moisture using an aircraft-based passive microwave instrument: algorithm and example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, T. J.; Le Vine, David E.

    1996-10-01

    Microwave remote sensing at L-band (21 cm wavelength) can provide a direct measurement of the surface soil moisture for a range of cover conditions and within reasonable error bounds. Surface soil moisture observations are rare and, therefore, the use of these data in hydrology and other disciplines has not been fully explored or developed. Without satellite-based observing systems, the only way to collect these data in large-scale studies is with an aircraft platform. Recently, aircraft systems such as the push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR) and the electronically scanned thinned array radiometer (ESTAR) have been developed to facilitate such investigations. In addition, field experiments have attempted to collect the passive microwave data as part of an integrated set of hydrologic data. One of the most ambitious of these investigations was the Washita'92 experiment. Preliminary analysis of these data has shown that the microwave observations are indicative of deterministic spatial and temporal variations in the surface soil moisture. Users of these data should be aware of a number of issues related to using aircraft-based systems and practical approaches to applying soil moisture estimation algorithms to large data sets. This paper outlines the process of mapping surface soil moisture from an aircraft-based passive microwave radiometer system for the Washita'92 experiment.

  12. Sensitivity of Active and Passive Microwave Observations to Soil Moisture during Growing Corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, J.; Monsivais-Huertero, A.; Liu, P.; De Roo, R. D.; England, A. W.; Nagarajan, K.

    2011-12-01

    Soil moisture (SM) in the root zone is a key factor governing water and energy fluxes at the land surface and its accurate knowledge is critical to predictions of weather and near-term climate, nutrient cycles, crop-yield, and ecosystem productivity. Microwave observations, such as those at L-band, are highly sensitive to soil moisture in the upper few centimeters (near-surface). The two satellite-based missions dedicated to soil moisture estimation include, the European Space Agency's Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission and the planned NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) [4] mission. The SMAP mission will include active and passive sensors at L-band to provide global observations of SM, with a repeat coverage of every 2-3 days. These observations can significantly improve root zone soil moisture estimates through data assimilation into land surface models (LSMs). Both the active (radar) and passive (radiometer) microwave sensors measure radiation quantities that are functions of soil dielectric constant and exhibit similar sensitivities to SM. In addition to the SM sensitivity, radar backscatter is highly sensitive to roughness of soil surface and scattering within the vegetation. These effects may produce a much larger dynamic range in backscatter than that produced due to SM changes alone. In this study, we discuss the field observations of active and passive signatures of growing corn at L-band from several seasons during the tenth Microwave, Water and Energy Balance Experiment (MicroWEX-10) conducted in North Central Florida, and to understand the sensitivity of these signatures to soil moisture under dynamic vegetation conditions. The MicroWEXs are a series of season-long field experiments conducted during the growing seasons of sweet corn, cotton, and energy cane over the past six years (for example, [22]). The corn was planted on July 5 and harvested on September 23, 2011 during MicroWEX-10. The size of the field was 0.04 km2 and the soils

  13. Development of an Objective High Spatial Resolution Soil Moisture Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavodsky, B.; Case, J.; White, K.; Bell, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Drought detection, analysis, and mitigation has become a key challenge for a diverse set of decision makers, including but not limited to operational weather forecasters, climatologists, agricultural interests, and water resource management. One tool that is heavily used is the United States Drought Monitor (USDM), which is derived from a complex blend of objective data and subjective analysis on a state-by-state basis using a variety of modeled and observed precipitation, soil moisture, hydrologic, and vegetation and crop health data. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center currently runs a real-time configuration of the Noah land surface model (LSM) within the NASA Land Information System (LIS) framework. The LIS-Noah is run at 3-km resolution for local numerical weather prediction (NWP) and situational awareness applications at select NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) forecast offices over the Continental U.S. (CONUS). To enhance the practicality of the LIS-Noah output for drought monitoring and assessing flood potential, a 30+-year soil moisture climatology has been developed in an attempt to place near real-time soil moisture values in historical context at county- and/or watershed-scale resolutions. This LIS-Noah soil moisture climatology and accompanying anomalies is intended to complement the current suite of operational products, such as the North American Land Data Assimilation System phase 2 (NLDAS-2), which are generated on a coarser-resolution grid that may not capture localized, yet important soil moisture features. Daily soil moisture histograms are used to identify the real-time soil moisture percentiles at each grid point according to the county or watershed in which the grid point resides. Spatial plots are then produced that map the percentiles as proxies to the different USDM categories. This presentation will highlight recent developments of this gridded, objective soil moisture index, comparison to subjective

  14. Climate variability effects on spatial soil moisture dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    A. J. Teuling; Hupet, F.; R. Uijlenhoet; P. A. Troch

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the role of interannual climate variability on spatial soil moisture variability dynamics for a field site in Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium. Observations were made during 3 years under intermediate (1999), wet (2000), and extremely dry conditions (2003). Soil moisture variability dynamics are simulated with a comprehensive model for the period 1989-2003. The results show that climate variability induces non-uniqueness and two distinct hysteresis modes in the yearly relation between...

  15. Analysis of the linearised observation operator in a soil moisture and temperature analysis scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharssi, I.; Candy, B.; Steinle, P.

    2015-06-01

    Several weather forecasting agencies have developed advanced land data assimilation systems that, in principle, can analyse any model land variable. Such systems can make use of a wide variety of observation types, such as screen level (2 m above the surface) observations and satellite based measurements of surface soil moisture and skin temperature. Indirect measurements can be used and information propagated from the surface into the deeper soil layers. A key component of the system is the calculation of the linearised observation operator matrix (Jacobian matrix) which describes the link between the observations and the land surface model variables. The elements of the Jacobian matrix (Jacobians) are estimated using finite difference by performing short model forecasts with perturbed initial conditions. The calculated Jacobians show that there can be strong coupling between the screen level and the soil. The coupling between the screen level and surface soil moisture is found to be due to a number of processes including bare soil evaporation, soil thermal conductivity as well as transpiration by plants. Therefore, there is significant coupling both during the day and at night. The coupling between the screen level and root-zone soil moisture is primarily through transpiration by plants. Therefore the coupling is only significant during the day and the vertical variation of the coupling is modulated by the vegetation root depths. The calculated Jacobians that link screen level temperature to model soil temperature are found to be largest for the topmost model soil layer and become very small for the lower soil layers. These values are largest during the night and generally positive in value. It is found that the Jacobians that link observations of surface soil moisture to model soil moisture are strongly affected by the soil hydraulic conductivity. Generally, for the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES) land surface model, the coupling between the surface

  16. Determining soil moisture by assimilating soil temperature measurements using the Ensemble Kalman Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; Ochsner, Tyson E.; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the potential to estimate the vertical profile of soil moisture by assimilating temperature observations at a limited number of depths into a coupled heat and moisture transport model (Hydrus-1D). The method is developed with a view to assimilating temperature data from distributed temperature sensing (DTS) to estimate soil moisture at high resolution over large areas. The correlation between temperature and soil moisture in the shallow soil (top ∼ 50 cm) ensures that soil moisture can be estimated using just soil temperature observations. Synthetic tests across a range of soil textures show that with data assimilation both modeled temperature and the moisture profile are improved considerably compared to the ensemble open loop model simulations. In addition, employing data assimilation provides a means to quantitatively account for different sources of uncertainty. This is particularly relevant in the context of DTS given the influence of spatial variability in soil texture and its impact on estimation error. The data assimilation approach could also be used to determine, the number of temperature observations required and the depths at which they should be made. Results suggest that temperature observed at two depths is typically sufficient to estimate soil moisture using this approach. The root mean square error (RMSE) in soil moisture was reduced by up to 75% in the top 20 cm. Furthermore, this approach solves many of the challenges identified in the application of an inversion approach to estimate soil moisture from DTS.

  17. THE CLAY CONTENT EFFECT ON THE FORMATION OF SHALLOW MOLE DRAINAGE AND THE RATE OF LOWERING SOIL MOISTURE CONTENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Suharyatun

    2014-10-01

    loam soil did not infl uence the rate of lowering soil moisture content. Contrary, the mole drainage installed in clay soil has effected to increase the rate of lowering soil moisture content. Keywords: Mole drainage, soil moisture content, clay content

  18. Long-Term Evaluation of the AMSR-E Soil Moisture Product Over the Walnut Gulch Watershed, AZ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolten, J. D.; Jackson, T. J.; Lakshmi, V.; Cosh, M. H.; Drusch, M.

    2005-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer -Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) was launched aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on May 4th, 2002. Quantitative estimates of soil moisture using the AMSR-E provided data have required routine radiometric data calibration and validation using comparisons of satellite observations, extended targets and field campaigns. The currently applied NASA EOS Aqua ASMR-E soil moisture algorithm is based on a change detection approach using polarization ratios (PR) of the calibrated AMSR-E channel brightness temperatures. To date, the accuracy of the soil moisture algorithm has been investigated on short time scales during field campaigns such as the Soil Moisture Experiments in 2004 (SMEX04). Results have indicated self-consistency and calibration stability of the observed brightness temperatures; however the performance of the moisture retrieval algorithm has been poor. The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the quality of the current version of the AMSR-E soil moisture product for a three year period over the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (150 km2) near Tombstone, AZ; the northern study area of SMEX04. This watershed is equipped with hourly and daily recording of precipitation, soil moisture and temperature via a network of raingages and a USDA-NRCS Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) site. Surface wetting and drying are easily distinguished in this area due to the moderately-vegetated terrain and seasonally intense precipitation events. Validation of AMSR-E derived soil moisture is performed from June 2002 to June 2005 using watershed averages of precipitation, and soil moisture and temperature data from the SCAN site supported by a surface soil moisture network. Long-term assessment of soil moisture algorithm performance is investigated by comparing temporal variations of moisture estimates with seasonal changes and precipitation events. Further comparisons are made with a standard soil dataset from the European

  19. Soil moisture - resistivity relation at the plot and catchment scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calamita, Giuseppe; Perrone, Angela; Satriani, Antonio; Brocca, Luca; Moramarco, Tommaso

    2010-05-01

    The key role played by soil moisture in both Global Hydrological Cycle and Earth Radiation Budget has been claimed by numerous authors during past decades. The importance of this environmental variable is evident in several natural processes operating in a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. At continental and regional scales soil moisture influences the evapotranspiration process and so acts indirectly on the climate processes; at middle scale is one of the major controls of the infiltration-runoff soil response during rainfall events; at small scales the knowledge of soil moisture evolution is crucial for precision agriculture and the associated site-specific management practices. However, soil moisture exhibits an high temporal and spatial variability and this is even more evident in the vadose zone. Thus, in order to better understand the soil moisture dynamics it is desirable to capture its behavior at different temporal and/or spatial scales. Traditional in situ methods to measure soil moisture like TDR can be very precise and allows an high temporal resolution. Recently, the application in field of geophysical methods for capturing soil moisture spatial and temporal variations has demonstrated to be a promising tool for hydro-geological studies. One of the major advantages relies on the capability to capture the soil moisture variability at larger scales, that is decametric or hectometric scale. In particular, this study is based on the simultaneous application of the electrical resistivity and the TDR methods. We present two study cases that differ from each other by both spatial and temporal resolution. For the first one, simultaneous measurements obtained during four different period of the year and carried out within a test catchment (~60 km2) in Umbria region (central Italy) were analyzed. The second case concerns almost three months of simultaneous measurements carried out in a small test site ( sampling events during 80 days. In both case we

  20. Gully Impact on Soil Moisture in the Gully Bank

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Ji-Yong; WANG Li-Mei; SHAO Ming-An; WANG Quan-Jiu; LI Shi-Qing

    2006-01-01

    In order to preliminarily look at rules for soil moisture changes in the bank of the gully and to provide some recommendations for vegetative restoration in gully bank regions in the Loess Plateau, changes of soil moisture with depth and distance to the gully edge and their dynamic changes with time were observed to study the soil water characteristics in the bank of the gully. The results showed that soil water content increased with increasing distance from the gully edge, whereas for the same time period, the closer the distance to the gully wall, the greater the water loss; and that the influential distance of side evaporation decreased as depth increased.

  1. Galvanic Cell Type Sensor for Soil Moisture Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Pramod; Devendrachari, Mruthyunjayachari Chattanahalli; Thimmappa, Ravikumar; Paswan, Bhuneshwar; Raja Kottaichamy, Alagar; Makri Nimbegondi Kotresh, Harish; Thotiyl, Musthafa Ottakam

    2015-07-21

    Here we report the first potentiometric sensor for soil moisture analysis by bringing in the concept of Galvanic cells wherein the redox energies of Al and conducting polyaniline are exploited to design a battery type sensor. The sensor consists of only simple architectural components, and as such they are inexpensive and lightweight, making it suitable for on-site analysis. The sensing mechanism is proved to be identical to a battery type discharge reaction wherein polyaniline redox energy changes from the conducting to the nonconducting state with a resulting voltage shift in the presence of soil moisture. Unlike the state of the art soil moisture sensors, a signal derived from the proposed moisture sensor is probe size independent, as it is potentiometric in nature and, hence, can be fabricated in any shape or size and can provide a consistent output signal under the strong aberration conditions often encountered in soil moisture analysis. The sensor is regenerable by treating with 1 M HCl and can be used for multiple analysis with little read out hysteresis. Further, a portable sensor is fabricated which can provide warning signals to the end user when the moisture levels in the soil go below critically low levels, thereby functioning as a smart device. As the sensor is inexpensive, portable, and potentiometric, it opens up avenues for developing effective and energy efficient irrigation strategies, understanding the heat and water transfer at the atmosphere-land interface, understanding soil mechanics, forecasting the risk of natural calamities, and so on.

  2. L band microwave remote sensing and land data assimilation improve the representation of prestorm soil moisture conditions for hydrologic forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, W. T.; Chen, F.; Reichle, R. H.; Liu, Q.

    2017-06-01

    Recent advances in remote sensing and land data assimilation purport to improve the quality of antecedent soil moisture information available for operational hydrologic forecasting. We objectively validate this claim by calculating the strength of the relationship between storm-scale runoff ratio (i.e., total streamflow divided by total rainfall accumulation in depth units) and prestorm surface soil moisture estimates from a range of surface soil moisture data products. Results demonstrate that both satellite-based, L band microwave radiometry and the application of land data assimilation techniques have significantly improved the utility of surface soil moisture data sets for forecasting streamflow response to future rainfall events.type="synopsis">type="main">Plain Language SummaryForecasting streamflow conditions is important for minimizing loss of life and property during flooding and adequately planning for low streamflow conditions accompanying drought. One way to improve these forecasts is measuring the amount of water in the soil—since soil moisture conditions determine what fraction of rainfall will run off horizontally into stream channels (versus vertically infiltrate into the soil column). Within the past 5 years, there have been important advances in our ability to monitor soil moisture over large scales using both satellite-based sensors and the application of new land data assimilation techniques. This paper illustrates that these advances have significantly improved our capacity to forecast how much streamflow will be generated by future precipitation events. These results may eventually be used by operational forecasters to improve flash flood forecasting and agricultural water use management.

  3. Quality Assessment of the CCI ECV Soil Moisture Product Using ENVISAT ASAR Wide Swath Data over Spain, Ireland and Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Pratola

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade, great progress has been made by the scientific community in generating satellite-derived global surface soil moisture products, as a valuable source of information to be used in a variety of applications, such as hydrology, meteorology and climatic modeling. Through the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (ESA CCI, the most complete and consistent global soil moisture (SM data record based on active and passive microwaves sensors is being developed. However, the coarse spatial resolution characterizing such data may be not sufficient to accurately represent the moisture conditions. The objective of this work is to assess the quality of the CCI Essential Climate Variable (ECV SM product by using finer spatial resolution Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR Wide Swath and in situ soil moisture data taken over three regions in Europe. Ireland, Spain, and Finland have been selected with the aim of assessing the spatial and temporal representativeness of the ECV SM product over areas that differ in climate, topography, land cover and soil type. This approach facilitated an understanding of the extent to which geophysical factors, such as soil texture, terrain composition and altitude, affect the retrieved ECV SM product values. A good temporal and spatial agreement has been observed between the three soil moisture datasets for the Irish and Spanish sites, while poorer results have been found at the Finnish sites. Overall, the two different satellite derived products capture the soil moisture temporal variations well and are in good agreement with each other.

  4. Evaluation of SMAP radiometer level 2 soil moisture algorithms using four years of SMOS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objectives of the SMAP (Soil Moisture Active Passive) mission include global measurements of soil moisture at three different spatial resolutions. SMAP will provide soil moisture with a 3-day revisit time at an accuracy of 0.04 m3/m3 The 36 km gridded soil moisture product (L2_SM_P) is primar...

  5. Evaluation of soil moisture by bistatic microwave remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, K. P.; Sharma, S. K.

    1992-07-01

    Bistatic outdoor measurements of soil moisture at X-band of microwave frequencies are reported in this paper. The moisture content in the soil greatly affects the dielectric constant and the loss tangent of the composite material and hence the response to microwave signals are also affected. In turn, it has been observed to reflect, in our measurements, on the following derived cognisable parameters, namely, scattering cross-section, and brightness temperature. These parameters are seen to depend, besides moisture content on incidence angle, polarization and surface roughness too. The importance of these outdoor measurements are shown in microwave remote sensing. Limitations of our measurements are also outlined.

  6. Fiber Optic Thermo-Hygrometers for Soil Moisture Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Marco; Principe, Sofia; Consales, Marco; Parente, Roberto; Laudati, Armando; Caliro, Stefano; Cutolo, Antonello; Cusano, Andrea

    2017-06-20

    This work deals with the fabrication, prototyping, and experimental validation of a fiber optic thermo-hygrometer-based soil moisture sensor, useful for rainfall-induced landslide prevention applications. In particular, we recently proposed a new generation of fiber Bragg grating (FBGs)-based soil moisture sensors for irrigation purposes. This device was realized by integrating, inside a customized aluminum protection package, a FBG thermo-hygrometer with a polymer micro-porous membrane. Here, we first verify the limitations, in terms of the volumetric water content (VWC) measuring range, of this first version of the soil moisture sensor for its exploitation in landslide prevention applications. Successively, we present the development, prototyping, and experimental validation of a novel, optimized version of a soil VWC sensor, still based on a FBG thermo-hygrometer, but able to reliably monitor, continuously and in real-time, VWC values up to 37% when buried in the soil.

  7. Fiber Optic Thermo-Hygrometers for Soil Moisture Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Leone

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This work deals with the fabrication, prototyping, and experimental validation of a fiber optic thermo-hygrometer-based soil moisture sensor, useful for rainfall-induced landslide prevention applications. In particular, we recently proposed a new generation of fiber Bragg grating (FBGs-based soil moisture sensors for irrigation purposes. This device was realized by integrating, inside a customized aluminum protection package, a FBG thermo-hygrometer with a polymer micro-porous membrane. Here, we first verify the limitations, in terms of the volumetric water content (VWC measuring range, of this first version of the soil moisture sensor for its exploitation in landslide prevention applications. Successively, we present the development, prototyping, and experimental validation of a novel, optimized version of a soil VWC sensor, still based on a FBG thermo-hygrometer, but able to reliably monitor, continuously and in real-time, VWC values up to 37% when buried in the soil.

  8. Benchmarking a Soil Moisture Data Assimilation System for Agricultural Drought Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hun, Eunjin; Crow, Wade T.; Holmes, Thomas; Bolten, John

    2014-01-01

    Despite considerable interest in the application of land surface data assimilation systems (LDAS) for agricultural drought applications, relatively little is known about the large-scale performance of such systems and, thus, the optimal methodological approach for implementing them. To address this need, this paper evaluates an LDAS for agricultural drought monitoring by benchmarking individual components of the system (i.e., a satellite soil moisture retrieval algorithm, a soil water balance model and a sequential data assimilation filter) against a series of linear models which perform the same function (i.e., have the same basic inputoutput structure) as the full system component. Benchmarking is based on the calculation of the lagged rank cross-correlation between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and soil moisture estimates acquired for various components of the system. Lagged soil moistureNDVI correlations obtained using individual LDAS components versus their linear analogs reveal the degree to which non-linearities andor complexities contained within each component actually contribute to the performance of the LDAS system as a whole. Here, a particular system based on surface soil moisture retrievals from the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM), a two-layer Palmer soil water balance model and an Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is benchmarked. Results suggest significant room for improvement in each component of the system.

  9. Indirect Measurement of Evapotranspiration from Soil Moisture Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, M.; Chen, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Direct and in situ measurement of evapotranspiration (ET), such as the eddy covariance (EC) method, is often expensive and complicated, especially over tall canopy. In view of soil water balance, depletion of soil moisture can be attributed to canopy ET when horizontal soil moisture movement is negligible and percolation ceases. This study computed the daily soil moisture depletion at the Lien-Hua-Chih (LHC) station (23°55'52"N, 120°53'39"E, 773 m elevation) from July, 2004 to June, 2007 to estimate daily ET. The station is inside an experimental watershed of a natural evergreen forest and the canopy height is about 17 m. Rainfall days are assumed to be no ET. For those days with high soil moisture content, normally 2 to 3 days after significant rainfall input, ET is estimated by potential ET. Soil moistures were measured by capacitance probes at -10 cm, - 30 cm, -50 cm, -70 cm, and -90 cm. A soil heat flux plate was placed at -5 cm. In the summer of 2006, a 22 m tall observation tower was constructed. Temperature and relative humidity sensors were placed every 5 m from ground surface to 20 m for inner and above canopy measurements. Net radiation and wind speed/directions were also installed. A drainage gauge was installed at -50 cm to collect infiltrated water. Continuous measurements of low response instruments were recorded every 30-minute averaged from 10-minute samplings. A nearby weather station provides daily pan evaporation and precipitation data. Since the response of soil water variations is relatively slow to the fluctuations of atmospheric forcing, only daily ET is estimated from daily soil moisture depletion. The annual average precipitation is 2902 mm and the annual average ET is 700 mm. The seasonal ET patterns of the first two water years are similar. The third year has a higher ET because soil moisture was recharged frequently by rainfall In order to examine the applicability of this approach, an EC system, including a 3-D sonic anemometer (Young

  10. Rainfall estimation over-land using SMOS soil moisture observations: SM2RAIN, LMAA and SMART algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massari, Christian; Brocca, Luca; Pellarin, Thierry; Kerr, Yann; Crow, Wade; Cascon, Carlos; Ciabatta, Luca

    2016-04-01

    Recent advancements in the measurement of precipitation from space have provided estimates at scales that are commensurate with the needs of the hydrological and land-surface model communities. However, as demonstrated in a number of studies (Ebert et al. 2007, Tian et al. 2007, Stampoulis et al. 2012) satellite rainfall estimates are characterized by low accuracy in certain conditions and still suffer from a number of issues (e.g., bias) that may limit their utility in over-land applications (Serrat-Capdevila et al. 2014). In recent years many studies have demonstrated that soil moisture observations from ground and satellite sensors can be used for correcting satellite precipitation estimates (e.g. Crow et al., 2011; Pellarin et al., 2013), or directly estimating rainfall (SM2RAIN, Brocca et al., 2014). In this study, we carried out a detailed scientific analysis in which these three different methods are used for: i) estimating rainfall through satellite soil moisture observations (SM2RAIN, Brocca et al., 2014); ii) correcting rainfall through a Land surface Model Assimilation Algorithm (LMAA) (an improvement of a previous work of Crow et al. 2011 and Pellarin et al. 2013) and through the Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool (SMART, Crow et al. 2011). The analysis is carried within the ESA project "SMOS plus Rainfall" and involves 9 sites in Europe, Australia, Africa and USA containing high-quality hydrometeorological and soil moisture observations. Satellite soil moisture data from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission are employed for testing their potential in deriving a cumulated rainfall product at different temporal resolutions. The applicability and accuracy of the three algorithms is investigated also as a function of climatic and soil/land use conditions. A particular attention is paid to assess the expected limitations soil moisture based rainfall estimates such as soil saturation, freezing/snow conditions, SMOS RFI, irrigated areas

  11. The Presence of Plants Alters the Effect of Soil Moisture on Soil C Decomposition in Two Different Soil Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, F. A.; Cheng, W.

    2005-12-01

    While it is well known that soil moisture directly affects microbial activity and soil C decomposition, it is unclear if the presence of plants alters these effects through rhizosphere processes. We studied soil moisture effects on soil C decomposition with and without sunflower and soybean. Plants were grown in two different soil types with soil moisture contents of 45 and 85% of field capacity in a greenhouse experiment. We continuously labeled plants with depleted 13C, which allowed us to separate plant-derived CO2-C from original soil-derived CO2-C in soil respiration measurements. We observed an overall increase in soil-derived CO2-C efflux in the presence of plants (priming effect) in both soils with on average a greater priming effect in the high soil moisture treatment (60% increase in soil-derived CO2-C compared to control) than in the low soil moisture treatment (37% increase). Greater plant biomass in the high soil moisture treatment contributed to greater priming effects, but priming effects remained significantly higher after correcting for plant biomass. Possibly, root exudation of labile C may have increased more than plant biomass and may have become more effective in stimulating microbial decomposition in the higher soil moisture treatment. Our results indicate that changing soil moisture conditions can significantly alter rhizosphere effects on soil C decomposition.

  12. Desert shrub stemflow and its significance in soil moisture replenishment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.-P. Wang

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Stemflow of xerophytic shrubs represents a significant component of water replenishment to the soil-root system influencing water utilization of plant roots at the stand scale, especially in water scarce desert ecosystems. In this study, stemflow of Caragana korshinskii was quantified by an aluminum foil collar collection method on re-vegetated sand dunes of the Shapotou restored desert ecosystem in northwestern China. Time domain reflectometry probes were inserted horizontally at 20 different soil profile depths under the C. korshinskii shrub to monitor soil moisture variation at hourly intervals. Results indicated that 2.2 mm precipitation was necessary for the generation of stemflow for C. korshinskii. Stemflow averaged 8% of the gross precipitation and the average funnelling ratio was as high as 90. The soil moisture in the uppermost soil profile was strongly correlated with individual rainfall and the stemflow strengthened this relationship. Therefore, it is favourable for the infiltrated water redistribution in the deeper soil profile of the root zone. Consequently, stemflow contributes significantly to a positive soil moisture balance in the root zone and the replenishment of soil moisture at deeper soil layers. This plays an important role in plant survival and the general ecology of arid desert environments.

  13. Can soil moisture be mapped onto the terrain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M. Blyth

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil moisture heterogeneity has an effect on the rainfall–runoff characteristics of a landscape. The aggregate effect on the mean water balance over an area can be quantified successfully using models such as the PDM (Moore, 1986 and TOPMODEL (Beven and Kirkby, 1979. These rainfall–runoff models have been embedded in the large-scale land surface schemes used in meteorological models. However, there is also a requirement (e.g. model validation to identify the spatial structure of the fine-scale soil moisture heterogeneity that makes up these aggregate models. In some types of landscape, this will be dictated by topography, in others by soil characteristics, or by a combination of both. A method to distribute area-average soil moisture according to the likely effect of local topography is presented and tested. The heterogeneity of the soil moisture is described by the Xinanxiang distribution (Zhao et al., 1980, commonly used to describe the natural spatial heterogeneity of the landscape. This distribution is then mapped onto the terrain using a topographic index to locate the wettest and driest areas. Soil moisture data from the Wye catchment in Wales and from the Pang catchment in Berkshire, England, are used to test the method. It is found that soil moisture data from the Wye catchment follow the topographic index reasonably well, whereas data from the quick-draining, chalky Pang catchment do not. The conclusion that topographic index is a useful indicator only in some landscapes applies equally to using this mapping method and those models that use topographic index directly. Keywords: soil moisture, heterogeneity, topographic index, data

  14. Microwave Measurements of Moisture Distributions in the Upper Soil Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, A. M.; Hancock, G. D.; Waite, W. P.; Scott, H. D.; Rand, J. A.

    1984-07-01

    Laboratory and field experiments were conducted to investigate the ability of microwave remote sensing systems to detect the moisture status of a silt loam soil exhibiting abrupt changes in moisture content near the surface. Laboratory soil profiles were prepared with a discontinuous moisture boundary in the subsurface. Reflectivity measurements of these profiles were made with a bistatic reflectometer operating over the frequency ranges of 1-2 and 4-8 GHz (wavelength ranges of 30-15 and 7.5-3.75 cm, respectively). These measurements exhibited a well-developed coherent interference pattern in good agreement with a simple two-layer reflectivity model. Field measurements of bare soil surfaces were conducted for initially saturated profiles and continued for extended periods of drying. During drying, coherent interference patterns similar to those observed in the laboratory were detected. These appear to be due to steep moisture gradients occurring between drying layers near the surface. The field results were modeled by a five-segment linear moisture profile with one or two steep segments and a multilayer reflectivity program. Agreement between model and field response over the frequency range was used to estimate the depth of drying layers within the soil. These depths were monitored over the second and third drying cycles. Formation of the drying layers under field conditions appears to be influenced by drying time, tillage, and evaporative demand. In any case, it appears that the coherent effects caused by nonuniform moisture profiles may substantially affect the reflectivity of even rough soil surfaces.

  15. Estimating soil moisture and soil thermal and hydraulic properties by assimilating soil temperatures using a particle batch smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan C.; Ochsner, Tyson E.; Giesen, Nick van de

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the potential of estimating the soil moisture profile and the soil thermal and hydraulic properties by assimilating soil temperature at shallow depths using a particle batch smoother (PBS) using synthetic tests. Soil hydraulic properties influence the redistribution of soil moisture within the soil profile. Soil moisture, in turn, influences the soil thermal properties and surface energy balance through evaporation, and hence the soil heat transfer. Synthetic experiments were used to test the hypothesis that assimilating soil temperature observations could lead to improved estimates of soil hydraulic properties. We also compared different data assimilation strategies to investigate the added value of jointly estimating soil thermal and hydraulic properties in soil moisture profile estimation. Results show that both soil thermal and hydraulic properties can be estimated using shallow soil temperatures. Jointly updating soil hydraulic properties and soil states yields robust and accurate soil moisture estimates. Further improvement is observed when soil thermal properties were also estimated together with the soil hydraulic properties and soil states. Finally, we show that the inclusion of a tuning factor to prevent rapid fluctuations of parameter estimation, yields improved soil moisture, temperature, and thermal and hydraulic properties.

  16. Inverse modeling of soil characteristics from surface soil moisture observations: potential and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Loew

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Land surface models (LSM are widely used as scientific and operational tools to simulate mass and energy fluxes within the soil vegetation atmosphere continuum for numerous applications in meteorology, hydrology or for geobiochemistry studies. A reliable parameterization of these models is important to improve the simulation skills. Soil moisture is a key variable, linking the water and energy fluxes at the land surface. An appropriate parameterisation of soil hydraulic properties is crucial to obtain reliable simulation of soil water content from a LSM scheme. Parameter inversion techniques have been developed for that purpose to infer model parameters from soil moisture measurements at the local scale. On the other hand, remote sensing methods provide a unique opportunity to estimate surface soil moisture content at different spatial scales and with different temporal frequencies and accuracies. The present paper investigates the potential to use surface soil moisture information to infer soil hydraulic characteristics using uncertain observations. Different approaches to retrieve soil characteristics from surface soil moisture observations is evaluated and the impact on the accuracy of the model predictions is quantified. The results indicate that there is in general potential to improve land surface model parameterisations by assimilating surface soil moisture observations. However, a high accuracy in surface soil moisture estimates is required to obtain reliable estimates of soil characteristics.

  17. The impact of different soil texture datasets on soil moisture and evapotranspiration simulated by CLM4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, B.; Dickinson, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is both a moisture flux and an energy flux. It has a substantial impact on climate. Community Land Model Version 4 (CLM4) is a widely used land surface model that simulates moisture, energy and momentum exchange between land and atmosphere. However, ET from CLM4 suffers from relatively low accuracy, especially for ground evaporation. In the parameterization of CLM4, soil texture, by determining soil hydraulic properties, affects the evolution of soil moisture and consequently ET. The three components of ET in climate models can more readily be improved after an evaluation of soil texture dataset's impact on ET simulations. Besides the IGBP-DIS (International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme Data and Information System) dataset used in CLM4, another two US multi-layer soil particle content datasets, Soil Database for the Conterminous United States (CONUS-SOIL) and Global Soil Texture and Derived Water-Holding Capacities (Webb2000), are also used. The latter two show a consistent substantial reduction of both sand and clay contents in Mississippi River Basin. CLM4 is run off line over the US with the three different soil texture datasets (Control Run, CONUS SOIL and Webb2000). Comparisons of simulated soil moisture with NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction) reanalysis data show a higher agreement between CONUS SOIL and NCEP over Mississippi River Basin. Compared with Control Run, soil moisture from the other two runs increases in Western US and decreases in Eastern US, which produces a stronger west-east soil moisture gradient. The response of ET to soil moisture change differs in different climate regimes. In Mississippi River Basin, the change of ET is negligible even if soil moisture increases substantially. On the other hand, in eastern US and US Central Great Plains, ET is very sensitive to soil moisture during the warm seasons, with the change of up to 10 W/m2.

  18. Enhancement of the Automated Quality Control Procedures for the International Soil Moisture Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heer, Elsa; Xaver, Angelika; Dorigo, Wouter; Messner, Romina

    2017-04-01

    spectrum where a high majority of values before and after is flagged and therefore a sensor malfunction is certain. For the evaluation of the enhanced automated quality control system many test data sets were chosen, and manually validated to be compared to the existing quality control procedures and the new algorithms. Improvements will be shown that assure an appropriate assessment of the ISMN data sets, which are used for validations of soil moisture data retrieved by satellite data and are the foundation many other scientific publications.

  19. Upscaling sparse, irregularly spaced in situ soil moisture measurements for calibration and validation of SMAP soil moisture products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitcomb, J.; Clewley, D.; Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; Silva, A. R. D.

    2015-12-01

    There is a large difference in the footprints over which remote sensing instruments, such as the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, retrieve soil moisture and that of in situ networks. Therefore a method for upscaling in situ measurements is required before they can be used to validate remote sensing instruments. The upscaling problem is made more difficult when measurements are sparse and irregularly spaced within the footprint. To address these needs, we have developed a method for producing upscaled estimates of soil moisture based on a network of in situ soil moisture measurements and airborne P-band SAR data, and utilizing a Random Forests-based regression algorithm. Sites within the SoilSCAPE network, for which the technique was developed, typically contains sensors at ~30 locations, with each location sampled at multiple depths. Measurements are taken at 20 minute intervals and averaged over a selectable time interval, thereby supporting near-real time generation of soil moisture maps. The collected measurements are automatically uploaded to a central database from which they can be accessed for use in the regression algorithm. Our regression-based approach works well with irregularly-spaced sensors by incorporating a set of data layers that correlate well with soil moisture. The layers include thematic land cover, elevation, slope, aspect, flow accumulation, clay fraction, air temperature, precipitation, and P-Band HH, VV, and HV backscatter. Values from these data layers are extracted for each sensor location and applied to train the Random Forests algorithm. The decision trees generated are then applied to estimate soil moisture at a 100 m spacing throughout the network region, after which the evenly-spaced values are averaged to accord with the 3-, 9-, and 36-km SMAP measurement grids. The resulting set of near-real time soil moisture estimates suitable for SMAP calibration and validation is placed online for use by the SMAP Cal/Val team

  20. Influence of Soil Moisture on Soil Gas Vapor Concentration for Vapor Intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-10-01

    Mathematical models have been widely used in analyzing the effects of various environmental factors in the vapor intrusion process. Soil moisture content is one of the key factors determining the subsurface vapor concentration profile. This manuscript considers the effects of soil moisture profiles on the soil gas vapor concentration away from any surface capping by buildings or pavement. The "open field" soil gas vapor concentration profile is observed to be sensitive to the soil moisture distribution. The van Genuchten relations can be used for describing the soil moisture retention curve, and give results consistent with the results from a previous experimental study. Other modeling methods that account for soil moisture are evaluated. These modeling results are also compared with the measured subsurface concentration profiles in the U.S. EPA vapor intrusion database.

  1. Dependence of soil respiration on soil temperature and soil moisture in successional forests in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, X.-L.; Zhou, G.-Y.; Liu, S.-G.; Zhang, D.-Q.; Liu, S.-Z.; Li, J.; Zhou, C.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in soil respiration and its relationship with biophysical factors in forests near the Tropic of Cancer remain highly uncertain. To contribute towards an improvement of actual estimates, soil respiration rates, soil temperature, and soil moisture were measured in three successional subtropical forests at the Dinghushan Nature Reserve (DNR) in southern China from March 2003 to February 2005. The overall objective of the present study was to analyze the temporal variations of soil respiration and its biophysical dependence in these forests. The relationships between biophysical factors and soil respiration rates were compared in successional forests to test the hypothesis that these forests responded similarly to biophysical factors. The seasonality of soil respiration coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with high respiration rates in the hot humid season (April-September) and with low rates in the cool dry season (October-March). Soil respiration measured at these forests showed a clear increasing trend with the progressive succession. Annual mean (?? SD) soil respiration rate in the DNR forests was (9.0 ?? 4.6) Mg CO2-C/hm2per year, ranging from (6.1 ?? 3.2) Mg CO2-C/hm2per year in early successional forests to (10.7 ?? 4.9) Mg CO2-C/hm2 per year in advanced successional forests. Soil respiration was correlated with both soil temperature and moisture. The T/M model, where the two biophysical variables are driving factors, accounted for 74%-82% of soil respiration variation in DNR forests. Temperature sensitivity decreased along progressive succession stages, suggesting that advanced-successional forests have a good ability to adjust to temperature. In contrast, moisture increased with progressive succession processes. This increase is caused, in part, by abundant respirators in advanced-successional forest, where more soil moisture is needed to maintain their activities. ?? 2006 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of

  2. Dependence of Soil Respiration on Soil Temperature and Soil Moisture in Successional Forests in Southern China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu-Li Tang; Guo-Yi Zhou; Shu-Guang Liu; De-Qiang Zhang; Shi-Zhong Liu; Jiong Li; Cun-Yu Zhou

    2006-01-01

    The spatial and temporal variations in soil respiration and its relationship with biophysical factors in forests near the Tropic of Cancer remain highly uncertain. To contribute towards an improvement of actual estimates, soil respiration rates, soil temperature, and soil moisture were measured in three successional subtropical forests at the Dinghushan Nature Reserve (DNR) in southern China from March 2003 to February 2005. The overall objective of the present study was to analyze the temporal variations of soil respiration and its biophysical dependence in these forests. The relationships between biophysical factors and soil respiration rates were compared in successional forests to test the hypothesis that these forests responded similarly to biophysical factors. The seasonality of soil respiration coincided with the seasonal climate pattern, with high respiration rates in the hot humid season (April-September) and with low rates in the cool dry season (October-March). Soil respiration measured at these forests showed a clear increasing trend with the progressive succession. Annual mean (± SD) soil respiration rate in the DNR forests was (9.0±4.6) Mg CO2-C/hm2 per year, ranging from (6.1±3.2) Mg CO2-C/hm2 per year in early successional forests to (10.7±4.9) Mg CO2-C/hm2 per year in advanced successional forests. Soil respiration was correlated with both soil temperature and moisture. The T/M model, where the two biophysical variables are driving factors, accounted for 74%-82% of soil respiration variation in DNR forests. Temperature sensitivity decreased along progressive succession stages, suggesting that advanced-successional forests have a good ability to adjust to temperature. In contrast, moisture increased with progressive succession processes. This increase is caused, in part, by abundant respirators in advanced-successional forest, where more soil moisture is needed to maintain their activities.

  3. Soil moisture dynamics in an eastern Amazonian tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Rogério D.; da Rocha, Humberto R.; de Freitas, Helber C.; Goulden, Michael L.; Miller, Scott D.

    2006-08-01

    We used frequency-domain reflectometry to make continuous, high-resolution measurements for 22 months of the soil moisture to a depth of 10 m in an Amazonian rain forest. We then used these data to determine how soil moisture varies on diel, seasonal and multi-year timescales, and to better understand the quantitative and mechanistic relationships between soil moisture and forest evapotranspiration. The mean annual precipitation at the site was over 1900 mm. The field capacity was approximately 0.53 m3 m-3 and was nearly uniform with soil depth. Soil moisture decreased at all levels during the dry season, with the minimum of 0.38 m3 m-3 at 3 m beneath the surface. The moisture in the upper 1 m showed a strong diel cycle with daytime depletion due to evapotranspiration. The moisture beneath 1 m declined during both day and night due to the combined effects of evapotranspiration, drainage and a nighttime upward movement of water. The depth of active water withdrawal changed markedly over the year. The upper 2 m of soil supplied 56% of the water used for evapotranspiration in the wet season and 28% of the water used in the dry season. The zone of active water withdrawal extended to a depth of at least 10 m. The day-to-day rates of moisture withdrawal from the upper 10 m of soil during rain-free periods agreed well with simultaneous measurements of whole-forest evapotranspiration made by the eddy covariance technique. The forest at the site was well adapted to the normal cycle of wet and dry seasons, and the dry season had only a small effect on the rates of land-atmosphere water vapour exchange.

  4. Assessment of SMOS Soil Moisture Retrieval Parameters Using Tau-Omega Algorithms for Soil Moisture Deficit Estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Prashant K.; Han, Dawei; Rico-Ramirez, Miguel A.; O'Neill, Peggy; Islam, Tanvir; Gupta, Manika

    2014-01-01

    Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is the latest mission which provides flow of coarse resolution soil moisture data for land applications. However, the efficient retrieval of soil moisture for hydrological applications depends on optimally choosing the soil and vegetation parameters. The first stage of this work involves the evaluation of SMOS Level 2 products and then several approaches for soil moisture retrieval from SMOS brightness temperature are performed to estimate Soil Moisture Deficit (SMD). The most widely applied algorithm i.e. Single channel algorithm (SCA), based on tau-omega is used in this study for the soil moisture retrieval. In tau-omega, the soil moisture is retrieved using the Horizontal (H) polarisation following Hallikainen dielectric model, roughness parameters, Fresnel's equation and estimated Vegetation Optical Depth (tau). The roughness parameters are empirically calibrated using the numerical optimization techniques. Further to explore the improvement in retrieval models, modifications have been incorporated in the algorithms with respect to the sources of the parameters, which include effective temperatures derived from the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) downscaled using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF)-NOAH Land Surface Model and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land surface temperature (LST) while the s is derived from MODIS Leaf Area Index (LAI). All the evaluations are performed against SMD, which is estimated using the Probability Distributed Model following a careful calibration and validation integrated with sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. The performance obtained after all those changes indicate that SCA-H using WRF-NOAH LSM downscaled ECMWF LST produces an improved performance for SMD estimation at a catchment scale.

  5. Multi-decadal analysis of root-zone soil moisture applying the exponential filter across CONUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. J. Tobin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study applied the exponential filter to produce an estimate of root-zone soil moisture (RZSM. Four types of microwave-based, surface satellite soil moisture were used. The core remotely sensed data for this study came from NASA's long-lasting AMSR-E mission. Additionally, three other products were obtained from the European Space Agency Climate Change Initiative (CCI. These datasets were blended based on all available satellite observations (CCI-active, CCI-passive, and CCI-combined. All of these products were 0.25° and taken daily. We applied the filter to produce a soil moisture index (SWI that others have successfully used to estimate RZSM. The only unknown in this approach was the characteristic time of soil moisture variation (T. We examined five different eras (1997–2002; 2002–2005; 2005–2008; 2008–2011; 2011–2014 that represented periods with different satellite data sensors. SWI values were compared with in situ soil moisture data from the International Soil Moisture Network at a depth ranging from 20 to 25 cm. Selected networks included the US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM program (25 cm, Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN; 20.32 cm, SNOwpack TELemetry (SNOTEL; 20.32 cm, and the US Climate Reference Network (USCRN; 20 cm. We selected in situ stations that had reasonable completeness. These datasets were used to filter out periods with freezing temperatures and rainfall using data from the Parameter elevation Regression on Independent Slopes Model (PRISM. Additionally, we only examined sites where surface and root-zone soil moisture had a reasonably high lagged r value (r > 0. 5. The unknown T value was constrained based on two approaches: optimization of root mean square error (RMSE and calculation based on the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI value. Both approaches yielded comparable results; although, as to be expected, the optimization approach generally

  6. Using high-resolution soil moisture modelling to assess the uncertainty of microwave remotely sensed soil moisture products at the correct spatial and temporal support

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, N.; Karssenberg, D.; Bierkens, M. F. P.; Van Dam, J. C.; De Jong, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in the hydrological cycle and important in hydrological modelling. When assimilating soil moisture into flood forecasting models, the improvement of forecasting skills depends on the ability to accurately estimate the spatial and temporal patterns of soil moisture con

  7. Determination of soil moisture distribution from impedance and gravimetric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Stephen G.; Layman, Robert; Campbell, Jeffrey E.; Walsh, John; Mckim, Harlan J.

    1992-01-01

    Daily measurements of the soil dielectric properties at 5 and 10 cm were obtained at five locations throughout the First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) test site during the 1987 intensive field campaigns (IFCs). An automated vector voltmeter was used to monitor the complex electrical impedance, at 10 MHz, of cylindrical volumes of soil delineated by specially designed soil moisture probes buried at these locations. The objective of this exercise was to test the hypothesis that the soil impedance is sensitive to the moisture content of the soil and that the imaginary part (that is, capacitive reactance) can be used to calculate the volumetric water content of the soil. These measurements were compared with gravimetric samples collected at these locations by the FIFE staff science team.

  8. Physically plausible prescription of land surface model soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Mathias; Orth, René; Thiery, Wim; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2016-04-01

    Land surface hydrology is an important control of surface weather and climate, especially under extreme dry or wet conditions where it can amplify heat waves or floods, respectively. Prescribing soil moisture in land surface models is a valuable technique to investigate this link between hydrology and climate. It has been used for example to assess the influence of soil moisture on temperature variability, mean and extremes (Seneviratne et al. 2006, 2013, Lorenz et al., 2015). However, perturbing the soil moisture content artificially can lead to a violation of the energy and water balances. Here we present a new method for prescribing soil moisture which ensures water and energy balance closure by using only water from runoff and a reservoir term. If water is available, the method prevents soil moisture decrease below climatological values. Results from simulations with the Community Land Model (CLM) indicate that our new method allows to avoid soil moisture deficits in many regions of the world. We show the influence of the irrigation-supported soil moisture content on mean and extreme temperatures and contrast our findings with that of earlier studies. Additionally, we will assess how long into the 21st century the new method will be able to maintain present-day climatological soil moisture levels for different regions. Lorenz, R., Argüeso, D., Donat, M.G., Pitman, A.J., den Hurk, B.V., Berg, A., Lawrence, D.M., Chéruy, F., Ducharne, A., Hagemann, S. and Meier, A., 2015. Influence of land-atmosphere feedbacks on temperature and precipitation extremes in the GLACE-CMIP5 ensemble. Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres. Seneviratne, S.I., Lüthi, D., Litschi, M. and Schär, C., 2006. Land-atmosphere coupling and climate change in Europe. Nature, 443(7108), pp.205-209. Seneviratne, S.I., Wilhelm, M., Stanelle, T., Hurk, B., Hagemann, S., Berg, A., Cheruy, F., Higgins, M.E., Meier, A., Brovkin, V. and Claussen, M., 2013. Impact of soil moisture

  9. Rainfall estimation by inverting SMOS soil moisture estimates: A comparison of different methods over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocca, Luca; Pellarin, Thierry; Crow, Wade T.; Ciabatta, Luca; Massari, Christian; Ryu, Dongryeol; Su, Chun-Hsu; Rüdiger, Christoph; Kerr, Yann

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing of soil moisture has reached a level of maturity and accuracy for which the retrieved products can be used to improve hydrological and meteorological applications. In this study, the soil moisture product from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite is used for improving satellite rainfall estimates obtained from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission multisatellite precipitation analysis product (TMPA) using three different "bottom up" techniques: SM2RAIN, Soil Moisture Analysis Rainfall Tool, and Antecedent Precipitation Index Modification. The implementation of these techniques aims at improving the well-known "top down" rainfall estimate derived from TMPA products (version 7) available in near real time. Ground observations provided by the Australian Water Availability Project are considered as a separate validation data set. The three algorithms are calibrated against the gauge-corrected TMPA reanalysis product, 3B42, and used for adjusting the TMPA real-time product, 3B42RT, using SMOS soil moisture data. The study area covers the entire Australian continent, and the analysis period ranges from January 2010 to November 2013. Results show that all the SMOS-based rainfall products improve the performance of 3B42RT, even at daily time scale (differently from previous investigations). The major improvements are obtained in terms of estimation of accumulated rainfall with a reduction of the root-mean-square error of more than 25%. Also, in terms of temporal dynamic (correlation) and rainfall detection (categorical scores) the SMOS-based products provide slightly better results with respect to 3B42RT, even though the relative performance between the methods is not always the same. The strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm and the spatial variability of their performances are identified in order to indicate the ways forward for this promising research activity. Results show that the integration of bottom up and top down approaches

  10. Assessing Seasonal Backscatter Variations with Respect to Uncertainties in Soil Moisture Retrieval in Siberian Tundra Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elin Högström

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of surface hydrology is essential for many applications, including studies that aim to understand permafrost response to changing climate and the associated feedback mechanisms. Advanced remote sensing techniques make it possible to retrieve a range of land-surface variables, including radar retrieved soil moisture (SSM. It has been pointed out before that soil moisture retrieval from satellite data can be challenging at high latitudes, which correspond to remote areas where ground data are scarce and the applicability of satellite data of this type is essential. This study investigates backscatter variability other than associated with changing soil moisture in order to examine the possible impact on soil moisture retrieval. It focuses on issues specific to SSM retrieval in the Arctic, notably variations related to tundra lakes. ENVISAT Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar (ASAR Wide Swath (WS, 120 m data are used to understand and quantify impacts on Metop (AAdvanced Scatterometer (ASCAT, 25 km soil moisture retrieval during the snow free period. Sites of interest are chosen according to ASAR WS availability, high or low agreement between output from the land surface model ORCHIDEE and ASCAT derived SSM. Backscatter variations are analyzed with respect to the ASCAT footprint area. It can be shown that the low model agreement is related to water fraction in most cases. No difference could be detected between periods with floating ice (in snow off situation and ice free periods at the chosen sites. The mean footprint backscatter is however impacted by partial short term surface roughness change. The water fraction correlates with backscatter deviations (relative to a smooth water surface reference image within the ASCAT footprint areas (R = 0.91

  11. Thresholds and interactive effects of soil moisture on the temperature response of soil respiration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lellei-Kovács, Eszter; Kovács-Láng, Edit; Botta-Dukát, Zoltán;

    2011-01-01

    Ecosystem carbon exchange is poorly understood in low-productivity, semiarid habitats. Here we studied the controls of soil temperature and moisture on soil respiration in climate change field experiment in a sandy forest-steppe. Soil CO2 efflux was measured monthly from April to November in 2003......–2008 on plots receiving either rain exclusion or nocturnal warming, or serving as ambient control. Based on this dataset, we developed and compared empirical models of temperature and moisture effects on soil respiration. Results suggest that in this semiarid ecosystem the main controlling factor for soil CO2...... efflux is soil temperature, while soil moisture has less, although significant effect on soil respiration. Clear thresholds for moisture effects on temperature sensitivity were identified at 0.6, 4.0 and 7.0vol% by almost each model, which relate well to other known limits for biological activity...

  12. The Impact of Soil Moisture Initialization On Seasonal Precipitation Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, R. D.; Suarez, M. J.; Tyahla, L.; Houser, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Some studies suggest that the proper initialization of soil moisture in a forecasting model may contribute significantly to the accurate prediction of seasonal precipitation, especially over mid-latitude continents. In order for the initialization to have any impact at all, however, two conditions must be satisfied: (1) the initial soil moisture anomaly must be "remembered" into the forecasted season, and (2) the atmosphere must respond in a predictable way to the soil moisture anomaly. In our previous studies, we identified the key land surface and atmospheric properties needed to satisfy each condition. Here, we tie these studies together with an analysis of an ensemble of seasonal forecasts. Initial soil moisture conditions for the forecasts are established by forcing the land surface model with realistic precipitation prior to the start of the forecast period. As expected, the impacts on forecasted precipitation (relative to an ensemble of runs that do not utilize soil moisture information) tend to be localized over the small fraction of the earth with all of the required land and atmosphere properties.

  13. Retrieval of Both Soil Moisture and Texture Using one configuration TerraSAR-X radar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zribi, M., Sr.; Gorrab, A.; Baghdadi, N.; Lili-Chabaane, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to propose a methodology combing multi-temporal X-band SAR images (TerraSAR-X) with continuous ground thetaprobe measurements, for the retrieval of surface soil moisture and texture at a high spatial resolution. Our analysis is based on seven radar images acquired at a 36° incidence angle in the HH polarization, over a semi-arid site in Tunisia (North Africa). All ground measurements of surface soil parameters were carried out over several bare soil reference fields located at the Kairouan site. Between November 2013 and January 2014 (three months), ground campaigns were carried out at the same time as the seven satellite acquisitions. The soil moisture estimations are based on an empirical change detection approach using TerraSAR-X data and ground auxiliary thetaprobe network measurements. Two assumptions were tested: (1) roughness variations during the three-month radar acquisition campaigns were not accounted for; (2) a simple correction for temporal variations in roughness was included. For the two considered approaches, the soil moisture estimations were validated using ground measurements acquired over fifteen test fields, under different moisture conditions. These comparisons lead to a volumetric moisture RMSE equal to 3.8% and 3.3%, and a bias equal to 0.5% and 0.3%, respectively. By considering the estimated temporal dynamics of soil moisture, a methodology is proposed for the retrieval of clay and sand content (expressed as percentages) in soil. Two empirical relationships were established between the mean moisture values retrieved from the seven acquired radar images and the two soil texture components over 36 test fields. Validation of the proposed approach was carried out over a second set of 34 fields, showing that highly accurate clay estimations can be achieved. For clay and sand, we retrieve an rms error equal to 10.8% (equivalent to 108 g/kg) and 18.6% (equivalent to 186 g/kg), respectively. Maps of soil moisture, clay

  14. Small-scale soil moisture determination with GPR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igel, Jan; Preetz, Holger

    2010-05-01

    The knowledge of topsoil moisture distribution is an important input for modelling water flow and evapotranspiration which are essential processes in hydrology, meteorology, and agriculture. All these processes involve non-linear effects and thus the small-scale variability of input parameters play an important role. Using smoothed interpolations instead can cause significant biases. Lateral soil moisture distribution can be sensed by different techniques at various scales whereby geophysical methods provide spatial information which closes the gap between point measurements by classical soil scientific methods and measurements on the field or regional scale by remote sensing. Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) can be used to explore soil moisture on the field scale as propagation of electromagnetic waves is correlated to soil water content. By determining the velocity of the ground wave, which is a guided wave travelling along the soil surface, we can sense soil water content. This method has been applied to determine topsoil moisture for several years. We present a new groundwave technique which determines the velocity in between two receiving antennas which enables a higher lateral resolution (approx. 10 cm) compared to classical groundwave technique (half meter and more). We present synthetic data from finite-differences (FD) calculations as well as data from a sandbox experiment carried out under controlled conditions to demonstrate the performance of this method. Further, we carried out field measurements on two sites on a sandy soil which is used as grassland. The measurements were carried out in late summer at dry soil conditions. Soil moisture on the first site shows an isotropic pattern with correlation lengths of approx. 35 cm. We think this natural pattern is governed by rout distribution within the soil and the water uptake of vegetation. On the second site, soil moisture distribution shows a regular stripe pattern. As the land has been used as

  15. Automated general temperature correction method for dielectric soil moisture sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapilaratne, R. G. C. Jeewantinie; Lu, Minjiao

    2017-08-01

    An effective temperature correction method for dielectric sensors is important to ensure the accuracy of soil water content (SWC) measurements of local to regional-scale soil moisture monitoring networks. These networks are extensively using highly temperature sensitive dielectric sensors due to their low cost, ease of use and less power consumption. Yet there is no general temperature correction method for dielectric sensors, instead sensor or site dependent correction algorithms are employed. Such methods become ineffective at soil moisture monitoring networks with different sensor setups and those that cover diverse climatic conditions and soil types. This study attempted to develop a general temperature correction method for dielectric sensors which can be commonly used regardless of the differences in sensor type, climatic conditions and soil type without rainfall data. In this work an automated general temperature correction method was developed by adopting previously developed temperature correction algorithms using time domain reflectometry (TDR) measurements to ThetaProbe ML2X, Stevens Hydra probe II and Decagon Devices EC-TM sensor measurements. The rainy day effects removal procedure from SWC data was automated by incorporating a statistical inference technique with temperature correction algorithms. The temperature correction method was evaluated using 34 stations from the International Soil Moisture Monitoring Network and another nine stations from a local soil moisture monitoring network in Mongolia. Soil moisture monitoring networks used in this study cover four major climates and six major soil types. Results indicated that the automated temperature correction algorithms developed in this study can eliminate temperature effects from dielectric sensor measurements successfully even without on-site rainfall data. Furthermore, it has been found that actual daily average of SWC has been changed due to temperature effects of dielectric sensors with a

  16. The moisture response of soil heterotrophic respiration: interaction with soil properties

    OpenAIRE

    F. E. Moyano; N. Vasilyeva; L. Bouckaert; Cook, F; J. Craine; J. Curiel Yuste; Don, A.; Epron, D.; Formanek, P; A. Franzluebbers; Ilstedt, U; T. Kätterer; Orchard, V.; Reichstein, M.; Rey, A.

    2012-01-01

    Soil moisture is of primary importance for predicting the evolution of soil carbon stocks and fluxes, both because it strongly controls organic matter decomposition and because it is predicted to change at global scales in the following decades. However, the soil functions used to model the heterotrophic respiration response to moisture have limited empirical support and introduce an uncertainty of at least 4% in global soil carbon stock predictions by 2100. The necessity of improving the rep...

  17. The moisture response of soil heterotrophic respiration: interaction with soil properties

    OpenAIRE

    F. E. Moyano; N. Vasilyeva; L. Bouckaert; Cook, F; J. Craine; J. Curiel Yuste; Don, A.; Epron, D.; Formanek, P; A. Franzluebbers; Ilstedt, U; T. Kätterer; Orchard, V.; Reichstein, M.; Rey, A.

    2011-01-01

    Soil moisture is of primary importance for predicting the evolution of soil carbon stocks and fluxes, both because it strongly controls organic matter decomposition and because it is predicted to change at global scales in the following decades. However, the soil functions used to model the heterotrophic respiration response to moisture have limited empirical support and introduce an uncertainty of at least 4 % in global soil carbon stock predictions by 2100. The necessity of improving t...

  18. Does Soil Moisture Influence Climate Variability and Predictability over Australia?.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timbal, B.; Power, S.; Colman, R.; Viviand, J.; Lirola, S.

    2002-05-01

    Interannual variations of Australian climate are strongly linked to the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. However, the impact of other mechanisms on prediction, such as atmosphere-land surface interactions, has been less frequently investigated. Here, the impact of soil moisture variability on interannual climate variability and predictability is examined using the Bureau of Meteorology Research Centre atmospheric general circulation model. Two sets of experiments are run, each with five different initial conditions. In the first set of experiments, soil moisture is free to vary in response to atmospheric forcing in each experiment according to a set of simple prognostic equations. A potential predictability index is computed as the ratio of the model's internal variability to its external forced variability. This estimates the level of predictability obtained assuming perfect knowledge of future ocean surface temperatures. A second set of five experiments with prescribed soil moisture is performed. A comparison between these two sets of experiments reveals that fluctuations of soil moisture increase the persistence, the variance, and the potential predictability of surface temperature and rainfall. The interrelationship between these two variables is also strongly dependent upon the soil water content. Results are particularly marked over Australia in this model. A novel feature of this study is the focus on the effectiveness of ENSO-based statistical seasonal forecasting over Australia. Forecasting skill is shown to be crucially dependent upon soil moisture variability over the continent. In fact, surface temperature forecasts in this manner are not possible without soil moisture variability. This result suggests that a better representation of land-surface interaction has the potential to increase the skill of seasonal prediction schemes.

  19. Soil moisture under contrasted atmospheric conditions in Eastern Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azorin-Molina, César; Cerdà, Artemi; Vicente-Serrano, Sergio M.

    2014-05-01

    Soil moisture plays a key role on the recently abandoned agriculture land where determine the recovery and the erosion rates (Cerdà, 1995), on the soil water repellency degree (Bodí et al., 2011) and on the hydrological cycle (Cerdà, 1999), the plant development (García Fayos et al., 2000) and the seasonality of the geomorphological processes (Cerdà, 2002). Moreover, Soil moisture is a key factor on the semiarid land (Ziadat and Taimeh, 2013), on the productivity of the land (Qadir et al., 2013) and soils treated with amendments (Johnston et al., 2013) and on soil reclamation on drained saline-sodic soils (Ghafoor et al., 2012). In previous study (Azorin-Molina et al., 2013) we investigated the intraannual evolution of soil moisture in soils under different land managements in the Valencia region, Eastern Spain, and concluded that soil moisture recharges are much controlled by few heavy precipitation events; 23 recharge episodes during 2012. Most of the soil moisture recharge events occurred during the autumn season under Back-Door cold front situations. Additionally, sea breeze front episodes brought isolated precipitation and moisture to mountainous areas within summer (Azorin-Molina et al., 2009). We also evidenced that the intraanual evolution of soil moisture changes are positively and significatively correlated (at pMataix-Solera, J., Doerr, S.H. & Cerdà, A. 2011. The wettability of ash from burned vegetation and its relationship to Mediterranean plant species type, burn severity and total organic carbon content. Geoderma, 160, 599-607. 10.1016/j.geoderma.2010.11.009 Cerdà, A. 1995. Soil moisture regime under simulated rainfall in a three years abandoned field in Southeast Spain. Physics and Chemistry of The Earth, 20 (3-4), 271-279. Cerdà, A. 1999. Seasonal and spatial variations in infiltration rates in badland surfaces under Mediterranean climatic conditions. Water Resources Research, 35 (1) 319-328. Cerdà, A. 2002. The effect of season and parent

  20. A hydrometeorological approach for probabilistic simulation of monthly soil moisture under bare and crop land conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sarit Kumar; Maity, Rajib

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on the probabilistic estimation of monthly soil moisture variation by considering (a) the influence of hydrometeorological forcing to model the temporal variation and (b) the information of Hydrological Soil Groups (HSGs) and Agro-Climatic Zones (ACZs) to capture the spatial variation. The innovative contributions of this study are: (i) development of a Combined Hydro-Meteorological (CHM) index to extract the information of different influencing hydrometeorological variables, (ii) consideration of soil-hydrologic characteristics (through HSGs) and climate regime-based zoning for agriculture (through ACZs), and (iii) quantification of uncertainty range of the estimated soil moisture. Usage of Supervised Principal Component Analysis (SPCA) in the development of the CHM index helps to eliminate the "curse of dimensionality," typically arises in the multivariate analysis. The usage of SPCA also ensures the maximum possible association between the developed CHM index and soil moisture variation. The association between these variables is modeled through their joint distribution which is obtained by using the theory of copula. The proposed approach is also spatially transferable, since the information on HSGs and ACZs is considered. The "leave-one-out" cross-validation (LOO-CV) approach is adopted for stations belong to a particular HSG to examine the spatial transferability. The simulated soil moisture values are also compared with a few existing soil moisture data sets, derived from different Land Surface Models (LSMs) or retrieved from different satellite-based missions. The potential of the proposed approach is found to be promising and even applicable to crop land also, though with a lesser degree of efficiency as compared to bare land conditions.

  1. Impact of the soil hydrology scheme on simulated soil moisture memory in a GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagemann, Stefan; Stacke, Tobias

    2013-04-01

    Soil moisture-atmosphere feedback effects play an important role in several regions of the globe. For some of these regions, soil moisture memory may contribute significantly to the development of the regional climate. Identifying those regions can help to improve predictability in seasonal to decadal climate forecasts. The present study investigates how different setups of the soil hydrology scheme affect soil moisture memory simulated by the global climate model of the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology (MPI-M), ECHAM6/JSBACH. First, the standard setup applied for the CMIP5 exercise is used, in which soil water is represented by a single soil moisture reservoir. Second, a new five soil layer hydrology scheme is utilized where the previous bucket soil moisture now corresponds to the root zone soil moisture. In the standard setup, transpiration may access the whole soil moisture that is exceeding the wilting point over vegetated areas. However, in the five layer scheme, soil water below the root zone cannot be accessed by transpiration directly, but only be transported upwards into the root zone by diffusion following the Richard's equation. Thus, this below the root zone, which is not present in the standard setup, can act as buffer in the transition between wet and dry periods. A second notable difference between the two setups is the formulation of bare soil evaporation. In the standard setup, it may only occur if the whole soil moisture bucket is almost completely saturated, while in the new setup, it depends only on the saturation of the upper most soil layer. As the latter is much thinner than the root zone (bucket), bare soil evaporation can occur more frequently, especially after rainfall events. For the second setup, two further variants are considered: one where the bare soil evaporation was modified and one where a new parameter dataset of soil water holding capacities was used. Soil moisture memory of the different setups will be analysed from global

  2. Sensitivity of soil respiration to variability in soil moisture and temperature in a humid tropical forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tana Wood; M. Detto; W.L. Silver

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation and temperature are important drivers of soil respiration. The role of moisture and temperature are generally explored at seasonal or inter-annual timescales; however, significant variability also occurs on hourly to daily time-scales. We used small (1.54 m2), throughfall exclusion shelters to evaluate the role soil moisture and temperature as temporal...

  3. Spatial Variation of Soil Type and Soil Moisture in the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, R.

    2001-06-27

    Soil characteristics (texture and moisture) are typically assumed to be initially constant when performing simulations with the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Soil texture is spatially homogeneous and time-independent, while soil moisture is often spatially homogeneous initially, but time-dependent. This report discusses the conversion of a global data set of Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) soil types to RAMS soil texture and the subsequent modifications required in RAMS to ingest this information. Spatial variations in initial soil moisture obtained from the National Center for Environmental Predictions (NCEP) large-scale models are also introduced. Comparisons involving simulations over the southeastern United States for two different time periods, one during warmer, more humid summer conditions, and one during cooler, dryer winter conditions, reveals differences in surface conditions related to increases or decreases in near-surface atmospheric moisture con tent as a result of different soil properties. Three separate simulation types were considered. The base case assumed spatially homogeneous soil texture and initial soil moisture. The second case assumed variable soil texture and constant initial soil moisture, while the third case allowed for both variable soil texture and initial soil moisture. The simulation domain was further divided into four geographically distinct regions. It is concluded there is a more dramatic impact on thermodynamic variables (surface temperature and dewpoint) than on surface winds, and a more pronounced variability in results during the summer period. While no obvious trends in surface winds or dewpoint temperature were found relative to observations covering all regions and times, improvement in surface temperatures in most regions and time periods was generally seen with the incorporation of variable soil texture and initial soil moisture.

  4. BOREAS HYD-6 Ground Gravimetric Soil Moisture Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Thomas; Knapp, David E. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Peck, Eugene L.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Hydrology (HYD)-6 team collected several data sets related to the moisture content of soil and overlying humus layers. This data set contains percent soil moisture ground measurements. These data were collected on the ground along the various flight lines flown in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Northern Study Area (NSA) during 1994 by the gamma ray instrument. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The HYD-06 ground gravimetric soil moisture data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  5. Soil Moisture Initialization Error and Subgrid Variability of Precipitation in Seasonal Streamflow Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal D.; Walker, Gregory K.; Mahanama, Sarith P.; Reichle, Rolf H.

    2013-01-01

    Offline simulations over the conterminous United States (CONUS) with a land surface model are used to address two issues relevant to the forecasting of large-scale seasonal streamflow: (i) the extent to which errors in soil moisture initialization degrade streamflow forecasts, and (ii) the extent to which a realistic increase in the spatial resolution of forecasted precipitation would improve streamflow forecasts. The addition of error to a soil moisture initialization field is found to lead to a nearly proportional reduction in streamflow forecast skill. The linearity of the response allows the determination of a lower bound for the increase in streamflow forecast skill achievable through improved soil moisture estimation, e.g., through satellite-based soil moisture measurements. An increase in the resolution of precipitation is found to have an impact on large-scale streamflow forecasts only when evaporation variance is significant relative to the precipitation variance. This condition is met only in the western half of the CONUS domain. Taken together, the two studies demonstrate the utility of a continental-scale land surface modeling system as a tool for addressing the science of hydrological prediction.

  6. Two Topics in Seasonal Streamflow Forecasting: Soil Moisture Initialization Error and Precipitation Downscaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, Randal; Walker, Greg; Mahanama, Sarith; Reichle, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Continental-scale offline simulations with a land surface model are used to address two important issues in the forecasting of large-scale seasonal streamflow: (i) the extent to which errors in soil moisture initialization degrade streamflow forecasts, and (ii) the extent to which the downscaling of seasonal precipitation forecasts, if it could be done accurately, would improve streamflow forecasts. The reduction in streamflow forecast skill (with forecasted streamflow measured against observations) associated with adding noise to a soil moisture field is found to be, to first order, proportional to the average reduction in the accuracy of the soil moisture field itself. This result has implications for streamflow forecast improvement under satellite-based soil moisture measurement programs. In the second and more idealized ("perfect model") analysis, precipitation downscaling is found to have an impact on large-scale streamflow forecasts only if two conditions are met: (i) evaporation variance is significant relative to the precipitation variance, and (ii) the subgrid spatial variance of precipitation is adequately large. In the large-scale continental region studied (the conterminous United States), these two conditions are met in only a somewhat limited area.

  7. Implications of complete watershed soil moisture measurements to hydrologic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, E. T.; Jackson, T. J.; Schmugge, T. J.

    1983-01-01

    A series of six microwave data collection flights for measuring soil moisture were made over a small 7.8 square kilometer watershed in southwestern Minnesota. These flights were made to provide 100 percent coverage of the basin at a 400 m resolution. In addition, three flight lines were flown at preselected areas to provide a sample of data at a higher resolution of 60 m. The low level flights provide considerably more information on soil moisture variability. The results are discussed in terms of reproducibility, spatial variability and temporal variability, and their implications for hydrologic modeling.

  8. ESTAR - A synthetic aperture microwave radiometer for measuring soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Vine, D. M.; Griffis, A.; Swift, C. T.; Jackson, T. J.

    1992-01-01

    The measurement of soil moisture from space requires putting relatively large microwave antennas in orbit. Aperture synthesis, an interferometric technique for reducing the antenna aperture needed in space, offers the potential for a practical means of meeting these requirements. An aircraft prototype, electronically steered thinned array L-band radiometer (ESTAR), has been built to develop this concept and to demonstrate its suitability for the measurement of soil moisture. Recent flights over the Walnut Gulch Watershed in Arizona show good agreement with ground truth and with measurements with the Pushbroom Microwave Radiometer (PBMR).

  9. Soil Temperature and Moisture Profile (STAMP) System Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David R [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The soil temperature and moisture profile system (STAMP) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil water content (soil-type specific and loam type), plant water availability, soil conductivity, and real dielectric permittivity as a function of depth below the ground surface at half-hourly intervals, and precipitation at one-minute intervals. The profiles are measured directly by in situ probes at all extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The profiles are derived from measurements of soil energy conductivity. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil. The STAMP system replaced the SWATS system in early 2016.

  10. Soil moisture and vegetation memories in a cold, arid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Masato; Nandintsetseg, Banzragch

    2011-10-01

    Continental climate is established as a result of a complex interplay between the atmosphere and various land-surface systems such as the biosphere, soil, hydrosphere, and cryosphere. These systems function as climate memory, allowing the maintenance of interannual atmospheric anomalies. In this paper, we present new observational evidence of an interseasonal moisture memory mechanism mediated by the land surface that is manifested in the coupled cold and arid climate of Mongolia. Interannual anomalies of soil moisture and vegetation due to rainfall during a given summer are maintained through the freezing winter months to the spring, acting as an initial condition for subsequent summer land-surface and rainfall conditions. Both the soil moisture and vegetation memories were prominent over the eastern part of the Mongolian steppe zone (103-112°E and 46-50°N). That is, the cold-season climate with low evapotranspiration and strong soil freezing acts to prolong the decay time scale of autumn soil moisture anomalies to 8.2 months that is among the longest in the world. The vegetation also has a memory of the similar time scale, likely because the large rootstock of the perennial plants dominant in the Mongolian steppe may remain alive, retain belowground biomass anomalies during the winter, and have an impact on the initial vegetation growth during the spring.

  11. Preliminary analysis of distributed in situ soil moisture measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brocca

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface soil moisture content is highly variable in both space and time. Remote sensing can provide an effective methodology for mapping surface moisture content over large areas but ground based measurements are required to test its reliability and to calibrate retrieval algorithms. Recently, we had the opportunity to design and perform an experiment aimed at jointly acquiring measurements of surface soil water content at various locations and remotely sensed hyperspectral data. The area selected for the experiment is located in central Umbria and it extends for 90km2. For the area, detailed lithological and multi-temporal landslide inventory maps were available. We identified eight plots where measurements of soil water content were made using a Time Domain Reflectometer (TDR. The plots range in size from 100m2 to 600m2, and cover a variety of topographic and morphological settings. The TDR measurements were conducted during four days, on 5 April, 15 April, 2 May and 3 May 2004. On 3 May the NERC airborne CASI 2 acquired the hyperspectral data. Preliminary analysis concerning the matching between the landslides and the soil moisture were reported. Statistical and geostatistical analysis investigating the spatial-temporal soil moisture distribution were performed. These results will be compared with the data of surface temperature obtained from the remotely sensed hyperspectral sensor.

  12. Examining the relationship between intermediate-scale soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation within a semi-arid grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Raghavendra B.; Ershadi, Ali; McCabe, Matthew F.

    2016-09-01

    Interactions between soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation affect water cycle behaviour and responses between the land surface and the atmosphere across scales. With strong heterogeneities at the land surface, the inherent spatial variability in soil moisture makes its representation via point-scale measurements challenging, resulting in scale mismatch when compared to coarser-resolution satellite-based soil moisture or evaporation estimates. The Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe (CRNP) was developed to address such issues in the measurement and representation of soil moisture at intermediate scales. Here, we present a study to assess the utility of CRNP soil moisture observations in validating model evaporation estimates. The CRNP soil moisture product from a pasture in the semi-arid central west region of New South Wales, Australia, was compared to evaporation derived from three distinct approaches, including the Priestley-Taylor (PT-JPL), Penman-Monteith (PM-Mu), and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) models, driven by forcing data from local meteorological station data and remote sensing retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Pearson's correlations, quantile-quantile (Q-Q) plots, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the temporal distributions of soil moisture and evaporation over the study site. The relationships were examined against nearly 2 years of observation data, as well as for different seasons and for defined periods of analysis. Results highlight that while direct correlations of raw data were not particularly instructive, the Q-Q plots and ANOVA illustrate that the root-zone soil moisture represented by the CRNP measurements and the modelled evaporation estimates reflect similar distributions under most meteorological conditions. The PT-JPL and PM-Mu model estimates performed contrary to expectation when high soil moisture and cold temperatures were present

  13. Examining the relationship between intermediate-scale soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation within a semi-arid grassland

    KAUST Repository

    Jana, Raghavendra B.

    2016-09-30

    Interactions between soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation affect water cycle behaviour and responses between the land surface and the atmosphere across scales. With strong heterogeneities at the land surface, the inherent spatial variability in soil moisture makes its representation via point-scale measurements challenging, resulting in scale mismatch when compared to coarser-resolution satellite based soil moisture or evaporation estimates. The Cosmic Ray Neutron Probe (CRNP) was developed to address such issues in the measurement and representation of soil moisture at intermediate scales. Here, we present a study to assess the utility of CRNP soil moisture observations in validating model evaporation estimates. The CRNP soil moisture product from a pasture in the semi-arid central west region of New South Wales, Australia, was compared to evaporation derived from three distinct approaches, including the Priestley–Taylor (PT-JPL), Penman–Monteith (PM-Mu), and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) models, driven by forcing data from local meteorological station data and remote sensing retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Pearson’s correlations, quantile–quantile (Q–Q) plots, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the temporal distributions of soil moisture and evaporation over the study site. The relationships were examined against nearly 2 years of observation data, as well as for different seasons and for defined periods of analysis. Results highlight that while direct correlations of raw data were not particularly instructive, the Q–Q plots and ANOVA illustrate that the root-zone soil moisture represented by the CRNP measurements and the modelled evaporation estimates reflect similar distributions under most meteorological conditions. The PT-JPL and PM-Mu model estimates performed contrary to expectation when high soil moisture and cold temperatures were

  14. Examining the relationship between intermediate scale soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation within a semi-arid grassland

    KAUST Repository

    Jana, Raghavendra Belur

    2016-05-17

    Interactions between soil moisture and terrestrial evaporation affect water cycle behaviour and responses between the land surface and the atmosphere across scales. With strong heterogeneities at the land surface, the inherent spatial variability in soil moisture makes its representation via point-scale measurements challenging, resulting in scale-mismatch when compared to coarser-resolution satellite-based soil moisture or evaporation estimates. The Cosmic Ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS) was developed to address such issues in the measurement and representation of soil moisture at intermediate scales. Here we present an examination of the links observed between COSMOS soil moisture retrievals and evaporation estimates over a pasture in the semi-arid central-west region of New South Wales, Australia. The COSMOS soil moisture product was compared to evaporation derived from three distinct approaches, including the Priestley-Taylor (PT-JPL), Penman-Monteith (PM-Mu) and Surface Energy Balance System (SEBS) models, driven by forcing data from local meteorological station data and remote sensing retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Pearson’s Correlations, Quantile-Quantile (Q-Q) plots, and Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) were used to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate the temporal distributions of soil moisture and evaporation over the study site. The relationships were examined against nearly two years of observation data, as well as for different seasons and for defined periods of analysis. Results highlight that while direct correlations of raw data were not particularly instructive, the Q-Q plots and ANOVA illustrate that the root-zone soil moisture represented by the COSMOS measurements and the modelled evaporation estimates reflect similar distributions under most meteorological conditions. The PT-JPL and PM-Mu model estimates performed contrary to expectation when high soil moisture and cold

  15. [Characteristics of soil moisture in artificial impermeable layers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suo, Gai-Di; Xie, Yong-Sheng; Tian, Fei; Chuai, Jun-Feng; Jing, Min-Xiao

    2014-09-01

    For the problem of low water and fertilizer use efficiency caused by nitrate nitrogen lea- ching into deep soil layer and soil desiccation in dryland apple orchard, characteristics of soil moisture were investigated by means of hand tamping in order to find a new approach in improving the water and fertilizer use efficiency in the apple orchard. Two artificial impermeable layers of red clay and dark loessial soil were built in soil, with a thickness of 3 or 5 cm. Results showed that artificial impermeable layers with the two different thicknesses were effective in reducing or blocking water infiltration into soil and had higher seepage controlling efficiency. Seepage controlling efficiency for the red clay impermeable layer was better than that for the dark loessial soil impermeable layer. Among all the treatments, the red clay impermeable layer of 5 cm thickness had the highest bulk density, the lowest initial infiltration rate (0.033 mm · min(-1)) and stable infiltration rate (0.018 mm · min(-1)) among all treatments. After dry-wet alternation in summer and freezing-thawing cycle in winter, its physiochemical properties changed little. Increase in years did not affect stable infiltration rate of soil water. The red clay impermeable layer of 5 cm thickness could effectively increase soil moisture content in upper soil layer which was conducive to raise the water and nutrient use efficiency. The approach could be applied to the apple production of dryland orchard.

  16. MISTRALE: Soil moisture mapping service based on a UAV-embedded GNSS-Reflectometry sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Vyvere, Laura; Desenfans, Olivier

    2016-04-01

    Around 70 percent of worldwide freshwater is used by agriculture. To be able to feed an additional 2 billion people by 2030, water demand is expected to increase tremendously in the next decades. Farmers are challenged to produce "more crop per drop". In order to optimize water resource management, it is crucial to improve soil moisture situation awareness, which implies both a better temporal and spatial resolution. To this end, the objective of the MISTRALE project (Monitoring soIl moiSture and waTeR-flooded Areas for agricuLture and Environment) is to provide UAV-based soil moisture maps that could complement satellite-based and field measurements. In addition to helping farmers make more efficient decisions about where and when to irrigate, MISTRALE moisture maps are an invaluable tool for risk management and damage evaluation, as they provide highly relevant information for wetland and flood-prone area monitoring. In order to measure soil water content, a prototype of a new sensor, called GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R), is being developed in MISTRALE. This approach consists in comparing the direct signal, i.e. the signal travelling directly from satellite to receiver (in this case, embedded in the UAV), with its ground-reflected equivalent. Since soil dielectric properties vary with moisture content, the reflected signal's peak power is affected by soil moisture, unlike the direct one. In order to mitigate the effect of soil surface roughness on measurements, both left-hand and right-hand circular polarization reflected signals have to be recorded and processed. When it comes to soil moisture, using GNSS signals instead of traditional visible/NIR imagery has many advantages: it is operational under cloud cover, during the night, and also under vegetation (bushes, grass, trees). In addition, compared to microwaves, GNSS signal (which lies in L-band, between 1.4 and 1.8 GHz) is less influenced by variation on thermal background. GNSS frequencies are then ideal

  17. Evaluation of Data from the Multi-frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR) and Its Potential for Soil Moisture Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, J.; Jackson, T. J.; Bindlish, R.; Su, Z. B.

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-frequency Scanning Microwave Radiometer (MSMR) aboard the India Space Research Organization - Oceansat-1 (IRS-P4) platform measured land surface brightness temperature at low frequencies and provided an opportunity for exploring large-scale soil moisture retrieval during its two years period of observation. Several data issues had to be addressed before using the data. These included geolocation errors, data calibration and anthropogenic Radio-frequency Interference (RFI). Calibration was evaluated by comparisons to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission/Microwave Imager (TRMM/TMI) measured brightness temperatures. A negative bias of 3.4 and 3.6 K were observed for the 10.6 GHz horizontal and vertical polarization bands respectively, negative differences of 14.0 and 10.1 K were found between the MSMR 6.6 GHz and TMI 10.6 GHz horizontal and vertical polarizations over land surface. These results suggested that additional calibration of the MSMR data was required. Comparisons between the MSMR measured brightness temperature and ground measured volumetric soil moisture collected during two field campaigns indicated that the lower frequency and horizontal polarization had higher sensitivity to the ground soil moisture. Using a previously developed soil emission model, multi-temporal soil moisture was retrieved for the continental United States. Comparisons between the MSMR based soil moisture and ground measured volumetric soil moisture indicated an uncertain error of 3.8 percent in the estimated soil moisture. This data may provide a valuable extension to the SMMR and AMSR instruments since it covers a portion of the time between the two missions. Keywords: passive microwave, brightness temperature, soil moisture, satellite remote sensing.

  18. MAPSM: A Spatio-Temporal Algorithm for Merging Soil Moisture from Active and Passive Microwave Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sat Kumar Tomer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Availability of soil moisture observations at a high spatial and temporal resolution is a prerequisite for various hydrological, agricultural and meteorological applications. In the current study, a novel algorithm for merging soil moisture from active microwave (SAR and passive microwave is presented. The MAPSM algorithm—Merge Active and Passive microwave Soil Moisture—uses a spatio-temporal approach based on the concept of the Water Change Capacity (WCC which represents the amplitude and direction of change in the soil moisture at the fine spatial resolution. The algorithm is applied and validated during a period of 3 years spanning from 2010 to 2013 over the Berambadi watershed which is located in a semi-arid tropical region in the Karnataka state of south India. Passive microwave products are provided from ESA Level 2 soil moisture products derived from Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS satellite (3 days temporal resolution and 40 km nominal spatial resolution. Active microwave are based on soil moisture retrievals from 30 images of RADARSAT-2 data (24 days temporal resolution and 20 m spatial resolution. The results show that MAPSM is able to provide a good estimate of soil moisture at a spatial resolution of 500 m with an RMSE of 0.025 m3/m3 and 0.069 m3/m3 when comparing it to soil moisture from RADARSAT-2 and in-situ measurements, respectively. The use of Sentinel-1 and RISAT products in MAPSM algorithm is envisioned over other areas where high number of revisits is available. This will need an update of the algorithm to take into account the angle sampling and resolution of Sentinel-1 and RISAT data.

  19. Macrofauna assemblage composition and soil moisture interact to affect soil ecosystem functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collison, E. J.; Riutta, T.; Slade, E. M.

    2013-02-01

    Changing climatic conditions and habitat fragmentation are predicted to alter the soil moisture conditions of temperate forests. It is not well understood how the soil macrofauna community will respond to changes in soil moisture, and how changes to species diversity and community composition may affect ecosystem functions, such as litter decomposition and soil fluxes. Moreover, few studies have considered the interactions between the abiotic and biotic factors that regulate soil processes. Here we attempt to disentangle the interactive effects of two of the main factors that regulate soil processes at small scales - moisture and macrofauna assemblage composition. The response of assemblages of three common temperate soil invertebrates (Glomeris marginata Villers, Porcellio scaber Latreille and Philoscia muscorum Scopoli) to two contrasting soil moisture levels was examined in a series of laboratory mesocosm experiments. The contribution of the invertebrates to the leaf litter mass loss of two common temperate tree species of contrasting litter quality (easily decomposing Fraxinus excelsior L. and recalcitrant Quercus robur L.) and to soil CO2 fluxes were measured. Both moisture conditions and litter type influenced the functioning of the invertebrate assemblages, which was greater in high moisture conditions compared with low moisture conditions and on good quality vs. recalcitrant litter. In high moisture conditions, all macrofauna assemblages functioned at equal rates, whereas in low moisture conditions there were pronounced differences in litter mass loss among the assemblages. This indicates that species identity and assemblage composition are more important when moisture is limited. We suggest that complementarity between macrofauna species may mitigate the reduced functioning of some species, highlighting the importance of maintaining macrofauna species richness.

  20. Potential for Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture Data in Hydrologic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engman, Edwin T.

    1997-01-01

    Many hydrologic processes display a unique signature that is detectable with microwave remote sensing. These signatures are in the form of the spatial and temporal distributions of surface soil moisture and portray the spatial heterogeneity of hydrologic processes and properties that one encounters in drainage basins. The hydrologic processes that may be detected include ground water recharge and discharge zones, storm runoff contributing areas, regions of potential and less than potential ET, and information about the hydrologic properties of soils and heterogeneity of hydrologic parameters. Microwave remote sensing has the potential to detect these signatures within a basin in the form of volumetric soil moisture measurements in the top few cm. These signatures should provide information on how and where to apply soil physical parameters in distributed and lumped parameter models and how to subdivide drainage basins into hydrologically similar sub-basins.

  1. A wireless soil moisture sensor powered by solar energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Mingliang; Lv, Mouchao; Deng, Zhong; Zhai, Guoliang

    2017-01-01

    In a variety of agricultural activities, such as irrigation scheduling and nutrient management, soil water content is regarded as an essential parameter. Either power supply or long-distance cable is hardly available within field scale. For the necessity of monitoring soil water dynamics at field scale, this study presents a wireless soil moisture sensor based on the impedance transform of the frequency domain. The sensor system is powered by solar energy, and the data can be instantly transmitted by wireless communication. The sensor electrodes are embedded into the bottom of a supporting rod so that the sensor can measure soil water contents at different depths. An optimal design with time executing sequence is considered to reduce the energy consumption. The experimental results showed that the sensor is a promising tool for monitoring moisture in large-scale farmland using solar power and wireless communication.

  2. Relating trends in land surface-air temperature difference to soil moisture and evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veal, Karen; Taylor, Chris; Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Ghent, Darren; Harris, Phil; Remedios, John

    2016-04-01

    Soil water is central to both physical and biogeochemical processes within the Earth System. Drying of soils leads to evapotranspiration (ET) becoming limited or "water-stressed" and is accompanied by rises in land surface temperature (LST), land surface-air temperature difference (delta T), and sensible heat flux. Climate models predict sizable changes to the global water cycle but there is variation between models in the time scale of ET decay during dry spells. The e-stress project is developing novel satellite-derived diagnostics to assess the ability of Earth System Models (ESMs) to capture behaviour that is due to soil moisture controls on ET. Satellite records of LST now extend 15 years or more. MODIS Terra LST is available from 2000 to the present and the Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (ATSR) LST record runs from 1995 to 2012. This paper presents results from an investigation into the variability and trends in delta T during the MODIS Terra mission. We use MODIS Terra and MODIS Aqua LST and ESA GlobTemperature ATSR LST with 2m air temperatures from reanalyses to calculate trends in delta T and "water-stressed" area. We investigate the variability of delta T in relation to soil moisture (ESA CCI Passive Daily Soil Moisture), vegetation (MODIS Monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and precipitation (TRMM Multi-satellite Monthly Precipitation) and compare the temporal and spatial variability of delta T with model evaporation data (GLEAM). Delta T anomalies show significant negative correlations with soil moisture, in different seasons, in several regions across the planet. Global mean delta T anomaly is small (magnitude mostly less than 0.2 K) between July 2002 and July 2008 and decreases to a minimum in early 2010. The reduction in delta T anomaly coincides with an increase in soil moisture anomaly and NDVI anomaly suggesting an increase in evapotranspiration and latent heat flux with reduced sensible heat flux. In conclusion there have been

  3. Estimation of Soil Moisture Under Vegetation Cover at Multiple Frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadghuber, Thomas; Hajnsek, Irena; Weiß, Thomas; Papathanassiou, Konstantinos P.

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture under vegetation cover was estimated by a polarimetric, iterative, generalized, hybrid decomposition and inversion approach at multiple frequencies (X-, C- and L-band). Therefore the algorithm, originally designed for longer wavelength (L-band), was adapted to deal with the short wavelength scattering scenarios of X- and C-band. The Integral Equation Method (IEM) was incorporated together with a pedo-transfer function of Dobson et al. to account for the peculiarities of short wavelength scattering at X- and C-band. DLR's F-SAR system acquired fully polarimetric SAR data in X-, C- and L-band over the Wallerfing test site in Lower Bavaria, Germany in 2014. Simultaneously, soil and vegetation measurements were conducted on different agricultural test fields. The results indicate a spatially continuous inversion of soil moisture in all three frequencies (inversion rates >92%), mainly due to the careful adaption of the vegetation volume removal including a physical constraining of the decomposition algorithm. However, for X- and C-band the inversion results reveal moisture pattern inconsistencies and in some cases an incorrectly high inversion of soil moisture at X-band. The validation with in situ measurements states a stable performance of 2.1- 7.6vol.% at L-band for the entire growing period. At C- and X-band a reliable performance of 3.7-13.4vol.% in RMSE can only be achieved after distinct filtering (X- band) leading to a loss of almost 60% in spatial inversion rate. Hence, a robust inversion for soil moisture estimation under vegetation cover can only be conducted at L-band due to a constant availability of the soil signal in contrast to higher frequencies (X- and C-band).

  4. PRELIMINARY RESULTS OF ESTIMATING SOIL MOISTURE OVER BARE SOIL USING FULL-POLARIMETRIC ALOS-2 DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sekertekin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR imaging system is one of the most effective way for Earth observation. The aim of this study is to present the preliminary results about estimating soil moisture using L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR data. Full-polarimetric (HH, HV, VV, VH ALOS-2 data, acquired on 22.04.2016 with the incidence angle of 30.4o, were used in the study. Simultaneously with the SAR acquisition, in-situ soil moisture samples over bare agricultural lands were collected and evaluated using gravimetric method. Backscattering coefficients for all polarizations were obtained and linear regression analysis was carried out with in situ moisture measurements. The best correlation coefficient was observed with VV polarization. Cross-polarized backscattering coefficients were not so sensitive to soil moisture content. In the study, it was observed that soil moisture maps can be retrieved with the accuracy about 14% (RMSE.

  5. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugathan, Neena; Biju, V.; Renuka, G.

    2014-06-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76°59'E longitude and 8°29'N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  6. Influence of soil moisture content on surface albedo and soil thermal parameters at a tropical station

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neena Sugathan; V Biju; G Renuka

    2014-07-01

    Half hourly data of soil moisture content, soil temperature, solar irradiance, and reflectance are measured during April 2010 to March 2011 at a tropical station, viz., Astronomical Observatory, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India (76° 59’E longitude and 8°29’N latitude). The monthly, seasonal and seasonal mean diurnal variation of soil moisture content is analyzed in detail and is correlated with the rainfall measured at the same site during the period of study. The large variability in the soil moisture content is attributed to the rainfall during all the seasons and also to the evaporation/movement of water to deeper layers. The relationship of surface albedo on soil moisture content on different time scales are studied and the influence of solar elevation angle and cloud cover are also investigated. Surface albedo is found to fall exponentially with increase in soil moisture content. Soil thermal diffusivity and soil thermal conductivity are also estimated from the subsoil temperature profile. Log normal dependence of thermal diffusivity and power law dependence of thermal conductivity on soil moisture content are confirmed.

  7. GCOM-W soil moisture and temperature algorithms and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passive microwave remote sensing of soil moisture has matured over the past decade as a result of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR) program of JAXA. This program has resulted in improved algorithms that have been supported by rigorous validation. Access to the products and the valida...

  8. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission Status and Science Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Njoku, Eni; Entin, Jared K.

    2016-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory was launched January 31, 2015, and its L-band radiometer and radar instruments became operational since mid-April 2015. The SMAP radiometer has been operating flawlessly, but the radar transmitter ceased operation on July 7. This paper provides a status summary of the calibration and validation of the SMAP instruments and the quality assessment of its soil moisture and freeze/thaw products. Since the loss of the radar in July, the SMAP project has been conducting two parallel activities to enhance the resolution of soil moisture products. One of them explores the Backus Gilbert optimum interpolation and de-convolution techniques based on the oversampling characteristics of the SMAP radiometer. The other investigates the disaggregation of the SMAP radiometer data using the European Space Agency's Sentinel-1 C-band synthetic radar data to obtain soil moisture products at about 1 to 3 kilometers resolution. In addition, SMAP's L-band data have found many new applications, including vegetation opacity, ocean surface salinity and hurricane ocean surface wind mapping. Highlights of these new applications will be provided.

  9. An adaptive ensemble Kalman filter for soil moisture data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    In a 19-year twin experiment for the Red-Arkansas river basin we assimilate synthetic surface soil moisture retrievals into the NASA Catchment land surface model. We demonstrate how poorly specified model and observation error parameters affect the quality of the assimilation products. In particul...

  10. Recent advances in (soil moisture) triple collocation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, A.; Su, C.-H.; Zwieback, S.; Crow, W.; Dorigo, W.; Wagner, W.

    2016-03-01

    To date, triple collocation (TC) analysis is one of the most important methods for the global-scale evaluation of remotely sensed soil moisture data sets. In this study we review existing implementations of soil moisture TC analysis as well as investigations of the assumptions underlying the method. Different notations that are used to formulate the TC problem are shown to be mathematically identical. While many studies have investigated issues related to possible violations of the underlying assumptions, only few TC modifications have been proposed to mitigate the impact of these violations. Moreover, assumptions, which are often understood as a limitation that is unique to TC analysis are shown to be common also to other conventional performance metrics. Noteworthy advances in TC analysis have been made in the way error estimates are being presented by moving from the investigation of absolute error variance estimates to the investigation of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) metrics. Here we review existing error presentations and propose the combined investigation of the SNR (expressed in logarithmic units), the unscaled error variances, and the soil moisture sensitivities of the data sets as an optimal strategy for the evaluation of remotely-sensed soil moisture data sets.

  11. Combining modelled and remote sensing soil moisture anomalies for an operational global drought monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammalleri, Carmelo; Vogt, Jürgen

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture anomalies (i.e., deviations from the climatology) are often seen as a reliable tool to monitor and quantify the occurrence of drought events and their potential impacts, especially in agricultural and naturally vegetated lands. Soil moisture datasets (or their proxy) can be derived from a variety of sources, including land-surface models and thermal and microwave satellite remote sensing images. However, each data source has different advantages and drawbacks that prevent to unequivocally prefer one dataset over the others, especially in global applications that encompass a wide range of soil moisture regimes. The analysis of the spatial reliability of the different datasets at global scale is further complicated by the lack of reliable long-term soil moisture records for a ground validation over most regions. To overcome this limitation, in recent years the Triple Collocation (TC) technique has been deployed in order to quantify the likely errors associated to three mutually-independent datasets without assuming that one of them represents the "truth". In this study, three global datasets of soil moisture anomalies are investigated: the first one derived from the runs of the Lisflood hydrological model, the second one obtained from the combined active/passive microwave dataset produced in the framework of the European Space Agency (ESA) Climate Change Initiative (CCI), and the last one derived from the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Land Surface Temperature (LST) observations. A preliminary analysis of the three datasets aimed at detecting the areas where the TC technique can be successfully applied, hence the spatial distribution of the random error variance for each model is evaluated. This study allows providing useful advises for a robust combination of the three datasets into a single product for a more reliable global drought monitoring.

  12. The Impact of Local Acquisition Time on the Accuracy of Microwave Surface Soil Moisture Retrievals over the Contiguous United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangni Lei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Satellite-derived soil moisture products have become an important data source for the study of land surface processes and related applications. For satellites with sun-synchronous orbits, these products are typically derived separately for ascending and descending overpasses with different local acquisition times. Moreover, diurnal variations in land surface conditions, and the extent to which they are accurately characterized in retrieval algorithms, lead to distinct systematic and random error characteristics in ascending versus descending soil moisture products. Here, we apply two independent evaluation techniques (triple collocation and direct comparison against sparse ground-based observations to quantify (correlation-based accuracy differences in satellite-derived surface soil moisture acquired at different local acquisition times. The orbits from different satellites are separated into two overpass categories: AM (12:00 a.m. to 11:59 a.m. Local Solar Time and PM (12:00 p.m. to 11:59 p.m. Local Solar Time. Results demonstrate how patterns in the accuracy of AM versus PM retrieval products obtained from a variety of active and passive microwave satellite sensors vary according to land cover and across satellite products with different local acquisition times.

  13. Examining moisture and temperature sensitivity of soil organic matter decomposition in a temperate coniferous forest soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Gabriel

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and moisture are primary environmental drivers of soil organic matter (SOM decomposition, and the development of a better understanding fo their roles in this process through depth in soils is needed. The objective of this research is to independently assess the roles of temperature and moisture in driving heterotrophic soil respiration for shallow and deep soils in a temperate red spruce forest. Minimally disturbed soil cores from shallow (0–25 cm and deep (25–50 cm layers were extracted from a 20 yr old red spruce stand and were then transferred to a climate chamber where they were incubated for 3 months under constant and diurnal temperature regimes. Soils were subjected to different watering treatments representing a full range of water contents. Temperature, moisture, and CO2 surface flux were assessed daily for all soils and continuously on a subset of the microcosms. The results from this study indicate that shallow soils dominate the contribution to surface flux (90% and respond more predictably to moisture than deep soils. An optimum moisture range of 0.15 to 0.60 water-filled pore space was observed for microbial SOM decomposition in shallow cores across which a relatively invariant temperature sensitivity was observed. For soil moisture conditions experienced by most field sites in this region, flux-temperature relationships alone can be used to reasonably estimate heterotrophic respiration, as in this range moisture does not alter flux, with the exception of rewetting events along the lower part of this optimal range. Outside this range, however, soil moisture determines SOM decomposition rates.

  14. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization, soil moisture and soil temperature on soil respiration during summer fallow season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Guo, Sheng-Li; Zou, Jun-Liang; Li, Ze; Zhang, Yan-Jun

    2011-11-01

    On the loess plateau, summer fallow season is a hot rainy time with intensive soil microbe activities. To evaluate the response of soil respiration to soil moisture, temperature, and N fertilization during this period is helpful for a deep understanding about the temporal and spatial variability of soil respiration and its impact factors, then a field experiment was conducted in the Changwu State Key Agro-Ecological Experimental Station, Shaanxi, China. The experiment included five N application rates: unfertilized 0 (N0), 45 (N45), 90 (N90), 135(N135), and 180 (N180) kg x hm(-2). The results showed that at the fallow stage, soil respiration rate significantly enhanced from 1.24 to 1.91 micromol x (m2 x s)(-1) and the average of soil respiration during this period [6.20 g x (m2 x d)(-1)] was close to the growing season [6.95 g x (m2 x d)(-1)]. The bivariate model of soil respiration with soil water and soil temperature was better than the single-variable model, but not so well as the three-factor model when explaining the actual changes of soil respiration. Nitrogen fertilization alone accounted for 8% of the variation soil respiration. Unlike the single-variable model, the results could provide crucial information for further research of multiple factors on soil respiration and its simulation.

  15. Soil Surface Sealing Effect on Soil Moisture at a Semiarid Hillslope: Implications for Remote Sensing Estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shai Sela

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Robust estimation of soil moisture using microwave remote sensing depends on extensive ground sampling for calibration and validation of the data. Soil surface sealing is a frequent phenomenon in dry environments. It modulates soil moisture close to the soil surface and, thus, has the potential to affect the retrieval of soil moisture from microwave remote sensing and the validation of these data based on ground observations. We addressed this issue using a physically-based modeling approach that accounts explicitly for surface sealing at the hillslope scale. Simulated mean soil moisture at the respective layers corresponding to both the ground validation probe and the radar beam’s typical effective penetration depth were considered. A cyclic pattern was found in which, as compared to an unsealed profile, the seal layer intensifies the bias in validation during rainfall events and substantially reduces it during subsequent drying periods. The analysis of this cyclic pattern showed that, accounting for soil moisture dynamics at the soil surface, the optimal time for soil sampling following a rainfall event is a few hours in the case of an unsealed system and a few days in the case of a sealed one. Surface sealing was found to increase the temporal stability of soil moisture. In both sealed and unsealed systems, the greatest temporal stability was observed at positions with moderate slope inclination. Soil porosity was the best predictor of soil moisture temporal stability, indicating that prior knowledge regarding the soil texture distribution is crucial for the application of remote sensing validation schemes.

  16. Validation and reconstruction of FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture using an artificial neural network based on reconstructed MODIS optical products over the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yaokui; Long, Di; Hong, Yang; Zeng, Chao; Zhou, Jie; Han, Zhongying; Liu, Ronghua; Wan, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in the exchange of water and energy between the land surface and the atmosphere, especially over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) which is climatically and hydrologically sensitive as the Earth's 'third pole'. Large-scale spatially consistent and temporally continuous soil moisture datasets are of great importance to meteorological and hydrological applications, such as weather forecasting and drought monitoring. The Fengyun-3B Microwave Radiation Imager (FY-3B/MWRI) soil moisture product is a relatively new passive microwave product, with the satellite being launched on November 5, 2010. This study validates and reconstructs FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture across the TP. First, the validation is performed using in situ measurements within two in situ soil moisture measurement networks (1° × 1° and 0.25° × 0.25°), and also compared with the Essential Climate Variable (ECV) soil moisture product from multiple active and passive satellite soil moisture products using new merging procedures. Results show that the ascending FY-3B/MWRI product outperforms the descending product. The ascending FY-3B/MWRI product has almost the same correlation as the ECV product with the in situ measurements. The ascending FY-3B/MWRI product has better performance than the ECV product in the frozen season and under the lower NDVI condition. When the NDVI is higher in the unfrozen season, uncertainty in the ascending FY-3B/MWRI product increases with increasing NDVI, but it could still capture the variability in soil moisture. Second, the FY-3B/MWRI soil moisture product is subsequently reconstructed using the back-propagation neural network (BP-NN) based on reconstructed MODIS products, i.e., LST, NDVI, and albedo. The reconstruction method of generating the soil moisture product not only considers the relationship between the soil moisture and NDVI, LST, and albedo, but also the relationship between the soil moisture and four-dimensional variations using the

  17. Radon diffusion coefficients in soils of varying moisture content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristodoulou, C.; Ioannides, K.; Pavlides, S.

    2009-04-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is generated in the Earth's crust and is free to migrate through soil and be released to the atmosphere. Due to its unique properties, soil gas radon has been established as a powerful tracer used for a variety of purposes, such as exploring uranium ores, locating geothermal resources and hydrocarbon deposits, mapping geological faults, predicting seismic activity or volcanic eruptions and testing atmospheric transport models. Much attention has also been given to the radiological health hazard posed by increased radon concentrations in the living and working environment. In order to exploit radon profiles for geophysical purposes and also to predict its entry indoors, it is necessary to study its transport through soils. Among other factors, the importance of soil moisture in such studies has been largely highlighted and it is widely accepted that any measurement of radon transport parameters should be accompanied by a measurement of the soil moisture content. In principle, validation of transport models in the field is encountered by a large number of uncontrollable and varying parameters; laboratory methods are therefore preferred, allowing for experiments to be conducted under well-specified and uniform conditions. In this work, a laboratory technique has been applied for studying the effect of soil moisture content on radon diffusion. A vertical diffusion chamber was employed, in which radon was produced from a 226Ra source, was allowed to diffuse through a soil column and was finally monitored using a silicon surface barrier detector. By solving the steady-state radon diffusion equation, diffusion coefficients (D) were determined for soil samples of varying moisture content (m), from null (m=0) to saturation (m=1). For dry soil, a D value of 4.1×10-7 m2s-1 was determined, which increased moderately by a factor of ~3 for soil with low moisture content, i.e. up to m ~0.2. At higher water fractions, a decrease

  18. Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge : Soil and Moisture Conservation Plan : 1972 Calendar Year

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is the Ottawa National Wildlife Refuge Soil and Moisture Conservation Plan. The Soil and Moisture Conservation Plan outlines the relationship between refuge...

  19. Soil moisture modelling of a SMOS pixel: interest of using the PERSIANN database over the Valencia Anchor Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Juglea

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS Calibration/Validation (Cal/Val activities, this study addresses the use of the PERSIANN-CCS1database in hydrological applications to accurately simulate a whole SMOS pixel by representing the spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the soil moisture fields over a wide area (50×50 km2. The study focuses on the Valencia Anchor Station (VAS experimental site, in Spain, which is one of the main SMOS Cal/Val sites in Europe.

    A faithful representation of the soil moisture distribution at SMOS pixel scale (50×50 km2 requires an accurate estimation of the amount and temporal/spatial distribution of precipitation. To quantify the gain of using the comprehensive PERSIANN database instead of sparsely distributed rain gauge measurements, comparisons between in situ observations and satellite rainfall data are done both at point and areal scale. An overestimation of the satellite rainfall amounts is observed in most of the cases (about 66% but the precipitation occurrences are in general retrieved (about 67%.

    To simulate the high variability in space and time of surface soil moisture, a Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT model – ISBA (Interactions between Soil Biosphere Atmosphere is used. The interest of using satellite rainfall estimates as well as the influence that the precipitation events can induce on the modelling of the water content in the soil is depicted by a comparison between different soil moisture data. Point-like and spatialized simulated data using rain gauge observations or PERSIANN – CCS database as well as ground measurements are used. It is shown that a good adequacy is reached in most part of the year, the precipitation differences having less impact upon the simulated soil moisture. The behaviour of simulated surface soil moisture at SMOS scale is verified by the use of remote sensing data from the Advanced

  20. Evaluating the Performance of a Soil Moisture Data Assimilation System for Agricultural Drought Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, E.; Crow, W. T.; Holmes, T. R.; Bolten, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Despite considerable interest in the application of land surface data assimilation systems (LDAS) for agricultural drought applications, relatively little is known about the large-scale performance of such systems and, thus, the optimal methodological approach for implementing them. To address this need, we evaluates a soil moisture assimilation system for agricultural drought monitoring by benchmarking each component of the system (i.e., a satellite soil moisture retrieval algorithm, a soil water balance model and a sequential data assimilation filter) against a series of linear models which perform the same function (i.e., have the same basic inputs/output) as the full component. Lagged soil moisture/NDVI correlations obtained using individual LDAS components versus their linear analogs reveal the degree to which non-linearities and/or complexities contained within each component actually contribute to the performance of the LDAS system as a whole. Here, a particular system based on surface soil moisture retrievals from the Land Parameter Retrieval Model (LPRM), a two-layer Palmer soil water balance model and an Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is benchmarked. Results suggest significant room for improvement in each component of the system. First, the non-linear LPRM retrieval algorithm does not appear to add much additional predictive information for future NDVI compared to the simple linear benchmark model comprised of initial AMSR-E observations (horizontally and vertically polarized brightness temperatures and surface temperature). Second, the Palmer model performed worse than the purely linear prognostic model (Antecedent Precipitation Index model) in predicting future vegetation condition. This result points out that the saturation threshold of soil layers in the modern LSMs for runoff generation hinders maximum utilization of meteorological input information for agricultural drought monitoring. As to the assimilation algorithm, better performance of the

  1. Observing and modeling links between soil moisture, microbes and CH4 fluxes from forest soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Jesper; Levy-Booth, David; Barker, Jason; Prescott, Cindy; Grayston, Sue

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is a key driver of methane (CH4) fluxes in forest soils, both of the net uptake of atmospheric CH4 and emission from the soil. Climate and land use change will alter spatial patterns of soil moisture as well as temporal variability impacting the net CH4 exchange. The impact on the resultant net CH4 exchange however is linked to the underlying spatial and temporal distribution of the soil microbial communities involved in CH4 cycling as well as the response of the soil microbial community to environmental changes. Significant progress has been made to target specific CH4 consuming and producing soil organisms, which is invaluable in order to understand the microbial regulation of the CH4 cycle in forest soils. However, it is not clear as to which extent soil moisture shapes the structure, function and abundance of CH4 specific microorganisms and how this is linked to observed net CH4 exchange under contrasting soil moisture regimes. Here we report on the results from a research project aiming to understand how the CH4 net exchange is shaped by the interactive effects soil moisture and the spatial distribution CH4 consuming (methanotrophs) and producing (methanogens). We studied the growing season variations of in situ CH4 fluxes, microbial gene abundances of methanotrophs and methanogens, soil hydrology, and nutrient availability in three typical forest types across a soil moisture gradient in a temperate rainforest on the Canadian Pacific coast. Furthermore, we conducted laboratory experiments to determine whether the net CH4 exchange from hydrologically contrasting forest soils responded differently to changes in soil moisture. Lastly, we modelled the microbial mediation of net CH4 exchange along the soil moisture gradient using structural equation modeling. Our study shows that it is possible to link spatial patterns of in situ net exchange of CH4 to microbial abundance of CH4 consuming and producing organisms. We also show that the microbial

  2. Investigating soil controls on soil moisture spatial variability: Numerical simulations and field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Zlotnik, Vitaly A.; You, Jinsheng; Shulski, Martha D.

    2015-05-01

    Due to its complex interactions with various processes and factors, soil moisture exhibits significant spatial variability across different spatial scales. In this study, a modeling approach and field observations were used to examine the soil control on the relationship between mean (θ bar) and standard deviation (σθ) of soil moisture content. For the numerical experiments, a 1-D vadose zone model along with van Genuchten parameters generated by pedotransfer functions was used for simulating soil moisture dynamics under different climate and surface conditions. To force the model, hydrometeorological and physiological data that spanned over three years from five research sites within the continental US were used. The modeling results showed that under bare surface conditions, different forms of the θ bar -σθ relationship as observed in experimental studies were produced. For finer soils, a positive θ bar -σθ relationship gradually changed to an upward convex and a negative one from arid to humid conditions; whereas, a positive relationship existed for coarser soils, regardless of climatic conditions. The maximum σθ for finer soils was larger under semiarid conditions than under arid and humid conditions, while the maximum σθ for coarser soils increased with increasing precipitation. Moreover, vegetation tended to reduce θ bar and σθ, and thus affected the θ bar -σθ relationship. A sensitivity analysis was also conducted to examine the controls of different van Genuchten parameters on the θ bar -σθ relationship under bare surface conditions. It was found that the residual soil moisture content mainly affected σθ under dry conditions, while the saturated soil moisture content and the saturated hydraulic conductivity largely controlled σθ under wet conditions. Importantly, the upward convex θ bar -σθ relationship was mostly caused by the shape factor n that accounts for pore size distribution. Finally, measured soil moisture data from a

  3. Impact of Direct Soil Moisture and Revised Soil Moisture Index Methods on Hydrologic Predictions in an Arid Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Milad Jajarmizadeh; Sobri bin Harun; Shamsuddin Shahid; Shatirah Akib; Mohsen Salarpour

    2014-01-01

    The soil and water assessment tool (SWAT) is a physically based model that is used extensively to simulate hydrologic processes in a wide range of climates around the world. SWAT uses spatial hydrometeorological data to simulate runoff through the computation of a retention curve number. The objective of the present study was to compare the performance of two approaches used for the calculation of curve numbers in SWAT, that is, the Revised Soil Moisture Index (SMI), which is based on previou...

  4. Sensitivity of soil moisture analyses to contrasting background and observation error scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Sabater, Joaquín; de Rosnay, Patricia; Albergel, Clément; Isaksen, Lars

    2017-04-01

    Soil moisture is a crucial variable for numerical weather prediction. Accurate, global initialization of soil moisture is obtained through data assimilation systems. However analyses depend largely on the way observations and background errors are defined. In this paper a wide range of short experiments with contrasted specification of the observation error and soil moisture background were conducted. As observations, screen-level variables and brightness temperatures from the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission were used. The region of interest was North America given the good availability of in-situ observations. The impact of these experiments on soil moisture and the atmospheric layer near the surface were evaluated. The results highlighted the importance of assimilating sensitive observations to soil moisture for air temperature and humidity forecasts. The benefits on the soil water content were more noticeable with increasing the SMOS observation error and with the introduction of soil texture dependency in the soil moisture background error.

  5. Sensitivity of LISEM predicted catchment discharge to initial soil moisture content of soil profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Sheikh; E. van Loon; R. Hessel; V. Jetten

    2010-01-01

    This study conducts a broad sensitivity analysis, taking into account the influence of initial soil moisture content in two soil layers, layer depths, event properties, and two infiltration models. A distributed hydrology and soil erosion model (LISEM) is used. Using the terrain data from the Catsop

  6. Rainfall estimation by inverting SMOS soil moisture estimates: a comparison of different methods over Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remote sensing of soil moisture has reached a level of maturity and accuracy for which the retrieved products can be used to improve hydrological and meteorological applications. In this study, the soil moisture product from the European Space Agency’s Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) is used...

  7. Pattern similarity based soil moisture analysis for three seasons on a steep hillslope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunhyung; Kim, Sanghyun

    2017-08-01

    Soil moisture is an important factor for understanding hydrological and solute transport processes at the hillslope scale. The selection of representative points for soil moisture measurement has been explored to investigate temporal variation of average soil moisture with minimum costs and maximum stability. The optimal selection of soil moisture monitoring points has been reevaluated to address hillslope hydrological processes and the impacts of seasonal differences. An alternative method to select soil moisture measurement points was developed to adequately represent immediate soil moisture response patterns to sequential rainfall events. To address the seasonal features of rainfall events and their impacts on soil moisture redistribution along the hillslope, field soil moisture data were collected at 49 points for three seasons over periods of 25 days with bi-hourly monitoring intervals. For effective characterization of soil moisture variation, soil moisture datasets were classified using cluster analysis based on Euclidean similarity. Points delineated using the proposed method not only provide better stability of average soil moistures but also adequately represent the response patterns of soil moisture to rainfall events on the hillslope.

  8. On the comparison between the LISFLOOD modelled and the ERS/SCAT derived soil moisture estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Laguardia

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the reliability of the soil moisture product obtained by means of the LISFLOOD hydrological model (De Roo et al., 2000, we compare it to soil moisture estimates derived from ERS scatterometer data (Wagner et al., 1999b.

    Once evaluated the effect of scale mismatch, we calculate the root mean square error and the correlation between the two soil moisture time series on a pixel basis and we assess the fraction of variance that can be explained by a set of input parameter fields that vary from elevation and soil depth to rainfall statistics and missing or snow covered ERS images.

    The two datasets show good agreement over large regions, with 90% of the area having a positive correlation coefficient and 66% having a root mean square error minor than 0.5 pF units. Major inconsistencies are located in mountainous regions such as the Alps or Scandinavia where both the methodologies suffer from insufficiently resolved land surface processes at the given spatial resolution, as well as from limited availability of satellite data on the one hand and the uncertainties in meteorological data retrieval on the other hand.

  9. Soil Moisture Content Monitoring Based on ERS Wind Scatterometer Data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian-ming; SHI Jian-cheng; SHAO Yun; LIU Wei

    2005-01-01

    The ERS-1/2 wind scatterometer (WSC) has a low resolution cell of about 50 km but provides a high repetition rate (<4 d) and can make measurements at multiple incidence angles. In order to estimate effective surface reflectivity (related to soil moisture content) over bare soil using WSC data, an original methodology based on the advance integral equation model (AIEM) is presented, which takes advantage of its multiple view angular characteristics. This method includes two steps. First, a simplified two-parameter surface scattering model is calibrated by AIEM simulated-database over a wide parameter space. Second, regression analyses are carried out using the simulated database to build the relation between those parameters of our model at different incident angles from two observations of Mid and Fore beams. From the model simulated database, our technique works quite well in estimating Γ0. The possibility of applying the model to retrieve soil moisture is investigated using a set of data collected from the Intensive Observation Period field campaign in 1998 of the Asian Monsoon Experiment Tibet (GAME-Tibet). The retrieved values obtained for the bare land surface are consistent with ground measurements collected in these areas and the correlation coefficient between retrieved soil moisture and the measured one reaches 0.65.

  10. Improving Estimates of Root-zone Soil Water Content Using Soil Hydrologic Properties and Remotely Sensed Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, D. C.; Miller, D. A.; Singha, K.; Davis, K. J.; Smithwick, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Newly defined relationships between remotely sensed soil moisture and soil hydraulic parameters were used to develop fine-scale (100 m) maps of root-zone soil moisture (RZSM) content at the regional scale on a daily time-step. There are several key outcomes from our research: (1) the first multi-layer regional dataset of soil hydraulic parameters developed from gSSURGO data for hydrologic modeling efforts in the Chequemegon Ecosystem Atmospheric Study (ChEAS) region, (2) the operation and calibration of a new model for estimating soil moisture flow through the root-zone at eddy covariance towers across the U.S. using remotely sensed active and passive soil moisture products, and (3) region-wide maps of estimated root-zone soil moisture content. The project links soil geophysical analytical approaches (pedotransfer functions) to new applications in remote sensing of soil moisture that detect surface moisture (~5 cm depth). We answer two key questions in soil moisture observation and prediction: (1) How do soil hydrologic properties of U.S. soil types quantitatively relate to surface-to-subsurface water loss? And (2) Does incorporation of fine-scale soil hydrologic parameters with remotely sensed soil moisture data provide improved hindcasts of in situ RZSM content? The project meets several critical research needs in estimation of soil moisture from remote sensing. First, soil moisture is known to vary spatially with soil texture and soil hydraulic properties that do not align well with the spatial resolution of current remote sensing products of soil moisture (~ 50 km2). To address this, we leveraged new advances in gridded soil parameter information (gSSURGO) together with existing remotely sensed estimates of surface soil moisture into a newly emerging semi-empirical modeling approach called SMAR (Soil Moisture Analytical Relationship). The SMAR model was calibrated and cross-validated using existing soil moisture data from a portion of AMERIFLUX tower sites and

  11. Sequential Ensembles Tolerant to Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR Soil Moisture Retrieval Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Hyoung Lee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to complicated and undefined systematic errors in satellite observation, data assimilation integrating model states with satellite observations is more complicated than field measurements-based data assimilation at a local scale. In the case of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR soil moisture, the systematic errors arising from uncertainties in roughness conditions are significant and unavoidable, but current satellite bias correction methods do not resolve the problems very well. Thus, apart from the bias correction process of satellite observation, it is important to assess the inherent capability of satellite data assimilation in such sub-optimal but more realistic observational error conditions. To this end, time-evolving sequential ensembles of the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF is compared with stationary ensemble of the Ensemble Optimal Interpolation (EnOI scheme that does not evolve the ensembles over time. As the sensitivity analysis demonstrated that the surface roughness is more sensitive to the SAR retrievals than measurement errors, it is a scope of this study to monitor how data assimilation alters the effects of roughness on SAR soil moisture retrievals. In results, two data assimilation schemes all provided intermediate values between SAR overestimation, and model underestimation. However, under the same SAR observational error conditions, the sequential ensembles approached a calibrated model showing the lowest Root Mean Square Error (RMSE, while the stationary ensemble converged towards the SAR observations exhibiting the highest RMSE. As compared to stationary ensembles, sequential ensembles have a better tolerance to SAR retrieval errors. Such inherent nature of EnKF suggests an operational merit as a satellite data assimilation system, due to the limitation of bias correction methods currently available.

  12. Soil Moisture Estimation Using MODIS Images (Case Study: Mashhad Plain Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fashaee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Numerous studies have been undertaken based on satellite imagery in order to estimate soil moisture using vegetation indices such as NDVI. Previous studies suffer from a restriction; these indices are not able to estimate where the vegetative coverage is low or where no vegetation exists. Hence, it is essential to develop a model which can overcome this restriction. Focus of this research is on estimation of soil moisture for low or scattered vegetative land covers. Trapezoidal temperature-vegetation (Ts~VI model is able to consider the status of soil moisture and vegetation condition. It can estimate plant water deficit for weak or no vegetation land cover. Materials and Methods: Moran proposed Water Deficit Index (WDI for evaluating field evapotranspiration rates and relative field water deficit for both full-cover and partially vegetated sites. The theoretical basis of this method is based on the energy balance equation. Penman-Monteith equation of energy balance was used to calculate the coordinates of the four vertices of the temperature-vegetation trapezoid also for four different extreme combinations of temperature and vegetation. For the (Ts−Ta~Vc trapezoid, four vertices correspond to 1 well-watered full-cover vegetation, 2 water-stressed full-cover vegetation, 3 saturated bare soil, and 4 dry bare soil. WDI is equal to 0 for well-watered conditions and equals to 1 for maximum stress conditions. As suggested by Moran et al. to draw a trapezoidal shape, some field measurements are required such as wind speed at the height of 2 meters, air pressure, mean daily temperature, vapor pressure-temperature curve slope, Psychrometrics constant, vapor pressure at mean temperature, vapor pressure deficit, external radiation, solar radiation of short wavelength, longwave radiation, net radiation, soil heat flux and air aerodynamic resistance is included. Crop vegetation and canopy resistance should be measured or estimated. The study

  13. Spatial Scaling Assessment of Surface Soil Moisture Estimations Using Remotely Sensed Data for Precision Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan Esfahani, L.; Torres-Rua, A. F.; Jensen, A.; McKee, M.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne and Landsat remote sensing are promising technologies for measuring the response of agricultural crops to variations in several agricultural inputs and environmental conditions. Of particular significance to precision agriculture is surface soil moisture, a key component of the soil water balance, which addresses water and energy exchanges at the surface/atmosphere interface and affects vegetation health. Its estimation using the spectral reflectance of agricultural fields could be of value to agricultural management decisions. While top soil moisture can be estimated using radiometric information from aircraft or satellites and data mining techniques, comparison of results from two different aerial platforms might be complicated because of the differences in spatial scales (high resolution of approximately 0.15m versus coarser resolutions of 30m). This paper presents a combined modeling and scale-based approach to evaluate the impact of spatial scaling in the estimation of surface soil moisture content derived from remote sensing data. Data from Landsat 7 ETM+, Landsat 8 OLI and AggieAirTM aerial imagery are utilized. AggieAirTM is an airborne remote sensing platform developed by Utah State University that includes an autonomous Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) which captures radiometric information at visual, near-infrared, and thermal wavebands at spatial resolutions of 0.15 m or smaller for the optical cameras and about 0.6 m or smaller for the thermal infrared camera. Top soil moisture maps for AggieAir and Landsat are developed and statistically compared at different scales to determine the impact in terms of quantitative predictive capability and feasibility of applicability of results in improving in field management.

  14. GLEAM v3: updated land evaporation and root-zone soil moisture datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Brecht; Miralles, Diego; Lievens, Hans; van der Schalie, Robin; de Jeu, Richard; Fernández-Prieto, Diego; Verhoest, Niko

    2016-04-01

    Evaporation determines the availability of surface water resources and the requirements for irrigation. In addition, through its impacts on the water, carbon and energy budgets, evaporation influences the occurrence of rainfall and the dynamics of air temperature. Therefore, reliable estimates of this flux at regional to global scales are of major importance for water management and meteorological forecasting of extreme events. However, the global-scale magnitude and variability of the flux, and the sensitivity of the underlying physical process to changes in environmental factors, are still poorly understood due to the limited global coverage of in situ measurements. Remote sensing techniques can help to overcome the lack of ground data. However, evaporation is not directly observable from satellite systems. As a result, recent efforts have focussed on combining the observable drivers of evaporation within process-based models. The Global Land Evaporation Amsterdam Model (GLEAM, www.gleam.eu) estimates terrestrial evaporation based on daily satellite observations of meteorological drivers of terrestrial evaporation, vegetation characteristics and soil moisture. Since the publication of the first version of the model in 2011, GLEAM has been widely applied for the study of trends in the water cycle, interactions between land and atmosphere and hydrometeorological extreme events. A third version of the GLEAM global datasets will be available from the beginning of 2016 and will be distributed using www.gleam.eu as gateway. The updated datasets include separate estimates for the different components of the evaporative flux (i.e. transpiration, bare-soil evaporation, interception loss, open-water evaporation and snow sublimation), as well as variables like the evaporative stress, potential evaporation, root-zone soil moisture and surface soil moisture. A new dataset using SMOS-based input data of surface soil moisture and vegetation optical depth will also be

  15. Global observation-based diagnosis of soil moisture control on land surface flux partition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Elvira, Belen; Taylor, Christopher M.; Harris, Phil P.; Ghent, Darren; Veal, Karen L.; Folwell, Sonja S.

    2016-04-01

    Soil moisture plays a central role in the partition of available energy at the land surface between sensible and latent heat flux to the atmosphere. As soils dry out, evapotranspiration becomes water-limited ("stressed"), and both land surface temperature (LST) and sensible heat flux rise as a result. This change in surface behaviour during dry spells directly affects critical processes in both the land and the atmosphere. Soil water deficits are often a precursor in heat waves, and they control where feedbacks on precipitation become significant. State-of-the-art global climate model (GCM) simulations for the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) disagree on where and how strongly the surface energy budget is limited by soil moisture. Evaluation of GCM simulations at global scale is still a major challenge owing to the scarcity and uncertainty of observational datasets of land surface fluxes and soil moisture at the appropriate scale. Earth observation offers the potential to test how well GCM land schemes simulate hydrological controls on surface fluxes. In particular, satellite observations of LST provide indirect information about the surface energy partition at 1km resolution globally. Here, we present a potentially powerful methodology to evaluate soil moisture stress on surface fluxes within GCMs. Our diagnostic, Relative Warming Rate (RWR), is a measure of how rapidly the land warms relative to the overlying atmosphere during dry spells lasting at least 10 days. Under clear skies, this is a proxy for the change in sensible heat flux as soil dries out. We derived RWR from MODIS Terra and Aqua LST observations, meteorological re-analyses and satellite rainfall datasets. Globally we found that on average, the land warmed up during dry spells for 97% of the observed surface between 60S and 60N. For 73% of the area, the land warmed faster than the atmosphere (positive RWR), indicating water stressed conditions and increases in sensible heat flux

  16. The moisture response of soil heterotrophic respiration: interaction with soil properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moyano, F E; Vasilyeva, N; Bouckaert, L

    2012-01-01

    Soil moisture is of primary importance for predicting the evolution of soil carbon stocks and fluxes, both because it strongly controls organic matter decomposition and because it is predicted to change at global scales in the following decades. However, the soil functions used to model the heter...... predictions of the response of soil carbon to future climate scenarios will require the integration of soil-dependent moisture-respiration functions coupled with realistic representations of soil water dynamics.......Soil moisture is of primary importance for predicting the evolution of soil carbon stocks and fluxes, both because it strongly controls organic matter decomposition and because it is predicted to change at global scales in the following decades. However, the soil functions used to model...... the heterotrophic respiration response to moisture have limited empirical support and introduce an uncertainty of at least 4% in global soil carbon stock predictions by 2100. The necessity of improving the representation of this relationship in models has been highlighted in recent studies. Here we present a data...

  17. Remotely sensed latent heat fluxes for improving model predictions of soil moisture: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Schuurmans

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates whether the use of remotely sensed latent heat fluxes improves the accuracy of spatially-distributed soil moisture predictions by a hydrological model. By using real data we aim to show the potential and limitations in practice. We use (i satellite data of both ASTER and MODIS for the same two days in the summer of 2006 that, in association with the Surface Energy Balance Algorithm for Land (SEBAL, provides us the spatial distribution of daily ETact and (ii an operational physically based distributed (25 m×25 m hydrological model of a small catchment (70 km2 in The Netherlands that simulates the water flow in both the unsaturated and saturated zone. Firstly, model outcomes of ETact are compared to the processed satellite data. Secondly, we perform data assimilation that updates the modelled soil moisture. We show that remotely sensed ETact is useful in hydrological modelling for two reasons. Firstly, in the procedure of model calibration: comparison of modeled and remotely sensed ETact together with the outcomes of our data assimilation procedure points out potential model errors (both conceptual and flux-related. Secondly, assimilation of remotely sensed ETact results in a realistic spatial adjustment of soil moisture, except for the area with forest and deep groundwater levels. As both ASTER and MODIS images were available for the same days, this study provides also an excellent opportunity to compare the worth of these two satellite sources. It is shown that, although ASTER provides much better insight in the spatial distribution of ETact due to its higher spatial resolution than MODIS, they appeared in this study just as useful.

  18. Improving Landslide Forecasting Using ASCAT-Derived Soil Moisture Data: A Case Study of the Torgiovannetto Landslide in Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Wagner

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Predicting the spatial and temporal occurrence of rainfall triggered landslides represents an important scientific and operational issue due to the high threat that they pose to human life and property. This study investigates the relationship between rainfall, soil moisture conditions and landslide movement by using recorded movements of a rock slope located in central Italy, the Torgiovannetto landslide. This landslide is a very large rock slide, threatening county and state roads. Data acquired by a network of extensometers and a meteorological station clearly indicate that the movements of the unstable wedge, first detected in 2003, are still proceeding and the alternate phases of quiescence and reactivation are associated with rainfall patterns. By using a multiple linear regression approach, the opening of the tension cracks (as recorded by the extensometers as a function of rainfall and soil moisture conditions prior the occurrence of rainfall, are predicted for the period 2007–2009. Specifically, soil moisture indicators are obtained through the Soil Water Index, SWI, a product derived by the Advanced SCATterometer (ASCAT on board the MetOp (Meteorological Operational satellite and by an Antecedent Precipitation Index, API. Results indicate that the regression performance (in terms of correlation coefficient, r significantly enhances if an indicator of the soil moisture conditions is included. Specifically, r is equal to 0.40 when only rainfall is used as a predictor variable and increases to r = 0.68 and r = 0.85 if the API and the SWI are used respectively. Therefore, the coarse spatial resolution (25 km of satellite data notwithstanding, the ASCAT SWI is found to be very useful for the prediction of landslide movements on a local scale. These findings, although valid for a specific area, present new opportunities for the effective use of satellite-derived soil moisture estimates to improve landslide forecasting.

  19. Soil Moisture Sensing via Swept Frequency Based Microwave Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg A. Holt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a need for low-cost, high-accuracy measurement of water content in various materials. This study assesses the performance of a new microwave swept frequency domain instrument (SFI that has promise to provide a low-cost, high-accuracy alternative to the traditional and more expensive time domain reflectometry (TDR. The technique obtains permittivity measurements of soils in the frequency domain utilizing a through transmission configuration, transmissometry, which provides a frequency domain transmissometry measurement (FDT. The measurement is comparable to time domain transmissometry (TDT with the added advantage of also being able to separately quantify the real and imaginary portions of the complex permittivity so that the measured bulk permittivity is more accurate that the measurement TDR provides where the apparent permittivity is impacted by the signal loss, which can be significant in heavier soils. The experimental SFI was compared with a high-end 12 GHz TDR/TDT system across a range of soils at varying soil water contents and densities. As propagation delay is the fundamental measurement of interest to the well-established TDR or TDT technique; the first set of tests utilized precision propagation delay lines to test the accuracy of the SFI instrument’s ability to resolve propagation delays across the expected range of delays that a soil probe would present when subjected to the expected range of soil types and soil moisture typical to an agronomic cropping system. The results of the precision-delay line testing suggests the instrument is capable of predicting propagation delays with a RMSE of +/−105 ps across the range of delays ranging from 0 to 12,000 ps with a coefficient of determination of r2 = 0.998. The second phase of tests noted the rich history of TDR for prediction of soil moisture and leveraged this history by utilizing TDT measured with a high-end Hewlett Packard TDR/TDT instrument to directly benchmark the

  20. The impact of model and rainfall forcing errors on characterizing soil moisture uncertainty in land surface modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Maggioni

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The contribution of rainfall forcing errors relative to model (structural and parameter uncertainty in the prediction of soil moisture is investigated by integrating the NASA Catchment Land Surface Model (CLSM, forced with hydro-meteorological data, in the Oklahoma region. Rainfall-forcing uncertainty is introduced using a stochastic error model that generates ensemble rainfall fields from satellite rainfall products. The ensemble satellite rain fields are propagated through CLSM to produce soil moisture ensembles. Errors in CLSM are modeled with two different approaches: either by perturbing model parameters (representing model parameter uncertainty or by adding randomly generated noise (representing model structure and parameter uncertainty to the model prognostic variables. Our findings highlight that the method currently used in the NASA GEOS-5 Land Data Assimilation System to perturb CLSM variables poorly describes the uncertainty in the predicted soil moisture, even when combined with rainfall model perturbations. On the other hand, by adding model parameter perturbations to rainfall forcing perturbations, a better characterization of uncertainty in soil moisture simulations is observed. Specifically, an analysis of the rank histograms shows that the most consistent ensemble of soil moisture is obtained by combining rainfall and model parameter perturbations. When rainfall forcing and model prognostic perturbations are added, the rank histogram shows a U-shape at the domain average scale, which corresponds to a lack of variability in the forecast ensemble. The more accurate estimation of the soil moisture prediction uncertainty obtained by combining rainfall and parameter perturbations is encouraging for the application of this approach in ensemble data assimilation systems.

  1. NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission Status and Science Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yueh, Simon; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Entin, Jared

    2017-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) observatory was launched January 31, 2015, and its L-band radiometer and radar instruments became operational during April 2015. This paper provides a summary of the quality assessment of its baseline soil moisture and freeze/thaw products as well as an overview of new products. The first new product explores the Backus Gilbert optimum interpolation based on the oversampling characteristics of the SMAP radiometer. The second one investigates the disaggregation of the SMAP radiometer data using the European Space Agency's Sentinel-1 C-band synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to obtain soil moisture products at about 1 to 3 km resolution. In addition, SMAPs L-band data have been found useful for many scientific applications, including depictions of water cycles, vegetation opacity, ocean surface salinity and hurricane ocean surface wind mapping. Highlights of these new applications will be provided.The SMAP soil moisture, freeze/taw state and SSSprovide a synergistic view of water cycle. For example, Fig.7 illustrates the transition of freeze/thaw state, change of soilmoisture near the pole and SSS in the Arctic Ocean fromApril to October in 2015 and 2016. In April, most parts ofAlaska, Canada, and Siberia remained frozen. Melt onsetstarted in May. Alaska, Canada, and a big part of Siberia havebecome thawed at the end of May; some freshwater dischargecould be found near the mouth of Mackenzie in 2016, but notin 2015. The soil moisture appeared to be higher in the Oband Yenisei river basins in Siberia in 2015. As a result,freshwater discharge was more widespread in the Kara Seanear the mouths of both rivers in June 2015 than in 2016. TheNorth America and Siberia have become completely thawedin July. After June, the freshwater discharge from other riversinto the Arctic, indicated by blue, also became visible. Thefreeze-up started in September and the high latitude regionsin North America and Eurasia became frozen. Comparing

  2. Multivariate hydrological data assimilation of soil moisture and groundwater head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donghua; Madsen, Henrik; Ridler, Marc E.; Kidmose, Jacob; Jensen, Karsten H.; Refsgaard, Jens C.

    2016-10-01

    Observed groundwater head and soil moisture profiles are assimilated into an integrated hydrological model. The study uses the ensemble transform Kalman filter (ETKF) data assimilation method with the MIKE SHE hydrological model code. The method was firstly tested on synthetic data in a catchment of less complexity (the Karup catchment in Denmark), and later implemented using data from real observations in a larger and more complex catchment (the Ahlergaarde catchment in Denmark). In the Karup model, several experiments were designed with respect to different observation types, ensemble sizes and localization schemes, to investigate the assimilation performance. The results showed the necessity of using localization, especially when assimilating both groundwater head and soil moisture. The proposed scheme with both distance localization and variable localization was shown to be more robust and provide better results. Using the same assimilation scheme in the Ahlergaarde model, groundwater head and soil moisture were successfully assimilated into the model. The hydrological model with assimilation showed an overall improved performance compared to the model without assimilation.

  3. Interactive Vegetation Phenology, Soil Moisture, and Monthly Temperature Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, R. D.; Walker, G. K.

    2015-01-01

    The time scales that characterize the variations of vegetation phenology are generally much longer than those that characterize atmospheric processes. The explicit modeling of phenological processes in an atmospheric forecast system thus has the potential to provide skill to subseasonal or seasonal forecasts. We examine this possibility here using a forecast system fitted with a dynamic vegetation phenology model. We perform three experiments, each consisting of 128 independent warm-season monthly forecasts: 1) an experiment in which both soil moisture states and carbon states (e.g., those determining leaf area index) are initialized realistically, 2) an experiment in which the carbon states are prescribed to climatology throughout the forecasts, and 3) an experiment in which both the carbon and soil moisture states are prescribed to climatology throughout the forecasts. Evaluating the monthly forecasts of air temperature in each ensemble against observations, as well as quantifying the inherent predictability of temperature within each ensemble, shows that dynamic phenology can indeed contribute positively to subseasonal forecasts, though only to a small extent, with an impact dwarfed by that of soil moisture.

  4. Impact of Direct Soil Moisture and Revised Soil Moisture Index Methods on Hydrologic Predictions in an Arid Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milad Jajarmizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The soil and water assessment tool (SWAT is a physically based model that is used extensively to simulate hydrologic processes in a wide range of climates around the world. SWAT uses spatial hydrometeorological data to simulate runoff through the computation of a retention curve number. The objective of the present study was to compare the performance of two approaches used for the calculation of curve numbers in SWAT, that is, the Revised Soil Moisture Index (SMI, which is based on previous meteorological conditions, and the Soil Moisture Condition II (SMCII, which is based on soil features for the prediction of flow. The results showed that the sensitive parameters for the SMI method are land-use and land-cover features. However, for the SMCII method, the soil and the channel are the sensitive parameters. The performances of the SMI and SMCII methods were analyzed using various indices. We concluded that the fair performance of the SMI method in an arid region may be due to the inherent characteristics of the method since it relies mostly on previous meteorological conditions and does not account for the soil features of the catchment.

  5. Multilayer soil model for improvement of soil moisture estimation using the small perturbation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kaijun; Zhou, Xiaobing; Fan, Yong

    2009-12-01

    A multilayer soil model is presented for improved estimation of soil moisture content using the first-order small perturbation method (SPM) applied to measurements of radar backscattering coefficient. The total reflection coefficient of the natural bare soil including volume scattering contribution is obtained using the multilayer model. The surface reflection terms in SPM model are replaced by the total reflection coefficient from the multilayer soil surface in estimating soil moisture. The difference between the modified SPM model and the original SPM surface model is that the modified SPM model includes both the surface scattering and the volumetric scattering of the natural bare soil. Both the modified SPM model and the original SPM model are tested in soil moisture retrievals using experimental microwave backscattering coefficient data in the literature. Results show that the mean square errors between the measured data and the values estimated by the modified SPM model from all samples are 5.2%, while errors from the original SPM model are 8.4%. This indicates that the capability of estimating soil moisture by the SPM model is improved when the surface reflection terms are replaced by the total reflection coefficients of multilayer soil model over bare or very sparsely vegetation covered fields.

  6. Round Robin evaluation of soil moisture retrieval models for the MetOp-A ASCAT Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Alexander; Paloscia, Simonetta; Santi, Emanuele; Notarnicola, Claudia; Pasolli, Luca; Smolander, Tuomo; Pulliainen, Jouni; Mittelbach, Heidi; Dorigo, Wouter; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2014-05-01

    Global soil moisture observations are crucial to understand hydrologic processes, earth-atmosphere interactions and climate variability. ESA's Climate Change Initiative (CCI) project aims to create a global consistent long-term soil moisture data set based on the merging of the best available active and passive satellite-based microwave sensors and retrieval algorithms. Within the CCI, a Round Robin evaluation of existing retrieval algorithms for both active and passive instruments was carried out. In this study we present the comparison of five different retrieval algorithms covering three different modelling principles applied to active MetOp-A ASCAT L1 backscatter data. These models include statistical models (Bayesian Regression and Support Vector Regression, provided by the Institute for Applied Remote Sensing, Eurac Research Viale Druso, Italy, and an Artificial Neural Network, provided by the Institute of Applied Physics, CNR-IFAC, Italy), a semi-empirical model (provided by the Finnish Meteorological Institute), and a change detection model (provided by the Vienna University of Technology). The algorithms were applied on L1 backscatter data within the period of 2007-2011, resampled to a 12.5 km grid. The evaluation was performed over 75 globally distributed, quality controlled in situ stations drawn from the International Soil Moisture Network (ISMN) using surface soil moisture data from the Global Land Data Assimilation System (GLDAS-) Noah land surface model as second independent reference. The temporal correlation between the data sets was analyzed and random errors of the the different algorithms were estimated using the triple collocation method. Absolute soil moisture values as well as soil moisture anomalies were considered including both long-term anomalies from the mean seasonal cycle and short-term anomalies from a five weeks moving average window. Results show a very high agreement between all five algorithms for most stations. A slight

  7. Regional soil moisture simulation for Shaanxi Province using SWAT model validation and trend analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The soil moisture in Shaanxi Province,a region with complex topography,is simulated using the distributed hydrological model Soil Water Assessment Tool(SWAT).Comparison and contrast of modeled and observed soil moisture show that the SWAT model can reasonably simulate the long-term trend in soil moisture and the spatiotemporal variability of soil moisture in the region.Comparisons to NCEP/NCAR and ERA40 reanalysis of soil moisture show that the trend of variability in soil moisture simulated by SWAT is more consistent with the observed.SWAT model results suggested that high soil moisture in surface soil layers appears in the southern Shaanxi with high vegetation cover,and the Qinling mountainous region with frequent orographic precipitation.In deeper soil layers,high soil moisture appears in the river basins and plains.The regional soil moisture showed a generally decreasing trend on all soil layers from 1951 to 2004,with a stronger and significant decreasing trend in deeper soil layers,especially in the northern parts of the province.

  8. Improvement of the Trapezoid Method Using Raw Landsat Image Digital Count Data for Soil Moisture Estimation in the Texas (USA High Plains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Shafian

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in soil moisture strongly affect surface energy balances, regional runoff, land erosion and vegetation productivity (i.e., potential crop yield. Hence, the estimation of soil moisture is very valuable in the social, economic, humanitarian (food security and environmental segments of society. Extensive efforts to exploit the potential of remotely sensed observations to help quantify this complex variable are ongoing. This study aims at developing a new index, the Thermal Ground cover Moisture Index (TGMI, for estimating soil moisture content. This index is based on empirical parameterization of the relationship between raw image digital count (DC data in the thermal infrared spectral band and ground cover (determined from raw image digital count data in the red and near-infrared spectral bands.The index uses satellite-derived information only, and the potential for its operational application is therefore great. This study was conducted in 18 commercial agricultural fields near Lubbock, TX (USA. Soil moisture was measured in these fields over two years and statistically compared to corresponding values of TGMI determined from Landsat image data. Results indicate statistically significant correlations between TGMI and field measurements of soil moisture (R2 = 0.73, RMSE = 0.05, MBE = 0.17 and AAE = 0.049, suggesting that soil moisture can be estimated using this index. It was further demonstrated that maps of TGMI developed from Landsat imagery could be constructed to show the relative spatial distribution of soil moisture across a region.

  9. Improvment of the Trapezoid Method Using Raw Landsat Image Digital Count Data for Soil Moisture Estimation in the Texas (usa) High Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafian, S.; Maas, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Variations in soil moisture strongly affect surface energy balances, regional runoff, land erosion and vegetation productivity (i.e., potential crop yield). Hence, the estimation of soil moisture is very valuable in the social, economic, humanitarian (food security) and environmental segments of society. Extensive efforts to exploit the potential of remotely sensed observations to help quantify this complex variable are ongoing. This study aims at developing a new index, the Thermal Ground cover Moisture Index (TGMI), for estimating soil moisture content. This index is based on empirical parameterization of the relationship between raw image digital count (DC) data in the thermal infrared spectral band and ground cover (determined from raw image digital count data in the red and near-infrared spectral bands).The index uses satellite-derived information only, and the potential for its operational application is therefore great. This study was conducted in 18 commercial agricultural fields near Lubbock, TX (USA). Soil moisture was measured in these fields over two years and statistically compared to corresponding values of TGMI determined from Landsat image data. Results indicate statistically significant correlations between TGMI and field measurements of soil moisture (R2 = 0.73, RMSE = 0.05, MBE = 0.17 and AAE = 0.049), suggesting that soil moisture can be estimated using this index. It was further demonstrated that maps of TGMI developed from Landsat imagery could be constructed to show the relative spatial distribution of soil moisture across a region.

  10. The benefits of using remotely sensed soil moisture in parameter identification of large-scale hydrological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karssenberg, D.; Wanders, N.; de Roo, A.; de Jong, S.; Bierkens, M. F.

    2013-12-01

    Large-scale hydrological models are nowadays mostly calibrated using observed discharge. As a result, a large part of the hydrological system that is not directly linked to discharge, in particular the unsaturated zone, remains uncalibrated, or might be modified unrealistically. Soil moisture observations from satellites have the potential to fill this gap, as these provide the closest thing to a direct measurement of the state of the unsaturated zone, and thus are potentially useful in calibrating unsaturated zone model parameters. This is expected to result in a better identification of the complete hydrological system, potentially leading to improved forecasts of the hydrograph as well. Here we evaluate this added value of remotely sensed soil moisture in calibration of large-scale hydrological models by addressing two research questions: 1) Which parameters of hydrological models can be identified by calibration with remotely sensed soil moisture? 2) Does calibration with remotely sensed soil moisture lead to an improved calibration of hydrological models compared to approaches that calibrate only with discharge, such that this leads to improved forecasts of soil moisture content and discharge as well? To answer these questions we use a dual state and parameter ensemble Kalman filter to calibrate the hydrological model LISFLOOD for the Upper Danube area. Calibration is done with discharge and remotely sensed soil moisture acquired by AMSR-E, SMOS and ASCAT. Four scenarios are studied: no calibration (expert knowledge), calibration on discharge, calibration on remote sensing data (three satellites) and calibration on both discharge and remote sensing data. Using a split-sample approach, the model is calibrated for a period of 2 years and validated for the calibrated model parameters on a validation period of 10 years. Results show that calibration with discharge data improves the estimation of groundwater parameters (e.g., groundwater reservoir constant) and

  11. [Effect of Biochar Application on Soil Aggregates Distribution and Moisture Retention in Orchard Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yan; Ji, Qiang; Zhao, Shi-xiang; Wang, Xu-dong

    2016-01-15

    Applying biochar to soil has been considered to be one of the important practices in improving soil properties and increasing carbon sequestration. In order to investigate the effects of biochar application on soil aggregates distribution and its organic matter content and soil moisture constant in different size aggregates, various particle-size fractions of soil aggregates were obtained with the dry-screening method. The results showed that, compared to the treatment without biochar (CK), the application of biochar reduced the mass content of 5-8 mm and soil aggregates at 0-10 cm soil horizon, while increased the content of 1-2 mm and 2-5 mm soil aggregates at this horizon, and the content of 1-2 mm aggregates significantly increased along with the rates of biochar application. The mean diameter of soil aggregates was reduced by biochar application at 0-10 cm soil horizon. However, the effect of biochar application on the mean diameter of soil aggregates at 10-20 cm soil horizon was not significant. Compared to CK, biochar application significantly increased soil organic carbon content in aggregates, especially in 1-2 mm aggregates which was increased by > 70% compared to CK. Both the water holding capacity and soil porosity were significantly increased by biochar application. Furthermore, the neutral biochar was more effective than alkaline biochar in increasing soil moisture.

  12. Towards the implementation of L-band Soil Moisture Brightness Temperatures in the Canadian Land Data Assimilation System (CaLDAS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Marco; Bilodeau, Bernard; Russell, Albert; Wang, Xihong; Belair, Stephane

    2016-04-01

    The Canadian Land Data Assimilation System (CaLDAS) currently runs in Environment Canada (EC) operations and provides the initial conditions for soil moisture and soil temperature to the High-Resolution Regional Deterministic Prediction System (HRDPS). Errors in screen-level temperature and dew-point temperature are used to analyze soil moisture and soil temperature. The observational gap in soil moisture is being alleviated by significant advances in remote sensing technologies specifically dedicated to the measurement of soil moisture. The Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite was launched by the European Space Agency (ESA) in November 2009 and has been providing global coverage of near-surface soil moisture every 3 days. In January 2015, the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite was launched by NASA, and similar to SMOS, is equipped with a passive radiometer measuring the soil emission in the highly sensitive L-band frequency. The land-surface modeling component within CaLDAS has been coupled to the CMEM (Community Microwave Emission Modeling Platform) microwave radiative transfer model to allow for the assimilation of L-band brightness temperatures (TB). This study reports upon a series of pre-operational experiments exploring how best to combine the traditional screen-level variables with the more direct measurements of soil moisture provided by SMOS and SMAP for a better analysis of the soil moisture state. The study period will be the warm season periods for 2014 and 2015 over North America. Analyzed soil moistures will be compared against in-situ monitoring networks, but the principal focus will be upon the impacts in numerical weather prediction (NWP) mode. EC's Regional Deterministic Prediction System (RDPS), with 10 km grid spacing, is the principal NWP guidance used by Meteorological Service of Canada forecasters in the 1-2 day range. CaLDAS will be run assimilating different configurations of screen-level data and SMOS/SMAP TBs to

  13. The Impact of Rainfall on Soil Moisture Dynamics in a Foggy Desert

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bonan; Wang, Lixin; Kaseke, Kudzai F.; Li, Lin; Seely, Mary K.

    2016-01-01

    Soil moisture is a key variable in dryland ecosystems since it determines the occurrence and duration of vegetation water stress and affects the development of weather patterns including rainfall. However, the lack of ground observations of soil moisture and rainfall dynamics in many drylands has long been a major obstacle in understanding ecohydrological processes in these ecosystems. It is also uncertain to what extent rainfall controls soil moisture dynamics in fog dominated dryland systems. To this end, in this study, twelve to nineteen months’ continuous daily records of rainfall and soil moisture (from January 2014 to August 2015) obtained from three sites (one sand dune site and two gravel plain sites) in the Namib Desert are reported. A process-based model simulating the stochastic soil moisture dynamics in water-limited systems was used to study the relationships between soil moisture and rainfall dynamics. Model sensitivity in response to different soil and vegetation parameters under diverse soil textures was also investigated. Our field observations showed that surface soil moisture dynamics generally follow rainfall patterns at the two gravel plain sites, whereas soil moisture dynamics in the sand dune site did not show a significant relationship with rainfall pattern. The modeling results suggested that most of the soil moisture dynamics can be simulated except the daily fluctuations, which may require a modification of the model structure to include non-rainfall components. Sensitivity analyses suggested that soil hygroscopic point (sh) and field capacity (sfc) were two main parameters controlling soil moisture output, though permanent wilting point (sw) was also very sensitive under the parameter setting of sand dune (Gobabeb) and gravel plain (Kleinberg). Overall, the modeling results were not sensitive to the parameters in non-bounded group (e.g., soil hydraulic conductivity (Ks) and soil porosity (n)). Field observations, stochastic modeling

  14. Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Data and Services at the NASA NSIDC DAAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon, Amanda; Jodha Singh Khalsa, Siri; Leslie, Shannon

    2016-04-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, launched on 31 January 2015, provides a capability for global mapping of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state with unprecedented accuracy, resolution, and coverage. The SMAP instrument includes both a radiometer and a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) operating at the L-band (1.20-1.41 GHz) and provides global coverage at the equator every 3 days. The SMAP mission will play a critical role in understanding the Earth's water and energy cycles, improving weather and climate forecasting, and developing disaster prediction and monitoring services. The NASA Distributed Active Archive Centers (DAACs) at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) and the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) are jointly distributing and supporting SMAP data products. The DAACs draw upon their unique expertise - NSIDC with cryospheric and remotely-sensed soil moisture data and ASF with SAR data - as well as their shared technologies to provide synergistic data access and support for SMAP products. NSIDC DAAC provides distribution and support of the SMAP Level-1 radiometer products, the Level-2 through Level-4 soil moisture products, the Level-3 freeze/thaw product, and the Level-4 carbon net ecosystem exchange product. By leveraging NASA Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) data systems, NSIDC DAAC provide data discovery, access, and visualization services for SMAP that are common across all NASA Earth science data archived at the DAACs. NSIDC DAAC also provides custom services aimed at meeting the unique needs of their SMAP user communities. This presentation strives to educate and expand the SMAP user community as well as engage with current and potential users for areas of opportunity in the support and services that NSIDC DAAC provides.

  15. Microwave remote sensing of soil moisture with vegetation effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsegaye, Teferi D.; Inguva, Ramarao; Lang, Roger H.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Fahsi, Ahmed; Coleman, Tommy L.; Tadesse, Wubishet; Rajbhandari, Narayan B.; Aburemie, Sunnie A.; de Matthaeis, Paolo

    1999-12-01

    The objectives of this study were: to examine the sensitivity of radar backscatter, to estimate soil moisture under a corn plot and to evaluate the effectiveness and sensitivity of a Radiative Transfer Model (RTM), adapted from the earlier work of Njoku and Kong, (1977) in predicting brightness temperature from a grass plot. Microwave radar measurements were collected from plots of different vegetation cover types, vegetation density, and moisture conditions during the Huntsville 1998 field experiment. A large amount of ground data on brightness temperatures, soil moisture, and vegetation characteristics (e.g., biomass, and water content) were collected. The experiments were conducted at Alabama A&M University's, Winfred Thomas Agricultural Research Station, located near Hazel Green, Alabama. Six plots, one 50 X 60 m smooth bare plot, one 50 X 60 m grass plot, and four 30 X 50 m corn plots at full, 2/3, 1/2, and 1/3 densities were used. Radar backscatter data were obtained from a ground based truck mounted radar operating at L, C, and X bands (1.6, 4.75, and 10 GHz) with four linear polarization HH, HV, VV, and VH and two incidence angles (15 and 45 degrees). Soil moisture values were determined using Water Content Reflectometry (WCR). Three types of soil temperature sensors (Infrared Thermometer, Thermistor, and a 4-sensor averaging thermocouple probes) were used. A discrete backscatter approach model and RTM were evaluated. Comparisons between model prediction and experimental observation for HH polarization indicated good agreement for a corn full plot. The direct-reflected scattering coefficient is found to be the most dominant term for both polarization and the backscatter is also highly sensitive to soil moisture. The trends in time variation of brightness temperature are in agreement with the experimental results and the numerical results are within a few percent of the experimental results. The vegetation corrections as estimated by the Jackson and Schmugge

  16. Remote Sensing Observations of Snow and Soil Moisture for Snowmelt Flood Predictions in the Red River of the North Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, S. E.; Jacobs, J. M.; Vuyovich, C.; Cho, E.; Restrepo, P. J.; Jia, X.; Cosh, M. H.; Deweese, M. M.; Connelly, B.; Buan, S.

    2015-12-01

    The northward-flowing Red River of the North Basin (RRB), located in eastern North Dakota and western Minnesota, is vulnerable to frequent floods due to its flat terrain and low permeability soil. A vast majority of floods in the basin occur during the snowmelt season, when the winter snowpack thaws and spring rains fall onto saturated soils. This causes the Red River to spill over shallow banks and across the floodplain. The region has sparse in situ observations of snow and soil moisture, making flood prediction in the RRB difficult. Remote sensing data can help to capture magnitude, timing, and spatial distribution of watershed scale snow, soil moisture, and snowmelt parameters in the RRB, which will allow for better characterization of the watershed's hydrologic state. This research examines snow water equivalent (SWE; from the AMSR-E, AMSR2, and SSM/I satellite instruments), soil moisture (from AMSR-E, SMOS, and SMAP), and snow covered area (SCA; from MODIS), along with modeled SWE and snow depth from NOAA's National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) SNOw Data Assimilation System (SNODAS). These data are compared with observations from local and federal snow surveys, NOHRSC Airborne Gamma Radiation Snow Survey Program flights, NOAA National Climate Data Center (NCDC) cooperative network sites, Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) Soil Climate Analysis Network (SCAN) sites, and the North Central River Forecast Center's (NCRFC) model states, in order to determine data quality as well as strengths and weaknesses of satellite observations for RRB flood forecasting. Future analyses will include evaluation of freeze/thaw state information from the Soil Moisture Active-Passive (SMAP) satellite, and explore the potential for flood forecasting improvement by updating state variables of the NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) operational forecasting models with remotely sensed fields.

  17. Repeated electromagnetic induction measurements for mapping soil moisture at the field scale: comparison with data from a wireless soil moisture monitoring network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Edoardo; Werban, Ulrike; Zacharias, Steffen; Pohle, Marco; Dietrich, Peter; Wollschläger, Ute

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic induction (EMI) methods are widely used for soil mapping, as they allow fast and relatively low-cost surveys of soil apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) at various scales. Soil ECa is well known to be influenced by both the volumetric content and the electrical conductivity (EC) of soil water, as well as by soil temperature and by the volume of the solid particles and their EC. Among other applications, EMI has become widely used to determine soil water content or to study hydrological processes within the field of hydrogeophysics. Although the use of non-invasive EMI for imaging soil spatial properties is very attractive, the dependence of ECa on several properties and states challenges any interpretation with respect to individual soil properties or states such as θ. The major aim of this study was to further investigate the potential of repeated EMI measurements to map soil moisture at the hillslope scale, with particular focus on the temporal variability of the spatial patterns of ECa and soil moisture, respectively, and on the stability of the ECa-soil moisture relationship over time. To this end, we compared time series of EMI measurements with high-resolution soil moisture data for a non-intensively managed hillslope area in the Schäfertal catchment (Central Germany) for which the spatial distribution of soil properties and soil water dynamics were known in detail. Soil water and temperature dynamics were observed in 40 soil profiles at hourly resolution during 14 months using a wireless monitoring network. During this period of time, ECa was mapped on seven occasions using an EM38-DD device. For the investigated site, ECa showed small temporal variations (ranging between 0 and 24 mS/m) whereas the temporal range of soil moisture was very large (from very dry to soil saturation). Furthermore, temporal changes of the spatial pattern of ECa differed from temporal changes of the spatial pattern of soil moisture. The ECa-soil moisture

  18. Soil moisture effects on the carbon isotope composition of soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claire L. Phillips; Nick Nickerson; David Risk; Zachary E. Kayler; Chris Andersen; Alan Mix; Barbara J. Bond

    2010-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition (δ13C) of recently assimilated plant carbon is known to depend on water-stress, caused either by low soil moisture or by low atmospheric humidity. Air humidity has also been shown to correlate with the δ13C of soil respiration, which suggests indirectly that recently fixed photosynthates...

  19. Microwave brightness temperature and thermal inertia - towards synergistic method of high-resolution soil moisture retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukowski, Mateusz; Usowicz, Boguslaw; Sagan, Joanna; Szlazak, Radoslaw; Gluba, Lukasz; Rojek, Edyta

    2017-04-01

    reasonable, as both variables, brightness temperature and thermal inertia, strongly depend on soil moisture. Despite the fact that the presented research focused on modelling in the small size, 4 ha test site, the method is promising for larger scales as well, due to similarities between ELBARA and SMOS and between pyrometer and satellite imaging spectrometers (Landsat, Sentinel etc.). The approach will merge advantages: high accuracy of passive microwave sensing with a good spatial resolution of thermal infrared methods. The work was partially funded under two ESA projects: 1) "ELBARA_PD (Penetration Depth)" No. 4000107897/13/NL/KML, funded by the Government of Poland through an ESA-PECS contract (Plan for European Cooperating States). 2) "Technical Support for the fabrication and deployment of the radiometer ELBARA-III in Bubnow, Poland" No. 4000113360/15/NL/FF/gp.

  20. Time series modeling of soil moisture dynamics on a steep mountainous hillside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanghyun

    2016-05-01

    The response of soil moisture to rainfall events along hillslope transects is an important hydrologic process and a critical component of interactions between soil vegetation and the atmosphere. In this context, the research described in this article addresses the spatial distribution of soil moisture as a function of topography. In order to characterize the temporal variation in soil moisture on a steep mountainous hillside, a transfer function, including a model for noise, was introduced. Soil moisture time series with similar rainfall amounts, but different wetness gradients were measured in the spring and fall. Water flux near the soil moisture sensors was modeled and mathematical expressions were developed to provide a basis for input-output modeling of rainfall and soil moisture using hydrological processes such as infiltration, exfiltration and downslope lateral flow. The characteristics of soil moisture response can be expressed in terms of model structure. A seasonal comparison of models reveals differences in soil moisture response to rainfall, possibly associated with eco-hydrological process and evapotranspiration. Modeling results along the hillslope indicate that the spatial structure of the soil moisture response patterns mainly appears in deeper layers. Similarities between topographic attributes and stochastic model structures are spatially organized. The impact of temporal and spatial discretization scales on parameter expression is addressed in the context of modeling results that link rainfall events and soil moisture.

  1. Soil moisture mapping at Bubnow Wetland using L-band radiometer (ELBARA III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukowski, Mateusz; Schwank, Mike; Szlązak, Radosław; Wiesmann, Andreas; Marczewski, Wojciech; Usowicz, Bogusław; Usowicz, Jerzy; Rojek, Edyta; Werner, Charles

    2016-04-01

    The study of soil moisture is a scientific challenge. Not only because of large diversity of soils and differences in their water content, but also due to the difficulty of measuring, especially in large scale. On this field of interest several methods to determine the content of water in soil exists. The basic and referential is gravimetric method, which is accurate, but suitable only for small spatial scales and time-consuming. Indirect methods are faster, but need to be validated, for example those based on dielectric properties of materials (e.g. time domain reflectometry - TDR) or made from distance (remote), like brightness temperature measurements. Remote sensing of soil moisture can be performed locally (from towers, drones, planes etc.) or globally (