WorldWideScience

Sample records for satellite simulation experiment

  1. Simulator design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerald R.

    1992-01-01

    This simulation design task completion report documents the simulation techniques associated with the network models of both the Interim Service ISDN (integrated services digital network) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures. The ISIS network model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communication satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete events simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  2. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) simulator development for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The simulation development associated with the network models of both the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and the Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) architectures is documented. The ISIS Network Model design represents satellite systems like the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) orbiting switch. The FSIS architecture, the ultimate aim of this element of the Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program, moves all control and switching functions on-board the next generation ISDN communications satellite. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design will be obtained from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models for their major subsystems. Discrete event simulation experiments will be performed with these models using various traffic scenarios, design parameters, and operational procedures. The data from these simulations will be used to determine the engineering parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite.

  3. Satellite hole formation during dewetting: experiment and simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, C; Seemann, R; Blossey, R; Becker, J; Grün, G

    2003-01-01

    The dewetting of thin polymer films on solid substrates has been studied extensively in recent years. These films can decay either by nucleation events or by spinodal dewetting, essentially only depending on the interface potential describing the short- and long-range intermolecular interactions between the interfaces and the initial film thickness. Here, we describe experiments and simulations concerned with the decay of polystyrene thin films. The rupture of the film occurs by the formation of a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') along the liquid rims accumulating at the channel borders. The development of this complex film rupture process, which is neither simply spinodal nor nucleation dewetting, can be mimicked precisely by making use of a novel simulation code based on a rigorous mathematical treatment of the thin film equation and on the knowledge of the effective interface potential of the system. The conditions that determine the appearance and the position of the satellite holes around ...

  4. Satellite hole formation during dewetting: experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, Chiara [Department of Applied Physics, University of Ulm, Albert Einstein Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Jacobs, Karin [Department of Applied Physics, University of Ulm, Albert Einstein Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Seemann, Ralf [Department of Applied Physics, University of Ulm, Albert Einstein Allee 11, D-89069 Ulm (Germany); Blossey, Ralf [Centre for Bioinformatics, Saarland University, PO Box 151150, D-66041 Saarbruecken (Germany); Becker, Juergen [Institute of Applied Mathematics, University of Bonn, Beringstrasse 6, D-53115 Bonn (Germany); Gruen, Guenther [Institute of Applied Mathematics, University of Bonn, Beringstrasse 6, D-53115 Bonn (Germany)

    2003-05-21

    The dewetting of thin polymer films on solid substrates has been studied extensively in recent years. These films can decay either by nucleation events or by spinodal dewetting, essentially only depending on the interface potential describing the short- and long-range intermolecular interactions between the interfaces and the initial film thickness. Here, we describe experiments and simulations concerned with the decay of polystyrene thin films. The rupture of the film occurs by the formation of a correlated pattern of holes ('satellite holes') along the liquid rims accumulating at the channel borders. The development of this complex film rupture process, which is neither simply spinodal nor nucleation dewetting, can be mimicked precisely by making use of a novel simulation code based on a rigorous mathematical treatment of the thin film equation and on the knowledge of the effective interface potential of the system. The conditions that determine the appearance and the position of the satellite holes around pre-existing holes are discussed.

  5. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  6. A satellite observation system simulation experiment for carbon monoxide in the lowermost troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, David P.; Arellano, Avelino F.; Deeter, Merritt N.

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of using observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) studies to help define quantitative trace gas measurement requirements for satellite missions and to evaluate the expected performance of proposed observing strategies. The 2007 U.S. National Research Council Decadal Survey calls for a geostationary (GEO) satellite mission for atmospheric composition and air quality applications (Geostationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events Mission (GEO-CAPE)). The requirement includes a multispectral (near-infrared and thermal infrared) measurement of carbon monoxide (CO) at high spatiotemporal resolution with information on lowermost troposphere concentration. We present an OSSE to assess the improvement in surface CO characterization that would result from the addition of a GEO-CAPE CO measurement to current low Earth orbit (LEO) thermal infrared-only measurements. We construct instrument simulators for these two measurement scenarios and study the case of July 2004 when wildfires in Alaska and Canada led to significant CO pollution over the contiguous United States. Compared to a control experiment, an ensemble-based data assimilation of simulated satellite observations in a global model leads to improvements in both the surface CO distributions and the time evolution of CO profiles at locations affected by wildfire plumes and by urban emissions. In all cases, an experiment with the GEO-CAPE CO measurement scenario (overall model skill of 0.84) performed considerably better than the experiment with the current LEO/thermal infrared measurement (skill of 0.58) and the control (skill of 0.07). This demonstrates the advantages of increased sampling from GEO and enhanced measurement sensitivity to the lowermost troposphere with a multispectral retrieval.

  7. NWP Impact of Cloud Top and Boundary Layer Winds from a Satellite Borne Lidar: an Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, R. G.; Grassotti, C.; Hoffman, R. N.; Mickelson, M.; Nehrkorn, T.; Louis, J.-F.

    1992-01-01

    Observing systems simulation experiments (OSSE's) provide a powerful tool to assess the impact of proposed satellite borne observing systems on meteorological applications models. We describe the results of an OSSE conducted to assess the impact of data from a low power lidar wind sensor on the forecast accuracy of a global spectral numerical weather prediction (NWP) model, the Air Force Geophysics Laboratory Global Data Assimilation System. The instrument would be operating at near-infrared wavelengths thereby increasing the backscatter signal relative to comparable infrared lidar.

  8. Advanced ISDN satellite designs and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The research performed by GTE Government Systems and the University of Colorado in support of the NASA Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program is summarized. Two levels of research were undertaken. The first dealt with providing interim services Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) satellite (ISIS) capabilities that accented basic rate ISDN with a ground control similar to that of the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The ISIS Network Model development represents satellite systems like the ACTS orbiting switch. The ultimate aim is to move these ACTS ground control functions on-board the next generation of ISDN communications satellite to provide full-service ISDN satellite (FSIS) capabilities. The technical and operational parameters for the advanced ISDN communications satellite design are obtainable from the simulation of ISIS and FSIS engineering software models of the major subsystems of the ISDN communications satellite architecture. Discrete event simulation experiments would generate data for analysis against NASA SCAR performance measure and the data obtained from the ISDN satellite terminal adapter hardware (ISTA) experiments, also developed in the program. The Basic and Option 1 phases of the program are also described and include the following: literature search, traffic mode, network model, scenario specifications, performance measures definitions, hardware experiment design, hardware experiment development, simulator design, and simulator development.

  9. A Regional CO2 Observing System Simulation Experiment for the ASCENDS Satellite Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. S.; Kawa, S. R.; Eluszkiewicz, J.; Baker, D. F.; Mountain, M.; Henderson, J.; Nehrkorn, T.; Zaccheo, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions) generated by the WRF-STILT Lagrangian transport model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution, in this case at 1 degree latitude x 1 degree longitude and weekly for North America. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the 1 degree x 1 degree, weekly scale, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50 percent, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 micron candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 micron wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada). Uncertainty reductions at the annual, biome scale range from 40 percent to 75 percent across our four instrument design cases, and from 65 percent to 85 percent for the continent as a whole. Our uncertainty

  10. A regional CO2 observing system simulation experiment for the ASCENDS Satellite Mission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. S. Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Top-down estimates of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 will benefit from the increasing measurement density brought by recent and future additions to the suite of in situ and remote CO2 measurement platforms. In particular, the planned NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS satellite mission will provide greater coverage in cloudy regions, at high latitudes, and at night than passive satellite systems, as well as high precision and accuracy. In a novel approach to quantifying the ability of satellite column measurements to constrain CO2 fluxes, we use a portable library of footprints (surface influence functions generated by the WRF-STILT Lagrangian transport model in a regional Bayesian synthesis inversion. The regional Lagrangian framework is well suited to make use of ASCENDS observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution, in this case at 1° latitude × 1° longitude and weekly for North America. We consider random measurement errors only, modeled as a function of mission and instrument design specifications along with realistic atmospheric and surface conditions. We find that the ASCENDS observations could potentially reduce flux uncertainties substantially at biome and finer scales. At the 1° × 1°, weekly scale, the largest uncertainty reductions, on the order of 50%, occur where and when there is good coverage by observations with low measurement errors and the a priori uncertainties are large. Uncertainty reductions are smaller for a 1.57 μm candidate wavelength than for a 2.05 μm wavelength, and are smaller for the higher of the two measurement error levels that we consider (1.0 ppm vs. 0.5 ppm clear-sky error at Railroad Valley, Nevada. Uncertainty reductions at the annual, biome scale range from ∼40% to ∼75% across our four instrument design cases, and from ∼65% to ∼85% for the continent as a whole. Our uncertainty reductions at various scales are

  11. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) network model for advanced satellite designs and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

    1991-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Network Model for Advanced Satellite Designs and Experiments describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top-down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ISDN modeling abstractions are added to permit the determination and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  12. Cibola flight experiment satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P.; Liddle, Doug; Paffett, John; Sweeting, Martin; Curiel, A.; Sun, Wei; Eves, Stuart

    2004-11-01

    In order to achieve an "economy of scale" with respect to payload capacity the major trend in telecommunications satellites is for larger and larger platforms. With these large platforms the level of integration between platform and payload is increasing leading to longer delivery schedules. The typical lifecycle for procurement of these large telecommunications satellites is now 3-6 years depending on the level of non-recurring engineering needed. Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL) has designed a low-cost platform aimed at telecommunications and navigation applications. SSTL's Geostationary Minisatellite Platform (GMP) is a new entrant addressing the lower end of the market with payloads up to 250kg requiring less than 1.5 kW power. The British National Space Centre through the MOSAIC Small Satellite Initiative supported the development of GMP. The main design goals for GMP are low-cost for the complete mission including launch and operations and a platform allowing flexible payload accommodation. GMP is specifically designed to allow rapid development and deployment with schedules typically between 1 and 2 years from contract signature to flight readiness. GMP achieves these aims by a modular design where the level of integration between the platform and payload is low. The modular design decomposes the satellite into three major components - the propulsion bay, the avionics bay and the payload module. Both the propulsion and avionics bays are reusable, largely unchanged, and independent of the payload configuration. Such a design means that SSTL or a 3rd party manufacturer can manufacture the payload in parallel to the platform with integration taking place quite late in the schedule. In July 2003 SSTL signed a contract for ESA's first Galileo navigation satellite known as GSTBV2/A. The satellite is based on GMP and ESA plan to launch it into a MEO orbit late in 2005. The second flight of GMP is likely to be in 2006 carrying a geostationary payload

  13. Simulation of Satellite Vibration Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettacchioli, Alain

    2014-06-01

    During every mechanical qualification test of satellites on vibrator, we systematically notice beating phenomena that appear every time we cross a mode's frequency. There could lead to an over-qualification of the tested specimen when the beating reaches a maximum and a under-qualification when the beating passes by a minimum. On a satellite, three lateral modes raise such a problem in a recurring way: the first structure mode (between 10 and 15 hertz) and the two tanks modes (between 35 and 50 hertz).To step forward in the resolution of this problem, we are developing a simulator which is based on the identification of the responses of the accelerometers that are fixed on the satellite and on the shaker slip table. The estimated transfer functions then allow to reconstruct at once the sensors response and the drive which generated them.For the simulation, we do not select all the sensors but only those on the slip table and those used to limit the input level (notching). We may also add those which were close to generate a notching.To perform its calculations, the simulator reproduces on one hand the unity amplitude signal (cola) which serves as frequency reference for the sweep achievement (generally 3 octaves per minute from 5 to 100 and even 150 Hertz), and on the other hand, the vibrator control loop. The drive amplitude is calculated at each cola's period by taking into account a compression factor. The control applied through the amplifier to the shaker coil is the product of this amplitude by the cola. The simulated measurements are updated at each sampling period thanks to the propagation of the identified model. The superposition of these curves on those supplied by real sensors during the tests allows to validate the simulation.Thereby, it seems possible to actively control the beatings thanks to a real-time corrector which uses these identifications.

  14. Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.T. Conti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Future space missions will involve satellites with great autonomy and stringent pointing precision, requiring of the Attitude Control Systems (ACS with better performance than before, which is function of the control algorithms implemented on board computers. The difficulties for developing experimental ACS test is to obtain zero gravity and torque free conditions similar to the SCA operate in space. However, prototypes for control algorithms experimental verification are fundamental for space mission success. This paper presents the parameters estimation such as inertia matrix and position of mass centre of a Satellite Attitude Control System Simulator (SACSS, using algorithms based on least square regression and least square recursive methods. Simulations have shown that both methods have estimated the system parameters with small error. However, the least square recursive methods have performance more adequate for the SACSS objectives. The SACSS platform model will be used to do experimental verification of fundamental aspects of the satellite attitude dynamics and design of different attitude control algorithm.

  15. CHINA LAUNCHES 2 SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT SATELLITES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    China placed 2 scientific experiment satellites into preset orbits atop a LM-4B launch vehicle on Sept. 9, 2004. A LM-4B blasted off at 7:14 am from Taiyuan Satellite Launch Center in Shanxi Province. Sources from the Xi'an Satellite Monitor and Control Center said that one satellite,

  16. Design of satellite flexibility experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, M. H.; Hillard, S. E.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary study has been completed to begin development of a flight experiment to measure spacecraft control/flexible structure interaction. The work reported consists of two phases: identification of appropriate structural parameters which can be associated with flexibility phenomena, and suggestions for the development of an experiment for a satellite configuration typical of near-future vehicles which are sensitive to such effects. Recommendations are made with respect to the type of data to be collected and instrumentation associated with these data. The approach consists of developing the equations of motion for a vehicle possessing a flexible solar array, then linearizing about some nominal motion of the craft. A set of solutions are assumed for array deflection using a continuous normal mode method and important parameters are exposed. Inflight and ground based measurements are distinguished. Interrelationships between these parameters, measurement techniques, and input requirements are discussed which assure minimization of special vehicle maneuvers and optimization of data to be obtained during the normal flight sequence.

  17. End-to-End Simulation for a Forest-Dedicated Full-Waveform Lidar Onboard a Satellite Initialized from Airborne Ultraviolet Lidar Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoxia Shang; Patrick Chazette

    2015-01-01

    In order to study forests at the global scale, a detailed link budget for a lidar system onboard satellite is presented. It is based on an original approach coupling airborne lidar observations and an end-to-end simulator. The simulator is initialized by airborne lidar measurements performed over temperate and tropical forests on the French territory, representing a wide range of forests ecosystems. Considering two complementary wavelengths of 355 and 1064 nm, the end-to-end simulator compute...

  18. Constraints on Anthropogenic NOx Emissions from Geostationary Satellite Observations in a Regional Chemical Data Assimilation System: Evaluation Using Observing System Simulation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Mizzi, A. P.; Anderson, J. L.; Fung, I. Y.; Cohen, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx=NO+NO2) control the tropospheric ozone (O3) budget, the abundance of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the formation of organic and inorganic nitrate aerosol, and therefore affect air quality and climate. There remain significant uncertainties in the processes responsible for NOx emissions and subsequent mixing and chemical removal. NOx has a short lifetime and its emissions show high spatiotemporal variability at urban scale. Future geostationary satellite instruments including TEMPO, GEMS and Sentinel-4 will provide hourly time resolution and high spatial resolution observations providing maps of NO2 on diurnal and local scales. Here we determine the extent to which a TEMPO like instrument can quantify urban-scale NOx emissions using a regional data assimilation (DA) system comprising of a chemical transport model, WRF-Chem, a TEMPO simulator and the DART Ensemble Adjustment Kalman Filter. We generate synthetic TEMPO observations by sampling from a nature run on an urban scale domain. We consider the effect of albedo, surface pressure, solar and viewing angles and a priori NO2 profiles on the TEMPO NO2 averaging kernel to achieve scene-dependent instrument sensitivity. We estimate NOx emissions using DART in a state augmentation approach by including NOx emissions in the state vector being analyzed. The ensemble-based statistical estimation of error correlations between concentrations and emissions are critical as they determine the impact of assimilated observations. We describe observing system simulation experiments to explore the optimal approach in the ensemble-based DA system to estimate hourly-resolved NOx emissions from TEMPO NO2 observations. Several case studies will be presented examining the role of covariance localization length and chemical perturbations on the success of the approach.

  19. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) hardware experiment development for advanced ISDN satellite designs and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Service Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Hardware Experiment Development for Advanced Satellite Designs describes the development of the ISDN Satellite Terminal Adapter (ISTA) capable of translating ISDN protocol traffic into Time Division Multiple Access (TDMA) signals for use by a communications satellite. The ISTA connects the Type 1 Network Termination (NT1) via the U-interface on the line termination side of the CPE to the RS-499 interface for satellite uplink. The same ISTA converts in the opposite direction the RS-499 to U-interface data with a simple switch setting.

  20. Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) hardware experiment design for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) Hardware Experiment Design for Advanced Satellite Designs describes the design of the ISDN Satellite Terminal Adapter (ISTA) capable of translating ISDN protocol traffic into time division multiple access (TDMA) signals for use by a communications satellite. The ISTA connects the Type 1 Network Termination (NT1) via the U-interface on the line termination side of the CPE to the V.35 interface for satellite uplink. The same ISTA converts in the opposite direction the V.35 to U-interface data with a simple switch setting.

  1. Network simulation experiments manual

    CERN Document Server

    Aboelela, Emad

    2011-01-01

    Network Simulation Experiments Manual, Third Edition, contains simulation-based experiments to help students and professionals learn about key concepts in computer networking. The simulation approach provides a virtual environment for a wide range of desirable features, such as modeling a network based on specified criteria and analyzing its performance under different scenarios. The experiments include the basics of using OPNET IT Guru Academic Edition; operation of the Ethernet network; partitioning of a physical network into separate logical networks using virtual local area networks (V

  2. Simulation - modeling - experiment; Simulation - modelisation - experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    After two workshops held in 2001 on the same topics, and in order to make a status of the advances in the domain of simulation and measurements, the main goals proposed for this workshop are: the presentation of the state-of-the-art of tools, methods and experiments in the domains of interest of the Gedepeon research group, the exchange of information about the possibilities of use of computer codes and facilities, about the understanding of physical and chemical phenomena, and about development and experiment needs. This document gathers 18 presentations (slides) among the 19 given at this workshop and dealing with: the deterministic and stochastic codes in reactor physics (Rimpault G.); MURE: an evolution code coupled with MCNP (Meplan O.); neutronic calculation of future reactors at EdF (Lecarpentier D.); advance status of the MCNP/TRIO-U neutronic/thermal-hydraulics coupling (Nuttin A.); the FLICA4/TRIPOLI4 thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling (Aniel S.); methods of disturbances and sensitivity analysis of nuclear data in reactor physics, application to VENUS-2 experimental reactor (Bidaud A.); modeling for the reliability improvement of an ADS accelerator (Biarotte J.L.); residual gas compensation of the space charge of intense beams (Ben Ismail A.); experimental determination and numerical modeling of phase equilibrium diagrams of interest in nuclear applications (Gachon J.C.); modeling of irradiation effects (Barbu A.); elastic limit and irradiation damage in Fe-Cr alloys: simulation and experiment (Pontikis V.); experimental measurements of spallation residues, comparison with Monte-Carlo simulation codes (Fallot M.); the spallation target-reactor coupling (Rimpault G.); tools and data (Grouiller J.P.); models in high energy transport codes: status and perspective (Leray S.); other ways of investigation for spallation (Audoin L.); neutrons and light particles production at intermediate energies (20-200 MeV) with iron, lead and uranium targets (Le Colley F

  3. End-to-End Simulation for a Forest-Dedicated Full-Waveform Lidar Onboard a Satellite Initialized from Airborne Ultraviolet Lidar Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxia Shang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to study forests at the global scale, a detailed link budget for a lidar system onboard satellite is presented. It is based on an original approach coupling airborne lidar observations and an end-to-end simulator. The simulator is initialized by airborne lidar measurements performed over temperate and tropical forests on the French territory, representing a wide range of forests ecosystems. Considering two complementary wavelengths of 355 and 1064 nm, the end-to-end simulator computes the performance of spaceborne lidar systems for different orbits. The analysis is based on forest structural (tree top height, quadratic mean canopy height and optical (forest optical thickness parameters. Although an ultraviolet lidar appears to be a good candidate for airborne measurements, our results show that the limited energy is not favorable for spaceborne missions with such a wavelength. A near infrared wavelength at 1064 nm is preferable, requiring ~100 mJ laser emitted energy, which is in agreement with current and future spaceborne missions involving a lidar. We find that the signal-to-noise ratio at the ground level to extract both the structural and optical parameters of forests must be larger than 10. Hence, considering the presence of clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere and assuming a stationary forest, a good detection probability of 99% can be reached when 4 or 5 satellite revisits are considered for a lidar system onboard the ISS or ICESat, respectively. This concerns ~90% of forest covers observed from the lidar, which have an optical thickness less than 3.

  4. LADEE Satellite Modeling and Simulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Michael; Cannon, Howard; Frost, Chad

    2011-01-01

    As human activity on and around the Moon increases, so does the likelihood that our actions will have an impact on its atmosphere. The Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE), a NASA satellite scheduled to launch in 2013, will orbit the Moon collecting composition, density, and time variability data to characterize the current state of the lunar atmosphere. LADEE will also test the concept of the "Modular Common Bus" spacecraft architecture, an effort to reduce both development time and cost by designing reusable, modular components for use in multiple missions with similar requirements. An important aspect of this design strategy is to both simulate the spacecraft and develop the flight code in Simulink, a block diagram-style programming language that allows easy algorithm visualization and performance testing. Before flight code can be tested, however, a realistic simulation of the satellite and its dynamics must be generated and validated. This includes all of the satellite control system components such as actuators used for force and torque generation and sensors used for inertial orientation reference. My primary responsibilities have included designing, integrating, and testing models for the LADEE thrusters, reaction wheels, star trackers, and rate gyroscopes.

  5. Laser Communication Experiments with Artemis Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzkov, Sergii; Sodnik, Zoran; Kuzkov, Volodymyr

    2013-10-01

    In November 2001, the European Space Agency (ESA) established the world-first inter-satellite laser communication link between the geostationary ARTEMIS satellite and the low Earth orbiting (LEO) SPOT-4 Earth observation satellite, demonstrating data rates of 50 Mbps. In 2006, the Japanese Space Agency launched the KIRARI (OICETS) LEO satellite with a compatible laser communication terminal and bidirectional laser communication links (50 Mbps and 2 Mbps) were successfully realized between KIRARI and ARTEMIS. ESA is now developing the European Data Relay Satellite (EDRS) system, which will use laser communication technology to transmit data between the Sentinel 1 and 2 satellites in LEO to two geostationary satellites (EDRS-A and EDRS-C) at data rates of 1.8 Gbps. As the data handling capabilities of state-of-the-art telecommunication satellites in GEO increase so is the demand for the feeder-link bandwidth to be transmitted from ground. This is why there is an increasing interest in developing high bandwidth ground-to-space laser communication systems working through atmosphere. In 2002, the Main Astronomical Observatory (MAO) started the development of its own laser communication system for its 0.7m AZT-2 telescope, located in Kyiv, Ukraine. The work was supported by the National Space Agency of Ukraine and by ESA. MAO developed a highly accurate computerized tracking system for AZT-2 telescope and a compact laser communication package called LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication Experiments with Satellites). The LACES instrument includes a camera of the pointing and tracking subsystems, a receiver module, a laser transmitter module, a tip/tilt atmospheric turbulence compensation subsystem, a bit error rate tester module and other optical and electronic components. The principal subsystems are mounted on a platform, which is located at the Cassegrain focus of the AZT-2 telescope. All systems were tested with the laser communication payload on-board ARTEMIS and

  6. A direct broadcast satellite-audio experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaisnys, Arvydas; Abbe, Brian; Motamedi, Masoud

    1992-03-01

    System studies have been carried out over the past three years at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) on digital audio broadcasting (DAB) via satellite. The thrust of the work to date has been on designing power and bandwidth efficient systems capable of providing reliable service to fixed, mobile, and portable radios. It is very difficult to predict performance in an environment which produces random periods of signal blockage, such as encountered in mobile reception where a vehicle can quickly move from one type of terrain to another. For this reason, some signal blockage mitigation techniques were built into an experimental DAB system and a satellite experiment was conducted to obtain both qualitative and quantitative measures of performance in a range of reception environments. This paper presents results from the experiment and some conclusions on the effectiveness of these blockage mitigation techniques.

  7. Application of Unscented Kalman Filter in Satellite Orbit Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dongming; CAI Zhiwu

    2006-01-01

    A new estimate method is proposed, which takes advantage of the unscented transform method, thus the true mean and covariance are approximated more accurately. The new method can be applied to non-linear systems without the linearization process necessary for the EKF, and it does not demand a Gaussian distribution of noise and what's more, its ease of implementation and more accurate estimation features enables it to demonstrate its good performance in the experiment of satellite orbit simulation. Numerical experiments show that the application of the unscented Kalman filter is more effective than the EKF.

  8. Plan of advanced satellite communication experiments using ETS-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi

    1989-01-01

    In 1992, an Engineering Test Satellite 6 is scheduled to be launched by an H-2 rocket. The missions of ETS-6 are to establish basic technologies of inter-satellite communications using S-band, millimeter waves and optical beams and of fixed and mobile satellite communications using multibeam antenna on board the satellite. A plan of the experiments is introduced.

  9. Satellite power system (SPS) public outreach experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNeal, S.R.

    1980-12-01

    To improve the results of the Satellite Power System (SPS) Concept Development and Evaluation Program, an outreach experiment was conducted. Three public interest groups participated: the L-5 Society (L-5), Citizen's Energy Project (CEP), and the Forum for the Advancement of Students in Science and Technology (FASST). Each group disseminated summary information about SPS to approximately 3000 constituents with a request for feedback on the SPS concept. The objectives of the outreach were to (1) determine the areas of major concern relative to the SPS concept, and (2) gain experience with an outreach process for use in future public involvement. Due to the combined efforts of all three groups, 9200 individuals/organizations received information about the SPS concept. Over 1500 receipients of this information provided feedback. The response to the outreach effort was positive for all three groups, suggesting that the effort extended by the SPS Project Division to encourage an information exchange with the public was well received. The general response to the SPS differed with each group. The L-5 position is very much in favor of SPS; CEP is very much opposed and FASST is relatively neutral. The responses are analyzed, and from the responses some questions and answers about the satellite power system are presented in the appendix. (WHK)

  10. Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) network model for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1992-01-01

    The Full Service Integrated Services Digital Network (FSIS) network model for advanced satellite designs describes a model suitable for discrete event simulations. A top down model design uses the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) as its basis. The ACTS and the Interim Service ISDN Satellite (ISIS) perform ISDN protocol analyses and switching decisions in the terrestrial domain, whereas FSIS makes all its analyses and decisions on-board the ISDN satellite.

  11. Observer-based Satellite Attitude Control and Simulation Researches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王子才; 马克茂

    2002-01-01

    Observer design method is applied to the realization of satellite attitude control law baaed on simplified control model. Exact mathematical model of the satellite attitude control system is also constructed, together with the observer-based control law, to conduct simulation research. The simulation results justify the effectiveness andfeasibility of the observer-based control method.

  12. Thermal Mapping Airborne Simulator for Small Satellite Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A high performance, inexpensive, airborne simulator that will serve as the prototype for a small satellite based imaging system capable of mapping thermal anomalies...

  13. 78 FR 63459 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products to the Department of Defense (DoD), and GPS simulator users, both government and DoD contractors...

  14. High-precision satellite relative-trajectory simulating servosystem for inter-satellite laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Liu, Liren; Luan, Zhu; Liu, Hongzhan; Xu, Rongwei

    2004-10-01

    Because PAT (pointing-acquisition-tracking) parameters and integrated technical specifications of laser communication terminals for inter-satellite link must be pre-verified and assessed thoroughly on a ground-based test-bed before launched into the space, it is necessary to develop a system as a primary part of the test bed to simulate the relative trajectory between the satellites. In this paper, an original high-precision satellite relative-trajectory simulating servosystem is introduced in detail as well as its structures and characteristics. The system is used to simulate the motion of relative-trajectory between satellites in different orbits. The principle of the system is to import the data of two satellites" orbits into a computer-based control system in advance. After processed and analyzed, the data is transformed into the angular displacement of the servomotor which drives the gimbal directly. The angular displacement of the two axes of the gimbal can simulate precisely the relative-trajectory, namely elevation angle and azimuth angle of the two satellites in communication. A laser communication terminal mounted on the gimbal then performs the PAT mechanisms to evaluate the system"s capacity.

  15. 78 FR 67132 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice..., 2013 Vol. 78 No. 206. This new meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply...

  16. 77 FR 70421 - GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-26

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Control Working Group Meeting AGENCY: Space and Missile Systems Center, Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate, Department of the Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: This meeting notice is to inform GPS simulator manufacturers, who supply products...

  17. Satellite broadcasting - The European experience and perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan

    1991-11-01

    The use of satellites is considered as a means for developing a European transnational broadcasting system with attention given to the control of technology. A tension is described between maintaining technology as the property of one nation when the DBSs are developed for multinational program broadcasting. The simultaneous development of satellite systems is theorized to lead eventually to a single merged program for a particular nation, and the effect is considered of the regulation of cross-holding and cross-selling systems by investors.

  18. Satellite image time series simulation for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tao

    2014-11-01

    The performance of environmental monitoring heavily depends on the availability of consecutive observation data and it turns out an increasing demand in remote sensing community for satellite image data in the sufficient resolution with respect to both spatial and temporal requirements, which appear to be conflictive and hard to tune tradeoffs. Multiple constellations could be a solution if without concerning cost, and thus it is so far interesting but very challenging to develop a method which can simultaneously improve both spatial and temporal details. There are some research efforts to deal with the problem from various aspects, a type of approaches is to enhance the spatial resolution using techniques of super resolution, pan-sharpen etc. which can produce good visual effects, but mostly cannot preserve spectral signatures and result in losing analytical value. Another type is to fill temporal frequency gaps by adopting time interpolation, which actually doesn't increase informative context at all. In this paper we presented a novel method to generate satellite images in higher spatial and temporal details, which further enables satellite image time series simulation. Our method starts with a pair of high-low resolution data set, and then a spatial registration is done by introducing LDA model to map high and low resolution pixels correspondingly. Afterwards, temporal change information is captured through a comparison of low resolution time series data, and the temporal change is then projected onto high resolution data plane and assigned to each high resolution pixel referring the predefined temporal change patterns of each type of ground objects to generate a simulated high resolution data. A preliminary experiment shows that our method can simulate a high resolution data with a good accuracy. We consider the contribution of our method is to enable timely monitoring of temporal changes through analysis of low resolution images time series only, and usage of

  19. Plan of advanced satellite communications experiment using ETS-VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Tadashi

    1988-01-01

    Communications Research Laboratory (CRL, Ministry of Posts and Telecommunications, Japan) has been engaged in development of three advanced satellite communication payloads aiming at experiments by Japan's 2-ton class Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI) which is to be launched in H-II rocket by NASDA in August 1992. CRL's three experimental systems are: (1) S-band inter-satellite communications; (2) millimeter-wave inter-satellite and personal-satellite communications; and (3) optical inter-satellite communications. CRL develops experimental optical communication system with telescope of 75 mm diameter which has gimbal mirror beam pointing/tracking mechanism. The onboard system has fundamental optical communication functions with laser diode transmitter of wavelength 0.83 micron, laser beam point-ahead mechanism, receiver of wavelength 0.51 micron, modulation/demodulation subsystem, and so on.

  20. A novel approach for simulating the optical misalignment caused by satellite platform vibration in the ground test of satellite optical communication systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Tan, Liying; Ma, Jing; Yu, Siyuan; Jiang, Yijun

    2012-01-16

    Satellite platform vibration causes the misalignment between incident direction of the beacon and optical axis of the satellite optical communication system, which also leads to the instability of the laser link and reduces the precision of the system. So how to simulate the satellite platform vibration is a very important work in the ground test of satellite optical communication systems. In general, a vibration device is used for simulating the satellite platform vibration, but the simulation effect is not ideal because of the limited randomness. An approach is reasonable, which uses a natural random process for simulating the satellite platform vibration. In this paper, we discuss feasibility of the concept that the effect of angle of arrival fluctuation is taken as an effective simulation of satellite platform vibration in the ground test of the satellite optical communication system. Spectrum characteristic of satellite platform vibration is introduced, referring to the model used by the European Space Agency (ESA) in the SILEX program and that given by National Aeronautics and Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. Spectrum characteristic of angle of arrival fluctuation is analyzed based on the measured data from an 11.16km bi-directional free space laser transmission experiment. Spectrum characteristic of these two effects is compared. The results show that spectra of these two effects have similar variation trend with the variation of frequency and feasibility of the concept is proved by the comparison results. At last the procedure of this method is proposed, which uses the power spectra of angle of arrival fluctuation to simulate that of the satellite platform vibration. The new approach is good for the ground test of satellite optical communication systems.

  1. Satellite Docking Simulator with Generic Contact Dynamics Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, O.; Crabtree, D.; Carr, R.; Gonthier, Y.; Martin, E.; Piedboeuf, J.-C.

    2002-01-01

    Satellite docking (and capture) systems are critical for the servicing or salvage of satellites. Satellite servicing has comparatively recently become a realistic and promising space operation/mission. Satellite servicing includes several of the following operations: rendezvous; docking (capturing); inspection; towing (transporting); refueling; refurbishing (replacement of faulty or "used-up" modules/boxes); and un-docking (releasing). Because spacecraft servicing has been, until recently non-feasible or non-economical, spacecraft servicing technology has been neglected. Accordingly, spacecraft designs have featured self- contained systems without consideration for operational servicing. Consistent with this view, most spacecrafts were designed and built without docking interfaces. If, through some mishap, a spacecraft was rendered non-operational, it was simply considered expendable. Several feasibility studies are in progress on salvaging stranded satellites (which, in fact had led to this project). The task of the designer of the docking system for a salvaging task is difficult. He/she has to work with whatever it is on orbit, and this excludes any special docking interfaces, which might have made his/her task easier. As satellite servicing becomes an accepted design requirement, many future satellites will be equipped with appropriate docking interfaces. The designer of docking systems will be faced with slightly different challenges: reliable, cost-effective, docking (and re-supply) systems. Thus, the role of designers of docking systems will increase from one of a kind, ad-hoc interfaces intended for salvaging operations, to docking systems for satellites and "caretaker" spacecraft which are meant for servicing and are produced in larger numbers. As in any space system (for which full and representative ground hardware test-beds are very expensive and often impossible to develop), simulations are mandatory for the development of systems and operations for

  2. GPS SATELLITE SIMULATOR SIGNAL ESTIMATION BASED ON ANN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Multi-channel Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite signal simulator is used to provide realistic test signals for GPS receivers and navigation systems. In this paper, signals arriving the antenna of GPS receiver are analyzed from the viewpoint of simulator design. The estimation methods are focused of which several signal parameters are difficult to determine directly according to existing experiential models due to various error factors. Based on the theory of Artificial Neural Network (ANN), an approach is proposed to simulate signal propagation delay,carrier phase, power, and other parameters using ANN. The architecture of the hardware-in-the-loop test system is given. The ANN training and validation process is described. Experimental results demonstrate that the ANN designed can statistically simulate sample data in high fidelity.Therefore the computation of signal state based on this ANN can meet the design requirement,and can be directly applied to the development of multi-channel GPS satellite signal simulator.

  3. Satellite Galaxies and Fossil Groups in the Millennium Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Sales, L V; Lambas, D G; White, S D M; Croton, D J

    2007-01-01

    We use a semianalytic galaxy catalogue constructed from the Millennium Simulation to study the satellites of isolated galaxies in the LCDM cosmogony. This sample (~80,000$ bright primaries, surrounded by ~178,000 satellites) allows the characterization, with minimal statistical uncertainty, of the dynamical properties of satellite/primary galaxy systems in a LCDM universe. We find that, overall, the satellite population traces the dark matter rather well: its spatial distribution and kinematics may be approximated by an NFW profile with a mildly anisotropic velocity distribution. Their spatial distribution is also mildly anisotropic, with a well-defined ``anti-Holmberg'' effect that reflects the misalignment between the major axis and angular momentum of the host halo. The isolation criteria for our primaries picks not only galaxies in sparse environments, but also a number of primaries at the centre of ''fossil'' groups. We find that the abundance and luminosity function of these unusual systems are in reaso...

  4. Laser experiments in light cloudiness with the geostationary satellite ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzkov, V.; Kuzkov, S.; Sodnik, Z.

    2016-08-01

    The geostationary satellite ARTEMIS was launched in July 2001. The satellite is equipped with a laser communication terminal, which was used for the world's first inter-satellite laser communication link between ARTEMIS and the low earth orbit satellite SPOT-4. Ground-to-space laser communication experiments were also conducted under various atmospheric conditions involving ESA's optical ground station. With a rapidly increasing volume of information transferred by geostationary satellites, there is a rising demand for high-speed data links between ground stations and satellites. For ground-to-space laser communications there are a number of important design parameters that need to be addressed, among them, the influence of atmospheric turbulence in different atmospheric conditions and link geometries. The Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine developed a precise computer tracking system for its 0.7 m AZT-2 telescope and a compact laser communication package LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication experiments with Satellites) for laser communication experiments with geostationary satellites. The specially developed software allows computerized tracking of the satellites using their orbital data. A number of laser experiments between MAO and ARTEMIS were conducted in partial cloudiness with some amount of laser light observed through clouds. Such conditions caused high break-up (splitting) of images from the laser beacon of ARTEMIS. One possible explanation is Raman scattering of photons on molecules of a water vapor in the atmosphere. Raman scattering causes a shift in a wavelength of the photons.In addition, a different value for the refraction index appears in the direction of the meridian for the wavelength-shifted photons. This is similar to the anomalous atmospheric refraction that appears at low angular altitudes above the horizon. We have also estimated the atmospheric attenuation and the influence of atmospheric turbulence on observed results

  5. A modeling and simulation of control system of satellite tracking platform an- tenna

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiaojun; GONG Lihong

    2012-01-01

    Based on the platform of mobile carrier satellite tracking has a wide range of applications. The paper adopts the advanced method of to step response identify, using the data obtained by the experiment model of high-speed acquisition, using the method of the least squares, finally the antenna control system model function was identified. Make use of integral separation algorithm, simu- link simulation and experiment analysis to set the control parameters of it. Stimulate the signal antenna control system under inter- fering. The experiment of the simulation experiment showed that the antenna control system model is stable with little error.

  6. Stratospheric dryness: model simulations and satellite observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lelieveld

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms responsible for the extreme dryness of the stratosphere have been debated for decades. A key difficulty has been the lack of comprehensive models which are able to reproduce the observations. Here we examine results from the coupled lower-middle atmosphere chemistry general circulation model ECHAM5/MESSy1 together with satellite observations. Our model results match observed temperatures in the tropical lower stratosphere and realistically represent the seasonal and inter-annual variability of water vapor. The model reproduces the very low water vapor mixing ratios (below 2 ppmv periodically observed at the tropical tropopause near 100 hPa, as well as the characteristic tape recorder signal up to about 10 hPa, providing evidence that the dehydration mechanism is well-captured. Our results confirm that the entry of tropospheric air into the tropical stratosphere is forced by large-scale wave dynamics, whereas radiative cooling regionally decelerates upwelling and can even cause downwelling. Thin cirrus forms in the cold air above cumulonimbus clouds, and the associated sedimentation of ice particles between 100 and 200 hPa reduces water mass fluxes by nearly two orders of magnitude compared to air mass fluxes. Transport into the stratosphere is supported by regional net radiative heating, to a large extent in the outer tropics. During summer very deep monsoon convection over Southeast Asia, centered over Tibet, moistens the stratosphere.

  7. Simulation of radiometer data from a spin stabilized satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangaswamy, S.

    1976-01-01

    The effect of misregistration on cloud brightness threshold is investigated by simulating radiometric data as observed from a spin stabilized synchronous satellite such as the SMS. Clouds were introduced randomly and a bidirectional reflectance model was used to create radiance data from clouds and ocean. A theoretical and an empirical reflectance model were compared.

  8. An experimental analysis for the impact of 3D variation assi- milation of satellite data on typhoon track simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Hongqin; WU Zengmao; GAO Shanhong

    2004-01-01

    A series of test simulations are performed to evaluate the impact of satellite-derived meteorological data on numerical typhoon track prediction. Geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS-5) and NOAA's TIROS operational vertical sounder (TOVS) observations are used in the experiments. A three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) assimilation scheme is developed to assimilate the satellite data directly into the Penn State-NCAR nonhydrostatic meteorological model (MM5). Three-dimensional objective analysis fields based on the T213 results and conventional observations are employed as the background fields of the initialization. The comparisons of the simulated typhoon tracks are carried out, which correspond respectively to assimilate different kinds of satellite data. It is found that, compared with the experiment without satellite data assimilation, the 3D-Var assimilation schemes lead to significant improvements on typhoon track prediction. Track errors reduce from approximately 25% at 24 h to approximately 30% at 48 h for 3D-Var assimilation experiments.

  9. US experiments flown on the Soviet satellite COSMOS 936

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, S. N.; Souza, K. A.

    1978-01-01

    Results of spaceborne experiments onboard the Cosmos 936 satellite are reported. Alterations in normal bone chemistry, muscle structure, and general physiology resulting from spaceflight are covered along with measurements of cosmic radiation and its potential hazard to man during prolonged spaceflights. Postflight activities involving the seven U.S. experiments are emphasized.

  10. Analysis of Satellite-Based Navigation Signal Reflectometry: Simulations and Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Benzon, Hans-Henrik; Høeg, Per; Durgonics, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    A new wave propagator that can be used to simulate global navigation satellite systems reflected signals from ocean surfaces is presented. The wave propagator simulates the characteristics of a bistatic scattering system. Simulated GPS ocean surface reflections will be presented and discussed based...... on the Hawaiian island of Maui. The GPS receiver was during the experiments running in an open-loop configuration. The analysis of both the simulated surface-reflection signals and the measured reflection signals will in general reveal spectral structures of the reflected signals that can lead to extraction...

  11. Integrated Cryogenic Satellite Communications Cross-Link Receiver Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanofsky, R. R.; Bhasin, K. B.; Downey, A. N.; Jackson, C. J.; Silver, A. H.; Javadi, H. H. S.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment has been devised which will validate, in space, a miniature, high-performance receiver. The receiver blends three complementary technologies; high temperature superconductivity (HTS), pseudomorphic high electron mobility transistor (PHEMT) monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), and a miniature pulse tube cryogenic cooler. Specifically, an HTS band pass filter, InP MMIC low noise amplifier, HTS-sapphire resonator stabilized local oscillator (LO), and a miniature pulse tube cooler will be integrated into a complete 20 GHz receiver downconverter. This cooled downconverter will be interfaced with customized signal processing electronics and integrated onto the space shuttle's 'HitchHiker' carrier. A pseudorandom data sequence will be transmitted to the receiver, which is in low Earth orbit (LEO), via the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) on a 20 GHz carrier. The modulation format is QPSK and the data rate is 2.048 Mbps. The bit error rate (BER) will be measured in situ. The receiver is also equipped with a radiometer mode so that experiment success is not totally contingent upon the BER measurement. In this mode, the receiver uses the Earth and deep space as a hot and cold calibration source, respectively. The experiment closely simulates an actual cross-link scenario. Since the receiver performance depends on channel conditions, its true characteristics would be masked in a terrestrial measurement by atmospheric absorption and background radiation. Furthermore, the receiver's performance depends on its physical temperature, which is a sensitive function of platform environment, thermal design, and cryocooler performance. This empirical data is important for building confidence in the technology.

  12. Advancements of in-flight mass moment of inertia and structural deflection algorithms for satellite attitude simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jonathan W.

    Experimental satellite attitude simulators have long been used to test and analyze control algorithms in order to drive down risk before implementation on an operational satellite. Ideally, the dynamic response of a terrestrial-based experimental satellite attitude simulator would be similar to that of an on-orbit satellite. Unfortunately, gravitational disturbance torques and poorly characterized moments of inertia introduce uncertainty into the system dynamics leading to questionable attitude control algorithm experimental results. This research consists of three distinct, but related contributions to the field of developing robust satellite attitude simulators. In the first part of this research, existing approaches to estimate mass moments and products of inertia are evaluated followed by a proposition and evaluation of a new approach that increases both the accuracy and precision of these estimates using typical on-board satellite sensors. Next, in order to better simulate the micro-torque environment of space, a new approach to mass balancing satellite attitude simulator is presented, experimentally evaluated, and verified. Finally, in the third area of research, we capitalize on the platform improvements to analyze a control moment gyroscope (CMG) singularity avoidance steering law. Several successful experiments were conducted with the CMG array at near-singular configurations. An evaluation process was implemented to verify that the platform remained near the desired test momentum, showing that the first two components of this research were effective in allowing us to conduct singularity avoidance experiments in a representative space-like test environment.

  13. Achievements of Space Scientific Experiments Aboard SJ-8 Satellite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jingchang; WAN Shixin; ZHANG Pu; LIN Hai; LIU Fang; HU Wenrui

    2008-01-01

    As scientific experiment payloads, microgravity experiments of fluid physics, life science,combustion science, physics and accelerator measurement were conducted on board the Chinese recoverable satellite SJ-8 during 18-day orbital flight. The experimental payloads and an experiment support system constituted the microgravity experiment system of the flight mission. This article has presented the briefs of the scientific achievements of these space experiments, the composition and performance of the Microgravity Experimental System (MES) and the general picture of the overall flight mission, respectively.

  14. A digitally implemented communications experiment utilizing the Hermes /CTS/ satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, H. D.; Fiala, J.

    1977-01-01

    Attention is given to an investigation being conducted by NASA-Lewis and Comsat Laboratories which uses the Hermes (CTS) satellite to explain digital link implementation and the advantages it provides over conventional analog systems. The experiment concentrates on developing several video, audio, and data digital communications techniques.

  15. A digitally implemented communications experiment utilizing the Hermes (CTS) satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, H. D.; Fiala, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The Hermes (CTS) experiment program made possible a significant effort directed toward new developments which will reduce the costs associated with the distribution of satellite services. Advanced satellite transponder technology and small inexpensive earth terminals were demonstrated as part of the Hermes program. Another system element that holds promise for reduced transmission cost is associated with the communication link implementation. An experiment is described which uses CTS to demonstrate digital link implementation and its advantages over conventional analog systems. A Digitally Implemented Communications experiment which demonstrates the flexibility and efficiency of digital transmission of television video and audio, telephone voice and high-bit-rate data is also described. Presentation of the experiment concept which concentrates on the evaluation of full-duplex digital television in the teleconferencing environment is followed by a description of unique equipment that was developed.

  16. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Senith Satellite System Using Current Geostationary Satellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX realizes accurate synchronization between an atomic clock at a ground station and the QZSS onboard crystal oscillator, reduces overall cost and satellite power consumption, as well as onboard weight and volume, and is expected to have a longer lifetime than a system with onboard atomic clocks. Since a QZSS does not yet exist, we have been conducting synchronization experiments using geostationary earth orbit satellites (JCSAT-1B or Intelsat-4 to confirm that RESSOX is an excellent system for timing synchronization. JCSAT-1B, the elevation angle of which is 46.5 degrees at our institute, is little affected by tropospheric delay, whereas Intelsat-4, the elevation angle of which is 7.9 degrees, is significantly affected. The experimental setup and the results of uplink experiments and feedback experiments using mainly Intelsat-4 are presented. The results show that synchronization within 10 ns is realized.

  17. Satellite broadcasting experiments and in-orbit performance of BSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoseko, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Kajikawa, M.; Arai, K.

    1981-09-01

    The Japanese medium-scale Broadcasting Satellite for Experimental Purposes (BSE) was launched in April 1978 and placed in a geostationary orbit at 110 deg E longitude. Two transmitters with bandwidths of 50 MHz and 80 MHz were mounted on the BSE transponder to conduct experiments on various television signals; no significant variation in transmission characteristics was observed during the two-year period. Rain attenuation characteristics in the 12 GHz band were studied and a value of 6.6 dB was registered in Owase, one of the most rainy areas in Japan. The strength of the rain scatter wave of the BSE uplink signal was measured to investigate the characteristics between broadcasting satellite uplink and a terrestrial link in the 14 GHz band. Uplink power control, important for the efficient operation of satellite communications systems, was shown to compensate the variations in receiving power due to fluctuations in the beam pointing of the satellite antenna. Routine operations were performed to check the three-axis attitude control, stationkeeping, housekeeping, and the bus equipment. The electrical power, secondary propulsion, thermal control, and communication subsystems were also evaluated. The first operations 1 broadcasting satellite is scheduled to be launched early in 1984.

  18. Radiofrequency testing of satellite segment of simulated 30/20 GHz satellite communications system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R. F.; Kerczewski, R.

    1985-01-01

    A laboratory communications system has been developed that can serve as a test bed for the evaluation of advanced microwave (30/20 GHz) components produced under NASA technology programs. The system will ultimately permit the transmission of a stream of high-rate (220 Mbps) digital data from the originating user, through a ground terminal, through a hardware-simulated satellite, to a receiving ground station, to the receiving user. This report contains the results of radiofrequency testing of the satellite portion of that system. Data presented include output spurious responses, attainable signal-to-noise ratios, a baseline power budget, usable frequency bands, phase and amplitude response data for each of the frequency bands, and the effects of power level variation.

  19. Simulation of Satellite Water Vapour Lidar Measurements: Performance Assessment under Real Atmospheric Conditions.

    OpenAIRE

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Behrendt, Andreas; Kiemle, Christoph; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Bauer, Heinz; Summa, Donato; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Ehret, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    A lidar simulator has been applied to assess the performances of a satellite water vapour differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. Measurements performed by the airborne Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) water vapour DIAL on 15 May 2002 during ESA’s Water Vapour Lidar Experiment (WALEX), in combination with MM5 mesoscale model output, were used to obtain backscatter and water vapour fields with high resolution and accuracy. These data and model output serve as input for the ...

  20. Small satellite attitude determination during plasma brake deorbiting experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurshid, Osama; Selkäinaho, Jorma; Soken, Halil Ersin; Kallio, Esa; Visala, Arto

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a study on attitude estimation during the Plasma Brake Experiment (PBE) onboard a small satellite. The PBE demands that the satellite be spun at a very high angular velocity, up to 200 deg/s, to deploy the tether using centrifugal force. The spin controller, based on purely magnetic actuation, and the PBE demands accurate attitude estimation for the successful execution of the experiment. The biases are important to be estimated onboard small satellites due to the closely integrated systems and relatively higher interference experienced by the sensors. However, bias estimation is even more important for PBE due to the presence of a high voltage unit, onboard the satellite, that is used to charge the tether and can be the source of interference. The attitude and the biases, when estimated simultaneously, results in an augmented state vector that poses a challenge to the proper tuning of process noise. The adaptation of process noise covariance has, therefore, been studied and analysed for the challenging PBE. It has been observed that adapting the process noise covariance improves the estimation accuracy during the spin-up phase. Therefore, it is very important to use adaptive process noise covariance estimation.

  1. From laboratory plasma experiments to space plasma experiments with `CubeSat' nano-satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christine

    2016-09-01

    `CubeSat' nano-satellites provide low-cost access to space. SP3 laboratory's involvement in the European Union `QB50' `CubeSat' project [www.qb50.eu] which will launch into space 50 `CubeSats' from 27 Countries to study the ionosphere and the lower thermosphere will be presented. The Chi Kung laboratory plasma experiment and the Helicon Double Layer Thruster prototype can be tailored to investigate expanding magnetized plasma physics relevant to space physics (solar corona, Earth's aurora, adiabatic expansion and polytropic studies). Chi Kung is also used as a plasma wind tunnel for ground-based calibration of the University College London QB50 Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer. Space qualification of the three Australian QB50 `CubeSats' (June 2016) is carried out in the WOMBAT XL space simulation chamber. The QB50 satellites have attitude control but altitude control is not a requirement. SP3 is developing end-to-end miniaturised radiofrequency plasma propulsion systems (such as the Pocket Rocket and the MiniHel thrusters with power and propellant sub-systems) for future `CubeSat' missions.

  2. A Virtual Environment for Satellite Modeling and Orbital Analysis in a Distributed Interactive Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    center of mass to the center of the earth. Interactive modification of the heading or pitch components of satellite orientation is not factored in to... satellite orientation and orientation by simulating thruster-firing activities. Both systems accept actual satellite telemetry for propagating models in the...model by applying rigid body dynamics. Model satellite sensor capabilities to determine FOV. Process actual satellite orientation data. _ __ Incorporate

  3. Laser Experiments with ARTEMIS Satellite in Cloudy Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzkov, Volodymyr; Sodnik, Zoran; Kuzkov, Sergii; Caramia, Vincenzo

    2014-05-01

    In July 2001, the ARTEMIS satellite with laser communication terminal OPALE on board was launched. 1789 laser communications sessions were performed between ARTEMIS and SPOT-4 (PASTEL) from 01 April 2003 to 09 January 2008 with total duration of 378 hours. In addition ESA's Optical Ground Station (OGS) performed laser communication experiments with OPALE in various atmospheric conditions. Since the launch of ARTEMIS, the amount of information handled by geostationary telecommunication satellites has increased dramatically and so has the demand for data rate that needs to be transmitted from ground. With limited bandwidth allocations in the radio frequency bands interest has grown for laser communication feeder link technology. In this respect there is interest to compare the influence of atmosphere conditions in different atmospheric regions with respect to laser transmission. Two locations are being compared, namely ESA's OGS (located in an altitude of 2400 m above sea level) and the Main Astronomical Observatory of Ukraine (MAO) (located at an altitude of 190 m above sea level). In 2002 MAO started the development of a ground laser communication system for the AZT-2 telescope. The MAO developed compact laser communication system is called LACES (Laser Atmosphere and Communication Experiments with Satellites) [1] and the work was supported by the National Space Agency of Ukraine and by ESA. The beacon laser from OPALE was occasionally detected even in cloudy conditions and an anomalous atmospheric refraction at low elevation angles was observed. The main results of laser experiments with ARTEMIS through clouds are presented in the paper.

  4. Application of Geostatistical Simulation to Enhance Satellite Image Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavka, Christine A.; Dungan, Jennifer L.; Thirulanambi, Rajkumar; Roy, David

    2004-01-01

    With the deployment of Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites that provide daily, global imagery, there is increasing interest in defining the limitations of the data and derived products due to its coarse spatial resolution. Much of the detail, i.e. small fragments and notches in boundaries, is lost with coarse resolution imagery such as the EOS MODerate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data. Higher spatial resolution data such as the EOS Advanced Spaceborn Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), Landsat and airborne sensor imagery provide more detailed information but are less frequently available. There are, however, both theoretical and analytical evidence that burn scars and other fragmented types of land covers form self-similar or self-affine patterns, that is, patterns that look similar when viewed at widely differing spatial scales. Therefore small features of the patterns should be predictable, at least in a statistical sense, with knowledge about the large features. Recent developments in fractal modeling for characterizing the spatial distribution of undiscovered petroleum deposits are thus applicable to generating simulations of finer resolution satellite image products. We will present example EOS products, analysis to investigate self-similarity, and simulation results.

  5. Recoiling DNA Molecule Simulation & Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Neto, J C; Mesquita, O N; Neto, Jose Coelho; Dickman, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    Many recent experiments with single DNA molecules are based on force versus extension measurements and involve tethering a microsphere to one of its extremities and the other to a microscope coverglass. In this work we show that similar results can also be obtained by studying the recoil dynamics of the tethered microspheres. Computer simulations of the corresponding Langevin equation indicate which assumptions are required for a reliable analysis of the experimental recoil curves. We have measured the persistence length A of single naked DNA molecules and DNA-Ethidium Bromide complexes using this approach.

  6. Scenarios and performance measures for advanced ISDN satellite design and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.

    1991-01-01

    Described here are the contemplated input and expected output for the Interim Service Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) Satellite (ISIS) and Full Service ISDN Satellite (FSIS) Models. The discrete event simulations of these models are presented with specific scenarios that stress ISDN satellite parameters. Performance measure criteria are presented for evaluating the advanced ISDN communication satellite designs of the NASA Satellite Communications Research (SCAR) Program.

  7. Simobiz-Simulation Tool to Study the Impact of Small Satellites in Mobile Market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlacu, M.-M.; Kohlenberg, J.; Prathaban, M.

    2008-08-01

    Interest in small satellites is growing fast world- wide. Businesses, governments, universities and other organizations around the world are starting their own small satellite programs. The surveys conducted by the space agencies and universities shows a promising increase in the use of small satellites for commercial applications. More number of operators offers or plans to offer mobile phone services by satellite. With the help of cost effective small satellite, mobile operators can be able to provide the services cheaper. Hence, it is always interesting to study the effect of low cost small satellite over the mobile market. In this article, we present SmartSim (Small Satellites Mobile Market Simulator) - the new module of Simobiz business simulation game, in which we have implemented two operators, a normal satellite operator and a nanosatellite operator, with specific terminals and services. Our main focus in this work is to understand the future market of small satellite in mobile telecommunication network.

  8. Optimal scan strategies for future CMB satellite experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wallis, Christopher G R; Battye, Richard A; Delabrouille, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The B-mode polarisation power spectrum in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) is about four orders of magnitude fainter than the CMB temperature power spectrum. Any instrumental imperfections that couple temperature fluctuations to B-mode polarisation must therefore be carefully controlled and/or removed. We investigate the role that a scan strategy can have in mitigating certain common systematics by averaging systematic errors down with many crossing angles. We present approximate analytic forms for the error on the recovered B-mode power spectrum that would result from differential gain, differential pointing and differential ellipticity for the case where two detector pairs are used in a polarisation experiment. We use these analytic predictions to search the parameter space of common satellite scan strategies in order to identify those features of a scan strategy that have most impact in mitigating systematic effects. As an example we go on to identify a scan strategy suitable for the CMB satellite pro...

  9. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna technology verification experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a key to reaching NASA's goal of developing high-risk, advanced communications technology using multiple frequency bands to support the nation's future communication needs. Using the multiple, dynamic hopping spot beams, and advanced on board switching and processing systems, ACTS will open a new era in communications satellite technology. One of the key technologies to be validated as part of the ACTS program is the multibeam antenna with rapidly reconfigurable hopping and fixed spot beam to serve users equipped with small-aperature terminals within the coverage areas. The proposed antenna technology experiments are designed to evaluate in-orbit ACTS multibeam antenna performance (radiation pattern, gain, cross pol levels, etc.).

  10. 77 FR 23668 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-20

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group Notice of Meeting AGENCY: The United States... Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Directorate will be hosting an open GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group (SSWG) meeting for manufacturers of GPS constellation simulators utilized by the federal...

  11. Snow, Ice, & Satellites: An Early Career Researcher's Experience with Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, A.; Scambos, T. A.

    2014-12-01

    As a doctoral student, I was lucky enough to be able to experiment with a variety of communication and outreach activities (classroom visits, museum events, science festivals, blogging, social media, etc.) to build communication skills and learn how to talk about my science without writing a journal article. More importantly, the wide range of experience helped me identify what worked for me. My favorite way to share my science now? Twitter. To many, Twitter is a frivolous platform for sharing snippets 140 characters or less. To me, however, it is how I can connect directly with the elusive "wider public" and share my science. Specifically, I use satellite imagery (mostly Landsat 8) to study glaciers around the world. I look at long-term change related to climate, and I also investigate new, innovative ways to use satellite imagery to better understand glaciers and ice sheets. Luckily for me, my research is very visual. Whether fieldwork snapshots or satellite data, images make for great, shareable, accessible tweets. In this presentation, I propose to share my experience of tweeting as an early career researcher. I will include successful strategies (e.g. particular #hashtags, creating new content, using story-telling, timely tweets), as well as some not-so-successful attempts. I will also talk about how I built my Twitter network. In addition to anecdotes, I will include evaluation of my Twitter activity using available metrics and analytics (e.g. followers, favorites, re-tweets, Klout score, etc.). While misunderstood by many in the scientific community, Twitter is a platform increasingly being adopted by researchers. Used correctly, it can be a great tool for connecting directly with an interested, non-technical audience eager to learn about your research. With my experiences and evaluation, I will show how both scientists and the networks that they join and create can benefit by using Twitter as a platform for science communication.

  12. NASA Operational Simulator for Small Satellites (NOS3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemerick, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The Simulation-to-Flight 1 (STF-1) CubeSat mission aims to demonstrate how legacy simulation technologies may be adapted for flexible and effective use on missions using the CubeSat platform. These technologies, named NASA Operational Simulator (NOS), have demonstrated significant value on several missions such as James Webb Space Telescope, Global Precipitation Measurement, Juno, and Deep Space Climate Observatory in the areas of software development, mission operationstraining, verification and validation (VV), test procedure development and software systems check-out. STF-1 will demonstrate a highly portable simulation and test platform that allows seamless transition of mission development artifacts to flight products. This environment will decrease development time of future CubeSat missions by lessening the dependency on hardware resources. In addition, through a partnership between NASA GSFC, the West Virginia Space Grant Consortium and West Virginia University, the STF-1 CubeSat will hosts payloads for three secondary objectives that aim to advance engineering and physical-science research in the areas of navigation systems of small satellites, provide useful data for understanding magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling and space weather, and verify the performance and durability of III-V Nitride-based materials.

  13. An experimenal analysis for the impact of 2D variation assimilation of satellite data on typhoon track simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Hongqin; Wu Zengmao; Gao Shanhong

    2003-01-01

    A series of test simulations are performed to evaluate the impact of satellite-derived meteorological data on numerical typhoon track prediction. Geostationary meteorological satellite (GMS-5) and NOAA's TIROS operational vertical sounder (TOVS) observations are used in the experiments. A twodimensional variation assimilation scheme is developed to assimilate the satellite data directly into the Penn State-NCAR nonhydrostatic meteorological model (MM5). Three-dimensional objective analyses fields based on T213 results and routine observations are employed as the background fields of the initialization. The comparisons of the simulated typhoon tracks are also carried out, which correspond respectively to the initialization scheme with two-dimensional variation (2D- Var), three-dimensional observational nudging and direct assimilation of satellite data. It is found that, comparing with the experiments without satellite data assimilation, the first two assimilation schemes lead to significant improvements on typhoon track prediction. Track errors reduce by 18% at 12 h for 2D- Var and from about 16% at 24 h to about 35% at 48 h for observational nudging. The simulated results based on assimilating different kinds of satellite data are also compared.

  14. COMSTAR satellite 19/29 GHz propagation experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloch, S. C.; Davidson, D.; Tang, D. D.

    1981-08-01

    Results and analysis are presented for the 19/29-GHz satellite propagation experiments using beacons aboard the COMSTAR series. Emphasis is on diversity performance of the Tampa, Florida, Triad and single-site attenuation distributions in intense rain, and on single-site performance at Waltham, Massachusetts. The substantial data base evolved to show a flattish tail on distributions due to rapid rate-of-change at onset and recovery; this type of distribution found in Tampa rain environment was not found in Waltham.

  15. Mechanical Contact Experiments and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical contact is studied under dynamic development by means of a combined numerical and experimental investigation. The experiments are designed to allow dynamical development of non-planar contact areas with significant expansion in all three directions as the load is increased. Different...... geometries and different materials are analyzed including contact between dissimilar materials. The numerical implementation is performed with a finite element computer program based on the irreducible flow formulation, and contact between deformable objects is modelled by applying the penalty method....... The overall investigation serves for testing and validating the numerical implementation of the mechanical contact, which is one of the main contributions to a system intended for 3D simulation of resistance welding. Correct modelling of contact between parts to be welded, as well as contact with electrodes...

  16. A review of satellite communication and propagation experiments for frequencies above 10 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setty, P. N. R.; Goessl, H.; Hounam, D.

    1983-02-01

    Satellite experiments aimed at improving communications in the higher frequency bands, especially above 10 GHz, are described. The basic types of transmission and measurement methods in these experiments are discussed, including beacon transmission, transmission from the ground with measurement on the ground.The satellite experiments considered include: ATS-5 millimeter wave propagation experiments; ATS-6 experiments at 13, 18, 20 and 30 GHz; Comstar experiments at 19 and 28 GHz; experiments with the CTS, ETS-II, SIRIO, CS, BSE, and OTS satellites. The payload parameters of the satellites are shown, and functional block diagrams for the ground terminals are presented.

  17. Bridging experiments, models and simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carusi, Annamaria; Burrage, Kevin; Rodríguez, Blanca

    2012-01-01

    Computational models in physiology often integrate functional and structural information from a large range of spatiotemporal scales from the ionic to the whole organ level. Their sophistication raises both expectations and skepticism concerning how computational methods can improve our understan...... that contributes to defining the specific aspects of cardiac electrophysiology the MSE system targets, rather than being only an external test, and that this is driven by advances in experimental and computational methods and the combination of both....... of biovariability; 2) testing and developing robust techniques and tools as a prerequisite to conducting physiological investigations; 3) defining and adopting standards to facilitate the interoperability of experiments, models, and simulations; 4) and understanding physiological validation as an iterative process...... understanding of living organisms and also how they can reduce, replace, and refine animal experiments. A fundamental requirement to fulfill these expectations and achieve the full potential of computational physiology is a clear understanding of what models represent and how they can be validated. The present...

  18. Medium-rate speech coding simulator for mobile satellite systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copperi, Maurizio; Perosino, F.; Rusina, F.; Albertengo, G.; Biglieri, E.

    1986-01-01

    Channel modeling and error protection schemes for speech coding are described. A residual excited linear predictive (RELP) coder for bit rates 4.8, 7.2, and 9.6 kbit/sec is outlined. The coder at 9.6 kbit/sec incorporates a number of channel error protection techniques, such as bit interleaving, error correction codes, and parameter repetition. Results of formal subjective experiments (DRT and DAM tests) under various channel conditions, reveal that the proposed coder outperforms conventional LPC-10 vocoders by 2 subjective categories, thus confirming the suitability of the RELP coder at 9.6 kbit/sec for good quality speech transmission in mobile satellite systems.

  19. GRGS simulations for a GRASP-like satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulot, David; Pollet, Arnaud; Biancale, Richard; Zoulida, Myriam; Loyer, Sylvain; Perosanz, Félix; Marty, Jean-Charles; Lemoine, Jean-Michel; Soudarin, Laurent; Capderou, Michel; Nahmani, Samuel; Deleflie, Florent; Mandea, Mioara

    2016-04-01

    GRASP (Geodetic Reference Antenna in SPace) is a spacecraft system designed to provide the needed data for an enduring and stable TRF (Terrestrial Reference Frame) for accurately measuring and understanding changes in global and regional sea levels, ice sheets and other elements of the dynamic Earth system. To reach the goals for the TRF realization of 1 mm accuracy and 0.1 mm/yr stability (GGOS, Meeting the Requirements of a Global Society on a Changing Planet in 2020, Plag and Pearlman, eds., 2009), GRASP would carry very precise sensor systems for all the key geodetic techniques used to define and monitor the TRF (DORIS, GNSS, SLR, and VLBI). In this study, we present the results obtained regarding the simulations carried out by the French GRGS (Groupe de Recherche de Géodésie Spatiale) for a GRASP-like satellite. First, we searched for the optimal orbit for such a geodetic mission with Genetic Algorithms (stochastic optimization). Then, with the best found orbit, we simulated the measurements of the four geodetic techniques (DORIS and SLR measurements to GRASP, VLBI PPP or interferometric measurements to GRASP, and GNSS measurements received from ground stations and from GRASP) over three years, and we evaluated the expected accuracy and stability of the TRF obtained with the processing of these measurements. Finally, we also investigated the expected impact of the on-board instrument calibration on the quality of the TRF.

  20. Attitude Determination with Magnetometers and Accelerometers to Use in Satellite Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Koiti Kuga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Attitude control of artificial satellites is dependent on information provided by its attitude determination process. This paper presents the implementation and tests of a fully self-contained algorithm for the attitude determination using magnetometers and accelerometers, for application on a satellite simulator based on frictionless air bearing tables. However, it is known that magnetometers and accelerometers need to be calibrated so as to allow that measurements are used to their ultimate accuracy. A calibration method is implemented which proves to be essential for improving attitude determination accuracy. For the stepwise real-time attitude determination, it was used the well-known QUEST algorithm which yields quick response with reduced computer resources. The algorithms are tested and qualified with actual data collected on the streets under controlled situations. For such street runaways, the experiment employs a solid-state magnetoresistive magnetometer and an IMU navigation block consisting of triads of accelerometers and gyros, with MEMS technology. A GPS receiver is used to record positional information. The collected measurements are processed through the developed algorithms, and comparisons are made for attitude determination using calibrated and noncalibrated data. The results show that the attitude accuracy reaches the requirements for real-time operation for satellite simulator platforms.

  1. The alignment of satellite galaxies and cosmic filaments: observations and simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Tempel, E; Kipper, R; Libeskind, N I

    2015-01-01

    The accretion of satellites onto central galaxies along vast cosmic filaments is an apparent outcome of the anisotropic collapse of structure in our Universe. Numerical work (based on gravitational dynamics of N-body simulations) indicates that satellites are beamed towards hosts along preferred directions imprinted by the velocity shear field. Here we use the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to observationally test this claim. We construct 3D filaments and sheets and examine the relative position of satellites galaxies. A statistically significant alignment between satellite galaxy position and filament axis is confirmed. We find a similar (but stronger) signal by examining satellites and filaments similarly identified in the Millennium simulation, semi-analytical galaxy catalogue. We also examine the dependence of the alignment strength on galaxy properties such as colour, magnitude and (relative) satellite magnitude, finding that the alignment is strongest for the reddest and brightest central and satellite galaxi...

  2. Optimal scan strategies for future CMB satellite experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallis, Christopher G. R.; Brown, Michael L.; Battye, Richard A.; Delabrouille, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    The B-mode polarization power spectrum in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) is about four orders of magnitude fainter than the CMB temperature power spectrum. Any instrumental imperfections that couple temperature fluctuations to B-mode polarization must therefore be carefully controlled and/or removed. We investigate the role that a scan strategy can have in mitigating certain common systematics by averaging systematic errors down with many crossing angles. We present approximate analytic forms for the error on the recovered B-mode power spectrum that would result from differential gain, differential pointing and differential ellipticity for the case where two detector pairs are used in a polarization experiment. We use these analytic predictions to search the parameter space of common satellite scan strategies in order to identify those features of a scan strategy that have most impact in mitigating systematic effects. As an example, we go on to identify a scan strategy suitable for the CMB satellite proposed for the European Space Agency M5 call, considering the practical considerations of fuel requirement, data rate and the relative orientation of the telescope to the earth. Having chosen a scan strategy we then go on to investigate the suitability of the scan strategy.

  3. Improvement and Simulation of an Autonomous Time Synchronization Algorithm for a Layered Satellite Constellation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feijiang Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous time synchronization for satellite constellations is a key technology to establish a constellation system time without the use of a ground station. The characteristics of satellite visibility time for layered satellite constellations containing geostationary earth orbit (GEO, inclined geosynchronous orbit (IGSO, and medium earth orbit (MEO satellites are simulated by establishing a visible satellite model. Based on the satellite visible simulation results for a layered constellation, this study investigates the autonomous time synchronization algorithm that corresponds to the layered constellation structure, analyzes the main error of the time synchronization algorithm, and proposes methods to improve the characteristics of satellite movement in the constellation. This study uses an improved two-way time synchronization algorithm for autonomous time synchronization in the GEO-MEO satellite layer of a layered satellite constellation. The simulation results show that in a condition with simulation errors, the time synchronization precision of this improved algorithm can be controlled within 5 ns and used in high-precision autonomous time synchronization between layered satellite constellations.

  4. PEACESAT (Pan Pacific Education and Communication Experiments by Satellite) Project Early Experience: The Design and Early Years of the First Educational Communication Satellite Experiment. Report 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu.

    The PEACESAT Project (Pan Pacific Education and Communication Experiments by Satellite) has been in daily operation for four years since April 1971. Initiated as an individual research project of a university faculty member, it has expanded to involve educational institutions in 12 countries or jurisdictions in the Pacific Basin. These…

  5. EXPERIMENTS OF SEA ICE SIMULATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ying; ZHANG Xue-hong; YU Ru-cong; LIU Hai-long; YU Yong-qiang

    2005-01-01

    As a substitute for the original displaced pole grids, a simple rotated spherical coordinate system was introduced into the Community Sea Ice Model version 4(CSIM4), which is a component of the Community Climate System Model(CCSM) of the American National Center of Atmospheric Research(NCAR), to deal with the "pole problems".In the new coordinates, both the geographical North Pole and South Pole lie in the model equator and grid sizes near the polar region are more uniform.With reanalysis dataset of American National Centers for Environment Prediction(NCEP) and Levitus dataset without considering sub-mixed layer heat flux, the model was integrated for 100 years with thermodynamics process involved only in the former 49 years and both dynamic and thermodynamic processes involved in the left time.Inner consistency of model results was checked with no contradiction found.The results of last 10 years' model output were analyzed and it is shown that the simulated sea ice seasonal variation is rational whereas sea ice extent in the Barents Sea in winter is larger than that of observation.Numerical experiment on influence of sub-mixed layer heat flux was also carried out and it is shown that the sub-mixed layer heat flux can modulate seasonal variation of sea ice greatly.As a model component, the sea ice model with rotated spherical coordinates was coupled with other models (the oceanic general circulation model is the LASG/IAP Climate System Ocean Model(LICOM) with reduced grid, other models are components of NCAR CCSM2) forming a climate system model and its preliminary results were also given briefly.

  6. Simulation of Motion of Satellite under the Effect of Oblateness of Earth and Atmospheric Drag

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, Jaita; Pirzada, U M; Shah, Vishant

    2016-01-01

    The equations governing motion of the satellite under the effect of oblateness of Earth and atmospheric drag have been simulated, for a fixed initial position and three different initial velocities, till satellite collapses on Earth. Simulation of motion of artificial Earth satellite subject to the combined effects of oblate Earth and atmospheric drag is presented. The atmospheric model considered here takes in to account of exponential variation of the density with initial distance of Satellite from Earth's surface, scale height and radial distance. The minimum and maximum values of orbital elements and their variation over a time for different initial velocities have been reported.

  7. CTS United States experiments - A progress report. [Communications Technology Satellite for high power broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, W. H.; Donoughe, P. L.

    1976-01-01

    The Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) is a high-power broadcast satellite launched by NASA on January 17, 1976. CTS is the first satellite to operate at a frequency of 12 gigahertz and incorporates technology making possible new satellite telecommunications services. CTS is a cooperative program of the United States and Canada. This paper presents the results of the United States experimental activity to date. Wide segments of the population are involved in the Experiments Program, including the scientific community, other government agencies, industry, and the education and health entities. The experiments are associated with both technological objectives and the demonstration of new community and social services via satellite.

  8. Comparisons Between TIME-GCM/MERRA Simulations and LEO Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, M. E.; Haeusler, K.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Lu, G.

    2014-12-01

    We report on yearlong National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) simulations where we utilize the recently developed lower boundary condition based on 3-hourly MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application) reanalysis data to account for tropospheric waves and tides propagating upward into the model domain. The solar and geomagnetic forcing is based on prevailing geophysical conditions. The simulations show a strong day-to-day variability in the upper thermospheric neutral temperature tidal fields, which is smoothed out quickly when averaging is applied over several days, e.g. up to 50% DE3 amplitude reduction for a 10-day average. This is an important result with respect to tidal diagnostics from satellite observations where averaging over multiple days is inevitable. In order to assess TIME-GCM performance we compare the simulations with measurements from the Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE), Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites.

  9. Monte Carlo simulations of precise timekeeping in the Milstar communication satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camparo, James C.; Frueholz, R. P.

    1995-01-01

    The Milstar communications satellite system will provide secure antijam communication capabilities for DOD operations into the next century. In order to accomplish this task, the Milstar system will employ precise timekeeping on its satellites and at its ground control stations. The constellation will consist of four satellites in geosynchronous orbit, each carrying a set of four rubidium (Rb) atomic clocks. Several times a day, during normal operation, the Mission Control Element (MCE) will collect timing information from the constellation, and after several days use this information to update the time and frequency of the satellite clocks. The MCE will maintain precise time with a cesium (Cs) atomic clock, synchronized to UTC(USNO) via a GPS receiver. We have developed a Monte Carlo simulation of Milstar's space segment timekeeping. The simulation includes the effects of: uplink/downlink time transfer noise; satellite crosslink time transfer noise; satellite diurnal temperature variations; satellite and ground station atomic clock noise; and also quantization limits regarding satellite time and frequency corrections. The Monte Carlo simulation capability has proven to be an invaluable tool in assessing the performance characteristics of various timekeeping algorithms proposed for Milstar, and also in highlighting the timekeeping capabilities of the system. Here, we provide a brief overview of the basic Milstar timekeeping architecture as it is presently envisioned. We then describe the Monte Carlo simulation of space segment timekeeping, and provide examples of the simulation's efficacy in resolving timekeeping issues.

  10. How Good Are Satellite Rainfall Products For Hydrologic Simulations Of A Small Watershed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeweldi, D. A.; Gebremichael, M.; Downer, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Despite recent advances in satellite rainfall technology, the use of satellite rainfall products for hydrological applications is very limited. Assessing the potential and utility of satellite rainfall products is crucially important to advance their utility. In this work, first we quantify the errors in satellite rainfall products. We considered different satellite rainfall algorithms; namely, CMORPH (~8km, 30-minute), PERSIANN-CCS (4km, hourly) and HydroEstimator (10 km, hourly). Second, we assess how these errors propagate to hydrologic model streamflow simulations. We used the fully-distributed hydrologic model known as GSSHA. Our study region is the Goodwin Creek experimental watershed (21 sq. km) in Mississippi, USA. Our results provide information on how good different satellite rainfall products are for hydrologic simulations of a small watershed.

  11. Labotratory Simulation Experiments of Cometary Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    Minami, S; Baum, P. J.; Kamin, G.; R. S. White; 南, 繁行

    1986-01-01

    Laboratory simulation experiment to study the interaction between a cometary plasma and the solar wind has been performed using the UCR-T 1 space simulation facility at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, the University of California, Riverside. Light emitting plasma composed of Sr, Ba and/or C simulating cometary coma plasma is produced by a plasma emitter which interacts with intense plasma flow produced by a co-axial plasma gun simulating the solar wind. The purpose of this ...

  12. Experience and Methodology gained from 4 years of Student Satellite Projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alminde, Lars; Bisgaard, Morten; Bhanderi, Dan

    2005-01-01

    The AAU Cubesat student satellite project at Aalborg University was initiated in September 2001 and led to the launch of the satellite on the 30th of June 2003 with a “Rockot” rocket from Plesetsk in Russia. The satellite survived three months in orbit and based on the experiences gained the next...... student satellite project was commenced called AAUSAT II which is due for launch early 2006. This paper presents the experiences gained and lessons learned from the work with student satellite projects at Aalborg University as well as the methodology used to manage these projects. First an introduction...... to the concept of student satellite projects is given and the two student satellite projects are introduced. Then an introduction and description of the Problem Based Learning concept used at Aalborg University is given and advantages of applying it to these projects are discussed. The benets of student...

  13. Design and Implementation of a Space Environment Simulation Toolbox for Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Larsen, Jesper A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2005-01-01

    gravity field, Earth magnetic field and eclipse. The structure and facilities within the toolbox are described and exemplified using a student satellite case (AAUSAT-II). The validity of developed models is confirmed by comparing the simulation results with the realistic data obtained from the Danish...... Ørsted satellite....

  14. Design and Implementation of a Space Environment Simulation Toolbox for Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Larsen, Jesper A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    gravity field, Earth magnetic field and eclipse. The structure and facilities within the toolbox are described and exemplified using a student satellite case (AAUSAT-II). The validity of developed models is confirmed by comparing the simulation results with the realistic data obtained from the Danish...... Ørsted satellite....

  15. Satellite clock corrections estimation to accomplish real time ppp: experiments for brazilian real time network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Haroldo; Monico, João; Aquino, Marcio; Melo, Weyller

    2014-05-01

    that the phase ambiguities are eliminated when applying differences between consecutive epochs. However, when using undifferenced code and phase, the ambiguities may be estimated together with receiver clock errors, satellite clock corrections and troposphere parameters. In both strategies it is also possible to correct the troposphere delay from a Numerical Weather Forecast Model instead of estimating it. The prediction of the satellite clock correction can be performed using a straight line or a second degree polynomial using the time series of the estimated satellites clocks. To estimate satellite clock correction and to accomplish real time PPP two pieces of software have been developed, respectively, "RT_PPP" and "RT_SAT_CLOCK". The system (RT_PPP) is able to process GNSS code and phase data using precise ephemeris and precise satellites clocks corrections together with several corrections required for PPP. In the software RT_SAT_CLOCK we apply a Kalman filter algorithm to estimate satellite clock correction in the network PPP mode. In this case, all PPP corrections must be applied for each station. The experiments were generated in real time and post-processed mode (simulating real time) considering data from the Brazilian continuous GPS network and also from the IGS network in a global satellite clock solution. We have used IGU ephemeris for satellite position and estimated the satellite clock corrections, performing the updates as soon as new ephemeris files were available. Experiments were accomplished in order to assess the accuracy of the estimated clocks when using the Brazilian Numerical Weather Forecast Model (BNWFM) from CPTEC/INPE and also using the ZTD from European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) together with Vienna Mapping Function VMF or estimating troposphere with clocks and ambiguities in the Kalman Filter. The daily precision of the estimated satellite clock corrections reached the order of 0.15 nanoseconds. The clocks were

  16. Evaluation of satellite rainfall products through hydrologic simulation in a fully distributed hydrologic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitew, Menberu M.; Gebremichael, Mekonnen

    2011-06-01

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of four global high-resolution satellite rainfall products (CMORPH, TMPA 3B42RT, TMPA 3B42, and PERSIANN) through the hydrologic simulation of a 1656 km2 mountainous watershed in the fully distributed MIKE SHE hydrologic model. This study shows that there are significant biases in the satellite rainfall estimates and large variations in rainfall amounts, leading to large variations in hydrologic simulations. The rainfall algorithms that use primarily microwave data (CMORPH and TMPA 3B42RT) show consistent and better performance in streamflow simulation (bias in the order of -53% to -3%, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE) from 0.34 to 0.65); the rainfall algorithm that uses primarily infrared data (PERSIANN) shows lower performance (bias from -82% to -3%, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency from -0.39 to 0.43); and the rainfall algorithm that merges the satellite data with rain gage data (TMPA 3B42) shows inconsistencies and the lowest performance (bias from -86% to 0.43%, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency from -0.50 to 0.27). A dilemma between calibrating the hydrologic model with rain gage data and calibrating it with the corresponding satellite rainfall data is presented. Calibrating the model with corresponding satellite rainfall data increases the performance of satellite streamflow simulation compared to the model calibrated with rain gage data, but decreases the performance of satellite evapotranspiration simulation.

  17. Comparison of the simulated performance of a VSAT satellite link with measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwanakatwe, M.; Willis, M. J.; Evans, B. G.

    1991-06-01

    The transmisson performance of a Ka-band VSAT system (CODE) has been simulated to verify the systems design and to demonstrate the adequacy of the implementation margin and phase noise. A detailed simulation of phase noise effects on VSAT systems design is also presented. Hardware measurements and BOSS simulations for the test set-up show a good agreement for values of Eb/N0 up to 7dB. The simulated results indicate an increased error when the TWTA is operated in the nonlinear region, with the simulations indicating larger degradation than the measurement. The phase noise performance of the digital TRL modem is found to be consistently better than that of the simulated model. There appears to be closer agreement with the BOSS simulations than with the TOPSIM III simulations. The discrepancy between the TOPSIM III and BOSS phase noise simulations was only resolved by measurements taken using the Olympus satellite and BTI satellite simulator.

  18. Design and simulation of satellite attitude control system based on Simulink and VR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Gan, Qingbo; Kang, Jingshu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research satellite attitude control system design and visual simulation, the simulation framework of satellite dynamics and attitude control using Simulink were established. The design of satellite earth-oriented control system based on quaternion feedback was completed. The 3D scene based on VR was created and models in the scene were driven by simulation data of Simulink. By coordinate transformation. successful observing the scene in inertial coordinate system, orbit coordinate system and body coordinate system. The result shows that application of simulation method of Simulink combined with VR in the design of satellite attitude control system field, has the advantages of high confidence level, hard real-time property, multi-perspective and multi-coordinate system observing the scene, and improves the comprehensibility and accuracy of the design.

  19. The Application of the Technology of 3D Satellite Cloud Imaging in Virtual Reality Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-fang Xie

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Using satellite cloud images to simulate clouds is one of the new visual simulation technologies in Virtual Reality (VR. Taking the original data of satellite cloud images as the source, this paper depicts specifically the technology of 3D satellite cloud imaging through the transforming of coordinates and projection, creating a DEM (Digital Elevation Model of cloud imaging and 3D simulation. A Mercator projection was introduced to create a cloud image DEM, while solutions for geodetic problems were introduced to calculate distances, and the outer-trajectory science of rockets was introduced to obtain the elevation of clouds. For demonstration, we report on a computer program to simulate the 3D satellite cloud images.

  20. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 mission flight experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noonan, C. H.; McIntosh, R. J.; Rowe, J. N.; Defazio, R. L.; Galal, K. F.

    1995-05-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-8 spacecraft was launched on April 13, 1994, at 06:04:02 coordinated universal time (UTC), with separation from the Atlas-Centaur launch vehicle occurring at 06:33:05 UTC. The launch was followed by a series of complex, intense operations to maneuver the spacecraft into its geosynchronous mission orbit. The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) was responsible for GOES-8 attitude, orbit maneuver, orbit determination, and station acquisition support during the ascent phase. This paper summarizes the efforts of the FDF support teams and highlights some of the unique challenges the launch team faced during critical GOES-8 mission support. FDF operations experience discussed includes: (1) The abort of apogee maneuver firing-1 (AMF-1), cancellation of AMF-3, and the subsequent replans of the maneuver profile; (2) The unexpectedly large temperature dependence of the digital integrating rate assembly (DIRA) and its effect on GOES-8 attitude targeting in support of perigee raising maneuvers; (3) The significant effect of attitude control thrusting on GOES-8 orbit determination solutions; (4) Adjustment of the trim tab to minimize torque due to solar radiation pressure; and (5) Postlaunch analysis performed to estimate the GOES-8 separation attitude. The paper also discusses some key FDF GOES-8 lessons learned to be considered for the GOES-J launch which is currently scheduled for May 19, 1995.

  1. 77 FR 25150 - GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-27

    ... Department of the Air Force GPS Satellite Simulator Working Group; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Amending GPS Simulator Working group Meeting Notice. SUMMARY: We are requesting to amend the date of the GPS Simulator Working group meeting notice published on April 20, 2012...

  2. The design and fabrication of the satellite relative-movement trajectory simulator for inter-satellite laser communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Liu, Liren; Yun, Maojin; Zhang, Dejiang; Xu, Nan

    2005-08-01

    The characteristics of the terminals for the inter-satellite laser communication must be tested and verified on ground before flight test. Satellite relative-movement trajectory optical simulator is one of the most important devices of the ground test and verification system. It is used for simulation of the relative-movement between arbitrary satellites. Cooperating with the standard satellite laser communication terminal, the dynamical performance such as acquisition time and probability, pointing accuracy and tracking accuracy etc, of the terminal to be tested can be obtained. To keep the base of the terminal to be tested fixed, the clear aperture must be relatively large compare to the terminal's effect aperture. And for the practical application as well as in considering the size of optical glass commercially available, the optical aperture of the scanner was determined as φ420mm, the random accuracy for the simulation is 50-200μrad, Scanning angular coverage: azimuth +/-180°, elevation +/-15°. So the satellite relative-movement trajectory simulator belongs to the large-scale high-precision opto-mechanic and electrical equipment. In this paper, the design and fabrication of the simulator are introduced in detail. The simulator has the features as compact in construction, high accuracy in measurement, simple realization of the far-field condition in the near-field use, and direct simulation of 2D trajectory and consists of eight main elements: two wedge prisms, two pairs of worm and gear, damping gears, two actuating motors, two damping motors, rotating optical encoders, control computer and relevant electronics and mechanisms. The motivation of the design is to improve the accuracy as high as possible. The fabrication of the element of the simulator is stringent because of large-scale and high accuracy. For example, to solve the gap problem of the transmission mechanics, the damping method is introduced to the system. During the progress of the design and

  3. Mechanical Contact Experiments and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P; Zhang, W.;

    2011-01-01

    Mechanical contact is studied under dynamic development by means of a combined numerical and experimental investigation. The experiments are designed to allow dynamical development of non-planar contact areas with significant expansion in all three directions as the load is increased. Different...

  4. Simulation for Astroparticle Experiments and Planetary Explorations:Tools and Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.DeAngelis; A.Brunengo; 等

    2001-01-01

    We present a set of tools and general-pupose applications for the simulation of astrophysics and astroparticle experiments,concerning both physics and radiation background studies.They addrss the speific requirements of various typical astroparticle detectors:new-generation X-and γ-ray detectors on satellites,underground detectors for astroparticle experiments and solar system explorations.

  5. Mechanical Contact Experiments and Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Martins, P; Zhang, W.

    2011-01-01

    geometries and different materials are analyzed including contact between dissimilar materials. The numerical implementation is performed with a finite element computer program based on the irreducible flow formulation, and contact between deformable objects is modelled by applying the penalty method....... The overall investigation serves for testing and validating the numerical implementation of the mechanical contact, which is one of the main contributions to a system intended for 3D simulation of resistance welding. Correct modelling of contact between parts to be welded, as well as contact with electrodes......, is crucial for satisfactory modelling of the resistance welding process. The resistance heating at the contact interfaces depends on both contact area and pressure, and as the contact areas develop dynamically, the presented tests are relevant for assessing the validity and accuracy of the mechanical contact...

  6. Spread spectrum mobile communication experiment using ETS-V satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Tetsushi; Suzuki, Ryutaro; Kadowaki, Naoto; Taira, Shinichi; Sato, Nobuyasu

    1990-01-01

    The spread spectrum technique is attractive for application to mobile satellite communications, because of its random access capability, immunity to inter-system interference, and robustness to overloading. A novel direct sequence spread spectrum communication equipment is developed for land mobile satellite applications. The equipment is developed based on a matched filter technique to improve the initial acquisition performance. The data rate is 2.4 kilobits per sec. and the PN clock rate is 2.4552 mega-Hz. This equipment also has a function of measuring the multipath delay profile of land mobile satellite channel, making use of a correlation property of a PN code. This paper gives an outline of the equipment and the field test results with ETS-V satellite.

  7. The Distribution of Satellites Around Central Galaxies in a Cosmological Hydrodynamical Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Xuce; Kang, Xi; Wang, Yang O; Dutton, Aaron A; Macciò, Andrea V

    2014-01-01

    Observations have shown that the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies is not random, but rather, it is aligned with the major axes of central galaxies. The strength of the alignment is dependent on the properties of both satellites and centrals. Theoretical studies using dissipationless N-body simulations are limited by their inability to directly predict the shape of central galaxies. Using hydrodynamical simulations including gas cooling, star formation and feedback, we carry out a study of galaxy alignment and its dependence on galaxy properties predicted directly from the simulations. We found that the observed alignment signal is well produced, as is the color dependence: red satellites and red centrals both show stronger alignments than their blue counterparts. The reason for the stronger alignment of red satellites is that most of them stay in the inner region of the dark matter halo, where the shape of central galaxy traces better the dark matter distribution. The dependence of alignment on the ...

  8. A configurable distributed high-performance computing framework for satellite's TDI-CCD imaging simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Bo; Mao, Bingjing; Chen, Xiaomei; Ni, Guoqiang

    2010-11-01

    This paper renders a configurable distributed high performance computing(HPC) framework for TDI-CCD imaging simulation. It uses strategy pattern to adapt multi-algorithms. Thus, this framework help to decrease the simulation time with low expense. Imaging simulation for TDI-CCD mounted on satellite contains four processes: 1) atmosphere leads degradation, 2) optical system leads degradation, 3) electronic system of TDI-CCD leads degradation and re-sampling process, 4) data integration. Process 1) to 3) utilize diversity data-intensity algorithms such as FFT, convolution and LaGrange Interpol etc., which requires powerful CPU. Even uses Intel Xeon X5550 processor, regular series process method takes more than 30 hours for a simulation whose result image size is 1500 * 1462. With literature study, there isn't any mature distributing HPC framework in this field. Here we developed a distribute computing framework for TDI-CCD imaging simulation, which is based on WCF[1], uses Client/Server (C/S) layer and invokes the free CPU resources in LAN. The server pushes the process 1) to 3) tasks to those free computing capacity. Ultimately we rendered the HPC in low cost. In the computing experiment with 4 symmetric nodes and 1 server , this framework reduced about 74% simulation time. Adding more asymmetric nodes to the computing network, the time decreased namely. In conclusion, this framework could provide unlimited computation capacity in condition that the network and task management server are affordable. And this is the brand new HPC solution for TDI-CCD imaging simulation and similar applications.

  9. Investigation on Satellite-borne High-power Solid-state Power Amplifier Technology and Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Xiao-po; Zhao Hai-yang; Xi Song-tao

    2014-01-01

    Based on the research and development efforts of satellite-borne lumped solid-state transmitters, the design of a satellite-borne high-power microwave amplifier module is introduced. Focusing on satellite-borne applications, aspects of the high-power density thermal design, multipactor proof design, EMC design and so on, which are critical technologies for a solid-state power amplifier, are discussed. Subsequently, experiments are used to verify the concept.

  10. Investigation on Satellite-borne High-power Solid-state Power Amplifier Technology and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiao-po

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Based on the research and development efforts of satellite-borne lumped solid-state transmitters, the design of a satellite-borne high-power microwave amplifier module is introduced. Focusing on satellite-borne applications, aspects of the high-power density thermal design, multipactor proof design, EMC design and so on, which are critical technologies for a solid-state power amplifier, are discussed. Subsequently, experiments are used to verify the concept.

  11. MCNP simulations of material exposure experiments (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, Brian A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-08

    Simulations of proposed material exposure experiments were performed using MCNP6. The experiments will expose ampules containing different materials of interest with radiation to observe the chemical breakdown of the materials. Simulations were performed to map out dose in materials as a function of distance from the source, dose variation between materials, dose variation due to ampule orientation, and dose variation due to different source energy. This write up is an overview of the simulations and will provide guidance on how to use the data in the spreadsheet.

  12. Impact of Satellite Remote Sensing Data on Simulations of Coastal Circulation and Hypoxia on the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    We estimated surface salinity flux and solar penetration from satellite data, and performed model simulations to examine the impact of including the satellite estimates on temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen distributions on the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) near the ...

  13. Impact of Satellite Remote Sensing Data on Simulations of Coastal Circulation and Hypoxia on the Louisiana Continental Shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    We estimated surface salinity flux and solar penetration from satellite data, and performed model simulations to examine the impact of including the satellite estimates on temperature, salinity, and dissolved oxygen distributions on the Louisiana continental shelf (LCS) near the ...

  14. COMPASS Simulation for PHEBUS FPT-3 Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jun Ho; Kim, Jongtae; Park, Rae-Jun; Son, Donggun; Kim, Dong Ha [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The objective of this paper is to assess the core degradation modeling in COMPASS code by simulating the PHEBUS FPT3 experiment. For the comparison purpose, the numerical simulation by using MELCOR 2.1 have also conducted for the FPT3 experiment. Consequently, COMPASS results of PHEBUS FPT3 have been compared with the experimental data and MELCOR results. For the purpose of COMPASS code validation, the numerical simulation for PHEBUS FPT3 experiment has been conducted. The temperature of the main component has been secured by using COMPASS code for a fuel, cladding, control rod and surrounding structure. And they are compared with that of experimental data as well as MELCOR simulation results. MELCOR are showing that an oxidational reaction starts a little bit earlier time and has the slightly higher value of the accumulated hydrogen mass, while COMPASS code predicts the slightly lower value of the accumulated hydrogen mass.

  15. A study on quality and availability of COCTS images of HY- 1 satellite by simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李淑菁; 毛天明; 潘德炉

    2002-01-01

    Hy-1 is a first China's ocean color satellite which will be launched as a piggyback satellite on FY- 1 satellite using Long March rocket. On the satellite there are two sensors: one is the China's ocean color and temperature scanner (COCTS), the other is CCD coastal zone imager (CZI).The COCTS is considered to be a main sensor to play a key role. In order to understand the characteristics of future ocean color images observed, a simulation and evaluation study on the quality and availability of the COCTS image has been done. First, the simulation models are introduced briefly, and typical simulated cases of radiance images at visible bands are introduced, in which the radiance distribution is based on geographic location, the satellite orbital parameters and sensor properties, the simulated method to evaluate the image quality and availability is developed by using the characteristics of image called the complex signal noise ratio ( CSNR ). Meanwhile, a series of the CSNR images are generated from the simulated radiance components for different cases, which can be used to evaluate the quality and availability of the COCTS images before the HY - 1 is placed in orbit. Finally, the quality and availability of the COCTS images are quantitatively analyzed with the simulated CSNR data. The results will be beneficial to all scientists who are in charge of the COCTS mission and to those who plan to use the data from the COCTS.

  16. Pyro shock simulation: Experience with the MIPS simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Thomas J.; Moul, David S.

    1988-01-01

    The Mechanical Impulse Pyro Shock (MIPS) Simulator at GE Astro Space Division is one version of a design that is in limited use throughout the aerospace industry, and is typically used for component shock testing at levels up to 10,000 response g's. Modifications to the force imput, table and component boundary conditions have allowed a range of test conditions to be achieved. Twelve different designs of components with weights up to 23 Kg are in the process or have completed qualification testing in the Dynamic Simulation Lab at GE in Valley Forge, Pa. A summary of the experience gained through the use of this simulator is presented as well as examples of shock experiments that can be readily simulated at the GE Astro MIPS facility.

  17. Vast planes of satellites in a high resolution simulation of the Local Group: comparison to Andromeda

    CERN Document Server

    Gillet, N; Knebe, A; Libeskind, N; Yepes, G; Gottlober, S; Hoffman, Y

    2014-01-01

    We search for vast planes of satellites (VPoS) in a high resolution simulation of the Local Group performed by the CLUES project, which improves significantly the resolution of former similar studies. We use a simple method for detecting planar configurations of satellites, and validate it on the known plane of M31. We implement a range of prescriptions for modelling the satellite populations, roughly reproducing the variety of recipes used in the literature, and investigate the occurence and properties of planar structures in these populations. The structure of the simulated satellite systems is strongly non-random and contains planes of satellites, predominantly co-rotating, with, in some cases, sizes comparable to the plane observed in M31 by Ibata et al.. However the latter is slightly richer in satellites, slightly thinner and has stronger co-rotation, which makes it stand out as overall more exceptional than the simulated planes, when compared to a random population. Although the simulated planes we fin...

  18. Satellite delivered cable television - A Warner-Amex experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasi, D.; Setos, A.

    1984-03-01

    Operational aspects of the ground reception of C-band satellite transmissions by CATV operators are discussed. The current C-band network with 20 transmitters and 6000 receivers is shown to have been made possible by the relaxation of the earth-station licensing requirements, while economic factors have been responsible for the introduction of sophisticated and less sophisticated techniques to obtain 'adequate' picture quality with smaller antennas located in more difficult reception sites. The adoption of a quality standard of -18 dB C/I on the basis of empirical tests of viewer perception is considered reasonable, but further lowering of the standard (beyond -15 dB) is questioned. It is pointed out that antenna systems providing only minimal reception with 4-deg satellite spacing may be rendered useless by satellite video-traffic interference when 2-deg spacing is introduced over the next two years.

  19. Intraannual variability of tides in the thermosphere from model simulations and in situ satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häusler, K.; Hagan, M. E.; Forbes, J. M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Lu, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we provide insights into limitations imposed by current satellite-based strategies to delineate tidal variability in the thermosphere, as well as the ability of a state-of-the-art model to replicate thermospheric tidal determinations. Toward this end, we conducted a year-long thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) simulation for 2009, which is characterized by low solar and geomagnetic activity. In order to account for tropospheric waves and tides propagating upward into the ˜30-400 km model domain, we used 3-hourly MERRA (Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Application) reanalysis data. We focus on exospheric tidal temperatures, which are also compared with 72 day mean determinations from combined Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite observations to assess the model's capability to capture the observed tidal signatures and to quantify the uncertainties associated with the satellite exospheric temperature determination technique. We found strong day-to-day tidal variability in TIME-GCM that is smoothed out when averaged over as few as ten days. TIME-GCM notably overestimates the 72 day mean eastward propagating tides observed by CHAMP/GRACE, while capturing many of the salient features of other tidal components. However, the CHAMP/GRACE tidal determination technique only provides a gross climatological representation, underestimates the majority of the tidal components in the climatological spectrum, and moreover fails to characterize the extreme variability that drives the dynamics and electrodynamics of the ionosphere-thermosphere system. A multisatellite mission that samples at least six local times simultaneously is needed to provide this quantification.

  20. Design and implementation of an experiment scheduling system for the ACTS satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Mark J.

    1994-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) was launched on the 12th of September 1993 aboard STS-51. All events since that time have proceeded as planned with user operations commencing on December 6th, 1993. ACTS is a geosynchronous satellite designed to extend the state of the art in communication satellite design and is available to experimenters on a 'time/bandwidth available' basis. The ACTS satellite requires the advance scheduling of experimental activities based upon a complex set of resource, state, and activity constraints in order to ensure smooth operations. This paper describes the software system developed to schedule experiments for ACTS.

  1. SIMULATED ANIMAL EXPERIMENTS IN TEACHING AND RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chirag B. Mistry, Shreya M. Shah, Jagatkumar D. Bhatt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Animal experiments are of paramount importance in the pre-clinical screening of new chemical entity. On the other hand, various regulatory guidelines for animal experiments are becoming more stringent in the face of worldwide protests by animal rights activists. Moreover, simulated animal experiments’ softwares are being developed and they can be implemented in the postgraduate and graduate students’ curriculum for demonstration of standard physiological and pharmacological principles compared to real time animal experiments. In fact, implementation of virtual experiment will decrease hand on experience of animal experiments among medical students, but after medical graduation, animal experiment is lest utilized during their day to day clinical practice. Similarly, in case of postgraduate pharmacology curriculum, computer based virtual animal experiments can facilitate teaching and learning in a short span of time with various protocols, without sacrificing any animal for already established experimental outcomes.

  2. PlumeSat: A Micro-Satellite Based Plume Imagery Collection Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A.G.; Ng, L.C.

    2002-06-30

    This paper describes a technical approach to cost-effectively collect plume imagery of boosting targets using a novel micro-satellite based platform operating in low earth orbit (LEO). The plume collection Micro-satellite or PlueSat for short, will be capable of carrying an array of multi-spectral (UV through LWIR) passive and active (Imaging LADAR) sensors and maneuvering with a lateral divert propulsion system to different observation altitudes (100 to 300 km) and different closing geometries to achieve a range of aspect angles (15 to 60 degrees) in order to simulate a variety of boost phase intercept missions. The PlumeSat will be a cost effective platform to collect boost phase plume imagery from within 1 to 10 km ranges, resulting in 0.1 to 1 meter resolution imagery of a variety of potential target missiles with a goal of demonstrating reliable plume-to-hardbody handover algorithms for future boost phase intercept missions. Once deployed on orbit, the PlumeSat would perform a series phenomenology collection experiments until expends its on-board propellants. The baseline PlumeSat concept is sized to provide from 5 to 7 separate fly by data collects of boosting targets. The total number of data collects will depend on the orbital basing altitude and the accuracy in delivering the boosting target vehicle to the nominal PlumeSat fly-by volume.

  3. Simulation Application for the LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Roiser, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    We describe the LHCb detector simulation application (Gauss) based on the Geant4 toolkit. The application is built using the Gaudi software framework, which is used for all event-processing applications in the LHCb experiment. The existence of an underlying framework allows several common basic services such as persistency, interactivity, as well as detector geometry description or particle data to be shared between simulation, reconstruction and analysis applications. The main benefits of such common services are coherence between different event-processing stages as well as reduced development effort. The interfacing to Geant4 toolkit is realized through a façade (GiGa) which minimizes the coupling to the simulation engine and provides a set of abstract interfaces for configuration and event-by-event communication. The Gauss application is composed of three main blocks, i.e. event generation, detector response simulation and digitization which reflect the different stages performed during the simulation jo...

  4. Fast simulations for intensity mapping experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, David; Santos, Mário G

    2014-01-01

    We present a code to generate mock observations of 21 cm intensity mapping experiments. The emphasis of the code is on reducing the computational cost of running a full-blown simulation, trading computational time for accuracy. The code can be used to generate independent realizations of the cosmological signal and foregrounds, which are necessary, for instance, in order to obtain realistic forecasts for future intensity mapping experiments. The code is able to reproduce the correct angular and radial clustering pattern for the cosmological signal, including redshift-space distortions, lightcone evolution and bias. Furthermore, it is possible to simulate a variety of foregrounds, including the potentially problematic polarized synchrotron emission.

  5. Experimenting with Request Assignment Simulator (RAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Arokia Paul Rajan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available There is no existence of dedicated simulators on the Internet that studies the impact of load balancing principles of the cloud architectures. Request Assignment Simulator (RAS is a customizable, visual tool that helps to understand the request assignment to the resources based on the load balancing principles. We have designed this simulator to fit into Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS cloud model. In this paper, we present a working manual useful for the conduct of experiment with RAS. The objective of this paper is to instill the user to understand the pertinent parameters in the cloud, their metrics, load balancing principles, and their impact on the performance.

  6. Applications Technology Satellite ATS-6 experiment checkout and continuing spacecraft evaluation report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, W.; Prensky, W. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    The activities of the ATS-6 spacecraft are reviewed. The following subsystems and experiments are summarized: (1) radio beacon experiments; (2) spacecraft attitude precision pointing and slewing adaptive control experiment; (3) satellite instruction television experiment; (4) thermal control subsystem; (5) spacecraft propulsion subsystem; (6) telemetry and control subsystem; (7) millimeter wave experiment; and (8) communications subsystem. The results of performance evaluation of its subsystems and experiments are presented.

  7. Mechatronic Design, Dynamic Modeling and Results of a Satellite Flight Simulator for Experimental Validation of Satellite Attitude Determination and Control Schemes in 3-Axis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Mendoza-Bárcenas

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the integration and implementation of a satellite flight simulator based on an air bearing system, which was designed and instrumented in our laboratory to evaluate and to perform research in the field of Attitude Determination and Control Systems for satellites, using the hardware-in-the-loop technique. The satellite flight simulator considers two main blocks: an instrumented mobile platform and an external computer executing costume-made Matlab® software. The first block is an air bearing system containing an FPGA based on-board computer with capabilities to integrate digital architectures for data acquisition from inertial navigation sensors, control of actuators and communications data handling. The second block is an external personal computer, which runs in parallel Matlab® based algorithms for attitude determination and control. Both blocks are linked by means of radio modems. The paper also presents the analysis of the satellite flight simulator dynamics in order to obtain its movement equation which allows a better understanding of the satellite flight simulator behavior. In addition, the paper shows experimental results about the automated tracking of the satellite flight simulator based a virtual reality model developed in Matlab®. It also depicts two different versions of FPGA based on-board computers developed in-house to integrate embedded and polymorphic digital architectures for spacecrafts applications. Finally, the paper shows successful experimental results for an attitude control test using the satellite flight simulator based on a linear control law.

  8. CTS /Hermes/ - United States experiments and operations summary. [Communications Technology Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoughe, P. L.; Hunczak, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. experiments conducted with the Communications Technology Satellite, a joint Canadian-U.S. venture launched in 1976, are discussed. The 14/12 GHz frequencies employed by the 200-W transmitter on board the satellite provide two-way television and voice communications. Applications of the satellite in the categories of health care, community services and education are considered; experiments have also made use of the special properties of the super-high frequency band (e.g. link characterization and digital communications). Time-sharing of the 14/12 GHz communication between the U.S. and Canada has functioned well.

  9. A Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite Model Using Easy Java Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Loo Kang; Goh, Giam Hwee

    2013-01-01

    We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to visualize geostationary orbits near Earth, modelled using a Java 3D implementation of the EJS 3D library. The simplified physics model is described and simulated using a simple constant angular velocity equation. We discuss four computer model design ideas: (1) a simple and realistic…

  10. A Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite Model Using Easy Java Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Loo Kang; Goh, Giam Hwee

    2013-01-01

    We develop an Easy Java Simulation (EJS) model for students to visualize geostationary orbits near Earth, modelled using a Java 3D implementation of the EJS 3D library. The simplified physics model is described and simulated using a simple constant angular velocity equation. We discuss four computer model design ideas: (1) a simple and realistic…

  11. Development of a Robotics-based Satellites Docking Simulator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zebenay, M.

    2014-01-01

    The European Proximity Operation Simulator (EPOS) is a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) system aiming, among other objectives, at emulating on-orbit docking of spacecraft for verification and validation of the docking phase. This HIL docking simulator set-up essentially consists of docking interfaces, sim

  12. NASA Perspectives on Earth Observations from Satellite or 50 Years of Meteorological Satellite Experiments-The NASA Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einaudi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    The NASA was established in 1959. From those very eady days to the present NASA has been intimately involved with NOAA and the scientific community in the development and operation of satellite and sensor experiments. The early efforts included experiments on the TIROS and geostationary Applications Technology Satellites (ATS) series. In the latter case the spin-scan cameras conceived by Verner Suomi, along with the TIROS cameras, opened new vistas at what could be done in meteorological studies with the daily, nearly global, synoptic views from space-borne sensors As the years passed and the Nimbus series of satellites came into being in the 1960's, more quantitative observations with longer-lifetime, increasingly capable, better calibrated instruments came into being. NASA, in collaboration with and in support of NOAA, implemented operational systems that we now know as the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) series and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) series that provided dependable, continuous, dedicated satellite observations for use by the weather and atmospheric science communities. Through the 1970's, 1980's, and 1990's improved, well-calibrated instruments with more spectral bands extending into the thermal and the microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum were provided to obtain accurate soundings of the atmosphere, atmospheric chemistry constituents such as ozone, global sea surface temperature, snow and ice extent, vegetation dynamics, etc. In the 1990's and up to the present the NASA/Earth Observing System (EOS) has been developed, implemented, and operated over many years to provide a very comprehensive suite of observations of the atmosphere, as well as land and ocean parameters. The future looks bright wherein the development of new systems, broadly described by the National Academy of Science Decadal Study, is now underway. NASA, along with collaborations with NOAA, other agencies, and the

  13. Ground Simulation of an Autonomous Satellite Rendezvous and Tracking System Using Dual Robotic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trube, Matthew J.; Hyslop, Andrew M.; Carignan, Craig R.; Easley, Joseph W.

    2012-01-01

    A hardware-in-the-loop ground system was developed for simulating a robotic servicer spacecraft tracking a target satellite at short range. A relative navigation sensor package "Argon" is mounted on the end-effector of a Fanuc 430 manipulator, which functions as the base platform of the robotic spacecraft servicer. Machine vision algorithms estimate the pose of the target spacecraft, mounted on a Rotopod R-2000 platform, relay the solution to a simulation of the servicer spacecraft running in "Freespace", which performs guidance, navigation and control functions, integrates dynamics, and issues motion commands to a Fanuc platform controller so that it tracks the simulated servicer spacecraft. Results will be reviewed for several satellite motion scenarios at different ranges. Key words: robotics, satellite, servicing, guidance, navigation, tracking, control, docking.

  14. The Milky Way's Mass Inferered by Satellite Kinematics from the Illustris Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Alexander; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael

    2017-06-01

    A precise interpretion of the Milky Way’s dark matter halo mass has limited our ability to depict the Milky Way in cosmological context. One of the noteworthy issues is that only a handful of tracers — satellite galaxies — probe the gravitational potential at large radii, and converting observed velocities into a constraint on the mass profile requires significant assumptions. High resolution cosmological simulations provide a powerful tool for interpreting data, but most results to date rely on dark-matter-only simulations that neglect the effects of galaxy formation physics. We compare the orbital kinematics of satellite galaxies in the Illustris simulation with its dark-matter-only counterpart, which allows us to compare, on an object-by-object basis, the differences influenced in orbits from baryonic physics. We quantify the effects of galaxy formation physics on orbital distributions of satellites and describe how these differences affect inferences for the mass of the Milky Way.

  15. Simulations of DT experiments in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budny, R.; Bell, M.G.; Biglari, H.; Bitter, M.; Bush, C.; Cheng, C.Z.; Fredrickson, E.; Grek, B.; Hill, K.W.; Hsuan, H.; Janos, A.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, D.; Johnson, L.C.; LeBlanc, B.; McCune, D.C.; Mikkelsen, D.R.; Park, H.; Ramsey, A.T.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Scott, S.; Schivell, J.; Strachan, J.D.; Stratton, B.C.; Synakowski, E.; Taylor, G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.; Zweben, S.J.

    1991-12-01

    A transport code (TRANSP) is used to simulate future deuterium-tritium experiments (DT) in TFTR. The simulations are derived from 14 TFTR DD discharges, and the modeling of one supershot is discussed in detail to indicate the degree of accuracy of the TRANSP modeling. Fusion energy yields and {alpha}-particle parameters are calculated, including profiles of the {alpha} slowing down time, average energy, and of the Alfven speed and frequency. Two types of simulations are discussed. The main emphasis is on the DT equivalent, where an equal mix of D and T is substituted for the D in the initial target plasma, and for the D{sup O} in the neutral-beam injection, but the other measured beam and plasma parameters are unchanged. This simulation does not assume that {alpha} heating will enhance the plasma parameters, or that confinement will increase with T. The maximum relative fusion yield calculated for these simulations is Q{sub DT} {approx} 0.3, and the maximum {alpha} contribution to the central toroidal {beta} is {beta}{sub {alpha}}(0) {approx} 0.5%. The stability of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) and kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) is discussed. The TAE mode is predicted to become unstable for some of the equivalent simulations, particularly after the termination of neutral beam injection. In the second type of simulation, empirical supershot scaling relations are used to project the performance at the maximum expected beam power. The MHD stability of the simulations is discussed.

  16. Design and Analysis of Simulation Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.

    2015-01-01

    This is a new edition of Kleijnen’s advanced expository book on statistical methods for the Design and Analysis of Simulation Experiments (DASE). Altogether, this new edition has approximately 50% new material not in the original book. More specifically, the author has made significant changes to

  17. Introduction to Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prive, Nikki C.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation gives a brief overview of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs), including what OSSEs are, and how and why they are performed. The intent is to educate the audience in light of the OSSE-related sections of the Forecast Improvement Act (H.R. 2413).

  18. Monte Carlo Simulation of Counting Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Philip M.

    A computer program to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of counting experiments was written. The program was based on a mathematical derivation which started with counts in a time interval. The time interval was subdivided to form a binomial distribution with no two counts in the same subinterval. Then the number of subintervals was extended to…

  19. Computer Simulation Instruction: Carrying out Chemical Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibtesam Al-Mashaqbeh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of computer simulation Instruction (CSI on students' achievements: Carrying out chemical experiments to acquire chemical concepts for eleventh grade students. The subject of the study consisted two sections of a one girl's high school in Jordan. One section was randomly assigned to experimental group in which computer simulation Instruction (CSI was used, and the other section was randomly assigned to control group in which students were instructed by using the traditional teaching instruction. The findings indicated that there is progress on the part of the experimental group which used the computer simulation Instruction (CSI and this was reflected positively in the students’ achievement in carrying out chemical experiments to acquire chemical concepts.

  20. Evaluating the Effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) Satellite Clock Error via GPS Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyamoorthy, Dinesh; Shafii, Shalini; Amin, Zainal Fitry M.; Jusoh, Asmariah; Zainun Ali, Siti

    2016-06-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the effect of Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite clock error using GPS simulation. Two conditions of tests are used; Case 1: All the GPS satellites have clock errors within the normal range of 0 to 7 ns, corresponding to pseudorange error range of 0 to 2.1 m; Case 2: One GPS satellite suffers from critical failure, resulting in clock error in the pseudorange of up to 1 km. It is found that increase of GPS satellite clock error causes increase of average positional error due to increase of pseudorange error in the GPS satellite signals, which results in increasing error in the coordinates computed by the GPS receiver. Varying average positional error patterns are observed for the each of the readings. This is due to the GPS satellite constellation being dynamic, causing varying GPS satellite geometry over location and time, resulting in GPS accuracy being location / time dependent. For Case 1, in general, the highest average positional error values are observed for readings with the highest PDOP values, while the lowest average positional error values are observed for readings with the lowest PDOP values. For Case 2, no correlation is observed between the average positional error values and PDOP, indicating that the error generated is random.

  1. GEANT4 Simulation of the NPDGamma Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frlez, Emil

    2014-03-01

    The n-> + p --> d + γ experiment, currently taking data at the Oak Ridge SNS facility, is a high-precision measurement of weak nuclear forces at low energies. Detecting the correlation between the cold neutron spin and photon direction in the capture of neutrons on Liquid Hydrogen (LH) target, the experiment is sensitive to the properties of neutral weak current. We have written a GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation of the NPDGamma detector that, in addition to the active CsI detectors, also includes different targets and passive materials as well as the beam line elements. The neutron beam energy spectrum, its profiles, divergencies, and time-of-flight are simulated in detail. We have used the code to cross-calibrate the positions of (i) polarized LH target, (ii) Aluminum target, and (iii) CCl4 target. The responses of the 48 CsI detectors in the simulation were fixed using data taken on the LH target. Both neutron absorption as well as scattering and thermal processes were turned on in the GEANT4 physics lists. We use the results to simulate in detail the data obtained with different targets used in the experiment within a comprehensive analysis. This work is supported by NSF grant PHY-1307328.

  2. The experience of land cover change detection by satellite data

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lev SPIVAK; Irina VITKOVSKAYA; Madina BATYRBAYEVA; Alexey TEREKHOV

    2012-01-01

    Sigificant dependence from climate and anthropogenic influences characterize ecological systems of Kazakhstan.As result of the geographical location of the republic and ecological situation vegetative degradation sites exist throughout the territory of Kazakhstan.The major process of desertification takes place in the arid and semi-arid areas.To allocate spots of stable degradation of vegetation,the transition zone was first identified.Productivity of vegetation in transfer zone is slightly dependent on climate conditions.Multi-year digital maps of vegetation index were generated with NOAA satellite images.According to the result,the territory of the republic was zoned by means of vegetation productivity criterion.All the arable lands in Kazakhstan are in the risky agriculture zone.Estimation of the productivity of agricultural lands is highly important in the context of risky agriculture,where natural factors,such as wind and water erosion,can significantly change land quality in a relatively short time period.We used an integrated vegetation index to indicate land degradation measures to assess the inter-annual features in the response of vegetation to variations in climate conditions from lowresolution satellite data for all of Kazakhstan.This analysis allowed a better understanding of the spatial and temporal variations of land degradation in the country.

  3. Use of industrial robots for hardware-in-the-loop simulation of satellite rendezvous and docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ou; Flores-Abad, Angel; Boge, Toralf

    2012-12-01

    One of the most challenging and risky operations for spacecraft is to perform rendezvous and docking autonomously in space. To ensure a safe and reliable operation, such a mission must be carefully designed and thoroughly verified before a real space mission can be launched. This paper describes the control strategy for achieving high fidelity contact dynamics simulation of a new, robotics-based, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) rendezvous and docking simulation facility that uses two industrial robots to physically simulate the 6-DOF dynamic maneuvering of two docking satellites. The facility is capable of physically simulating the final approaching within a 25-meter range and the entire docking/capturing process for a satellite on-orbit servicing mission. The key difficulties of using industrial robots for high-fidelity HIL contact dynamics simulation were found and different solution techniques were investigated in the presented project. An admittance control method was proposed to achieve the goal of making the robots in the HIL simulation process match the impedance of the two docking satellites. Simulation study showed the effectiveness and performance of the proposed solution method.

  4. Research on the acquisition and tracking simulation system of light beacon in satellite-ground optical communications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZUO Tao; AI Yong; HUANG Hai-bo; SU Gui-bo

    2010-01-01

    @@ The study on the acquisition and tracking simulation system in satellite-ground optical communications is presented here.By applying global positioning system(GPS)coordinate calculation,the time needed in initial acquisition of light beacon can be reduced largely.Smith predictor is applied to compensate the mechanical hysteresis of tracking system and to improve the dynamic performance of the system.Tracking experiments over a i 6 km distance on the ground are conducted to verify the tracking of light beacon in satellite-ground optical communications.The standard deviation of horizontal coordinates is 35.3568 μrad and the maximum offset is 209.3675 μrad in stable tracking.

  5. Titan's organic chemistry: Results of simulation experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagan, Carl; Thompson, W. Reid; Khare, Bishun N.

    1992-01-01

    Recent low pressure continuous low plasma discharge simulations of the auroral electron driven organic chemistry in Titan's mesosphere are reviewed. These simulations yielded results in good accord with Voyager observations of gas phase organic species. Optical constants of the brownish solid tholins produced in similar experiments are in good accord with Voyager observations of the Titan haze. Titan tholins are rich in prebiotic organic constituents; the Huygens entry probe may shed light on some of the processes that led to the origin of life on Earth.

  6. Phase control system concepts and simulations. [solar power satellite system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsay, V. C.

    1980-01-01

    A phase control system concept for a solar power satellite is proposed which partitions the system into three major levels. The first level of phase control consists of a reference phase distribution system implemented in the form of phase distribution tree structure. The major purpose of the tree structure is to electronically compensate for the phase shift due to the transition path lengths from the center of the spacetenna to each phase control center located in each subarray. In the reference system, this is accomplished using the master slave returnable timing system technique. The second level of phase control consists of the beam steering and microwave power generating system which houses the power transponders. This transponder consists of a set of phase conjugation multipliers driven by the reference phase distribution system output and the output of a pilot spread spectrum receiver which accepts the received pilot via a diplexer connected to a separate receive horn or the subarray itself. The output of the phase conjugation circuits serve as inputs to the third level of the phase control system. The third level of phase control is associated with maintaining an equal and constant phase shift through the microwave power amplifier devices while minimizing the associated phase noise effects on the generated power beam. This is accomplished by providing a phase locked loop around each high power amplifier.

  7. Simulation and Analysis of Autonomous Time Synchronization Based on Asynchronism Two-way Inter-satellite Link

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, L.; Yang, X. H.; Sun, B. Q.; Qin, W. J.; Kong, Y.

    2013-09-01

    The measurement of the inter-satellite link is one of the key techniques in the autonomous operation of satellite navigation system. Based on the asynchronism inter-satellite two-way measurement mode in GPS constellation, the reduction formula of the inter-satellite time synchronization is built in this paper. Moreover, the corrective method of main systematic errors is proposed. Inter-satellite two-way time synchronization is simulated on the basis of IGS (International GNSS Service) precise ephemeris. The impacts of the epoch domestication of asynchronism inter-satellite link pseudo-range, the initial orbit, and the main systematic errors on satellite time synchronization are analyzed. Furthermore, the broadcast clock error of each satellite is calculated by the ``centralized'' inter-satellite autonomous time synchronization. Simulation results show that the epoch domestication of asynchronism inter-satellite link pseudo-range and the initial orbit have little impact on the satellite clock errors, and thus they needn't be taken into account. The errors caused by the relativistic effect and the asymmetry of path travel have large impact on the satellite clock errors. These should be corrected with theoretical formula. Compared with the IGS precise clock error, the root mean square of the broadcast clock error of each satellite is about 0.4 ns.

  8. Attitude Control of a Satellite Simulator Using Reaction Wheels and a PID Controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Rohe, and Welty in the development of AFIT’s second- generation satellite simulator, SimSat II [40]. Instead of building another dumbbell-style spherical...Nathan F. Welty . A Systems Engineering Approach to the Design of a Spacecraft Dynamics and Control Testbed. MS thesis, Air Force Institute of

  9. Q-Band (37-41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37-41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cut-paraboloidal reflector.

  10. Q-Band (37 to 41 GHz) Satellite Beacon Architecture for RF Propagation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, Rainee N.; Wintucky, Edwin G.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the design of a beacon transmitter that will be flown as a hosted payload on a geostationary satellite to enable propagation experiments at Q-band (37 to 41 GHz) frequencies is presented. The beacon uses a phased locked loop stabilized dielectric resonator oscillator and a solid-state power amplifier to achieve the desired output power. The satellite beacon antenna is configured as an offset-fed cutparaboloidal reflector.

  11. Preliminary Investigation of the Satellite Gravitational Red Shift Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, J. R.; Searle, C. L.; Graham, J. W.; Badessa, R. S.; Bates, V. J.; Kent, R. L.

    1961-01-01

    The work performed under this contract involved study, design, and construction of experimental equipment to perform a short-term measurement of the gravitational red shift. In the system designed, phase comparison techniques are employed so that the time interval required to obtain a single measurement for one altitude is of the order of one minute. An elliptical orbit was chosen to permit measurement of frequency shift as a function of altitude. One particularly attractive orbit is that having a 12-hour orbiting period (perigee, 270 miles, apogee 24,800 miles). This orbit, shown in Fig. 1, allows continuous measurements to be made over an 11-hour interval during which time the altitude is varying greatly. Measurements can not be made for the succeeding 14 hours. Since the variation of frequency difference with altitude is of greatest interest, a fixed offset or a slow drift between the oscillator on the ground and. the oscillator in the satellite will not invalidate the measurements.

  12. Mine Blast Loading: Experiments and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    calculation provided a better correlation with the one experiment that was discussed. UNCLASSIFIED 4 UNCLASSIFIED Neuberger , et al. [20] examine the...497-504, DEStech Publications, Inc., Lancaster, PA (2008). 5. S. Peles, D. Touati, I. Azulay, and A. Neuberger , “Numerical simulation of mine...DEStech Publications, Inc., Lancaster, PA (2008). 20. A. Neuberger , S. Peles, and D. Rittel, “Scaling the response of circular plates subjected to

  13. Collaborative virtual experience based on reconfigurable simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahab, Qonita M.; Kwon, Yong-Moo; Ko, Heedong

    2006-10-01

    Virtual Reality simulation enables immersive 3D experience of a Virtual Environment. A simulation-based Virtual Environment can be used to map real world phenomena onto virtual experience. With a reconfigurable simulation, users can reconfigure the parameters of the involved objects, so that they can see different effects from the different configurations. This concept is suitable for a classroom learning of physics law. This research studies the Virtual Reality simulation of Newton's physics law on rigid body type of objects. With network support, collaborative interaction is enabled so that people from different places can interact with the same set of objects in immersive Collaborative Virtual Environment. The taxonomy of the interaction in different levels of collaboration is described as: distinct objects and same object, in which there are same object - sequentially, same object - concurrently - same attribute, and same object - concurrently - distinct attributes. The case studies are the interaction of users in two cases: destroying and creating a set of arranged rigid bodies. In Virtual Domino, users can observe physics law while applying force to the domino blocks in order to destroy the arrangements. In Virtual Dollhouse, users can observe physics law while constructing a dollhouse using existing building blocks, under gravity effects.

  14. Reducing Errors in Satellite Simulated Views of Clouds with an Improved Parameterization of Unresolved Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, B. R.; Marchand, R.; Ackerman, T. P.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite instrument simulators have emerged as a means to reduce errors in model evaluation by producing simulated or psuedo-retrievals from model fields, which account for limitations in the satellite retrieval process. Because of the mismatch in resolved scales between satellite retrievals and large-scale models, model cloud fields must first be downscaled to scales consistent with satellite retrievals. This downscaling is analogous to that required for model radiative transfer calculations. The assumption is often made in both model radiative transfer codes and satellite simulators that the unresolved clouds follow maximum-random overlap with horizontally homogeneous cloud condensate amounts. We examine errors in simulated MISR and CloudSat retrievals that arise due to these assumptions by applying the MISR and CloudSat simulators to cloud resolving model (CRM) output generated by the Super-parameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SP-CAM). Errors are quantified by comparing simulated retrievals performed directly on the CRM fields with those simulated by first averaging the CRM fields to approximately 2-degree resolution, applying a "subcolumn generator" to regenerate psuedo-resolved cloud and precipitation condensate fields, and then applying the MISR and CloudSat simulators on the regenerated condensate fields. We show that errors due to both assumptions of maximum-random overlap and homogeneous condensate are significant (relative to uncertainties in the observations and other simulator limitations). The treatment of precipitation is particularly problematic for CloudSat-simulated radar reflectivity. We introduce an improved subcolumn generator for use with the simulators, and show that these errors can be greatly reduced by replacing the maximum-random overlap assumption with the more realistic generalized overlap and incorporating a simple parameterization of subgrid-scale cloud and precipitation condensate heterogeneity. Sandia National Laboratories is a

  15. Simulation of a Narrow Bandpass-Limited Satellite Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-28

    3.2 was the first to be designed [36] and simulated. This linear phase filter is used as a baseline for comparison, especially with respect to...results for nonlinear phase filters . Its frequency response and the associated performance data for B/R = 0.69 and 0.46 are given in Figs, 10-12 of [37...A 1 01 a 0.88 • 076 10 12 (Eb/No»eff Fig. 3.6. BPSK performance for cubic- phase filter , bandpass limiter, random data, and balanced links (36

  16. Cloud cover diurnal cycles in satellite data and regional climate model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifroth, Uwe; Ahrens, Bodo [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. for Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences; Hollmann, Rainer [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The amount and diurnal cycle of cloud cover play an important role in the energy and water cycle of the earth-atmosphere system and influence the radiation budget of the earth. Due to its importance and the challenging nature of its quantification, cloud cover is considered the biggest uncertainty factor in climate modeling. There is a clear need for reliable cloud datasets suitable for climate model evaluation studies. This study analyzes two datasets of cloud cover and its diurnal cycle derived from satellite observations by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and by EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) in Africa and Europe. Two regions, Europe and the subtropical southern Atlantic Ocean, were identified as offering distinct cloud cover diurnal cycles reasonably observed by both satellite datasets. In these regions, simulations by the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (CCLM) were evaluated in terms of cloud cover and its diurnal cycle during the time period of 1990 to 2007. Results show that the satellite derived cloud diurnal cycles largely agree, while discrepancies occur under extreme conditions like in the Sahara region. The CCLM is able to simulate the diurnal cycle observed consistently in the two satellite datasets in the South-Atlantic ocean, but not in Europe. CCLM misses the afternoon maximum cloud cover in Summer in Europe, which implies deficiencies in the parameterization of convection and in the treatment of surface-atmosphere interactions. The simulation of the diurnal cycle of the more stratiform cloud cover over the subtropical Atlantic was satisfactory in CCLM. (orig.)

  17. Simulation Studies of Satellite Laser CO2 Mission Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, Stephan Randy; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Collatz, G. J.; Sun X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2011-01-01

    Results of mission simulation studies are presented for a laser-based atmospheric CO2 sounder. The simulations are based on real-time carbon cycle process modeling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to ASCENDS as recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey. Compared to passive sensors, active (lidar) sensing of CO2 from space has several potentially significant advantages that hold promise to advance CO2 measurement capability in the next decade. Although the precision and accuracy requirements remain at unprecedented levels of stringency, analysis of possible instrument technology indicates that such sensors are more than feasible. Radiative transfer model calculations, an instrument model with representative errors, and a simple retrieval approach complete the cycle from "nature" run to "pseudodata" CO2. Several mission and instrument configuration options are examined, and the sensitivity to key design variables is shown. Examples are also shown of how the resulting pseudo-measurements might be used to address key carbon cycle science questions.

  18. Design and Implementation of a Space Environment Simulation Toolbox for Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Larsen, Jesper A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    This paper presents a developed toolbox for space environment model in SIMULINK that facilitates development and design of Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The toolbox includes, among others, models of orbit propagators, disturbances, Earth...... gravity field, Earth magnetic field and eclipse. The structure and facilities within the toolbox are described and exemplified using a student satellite case (AAUSAT-II). The validity of developed models is confirmed by comparing the simulation results with the realistic data obtained from the Danish...... Ørsted satellite....

  19. Design and Implementation of a Space Environment Simulation Toolbox for Small Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amini, Rouzbeh; Larsen, Jesper A.; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a developed toolbox for space environment model in SIMULINK that facilitates development and design of Attitude Determination and Control Systems (ADCS) for a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The toolbox includes, among others, models of orbit propagators, disturbances, Earth...... gravity field, Earth magnetic field and eclipse. The structure and facilities within the toolbox are described and exemplified using a student satellite case (AAUSAT-II). The validity of developed models is confirmed by comparing the simulation results with the realistic data obtained from the Danish...... Ørsted satellite....

  20. A digital simulation of message traffic for natural disaster warning communications satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, G. F.; Stevenson, S. M.

    1972-01-01

    Various types of weather communications are required to alert industries and the general public about the impending occurrence of tornados, hurricanes, snowstorms, floods, etc. A natural disaster warning satellite system has been proposed for meeting the communications requirements of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Message traffic for a communications satellite was simulated with a digital computer in order to determine the number of communications channels to meet system requirements. Poisson inputs are used for arrivals and an exponential distribution is used for service.

  1. Regional model simulation of the North Atlantic cyclone "Caroline" and comparisons with satellite data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Keup-Thiel

    Full Text Available An individual regional model simulation of cyclone "Caroline" has been carried out to study water cycle components over the North Atlantic Ocean. The uncertainties associated with quantitative estimates of the water cycle components are highlighted by a comparison of the model results with SSM/I (Special Sensor Microwave Imager satellite data.

    The vertically integrated water vapor of the REgional MOdel REMO is in good agreement with the SSM/I satellite data. The simulation results for other water budget components like the vertically integrated liquid water content and precipitation compare also reasonably well within the frontal system. However, the high precipitation rate in the cold air outbreak on the backside of the cold front derived from SSM/I satellite data is generally underestimated by REMO. This results in a considerable deficit of the total precipitation amount accumulated for the cyclone "Caroline". While REMO simulates 24.3 108 m3 h-1 for 09:00 UTC, the total areal precipitation from SSM/I satellite data amounts to 54.7 08 m3 h-1.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (precipitation; mesoscale meteorology – Radio science (remote sensing

  2. Sensitivity of Distributed Hydrologic Simulations to Ground and Satellite Based Rainfall Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singaiah Chintalapudi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, seven precipitation products (rain gauges, NEXRAD MPE, PERSIANN 0.25 degree, PERSIANN CCS-3hr, PERSIANN CCS-1hr, TRMM 3B42V7, and CMORPH were used to force a physically-based distributed hydrologic model. The model was driven by these products to simulate the hydrologic response of a 1232 km2 watershed in the Guadalupe River basin, Texas. Storm events in 2007 were used to analyze the precipitation products. Comparison with rain gauge observations reveals that there were significant biases in the satellite rainfall products and large variations in the estimated amounts. The radar basin average precipitation compared very well with the rain gauge product while the gauge-adjusted TRMM 3B42V7 precipitation compared best with observed rainfall among all satellite precipitation products. The NEXRAD MPE simulated streamflows matched the observed ones the best yielding the highest Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency correlation coefficient values for both the July and August 2007 events. Simulations driven by TRMM 3B42V7 matched the observed streamflow better than other satellite products for both events. The PERSIANN coarse resolution product yielded better runoff results than the higher resolution product. The study reveals that satellite rainfall products are viable alternatives when rain gauge or ground radar observations are sparse or non-existent.

  3. The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) program: A unique series of scientific experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reasoner, David L.; McCook, Morgan W.; Vaughan, William W.

    The Defense Department and NASA have joined in a program to study the space environment which surrounds the earth and the effects of space radiation on modern satellite electronic systems. The Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) will carry an array of active experiments including chemical releases and a complement of sophisticated scientific instruments to accomplish these objectives. Other chemical release active experiments will be performed with sub-orbital rocket probes. The chemical releases will 'paint' the magnetic and electric fields of earthspace with clouds of glowing ions. Earthspace will be a laboratory, and the releases will be studied with an extensive network of ground-, aircraft-, and satellite-based diagnostic instruments. Some of the topics discussed include the following: the effects of earthspace; the need for active experiments; types of chemical releases; the CRRES program schedule; international support and coordinated studies; photographing chemical releases; information on locating chemical releases for observation by the amateur; and CRRES as a program.

  4. Numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the Tethered-Satellite-System and space plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashi, Bharat I.

    1992-01-01

    The first Tethered-Satellite-System (TSS-1), scheduled for a flight in late 1992, is expected to provide relevant information related to the concept of generating an emf in a 20-km-long (or longer) conducting wire. This paper presents numerical simulations of the electrodynamic interactions between the TSS system and space plasma, using a 2D and 3D models of the system. The 2D case code simulates the motion of a long cylinder past a plasma, which is composed of electrons and H(+) ions. The system is solved by allowing the plasma to flow past the cylinder with an imposed magnetic field. The more complex 3D case is considered to study the dynamics in great detail. Results of 2D simulation show that the interaction of a satellite with plasma flowing perpendicularly to the magnetic field results in an enhancement in the current collection.

  5. Comparison of TCeMA and TDMA for Inter-Satellite Communications using OPNET Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hain, Regina Rosales; Ramanathan, Ram; Bergamo, Marcos; Wallett, Thomas M.

    2003-01-01

    A robust data link protocol, enabling unique physical and MAC layer technologies and sub-network level protocols, is needed in order to take advantage of the full potential of using both TDMA and CDMA in a satellite communication network. A novel MAC layer protocol, TDMA with CDMA-encoding multiple access (TCeMA) integrated with null-steered digital beam-forming spatial multiplexing, is investigated to support flexible spacecraft communications. Abstract models of the TCeMA and TDMA processes are developed in OPNFiT and a comparison of the performances of TCeMA and TDMA in a satellite network simulation are made. TCeMA provides the better connectivity and capacity with respect to TDMA for satellite communication traffic.

  6. Data Assimilation of Satellite Fire Detection in Coupled Atmosphere-Fire Simulation by WRF-SFIRE

    CERN Document Server

    Mandel, Jan; Vejmelka, Martin; Beezley, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Currently available satellite active fire detection products from the VIIRS and MODIS instruments on polar-orbiting satellites produce detection squares in arbitrary locations. There is no global fire/no fire map, no detection under cloud cover, false negatives are common, and the detection squares are much coarser than the resolution of a fire behavior model. Consequently, current active fire satellite detection products should be used to improve fire modeling in a statistical sense only, rather than as a direct input. We describe a new data assimilation method for active fire detection, based on a modification of the fire arrival time to simultaneously minimize the difference from the forecast fire arrival time and maximize the likelihood of the fire detection data. This method is inspired by contour detection methods used in computer vision, and it can be cast as a Bayesian inverse problem technique, or a generalized Tikhonov regularization. After the new fire arrival time on the whole simulation domain is...

  7. US plant and radiation dosimetry experiments flown on the soviet satellite COSMOS 1129. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrich, M.R.; Souza, K.A.

    1981-05-01

    Experiments included: 30 young male Wistar SPF rats used for wide range physiological studies Kosmos Satellites experiments with plants, fungi, insects, and mammalian tissue cultures; radiation physics experiments; a heat convection study; a rat embryology experiment in which an attempt was made to breed 2 male and 5 female rats during the flight; and fertile quail eggs used to determine the effects of spaceflight on avian embryogenesis. Specimens for US experiments were initially prepared at the recovery site or in Moscow and transferred to US laboratories for complete analyses. An overview of the mission focusing on preflight, on orbit, and postflight activities pertinent to the fourteen US experiments aboard Cosmos 1129 is presented.

  8. A second simulated criticality accident dosimetry experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    This experiment was undertaken to facilitate training in criticality dose assessment by UKAEA and BNFL establishments with potential criticality hazards. Personal dosemeters, coins, samples of hair, etc. supplied by the seven participating establishments were attached to a man-phantom filled with a solution of sodium nitrate (simulating 'body-sodium'), and exposed to a burst of radiation from the AWRE pulsed reactor VIPER. The neutron and photon doses were each several hundred rads. Participants made two sets of dose assessments. The first, made solely from the evidence of their routine dosemeters the activation of body-sodium and standard monitoring data, simulated the initial dose assessment that would be made before the circumstances of a real incident were established. The second was made when the position and orientation of the phantom relative to the reactor and the shielding (20 cm of copper) between the reactor core and the phantom were disclosed. Neutron and photon dose assessments for comparison wit...

  9. Control of industrial robots for hardware-in-the-loop simulation of satellite docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ou; Zebenay, Melak; Boge, Toralf

    2011-06-01

    One of the most challenging and risky missions for spacecraft is to perform Rendezvous and Docking (RvD) autonomously in space. To ensure a safe and reliable operation, such a mission must be carefully designed and thoroughly verified before a real space mission can be launched. This paper describes the impact-contact dynamics simulation capability of a new, robotics-based, hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) RvD simulation facility which uses two industrial robots to simulate 6-DOF dynamic maneuvering of two docking satellites. The facility is capable of physically simulating the final approaching within 25-meter range and the entire docking/capturing process in a satellite on-orbit servicing mission. The paper briefly discusses the difficulties of using industrial robots for HIL contact dynamics simulation and how these problems are solved. Admittance control strategy is proposed to control the robotic system to make the robot dynamically behave like the spacecraft during a physical interception. The control strategy works as an outer loop on the top of the existing control system of the industrial robot and hence, it does not require altering the joint control hardware and software which are inaccessible for an industrial robot. A simulation study has shown that the methodology can accurately simulate the impact-contact dynamics behavior of the spacecraft in a docking operation.

  10. High resolution satellite derived erodibility factors for WRF/Chem windblown dust simulations in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremades, Pablo Gabriel; Fernandez, Rafael Pedro; Allend, David; Mulena, Celeste; Puliafito, Salvador Enrique

    2017-04-01

    A proper representation of dust sources is critical to accurately predict atmospheric particle concentrations in regional windblown dust simulations. The Weather Research and Forecasting model with Chemistry (WRF/Chem) includes a topographic-based erodibility map originally conceived for global scale modeling, which fails to identify the geographical location of dust sources in many regions of Argentina. Therefore, this study aims at developing a method to obtain a high-resolution erodibility map suitable for regional or local scale modeling using WRF/Chem. We present two independent approaches based on global methods to estimate soil erodibility using satellite retrievals, i.e. topography from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and surface reflectance from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). Simulation results of a severe Zonda wind episode in the arid central-west Argentina serve as bases for the analysis of these methods. Simulated dust concentration at surface level is compared with particulate matter measurements at one site in Mendoza city. In addition, we use satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals to investigate model performance in reproducing spatial distribution of dust emissions. The erodibility map based on surface reflectance from MODIS improves the representation of small scale features, and increases the overall dust aerosol loading with respect to the standard map included by default. Simulated concentrations are in good agreement with measurements as well as satellite derived dust spatial distribution.

  11. Integrating satellite imagery with simulation modeling to improve burn severity mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karau, Eva C; Sikkink, Pamela G; Keane, Robert E; Dillon, Gregory K

    2014-07-01

    Both satellite imagery and spatial fire effects models are valuable tools for generating burn severity maps that are useful to fire scientists and resource managers. The purpose of this study was to test a new mapping approach that integrates imagery and modeling to create more accurate burn severity maps. We developed and assessed a statistical model that combines the Relative differenced Normalized Burn Ratio, a satellite image-based change detection procedure commonly used to map burn severity, with output from the Fire Hazard and Risk Model, a simulation model that estimates fire effects at a landscape scale. Using 285 Composite Burn Index (CBI) plots in Washington and Montana as ground reference, we found that an integrated model explained more variability in CBI (R (2) = 0.47) and had lower mean squared error (MSE = 0.28) than image (R (2) = 0.42 and MSE = 0.30) or simulation-based models (R (2) = 0.07 and MSE = 0.49) alone. Overall map accuracy was also highest for maps created with the Integrated Model (63 %). We suspect that Simulation Model performance would greatly improve with higher quality and more accurate spatial input data. Results of this study indicate the potential benefit of combining satellite image-based methods with a fire effects simulation model to create improved burn severity maps.

  12. Satellite laser ranging experiment with sub-centimeter single-shot ranging precision at Shanghai Observatory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG; Fumin(杨福民); CHEN; Wanzhen(陈婉珍); ZHANG; Zhongping(张忠萍); CHEN; Juping(陈菊平); HU; Jingfu(扈荆夫); LI; Xin(李鑫); I.; Prochazka; K.; Hamal

    2003-01-01

    The Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, incollaboration with the Czech Technical University, carried out the experiment of satellite laser ranging with sub-centimeter precision in Shanghai in August 2001. A pico-second event timer was used for the measurement of the time interval between the transmitted and returned laser pulses for Lageos 1, 2, Starlette, Stella, Topex/Poseiden and ERS-2 in coordination with the existing laser transmitting and receiving system at the Shanghai Observatory. The analysis of the measurement showed that the single-shot ranging precision with these satellites is 7-8 mm. In order to compare ranging precision, the existing ranging system has tracked simultaneously these satellites and obtained the ranging precision of 12-15 mm. It means that the ranging precision with the new system is 80% better thanthe existing system. The systematic biases with the existing system have also been checked in the experiment.

  13. VAST PLANES OF SATELLITES IN A HIGH-RESOLUTION SIMULATION OF THE LOCAL GROUP: COMPARISON TO ANDROMEDA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillet, N.; Ocvirk, P.; Aubert, D. [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de lUniversité, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Knebe, A.; Yepes, G. [Departamento de Física Teórica, Módulo, Universidad Autónomade Madrid, Cantoblanco E-28049 (Spain); Libeskind, N.; Gottlöber, S. [Leibniz-Institute für Astrophysik Potsdam (AIP), An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Hoffman, Y. [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)

    2015-02-10

    We search for vast planes of satellites (VPoS) in a high-resolution simulation of the Local Group performed by the CLUES project, which improves significantly the resolution of previous similar studies. We use a simple method for detecting planar configurations of satellites, and validate it on the known plane of M31. We implement a range of prescriptions for modeling the satellite populations, roughly reproducing the variety of recipes used in the literature, and investigate the occurrence and properties of planar structures in these populations. The structure of the simulated satellite systems is strongly non-random and contains planes of satellites, predominantly co-rotating, with, in some cases, sizes comparable to the plane observed in M31 by Ibata et al. However, the latter is slightly richer in satellites, slightly thinner, and has stronger co-rotation, which makes it stand out as overall more exceptional than the simulated planes, when compared to a random population. Although the simulated planes we find are generally dominated by one real structure forming its backbone, they are also partly fortuitous and are thus not kinematically coherent structures as a whole. Provided that the simulated and observed planes of satellites are indeed of the same nature, our results suggest that the VPoS of M31 is not a coherent disk and that one-third to one-half of its satellites must have large proper motions perpendicular to the plane.

  14. Description and Simulation of a Fast Packet Switch Architecture for Communication Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintana, Jorge A.; Lizanich, Paul J.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has been developing the architecture for a multichannel communications signal processing satellite (MCSPS) as part of a flexible, low-cost meshed-VSAT (very small aperture terminal) network. The MCSPS architecture is based on a multifrequency, time-division-multiple-access (MF-TDMA) uplink and a time-division multiplex (TDM) downlink. There are eight uplink MF-TDMA beams, and eight downlink TDM beams, with eight downlink dwells per beam. The information-switching processor, which decodes, stores, and transmits each packet of user data to the appropriate downlink dwell onboard the satellite, has been fully described by using VHSIC (Very High Speed Integrated-Circuit) Hardware Description Language (VHDL). This VHDL code, which was developed in-house to simulate the information switching processor, showed that the architecture is both feasible and viable. This paper describes a shared-memory-per-beam architecture, its VHDL implementation, and the simulation efforts.

  15. Simulation of land surface temperatures: comparison of two climate models and satellite retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Edwards

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been significant progress in the retrieval of land surface temperature from satellite observations. Satellite retrievals of surface temperature offer several advantages, including broad spatial coverage, and such data are potentially of great value in assessing general circulation models of the atmosphere. Here, retrievals of the land surface temperature over the contiguous United States are compared with simulations from two climate models. The models generally simulate the diurnal range realistically, but show significant warm biases during the summer. The models' diurnal cycle of surface temperature is related to their surface flux budgets. Differences in the diurnal cycle of the surface flux budget between the models are found to be more pronounced than those in the diurnal cycle of surface temperature.

  16. A hybrid hopfield network-simulated annealing approach for frequency assignment in satellite communications systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo-Sanz, Sancho; Santiago-Mozos, Ricardo; Bousoño-Calzón, Carlos

    2004-04-01

    A hybrid Hopfield network-simulated annealing algorithm (HopSA) is presented for the frequency assignment problem (FAP) in satellite communications. The goal of this NP-complete problem is minimizing the cochannel interference between satellite communication systems by rearranging the frequency assignment, for the systems can accommodate the increasing demands. The HopSA algorithm consists of a fast digital Hopfield neural network which manages the problem constraints hybridized with a simulated annealing which improves the quality of the solutions obtained. We analyze the problem and its formulation, describing and discussing the HopSA algorithm and solving a set of benchmark problems. The results obtained are compared with other existing approaches in order to show the performance of the HopSA approach.

  17. A simulation of data acquisition system for SSC experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watase, Y.; Ikeda, H. [National Laboratory for High Energy Physics (KEK), Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1989-04-01

    A simulation on some parts of the data acquisition system was performed using a general purpose simulation language GPSS. Several results of the simulation are discussed for the data acquisition system for the SSC experiment.

  18. Simulation of the Impacts of Single LEO Satellite Orbit Parameters on the Distribution and Number of Occultation Events

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Focusing on carrying out GPS occultation observations with a receiver set on LEO satellite, this paper develops the LEO orbit simulation system based on which the occultation events can be simulated taking into account the geometric relationship of the satellites and the field of view of the receiver antenna. In this paper, the impacts of 4 types of LEO orbit parameters including argument of latitude (AOL), right ascension of ascending node (RAAN), orbit height and orbit inclination on the distribution and number of occultation events observed with a single LEO satellite are discussed through simulation and some conclusions are drawn.

  19. Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) Experiment: Educational planning and coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, William W.; Alzmann, Melanie

    1991-01-01

    The efforts conducted to provide educational planning and development support for the Combined Release and Radiation Satellite (CRRES) Experiment are summarized. Activities regarding the scientific working group and workshop development are presented including the preparation of descriptive information on the CRRES Project.

  20. Testing fundamental physics with laser ranged satellites: perspectives and goals of the LARASE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucchesi, David; Anselmo, Luciano; Pardini, Carmen; Peron, Roberto; Pucacco, Giuseppe; Visco, Massimo

    Passive laser-ranged satellites, launched for geodynamics and geophysics purposes, not only have contributed to significant measurements in space geodesy that enabled, among several aspects, a deeper knowledge of the Earth's geopotential (both in its static and dynamic behavior), as well as of the geocenter motion and GM value up to the definition of the terrestrial reference frame, but they also provided an outstanding test bench to fundamental physics, as in the case of the first measurement of the Lense-Thirring precession on the combined nodes of the two LAGEOS satellites, or in the case of the total relativistic precession of the argument of pericenter of LAGEOS II. Indeed, the physical characteristics of such satellites -- such as their low area-to-mass ratio -- as well as those of their orbits, and the availability of high-quality tracking data provided by the International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS), allow for precise tests of gravitational theories. The aim of LARASE (LAser RAnged Satellites Experiment) is to go a step further in the tests of the gravitational interaction in the field of Earth, i.e. in the weak-field and-slow motion limit of general relativity, by the joint analysis of the orbits of the two LAGEOS satellites and that of the most recent LARES satellite. One of the key ingredients to reach such a goal is to provide high-quality updated models for the perturbing non-gravitational forces acting on the surface of such satellites. A large amount of Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) data of LAGEOS and LAGEOS II has been analyzed using a set of dedicated models for satellite dynamics, and the related post-fit residuals have been analyzed. A parallel work is on-going in the case of LARES that, due to its much lower altitude, is subject to larger gravitational and non-gravitational effects; the latter are mitigated in part by its much lower area-to-mass ratio. Recent work on the data analysis of the orbit of such satellites will be presented together

  1. [Simulation in medicine: first experiences under hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duranti, Ennio; Calzeroni, Gino; Venneri, Francesco; Marziali, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    Education and practical training in medicine is neglected and pass directly from theory to do on the field, while also each task requires the acquisition of health behaviors that are aware and accountable to the outreach. In hemodialysis is necessary to create synergies and partnerships between different cooperating figures. Addressing organizational and legal protection of the professionals (Clinical Risk). Acquiring operational capabilities of team work. Managing the team roles and functions.It is necessary then to acquire a modern methodology where the simulation represents the main tool, "the mistake" need to "learn" and the acquisition of "awareness" about event handling (in this case on Hemodialysis), in the context of clinical scenarios absolutely realistic.The methodology is based on simulated tasks using past experience as a business tool and innovative research. Debriefing and discussion with those involved and finally debrief collegiate looking for active/latent errors and use of international guidelines. Use of indicators to measure and review of performance during the various events and proactively promoting the reduction of the error.Among the types of participants was clear the minor presence of doctors of hemodialysis, probably for the wrong feeling of being checked and then judged in carrying out of actions made complex by urgency. In addition participating physicians have all stressed the usefulness of simulations of unusual events within the Hemodialysis treatment, but that if not solved can lead to death of the patient.Simulation under hemodialysis, although its first steps, appears to be an effective methodology able to stimulate self-criticism of the operators, but still with hesitations and fears above all by the nephrologists timorous of being judged more on technical skills than on organizational skills and leadership.

  2. Parallel collisionless shocks forming in simulations of the LAPD experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidl, Martin S.; Jenko, Frank; Niemann, Chris; Winske, Dan

    2016-10-01

    Research on parallel collisionless shocks, most prominently occurring in the Earth's bow shock region, has so far been limited to satellite measurements and simulations. However, the formation of collisionless shocks depends on a wide range of parameters and scales, which can be accessed more easily in a laboratory experiment. Using a kJ-class laser, an ongoing experimental campaign at the Large Plasma Device (LAPD) at UCLA is expected to produce the first laboratory measurements of the formation of a parallel collisionless shock. We present hybrid kinetic/MHD simulations that show how beam instabilities in the background plasma can be driven by ablating carbon ions from a target, causing non-linear density oscillations which develop into a propagating shock front. The free-streaming carbon ions can excite both the resonant right-hand instability and the non-resonant firehose mode. We analyze their respective roles and discuss optimizing their growth rates to speed up the process of shock formation.

  3. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, H.; Lefmann, K.; Lake, B.; Nielsen, K.; Skaarup, P.

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared with the experimental data. Simulating the entire experiment is an attractive alternative to the usual method of convoluting the model cross section with the resolution function, especially if the resolution function is nontrivial.

  4. A thousand shadows of Andromeda: rotating planes of satellites in the Millennium-II cosmological simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ibata, Rodrigo A; Lewis, Geraint F; Martin, Nicolas F; Conn, Anthony; Elahi, Pascal; Arias, Veronica; Fernando, Nuwanthika

    2014-01-01

    In a recent contribution, Bahl \\& Baumgardt investigated the incidence of planar alignments of satellite galaxies in the Millennium-II simulation, and concluded that vast thin planes of dwarf galaxies, similar to that observed in the Andromeda galaxy (M31), occur frequently by chance in $\\Lambda$-Cold Dark Matter cosmology. However, their analysis did not capture the essential fact that the observed alignment is simultaneously radially extended, yet thin, and kinematically unusual. With the caveat that the Millennium-II simulation may not have sufficient mass resolution to identify confidently simulacra of low-luminosity dwarf galaxies, we re-examine that simulation for planar structures, using the same method as employed by Ibata et al. (2013) on the real M31 satellites. We find that 0.04\\% of host galaxies display satellite alignments that are at least as extreme as the observations, when we consider their extent, thickness and number of members rotating in the same sense. We further investigate the ang...

  5. Indonesia coverage simulation of SAR satellite at near-equatorial orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septanto, Harry; Utama, Satriya; Heru Triharjanto, Robertus; Suhermanto

    2017-01-01

    Properties of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) that able to penetrate the cloud and does not depend on the sunlight are a number of advantages when utilized for monitoring tropical region like the IMC (Indonesian Maritime Continent). Moreover, since having areas along equatorial belt, the IMC is at a shortcoming from perspective of highly inclined LEO (Low Earth Orbit) satellite. It would result shorter and infrequent pass times when compared with a near-equatorial LEO satellite whose low inclination. This paper reports on the investigation of a near-equatorial LEO SAR satellite coverage property through simulations. The simulations is run in nine scenarios of orbit parameter that consist of combinations of attitude {500 km, 600 km, 700 km} and inclination {80, 90, 100}. The target area is defined as 50 km x 50 km around Jakarta. Meanwhile, the SAR sensor simulation is run with swath width of 40 km, incidence angle around 250-290 and Stripmap mode. Minimum, Maximum and Mean Access Revisit of the target for each scenarios are resulted.

  6. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edwards, H.; Lefmann, K.; Lake, B.;

    2002-01-01

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared...

  7. CTS digital video college curriculum-sharing experiment. [Communications Technology Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumb, D. R.; Sites, M. J.

    1974-01-01

    NASA-Ames Research Center, Stanford University, and Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, are participating in a joint experiment to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of college curriculum sharing using compressed digital television and the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS). Each university will offer televised courses to the other during the 1976-1977 academic year via CTS, a joint program by NASA and the Canadian Department of Communications. The video compression techniques to be demonstrated will enable economical interconnection of educational institutions using existing and planned domestic satellites.

  8. Simulation on change of generic satellite radar cross section via artificially created plasma sprays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shen Shou Max; Chuang, Yu-Chou

    2016-06-01

    Recent advancements in antisatellite missile technologies have proven the effectiveness of such attacks, and the vulnerability of satellites in such exercises inspires a new paradigm in RF Stealth techniques suitable for satellites. In this paper we examine the possibility of using artificially created plasma sprays on the surface of the satellite’s main body to alter its radar cross section (RCS). First, we briefly review past research related to RF Stealth using plasma. Next, we discuss the physics between electromagnetic waves and plasma, and the RCS number game in RF Stealth design. A comparison of RCS in a generic satellite and a more complicated model is made to illustrate the effect of the RCS number game, and its meaning for a simulation model. We also run a comparison between finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) and multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM) codes, and find the RCS results are very close. We then compare the RCS of the generic satellite and the plasma-covered satellite. The incident radar wave is a differentiated Gaussian monopulse, with 3 dB bandwidth between 1.2 GHz and 4 GHz, and we simulate three kinds of plasma density, with a characteristic plasma frequency ω P  =  0.1, 1, and 10 GHz. The electron-neutral collision frequency ν en is set at 0.01 GHz. We found the RCS of plasma-covered satellite is not necessarily smaller than the originally satellite. When ω P is 0.1 GHz, the plasma spray behaves like a dielectric, and there is minor reduction in the RCS. When ω P is 1 GHz, the X-Y cut RCS increases. When ω P is 10 GHz, the plasma behaves more like a metal to the radar wave, and stronger RCS dependency to frequency appears. Therefore, to use plasma as an RCS adjustment tool requires careful fine-tuning of plasma density and shape, in order to achieve the so-called plasma stealth effect.

  9. A variable bandwidth assignment scheme for the Land Mobile Satellite experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, T.-Y.; Li, V. O. K.

    The Mobile Satellite Experiment is a proposed experimental satellite-based communications network which provides data and voice communications to mobile terminals dispersed in geographically dispersed areas. In this paper, an analytical model is developed to calculate the performance of a Variable Bandwidth Assignment (VBA) Scheme. Under this scheme, the satellite channel bandwidth is dynamically reassigned so that a message may be transmitted in the shortest possible time. To transmit a long message, message channels will be reconfigured to have more bandwidth such that the transmission time is reduced, while to transmit a short message, the channel bandwidth will be shrunk such that the released bandwidth can be used to serve other messages. The model is illustrated with numerical examples. It is shown that a VBA scheme can achieve considerable improvement in transmission delays over a Fixed Bandwidth Assignment Scheme.

  10. Registration of ELF waves in rocket-satellite experiment with plasma injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobeinikov, V. G.; Oraevskii, V. N.; Ruzhin, Iu. Ia.; Sobolev, Ia. P.; Skomarovskii, V. S.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Namazov, C. A.; Pokhunkov, A. A.; Nesmeianov, V. I.

    1992-12-01

    Two rocket KOMBI-SAMA experiments with plasma injection at height 100-240 km were performed in August 1987 in the region of Brazilian magnetic anomaly (L = 1.25). The launching time of the rocket was determined so that plasma injection was at the time when COSMOS 1809 satellite passed as close as possible to magnetic tube of injection. Caesium plasma jet was produced during not less than 300 s by an electric plasma generator separated from the payload. When the satellite passed the geomagnetic tube intersecting the injection region an enhancement of ELF emission at 140 Hz, 450 Hz by a factor of 2 was registered on board the satellite. An enhancement of energetic particle flux by a factor of 4-5 was registered on board the rocket. Observed ELF emission below 100 Hz is interpreted as the generation of oblique electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves due to drift plasma instability at the front of the plasma jet.

  11. Experiments and DEM Simulations of Granular Ratcheting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorzi Gianluca

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we studied the effect of cyclic loading on a granular packing by means of numerical simulations and experiments. A confined packing of glass beads was prepared and one of the walls was moved cyclically with a prescribed amplitude of the order of the particle diameter. Different amplitudes were tested, and their effect on the free surface evolution, the force transmitted to the moving wall and the displacement patterns in the material was characterized. Discrete numerical simulations were also carried out with the specific purpose of evaluating the effect of the particle shape on the dynamics of the system. The displacement amplitude of the moving wall was shown to increase the maximum force experienced at the end of the compressive phase of the wall movement; the angularity of the particles had a similar effect. Force-wall displacement curves displayed a peculiar hysteretic behavior. The evolution of the system towards an asymptotic state was shown to be faster for spheres than for angular particles; the latter displayed an interesting long-time evolution of the force-displacement paths which deserves deeper investigations.

  12. Background simulation for the COBRA-experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quante, Thomas [TU Dortmund, Institut fuer Physik (Germany); Collaboration: COBRA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    COBRA is a next-generation experiment searching for neutrinoless double beta (0νββ) decay using CdZnTe semiconductor detectors. The main focus is on {sup 116}Cd, with a Q-value of 2813.5 keV well above the highest dominant naturally occurring gamma lines. By measuring the half-life of the 0νββ decay, it is possible to clarify the nature of the neutrino as either Dirac or Majorana particle and furthermore to determine the effective Majorana mass. COBRA is currently in the demonstrator phase to study possible background contributions and gain information about the longterm stability of the used detectors. For this purpose a demonstrator array made up of 64 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) semiconductor detectors in coplanar grid configuration was designed and realised at the Gran Sasso Underground laboratory (LNGS) in Italy. Simulations of the whole demonstrator setup are ongoing to reproduce the measured spectra for each detector. This is done in two steps. The first uses the Geant4 based framework VENOM for tracking and energy deposition inside each detector. Detector effects like the energy resolution and electron trapping have to be applied in the second step. The used detector geometry has to be verified against calibration measurements. This talk gives an overview of the current simulation status.

  13. Modeling and Simulation of Phased Array Antennas to Support Next-Generation Satellite Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchorowski, Nicole; Murawski, Robert; Manning, Robert; Fuentes, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Developing enhanced simulation capabilities has become a significant priority for the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) project at NASA as new space communications technologies are proposed to replace aging NASA communications assets, such as the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). When developing the architecture for these new space communications assets, it is important to develop updated modeling and simulation methodologies, such that competing architectures can be weighed against one another and the optimal path forward can be determined. There have been many simulation tools developed here at NASA for the simulation of single RF link budgets, or for the modeling and simulation of an entire network of spacecraft and their supporting SCaN network elements. However, the modeling capabilities are never fully complete and as new technologies are proposed, gaps are identified. One such gap is the ability to rapidly develop high fidelity simulation models of electronically steerable phased array systems. As future relay satellite architectures are proposed that include optical communications links, electronically steerable antennas will become more desirable due to the reduction in platform vibration introduced by mechanically steerable devices. In this research, we investigate how modeling of these antennas can be introduced into out overall simulation and modeling structure. The ultimate goal of this research is two-fold. First, to enable NASA engineers to model various proposed simulation architectures and determine which proposed architecture meets the given architectural requirements. Second, given a set of communications link requirements for a proposed satellite architecture, determine the optimal configuration for a phased array antenna. There is a variety of tools available that can be used to model phased array antennas. To meet our stated goals, the first objective of this research is to compare the subset of tools available to us

  14. N-body Simulations of Satellite Formation around Giant Planets: Origin of Orbital Configuration of the Galilean Moons

    CERN Document Server

    Ogihara, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    As the number of discovered extrasolar planets has been increasing, diversity of planetary systems requires studies of new formation scenarios. It is important to study satellite formation in circumplanetary disks, which is often viewed as analogous to formation of rocky planets in protoplanetary disks. We investigated satellite formation from satellitesimals around giant planets through N-body simulations that include gravitational interactions with a circumplanetary gas disk. Our main aim is to reproduce the observable properties of the Galilean satellites around Jupiter through numerical simulations, as previous N-body simulations have not explained the origin of the resonant configuration. We performed accretion simulations based on the work of Sasaki et al. (2010), in which an inner cavity is added to the model of Canup & Ward (2002, 2006). We found that several satellites are formed and captured in mutual mean motion resonances outside the disk inner edge and are stable after rapid disk gas dissipat...

  15. Assessing the mineralogy and hydration of rocky cores of satellites: insights from experiments and thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynard, B.; Neri, A.; Sotin, C.

    2016-12-01

    Icy satellites and similar objects likely form from a mixture of hydrated rocky material, such as the CI chondrites, and various amounts of ices. Mass-balance estimates show that hydrous silicates such as serpentine, and brucite, the simple Mg-Fe hydroxide, dominate fully hydrated mineralogy. The inferred iron content of these minerals is, however, very dependent on assumptions of iron redox state, and whether it forms sulfides or segregates into a metal core. From the determination of the moment of inertia inferred from gravity measurements at Jupiter and Saturn by the Galileo and Cassini spacecraft, Ganymede and Europa would have a differentiated iron-rich core whereas Titan and Enceladus would not. Whatever the case, iron content is generally significantly higher than that of the terrestrial ultrabasic rocks used as analogs in modeling of hydrated satellite cores. Thus, we investigated the phase relations of iron-rich ultrabasic systems based on chondritic composition by combining thermodynamic modeling and preliminary high-pressure experiments. Our starting composition model is that of CI carbonaceous chondrites. Stable mineral assemblages are calculated with the PerpleX package (Connolly, 1990), assuming excess water, and various amounts of iron in the silicate phase through varying the amount of iron sulfide (troilite) or iron oxide (magnetite). Results show stable hydrated minerals are serpentine, chlorite, brucite, Na-phlogopite and in extreme cases, talc in the 1.5-5 GPa range relevant to bodies larger than about 1000 km in radius. Dehydration temperatures are extremely sensitive to the iron content, hence on the chosen amount of iron bearing phase (troilite or magnetite), and to a lower extent on average CI composition. An experimental approach was developed to simulate hydrous alteration of CI-like material. A mixture of synthetic silicates, troilite, and organic compounds, to which excess water is added, is used. Mineralogy and composition is checked

  16. Magnetized plasma jets in experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafel, Peter; Greenly, John; Gourdain, Pierre; Seyler, Charles; Blesener, Kate; Kusse, Bruce

    2013-10-01

    This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a thing (20 micron) Al foil driven on the 1 MA-in-100 ns COBRA through a 5 mm diameter cathode in a radial configuration. In these experiments, ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet can be observed developing midway through current-rise. Our goal is to establish the relationship between the ASP and the jet. These jets are of interest for their potential relevance to astrophysical phenomena. An independently pulsed 200 μF capacitor bank with a Helmholtz coil pair allows for the imposition of a slow (150 μs) and strong (~1 T) axial magnetic field on the experiment. Application of this field eliminates significant azimuthal asymmetry in extreme ultraviolet emission of the ASP. This asymmetry is likely a current filamentation instability. Laser-backlit shadowgraphy and interferometry confirm that the jet-hollowing is correlated with the application of the axial magnetic field. Visible spectroscopic measurements show a doppler shift consistent with an azimuthal velocity in the ASP caused by the applied B-field. Computational simulations with the XMHD code PERSEUS qualitatively agree with the experimental results.

  17. PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS AND SIMULATION OF VARIOUS BURST TIME PLAN GENERATION METHODS IN BROADBAND SATELLITE MULTIMEDIA SYSTEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Shaodong; Li Guangxia; Feng Qi

    2011-01-01

    The Burst Time Plan (BTP) generation is the key for resource allocation in Broadband Satellite Multimedia (BSM) system.The main purpose of this paper is to minimize the system response time to users' request caused by BTP generation as well as maintain the Quality of Service (QoS) and improve the channel utilization efficiency.Traditionally the BTP is generated periodically in order to simplify the implementation of the resource allocation algorithm.Based on the analysis we find that Periodical BTP Generation (P-BTPG) method cannot guarantee the delay performance,channel utilization efficiency and QoS simultaneously,especially when the capacity requests arrived randomly.The Optimized BTP Generation (O-BTPG) method is given based on the optimal scheduling period and scheduling latency without considering the signaling overhead.Finally,a novel Asynchronous BTP Generation (A-BTPG) method is proposed which is invoked according to users' requests.A BSM system application scenario is simulated.Simulation results show that A-BTPG is a trade-off between the performance and signaling overhead which can improve the system performance insensitive to the traffic pattern.This method can be used in the ATM onboard switching satellite system and further more can be expended to Digital Video Broadcasting-Return Channel Satellite (DVB-RCS) system or IP onboard routing BSM system in the future.

  18. Herbicide Persistence in Seawater Simulation Experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Mercurio

    Full Text Available Herbicides are detected year-round in marine waters, including those of the World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef (GBR. The few previous studies that have investigated herbicide persistence in seawater generally reported half-lives in the order of months, and several studies were too short to detect significant degradation. Here we investigated the persistence of eight herbicides commonly detected in the GBR or its catchments in standard OECD simulation flask experiments, but with the aim to mimic natural conditions similar to those found on the GBR (i.e., relatively low herbicide concentrations, typical temperatures, light and microbial communities. Very little degradation was recorded over the standard 60 d period (Experiment 1 so a second experiment was extended to 365 d. Half-lives of PSII herbicides ametryn, atrazine, diuron, hexazinone and tebuthiuron were consistently greater than a year, indicating high persistence. The detection of atrazine and diuron metabolites and longer persistence in mercuric chloride-treated seawater confirmed that biodegradation contributed to the breakdown of herbicides. The shortest half-life recorded was 88 d for growth-regulating herbicide 2,4-D at 31°C in the dark, while the fatty acid-inhibitor metolachlor exhibited a minimum half-life of 281 d. The presence of moderate light and elevated temperatures affected the persistence of most of the herbicides; however, the scale and direction of the differences were not predictable and were likely due to changes in microbial community composition. The persistence estimates here represent some of the first appropriate data for application in risk assessments for herbicide exposure in tropical marine systems. The long persistence of herbicides identified in the present study helps explain detection of herbicides in nearshore waters of the GBR year round. Little degradation of these herbicides would be expected during the wet season with runoff and associated

  19. A commercial procedure execution engine completing the command chain of a university satellite simulation infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Michael; Falke, Albert; Kuwahara, Toshinori; Roeser, Hans-Peter; Pearson, Steve; Witts, Andrew; Eickhoff, Jens

    2010-03-01

    The Institute of Space Systems at the University of Stuttgart has a small satellite programme consisting of currently four missions. The first of these missions is the Flying Laptop, the purpose of which are technology evaluation, Earth observation and scientific measurement. Since the budget for a University satellite programme is obviously limited, engineering models of the entire spacecraft are to be avoided. In order to keep technical risks at a low level, a simulation based development approach was selected instead which already has been applied as proven technology in industry. The Institute of Space Systems applies the system simulation infrastructure Model- based Development and Verification Environment (MDVE) developed by Astrium as real-time simulator which is commanded via a SCOS-2000 mission control system. Easy commanding of such an entire simulated S/C, respectively, later the hardware in AIT phase, is mandatory especially for students only working with the equipment for a typical 6 months thesis period. Therefore the infrastructure setup was completed by the test procedure editor and execution engine Manufacturing and Operations Information System (MOIS) which for the first time provides a complete command/execution/control chain in the programme.

  20. Simulating Complex Satellites and a Space-Based Surveillance Sensor Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    celestial sphe orbit is indicat nsor was in a h ed by the sate the orange arr ensor to the ta can observe t the viewing.   ) for a satellite ark blue...The cube ted. There ar ating. jection with t is not possible ewing is not p ensor -to-targe code, typically ction for six m so that one ca and...model, futur sses of orbits, pects. thank Dr. Do ts, suggestion Modernization e Research Lab which much o ensors Directo ting Attitude tributions

  1. Trans-Pacific HDR Satellite Communications Experiment Phase-2 Project Plan and Experimental Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Eddie; Kadowaki, Naoto; Yoshimura, Naoko; Takahashi, Takashi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Bergman, Larry; Bhasin, Kul

    2000-01-01

    The trans-Pacific high data rate (TP-HDR) satellite communications experiment was proposed at the Japan-U.S. Cooperation in Space (JUCS) Program Workshop held in Hawaii in 1993 and remote high definition video post-production was demonstrated as the first phase trial. ATM-based 45 Mbps trans-Pacific link was established in the first phase, and the following experiments with 155 Mbps was planned as the phase 2. This paper describes the experimental network configuration and project plan of TP-HDR experiment phase 2. Additional information is provided in the original.

  2. Impact of modelling foreground uncertainties on future CMB polarization satellite experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervías-Caimapo, Carlos; Bonaldi, Anna; Brown, Michael L.

    2017-07-01

    We present an analysis of errors on the tensor-to-scalar ratio due to residual diffuse foregrounds. We use simulated observations of a cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization satellite, the Cosmic Origins Explorer (COrE), using the specifications of the version proposed to ESA in 2010. We construct a full pipeline from microwave sky maps to r likelihood, using two models of diffuse Galactic foregrounds with different complexity and assuming component separation with varying degrees of accuracy. Our pipeline uses a linear mixture (generalized least squares) solution for component separation, and a hybrid approach for power spectrum estimation, with a quadratic maximum likelihood estimator at low ℓs and a pseudo-Cℓ deconvolution at high ℓs. In the likelihood for r, we explore modelling foreground residuals as nuisance parameters. Our analysis aims at measuring the bias introduced in r by mismodelling the foregrounds and to determine what error is tolerable while still successfully detecting r. We find that r = 0.01 can be measured successfully even for a complex sky model and in the presence of foreground parameters error. However, the detection of r = 0.001 is a lot more challenging, as inaccurate modelling of the foreground spectral properties may result in a biased measurement of r. Once biases are eliminated, the total error on r allows setting an upper limit rather than a detection, unless the uncertainties on the foreground spectral indices are very small, i.e. equal or better than 0.5 per cent error for both dust and synchrotron. This emphasizes the need for pursuing research on component separation and foreground characterization in view of next-generation CMB polarization experiments.

  3. Model-simulated and Satellite-derived Leaf Area Index (LAI) Comparisons Across Multiple Spatial Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiames, J. S., Jr.; Cooter, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    Leaf Area Index (LAI) is an important parameter in assessing vegetation structure for characterizing forest canopies over large areas at broad spatial scales using satellite remote sensing data. However, satellite-derived LAI products can be limited by obstructed atmospheric conditions yielding sub-optimal values, or complete non-returns. The United States Environmental Protection Agency's Exposure Methods and Measurements and Computational Exposure Divisions are investigating the viability of supplemental modelled LAI inputs into satellite-derived data streams to support various regional and local scale air quality models for retrospective and future climate assessments. In this present study, one-year (2002) of plot level stand characteristics at four study sites located in Virginia and North Carolina (USA) are used to calibrate species-specific plant parameters in a semi-empirical biogeochemical model. The Environmental Policy Integrated Climate (EPIC) model was designed primarily for managed agricultural field crop ecosystems, but also includes managed woody species that span both xeric and mesic sites (e.g., mesquite, pine, oak, etc.). LAI was simulated using EPIC at a 4 km2 and 12 km2 grid coincident with the regional Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) grid. LAI comparisons were made between model-simulated and MODIS-derived LAI. Field/satellite-upscaled LAI was also compared to the corresponding MODIS LAI value. Preliminary results show field/satellite-upscaled LAI (1 km2) was 1.5 to 3 times smaller than that with the corresponding 1 km2 MODIS LAI for all four sites across all dates, with the largest discrepancies occurring at leaf-out and leaf senescence periods. Simulated LAI/MODIS LAI comparison results will be presented at the conference. Disclaimer: This work is done in support of EPA's Sustainable Healthy Communities Research Program. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency funded and conducted the research described in this paper. Although

  4. Element test experiments and simulations: from dry towards cohesive powders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imole, O.I.; Kumar, N.; Luding, S.; Onate, E.; Owen, D.R.J.

    2011-01-01

    Findings from experiments and particle simulations for dry and cohesive granular materials are presented with the goal to reach quantitative agreement between simulations and experiments. Results for the compressibility, tested with the FT4 Powder Rheometer are presented. The first simulation result

  5. Evaluation of GISS SCM Simulated Cloud and Radiative Properties Using Both Surface and Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, A. D.; Dong, X.; Xi, B.; Del Genio, A.; Wolf, A.; Minnis, P.; Khaiyer, M.; Doelling, D.; Nordeen, M.; Keyes, D.

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the GISS SCM simulated cloud fractions, three years of surface and GOES satellite data have been collected at DOE ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site during 1999-2001. The GOES derived total and high cloud fractions from both 0.5° and 2.5° grid boxes are in excellent agreement with surface observations, suggesting that the ARM point observations can represent large areal observations. Compared to the ARM radar-lidar observed cloud fractions, the SCM simulated most mid-level clouds, overestimated low clouds, and underestimated total and high clouds with additional missed during the summer season. Further studies have revealed that the model simulated cloud fractions are strongly dependent on the large-scale synoptic pattern and its associated variables such as vertical motion and relative humidity. Because a significant amount of clouds over ARM SGP occur during synoptically quiescent conditions, the model has issues producing enough high cloud cover. This work suggests that alterations need to be made to the stratiform cloud scheme to better represent the sub-grid scale cloud variability in this case. The model simulated radiation budget is also evaluated with two years of collocated ARM surface radiation and CERES and GOES TOA radiation over the SGP site during March 2000-Dec. 2001. For this comparison, the model simulated surface and TOA radiation budgets agree well with surface and satellite observations (˜10 W m-2). Model simulated cloud optical depth, however, is about an order of magnitude higher than CERES/GOES retrievals, which may explain why the radiation budget is reasonable and yet total cloud fraction has a negative bias compared to observations. Further study is warranted to better understand how this impacts cloud radiative forcing.

  6. SPH Simulations of Volatiles Loss from Icy Satellites During a Late Heavy Bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movshovitz, N.; Nimmo, F.; Korycansky, D.; Asphaug, E. I.; Owen, J. M.

    2013-12-01

    The present day ice-to-silicate ratio in satellites of the outer solar system can be used to constrain dynamical models of solar system formation [1]. The reason is that a period of intense impact activity after formation of the planets, implied by some dynamical models [2,3,4], could have resulted in significant mass loss, of ice preferentially, from these satellites. The location of Jovian and Saturnian satellites inside the gravity well of these giant planets implies high impact velocities, perhaps as high as 30 km/s [5]. Combined with small satellite masses, a Late Heavy Bombardment may well lead to a significant fraction of a satellite's mass ejected. In a previous study, Nimmo and Korycansky [1] calculate, using a scaling law for vaporization of ice from craters [6], the total expected ice loss from satellites of Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. They find that many satellites should have lost significant fractions (>10%) of their water ice. As many of these satellites do not appear to be significantly depleted in volatiles, this raises questions about the timing or intensity of a late heavy bombardment. (See also [4]). But this conclusion depends on some key assumptions regarding the distribution of impactor sizes and velocities, and, critically, the expected mass loss during a single impact. Here we compare predictions of impact-driven mass loss using direct hydrodynamical simulations of the relevant impact events, with the scaling law originally developed for cratering by small impactors [6]. The main advantage of this approach is that we can consider impacts between comparably sized bodies, where a cratering scaling law does not strictly apply. Another advantage of a direct hydro simulation is that we can track escaping mass, rather than vapor production. This is most significant for lower velocity impacts, typical of accretion [7,8]. This method should also be less sensitive to the choice of equation of state. To resolve preferential ice loss during impacts

  7. A system for the simulation and evaluation of satellite communication networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagwell, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    With the emergence of a new era in satellite communications, brought about by NASA's thrust into the Ka band with multibeam and onboard processing technologies, new and innovative techniques for evaluating these concepts and systems are required. To this end, NASA, in conjunction with its extensive program for advanced communications technology development, has undertaken to develop a concept for the simulation and evaluation of a complete communications network. Incorporated in this network will be proof-of-concept models of the latest technologies proposed for future satellite communications systems. These include low noise receivers, matrix switches, baseband processors, and solid state and tube type high power amplifiers. To accomplish this, numerous supporting technologies must be added to those aforementioned proof-of-concept models. These include controllers for synchronization, order wire, resource allocation, gain compensation, signal leveling, power augmentation, and rain fade and range delay simulation. Taken together, these will be assembled to comprise a system capable of addressing numerous design and performance questions. The simulation and evaluation system, as planned, will be modular in design and implementation, capable of modification and updating to track and evaluate a continuum of emerging concepts and technologies. Previously announced in STAR as N84-13400

  8. The Marble Experiment: Overview and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, M. R.; Murphy, T. J.; Cobble, J. A.; Fincke, J. R.; Haines, B. M.; Hamilton, C. E.; Lee, M. N.; Oertel, J. A.; Olson, R. E.; Randolph, R. B.; Schmidt, D. W.; Shah, R. C.; Smidt, J. M.; Tregillis, I. L.

    2015-11-01

    The Marble ICF platform has recently been launched on both OMEGA and NIF with the goal to investigate the influence of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. The unique separated reactant capsule design consists of an ``engineered'' CH capsule filled with deuterated plastic foam that contains pores or voids that are filled with tritium gas. Initially the deuterium and tritium are separated, but as the implosion proceeds, the D and T mix, producing a DT signature. The results of these experiments will be used to inform a probability density function (PDF) burn modelling approach for un-resolved cell morphology. Initial targets for platform development have consisted of either fine-pore foams or gas mixtures, with the goal to field the engineered foams in 2016. An overview of the Marble experimental campaign will be presented and simulations will be discussed. This work is supported by US DOE/NNSA, performed at LANL, operated by LANS LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  9. Liquid crystal interfaces: Experiments, simulations and biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Piotr

    Interfacial phenomena are ubiquitous and extremely important in various aspects of biological and industrial processes. For example, many liquid crystal applications start by alignment with a surface. The underlying mechanisms of the molecular organization of liquid crystals at an interface are still under intensive study and continue to be important to the display industry in order to develop better and/or new display technology. My dissertation research has been devoted to studying how complex liquid crystals can be guided to organize at an interface, and to using my findings to develop practical applications. Specifically, I have been working on developing biosensors using liquid-crystal/surfactant/lipid/protein interactions as well as the alignment of low-symmetry liquid crystals for potential new display and optomechanical applications. The biotechnology industry needs better ways of sensing biomaterials and identifying various nanoscale events at biological interfaces and in aqueous solutions. Sensors in which the recognition material is a liquid crystal naturally connects the existing knowledge and experience of the display and biotechnology industries together with surface and soft matter sciences. This dissertation thus mainly focuses on the delicate phenomena that happen at liquid interfaces. In the introduction, I start by defining the interface and discuss its structure and the relevant interfacial forces. I then introduce the general characteristics of biosensors and, in particular, describe the design of biosensors that employ liquid crystal/aqueous solution interfaces. I further describe the basic properties of liquid crystal materials that are relevant for liquid crystal-based biosensing applications. In CHAPTER 2, I describe the simulation methods and experimental techniques used in this dissertation. In CHAPTER 3 and CHAPTER 4, I present my computer simulation work. CHAPTER 3 presents insight of how liquid crystal molecules are aligned by

  10. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML--the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Adams, Richard; Bergmann, Frank T; Hucka, Michael; Kolpakov, Fedor; Miller, Andrew K; Moraru, Ion I; Nickerson, David; Sahle, Sven; Snoep, Jacky L; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    .... In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments...

  11. Simulation of Stochastic Loads for Fatigue Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    A simple direct simulation method for stochastic fatigue load generation is described in this paper. The simulation method is based on the assumption that only the peaks of the load process significantly affect the fatigue life. The method requires the conditional distribution functions of load...... second using an IBM PC. Finally the proposed simulation method for fatigue load generation is tested by comparing some fatigue damage measures obtained by the simulation methods....

  12. ATS-6 - A satellite for human needs. [Health, Education, Telecommunications Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, A. A.; Johnston, W. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    On May 30, 1974, NASA launched the ATS-6 experimental communications satellite into a geosynchronous orbit at a station centered over the United States. The 1400 kg satellite was designed to be body-stabilized with a 3-axis control system capable of precision offset pointing. It deployed a 9.1 meter (30 foot) parabolic reflector antenna with a transponder that covered a frequency range from VHF through C-band. The high RF gains obtained with the antenna were to be used for many dramatic communications experiments, one of which was the Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment (HET), a demonstration of direct broadcast of color television to low cost terminals in remote regions of the United States. More than 120 terminals with 3-meter antennas were deployed in Alaska, Washington, the Rocky Mountains, and Appalachia to provide educational and health services to selected community centers. After 11 months of nearly continuous service, the performance of both the satellite and the experiment have exceeded all expectations.

  13. ATS-6 - A satellite for human needs. [Health, Education, Telecommunications Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalen, A. A.; Johnston, W. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    On May 30, 1974, NASA launched the ATS-6 experimental communications satellite into a geosynchronous orbit at a station centered over the United States. The 1400 kg satellite was designed to be body-stabilized with a 3-axis control system capable of precision offset pointing. It deployed a 9.1 meter (30 foot) parabolic reflector antenna with a transponder that covered a frequency range from VHF through C-band. The high RF gains obtained with the antenna were to be used for many dramatic communications experiments, one of which was the Health/Education Telecommunications Experiment (HET), a demonstration of direct broadcast of color television to low cost terminals in remote regions of the United States. More than 120 terminals with 3-meter antennas were deployed in Alaska, Washington, the Rocky Mountains, and Appalachia to provide educational and health services to selected community centers. After 11 months of nearly continuous service, the performance of both the satellite and the experiment have exceeded all expectations.

  14. Value of bias-corrected satellite rainfall products in SWAT simulations and comparison with other models in the Mara basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrat-Capdevila, A.; Abitew, T. A.; Roy, T.; van Griensven, A.; Valdes, J. B.; Bauwens, W.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrometeorological monitoring networks are often limited for basins located in the developing world such as the transboundary Mara Basin. The advent of earth observing systems have brought satellite rainfall and evapotranspiration products, which can be used to force hydrological models in data scarce basins. The objective of this study is to develop improved hydrologic simulations using distributed satellite rainfall products (CMORPH and TMPA) with a bias-correction, and compare the performance with different input data and models. The bias correction approach for the satellite-products (CMORPH and TMPA) involves the use of a distributed reference dataset (CHIRPS) and historical ground gauge records. We have applied the bias-corrected satellite products to force the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model for the Mara Basin. Firstly, we calibrate the SWAT parameters related to ET simulation using ET from remote sensing. Then, the SWAT parameters that control surface processes are calibrated using the available limited flow. From the analysis, we noted that not only the bias-corrected satellite rainfall but also augmenting limited flow data with monthly remote sensing ET improves the model simulation skill and reduces the parameter uncertainty to some extent. We have planned to compare these results from a lumped model forced by the same input satellite rainfall. This will shed light on the potential of satellite rainfall and remote sensing ET along with in situ data for hydrological processes modeling and the inherent uncertainty in a data scarce basin.

  15. Extended contingency table: Performance metrics for satellite observations and climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    AghaKouchak, A.; Mehran, A.

    2013-10-01

    Validation of gridded satellite observations and climate model simulations are fundamental to future improvements in retrieval algorithms and model developments. Among the metrics, the contingency table, which includes a number of categorical indices, is extensively used in evaluation studies. While the categorical indices offer invaluable information, they do not provide any insight into the volume of the variable detected correctly/incorrectly. In this study, the contingency table categorical metrics are extended to volumetric indices for evaluation of gridded data. The suggested indices include (a) Volumetric Hit Index (VHI): volume of correctly detected simulations relative to the volume of the correctly detected simulations and missed observations; (b) Volumetric False Alarm Ratio (VFAR): volume of false simulations relative to the sum of simulations; (c) Volumetric Miss Index (VMI): volume of missed observations relative to the sum of missed observations and correctly detected simulations; and (d) the Volumetric Critical Success Index (VCSI). The latter provides an overall measure of volumetric performance including volumetric hits, false alarms, and misses. First, using two synthetic time series, the volumetric indices are evaluated against the contingency table categorical metrics. Then, the volumetric indices are used to evaluate a gridded data set at the continental scale. The results show that the volumetric indices provide additional information beyond the commonly used categorical metrics that can be useful in evaluating gridded data sets.

  16. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: Comparing simulations to experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.P.; Sotthewes, K.; Swigchem, van J.; Zandvliet, H.J.W.; Kooij, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results,

  17. Application of satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature in the regional soil moisture simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. K. Shi

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available As the satellite microwave remote sensed brightness temperature is sensitive to land surface soil moisture (SM and SM is a basic output variable in model simulation, it is of great significance to use the brightness temperature data to improve SM numerical simulation. In this paper, the theory developed by Yan et al. (2004 about the relationship between satellite microwave remote sensing polarization index and SM was used to estimate the land surface SM from AMSR-E (Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer – Earth Observing System brightness temperature data. With consideration of land surface soil texture, surface roughness, vegetation optical thickness, and the AMSR-E monthly SM products, the regional daily land surface SM was estimated over the eastern part of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. The results show that the estimated SM is lower than the ground measurements and the NCEP (American National Centers for Environmental Prediction reanalysis data at the Maqu Station (33.85° N, 102.57° E and the Tanglha Station (33.07° N, 91.94° E, but its regional distribution is reasonable and somewhat better than that from the daily AMSR-E SM product, and its temporal variation shows a quick response to the ground daily precipitations. Furthermore, in order to improve the simulating ability of the WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting model to land surface SM, the estimated SM was assimilated into the Noah land surface model by the Newtonian relaxation (NR method. The results indicate that, by fine tuning of the quality factor in NR method, the simulated SM values are improved most in desert area, followed by grassland, shrub and grass mixed zone. At temporal scale, Root Mean Square Error (RMSE values between simulated and observed SM are decreased 0.03 and 0.07 m3/m3 by using the NR method in the Maqu Station and the Tanglha Station, respectively.

  18. A fast radiative transfer method for the simulation of visible satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheck, Leonhard; Frèrebeau, Pascal; Buras-Schnell, Robert; Mayer, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    A computationally efficient radiative transfer method for the simulation of visible satellite images is presented. The top of atmosphere reflectance is approximated by a function depending on vertically integrated optical depths and effective particle sizes for water and ice clouds, the surface albedo, the sun and satellite zenith angles and the scattering angle. A look-up table (LUT) for this reflectance function is generated by means of the discrete ordinate method (DISORT). For a constant scattering angle the reflectance is a relatively smooth and symmetric function of the two zenith angles, which can be well approximated by the lowest-order terms of a 2D Fourier series. By storing only the lowest Fourier coefficients and adopting a non-equidistant grid for the scattering angle, the LUT is reduced to a size of 21 MB per satellite channel. The computation of the top of atmosphere reflectance requires only the calculation of the cloud parameters from the model state and the evaluation and interpolation of the reflectance function using the compressed LUT and is thus orders of magnitude faster than DISORT. The accuracy of the method is tested by generating synthetic satellite images for the 0.6 μm and 0.8 μm channels of the SEVIRI instrument for operational COSMO-DE model forecasts from the German Weather Service (DWD) and comparing them to DISORT results. For a test period in June the root mean squared absolute reflectance error is about 10-2 and the mean relative reflectance error is less than 2% for both channels. For scattering angles larger than 170 ° the rapid variation of reflectance with the particle size related to the backscatter glory reduces the accuracy and the errors increase by a factor of 3-4. Speed and accuracy of the new method are sufficient for operational data assimilation and high-resolution model verification applications.

  19. Simulation of a complete inelastic neutron scattering experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Edwards, H; Nielsen, K; Skaarup, P; Lake, B

    2002-01-01

    A simulation of an inelastic neutron scattering experiment on the high-temperature superconductor La sub 2 sub - sub x Sr sub x CuO sub 4 is presented. The complete experiment, including sample, is simulated using an interface between the experiment control program and the simulation software package (McStas) and is compared with the experimental data. Simulating the entire experiment is an attractive alternative to the usual method of convoluting the model cross section with the resolution function, especially if the resolution function is nontrivial. (orig.)

  20. Tropospheric NO2 Columns over Northeastern North America:Comparison of CMAQ Model Simulations with GOME Satellite Measurements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We present comparisons of the NO2 regional Chemical Transport Model (CTM) simulations over Northeastern North America during the time period from May to September, 1998 with hourly surface NO2 observations and the NO2 columns retrieved from the GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) satellite instrument. The model calculations were performed using the Mesoscale Meteorological Model 5 (MM5),Sparse Matrix Operator Kernal Emissions (SMOKE), and Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ)modeling systems, using the emission data from the National Emissions Inventory (NEI) databases of 1996 (U.S.) and 1995 (Canada). The major objectives were to assess the performance of the CMAQ model and the accuracy of the emissions inventories as they affected the simulations of this important short-lived atmospheric species. The modeled (NCMAQ) and measured (NGOME) NO2 column amounts, as well as their temporal variations, agreed reasonably well. The absolute differences (NCMAQ-NGOME) across the domain were between ±3.0×1015 molecules cm-2, but they were less than ±1.0 × 1015 molecules cm-2 over the majority (80%) of the domain studied. The overall correlation coefficient between the measurements and the simulations was 0.75. The differences were mainly ascribed to a combination of inaccurate emission data for the CTM and the uncertainties in the GOME retrievals. Of these, the former were the more easily identifiable.

  1. Comparison of simulation modeling and satellite techniques for monitoring ecological processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Box, Elgene O.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985 improvements were made in the world climatic data base for modeling and predictive mapping; in individual process models and the overall carbon-balance models; and in the interface software for mapping the simulation results. Statistical analysis of the data base was begun. In 1986 mapping was shifted to NASA-Goddard. The initial approach involving pattern comparisons was modified to a more statistical approach. A major accomplishment was the expansion and improvement of a global data base of measurements of biomass and primary production, to complement the simulation data. The main accomplishments during 1987 included: production of a master tape with all environmental and satellite data and model results for the 1600 sites; development of a complete mapping system used for the initial color maps comparing annual and monthly patterns of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), actual evapotranspiration, net primary productivity, gross primary productivity, and net ecosystem production; collection of more biosphere measurements for eventual improvement of the biological models; and development of some initial monthly models for primary productivity, based on satellite data.

  2. On-orbit flight results from the reconfigurable cibola flight experiment satellite (CFEsat)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caffrey, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morgan, Keith [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Roussel-dupre, Diane [LANL; Robinson, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Anthony [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Salazar, Anthony [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wirthlin, Michael [BYU; Howes, William [BYU; Richins, Daniel [BYU

    2009-01-01

    The Cibola Flight Experiment (CFE) is an experimental small satellite developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to demonstrate the feasibility of using FPGA-based reconfigurable computing for sensor processing in a space environment. The CFE satellite was launched on March 8, 2007 in low-earth orbit and has operated extremely well since its deployment. The nine Xilinx Virtex FPGAs used in the payload have been used for several high-throughput sensor processing applications and for single-event upset (SEU) monitoring and mitigation. This paper will describe the CFE system and summarize its operational results. In addition, this paper will describe the results from several SEU detection circuits that were performed on the spacecraft.

  3. World′s first telepathology experiments employing WINDS ultra-high-speed internet satellite, nicknamed "KIZUNA"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sawai

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recent advances in information technology have allowed the development of a telepathology system involving high-speed transfer of high-volume histological figures via fiber optic landlines. However, at present there are geographical limits to landlines. The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA has developed the "Kizuna" ultra-high speed internet satellite and has pursued its various applications. In this study we experimented with telepathology in collaboration with JAXA using Kizuna. To measure the functionality of the Wideband InterNet working engineering test and Demonstration Satellite (WINDS ultra-high speed internet satellite in remote pathological diagnosis and consultation, we examined the adequate data transfer speed and stability to conduct telepathology (both diagnosis and conferencing with functionality, and ease similar or equal to telepathology using fiber-optic landlines. Materials and Methods: We performed experiments for 2 years. In year 1, we tested the usability of the WINDS for telepathology with real-time video and virtual slide systems. These are state-of-the-art technologies requiring massive volumes of data transfer. In year 2, we tested the usability of the WINDS for three-way teleconferencing with virtual slides. Facilities in Iwate (northern Japan, Tokyo, and Okinawa were connected via the WINDS and voice conferenced while remotely examining and manipulating virtual slides. Results: Network function parameters measured using ping and Iperf were within acceptable limits. However; stage movement, zoom, and conversation suffered a lag of approximately 0.8 s when using real-time video, and a delay of 60-90 s was experienced when accessing the first virtual slide in a session. No significant lag or inconvenience was experienced during diagnosis and conferencing, and the results were satisfactory. Our hypothesis was confirmed for both remote diagnosis using real-time video and virtual slide systems, and also

  4. Simulation of Stochastic Loads for Fatigue Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Brincker, Rune

    1989-01-01

    A simple direct simulation method for stochastic fatigue-load generation is described in this paper. The simulation method is based on the assumption that only the peaks of the load process significantly affect the fatigue life. The method requires the conditional distribution functions of load...... process by a Markov process. Two different spectra from two tubular joints in an offshore structure (one narrow banded and one wide banded) are considered in an example. The results show that the simple direct method is quite efficient and results in a simulation speed of about 3000 load cycles per second...... ranges given the last peak values. Analytical estimates of these distribution functions are presented in the paper and compared with estimates based on a more accurate simulation method. In the more accurate simulation method samples at equidistant times are generated by approximating the stochastic load...

  5. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML--the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltemath, Dagmar; Adams, Richard; Bergmann, Frank T; Hucka, Michael; Kolpakov, Fedor; Miller, Andrew K; Moraru, Ion I; Nickerson, David; Sahle, Sven; Snoep, Jacky L; Le Novère, Nicolas

    2011-12-15

    The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from different fields of research

  6. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML - The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE) proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. Results In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML). SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. Conclusions With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s) used, experiments covering models from

  7. Reproducible computational biology experiments with SED-ML - The Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waltemath Dagmar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The increasing use of computational simulation experiments to inform modern biological research creates new challenges to annotate, archive, share and reproduce such experiments. The recently published Minimum Information About a Simulation Experiment (MIASE proposes a minimal set of information that should be provided to allow the reproduction of simulation experiments among users and software tools. Results In this article, we present the Simulation Experiment Description Markup Language (SED-ML. SED-ML encodes in a computer-readable exchange format the information required by MIASE to enable reproduction of simulation experiments. It has been developed as a community project and it is defined in a detailed technical specification and additionally provides an XML schema. The version of SED-ML described in this publication is Level 1 Version 1. It covers the description of the most frequent type of simulation experiments in the area, namely time course simulations. SED-ML documents specify which models to use in an experiment, modifications to apply on the models before using them, which simulation procedures to run on each model, what analysis results to output, and how the results should be presented. These descriptions are independent of the underlying model implementation. SED-ML is a software-independent format for encoding the description of simulation experiments; it is not specific to particular simulation tools. Here, we demonstrate that with the growing software support for SED-ML we can effectively exchange executable simulation descriptions. Conclusions With SED-ML, software can exchange simulation experiment descriptions, enabling the validation and reuse of simulation experiments in different tools. Authors of papers reporting simulation experiments can make their simulation protocols available for other scientists to reproduce the results. Because SED-ML is agnostic about exact modeling language(s used

  8. Status of the NASA GMAO Observing System Simulation Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prive, Nikki C.; Errico, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) is a pure modeling study used when actual observations are too expensive or difficult to obtain. OSSEs are valuable tools for determining the potential impact of new observing systems on numerical weather forecasts and for evaluation of data assimilation systems (DAS). An OSSE has been developed at the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO, Errico et al 2013). The GMAO OSSE uses a 13-month integration of the European Centre for Medium- Range Weather Forecasts 2005 operational model at T511/L91 resolution for the Nature Run (NR). Synthetic observations have been updated so that they are based on real observations during the summer of 2013. The emulated observation types include AMSU-A, MHS, IASI, AIRS, and HIRS4 radiance data, GPS-RO, and conventional types including aircraft, rawinsonde, profiler, surface, and satellite winds. The synthetic satellite wind observations are colocated with the NR cloud fields, and the rawinsondes are advected during ascent using the NR wind fields. Data counts for the synthetic observations are matched as closely as possible to real data counts, as shown in Figure 2. Errors are added to the synthetic observations to emulate representativeness and instrument errors. The synthetic errors are calibrated so that the statistics of observation innovation and analysis increments in the OSSE are similar to the same statistics for assimilation of real observations, in an iterative method described by Errico et al (2013). The standard deviations of observation minus forecast (xo-H(xb)) are compared for the OSSE and real data in Figure 3. The synthetic errors include both random, uncorrelated errors, and an additional correlated error component for some observational types. Vertically correlated errors are included for conventional sounding data and GPS-RO, and channel correlated errors are introduced to AIRS and IASI (Figure 4). HIRS, AMSU-A, and MHS have a component of horizontally

  9. Experiment Simulation Configurations Used in DUNE CDR

    CERN Document Server

    Alion, T; Bashyal, A; Bass, M; Bishai, M; Cherdack, D; Diwan, M; Djurcic, Z; Evans, J; Fernandez-Martinez, E; Fields, L; Fleming, B; Gran, R; Guenette, R; Hewes, J; Hogan, M; Hylen, J; Junk, T; Kohn, S; LeBrun, P; Lundberg, B; Marchionni, A; Morris, C; Papadimitriou, V; Rameika, R; Rucinski, R; Soldner-Rembold, S; Sorel, M; Urheim, J; Viren, B; Whitehead, L; Wilson, R; Worcester, E; Zeller, G

    2016-01-01

    The LBNF/DUNE CDR describes the proposed physics program and experimental design at the conceptual design phase. Volume 2, entitled The Physics Program for DUNE at LBNF, outlines the scientific objectives and describes the physics studies that the DUNE collaboration will perform to address these objectives. The long-baseline physics sensitivity calculations presented in the DUNE CDR rely upon simulation of the neutrino beam line, simulation of neutrino interactions in the far detector, and a parameterized analysis of detector performance and systematic uncertainty. The purpose of this posting is to provide the results of these simulations to the community to facilitate phenomenological studies of long-baseline oscillation at LBNF/DUNE. Additionally, this posting includes GDML of the DUNE single-phase far detector for use in simulations. DUNE welcomes those interested in performing this work as members of the collaboration, but also recognizes the benefit of making these configurations readily available to the...

  10. Fast Simulators for Satellite Cloud Optical Centroid Pressure Retrievals, 1. Evaluation of OMI Cloud Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, J.; Vasilkov, A.; Gupta, P.; Bhartia, P. K.; Veefkind, P.; Sneep, M.; de Haan, J.; Polonsky, I.; Spurr, R.

    2012-01-01

    The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP), also known as the effective cloud pressure, is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosol. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudS at radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, low altitude clouds missed by CloudSat, and the fact that CloudSat only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  11. Fast simulators for satellite cloud optical centroid pressure retrievals; evaluation of OMI cloud retrievals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Joiner

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The cloud Optical Centroid Pressure (OCP is a satellite-derived parameter that is commonly used in trace-gas retrievals to account for the effects of clouds on near-infrared through ultraviolet radiance measurements. Fast simulators are desirable to further expand the use of cloud OCP retrievals into the operational and climate communities for applications such as data assimilation and evaluation of cloud vertical structure in general circulation models. In this paper, we develop and validate fast simulators that provide estimates of the cloud OCP given a vertical profile of optical extinction. We use a pressure-weighting scheme where the weights depend upon optical parameters of clouds and/or aerosols. A cloud weighting function is easily extracted using this formulation. We then use fast simulators to compare two different satellite cloud OCP retrievals, from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI, with estimates based on collocated cloud extinction profiles from a combination of CloudSat radar and MODIS visible radiance data. These comparisons are made over a wide range of conditions to provide a comprehensive validation of the OMI cloud OCP retrievals. We find generally good agreement between OMI cloud OCPs and those predicted by CloudSat. However, the OMI cloud OCPs from the two independent algorithms agree better with each other than either does with the estimates from CloudSat/MODIS. Differences between OMI cloud OCPs and those based on CloudSat/MODIS may result from undetected snow/ice at the surface, cloud 3-D effects, cases of low clouds obscurred by ground-clutter in CloudSat observations and by opaque high clouds in CALIPSO lidar observations, and the fact that CloudSat/CALIPSO only observes a relatively small fraction of an OMI field-of-view.

  12. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the

  13. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  14. Radial distribution and strong lensing statistics of satellite galaxies and substructure using high resolution LCDM hydrodynamical simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Maccio, A V; Stadel, J; Diemand, J; Maccio', Andrea V.; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim; Diemand, Juerg

    2006-01-01

    We analyse the number density and radial distribution of substructures and satellite galaxies using cosmological simulations that follow the gas dynamics of a baryonic component, including shock heating, radiative cooling and star formation within the hierarchical concordance LCDM model. We find that the dissipation of the baryons greatly enhances the survival of subhaloes, expecially in the galaxy core, resulting in a radial distribution of satellite galaxies that closely follows the overall mass distribution. Hydrodynamical simulations are necessary to resolve the adiabatic contraction and dense cores of galaxies, resulting in a total number of satellites a factor of two larger than found in pure dark matter simulation. Convergence tests show that the cored distribution found by previous authors was due to physical overmerging of dark matter only structures. We proceed to use a ray-shooting technique in order to study the impact of these additional substructures on the number of violations of the cusp caust...

  15. Variable conductance heat pipe technology. [research project resulting in heat pipe experiment on OAO-3 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, W. T.; Edwards, D. K.; Eninger, J. E.; Marcus, B. D.

    1974-01-01

    A research and development program in variable conductance heat pipe technology is reported. The project involved: (1) theoretical and/or experimental studies in hydrostatics, (2) hydrodynamics, (3) heat transfer into and out of the pipe, (4) fluid selection, and (5) materials compatibility. The development, fabrication, and test of the space hardware resulted in a successful flight of the heat pipe experiment on the OAO-3 satellite. A summary of the program is provided and a guide to the location of publications on the project is included.

  16. Blind Equalization of a Nonlinear Satellite System Using MCMC Simulation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sénécal Stéphane

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the use of Markov Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC simulation methods for equalizing a satellite communication system. The main difficulties encountered are the nonlinear distorsions caused by the amplifier stage in the satellite. Several processing methods manage to take into account the nonlinearity of the system but they require the knowledge of a training/learning input sequence for updating the parameters of the equalizer. Blind equalization methods also exist but they require a Volterra modelization of the system. The aim of the paper is also to blindly restore the emitted message. To reach the goal, we adopt a Bayesian point of view. We jointly use the prior knowledge on the emitted symbols, and the information available from the received signal. This is done by considering the posterior distribution of the input sequence and the parameters of the model. Such a distribution is very difficult to study and thus motivates the implementation of MCMC methods. The presentation of the method is cut into two parts. The first part solves the problem for a simplified model; the second part deals with the complete model, and a part of the solution uses the algorithm developed for the simplified model. The algorithms are illustrated and their performance is evaluated using bit error rate versus signal-to-noise ratio curves.

  17. Clustering of tethered satellite system simulation data by an adaptive neuro-fuzzy algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Sunanda; Pemmaraju, Surya

    1992-01-01

    Recent developments in neuro-fuzzy systems indicate that the concepts of adaptive pattern recognition, when used to identify appropriate control actions corresponding to clusters of patterns representing system states in dynamic nonlinear control systems, may result in innovative designs. A modular, unsupervised neural network architecture, in which fuzzy learning rules have been embedded is used for on-line identification of similar states. The architecture and control rules involved in Adaptive Fuzzy Leader Clustering (AFLC) allow this system to be incorporated in control systems for identification of system states corresponding to specific control actions. We have used this algorithm to cluster the simulation data of Tethered Satellite System (TSS) to estimate the range of delta voltages necessary to maintain the desired length rate of the tether. The AFLC algorithm is capable of on-line estimation of the appropriate control voltages from the corresponding length error and length rate error without a priori knowledge of their membership functions and familarity with the behavior of the Tethered Satellite System.

  18. Satellite quenching time-scales in clusters from projected phase space measurements matched to simulated orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oman, Kyle A.; Hudson, Michael J.

    2016-12-01

    We measure the star formation quenching efficiency and time-scale in cluster environments. Our method uses N-body simulations to estimate the probability distribution of possible orbits for a sample of observed Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies in and around clusters based on their position and velocity offsets from their host cluster. We study the relationship between their star formation rates and their likely orbital histories via a simple model in which star formation is quenched once a delay time after infall has elapsed. Our orbit library method is designed to isolate the environmental effect on the star formation rate due to a galaxy's present-day host cluster from `pre-processing' in previous group hosts. We find that quenching of satellite galaxies of all stellar masses in our sample (109-10^{11.5}M_{⊙}) by massive (> 10^{13} M_{⊙}) clusters is essentially 100 per cent efficient. Our fits show that all galaxies quench on their first infall, approximately at or within a Gyr of their first pericentric passage. There is little variation in the onset of quenching from galaxy-to-galaxy: the spread in this time is at most ˜2 Gyr at fixed M*. Higher mass satellites quench earlier, with very little dependence on host cluster mass in the range probed by our sample.

  19. Shadow imaging of geosynchronous satellites: simulation, image reconstruction, and shadow prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Dennis M.; Hunt, Bobby R.; Sheppard, David G.

    2016-09-01

    Shadow imaging is a technique to obtain highly resolved silhouettes of resident space objects (RSOs) which would otherwise be unattainable using conventional terrestrial based imaging approaches. This is done by post processing the measured irradiance pattern (shadow) cast onto the Earth as the RSO occults a star. The research presented here focuses on shadow imaging of geosynchronous (GEO) satellites with near stationary orbits approximately 36,000 km from the Earth. Shadows pertaining to a set of diverse observing scenarios are simulated and used as inputs to a Fresnel based phase retrieval algorithm. Spatial resolution limits are evaluated and correlated to signal to noise (SNR) metrics. Resolvable feature sizes of less than 1 m are shown to be readily achievable using foreseeable observing scenarios. Initial output from a shadow prediction tool indicates that there are, on average, over 1000 shadows on the Earth on any given time from a single GEO satellite for stars brighter than mv=10. Shadow ground track uncertainties are correlated to stellar astrometric errors. Global and localized shadow track maps are presented demonstrating a high feasibility for future shadow collections.

  20. Dynamic System Simulation of the KRUSTY Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, Steven Karl [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kimpland, Robert Herbert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-09

    The proposed KRUSTY experiment is a demonstration of a reactor operating at power. The planned experimental configuration includes a highly enriched uranium (HEU) reflected core, cooled by multiple heat pipes leading to Stirling engines for primary heat rejection. Operating power is expected to be approximately four (4) to five (5) kilowatts with a core temperature above 1,000 K. No data is available on any historical reactor employing HEU metal that operated over the temperature range required for the KRUSTY experiment. Further, no reactor has operated with heat pipes as the primary cooling mechanism. Historic power reactors have employed either natural or forced convection so data on their operation is not directly applicable to the KRUSTY experiment. The primary purpose of the system model once developed and refined by data from these component experiments, will be used to plan the KRUSTY experiment. This planning will include expected behavior of the reactor from start-up, through various transient conditions where cooling begins to become present and effective, and finally establishment of steady-state. In addition, the model can provide indicators of anticipated off-normal events and appropriate operator response to those conditions. This information can be used to develop specific experiment operating procedures and aids to guide the operators in conduct of the experiment.

  1. 20 Years Experience with using Low Cost Launch Opportunities for 20 Small Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerman, Maarten; Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    these larger 'small satellites' are too big to be carried 'piggy-back'. The entrepreneurial efforts of leading FSU rocket &missile organisations in converting existing vehicles to meet the small satellite launch market at an appropriate cost has resulted in the FSU now holding the prime position for providing launches for the small satellite community - and with an excellent track record of successful launches. However, negotiating and completing a Launch Services Agreement (LSA) for a nano-micro-minisatellite with any launcher organisation is a complex matter and risky territory for the unwary or inexperienced who may easily fall prey to unexpected additional costs and delays. Whilst this warning should be heeded when dealing with European and US organisations, it is particularly relevant when negotiating launches from the FSU where there is a plethora of agencies and organisations offering a bewildering range of launch vehicles and options. Furthermore, the FSU has developed a very different technical and managerial philosophy towards launchers when compared with the west and this can be unnerving to 'first-time buyers'. Organisations experienced in dealing in the FSU will encounter a different but excellent service - once the launch service agreement has been thoroughly and fiercely negotiated in every detail. The inexperienced, however, have encountered frustrating delays, lost opportunities, unexpected taxes and costs for additional services or facilities not originally specified, and bewilderment at the different procedures used in the FSU. Fortunately, all this can be avoided with proper experience and the FSU is the current mainstay for launching small satellites quickly, affordably and reliably. Surrey has unique experience gathered over 20 years in handling launches for 20 small satellites, ranging from a 6kg nanosatellite, 50-100kg microsatellites, and a 325kg minisatellite, using 7 different launchers from the USA, Russia, Ukraine, and Europe. By working

  2. Simulations and Experiments in Philosophy of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Robert L.

    1987-01-01

    Describes two interactive computer programs that simulate abstract relationships and require students to use inductive reasoning, form and test hypotheses, and analyze functions of systems and the reasoning processes required to understand them. Their development and use in college philosophy of science courses is outlined, and possible future…

  3. Guiding Simulations and Experiments using Continuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for dimension N, but not for larger dimensions. In other words, a model is usually implemented as a carefully derived implicit integration scheme tailored for numerically stable simulations with the highest spacial resolution admitted by the computational power available. On the other hand, stable numerical...

  4. Validation of terrestrial water storage variations as simulated by different global numerical models with GRACE satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liangjing; Dobslaw, Henryk; Stacke, Tobias; Güntner, Andreas; Dill, Robert; Thomas, Maik

    2017-02-01

    Estimates of terrestrial water storage (TWS) variations from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission are used to assess the accuracy of four global numerical model realizations that simulate the continental branch of the global water cycle. Based on four different validation metrics, we demonstrate that for the 31 largest discharge basins worldwide all model runs agree with the observations to a very limited degree only, together with large spreads among the models themselves. Since we apply a common atmospheric forcing data set to all hydrological models considered, we conclude that those discrepancies are not entirely related to uncertainties in meteorologic input, but instead to the model structure and parametrization, and in particular to the representation of individual storage components with different spatial characteristics in each of the models. TWS as monitored by the GRACE mission is therefore a valuable validation data set for global numerical simulations of the terrestrial water storage since it is sensitive to very different model physics in individual basins, which offers helpful insight to modellers for the future improvement of large-scale numerical models of the global terrestrial water cycle.

  5. Application of satellite estimates of rainfall distribution to simulate the potential for malaria transmission in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamana, T. K.; Eltahir, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Hydrology, Entomology and Malaria Transmission Simulator (HYDREMATS) is a mechanistic model developed to assess malaria risk in areas where the disease is water-limited. This model relies on precipitation inputs as its primary forcing. Until now, applications of the model have used ground-based precipitation observations. However, rain gauge networks in the areas most affected by malaria are often sparse. The increasing availability of satellite based rainfall estimates could greatly extend the range of the model. The minimum temporal resolution of precipitation data needed was determined to be one hour. The CPC Morphing technique (CMORPH ) distributed by NOAA fits this criteria, as it provides 30-minute estimates at 8km resolution. CMORPH data were compared to ground observations in four West African villages, and calibrated to reduce overestimation and false alarm biases. The calibrated CMORPH data were used to force HYDREMATS, resulting in outputs for mosquito populations, vectorial capacity and malaria transmission.

  6. Satellite-based RAR performance simulation for measuring directional ocean wave spectrum based on SAR inversion spectrum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Lin; MAO Zhihua; HUANG Haiqing; GONG Fang

    2010-01-01

    Some missions have been carried out to measure wave directional spectrum by synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and airborne real aperture radar (RAR) at a low incidence. Both them have their own advantages and limitations. Scientists hope that SAR and satellite-based RAR can complement each other for the research on wave properties in the future. For this study, the authors aim to simulate the satellite-based RAR system to validate performance for measuring the directional wave spectrum. The principal measurements are introduced and the simulation methods based on the one developed by Hauser are adopted and slightly modified. To enhance the authenticity of input spectrum and the wave spectrum measuring consistency for SAR and satellite-based RAR, the wave height spectrum inversed from Envisat ASAR data by cross spectrum technology is used as the input spectrum of the simulation system. In the process of simulation, the sea surface, backscattering signal, modulation spectrum and the estimated wave height spectrum are simulated in each look direction. Directional wave spectrum are measured based on the simulated observations from 0° to 360~. From the estimated wave spectrum, it has an 180° ambiguity like SAR, but it has no special high wave number cut off in all the direction. Finally, the estimated spectrum is compared with the input one in terms of the dominant wave wavelength, direction and SWH and the results are promising. The simulation shows that satellite-based RAR should be capable of measuring the directional wave properties. Moreover, it indicates satellite-based RAR basically can measure waves that SAR can measure.

  7. Seasonally Frozen Soil Monitoring Using Passive Microwave Satellite Data and Simulation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, D. L.; Owe, M.; Levine, E.

    1998-01-01

    Satellite data and simulation modeling were used to assess seasonally frozen soils in the central US - Canada borders area (46-53 degrees N and 96-108 degrees). We used Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) satellite data to delineate the top layer of frozen soils. SMMR is a passive microwave sensor having five channels (6.6, 10, 18, 21 and 37 GHz) with a horizontal and vertical polarization. SMRR data are available between 1978-1987 with noon and midnight overpass and footprint sizes between 25 km and 150 km. SMMR data were processed from resampled 1/4 degree grid cells during fall freeze-up and spring thaw (fall 1985 - spring 1987). The dielectric properties of a target may directly affect the satellite signal. The dielectric value is an order of magnitude smaller for frozen soil water. There are other significant changes to the emitted microwave signal from changes to the surface physical temperature, attenuation of the soil signal from plant water and soil moisture. We further characterized the temporal and spatial dynamic of frozen soils using the FroST (Frozen Soil Temperature) simulation model. The FroST model was used to further predict soil water and ice content, and soil temperature. SMMR results were compared versus 5-cm soil temperature data from available weather stations (14 in Canada and 11 for available months in the US). SMMR data were analyzed as a function of frequency, polarization, polarization difference, and "frequency gradient". In addition, vegetation density, physical temperature and snow depth were also considered. Preliminary analysis of SMMR derived frozen soil/thaw classification using a simple threshold classification indicates a mean overall classification accuracy by season of 85 percent. A sensitivity analysis for different soils with varying amounts of snow was conducted with FroST, which showed that the amount of snow, and the time of snow fall and melt affected the ice and water content, and depth of thaw. These

  8. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics......: basic chemical engineering, operability and safety analysis and process control. User experiences from both teachers and students are presented. The benefits of dynamic simulation as an additional teaching tool are discussed and summarized. The experiences confirm that commercial dynamic simulators...

  9. Closed loop simulations of the thermal experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Díaz-Aguiló, Marc; Mateos, Ignacio; Lobo, Alberto; Gesa, Lluís; Martín, Víctor; Lloro, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    The thermal experiments to be carried out onboard LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will provide essential information of the dependences of the instrument with respect to temperature variations. These thermal experiments must be modelled and simulated both to be validated for mission operations purposes and also to develop a data analysis tool able to characterise the temperature noise contribution to the instrument performance. Here we will present the models developed and the simulated signals for some of the experiments together with the corresponding interferometer readouts, the latter being computed by combining the thermal models with the global LTP (LISA Technology Package) simulator of the LTP Data Analysis team.

  10. A radiation belt monitor for the High Energy Transient Experiment Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, D. H.; Wenzel, K. W.; Petrasso, R. D.; Prigozhin, G. Y.; Doty, J.; Ricker, G.

    1993-01-01

    A Radiation Belt Monitor (RBM) sensitive to protons and electrons with energy approximately greater than 0.5 MeV has been designed for the High Energy Transient Experiment (HETE) satellite in order to: first, control the on-off configuration of the experiments (i.e. those susceptible to proton damage); and second, to indicate the presence of proton and/or electron events that could masquerade as legitimate high energy photon events. One of the two RBM channels has an enhanced sensitivity to electrons. Each channel of the RBM, based on a PIN silicon diode, requires a typical power of 6 milliwatts. Tests have been performed with protons with energies from approximately 0.1 to 2.5 MeV (generated by a Cockcroft-Walton linear accelerator via the d(d,p)t reaction), and with electrons with energies up to 1 MeV (from a 1.0 microcurie Bi-207 source).

  11. Polar-direct-drive simulations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marozas, J.A.; Marshall, F.J.; Craxton, R.S.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Skupsky, S.; Bonino, M.J.; Collins, T.J.B.; Epstein, R.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Jacobs-Perkins, D.; Knauer, J.P.; McCrory, R.L.; McKenty, P.W.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Noyes, S.G.; Radha, P.B.; Sangster, T.C.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.

    2006-05-17

    Polar direct drive (PDD) will allow direct-drive ignition experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as it is configured for x-ray drive. Optimal drive uniformity is obtained via a combination of beam repointing, pulse shapes, spot shapes, and/or target design. This article describes progress in the development of standard and "Saturn" PDD target designs.

  12. Phonocatalysis. An ab initio simulation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangnam Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Using simulations, we postulate and show that heterocatalysis on large-bandgap semiconductors can be controlled by substrate phonons, i.e., phonocatalysis. With ab initio calculations, including molecular dynamic simulations, the chemisorbed dissociation of XeF6 on h-BN surface leads to formation of XeF4 and two surface F/h-BN bonds. The reaction pathway and energies are evaluated, and the sorption and reaction emitted/absorbed phonons are identified through spectral analysis of the surface atomic motion. Due to large bandgap, the atomic vibration (phonon energy transfer channels dominate and among them is the match between the F/h-BN covalent bond stretching and the optical phonons. We show that the chemisorbed dissociation (the pathway activation ascent requires absorption of large-energy optical phonons. Then using progressively heavier isotopes of B and N atoms, we show that limiting these high-energy optical phonons inhibits the chemisorbed dissociation, i.e., controllable phonocatalysis.

  13. Plasma arc cutting technology: simulation and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantoro, G; Colombo, V; Concetti, A; Ghedini, E; Sanibondi, P; Zinzani, F; Rotundo, F [Department of Mechanical Engineering (D.I.E.M.) and Research Center for Applied Mathematics (C.I.R.A.M.), Alma Mater Studiorum-Universita di Bologna, Via Saragozza 8, 40123 Bologna (Italy); Dallavalle, S; Vancini, M, E-mail: emanuele.ghedini@unibo.it [Cebora S.p.A., Via Andrea Costa 24, 40057 Cadriano di Granarolo (Italy)

    2011-01-01

    Transferred arc plasma torches are widely used in industrial processes for cutting of metallic materials because of their ability to cut a wide range of metals with very high productivity. The process is characterized by a transferred electric arc established between an electrode inside the torch (the cathode) and another electrode, the metallic workpiece to be cut (the anode). In order to obtain a high quality cut and a high productivity, the plasma jet must be as collimated as possible and must have the higher achievable power density. Plasma modelling and numerical simulation can be very useful tools for the designing and optimizing these devices, but research is still in the making for finding a link between simulation of the plasma arc and a consistent prevision of cut quality. Numerical modelling of the behaviour of different types of transferred arc dual gas plasma torches can give an insight on the physical reasons for the industrial success of various design and process solutions that have appeared over the last years. Diagnostics based on high speed imaging and Schlieren photography can play an important role for investigating piercing, dross generation, pilot arcing and anode attachment location. Also, the behaviour of hafnium cathodes at high current levels at the beginning of their service life can been experimentally investigated, with the final aim of understanding the phenomena that take place during those initial piercing and cutting phases and optimizing the initial shape of the surface of the emissive insert exposed to plasma atmosphere.

  14. Ion tracking simulations for the WITCH experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Baczyk, Pawel

    2013-01-01

    The WITCH experiment (standing for Weak Interation Trap for CHarged particles) is dedicated to high-precision measurements of fundamental properties of electroweak interaction. Its first goal is to indirectly determine the electron-neutrino correlation coefficient in $\\beta$ decay by measuring the energy spectrum of the recoiling nuclei. For this, a set-up consisting of two Penning traps, a retardation spectrometer and an MCP (Microchannel Plate) detector was designed and coupled to REXTRAP at ISOLDE/CERN.

  15. Assimilation of satellite information in a snowpack model to improve characterization of snow cover for runoff simulation and forecasting

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    A new technique for constructing spatial fields of snow characteristics for runoff simulation and forecasting is presented. The technique incorporates satellite land surface monitoring data and available ground-based hydrometeorological measurements in a physical based snowpack model. The snowpack model provides simulation of temporal changes of the snow depth, density and water equivalent (SWE), accounting for snow melt, sublimation, refreezing melt water and snow metamorphism processes with...

  16. Tunable nonlinear superconducting metamaterials: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepanier, Melissa

    I present experimental and numerical simulation results for two types of nonlinear tunable superconducting metamaterials: 2D arrays of rf SQUIDs (radio frequency superconducting quantum interference devices) as magnetic metamaterials and arrays of Josephson junction-loaded wires as electric metamaterials. The effective inductance of a Josephson junction is sensitive to dc current, temperature, and rf current. I took advantage of this property to design arrays of Josephson junction-loaded wires that present a tunable cutoff frequency and thus a tunable effective permittivity for propagating electromagnetic waves in a one-conductor waveguide. I measured the response of the metamaterial to each tuning parameter and found agreement with numerical simulations that employ the RCSJ (resistively and capacitively shunted junction) model. An rf SQUID is an analogue of an SRR (split ring resonator) with the gap capacitance replaced with a Josephson junction. Like the SRR the SQUID is a resonant structure with a frequency-dependent effective permeability. The difference between the SQUID and the SRR is that the effective inductance and thus effective permeability of the SQUID can be tuned with dc and rf flux, and temperature. Individual rf SQUID meta-atoms and two-dimensional arrays were designed and measured as a function of each tuning parameter and I have found excellent agreement with numerical simulations. There is also an interesting transparency feature that occurs for intermediate rf flux values. The tuning of SQUID arrays has a similar character to the tuning of individual rf SQUID meta-atoms. However, I found that the coupling between the SQUIDs increases the resonant frequency, decreases dc flux tuning, and introduces additional resonant modes. Another feature of arrays is disorder which suppresses the coherence of the response and negatively impacts the emergent properties of the metamaterial. The disorder was experimentally found to be mainly due to a dc flux

  17. Experiences on dynamic simulation software in chemical engineering education

    OpenAIRE

    Komulainen, Tiina M.; Enemark-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Sin, Gürkan; John P Fletcher; Cameron, David

    2012-01-01

    Commercial process simulators are increasing interest in the chemical engineer education. In this paper, the use of commercial dynamic simulation software, D-SPICE® and K-Spice®, for three different chemical engineering courses is described and discussed. The courses cover the following topics: basic chemical engineering, operability and safety analysis and process control. User experiences from both teachers and students are presented. The benefits of dynamic simulation as an additional teac...

  18. Magnetized laboratory plasma jets: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrafel, Peter; Bell, Kate; Greenly, John; Seyler, Charles; Kusse, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Experiments involving radial foils on a 1 M A , 100 n s current driver can be used to study the ablation of thin foils and liners, produce extreme conditions relevant to laboratory astrophysics, and aid in computational code validation. This research focuses on the initial ablation phase of a 20 μ m Al foil (8111 alloy), in a radial configuration, driven by Cornell University's COBRA pulsed power generator. In these experiments ablated surface plasma (ASP) on the top side of the foil and a strongly collimated axial plasma jet are observed developing midway through the current rise. With experimental and computational results this work gives a detailed description of the role of the ASP in the formation of the plasma jet with and without an applied axial magnetic field. This ˜1 T field is applied by a Helmholtz-coil pair driven by a slow, 150 μ s current pulse and penetrates the load hardware before arrival of the COBRA pulse. Several effects of the applied magnetic field are observed: (1) without the field extreme-ultraviolet emission from the ASP shows considerable azimuthal asymmetry while with the field the ASP develops azimuthal motion that reduces this asymmetry, (2) this azimuthal motion slows the development of the jet when the field is applied, and (3) with the magnetic field the jet becomes less collimated and has a density minimum (hollowing) on the axis. PERSEUS, an XMHD code, has qualitatively and quantitatively reproduced all these experimental observations. The differences between this XMHD and an MHD code without a Hall current and inertial effects are discussed. In addition the PERSEUS results describe effects we were not able to resolve experimentally and suggest a line of future experiments with better diagnostics.

  19. Magnetic processes in astrophysics theory, simulations, experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Rüdiger, Günther; Hollerbach, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    In this work the authors draw upon their expertise in geophysical and astrophysical MHD to explore the motion of electrically conducting fluids, the so-called dynamo effect, and describe the similarities and differences between different magnetized objects. They also explain why magnetic fields are crucial to the formation of the stars, and discuss promising experiments currently being designed to investigate some of the relevant physics in the laboratory. This interdisciplinary approach will appeal to a wide audience in physics, astrophysics and geophysics. This second edition covers such add

  20. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  1. Optimizing Chromatographic Separation: An Experiment Using an HPLC Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalliker, R. A.; Kayillo, S.; Dennis, G. R.

    2008-01-01

    Optimization of a chromatographic separation within the time constraints of a laboratory session is practically impossible. However, by employing a HPLC simulator, experiments can be designed that allow students to develop an appreciation of the complexities involved in optimization procedures. In the present exercise, a HPLC simulator from "JCE…

  2. Designing Nursing Simulation Clinical Experiences to Promote Critical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Bev; Koroll, Donna; Price, Susan

    2010-01-01

    The use of high fidelity simulation (HFS) learning opportunities in nursing education has received increased attention in the literature. This article describes the design of a systematic framework used to promote critical inquiry and provide meaningful simulation clinical experiences for second year nursing students. Critical inquiry, as defined…

  3. Assimilation of satellite information in a snowpack model to improve characterization of snow cover for runoff simulation and forecasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Kuchment

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new technique for constructing spatial fields of snow characteristics for runoff simulation and forecasting is presented. The technique incorporates satellite land surface monitoring data and available ground-based hydrometeorological measurements in a physical based snowpack model. The snowpack model provides simulation of temporal changes of the snow depth, density and water equivalent (SWE, accounting for snow melt, sublimation, refreezing melt water and snow metamorphism processes with a special focus on forest cover effects. The model was first calibrated against available ground-based snow measurements and then was applied to calculate the spatial distribution of snow characteristics using satellite data and interpolated ground-based meteorological data. The remote sensing data used in the model consist of products derived from observations of MODIS and AMSR-E instruments onboard Terra and Aqua satellites. They include daily maps of snow cover, snow water equivalent (SWE, land surface temperature, and weekly maps of surface albedo. Maps of land cover classes and tree cover fraction derived from NOAA AVHRR were used to characterize the vegetation cover. The developed technique was tested over a study area of approximately 200 000 km2 located in the European part of Russia (56° N to 60° N, and 48° E to 54° E. The study area comprises the Vyatka River basin with the catchment area of 124 000 km2. The spatial distributions of SWE, obtained with the coupled model, as well as solely from satellite data were used as the inputs in a physically-based model of runoff generation to simulate runoff hydrographs on the Vyatka river for spring seasons of 2003, 2005. The comparison of simulated hydrographs with the observed ones has shown that suggested procedure gives a higher accuracy of snow cover spatial distribution representation and hydrograph simulations than the direct use of satellite SWE data.

  4. Assimilation of satellite information in a snowpack model to improve characterization of snow cover for runoff simulation and forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchment, L. S.; Romanov, P.; Gelfan, A. N.; Demidov, V. N.

    2009-08-01

    A new technique for constructing spatial fields of snow characteristics for runoff simulation and forecasting is presented. The technique incorporates satellite land surface monitoring data and available ground-based hydrometeorological measurements in a physical based snowpack model. The snowpack model provides simulation of temporal changes of the snow depth, density and water equivalent (SWE), accounting for snow melt, sublimation, refreezing melt water and snow metamorphism processes with a special focus on forest cover effects. The model was first calibrated against available ground-based snow measurements and then was applied to calculate the spatial distribution of snow characteristics using satellite data and interpolated ground-based meteorological data. The remote sensing data used in the model consist of products derived from observations of MODIS and AMSR-E instruments onboard Terra and Aqua satellites. They include daily maps of snow cover, snow water equivalent (SWE), land surface temperature, and weekly maps of surface albedo. Maps of land cover classes and tree cover fraction derived from NOAA AVHRR were used to characterize the vegetation cover. The developed technique was tested over a study area of approximately 200 000 km2 located in the European part of Russia (56° N to 60° N, and 48° E to 54° E). The study area comprises the Vyatka River basin with the catchment area of 124 000 km2. The spatial distributions of SWE, obtained with the coupled model, as well as solely from satellite data were used as the inputs in a physically-based model of runoff generation to simulate runoff hydrographs on the Vyatka river for spring seasons of 2003, 2005. The comparison of simulated hydrographs with the observed ones has shown that suggested procedure gives a higher accuracy of snow cover spatial distribution representation and hydrograph simulations than the direct use of satellite SWE data.

  5. Polyurethane Foam Impact Experiments and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, M. E.; Chhabildas, L. C.; Reinhart, W. D.; Wong, M. K.

    1999-06-01

    Uniaxial strain impact experiments with a rigid polyurethane foam of nominal density 0.22g/cc are reported. A 6 mm thick foam impactor is mounted on the face of a projectile and impacts a thin (1 mm) target plate of aluminum or copper, on which the rear free surface velocity history is acquired with a VISAR. Impact velocities ranged from 300 to 1500 m/s. The velocity record monitors the initial shock from the foam transmitted through the target, followed by a reverberation within the target plate as the wave interacts with the compressed foam at the impact interface and the free recording surface. These one-dimensional uniaxial strain impact experiments were modeled using a traditional p-alpha porous material model for the distended polyurethane, which generally captured the motion imparted to the target by the foam. Some of the high frequency aspects of the data, reflecting the heterogeneous nature of the foam, can be recovered with computations of fully 3-dimensional explicit representations of this porous material.

  6. Real-time horizontality adjusting and control system of a large platform applied to satellite experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHONG Shi-sheng; ZHANG Shi-peng; WANG Rui

    2007-01-01

    In order to satisfy a satellite horizontality requirement in an experiment, it is indispensable to monitor and adjust the horizontality of a large platform loading the satellite under the condition of ultra-low temperature with real time. So the control system design and control strategy are described in detail to accomplish the horizontality monitoring and adjusting. The system adopts the industry control computer as the upper computer and the SIEMENS S7-300 PLC as the lower computer. The upper computer that bases on industry configuration software IFIX takes charge of monitoring the platform and puts forward the control strategy. PLC takes charge of receiving the adjusting instructions and controlling the legs moving to accomplish the horizontality adjusting. The horizontality adjusting strategy is emphasized and the concept of grads is introduced to establish a mathematics model of the platform inclined state, so the adjusting method is obtained. Accordingly the key question of the automatic horizontality adjusting is solved in this control system.

  7. The evolution of satellite-monitored radio tags for large whales: One laboratory's experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mate, Bruce; Mesecar, Roderick; Lagerquist, Barbara

    2007-02-01

    Despite several centuries of whaling and directed research, there are only a few whale stocks whose year-round whereabouts are reasonably well known. For the vast majority of depleted populations, the link between seasonal feeding and breeding concentrations remains unknown. This lack of information on range, seasonal distribution, stock structure, and migration routes makes it difficult to design and implement effective conservation measures to promote recovery. The use of such information would have been valuable to develop stock-specific quotas for whaling, but now it may be even more important for recovery of depleted stocks and identifying anthropogenic threats throughout a depleted stock's range. Building upon the preliminary findings of Discovery tags and more recent photo identification studies, satellite-monitored radio tags are now providing range and seasonal distribution information for many stocks of depleted large whales. These parameters are important to better estimate population abundance, characterize habitats, identify threats to recovery, and design effective protection measures when needed. This paper traces one laboratory's experience with the development of satellite-monitored radio tag technology for large whales, including attachment mechanisms and delivery systems, in the hope that others will profit from our successes and our mistakes. Selected examples are used to demonstrate how such tags contribute to new insights about whales' habitats, migrations, behaviour, and management.

  8. Simulation of physiology experiments--an alternative to animal use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageswari, K Sri; Devi, M Syamala; Sharma, Rajeev

    2007-01-01

    Amphibian experiments on nerve-muscle preparation and heart are essential as per first year MBBS practical syllabus, for learning basic concepts in Physiology. Need was felt to design and develop computer based simulation software as an alternative to animal use, due to growing concern and stringent laws imposed by animal ethical bodies. Computer algorithms were developed for 13 amphibian experiments, by manually tracing the graphs obtained through mechanical experimentation and storing the X, Y coordinates for the end points of each line segment as data base tables. By retrieving the data base tables, one for each experiment, the computer simulated graphs were drawn using Visual Basic 6 with timer control and Macromedia Flash for animation effects. A CD-ROM consisting of the software for computer simulation of all the amphibian experiments, as an alternative to the conventional animal experiments, has been developed for the benefit of medical students across the country, as a useful active learning tool.

  9. How wild is your model fire? Constraining WRF-Chem wildfire smoke simulations with satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, E. V.; Ford, B.; Lassman, W.; Pierce, J. R.; Pfister, G.; Volckens, J.; Magzamen, S.; Gan, R.

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) present during acute pollution events is associated with adverse health effects. While many anthropogenic pollution sources are regulated in the United States, emissions from wildfires are difficult to characterize and control. With wildfire frequency and intensity in the western U.S. projected to increase, it is important to more precisely determine the effect that wildfire emissions have on human health, and whether improved forecasts of these air pollution events can mitigate the health risks associated with wildfires. One of the challenges associated with determining health risks associated with wildfire emissions is that the low spatial resolution of surface monitors means that surface measurements may not be representative of a population's exposure, due to steep concentration gradients. To obtain better estimates of ambient exposure levels for health studies, a chemical transport model (CTM) can be used to simulate the evolution of a wildfire plume as it travels over populated regions downwind. Improving the performance of a CTM would allow the development of a new forecasting framework that could better help decision makers estimate and potentially mitigate future health impacts. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting model with online chemistry (WRF-Chem) to simulate wildfire plume evolution. By varying the model resolution, meteorology reanalysis initial conditions, and biomass burning inventories, we are able to explore the sensitivity of model simulations to these various parameters. Satellite observations are used first to evaluate model skill, and then to constrain the model results. These data are then used to estimate population-level exposure, with the aim of better characterizing the effects that wildfire emissions have on human health.

  10. Simulation of the satellite radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Tonboe

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although it is well known that radar waves penetrate into snow and sea ice, the exact mechanisms for radar-altimeter scattering and its link to the depth of the effective scattering surface from sea ice are still unknown. Previously proposed mechanisms linked the snow ice interface, i.e. the dominating scattering horizon, directly with the depth of the effective scattering surface. However, simulations using a multilayer radar scattering model show that the effective scattering surface is affected by snow-cover and ice properties. With the coming Cryosat-2 (planned launch 2009 satellite radar altimeter it is proposed that sea ice thickness can be derived by measuring its freeboard. In this study we evaluate the radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty in terms of floe buoyancy, radar penetration and ice type distribution using both a scattering model and ''Archimedes' principle''. The effect of the snow cover on the floe buoyancy and the radar penetration and on the ice cover spatial and temporal variability is assessed from field campaign measurements in the Arctic and Antarctic. In addition to these well known uncertainties we use high resolution RADARSAT SAR data to simulate errors due to the variability of the effective scattering surface as a result of the sub-footprint spatial backscatter and elevation distribution sometimes called preferential sampling. In particular in areas where ridges represent a significant part of the ice volume (e.g. the Lincoln Sea the simulated altimeter thickness estimate is lower than the real average footprint thickness. This means that the errors are large, yet manageable if the relevant quantities are known a priori. A discussion of the radar altimeter ice thickness retrieval uncertainties concludes the paper.

  11. Simulation of the satellite radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonboe, R. T.; Pedersen, L. T.; Haas, C.

    2009-07-01

    Although it is well known that radar waves penetrate into snow and sea ice, the exact mechanisms for radar-altimeter scattering and its link to the depth of the effective scattering surface from sea ice are still unknown. Previously proposed mechanisms linked the snow ice interface, i.e. the dominating scattering horizon, directly with the depth of the effective scattering surface. However, simulations using a multilayer radar scattering model show that the effective scattering surface is affected by snow-cover and ice properties. With the coming Cryosat-2 (planned launch 2009) satellite radar altimeter it is proposed that sea ice thickness can be derived by measuring its freeboard. In this study we evaluate the radar altimeter sea ice thickness retrieval uncertainty in terms of floe buoyancy, radar penetration and ice type distribution using both a scattering model and ''Archimedes' principle''. The effect of the snow cover on the floe buoyancy and the radar penetration and on the ice cover spatial and temporal variability is assessed from field campaign measurements in the Arctic and Antarctic. In addition to these well known uncertainties we use high resolution RADARSAT SAR data to simulate errors due to the variability of the effective scattering surface as a result of the sub-footprint spatial backscatter and elevation distribution sometimes called preferential sampling. In particular in areas where ridges represent a significant part of the ice volume (e.g. the Lincoln Sea) the simulated altimeter thickness estimate is lower than the real average footprint thickness. This means that the errors are large, yet manageable if the relevant quantities are known a priori. A discussion of the radar altimeter ice thickness retrieval uncertainties concludes the paper.

  12. Integration of environmental simulation models with satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies: case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steyaert, Louis T.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Brown, Jesslyn F.; Reed, Bradley C.

    1993-01-01

    Environmental modelers are testing and evaluating a prototype land cover characteristics database for the conterminous United States developed by the EROS Data Center of the U.S. Geological Survey and the University of Nebraska Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. This database was developed from multi temporal, 1-kilometer advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) data for 1990 and various ancillary data sets such as elevation, ecological regions, and selected climatic normals. Several case studies using this database were analyzed to illustrate the integration of satellite remote sensing and geographic information systems technologies with land-atmosphere interactions models at a variety of spatial and temporal scales. The case studies are representative of contemporary environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management, and environmental simulation modeling at local to regional levels in global change research, land and water resource management and environmental risk assessment. The case studies feature land surface parameterizations for atmospheric mesoscale and global climate models; biogenic-hydrocarbons emissions models; distributed parameter watershed and other hydrological models; and various ecological models such as ecosystem, dynamics, biogeochemical cycles, ecotone variability, and equilibrium vegetation models. The case studies demonstrate the important of multi temporal AVHRR data to develop to develop and maintain a flexible, near-realtime land cover characteristics database. Moreover, such a flexible database is needed to derive various vegetation classification schemes, to aggregate data for nested models, to develop remote sensing algorithms, and to provide data on dynamic landscape characteristics. The case studies illustrate how such a database supports research on spatial heterogeneity, land use, sensitivity analysis, and scaling issues

  13. Evaluation of microphysics and precipitation-type frequencies in long-term three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulations using passive and active microwave sensors from the TRMM satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, T.; Zeng, X.; Tao, W.; Lang, S.; Zhang, M.; Masunaga, H.

    2007-12-01

    With significant improvements in computational power over the last decades, cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations can now be conducted on larger scales for longer time periods to better understand cloud- precipitation systems. However, even after the decadal development of CRMs, there are many uncertainties in cloud microphysics processes and cloud-precipitation structures due to the lack of routine observations. Therefore, we need to establish a practical CRM evaluation framework using frequent observations from satellites. This evaluation framework consists of i) multi-satellite simulators and ii) the construction of statistical composites that can be used to effectively evaluate cloud-precipitation systems. First, simulated cloud- precipitation structures and microphysics processes are converted to satellite-consistent radar reflectivity and microwave brightness temperature using microwave and radar simulators in the Satellite Data Simulator Unit (SDSU). Second, the CRM-computed and satellite-observed radar reflectivities and microwave brightness temperatures are used to construct two statistical composites. One combines TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission) PR (precipitation radar) 13.8-GHz radar echo-top heights and TRMM VIRS (visible/infrared scanner) 10.8-micron brightness temperatures. This composite categorizes precipitating clouds into shallow warm, cumulus congestus, deep stratiform, and deep convective clouds. The other composite combines multi- frequency TMI (TRMM microwave imager) brightness temperatures. The combination of low- and high-frequency channels reveals the performance of the model cloud microphysics in terms of liquid and ice precipitation amounts. In this study, long-term CRM simulations are performed using the Goddard Cumulus Ensemble (GCE) model for three cases: ARM TWP-ICE (Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment), SCSMEX (South China Sea Monsoon Experiment), and KWAJEX (Kwajalein Experiment). Results from the proposed

  14. Nanoindentation shape effect: experiments, simulations and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabri, L [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Pugno, N [Department of Structural Engineering, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Rota, A [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Marchetto, D [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy); Valeri, S [CNR-INFM-National Research Center on nanoStructures and bioSystems at Surfaces (S3), Via Campi 213/a, 41100 Modena (Italy)

    2007-10-03

    AFM nanoindentation is nowadays commonly used for the study of mechanical properties of materials at the nanoscale. The investigation of surface hardness of a material using AFM means that the probe has to be able to indent the surface, but also to image it. Usually standard indenters are not sharp enough to obtain high-resolution images, but on the other hand measuring the hardness behaviour of a material with a non-standard sharp indenter gives only comparative results affected by a significant deviation from the commonly used hardness scales. In this paper we try to understand how the shape of the indenter affects the hardness measurement, in order to find a relationship between the measured hardness of a material and the corner angle of a pyramidal indenter. To achieve this we performed a full experimental campaign, indenting the same material with three focused ion beam (FIB) nanofabricated probes with a highly altered corner angle. We then compared the results obtained experimentally with those obtained by numerical simulations, using the finite element method (FEM), and by theoretical models, using a general scaling law for nanoindentation available for indenters with a variable size and shape. The comparison between these three approaches (experimental, numerical and theoretical approaches) reveals a good agreement and allowed us to find a theoretical relationship which links the measured hardness value with the shape of the indenter. The same theoretical approach has also been used to fit the hardness experimental results considering the indentation size effect. In this case we compare the measured data, changing the applied load.

  15. Integrating satellite retrieved leaf chlorophyll into land surface models for constraining simulations of water and carbon fluxes

    KAUST Repository

    Houborg, Rasmus

    2013-07-01

    In terrestrial biosphere models, key biochemical controls on carbon uptake by vegetation canopies are typically assigned fixed literature-based values for broad categories of vegetation types although in reality significant spatial and temporal variability exists. Satellite remote sensing can support modeling efforts by offering distributed information on important land surface characteristics, which would be very difficult to obtain otherwise. This study investigates the utility of satellite based retrievals of leaf chlorophyll for estimating leaf photosynthetic capacity and for constraining model simulations of water and carbon fluxes. © 2013 IEEE.

  16. Design and experiments of an active isolator for satellite micro-vibration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Weipeng; Huang Hai; Zhou Xubin; Zheng Xintao; Bai Yang

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a soft active isolator (SAI) derived from a voice coil motor is studied to determine its abilities as a micro-vibration isolation device for sensitive satellite payloads. Firstly, the two most important parts of the SAI, the mechanical unit and the low-noise driver, are designed and manufactured. Then, a rigid-flexible coupling dynamic model of the SAI is built, and a dynamic analysis is conducted. Furthermore, a controller with a sky-hook damper is designed. Finally, results from the performance tests of the mechanical/electronic parts and the isolation experiments are presented. The SAI attenuations are found to be more than ?20 dB above 5 Hz, and the control effect is stable.

  17. Design and experiments of an active isolator for satellite micro-vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Weipeng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a soft active isolator (SAI derived from a voice coil motor is studied to determine its abilities as a micro-vibration isolation device for sensitive satellite payloads. Firstly, the two most important parts of the SAI, the mechanical unit and the low-noise driver, are designed and manufactured. Then, a rigid-flexible coupling dynamic model of the SAI is built, and a dynamic analysis is conducted. Furthermore, a controller with a sky-hook damper is designed. Finally, results from the performance tests of the mechanical/electronic parts and the isolation experiments are presented. The SAI attenuations are found to be more than −20 dB above 5 Hz, and the control effect is stable.

  18. SACRA – global data sets of satellite-derived crop calendars for agricultural simulations: an estimation of a high-resolution crop calendar using satellite-sensed NDVI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kotsuki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To date, many studies have performed numerical estimations of food production and agricultural water demand to understand the present and future supply–demand relationship. A crop calendar (CC is an essential input datum to estimate food production and agricultural water demand accurately with the numerical estimations. CC defines the date or month when farmers plant and harvest in cropland. This study aims to develop a new global data set of a satellite-derived crop calendar for agricultural simulations (SACRA and reveal advantages and disadvantages of the satellite-derived CC compared to other global products. We estimate global CC at a spatial resolution of 5 min (≈10 km using the satellite-sensed NDVI data, which corresponds well to vegetation growth and death on the land surface. We first demonstrate that SACRA shows similar spatial pattern in planting date compared to a census-based product. Moreover, SACRA reflects a variety of CC in the same administrative unit, since it uses high-resolution satellite data. However, a disadvantage is that the mixture of several crops in a grid is not considered in SACRA. We also address that the cultivation period of SACRA clearly corresponds to the time series of NDVI. Therefore, accuracy of SACRA depends on the accuracy of NDVI used for the CC estimation. Although SACRA shows different CC from a census-based product in some regions, multiple usages of the two products are useful to take into consideration the uncertainty of the CC. An advantage of SACRA compared to the census-based products is that SACRA provides not only planting/harvesting dates but also a peak date from the time series of NDVI data.

  19. "FluSpec": A Simulated Experiment in Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen W.; Bigger, Andrew S.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    The "FluSpec" educational software package is a fully contained tutorial on the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy as well as a simulator on which experiments can be performed. The procedure for each of the experiments is also contained within the package along with example analyses of results that are obtained using the software.

  20. Computer simulation of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment with photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, S.; Yuan, S.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2008-01-01

    We present a computer simulation model of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment that is a one-to-one copy of an experiment reported recently (Jacques V. et al., Science, 315 (2007) 966). The model is solely based on experimental facts, satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and does not rel

  1. "FluSpec": A Simulated Experiment in Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigger, Stephen W.; Bigger, Andrew S.; Ghiggino, Kenneth P.

    2014-01-01

    The "FluSpec" educational software package is a fully contained tutorial on the technique of fluorescence spectroscopy as well as a simulator on which experiments can be performed. The procedure for each of the experiments is also contained within the package along with example analyses of results that are obtained using the software.

  2. Experiences with linear solvers for oil reservoir simulation problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joubert, W.; Janardhan, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Biswas, D.; Carey, G.

    1996-12-31

    This talk will focus on practical experiences with iterative linear solver algorithms used in conjunction with Amoco Production Company`s Falcon oil reservoir simulation code. The goal of this study is to determine the best linear solver algorithms for these types of problems. The results of numerical experiments will be presented.

  3. Computer simulation of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment with photons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, S.; Yuan, S.; De Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    We present a computer simulation model of Wheeler's delayed-choice experiment that is a one-to-one copy of an experiment reported recently (Jacques V. et al., Science, 315 (2007) 966). The model is solely based on experimental facts, satisfies Einstein's criterion of local causality and does not

  4. Observation of TGFs onboard "Vernov" satellite and TGEs in ground-based experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogomolov, Vitaly; Panasyuk, Mikhail; Svertilov, Sergey; Garipov, Gali; Iyudin, Anatoly; Klimov, Pavel; Morozenko, Violetta; Maximov, Ivan; Mishieva, Tatiana; Klimov, Stanislav; Pozanenko, Alexey; Rothkaehl, Hanna

    2016-04-01

    "Vernov" satellite with RELEC experiment on-board was launched on 2014 July, 8 into a polar solar-synchronous orbit. The payload includes DRGE gamma-ray spectrometer providing measurements in 10-3000 keV energy range with four detectors directed to atmosphere. Total area of DRGE detectors is ~500 cm2. The data were recorded both in monitoring and gamma by gamma modes with timing accuracy ~15 us. Several TGF candidates with 10-40 gammas in a burst with duration instruments on-board "Vernov" satellite shows the absence of significant electromagnetic pulses around correspondent time moments. Comparison with WWLLN lightning network data base also indicates that there were no thunderstorms connected with most of detected TGF candidates. Possible connection of these flashes with electron precipitations is discussed. Ground-based experiments, with similar gamma-spectrometers were conducted, to study the spectral, temporal and spatial characteristics of TGEs in 20-3000 keV energy range, as well, as to search the fast hard X-ray and gamma-ray flashes possibly appearing at the moment of lightning. The time of each gamma-quantum interaction was recorded with an ~15 us s accuracy together with detailed spectral data. Measurements were done on the ground at Moscow region, and at mountain altitude in Armenia at Aragatz station. During the time interval covering spring, summer and autumn of 2015 a number of TGEs were detected. Measured low-energy gamma-ray spectra usually contain a set of lines that can be interpreted as radiation of Rn-222 daughter isotopes. The increase of Rn-222 radiation was detected during rainfalls with thunderstorm, as well, as during rainy weather without thunderstorms. Variations of Rn-222 radiation dominate at low energies (measure low energy gamma-radiation from the electrons accelerated in thunderclouds. There were no significant flashes with duration of ~1ms detected in coincidence with a nearby lightnings.

  5. Evaluating Frontal Precipitation with a Spectral Microphysics Mesoscale Model and a Satellite Simulator as Compared to Radar and Radiometer Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M.; Braun, S. A.; Matsui, T.; Iguchi, T.; Williams, C. R.

    2013-12-01

    The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) onboard NASA Aqua satellite and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar sampled a frontal precipitation event in the US west coast on 30 to 31 December 2005. Simulations with bulk microphysics schemes in the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model have been evaluated with those remote sensing data. In the current study, we continue similar work to evaluate a spectral bin microphysics (SBM) scheme, HUCM, in the WRF model. The Goddard-Satellite Data Simulation Unit (G-SDSU) is used to simulate quantities observed by the radar and radiometer. With advanced representation of cloud and precipitation microphysics processes, the HUCM scheme predicts distributions of 7 hydrometeor species as storms evolve. In this study, the simulation with HUCM well captured the structure of the precipitation and its microphysics characteristics. In addition, it improved total precipitation ice mass simulation and corrected, to a certain extent, the large low bias of ice scattering signature in the bulk scheme simulations. However, the radar reflectivity simulations with the HUCM scheme were not improved as compared to the bulk schemes. We conducted investigations to understand how microphysical processes and properties, such as snow break up parameter and particle fall velocities would influence precipitation size distribution and spectrum of water paths, and further modify radar and/or radiometer simulations. Influence by ice nuclei is going to be examined as well.

  6. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Zenith Satellite System Using Multiple Navigation Signals as Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX is a remote control method that permits synchronization between a ground station atomic clock and Japanese quasi-zenith satellite system (QZSS crystal oscillators. To realize the RESSOX of the QZSS, the utilization of navigation signals of QZSS for feedback control is an important issue. Since QZSS transmits seven navigation signals (L1C/A, L1CP, L1CD, L2CM, L2CL, L5Q, and L5I, all combinations of these signals should be evaluated. First, the RESSOX algorithm will be introduced. Next, experimental performance will be demonstrated. If only a single signal is available, ionospheric delay should be input from external measurements. If multiple frequency signals are available, any combination, except for L2 and L5, gives good performance with synchronization error being within two nanoseconds that of RESSOX. The combination of L1CD and L5Q gives the best synchronization performance (synchronization error within 1.14 ns. Finally, in the discussion, comparisons of long-duration performance, computer simulation, and sampling number used in feedback control are considered. Although experimental results do not correspond to the simulation results, the tendencies are similar. For the overlapping Allan deviation of long duration, the stability of 1.23×10−14 at 100,160 s is obtained.

  7. Satellite Cloud Assimilation in the Weather Research & Forecasting (WRF) Model and its Impact on Air Quality Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pour Biazar, Arastoo; White, Andrew; McNider, Richard; Khan, Maudood; Dornblaser, Bright; Wu, Yuling

    2017-04-01

    Clouds have a significant role in air quality simulations as they modulate biogenic hydrocarbon emissions and photolysis rates, impact boundary-layer development, lead to deep vertical mixing of pollutants and precursors, and induce aqueous phase chemistry. Unfortunately, numerical meteorological models still have difficulty in creating clouds in the right place and time compared to observed clouds. This is especially the case when synoptic-scale forcing is weak, as often is the case during air pollution episodes in the Southeast United States. Thus, poor representation of clouds impacts the photochemical model's ability in simulating the air quality. However, since satellites provide the best observational platform for defining the formation and location of clouds, satellite observations can be of great value in retrospective simulations. Here, we present results from a recent activity in which the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) derived cloud fields are assimilated within Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to improve simulated clouds. The assimilation technique dynamically support cloud formation/dissipation within WRF based on GOES observations. The technique uses observations to identify model cloud errors, estimates a target vertical velocity and moisture to create/remove clouds, and adjust the flow field accordingly. The technique was implemented and tested in WRF for a month-long simulation during August 2006, and was tested in an air quality simulation over the period of August-September 2013 (NASA's Discover-AQ field campaign). The cloud assimilation on the average improved model cloud simulation by 15%. The cloud correction not only improved the spatial and temporal distribution of clouds, it also improved boundary layer temperature, humidity, and wind speed. These improvements in meteorological fields directly impacted the air quality simulations and altered trace gas concentrations. For air quality simulations, WRF

  8. An observing system simulation experiment for climate monitoring with GNSS radio occultation data: Setup and test bed study

    OpenAIRE

    U. Foelsche; Kirchengast, G.; A. Steiner; Kornblueh, L.; Manzini, E.; L. Bengtsson

    2008-01-01

    The long-term stability, high accuracy, all-weather capability, high vertical resolution, and global coverage of Global Navigation Satellite System ( GNSS) radio occultation ( RO) suggests it as a promising tool for global monitoring of atmospheric temperature change. With the aim to investigate and quantify how well a GNSS RO observing system is able to detect climate trends, we are currently performing an ( climate) observing system simulation experiment over the 25-year period 2001 to 2025...

  9. CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) SPACERAD plasma wave experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Roger R.; Gurnett, Donald A.

    1988-10-01

    This document discusses the Main Electronics Package, two Electric Field Preamps and Search Coil Magnetometer for the AFGL 701 SPACERAD instrumentation on the CRRES (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite) project. This document discusses the scientific objectives and the importance of the Plasma Wave Experiment in the CRRES SPACERAD mission and describes the instrument design rational and the instrument development philosophy. This document also discusses the testing and operations of the experiment and contains a schematic drawing of the instrumentation electronics and lists of the schematics, drawings, and wiring diagrams that describe the as-built configuration of the Plasma Wave Experiment instrumentation. Problems encountered during the construction and testing of the instrument and their resolutions are discussed. Test results from already completed environmental and EMC/RFI tests have already been submitted to AFGL and to the Air Force Headquarters Space Division Space Test Program. The recertification of the calibration of the instrument is recommended in the near future under a new contract covering the re-delivery (necessitated due to the removal during the launch-delay storage period), pre-launch, and launch operations.

  10. The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite: Simulations of planet detections and astrophysical false positives

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Peter W; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K; Charbonneau, David; Deming, Drake; Dressing, Courtney D; Latham, David W; Levine, Alan M; McCullough, Peter R; Morton, Timothy; Ricker, George R; Vanderspek, Roland; Woods, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    The Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) is a NASA-sponsored Explorer mission that will perform a wide-field survey for planets that transit bright host stars. Here, we predict the properties of the transiting planets that TESS will detect along with the eclipsing binary stars that produce false-positive photometric signals. The predictions are based on Monte Carlo simulations of the nearby population of stars, occurrence rates of planets derived from Kepler, and models for the photometric performance and sky coverage of the TESS cameras. We expect that TESS will find approximately 1700 transiting planets from 200,000 pre-selected target stars. This includes 556 planets smaller than twice the size of Earth, of which 419 are hosted by M dwarf stars and 137 are hosted by FGK dwarfs. Approximately 130 of the R < 2 R_Earth planets will have host stars brighter than K = 9. Approximately 48 of the planets with R < 2 R_Earth lie within or near the habitable zone (0.2 < S/S_Earth < 2), and between...

  11. Satellite quenching timescales in clusters from projected phase space measurements matched to simulated orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Oman, Kyle A

    2016-01-01

    We measure the star formation quenching efficiency and timescale in cluster environments. Our method uses N-body simulations to estimate the probability distribution of possible orbits for a sample of observed SDSS galaxies in and around clusters based on their position and velocity offsets from their host cluster. We study the relationship between their star formation rates and their likely orbital histories via a simple model in which star formation is quenched once a delay time after infall has elapsed. Our orbit library method is designed to isolate the environmental effect on the star formation rate due to a galaxy's present-day host cluster from `pre-processing' in previous group hosts. We find that quenching of satellite galaxies of all stellar masses in our sample ($10^{9}-10^{11.5}\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$) by massive ($> 10^{13}\\,{\\rm M}_\\odot$) clusters is essentially $100$ per cent efficient. Our fits show that all galaxies quench on their first infall, approximately at or within a Gyr of their first peric...

  12. Vegetation monitoring for Guatemala: a comparison between simulated VIIRS and MODIS satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boken, Vijendra K.; Easson, Gregory L.; Rowland, James

    2010-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) and moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are being widely used for vegetation monitoring across the globe. However, sensors will discontinue collecting these data in the near future. National Aeronautics and Space Administration is planning to launch a new sensor, visible infrared imaging radiometer suite (VIIRS), to continue to provide satellite data for vegetation monitoring. This article presents a case study of Guatemala and compares the simulated VIIRS-Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) with MODIS-NDVI for four different dates each in 2003 and 2005. The dissimilarity between VIIRS-NDVI and MODIS-NDVI was examined on the basis of the percent difference, the two-tailed student's t-test, and the coefficient of determination, R 2. The per cent difference was found to be within 3%, the p-value ranged between 0.52 and 0.99, and R 2 exceeded 0.88 for all major types of vegetation (basic grains, rubber, sugarcane, coffee and forests) found in Guatemala. It was therefore concluded that VIIRS will be almost equally capable of vegetation monitoring as MODIS.

  13. From Earth to Heaven: Using `Newton's Cannon' Thought Experiment for Teaching Satellite Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velentzas, Athanasios; Halkia, Krystallia

    2013-10-01

    Thought Experiments are powerful tools in both scientific thinking and in the teaching of science. In this study, the historical Thought Experiment (TE) `Newton's Cannon' was used as a tool to teach concepts relating to the motion of satellites to students at upper secondary level. The research instruments were: (a) a teaching-interview designed and implemented according to the Teaching Experiment methodology and (b) an open-ended questionnaire administered to students 2 weeks after the teaching-interview. The sample consisted of forty students divided into eleven groups. The teaching and learning processes which occurred during the teaching-interview were recorded and analyzed. The findings of the present study show that the use of the TE helped students to mentally construct a physical system which has nothing to do with their everyday experience (i.e. they had to imagine themselves as observers in a context in which the whole Earth was visible) and to draw conclusions about phenomena within this system. Specifically, students managed (1) to conclude that if an object is appropriately launched, it may be placed in an orbit around the Earth and to support this conclusion by giving necessary arguments, and (2) to realize that the same laws of physics describe, on the one hand, the motion of the Moon around the Earth (and the motion of other celestial bodies as well) and, on the other hand, the motion of `terrestrial' objects (i.e. objects on the Earth, such as a tennis ball). The main difficulties students met were caused by their idea that there is no gravity in the vacuum (i.e. the area outside of the Earth's atmosphere) and also by their everyday experience, according to which it is impossible for a projectile to move continuously parallel to the ground.

  14. On the Use of Space-Environmental Satellite Data for Global Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations. Time-Scale Initialisation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Maibys Sierra; Domingues, Margarete Oliveira; Mecías, Angela León; Menconi, Varlei Everton; Mendes, Odim

    2016-12-01

    A global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model describes the solar-terrestrial system and the physical processes that live in it. Information obtained from satellites provides input to MHD model to compose a more realistic initial state for the equations and, therefore, more accurate simulations. However, the use of high resolution in time data can produce numerical instabilities that quickly interrupt the simulations. Moreover, satellite time series may have gaps which could be a problem in this context. In order to contribute to the overcoming of such challenges, we propose in this work a methodology based on a variant of the continuous wavelet transform to introduce environmental satellite data on the global resistive MHD model originally developed by Prof. Ogino at the University of Nagoya. Our methodology uses a simplified time-scale version of the original data that preserves the most important spectral features of the phenomena of interest. Then, we can do a long-term integration using this MHD model without any computational instability, while preserving the main time-scale features of the original data set and even overcome possible occurrence of gaps on the satellite data. This methodology also contributes to keeping more realistic physical results.

  15. Mapping of land cover in northern California with simulated hyperspectral satellite imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Matthew L.; Kilham, Nina E.

    2016-09-01

    Land-cover maps are important science products needed for natural resource and ecosystem service management, biodiversity conservation planning, and assessing human-induced and natural drivers of land change. Analysis of hyperspectral, or imaging spectrometer, imagery has shown an impressive capacity to map a wide range of natural and anthropogenic land cover. Applications have been mostly with single-date imagery from relatively small spatial extents. Future hyperspectral satellites will provide imagery at greater spatial and temporal scales, and there is a need to assess techniques for mapping land cover with these data. Here we used simulated multi-temporal HyspIRI satellite imagery over a 30,000 km2 area in the San Francisco Bay Area, California to assess its capabilities for mapping classes defined by the international Land Cover Classification System (LCCS). We employed a mapping methodology and analysis framework that is applicable to regional and global scales. We used the Random Forests classifier with three sets of predictor variables (reflectance, MNF, hyperspectral metrics), two temporal resolutions (summer, spring-summer-fall), two sample scales (pixel, polygon) and two levels of classification complexity (12, 20 classes). Hyperspectral metrics provided a 16.4-21.8% and 3.1-6.7% increase in overall accuracy relative to MNF and reflectance bands, respectively, depending on pixel or polygon scales of analysis. Multi-temporal metrics improved overall accuracy by 0.9-3.1% over summer metrics, yet increases were only significant at the pixel scale of analysis. Overall accuracy at pixel scales was 72.2% (Kappa 0.70) with three seasons of metrics. Anthropogenic and homogenous natural vegetation classes had relatively high confidence and producer and user accuracies were over 70%; in comparison, woodland and forest classes had considerable confusion. We next focused on plant functional types with relatively pure spectra by removing open-canopy shrublands

  16. Results from an experiment that collected visible-light polarization data using unresolved imagery for classification of geosynchronous satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speicher, Andy; Matin, Mohammad; Tippets, Roger; Chun, Francis; Strong, David

    2015-05-01

    In order to protect critical military and commercial space assets, the United States Space Surveillance Network must have the ability to positively identify and characterize all space objects. Unfortunately, positive identification and characterization of space objects is a manual and labor intensive process today since even large telescopes cannot provide resolved images of most space objects. The objective of this study was to collect and analyze visible-spectrum polarization data from unresolved images of geosynchronous satellites taken over various solar phase angles. Different collection geometries were used to evaluate the polarization contribution of solar arrays, thermal control materials, antennas, and the satellite bus as the solar phase angle changed. Since materials on space objects age due to the space environment, their polarization signature may change enough to allow discrimination of identical satellites launched at different times. Preliminary data suggests this optical signature may lead to positive identification or classification of each satellite by an automated process on a shorter timeline. The instrumentation used in this experiment was a United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) Department of Physics system that consists of a 20-inch Ritchey-Chrétien telescope and a dual focal plane optical train fed with a polarizing beam splitter. Following a rigorous calibration, polarization data was collected during two nights on eight geosynchronous satellites built by various manufacturers and launched several years apart. When Stokes parameters were plotted against time and solar phase angle, the data indicates that a polarization signature from unresolved images may have promise in classifying specific satellites.

  17. Rationalization of foundry processes on the basis of simulation experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Kukla

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research obtained on the basis of simulation experiment, whose aim was to analyze the performance of cast iron foundry. A simulation model of automobile industry foundry was made. The course of the following processes was analyzedin a computer model: preparation of liquid cast iron, forming and filling the moulds, cooling and stamping the castings, cleaning andfinishing treatment. The sheets of multi-criterion evaluation were prepared, where criteria and variants were assessed by meansof subjective point evaluation and fuzzy character evaluation. The paper presents an analysis example of finishing activities of castings realized in foundry on traditional machines and efficient presses and in cooperation. On the basis of reports from a simulation experiment information was achieved related to activities’ duration, load of accessible resources, the problems of storage and transport, bottle necks in the system and appearing queues in from of workplaces. The research used a universal modelling and simulation packet for productionsystems - ARENA.

  18. Use of SSU/MSU Satellite Observations to Validate Upper Atmospheric Temperature Trends in CMIP5 Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilong Zhao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The tropospheric and stratospheric temperature trends and uncertainties in the fifth Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5 model simulations in the period of 1979–2005 have been compared with satellite observations. The satellite data include those from the Stratospheric Sounding Units (SSU, Microwave Sounding Units (MSU, and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU. The results show that the CMIP5 model simulations reproduced the common stratospheric cooling (−0.46–−0.95 K/decade and tropospheric warming (0.05–0.19 K/decade features although a significant discrepancy was found among the individual models being selected. The changes of global mean temperature in CMIP5 simulations are highly consistent with the SSU measurements in the stratosphere, and the temporal correlation coefficients between observation and model simulations vary from 0.6–0.99 at the 99% confidence level. At the same time, the spread of temperature mean in CMIP5 simulations increased from stratosphere to troposphere. Multiple linear regression analysis indicates that the temperature variability in the stratosphere is dominated by radioactive gases, volcanic events and solar forcing. Generally, the high-top models show better agreement with observations than the low-top model, especially in the lower stratosphere. The CMIP5 simulations underestimated the stratospheric cooling in the tropics and overestimated the cooling over the Antarctic compared to the satellite observations. The largest spread of temperature trends in CMIP5 simulations is seen in both the Arctic and Antarctic areas, especially in the stratospheric Antarctic.

  19. Complementing the ground-based CMB Stage-4 experiment on large scales with the PIXIE satellite

    CERN Document Server

    Calabrese, Erminia; Dunkley, Jo

    2016-01-01

    We present forecasts for cosmological parameters from future Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) data measured by the Stage-4 (S4) generation of ground-based experiments in combination with large-scale anisotropy data from the PIXIE satellite. We demonstrate the complementarity of the two experiments and focus on science targets that benefit from their combination. We show that a cosmic-variance-limited measurement of the optical depth to reionization provided by PIXIE, with error $\\sigma(\\tau)=0.002$, is vital for enabling a 5$\\sigma$ detection of the sum of the neutrino masses when combined with a CMB-S4 lensing measurement, and with lower-redshift constraints on the growth of structure and the distance-redshift relation. Parameters characterizing the epoch of reionization will also be tightly constrained; PIXIE's $\\tau$ constraint converts into $\\sigma(\\rm{z_{re}})=0.2$ for the mean time of reionization, and a kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurement from S4 gives $\\sigma(\\Delta \\rm{z_{re}})=0.03$ for the du...

  20. Dynamic Modeling and Simulation of Marine Satellite Tracking Antenna Using Lagrange Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yunlong; Nourbakhsh, S. M; Hussain, Dil muhammed Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Marine Satellite Tracking Antenna (MSTA) is a necessary device in ships for receiving satellite signals when they are sailing on the sea. This paper presents a simple methodology to obtain the dynamic equations of MSTA through Lagrange method, which is fundamental in design of modelbased...

  1. Attitude guidance and simulation with animation of a land-survey satellite motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somova, Tatyana

    2017-01-01

    We consider problems of synthesis of the vector spline attitude guidance laws for a land-survey satellite and an in-flight support of the satellite attitude control system with the use of computer animation of its motion. We have presented the results on the efficiency of the developed algorithms.

  2. Formation of Chimneys in Mushy Layers: Experiment and Simulation

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Anthony M; Worster, Grae

    2011-01-01

    In this fluid dyanmics video, we show experimental images and simulations of chimney formation in mushy layers. A directional solidification apparatus was used to freeze 25 wt % aqueous ammonium chloride solutions at controlled rates in a narrow Hele-Shaw cell (1mm gap). The convective motion is imaged with schlieren. We demonstrate the ability to numerically simulate mushy layer growth for direct comparison with experiments.

  3. Computer Simulation of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Raedt, H.; Michielsen, K.

    2016-07-01

    We review an event-based simulation approach which reproduces the statistical distributions of quantum physics experiments by generating detection events one-by-one according to an unknown distribution and without solving a wave equation. Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-Bohm laboratory experiments are used as an example to illustrate the applicability of this approach. It is shown that computer experiments that employ the same post-selection procedure as the one used in laboratory experiments produce data that is in excellent agreement with quantum theory.

  4. Results of the ISEDE Experiment Encompassing Disaggregated Electronics on an all Inflatable Satellite on Board the BEXUS 16 Balloon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinn, T.; de Franca Queiroz, T.; Brownlie, F.; Allan, A.; Leite, L.; Rowan, A.; Gillespie, J.; Vasile, M.

    2015-09-01

    Traditional satellites have a rigid structure defining the basic configuration of the satellite and holding in place all subsystems. A variation of the shape or configuration of the satellite is normally achieved through the use of deployable structures or appendices (antennas, solar anays, booms, etc.). Although modern structural solutions are modular and multifunctional, the structure of a satellite still represents a significant portion of its mass and a limitation on the achievable configuration, extension of deployable components and packing efficiency during launch. The goal of this project is to design and build an initial prototype of an all-inflatable satellite with disaggregated electronics for deployment on-board a BEXUS balloon as proof of concept. The idea is to use inflatable cell structures as support for all the subsystems composing a typical nano-satellite. Each subsystem and component is mounted on a different cell. Cells are both individually inflated and individually controlled. The aim is to design and build an inflatable satellite, demonstrating the deployment, communication among components and local control enabling structure shape adaption via soft robotic actuators and micro pumps. The experiment will deploy two inflatable structures made of 5x2 cells which are packed in a lOxlOxlOcm3 cubesat reaching a size of 70x18x14cm3 once deployed. Flexible circuitry was used to mount all the electronic subsystems on the surface of the folded inflatable. The experiment was flown onboard the BEXUS16 stratospheric balloon to an altitude of 27,3km for 2 hours and 45mm from the Swedish space port ESRANGE on the 8th of October 2013 proving the functionality of the disaggregated electronics.

  5. Truth Seeded Reconstruction for Fast Simulation in the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Jansky, Roland; Salzburger, Andreas

    The huge success of the ATLAS experiment for particle physics during Run 1 of the LHC would not have been possible without the production of vast amounts of simulated Monte Carlo data. However, the very detailed detector simulation is a highly CPU intensive task and thus resource shortages occurred. Motivated by this, great effort has been put into speeding up the simulation. As a result, other timeconsuming parts became visible. One of which is the track reconstruction. This thesis describes one potential solution to the CPU intensive reconstruction of simulated data: a newly designed truth seeded reconstruction. At its basics is the idea to skip the pattern recognition altogether, instead utilizing the available (truth) information from simulation to directly fit particle trajectories without searching for them. At the same time tracking effects of the standard reconstruction need to be emulated. This approach is validated thoroughly and no critical deviations of the results compared to the standard reconst...

  6. Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation: Report 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    O’Daniel, 2016. Blast load simulator experiments for computational model validation – Report 1. ERDC/GSL TR-16-27. Vicksburg, MS: U.S. Army Engineer ...ER D C/ G SL T R- 16 -2 7 Blast Load Simulator Experiments for Computational Model Validation Report 2 G eo te ch ni ca l a nd S tr uc...Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. The U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) solves the nation’s toughest

  7. HFSS Simulation on Cavity Coupling for Axion Detecting Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yeo, Beomki

    2015-01-01

    In the resonant cavity experiment, it is vital maximize signal power at detector with the minimized reflection from source. Return loss is minimized when the impedance of source and cavity are matched to each other and this is called impedance matching. Establishing tunable antenna on source is required to get a impedance matching. Geometry and position of antenna is varied depending on the electromagnetic eld of cavity. This research is dedicated to simulation to nd such a proper design of coupling antenna, especially for axion dark matter detecting experiment. HFSS solver was used for the simulation.

  8. Reactor Simulation for Antineutrino Experiments using DRAGON and MURE

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, C L; Conrad, J M; Djurcic, Z; Fallot, M; Giot, L; Keefer, G; Onillon, A; Winslow, L

    2011-01-01

    Rising interest in nuclear reactors as a source of antineutrinos for experiments motivates validated, fast, and accessible simulations to predict reactor fission rates. Here we present results from the DRAGON and MURE simulation codes and compare them to other industry standards for reactor core modeling. We use published data from the Takahama-3 reactor to evaluate the quality of these simulations against the independently measured fuel isotopic composition. The propagation of the uncertainty in the reactor operating parameters to the resulting antineutrino flux predictions is also discussed.

  9. Numerical Simulation and Cold Modeling experiments on Centrifugal Casting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keerthiprasad, Kestur Sadashivaiah; Murali, Mysore Seetharam; Mukunda, Pudukottah Gopaliengar; Majumdar, Sekhar

    2011-02-01

    In a centrifugal casting process, the fluid flow eventually determines the quality and characteristics of the final product. It is difficult to study the fluid behavior here because of the opaque nature of melt and mold. In the current investigation, numerical simulations of the flow field and visualization experiments on cold models have been carried out for a centrifugal casting system using horizontal molds and fluids of different viscosities to study the effect of different process variables on the flow pattern. The effects of the thickness of the cylindrical fluid annulus formed inside the mold and the effects of fluid viscosity, diameter, and rotational speed of the mold on the hollow fluid cylinder formation process have been investigated. The numerical simulation results are compared with corresponding data obtained from the cold modeling experiments. The influence of rotational speed in a real-life centrifugal casting system has also been studied using an aluminum-silicon alloy. Cylinders of different thicknesses are cast at different rotational speeds, and the flow patterns observed visually in the actual castings are found to be similar to those recorded in the corresponding cold modeling experiments. Reasonable agreement is observed between the results of numerical simulation and the results of cold modeling experiments with different fluids. The visualization study on the hollow cylinders produced in an actual centrifugal casting process also confirm the conclusions arrived at from the cold modeling experiments and numerical simulation in a qualitative sense.

  10. Satellite/Terrestrial Networks: End-to-End Communication Interoperability Quality of Service Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivancic, William D.

    1998-01-01

    Various issues associated with satellite/terrestrial end-to-end communication interoperability are presented in viewgraph form. Specific topics include: 1) Quality of service; 2) ATM performance characteristics; 3) MPEG-2 transport stream mapping to AAL-5; 4) Observation and discussion of compressed video tests over ATM; 5) Digital video over satellites status; 6) Satellite link configurations; 7) MPEG-2 over ATM with binomial errors; 8) MPEG-2 over ATM channel characteristics; 8) MPEG-2 over ATM over emulated satellites; 9) MPEG-2 transport stream with errors; and a 10) Dual decoder test.

  11. Initial Experiences with Retrieving Similar Objects in Simulation Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, S-C S; Kamath, C

    2003-02-21

    Comparing the output of a physics simulation with an experiment, referred to as 'code validation,' is often done by visually comparing the two outputs. In order to determine which simulation is a closer match to the experiment, more quantitative measures are needed. In this paper, we describe our early experiences with this problem by considering the slightly simpler problem of finding objects in a image that are similar to a given query object. Focusing on a dataset from a fluid mixing problem, we report on our experiments with different features that are used to represent the objects of interest in the data. These early results indicate that the features must be chosen carefully to correctly represent the query object and the goal of the similarity search.

  12. Event-based simulation of neutron interferometry experiments

    CERN Document Server

    De Raedt, Hans; Michielsen, Kristel

    2012-01-01

    A discrete-event approach, which has already been shown to give a cause-and-effect explanation of many quantum optics experiments, is applied to single-neutron interferometry experiments. The simulation algorithm yields a logically consistent description in terms of individual neutrons and does not require the knowledge of the solution of a wave equation. It is shown that the simulation method reproduces the results of several single-neutron interferometry experiments, including experiments which, in quantum theoretical language, involve entanglement. Our results demonstrate that classical (non-Hamiltonian) systems can exhibit correlations which in quantum theory are associated with interference and entanglement, also when all particles emitted by the source are accounted for.

  13. Simulation of large-scale soil water systems using groundwater data and satellite based soil moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreye, Phillip; Meon, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Complex concepts for the physically correct depiction of dominant processes in the hydrosphere are increasingly at the forefront of hydrological modelling. Many scientific issues in hydrological modelling demand for additional system variables besides a simulation of runoff only, such as groundwater recharge or soil moisture conditions. Models that include soil water simulations are either very simplified or require a high number of parameters. Against this backdrop there is a heightened demand of observations to be used to calibrate the model. A reasonable integration of groundwater data or remote sensing data in calibration procedures as well as the identifiability of physically plausible sets of parameters is subject to research in the field of hydrology. Since this data is often combined with conceptual models, the given interfaces are not suitable for such demands. Furthermore, the application of automated optimisation procedures is generally associated with conceptual models, whose (fast) computing times allow many iterations of the optimisation in an acceptable time frame. One of the main aims of this study is to reduce the discrepancy between scientific and practical applications in the field of hydrological modelling. Therefore, the soil model DYVESOM (DYnamic VEgetation SOil Model) was developed as one of the primary components of the hydrological modelling system PANTA RHEI. DYVESOMs structure provides the required interfaces for the calibrations made at runoff, satellite based soil moisture and groundwater level. The model considers spatial and temporal differentiated feedback of the development of the vegetation on the soil system. In addition, small scale heterogeneities of soil properties (subgrid-variability) are parameterized by variation of van Genuchten parameters depending on distribution functions. Different sets of parameters are operated simultaneously while interacting with each other. The developed soil model is innovative regarding concept

  14. A Regional CO2 Observing System Simulation Experiment Using ASCENDS Observations and WRF-STILT Footprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, James S.; Kawa, S. Randolph; Eluszkiewicz, Janusz; Collatz, G. J.; Mountain, Marikate; Henderson, John; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Aschbrenner, Ryan; Zaccheo, T. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the spatiotemporal variations in emissions and uptake of CO2 is hampered by sparse measurements. The recent advent of satellite measurements of CO2 concentrations is increasing the density of measurements, and the future mission ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons) will provide even greater coverage and precision. Lagrangian atmospheric transport models run backward in time can quantify surface influences ("footprints") of diverse measurement platforms and are particularly well suited for inverse estimation of regional surface CO2 fluxes at high resolution based on satellite observations. We utilize the STILT Lagrangian particle dispersion model, driven by WRF meteorological fields at 40-km resolution, in a Bayesian synthesis inversion approach to quantify the ability of ASCENDS column CO2 observations to constrain fluxes at high resolution. This study focuses on land-based biospheric fluxes, whose uncertainties are especially large, in a domain encompassing North America. We present results based on realistic input fields for 2007. Pseudo-observation random errors are estimated from backscatter and optical depth measured by the CALIPSO satellite. We estimate a priori flux uncertainties based on output from the CASA-GFED (v.3) biosphere model and make simple assumptions about spatial and temporal error correlations. WRF-STILT footprints are convolved with candidate vertical weighting functions for ASCENDS. We find that at a horizontal flux resolution of 1 degree x 1 degree, ASCENDS observations are potentially able to reduce average weekly flux uncertainties by 0-8% in July, and 0-0.5% in January (assuming an error of 0.5 ppm at the Railroad Valley reference site). Aggregated to coarser resolutions, e.g. 5 degrees x 5 degrees, the uncertainty reductions are larger and more similar to those estimated in previous satellite data observing system simulation experiments.

  15. Simulation Data Management for Adaptive Design Of Experiment

    OpenAIRE

    BLONDET, Gaëtan; BOUDAOUD, Nassim; LE DUIGOU, Julien

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Recent evolutions of computer-aided product development and massive integration of numerical simulations to the design process require new methodologies to decrease the computational costs. Numerical design of experiments is used to increase quality of products by taking into account uncertainties in product development. But, this method can be time-consuming and involves a high computational cost. This paper presents a literature review of design of experiments method...

  16. Physically, Fully-Distributed Hydrologic Simulations Driven by GPM Satellite Rainfall over an Urbanizing Arid Catchment in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatim O. Sharif

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A physically-based, distributed-parameter hydrologic model was used to simulate a recent flood event in the city of Hafr Al Batin, Saudi Arabia to gain a better understanding of the runoff generation and spatial distribution of flooding. The city is located in a very arid catchment. Flooding of the city is influenced by the presence of three major tributaries that join the main channel in and around the heavily urbanized area. The Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (IMERG rainfall product was used due to lack of detailed ground observations. To overcome the heavy computational demand, the catchment was divided into three sub-catchments with a variable model grid resolution. The model was run on three subcatchments separately, without losing hydrologic connectivity among the sub-catchments. Uncalibrated and calibrated satellite products were used producing different estimates of the predicted runoff. The runoff simulations demonstrated that 85% of the flooding was generated in the urbanized portion of the catchments for the simulated flood. Additional model simulations were performed to understand the roles of the unique channel network in the city flooding. The simulations provided insights into the best options for flood mitigation efforts. The variable model grid size approach allowed using physically-based, distributed models—such as the Gridded Surface Subsurface Hydrologic Analysis (GSSHA model used in this study—on large basins that include urban centers that need to be modeled at very high resolutions.

  17. Traffic model for advanced satellite designs and experiments for ISDN services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Gerard R.; Hager, E. Paul

    1991-01-01

    The data base structure and fields for categorizing and storing Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) user characteristics is outlined. This traffic model data base will be used to exercise models of the ISDN Advanced Communication Satellite to determine design parameters and performance for the NASA Satellite Communications Applications Research (SCAR) Program.

  18. Simulation Experiments in Practice : Statistical Design and Regression Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2007-01-01

    In practice, simulation analysts often change only one factor at a time, and use graphical analysis of the resulting Input/Output (I/O) data. Statistical theory proves that more information is obtained when applying Design Of Experiments (DOE) and linear regression analysis. Unfortunately, classic t

  19. Photovoltaic Experiment Using Light from a Solar Simulator Lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell experiment utilizing the convenience of a solar simulating type lamp is described. Insight into the solid state aspect of a solar cell is gained by the student in studying the characteristics, and deducing from them cell parameters and efficiency. (Author/CS)

  20. Experience with the Simulated Patient-Physician Encounter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Richard B.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Computer-based simulations of the patient-physician encounter have been used at the University of Wisconsin Medical School for five years. They have been used to permit students to gain clinical experience, as part of a series of structured teaching conferences, and in a medical testing program. Student and faculty response is favorable.…

  1. Numerical simulation of the fast dense gas Ludwieg tube experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zamfirescu, C.; Guerdone, A.; Collona, P.

    2006-01-01

    The preliminary design of a Ludwieg tube experiment for the verification of the existence of nonclassical rarefaction shock waves in dense vapors is here critically analyzed by means of real gas numerical simulations of the experimental setup. The Flexible Asymmetric Shock Tube (FAST) setup is a den

  2. Photovoltaic Experiment Using Light from a Solar Simulator Lamp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell experiment utilizing the convenience of a solar simulating type lamp is described. Insight into the solid state aspect of a solar cell is gained by the student in studying the characteristics, and deducing from them cell parameters and efficiency. (Author/CS)

  3. Students' Experiences of Learning Manual Clinical Skills through Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannesson, Eva; Silen, Charlotte; Kvist, Joanna; Hult, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Learning manual skills is a fundamental part of health care education, and motor, sensory and cognitive learning processes are essential aspects of professional development. Simulator training has been shown to enhance factors that facilitate motor and cognitive learning. The present study aimed to investigate the students' experiences and…

  4. Simulations of ultrafast x-ray laser experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortmann-Grote, C.; Andreev, A. A.; Appel, K.; Branco, J.; Briggs, R.; Bussmann, M.; Buzmakov, A.; Garten, M.; Grund, A.; Huebl, A.; Jurek, Z.; Loh, N. D.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Samoylova, L.; Santra, R.; Schneidmiller, E. A.; Sharma, A.; Steiniger, K.; Yakubov, S.; Yoon, C. H.; Yurkov, M. V.; Zastrau, U.; Ziaja-Motyka, B.; Mancuso, A. P.

    2017-06-01

    Simulations of experiments at modern light sources, such as optical laser laboratories, synchrotrons, and free electron lasers, become increasingly important for the successful preparation, execution, and analysis of these experiments investigating ever more complex physical systems, e.g. biomolecules, complex materials, and ultra-short lived states of matter at extreme conditions. We have implemented a platform for complete start-to-end simulations of various types of photon science experiments, tracking the radiation from the source through the beam transport optics to the sample or target under investigation, its interaction with and scattering from the sample, and registration in a photon detector. This tool allows researchers and facility operators to simulate their experiments and instruments under real life conditions, identify promising and unattainable regions of the parameter space and ultimately make better use of valuable beamtime. In this paper, we present an overview about status and future development of the simulation platform and discuss three applications: 1.) Single-particle imaging of biomolecules using x-ray free electron lasers and optimization of x-ray pulse properties, 2.) x-ray scattering diagnostics of hot dense plasmas in high power laser-matter interaction and identification of plasma instabilities, and 3.) x-ray absorption spectroscopy in warm dense matter created by high energy laser-matter interaction and pulse shape optimization for low-isentrope dynamic compression.

  5. New simulation capability for gamma ray mirror experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Descalle, Marie-Anne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ruz-Armendariz, Jaime [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Decker, Todd [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brejhnolt, Nicolai [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pivovaroff, Michael [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-28

    This report provides a description of the simulation toolkit developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to support the design of nuclear safeguards experiments using grazing incidence multilayer mirrors in the energy band of uranium (U) and plutonium (Pu) emission lines. This effort was motivated by the data analysis of a scoping experiment at the Irradiated Fuels Examination Facility (IFEL) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY13 and of a benchmark experiment at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in FY14 that highlighted the need for predictive tools built around a ray-tracing capability. This report presents the simulation toolkit and relevant results such as the simulated spectra for TMI, MOX, and ATM106 fuel rods based on spent fuel models provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory and for a virgin high 240Pu-content fuel plate, as well as models of the IFEL and INL experiments implemented in the ray tracing tool. The beam position and height were validated against the INL ~60 keV americium data. Examples of alternate configurations of the optics or experimental set-up illustrate the future use of the simulation suite to guide the next IFEL experimental campaign.

  6. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  7. Lattice Boltzmann modeling of directional wetting: Comparing simulations to experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, H. Patrick; Sotthewes, Kai; van Swigchem, Jeroen; Zandvliet, Harold J. W.; Kooij, E. Stefan

    2013-07-01

    Lattice Boltzmann Modeling (LBM) simulations were performed on the dynamic behavior of liquid droplets on chemically striped patterned surfaces, ultimately with the aim to develop a predictive tool enabling reliable design of future experiments. The simulations accurately mimic experimental results, which have shown that water droplets on such surfaces adopt an elongated shape due to anisotropic preferential spreading. Details of the contact line motion such as advancing of the contact line in the direction perpendicular to the stripes exhibit pronounced similarities in experiments and simulations. The opposite of spreading, i.e., evaporation of water droplets, leads to a characteristic receding motion first in the direction parallel to the stripes, while the contact line remains pinned perpendicular to the stripes. Only when the aspect ratio is close to unity, the contact line also starts to recede in the perpendicular direction. Very similar behavior was observed in the LBM simulations. Finally, droplet movement can be induced by a gradient in surface wettability. LBM simulations show good semiquantitative agreement with experimental results of decanol droplets on a well-defined striped gradient, which move from high- to low-contact angle surfaces. Similarities and differences for all systems are described and discussed in terms of the predictive capabilities of LBM simulations to model direction wetting.

  8. Universality between Experiment and Simulation of a Diblock Copolymer Melt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardsley, Thomas M.; Matsen, Mark W.

    2016-11-01

    The equivalent behavior among analogous block copolymer systems involving chemically distinct molecules or mathematically different models has long hinted at an underlying universality, but only recently has it been rigorously demonstrated by matching results from different simulations. The profound implication of universality is that simple coarse-grained models can be calibrated so as to provide quantitatively accurate predictions to experiment. Here, we provide the first compelling demonstration of this by simulating a polyisoprene-polylactide diblock copolymer melt using a previously calibrated lattice model. The simulation successfully predicts the peak in the disordered-state structure function, the position of the order-disorder transition, and the latent heat of the transition in excellent quantitative agreement with experiment. This could mark a new era of precision in the field of block copolymer research.

  9. Effects of assimilating precipitation zones derived from satellite and lightning data on numerical simulations of tropical-like Mediterranean storms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fita

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The scarcity of meteorological observations in maritime areas is a well-known problem that can be an important limitation in the study of different phenomena. Tropical-like storms or medicanes developed over the Mediterranean sea are intense storms with some similarities to the tropical ones. Although they do not reach the hurricane intensity, their potential for damage is very high, due to the densely populated Mediterranean coastal regions. In this study, the two notable cases of medicane development which occurred in the western Mediterranean basin in September 1996 and October 2003, are considered. The capability of mesoscale numerical models to simulate general aspects of such a phenomena has been previously shown. With the aim of improving the numerical results, an adjustment of the humidity vertical profiles in MM5 simulations is performed by means of satellite derived precipitation. Convective and stratiform precipitation types obtained from satellite images are used to individually adjust the profiles. Lightning hits are employed to identify convective grid points. The adjustment of the vertical humidity profiles is carried out in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF analyses used as initial conditions for the simulations. Analyses nudging to ECMWF analyses and to the satellite-based humidity-corrected version of these analyses has also been applied using Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA. An additional adjustment is applied as observation nudging of satellite/lightning information at different time and spatial resolutions. Statistical parameters are proposed and tested as an objective way to intercompare satellite-derived and simulated trajectories. Simulations of medicanes exhibit a strong sensitivity to vertical humidity profiles. Trajectories of the storms are improved or worsened by using FDDA. A case dependence is obtained on the characteristics of the humidity-corrected medicanes. FDDA sensitivity

  10. Effects of assimilating precipitation zones derived from satellite and lightning data on numerical simulations of tropical-like Mediterranean storms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fita, L.; Romero, R.; Luque, A.; Ramis, C. [Univ. de les Illes Balears, Palma de Mallorca (Spain). Grup de Meteorologia

    2009-07-01

    The scarcity of meteorological observations in maritime areas is a well-known problem that can be an important limitation in the study of different phenomena. Tropical-like storms or medicanes developed over the Mediterranean sea are intense storms with some similarities to the tropical ones. Although they do not reach the hurricane intensity, their potential for damage is very high, due to the densely populated Mediterranean coastal regions. In this study, the two notable cases of medicane development which occurred in the western Mediterranean basin in September 1996 and October 2003, are considered. The capability of mesoscale numerical models to simulate general aspects of such a phenomena has been previously shown. With the aim of improving the numerical results, an adjustment of the humidity vertical profiles in MM5 simulations is performed by means of satellite derived precipitation. Convective and stratiform precipitation types obtained from satellite images are used to individually adjust the profiles. Lightning hits are employed to identify convective grid points. The adjustment of the vertical humidity profiles is carried out in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) analyses used as initial conditions for the simulations. Analyses nudging to ECMWF analyses and to the satellite-based humidity-corrected version of these analyses has also been applied using Four Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA). An additional adjustment is applied as observation nudging of satellite/lightning information at different time and spatial resolutions. Statistical parameters are proposed and tested as an objective way to intercompare satellite-derived and simulated trajectories. Simulations of medicanes exhibit a strong sensitivity to vertical humidity profiles. Trajectories of the storms are improved or worsened by using FDDA. A case dependence is obtained on the characteristics of the humidity-corrected medicanes. FDDA sensitivity on temporal and

  11. Life characteristics assessment of the communications technology satellite transmitter experiment package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, J.; Curren, A. N.

    1979-01-01

    The performance characteristics of the transmitter experiment package (TEP) aboard the Communications Technology Satellite (CTS) measured during its first 2 years in orbit are presented. The TEP consists of a nominal 200 watt output stage tube (OST), a supporting power processing system (PPS), and a variable conductance heat pipe system (VCHPS). The OST, a traveling wave tube augmented with a 10 stage depressed collector has an overall saturated average efficiency of 51.5 percent and an average saturated radio frequency (rf) output power at center band frequency of 240 watts. The PPS operated with a measured efficiency of 86.5 to 88.5 percent. The VCHPS, using three pipes to conduct heat from the PPS and the OST to a 52 by 124 centimeter radiator fin, maintained the PPS baseplate temperature below 50 C for all operating conditions. The TEP performance characteristics presented include frequency response, rf output power, thermal performance, and efficiency. Communications characteristics were evaluated by using both video and audio modulated signals. On four occasions, the TEP experienced temporary thermal control system malfunctions. The anomalies were terminated safely, and the problem was investigated because of the potential for TEP damage due to the signficant temperature increases. Safe TEP operating procedures were established.

  12. High resolution surface solar radiation patterns over Eastern Mediterranean: Satellite, ground-based, reanalysis data and radiative transfer simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandri, G.; Georgoulias, A.; Meleti, C.; Balis, D.

    2013-12-01

    Surface solar radiation (SSR) and its long and short term variations play a critical role in the modification of climate and by extent of the social and financial life of humans. Thus, SSR measurements are of primary importance. SSR is measured for decades from ground-based stations for specific spots around the planet. During the last decades, satellite observations allowed for the assessment of the spatial variability of SSR at a global as well as regional scale. In this study, a detailed spatiotemporal view of the SSR over Eastern Mediterranean is presented at a high spatial resolution. Eastern Mediterranean is affected by various aerosol types (continental, sea, dust and biomass burning particles) and encloses countries with significant socioeconomical changes during the last decades. For the aims of this study, SSR data from satellites (Climate Monitoring Satellite Application Facility - CM SAF) and our ground station in Thessaloniki, a coastal city of ~1 million inhabitants in northern Greece, situated in the heart of Eastern Mediterranean (Eppley Precision pyranometer and Kipp & Zonen CM-11 pyranometer) are used in conjunction with radiative transfer simulations (Santa Barbara DISORT Atmospheric Radiative Transfer - SBDART). The CM SAF dataset used here includes monthly mean SSR observations at a high spatial resolution of 0.03x0.03 degrees for the period 1983-2005. Our ground-based SSR observations span from 1983 until today. SBDART radiative transfer simulations were implemented for a number of spots in the area of study in order to calculate the SSR. High resolution (level-2) aerosol and cloud data from MODIS TERRA and AQUA satellite sensors were used as input, as well as ground-based data from the AERONET. Data from other satellites (Earth Probe TOMS, OMI, etc) and reanalysis projects (ECMWF) were used where needed. The satellite observations, the ground-based measurements and the model estimates are validated against each other. The good agreement

  13. Cloud cover climatologies in the Mediterranean obtained from satellites, surface observations, reanalyses, and CMIP5 simulations: validation and future scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez-Alonso, Aaron; Sanchez-Lorenzo, Arturo; Calbó, Josep; González, Josep-Abel; Norris, Joel R.

    2016-07-01

    Clouds are an important regulator of climate due to their connection to the water balance of the atmosphere and their interaction with solar and infrared radiation. In this study, monthly total cloud cover (TCC) records from different sources have been inter-compared on annual and seasonal basis for the Mediterranean region and the period 1984-2005. Specifically, gridded databases from satellite projects (ISCCP, CLARA, PATMOS-x), from reanalysis products (ERA-Interim, MERRA), and from surface observations over land (EECRA) and ocean (ICOADS) have been examined. Then, simulations from 44 climate runs of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project phase 5 corresponding to the historical scenario have been compared against the observations. Overall, we find good agreement between the mean values of TCC estimated from the three satellite products and from surface observations, while reanalysis products show much lower values across the region. Nevertheless, all datasets show similar behavior regarding the annual cycle of TCC. In addition, our results indicate an underestimation of TCC from climate model simulations as compared to the satellite products, especially during summertime, although the annual cycle is well simulated by most models. This result is quite general and apparently independent of the cloud parameterizations included in each particular model. Equally, similar results are obtained if the ISCCP simulator included in the Cloud Feedback Model Intercomparison Project Observation Simulator Package is considered, despite only few models provide the post-processed results. Finally, GCM projections of TCC over the Mediterranean are presented. These projections predict a reduction of TCC during the 21st century in the Mediterranean. Specifically, for an extreme emission scenario (RCP8.5) the projected relative rate of TCC decrease is larger than 10 % by the end of the century.

  14. Satellite Alignment: I. Distribution of Substructures and Their Dependence On Assembly History From N-Body Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yang Ocean; Kang, Xi; Dutton, Aaron; Yu, Yu; Macciò, Andrea V

    2014-01-01

    Observations have shown that the spatial distribution of satellite galaxies is not random, but aligned with the major axes of central galaxies. This alignment is dependent on galaxy properties, such that red satellites are more strongly aligned than blue satellites. Theoretical work done to interpret this phenomena has found that it is due to the non-spherical nature of dark matter halos. However, most studies over-predict the alignment signal under the assumption that the central galaxy shape follows the shape of the host halo. It is also not clear whether the color dependence of alignment is due to an assembly bias or an evolution effect. In this paper we study these problems using a cosmological N-body simulation. Subhalos are used to trace the positions of satellite galaxies. It is found that the shape of dark matter halos are mis-aligned at different radii. If the central galaxy shares the same shape as the inner host halo, then the alignment effect is weaker and agrees with observational data. However, ...

  15. Simulation of Ship-Track versus Satellite-Sensor Differences in Oceanic Precipitation Using an Island-Based Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jörg Burdanowitz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The point-to-area problem strongly complicates the validation of satellite-based precipitation estimates, using surface-based point measurements. We simulate the limited spatial representation of light-to-moderate oceanic precipitation rates along ship tracks with respect to areal passive microwave satellite estimates using data from a subtropical island-based radar. The radar data serves to estimate the discrepancy between point-like and areal precipitation measurements. From the spatial discrepancy, two statistical adjustments are derived so that along-track precipitation ship data better represent areal precipitation estimates from satellite sensors. The first statistical adjustment uses the average duration of a precipitation event as seen along a ship track, and the second adjustment uses the median-normalized along-track precipitation rate. Both statistical adjustments combined reduce the root mean squared error by 0.24 mm h − 1 (55% compared to the unadjusted average track of 60 radar pixels in length corresponding to a typical ship speed of 24–34 km h − 1 depending on track orientation. Beyond along-track averaging, the statistical adjustments represent an important step towards a more accurate validation of precipitation derived from passive microwave satellite sensors using point-like along-track surface precipitation reference data.

  16. Assessment of GPM and TRMM Multi-Satellite Precipitation Products in Streamflow Simulations in a Data-Sparse Mountainous Watershed in Myanmar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fei Yuan; Limin Zhang; Khin Wah Wah Win; Liliang Ren; Chongxu Zhao; Yonghua Zhu; Shanhu Jiang; Yi Liu

    2017-01-01

    ...) final run and the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42V7 precipitation products, and their feasibility in streamflow simulations in the Chindwin River basin, Myanmar, from April 2014...

  17. Scientific results from the SABER Experiment on the TIMED Satellite: 2002 - 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. M.; Mlynczak, M. G.

    2011-12-01

    The primary science goal of the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) experiment on the TIMED satellite is to achieve major advances in understanding the structure, energetics, chemistry, and dynamics in the atmospheric region extending from 60 to 180 km altitude. The SABER instrument has been observing the atmosphere nearly continuously since data collection began in January of 2002 using the technique of spectral broadband limb emission radiometry applied in 10 infrared spectral bands ranging from 1.27 to 17μm. Four bands - three in the 15μm band and one in the 4.3μm band of CO2, are used to retrieve temperature and CO2 concentrations and to correct retrievals for spacecraft motion effects. The remaining bands are used to retrieve O3, H2O, [O], [H],and energetics parameters, and to measure atmospheric heating and cooling. The measured limb emission profiles are being processed on the ground to provide vertical temperature, constituent and other parameter profiles with 2 km altitude resolution. Measurements are made both night and day over the latitude range from 52 degrees to 83 degrees with alternating hemisphere coverage every 60 days. During the time SABER has been operating, many solar storms have occurred and data have been collected over the range from solar maximum in 2002 to the 2009 solar minimum and up to the present day. The temporal and geographic coverage provided by SABER has provided path finding observations on the atmospheric effects of these events. In addition, the battery of measurements made by SABER has yielded new information on atmospheric energetics effects over the solar cycle including radiative cooling due to the 15μm CO2 and 5.3μm NO bands. Numerous synergistic science studies have been conducted with data from the AIM satellite that is dedicated to the study of noctilucent clouds (NLCs) including the driving parameters that control the start and end of the NLC season, the relationship between

  18. APPLICATION OF INTERACTIVE ONLINE SIMULATIONS FOR DEMONSTRATION EXPERIMENT IN PHYSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina P. Dementievska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Development of modern school physics experiment is related to the extensive use of ICT not only for data processing and visualization. Interactive computer simulation for processes and phenomena, developed by scientists and methodologists by the site Phet, helps to improve the physical demonstration experiment with the support of modern pedagogical technologies that change the traditional procedure to form students' understanding of the processes and phenomena, active cognitive activity. To study the influence of methods to integrate interactive computer simulations for better understanding the students' physical processes, phenomena and laws of the international community, teachers and Ukrainian scientists and teachers of physics have been involved. The aim of the article is to introduce the research results in the development and testing of individual components of educational technology in performing a physical experiment in secondary school.

  19. SIMEX: Simulation of Experiments at Advanced Light Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Fortmann-Grote, C; Briggs, R; Bussmann, M; Buzmakov, A; Garten, M; Grund, A; Hübl, A; Hauff, S; Joy, A; Jurek, Z; Loh, N D; Rüter, T; Samoylova, L; Santra, R; Schneidmiller, E A; Sharma, A; Wing, M; Yakubov, S; Yoon, C H; Yurkov, M V; Ziaja, B; Mancuso, A P

    2016-01-01

    Realistic simulations of experiments at large scale photon facilities, such as optical laser laboratories, synchrotrons, and free electron lasers, are of vital importance for the successful preparation, execution, and analysis of these experiments investigating ever more complex physical systems, e.g. biomolecules, complex materials, and ultra-short lived states of highly excited matter. Traditional photon science modelling takes into account only isolated aspects of an experiment, such as the beam propagation, the photon-matter interaction, or the scattering process, making idealized assumptions about the remaining parts, e.g.\\ the source spectrum, temporal structure and coherence properties of the photon beam, or the detector response. In SIMEX, we have implemented a platform for complete start-to-end simulations, following the radiation from the source, through the beam transport optics to the sample or target under investigation, its interaction with and scattering from the sample, and its registration in...

  20. Comparing ballistic wounds with experiments on body simulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresson, F; Franck, O

    2010-05-20

    This paper demonstrates how ballistic experiments on body simulator can bring a key information in the forensic science field. In the investigated case, a hunter was shot by accident in the back. Two hunters were suspected of having inadvertently shot towards the victim. The deadly bullet left the body and cannot be found on the scene neither in the body. The only way to discriminate the two options was to perform ballistic tests in body simulators. Even though the knowledge about body simulators is not enough advanced yet to expect accurate quantitative results, it was supposed to fully discriminate the two investigated cases as its respective impact energy are highly different (respectively 1200J and 2400J). For each investigated possibility, bullet's expansion state and body wounds were simulated. Bullet impact characteristics were determined by measuring the muzzle velocity, compute the impact velocity in the considered range (the position of each hunter is accurately known). Reloading cartridges allowed to reproduce accuretaly the corresponding velocity. The body was simulated by 3 different means in order to explore the accuracy of the simulation process. We demonstrated that the reported case is situated in a velocity/energy range in which body simulators do not need to be particularly accurate to reproduce the bullet expansion/non-expansion state. It furthermore demonstrated that only one case is compatible with the ballistic wounds of the victim. In the other case, the bullet's expansion would lead to a completely different wound shape.

  1. Complete Monte Carlo Simulation of Neutron Scattering Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drosg, M.

    2011-12-01

    In the far past, it was not possible to accurately correct for the finite geometry and the finite sample size of a neutron scattering set-up. The limited calculation power of the ancient computers as well as the lack of powerful Monte Carlo codes and the limitation in the data base available then prevented a complete simulation of the actual experiment. Using e.g. the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNPX [1], neutron scattering experiments can be simulated almost completely with a high degree of precision using a modern PC, which has a computing power that is ten thousand times that of a super computer of the early 1970s. Thus, (better) corrections can also be obtained easily for previous published data provided that these experiments are sufficiently well documented. Better knowledge of reference data (e.g. atomic mass, relativistic correction, and monitor cross sections) further contributes to data improvement. Elastic neutron scattering experiments from liquid samples of the helium isotopes performed around 1970 at LANL happen to be very well documented. Considering that the cryogenic targets are expensive and complicated, it is certainly worthwhile to improve these data by correcting them using this comparatively straightforward method. As two thirds of all differential scattering cross section data of 3He(n,n)3He are connected to the LANL data, it became necessary to correct the dependent data measured in Karlsruhe, Germany, as well. A thorough simulation of both the LANL experiments and the Karlsruhe experiment is presented, starting from the neutron production, followed by the interaction in the air, the interaction with the cryostat structure, and finally the scattering medium itself. In addition, scattering from the hydrogen reference sample was simulated. For the LANL data, the multiple scattering corrections are smaller by a factor of five at least, making this work relevant. Even more important are the corrections to the Karlsruhe data due to the

  2. Transport of NOx in East Asia identified by satellite and in situ measurements and Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H.-J.; Kim, S.-W.; Brioude, J.; Cooper, O. R.; Frost, G. J.; Kim, C.-H.; Park, R. J.; Trainer, M.; Woo, J.-H.

    2014-03-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) columns observed from space have been useful in detecting the increase of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions in East Asia, particularly China, coinciding with rapid economic growth during the past several decades. NO2 columns retrieved above a particular location reflect a combination of local NOx emissions and transported NOx from upwind sources. In this study, we demonstrate the transport of NOx emitted in East Asia using satellite and surface in situ measurements and Lagrangian particle dispersion model simulations. Enhanced satellite NO2 columns in the Yellow Sea (between China and South Korea) and the East Sea (between South Korea and Japan), and different seasonal variations of NO2 in China, North and South Korea, and Japan, suggest the importance of NOx transport in understanding the local NOx budget. Lagrangian transport model simulations with tracers of different chemical lifetimes identify source-receptor relationships that explain high NO2 over the oceans and springtime peaks in Korea and Japan, with China being the most likely source region. Our results have important implications for studies using satellite NO2 retrievals to derive NOx emissions at local scales in regions adjacent to large sources, such as in East Asia, Europe, and the Eastern U.S.

  3. Processing biobased polymers using plasticizers: Numerical simulations versus experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desplentere, Frederik; Cardon, Ludwig; Six, Wim; Erkoç, Mustafa

    2016-03-01

    In polymer processing, the use of biobased products shows lots of possibilities. Considering biobased materials, biodegradability is in most cases the most important issue. Next to this, bio based materials aimed at durable applications, are gaining interest. Within this research, the influence of plasticizers on the processing of the bio based material is investigated. This work is done for an extrusion grade of PLA, Natureworks PLA 2003D. Extrusion through a slit die equipped with pressure sensors is used to compare the experimental pressure values to numerical simulation results. Additional experimental data (temperature and pressure data along the extrusion screw and die are recorded) is generated on a dr. Collin Lab extruder producing a 25mm diameter tube. All these experimental data is used to indicate the appropriate functioning of the numerical simulation tool Virtual Extrusion Laboratory 6.7 for the simulation of both the industrial available extrusion grade PLA and the compound in which 15% of plasticizer is added. Adding the applied plasticizer, resulted in a 40% lower pressure drop over the extrusion die. The combination of different experiments allowed to fit the numerical simulation results closely to the experimental values. Based on this experience, it is shown that numerical simulations also can be used for modified bio based materials if appropriate material and process data are taken into account.

  4. Simulation of the BGO-OD experiment at ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnstone, Russell [University of Bonn, Physikalisches Institut, Bonn (Germany); Collaboration: BGO-OD-Collaboration

    2011-07-01

    The goal of the BGO Open-Dipole (BGO-OD) project is the systematic investigation of the photoproduction of mesons off the nucleon. These processes are related to the structure of both the mesons and the baryons involved in reactions typical of low-energy hadronic physics. In order to fully understand and accurately interpret the results of the BGO-OD experiment it will be necessary to have a full detector and reaction simulation so that effects from detector resolution and acceptance can be accounted for in the final results. The simulation of the BGO-OD will be be undertaken with the Explora Virtual Monte-Carlo (VMC) software framework. This allows for one common user code to be implemented under Geant4, Geant3 and Fluka. The simulation software is also an analysis tool and such flexibility will be key to an efficient final analysis of the data from the BGO-OD experiment. Presented here are current status of the simulation software for the BGO-OD project and the relevant geometry of the BGO-OD, including the central BGO rugby ball detector with the dual-layer Multiwire Proportional Chambers (MWPCs) and the forward spectrometer, consisting of a large dipole magnet, tracking detectors and the Time-of-Flight walls. Simulation of the magnetic field will also be covered.

  5. CET exSim: mineral exploration experience via simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Jason C. 13Holden, Eun-Jung 1Kovesi, Peter 1McCuaig, T. Campbell 1Hronsky, Jon

    2013-08-01

    Undercover mineral exploration is a challenging task as it requires understanding of subsurface geology by relying heavily on remotely sensed (i.e. geophysical) data. Cost-effective exploration is essential in order to increase the chance of success using finite budgets. This requires effective decision-making in both the process of selecting the optimum data collection methods and in the process of achieving accuracy during subsequent interpretation. Traditionally, developing the skills, behaviour and practices of exploration decision-making requires many years of experience through working on exploration projects under various geological settings, commodities and levels of available resources. This implies long periods of sub-optimal exploration decision-making, before the necessary experience has been successfully obtained. To address this critical industry issue, our ongoing research focuses on the development of the unique and novel e-learning environment, exSim, which simulates exploration scenarios where users can test their strategies and learn the consequences of their choices. This simulator provides an engaging platform for self-learning and experimentation in exploration decision strategies, providing a means to build experience more effectively. The exSim environment also provides a unique platform on which numerous scenarios and situations (e.g. deposit styles) can be simulated, potentially allowing the user to become virtually familiarised with a broader scope of exploration practices. Harnessing the power of computer simulation, visualisation and an intuitive graphical user interface, the simulator provides a way to assess the user's exploration decisions and subsequent interpretations. In this paper, we present the prototype functionalities in exSim including: simulation of geophysical surveys, follow-up drill testing and interpretation assistive tools.

  6. Comparisons of pion simulations for the MOLLER experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunde, Dominic; Moller Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The MOLLER experiment at Jefferson Lab will measure the parity-violating asymmetry in Møller scattering, the scattering of electrons from electrons. A precise measurement of this parity-violating asymmetry will allow us to determine the weak charge of the electron with a precision that improves over the E158 experiment at SLAC. The experiment will scatter electrons from a 11 GeV beam from atomic electrons in a liquid hydrogen target. The detected particles will include inelastically produced pions, which will be a background to our measurements. In this work we investigate the validity and accuracy of two available pion physics models in order to estimate the uncertainty in the size of the pion background in the simulation. Currently there are two methods of pion models implemented. The LUND model is based on the Pythia event generator and has been used with success in simulations for the SoLID experiment. The Wiser model is based on data from previous pion scattering experiments. Comparison of the rates, cross sections, particle momentum, scattering angles, and other parameters show that both models produce consistent results for the parameters that were studied in this work, within the range of energies and scattering angles of interest to the MOLLER experiment. The work was supported in part by the National Science Foundation under Grant Nos. PHY-1359364 and PHY-1405857.

  7. Learner performance and attitudes in traditional versus simulated lab experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatt, Kevin A.

    The expository laboratory, a type of physical laboratory that has prescribed outcomes, was initially designed to address learning environments and laboratory environments of the 20th century. Evidence suggests that it has lost its instructional value. Emerging technologies such as simulations have a multitude of instructional benefits which can serve as robust replacements for the expository lab. There is evidence that the expository lab is being redefined and may need to be redesigned for the online world. These changes have not been realized, however, due to the current accreditation process which does not recognize the simulated lab as a legitimate alternative to expository labs. This study investigated whether simulated laboratories can achieve the goals of contemporary lab instruction as successfully as the expository lab paradigm. This study addressed the differences and similarities in student attitudes toward using a simulated lab and an expository lab. The methodology used in this study was experimental and quantitative in nature. Two experiments were carried out, each of which comprised the completion of a lab activity by participants who were assigned to a control group (expository lab) or an experimental group (simulated lab). This study found that there were significant differences between the assessment means of the simulated lab groups and the expository lab groups. The assessment means for the simulated lab groups were significantly higher than the assessment means of the expository lab groups. In terms of learner attitude, it was found that simulated labs were perceived to be more open-ended, easier to use, and easier to generate usable data, than expository labs. Moreover, students preferred using simulated labs over expository labs, and the time to complete simulated lab activities was significantly less than the time to complete expository lab activities. This study showed that the simulated lab can serve as a legitimate alternative to the

  8. Virtual experiments: Combining realistic neutron scattering instrument and sample simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhi, E.; Hugouvieux, V.; Johnson, M. R.; Kob, W.

    2009-08-01

    A new sample component is presented for the Monte Carlo, ray-tracing program, McStas, which is widely used to simulate neutron scattering instruments. The new component allows the sample to be described by its material dynamic structure factor, which is separated into coherent and incoherent contributions. The effects of absorption and multiple scattering are treated and results from simulations and previous experiments are compared. The sample component can also be used to treat any scattering material which may be close to the sample and therefore contaminates the total, measured signal.

  9. A system for designing and simulating particle physics experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żelazny, Roman; Strzałkowski, Piotr

    1987-01-01

    In view of the rapid development of experimental facilities and their costs, the systematic design and preparation of particle physics experiments have become crucial. A software system is proposed as an aid for the experimental designer, mainly for experimental geometry analysis and experimental simulation. The following model is adopted: the description of an experiment is formulated in a language (here called XL) and put by its processor in a data base. The language is based on the entity-relationship-attribute approach. The information contained in the data base can be reported and analysed by an analyser (called XA) and modifications can be made at any time. In particular, the Monte Carlo methods can be used in experiment simulation for both physical phenomena in experimental set-up and detection analysis. The general idea of the system is based on the design concept of ISDOS project information systems. The characteristics of the simulation module are similar to those of the CERN Geant system, but some extensions are proposed. The system could be treated as a component of a greater, integrated software environment for the design of particle physics experiments, their monitoring and data processing.

  10. Simulations of flashing experiments in TOPFLOW facility with TRACE code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikuž, Blaž, E-mail: blaz.mikuz@ijs.si [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Engineering Division, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Tiselj, Iztok [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Engineering Division, Jamova cesta 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Beyer, Matthias; Lucas, Dirk [Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • Two decompression experiments performed at TOPFLOW are simulated with a TRACE code. • The depressurization triggers flashing of the slightly undersaturated liquid water. • Pressure, temperature and void fractions are compared with measurements. • Prediction of the choked flow is the most critical parameter of simulations. • Good agreement with measurements at high initial pressure (i.e. 65 and 40 bars). - Abstract: The decompression experiments performed at TOPFLOW facility in 2010 have been reproduced using the latest best-estimate thermohydraulic system code TRACE (V 5.0 Patch 3). The main component of TOPFLOW facility was about 8 m long vertical tube with an inner diameter of 195.3 mm. The evaporation of liquid water to steam caused by depressurization was simulated using two different procedures: from stagnant water and during circulating of water in tubes. The liquid water was almost saturated at initial pressure values of 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 and 6.5 MPa. Our approach applies one-dimensional code to simulate all the important parts of the facility not just the vertical test section, where the measurements were taken. The obtained simulated pressure, temperature and void fractions are compared with measured values. The simulations of the first procedure (stagnant water at beginning) are in a good agreement with measurements, especially for the cases with longer transients and higher initial pressure, however, choked flow model through the blow-off valve had to be adjusted. There is a short transient (about 2 s) after the fast opening valve opens, which was not reproduced correctly with TRACE. The simulations of the second procedure (circulating water in a loop) correctly predict pressure and temperature decrease, but underpredict void fraction. No modification of the default TRACE choked flow model was needed for procedure B.

  11. Coded throughput performance simulations for the time-varying satellite channel. M.S. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, LI

    1995-01-01

    The design of a reliable satellite communication link involving the data transfer from a small, low-orbit satellite to a ground station, but through a geostationary satellite, was examined. In such a scenario, the received signal power to noise density ratio increases as the transmitting low-orbit satellite comes into view, and then decreases as it then departs, resulting in a short-duration, time-varying communication link. The optimal values of the small satellite antenna beamwidth, signaling rate, modulation scheme and the theoretical link throughput (in bits per day) have been determined. The goal of this thesis is to choose a practical coding scheme which maximizes the daily link throughput while satisfying a prescribed probability of error requirement. We examine the throughput of both fixed rate and variable rate concatenated forward error correction (FEC) coding schemes for the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel, and then examine the effect of radio frequency interference (RFI) on the best coding scheme among them. Interleaving is used to mitigate degradation due to RFI. It was found that the variable rate concatenated coding scheme could achieve 74 percent of the theoretical throughput, equivalent to 1.11 Gbits/day based on the cutoff rate R(sub 0). For comparison, 87 percent is achievable for AWGN-only case.

  12. An Observing System Simulation Experiment Approach to Meteorological Network Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasnezhadi, K.; Rasmussen, P. F.; Stadnyk, T.; Boluwade, A.

    2016-12-01

    A proper knowledge of the spatiotemporal distribution of rainfall is important in order to conduct a mindful investigation of water movement and storage throughout a catchment. Currently, the most accurate precipitation information available for the remote Boreal ecozones of northern Manitoba is coming from the Canadian Precipitation Analysis (CaPA) data assimilation system. Throughout the Churchill River Basin (CRB), CaPA still does not have the proper skill due to the limited number of weather stations. A new approach to experimental network design was investigated based on the concept of Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE). The OSSE-based network assessment procedure which simulates the CaPA system provides a scientific and hydrologically significant tool to assess the sensitivity of CaPA precipitation analysis to observation network density throughout the CRB. To simulate CaPA system, synthetic background and station data were simulated, respectively, by adding spatially uncorrelated and correlated Gaussian noises to an assumingly true daily weather field synthesized by a gridded precipitation generator which simulates CaPA data. Given the true reference field on one hand, and a set of pseudo-CaPA analyses associated with different network realizations on the other hand, a WATFLOOD hydrological model was employed to compare the modeled runoff. The simulations showed that as network density increases, the accuracy of CaPA precipitation products improves up to a certain limit beyond which adding more stations to the network does not result in further accuracy.

  13. Midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendahls, Lena; Oscarsson, Marie G

    2017-03-01

    In Sweden, simulation- and skills training are implemented in midwifery education in order to prepare students for clinical practice. Research regarding the use of both low to high levels of fidelity in simulation in midwifery programme is limited. The aim of this study was to explore midwifery students' experiences of simulation- and skills training. Midwifery students (n=61), at advanced level, were interviewed in 13 group interviews from 2011 to 2105. A semi-structured interview guide was used, and data were analysed by content analysis. The results are presented in four main categories: develops hands on skills and communication, power of collaborative learning, highly valued learning environment and facilitates clinical practice. The majority of students felt that the simulation- and skills training were necessary to become familiar with hands on skills. Having repetitive practices in a safe and secure environment was viewed as important, and students highly valued that mistakes could be made without fear of comprising patient safety. Student's collaboration, reflections and critical thinking increased learning ability. Simulation- and skills training created links between theory and practice, and the lecturer had an important role in providing instructions and feedback. Students felt prepared and confident before their clinical practice, and simulation- and skills training increased safety for all involved, resulting in students being more confident, as patients in clinical practice became less exposed. Furthermore, mentors were satisfied with students' basic skills. Simulation- and skills training support the development of midwifery skills. It creates links between theory and practice, which facilitates students' learning ability. Training needs to include reflections and critical thinking in order to develop their learning. The lecturer has an important role in encouraging time for reflections and creating safe environment during the skills and simulation

  14. On integrating large eddy simulation and laboratory turbulent flow experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Fernando F

    2009-07-28

    Critical issues involved in large eddy simulation (LES) experiments relate to the treatment of unresolved subgrid scale flow features and required initial and boundary condition supergrid scale modelling. The inherently intrusive nature of both LES and laboratory experiments is noted in this context. Flow characterization issues becomes very challenging ones in validation and computational laboratory studies, where potential sources of discrepancies between predictions and measurements need to be clearly evaluated and controlled. A special focus of the discussion is devoted to turbulent initial condition issues.

  15. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Liko, D. [Institut fur Hochenenergiephysik, Vienna, (Austria); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Braithwaite, W. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  16. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Liko, D. [Institut fur Hochenenergiephysik, Vienna, (Austria); Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle (United States); Braithwaite, W. [Univ. of Arkansas, Little Rock (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  17. Bringing history to life: simulating landmark experiments in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, David M; Smith, Laurence D

    2006-05-01

    The course in history of psychology can be challenging for students, many of whom enter it with little background in history and faced with unfamiliar names and concepts. The sheer volume of material can encourage passive memorization unless efforts are made to increase student involvement. As part of a trend toward experiential history, historians of science have begun to supplement their lectures with demonstrations of classic physics experiments as a way to bring the history of science to life. Here, the authors report on computer simulations of five landmark experiments from early experimental psychology in the areas of reaction time, span of attention, and apparent motion. The simulations are designed not only to permit hands-on replication of historically important results but also to reproduce the experimental procedures closely enough that students can gain a feel for the nature of early research and the psychological processes being studied.

  18. Neutron Generation Simulations of Collisionless Shock Experiments on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilks, S. C.; Higginson, D. P.; Weber, S. V.; Ryutov, D. D.; Ross, J. S.; Park, H.-S.; Fiuza, F.

    2015-11-01

    A series of simulations that model recent collisionless shock experiments at the NIF will be presented. In these experiments, two opposing CD plasmas flow into each other, both plasmas arising from lasers hitting planar CD targets separated by 6, 8, and 10mm. Where the plasma flows overlap, a symmetric peak of neutron generation was observed about the mid-plane. When one of the CD foils was replaced by CH, neutron generation was still observed, but with an asymmetry about the mid-plane. The hybrid PIC code LSP is used to model this interaction. Neutron yields, temporal profiles and burn widths obtained from simulation compare favorably with experimental measurements from NTOF and PTOF diagnostics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675193.

  19. Simulation of Reactors for Antineutrino Experiments Using DRAGON

    CERN Document Server

    Winslow, L

    2011-01-01

    From the discovery of the neutrino to the precision neutrino oscillation measurements in KamLAND, nuclear reactors have proven to be an important source of antineutrinos. As their power and our knowledge of neutrino physics has increased, more sensitive measurements have become possible. The next generation of reactor antineutrino experiments require more detailed simulations of the reactor core. Many of the reactor simulation codes are proprietary which makes detailed studies difficult. Here we present the results of the open source DRAGON code and compare it to other industry standards for reactor modeling. We use published data from the Takahama reactor to determine the quality of the simulations. The propagation of the uncertainty to the antineutrino flux is also discussed.

  20. Virtual Reality Simulation of the International Space Welding Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Virtual Reality (VR) is a set of breakthrough technologies that allow a human being to enter and fully experience a 3-dimensional, computer simulated environment. A true virtual reality experience meets three criteria: (1) It involves 3-dimensional computer graphics; (2) It includes real-time feedback and response to user actions; and (3) It must provide a sense of immersion. Good examples of a virtual reality simulator are the flight simulators used by all branches of the military to train pilots for combat in high performance jet fighters. The fidelity of such simulators is extremely high -- but so is the price tag, typically millions of dollars. Virtual reality teaching and training methods are manifestly effective, and we have therefore implemented a VR trainer for the International Space Welding Experiment. My role in the development of the ISWE trainer consisted of the following: (1) created texture-mapped models of the ISWE's rotating sample drum, technology block, tool stowage assembly, sliding foot restraint, and control panel; (2) developed C code for control panel button selection and rotation of the sample drum; (3) In collaboration with Tim Clark (Antares Virtual Reality Systems), developed a serial interface box for the PC and the SGI Indigo so that external control devices, similar to ones actually used on the ISWE, could be used to control virtual objects in the ISWE simulation; (4) In collaboration with Peter Wang (SFFP) and Mark Blasingame (Boeing), established the interference characteristics of the VIM 1000 head-mounted-display and tested software filters to correct the problem; (5) In collaboration with Peter Wang and Mark Blasingame, established software and procedures for interfacing the VPL DataGlove and the Polhemus 6DOF position sensors to the SGI Indigo serial ports. The majority of the ISWE modeling effort was conducted on a PC-based VR Workstation, described below.

  1. Kinetic simulating experiment on the secondary hydrocarbon generation of kerogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of generation have been obtained for different hydrocarbon classes, including methane, C2-C5 gas hydrocarbons, C6-C13 light hydrocarbons and C13+ heavy hydrocarbons, and vitrinite reflectance (Ro) by the kinetic simulating experiment of kerogen cracking. Then, combined with the detailed geology of Sichuan Basin, the effective gas-generating intensity of the Lower Cambrian source rock is approximately estimated by applying these parameters.

  2. Neutron Transmission through Sapphire Crystals: Experiments and Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Rantsiou, Emmanouela; Filges, Uwe; Panzner, Tobias; Klinkby, Esben Bryndt

    2013-01-01

    Sapphire crystals are excellent filters of fast neutrons, while at the same time exhibit moderate to very little absorption at smaller energies. We have performed an extensive series of measurements in order to quantify the above effect. Alongside our experiments, we have performed a series of simulations, in order to reproduce the transmission of cold neutrons through sapphire crystals. Thosesimulations were part of the effort of validating and improving the newly developed interface between...

  3. Hydrodynamic simulations of gaseous Argon shock compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Daniel B.; Dattelbaum, Dana M.; Goodwin, Peter M.; Sheffield, Stephen A.; Morris, John S.; Gustavsen, Richard L.; Burkett, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The lack of published Ar gas shock data motivated an evaluation of the Ar Equation of State (EOS) in gas phase initial density regimes. In particular, these regimes include initial pressures in the range of 13.8 - 34.5 bar (0.025 - 0.056 g/ cm3) and initial shock velocities around 0.2 cm/μs. The objective of the numerical evaluation was to develop a physical understanding of the EOS behavior of shocked and subsequently multiply re-shocked Ar gas through Pagosa numerical simulations utilizing the SESAME equation of state. Pagosa is a Los Alamos National Laboratory 2-D and 3-D Eulerian continuum dynamics code capable of modeling high velocity compressible flow with multiple materials. The approach involved the use of gas gun experiments to evaluate the shock and multiple re-shock behavior of pressurized Ar gas to validate Pagosa simulations and the SESAME EOS. Additionally, the diagnostic capability within the experiments allowed for the EOS to be fully constrained with measured shock velocity, particle velocity and temperature. The simulations demonstrate excellent agreement with the experiments in the shock velocity/particle velocity space, and reasonable comparisons for the ionization temperatures.

  4. Transverse beam compression on the Paul trap simulator experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik P. Gilson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The Paul trap simulator experiment is a compact laboratory Paul trap that simulates a long, thin charged-particle bunch coasting through a kilometers-long magnetic alternating-gradient (AG transport system by putting the physicist in the beam’s frame of reference. The transverse dynamics of particles in both systems are described by similar equations, including all nonlinear space-charge effects. The time-dependent quadrupolar electric fields created by the confinement electrodes of a linear Paul trap correspond to the axially dependent magnetic fields applied in the AG system. Results are presented for experiments in which the lattice period and strength are changed over the course of the experiment to transversely compress a beam with an initial depressed tune of 0.9. Instantaneous and smooth changes are considered. Emphasis is placed on determining the conditions that minimize the emittance growth and the number of halo particles produced by the beam compression process. Both the results of particle-in-cell simulations performed with the warp code and envelope equation solutions agree well with the experimental data.

  5. Solar irradiance observed on the FY-3 satellites - instrument overview and primary observation results of in-orbit experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Fang, W.; Li, H.

    2015-12-01

    Solar driving mechanism for Earth climate has been a controversial problem for centuries. Data of Solar Irradiance (SI) is required by the investigations of the solar driving mechanism, including Total Solar Irradiance (TSI) and Spectral Solar Irradiance (SSI). SI observations with short term accuracy and long term precision are essential to separate solar forcing from human-induced factors. TSI and SSI have been measured on Chinese FY-3 satellites, including FY-3A, FY-3B and FY-3C. FY-3A satellite launched in May, 2008 is the first satellite. FY-3B satellite launched in November, 2010 is the second satellite and FY-3C satellite launched in September, 2013 is the third satellite. SSI has been measured by SBUS (Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Sounder) in the ultraviolet spectrum in the FY-3 mission. When a solar diffuser plate is deployed to reflect the incoming sunlight, SI is measured at 12 discrete, 1.1 nm wide wavelength bands between 250 nm and 340 nm. The SSI measurements are performed using a double monochromator operated in a stepped wavelength scan mode. SBUS collects SSI weekly at 12 discrete wave-lengths near polar area. Moreover, SSI is measured by SBUS every month covering 160-400 nm continuous spectral region. SSI has been recorded in SBUS missions since the ascending phase of Solar Cycle 24. Approximately the same variation tendencies of SSI were detected by SBUS in specific spectrum compared with data from SOLSTICE/SORCE. TSI have been recorded by Total Solar Irradiance Monitors (TSIM) in FY-3 missions. The sun was measured by TSIM/FY-3A and TSIM/FY-3B in a scanning manner. TSI data quality is improved by TSIM/FY-3C which has a pointing system. TSIM/FY-3C measures the sun with nearly zero solar pointing errors. TSI variations detected by TSIM/FY-3C are nearly the same with VIRGO/SOHO and TIM/SORCE. The TSIM experiments have observed the sun for about 7 years. A slowly increasing TSI trend has been detected by TSIMs in the Solar Cycle 24. We present the

  6. Estimation of land remote sensing satellites productivity based on the simulation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurenkov, Vladimir I.; Kucherov, Alexander S.; Yakischik, Artem A.

    2017-01-01

    The problem of estimating land remote sensing satellites productivity is considered. Here, productivity is treated as a number of separate survey objects taken in a definite time. Appropriate mathematical models have been developed. Some results obtained with the help of the software worked out in Delphi programming support environment are presented.

  7. Mapping Offshore Winds Around Iceland Using Satellite Synthetic Aperture Radar and Mesoscale Model Simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Badger, Merete; Nawri, Nikolai

    2015-01-01

    The offshore wind climate in Iceland is examined based on satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR), coastal meteorological station measurements, and results from two atmospheric model data sets, HARMONIE and NORA10. The offshore winds in Iceland are highly influenced by the rugged coastline. Lee...

  8. Intraannual variability of tides in the thermosphere from model simulations and in situ satellite observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Häusler, K.; Hagan, M.E.; Forbes, J.M.; Zhang, X.; Doornbos, E.; Bruinsma, S.; Lu, G.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we provide insights into limitations imposed by current satellite-based strategies to delineate tidal variability in the thermosphere, as well as the ability of a state-of-the-art model to replicate thermospheric tidal determinations. Toward this end, we conducted a year-long thermosp

  9. Advancements of In-Flight Mass Moment of Inertia and Structural Deflection Algorithms for Satellite Attitude Simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    on the air-bearing satellite attitude simulator at Shenyang University of Technology. Additionally, Chesi et al., [3] advanced the EKF developed by Kim...in a disturbance torque. The data for hrw about the test axis is then used to calculate the coefficients Arw and Brw that best fit the equation hrw...oscillation; and m, b, D, and E are coefficients that best fit the 51 0 10 20 30 40 50 −0.4 −0.3 −0.2 −0.1 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 time (s) A ng ul ar M om en

  10. Assimilation of simulated satellite altimetric data and ARGO temperature data into a double-gyre NEMO ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yajing; Barth, Alexander; Laenen, François; Beckers, Jean-Marie

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, data assimilation, adressing the problem of producing useful analyses and forecasts given imperfect dynamical models and observations, has shown increasing interest in the atmosphere and ocean science community. The efficiency of data assimilation in improving the model prediction has been proven by numerous work. However, it is still a challenge to design operational data assimilation schemes which can be operated with realistic ocean models, with reasonable quality and at acceptable cost. In this work, several experiments, assimilating the simulated altimetry and temperature observations into a double-gyre NEMO ocean model, are performed with objective to investigate the impact of different assimilation setups, including changing the observation distribution, the ensemble size and the localisation scale, on the quality of the analysis. The double-gyre NEMO ocean model corresponds to an idealized configuration of the NEMO model: a square and 5000-meter deep flat bottom ocean at mid latitudes (the so called square-box or SQB configuration). The main physical parameters governing the dominant characteristics of the flow are the initial stratification, the wind stress, the bottom friction and the lateral mixing parameterization. The domain extends from 24N to 44N, over 30° in longitude (60W - 30W) with 11 vertical levels between 152 m and 4613 m in depth. The minimum horizontal resolution of the model is 1/4°. The observations are generated from the model simulations (the truth) by adding spatially uncorrelated gaussian noise with given standard deviation. Two types of observation are considered : sea surface height (SSH) and temperature. The observation grid of the SSH is simulated from the ENVISAT and Jason-1 satellite tracks, and that of the temperature is generated in order to mimic the ARGO float profile. The observation localisation is performed in order to avoid spurious correlation at large distance. For this, the observations are weighted

  11. Impact of Southeast Asian smoke on aerosol properties in Southwest China: First comparison of model simulations with satellite and ground observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jun; Xia, Xiangao; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Jinqiang; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Fisher, Jenny A.; Keller, Christoph A.

    2017-04-01

    Smoke aerosols have been observed in Southwest China as a result of long-range transport from surrounding areas in March and April. The processes driving this transport and the resultant impact on regional aerosol optical properties are studied here through a combined use of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS)-Chem chemistry transport model in conjunction with satellite and the first-ever ground-based observations in the Southwest China. The potential biomass burning source regions as well as their respective contributions to aerosol loading in Southwest China are quantified. Compared to Sun photometer observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm at eight stations in the study region (10-28°N, 90-115°E, comprising Northeast India, Indo-China Peninsula, and Southwest and South China), the AOD simulated by GEOS-Chem (nested grid with 0.5° × 0.667° resolution) by using the Fire Inventory from National Center for Atmospheric Research shows an average bias of -0.17 during January 2012 to May 2013. However, during the biomass burning months (March-April), the simulated AOD is much improved with a bias of -0.04. Model sensitivity experiments show that biomass burning in Burma and Northeast India is the largest contributor to smoke AOD ( 88%) and total AOD ( 57%) over Kunming, an urban site in Southwest China. Case studies on 21-23 March 2013 show that the smoke layer in Northeast India and North Burma can extend from the surface to 4 km and then be transported to Southwest China by prevailing westerly airflow. Model-simulated AOD and vertical distribution of aerosols are respectively in good agreement with satellite measurements from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization.

  12. ASTROPHYSICAL JETS AS HYPERSONIC BUCKSHOT: LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS AND SIMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Frank

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Herbig-Haro (HH jets are commonly thought of as homogeneous beams of plasma traveling at hypersonic velocities. Structure within jet beams is often attributed to periodic or "pulsed" variations of conditions at the jet source. In this contribution we offer an alternative to "pulsed" models of protostellar jets. Using direct numerical simulations and laboratory experiments we explore the possibility that jets are chains of sub-radial clumps propagating through a moving inter-clump medium. Our simulations explore an idealization of this scenario by injecting small (r ¿jet spheres embedded in an otherwise smooth inter-clump jet flow. The spheres are initialized with velocities differing from the jet velocity by ¿ 15%. We find the consequences of shifting from homogeneous to heterogeneous flows are significant as clumps interact with each other and with the inter-clump medium in a variety of ways. We also present new experiments that, for the first time, directly address issues of magnetized astrophysical jets. Our experiments explore the propagation and stability of super-magnetosonic, radiatively cooled, and magnetically dominated bubbles with internal, narrow jets. The results are scalable to astrophysical environments via the similarity of dimensionl ss numbers controlling the dynamics in both settings. These experiments show the jets are subject to kink mode instabilities which quickly fragment the jet into narrow chains of hypersonic knots, providing support for the "clumpy jet" paradigm.

  13. DSMC Simulations of Hypersonic Flows and Comparison With Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, James N.; Bird, Graeme A.; Markelov, Gennady N.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents computational results obtained with the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for several biconic test cases in which shock interactions and flow separation-reattachment are key features of the flow. Recent ground-based experiments have been performed for several biconic configurations, and surface heating rate and pressure measurements have been proposed for code validation studies. The present focus is to expand on the current validating activities for a relatively new DSMC code called DS2V that Bird (second author) has developed. Comparisons with experiments and other computations help clarify the agreement currently being achieved between computations and experiments and to identify the range of measurement variability of the proposed validation data when benchmarked with respect to the current computations. For the test cases with significant vibrational nonequilibrium, the effect of the vibrational energy surface accommodation on heating and other quantities is demonstrated.

  14. Simulations of Laboratory Astrophysics Experiments using the CRASH code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantham, Matthew; Kuranz, Carolyn; Fein, Jeff; Wan, Willow; Young, Rachel; Keiter, Paul; Drake, R. Paul

    2015-11-01

    Computer simulations can assist in the design and analysis of laboratory astrophysics experiments. The Center for Radiative Shock Hydrodynamics (CRASH) at the University of Michigan developed a code that has been used to design and analyze high-energy-density experiments on OMEGA, NIF, and other large laser facilities. This Eulerian code uses block-adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with implicit multigroup radiation transport, electron heat conduction and laser ray tracing. This poster will demonstrate some of the experiments the CRASH code has helped design or analyze including: Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor, magnetized flows, jets, and laser-produced plasmas. This work is funded by the following grants: DEFC52-08NA28616, DE-NA0001840, and DE-NA0002032.

  15. Near real time observational data collection for SPRUCE experiment- PakBus protocol for slow satellite connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassovski, Misha; Hanson, Paul; Riggs, Jeff

    2017-04-01

    Climate change studies are one of the most important aspects of modern science and related experiments are getting bigger and more complex. One such experiment is the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE, http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) conducted in in northern Minnesota, 40 km north of Grand Rapids, in the USDA Forest Service Marcell Experimental Forest (MEF). The SPRUCE experimental mission is to assess ecosystem-level biological responses of vulnerable, high carbon terrestrial ecosystems to a range of climate warming manipulations and an elevated CO2 atmosphere. This manipulation experiment generates a lot of observational data and requires a reliable onsite data collection system, dependable methods to transfer data to a robust scientific facility, and real-time monitoring capabilities. This publication shares our experience of establishing near real time data collection and monitoring system via a satellite link using PakBus protocol.

  16. GLoBES: General Long Baseline Experiment Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Patrick; Kopp, Joachim; Lindner, Manfred; Rolinec, Mark; Winter, Walter

    2007-09-01

    GLoBES (General Long Baseline Experiment Simulator) is a flexible software package to simulate neutrino oscillation long baseline and reactor experiments. On the one hand, it contains a comprehensive abstract experiment definition language (AEDL), which allows to describe most classes of long baseline experiments at an abstract level. On the other hand, it provides a C-library to process the experiment information in order to obtain oscillation probabilities, rate vectors, and Δχ-values. Currently, GLoBES is available for GNU/Linux. Since the source code is included, the port to other operating systems is in principle possible. GLoBES is an open source code that has previously been described in Computer Physics Communications 167 (2005) 195 and in Ref. [7]). The source code and a comprehensive User Manual for GLoBES v3.0.8 is now available from the CPC Program Library as described in the Program Summary below. The home of GLobES is http://www.mpi-hd.mpg.de/~globes/. Program summaryProgram title: GLoBES version 3.0.8 Catalogue identifier: ADZI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADZI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 145 295 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 811 892 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C Computer: GLoBES builds and installs on 32bit and 64bit Linux systems Operating system: 32bit or 64bit Linux RAM: Typically a few MBs Classification: 11.1, 11.7, 11.10 External routines: GSL—The GNU Scientific Library, www.gnu.org/software/gsl/ Nature of problem: Neutrino oscillations are now established as the leading flavor transition mechanism for neutrinos. In a long history of many experiments, see, e.g., [1], two oscillation frequencies have been identified: The fast atmospheric

  17. Developing an instrument simulator: experience feedback from the JWST/NIRSpec and VLT/MUSE simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarno, Aurélien; Piqueras, Laure; Bacon, Roland; Ferruit, Pierre; Legros, Emeline; Pécontal-Rousset, Arlette; Gnata, Xavier; Streicher, Ole; Weilbacher, Peter

    2012-09-01

    The Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (CRAL) has recently developed two instrument simulators for spectrographic instruments. They are based on Fourier optics, and model the whole chain of acquisition, taking into account both optical aberrations and diffraction effects, by propagating a wavefront through the instrument, according to the Fourier optics concept. One simulates the NIRSpec instrument, a near-infrared multi-object spectrograph for the future James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The other one models the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument, a second-generation integral-field spectrograph for the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The two simulators have been developed in different contexts (subcontracted versus developed internally), and for very different instruments (space-based versus ground-based), which strengthen the CRAL experience. This paper describes the lessons learned while developing these simulators: development methods, phasing with the project, points to focus on, getting data, interacting with scientists and users, etc.

  18. Dust aerosol characterization and transport features based on combined ground-based, satellite and model-simulated data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, K.; Devara, P. C. S.; Rao, S. Vijaya Bhaskara; Jayasankar, C. K.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study aerosol characteristics over an urban station in Western India, during a dust event that occurred between 19 and 26 March 2012, with the help of ground-based and satellite measurements and model simulation data. The aerosol parameters are found to change significantly during dust events and they suggest dominance of coarse mode aerosols. The fine mode fraction, size distribution and single scattering albedo reveal that dust (natural) aerosols dominate the anthropogenic aerosols over the study region. Ground-based measurements show drastic reduction in visibility on the dust-laden day (22 March 2012). Additionally, HYSPLIT model and satellite daily data have been used to trace the source, path and spatial extent of dust storm events. Most of the dust aerosols, during the study period, travel from west-to-east pathway from source-to-sink region. Furthermore, aerosol vertical profiles from CALIPSO and synoptic meteorological parameters from ECMWF re-analysis data reveal a layer of thick dust extending from surface to an altitude of about 4 km, and decrease in temperature and increase in specific humidity, respectively. The aerosol radiative forcing calculations indicate more cooling at the surface and warming in the atmosphere during dust event. The results of satellite observations are found to have good consistency with ground-based air quality measurements. Synthesis of satellite data integrated with ground-based observations, supplemented by model analysis, is found to be a promising technique for improved understanding of dust storm phenomenon and its impact on regional climate.

  19. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION FOR MODELING THE EFFECT OF GROUND SEGMENT LOCATION ON IN-ORBIT RESPONSIVENESS OF LEO SUNSYNCHRONOUS SATELLITE S

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Navabi; Hossein Bonyan Khamseh

    2011-01-01

    Responsiveness is a challenge for space systems to sustain competitive advantage over alternate non-spaceborne technologies.For a satellite in its operational orbit,in-orbit responsiveness is defined as the capability of the satellite to respond to a given demand in a timely manner.In this paper,it is shown that Average Wait Time (AWT) to pick up user demand from ground segment is the appropriate metric to evaluate the effect of ground segment location on in-orbit responsiveness of Low Earth Orbit (LEO) sunsynchronous satellites.This metric depends on pattern of ground segment access to satellite and distribution of user demands in time domain.A mathematical model is presented to determine pattern of ground segment access to satellite and concept of cumulative distribution function is used to simulate distribution of user demands for markets with different total demand scenarios.Monte Carlo simulations are employed to take account of uncertainty in distribution and total volume of user demands.Sampling error and standard deviation are used to ensure validity of AWT metric obtained from Monte Carlo simulations.Incorporation of the proposed metric in the ground segment site location process results in more responsive satellite systems which,in turn,lead to greater customer satisfaction levels and attractiveness of spaceborne systems for different applications.Finally,simulation results for a case study are presented.

  20. Engineering and simulation of life sciences Spacelab experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, R S; Bush, W H; Rummel, J A; Alexander, W C

    1979-10-01

    The third in a series of Spacelab Mission Development tests was conducted at the Johnson (correction of Johnston) Space Center as a part of the development of Life Sciences experiments for the Space Shuttle era. The latest test was a joint effort of the Ames Research and Johnson Space Centers and utilized animals and men for study. The basic objective of this test was to evaluate the operational concepts planned for the Space Shuttle life science payloads program. A three-man crew (Mission Specialist and two Payload Specialists) conducted 26 experiments and 12 operational tests, which were selected for this 7-day mission simulation. The crew lived on board a simulated Orbiter/Spacelab mockup 24 hr a day. The Orbiter section contained the mid deck crew quarters area, complete with sleeping, galley and waste management provisions. The Spacelab was identical in geometry to the European Space Agency Spacelab design, complete with removable rack sections and stowage provisions. Communications between the crewmen and support personnel were configured and controlled as currently planned for operational shuttle flights. For this test a Science Operations Remote Center was manned at the Ames Research Center and was managed by simulated Mission Control and Payload Operation Control Centers at the Johnson Space Center. This paper presents the test objectives, description of the facilities and test program, and the results of this test.

  1. Comparison Between Linear and Nonlinear Models of Mixed Pixels in Remote Sensing Satellite Images Based on Cierniewski Surface BRDF Model by Means of Monte Carlo Ray Tracing Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Comparative study on linear and nonlinear mixed pixel models of which pixels in remote sensing satellite images is composed with plural ground cover materials mixed together, is conducted for remote sensing satellite image analysis. The mixed pixel models are based on Cierniewski of ground surface reflectance model. The comparative study is conducted by using of Monte Carlo Ray Tracing: MCRT simulations. Through simulation study, the difference between linear and nonlinear mixed pixel models is clarified. Also it is found that the simulation model is validated.

  2. Simulation of Satellite, Airborne and Terrestrial LiDAR with DART (I):Waveform Simulation with Quasi-Monte Carlo Ray Tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastellu-Etchegorry, Jean-Philippe; Yin, Tiangang; Lauret, Nicolas; Grau, Eloi; Rubio, Jeremy; Cook, Bruce D.; Morton, Douglas C.; Sun, Guoqing

    2016-01-01

    Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) provides unique data on the 3-D structure of atmosphere constituents and the Earth's surface. Simulating LiDAR returns for different laser technologies and Earth scenes is fundamental for evaluating and interpreting signal and noise in LiDAR data. Different types of models are capable of simulating LiDAR waveforms of Earth surfaces. Semi-empirical and geometric models can be imprecise because they rely on simplified simulations of Earth surfaces and light interaction mechanisms. On the other hand, Monte Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) models are potentially accurate but require long computational time. Here, we present a new LiDAR waveform simulation tool that is based on the introduction of a quasi-Monte Carlo ray tracing approach in the Discrete Anisotropic Radiative Transfer (DART) model. Two new approaches, the so-called "box method" and "Ray Carlo method", are implemented to provide robust and accurate simulations of LiDAR waveforms for any landscape, atmosphere and LiDAR sensor configuration (view direction, footprint size, pulse characteristics, etc.). The box method accelerates the selection of the scattering direction of a photon in the presence of scatterers with non-invertible phase function. The Ray Carlo method brings traditional ray-tracking into MCRT simulation, which makes computational time independent of LiDAR field of view (FOV) and reception solid angle. Both methods are fast enough for simulating multi-pulse acquisition. Sensitivity studies with various landscapes and atmosphere constituents are presented, and the simulated LiDAR signals compare favorably with their associated reflectance images and Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) waveforms. The LiDAR module is fully integrated into DART, enabling more detailed simulations of LiDAR sensitivity to specific scene elements (e.g., atmospheric aerosols, leaf area, branches, or topography) and sensor configuration for airborne or satellite LiDAR sensors.

  3. Experimental quantum key distribution with simulated ground-to-satellite photon losses and processing limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Gigov, Nikolay; Higgins, Brendon L.; Yan, Zhizhong; Meyer-Scott, Evan; Khandani, Amir K.; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Jennewein, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) has the potential to improve communications security by offering cryptographic keys whose security relies on the fundamental properties of quantum physics. The use of a trusted quantum receiver on an orbiting satellite is the most practical near-term solution to the challenge of achieving long-distance (global-scale) QKD, currently limited to a few hundred kilometers on the ground. This scenario presents unique challenges, such as high photon losses and restricted classical data transmission and processing power due to the limitations of a typical satellite platform. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of such a system by implementing a QKD protocol, with optical transmission and full post-processing, in the high-loss regime using minimized computing hardware at the receiver. Employing weak coherent pulses with decoy states, we demonstrate the production of secure key bits at up to 56.5 dB of photon loss. We further illustrate the feasibility of a satellite uplink by generating a secure key while experimentally emulating the varying losses predicted for realistic low-Earth-orbit satellite passes at 600 km altitude. With a 76 MHz source and including finite-size analysis, we extract 3374 bits of a secure key from the best pass. We also illustrate the potential benefit of combining multiple passes together: while one suboptimal "upper-quartile" pass produces no finite-sized key with our source, the combination of three such passes allows us to extract 165 bits of a secure key. Alternatively, we find that by increasing the signal rate to 300 MHz it would be possible to extract 21 570 bits of a secure finite-sized key in just a single upper-quartile pass.

  4. Nonlinear compensation research and simulation of bandlimited QPSK digital satellite channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents a phase compensation against the signal distortion mainly caused by TWTA to solve the problem of compensation and modelling of a nonlinear QPSK satellite channel assumed to be bandlimited and exhibit both ampli tude and phase nonlinearities, and to lower the bit error probability of nonlinear channel, and concludes with simula tion results that the compensation against phase distortion of TWTA can significantly improve the nonlinear performance of the channel.

  5. Non-equilibrium Warm Dense Gold: Experiments and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    This talk is an overview of a series of studies of non-equilibrium Warm Dense Matter using a broad range of measured properties of a single material, namely Au, as comprehensive benchmarks for theory. The measurements are made in fs-laser pump-probe experiments. For understanding lattice stability, our investigation reveals a solid phase at high energy density. This leads to the calculation of lattice dynamics using MD simulations and phonon hardening in DFT-MD simulations. For understanding electron transport in two-temperature states, AC conductivity is used to evaluate DFT-MD and Kubo-Greenwood calculations while DC conductivity is used to test Ziman calculations in a DFT average atom model. The electron density is also used to assess electronic structure calculations in DFT simulations. In our latest study of electron kinetics in states with a non-Fermi-Dirac distribution, three-body recombination is found to have a significant effect on electron thermalizaiton time. This is driving an effort to develop electron kinetics simulations using the Boltzmann equation method.

  6. Granular Solid-liquid Transition: Experiment and Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, M.; Xu, X.; Sun, Q.

    2015-12-01

    Granular media are amorphous materials, which differs from traditional solid or liquid. In different circumstance, granular behavior varies from solid-like to liquid-like, and the transitions between these regimes are always related to many complex natural progresses such as the failure of soil foundation and the occurrence of landslide and debris flow. The mechanic of elastic instability during the transition from solid-like to liquid-like regime, and the quantitative description of irreversible deformation during flow are the key problems to interpret these transition phenomena. In this work, we developed a continuum model with elastic stable condition and irreversible flow rule of granular material based on a thermal dynamical model, the Two-Granular-Temperature model (TGT). Since infinitesimal elastic deformation in solid-like regime and significant plastic large deformation in liquid-like regime can coexist in the granular solid-liquid transition process, the material point method (MPM) was used to build an effective numerical model. Collapse of rectangular granular pile contains both the transition from granular solid to granular liquid and the inverse process, thus in this work we carried out collapse experiment with clay particles, and simulated the experiment with our continuum model and an open-source DEM model YADE to study the transition processes. Results between experiment and simulations were compared and good agreements on collapse shape and velocity profiles were achieved, and the new model proposed in this work seems to work well on the description of granular solid-liquid transition.

  7. Cycle-life testing of 100-Ah class lithium-ion battery in a simulated geosynchronous-Earth-orbit satellite operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xianming; Sone, Yoshitsugu; Naito, Hitoshi; Yamada, Chisa; Segami, Go; Kibe, Koichi [Institute of Aerospace Technology, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, Tsukuba Space Center, Sengen 2-1-1, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan)

    2006-09-29

    In this paper, we review our work on cycle-life testing of a 100-Ah class lithium-ion battery in a simulated geosynchronous-Earth-orbit (GEO) satellite operation. The battery consists of ten 100-Ah lithium-ion (10) cells in a series, with a high energy density exceeding 100Whkg{sup -1} at the battery level. We simulate the eclipse period in real-time testing with five depth-of-discharge (DOD) patterns at an ambient temperature of 15{sup o}C. We also simulate a sun-shine period in 8-day thermally accelerated full-charge storage at an ambient temperature of 25{sup o}C, which in our experience corresponds to full-charge storage of a half-year operation at 0{sup o}C. Eighteen eclipse seasons have presently been completed, corresponding to 9 years of GEO operation. The battery maintained a high voltage near 3.4V at the end of the discharge, even when the DOD was set at 70%. The voltage dispersion of 10 cells was also sufficiently small in the range of 48mV. The cell temperature reached a maximum of 29{sup o}C and maintained minimal dispersion smaller than 4{sup o}C even when the battery was discharged at a high DOD of 70%. (author)

  8. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    CERN Document Server

    Wheeler, Coral; Bullock, James S; Boylan-Kolchin, Michael; Elbert, Oliver; Garrison-Kimmel, Shea; Hopkins, Philip F; Keres, Dusan

    2015-01-01

    We present FIRE/Gizmo hydrodynamic zoom-in simulations of isolated dark matter halos, two each at the mass of classical dwarf galaxies ($M_{\\rm vir} \\simeq 10^{10} M_{\\odot}$) and ultra-faint galaxies ($M_{\\rm vir} \\simeq 10^9 M_{\\odot}$), and with two feedback implementations. The resultant central galaxies lie on an extrapolated abundance matching relation from $M_{\\star} \\simeq 10^6$ to $10^4 M_{\\odot}$ without a break. Every host is filled with subhalos, many of which form stars. Our dwarfs with $M_{\\star} \\simeq 10^6 M_{\\odot}$ each have 1-2 well-resolved satellites with $M_{\\star} = 3-200 \\times 10^3 M_{\\odot}$. Even our isolated ultra-faint galaxies have star-forming subhalos. If this is representative, dwarf galaxies throughout the universe should commonly host tiny satellite galaxies of their own. We combine our results with the ELVIS simulations to show that targeting $\\sim 50~ \\rm kpc$ regions around nearby isolated dwarfs could increase the chances of discovering ultra-faint galaxies by $\\sim 35\\%...

  9. Combining Experiments and Simulations Using the Maximum Entropy Principle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-01-01

    are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy...... in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results....... Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges....

  10. Analytical and numerical simulations of a hydraulic fracturing experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, M.Z.; Namiq, M.A.; Zhou, L.; Gou, Y. [Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany). Inst. of Petroleum Engineering

    2008-10-23

    Based on simulations of a previously published hydraulic fracturing experiment performed by Casas et al. (2006), this paper presents the performance assessment of the famous analytical fracture 2D-models (PKN and KGD) and a 3D numerical model (FDM program FLAC3D of the ITASCA Inc.). Strain-softening models are used in the FLAC3D to describe the fracture creation and propagation as well as to present the material softening properties (permeability, tensile strength, cohesion, friction and dilation angel) as functions of the plastic strain. The results show that the numerical simulator has a much better performance and produces more reliable results than the analytical fracture models. However, numerical models have limitations and thus potential for further development. (orig.)

  11. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global Turbulent Transport Properties in Tokamak Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W.X.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Rewoldt, G.; Hahm, T.S.; Manickam, J.

    2006-01-01

    A general geometry gyro-kinetic model for particle simulation of plasma turbulence in tokamak experiments is described. It incorporates the comprehensive influence of noncircular cross section, realistic plasma profiles, plasma rotation, neoclassical (equilibrium) electric fields, and Coulomb collisions. An interesting result of global turbulence development in a shaped tokamak plasma is presented with regard to nonlinear turbulence spreading into the linearly stable region. The mutual interaction between turbulence and zonal flows in collisionless plasmas is studied with a focus on identifying possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows. A bursting temporal behavior with a period longer than the geodesic acoustic oscillation period is observed even in a collisionless system. Our simulation results suggest that the zonal flows can drive turbulence. However, this process is too weak to be an effective zonal flow saturation mechanism.

  12. Simulations of MATROSHKA experiments at ISS using PHITS

    CERN Document Server

    Sihver, L; Puchalska, M; Reitz, G

    2010-01-01

    Concerns about the biological effects of space radiation are increasing rapidly due to the perspective of long-duration manned missions, both in relation to the International Space Station (ISS) and to manned interplanetary missions to Moon and Mars in the future. As a preparation for these long duration space missions it is important to ensure an excellent capability to evaluate the impact of space radiation on human health in order to secure the safety of the astronauts/cosmonauts and minimize their risks. It is therefore necessary to measure the radiation load on the personnel both inside and outside the space vehicles and certify that organ and tissue equivalent doses can be simulated as accurate as possible. In this paper we will present simulations using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo Particle and Heavy Ion Transport code System (PHITS) of long term dose measurements performed with the ESA supported experiment MATROSHKA (MTR), which is an anthropomorphic phantom containing over 6000 radiation detecto...

  13. STUDY ON SIMULATION EXPERIMENT OF EQUIVALENT MATERIAL APPLIED IN COAL MINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴敬; 苏普正; 刘晋安

    1998-01-01

    Based on simulation experiments of a number of scientific research items, the latestprogress of experiment method and test technique about equivalent material simulation areintroduced. The development of experiment technique makes analogy simulation evolve intoquantitative research about support-surrounding rock relationship from qualitative experiment.From this, large scale stereoscopic simulation experiment is developed, which has neverappeared in underground pressure research in China. The present mold specification is 3.6 m ×2,0 m×l.5 m.

  14. High-fidelity simulation in anesthesiology training: a survey of Canadian anesthesiology residents' simulator experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James W; Price, John R; Pratt, Dan D; Collins, John B; McDonald, Julie

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this survey was to explore Canadian anesthesiology residents' educational experience with high-fidelity simulation and to improve understanding of the factors perceived to have either a positive or a negative effect on residents' learning. In 2008, all Canadian anesthesiology residents (n = 599) were invited to complete a ten-minute anonymous online survey. Survey questions were derived from two sources, a literature search of MEDLINE (1966 to present), EMBASE (1980 to present), and the Cochrane and Campbell collaboration libraries and the experience of 25 pilot residents and the lead author. The survey response rate was 27.9% (n = 167). Junior residents (PGY1-3) responded that it would be helpful to have an introductory simulation course dealing with common intraoperative emergencies. The introduction of multidisciplinary scenarios (where nurses and colleagues from different specialties were involved in scenarios) was strongly supported. With respect to gender, male anesthesia residents indicated their comfort in making mistakes and asking for help in the simulator more frequently than female residents. In accordance with the ten Best Evidence Medical Education (BEME) principles of successful simulator education, Canadian centres could improve residents' opportunities for repetitive practice (with feedback), individualization of scenarios, and defined learning outcomes for scenarios. Anesthesiology residents indicate that simulation-based education is an anxiety provoking experience, but value its role in promoting safe practice and enhancing one's ability to deal with emergency situations. Suggestions to improve simulation training include increasing residents' access, adopting a more student-centred approach to learning, and creating a safer learning environment.

  15. Simulation experiences of paramedic students: a cross-cultural examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Chloe Abel,1 Eihab Khasawneh,2 Linda Ross,1 Tracy Levett-Jones31Department of Community Emergency Health & Paramedic Practice, Monash University, Frankston, Victoria, Australia; 2Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan; 3School of Nursing and Midwifery, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, New South Wales, AustraliaBackground: Simulation-based education is an important part of paramedic education and ­training. While accessing clinical placements that are adequate in quality and quantity continues to be challenging, simulation is being recognized by paramedic academics as a potential alternative. Examining students’ satisfaction of simulation, particularly cross-culturally is therefore important in providing feedback to academic teaching staff and the international paramedic community.Objective: This study aimed to compare simulation satisfaction among paramedic students from universities in Australia and Jordan.Methods: A cross-sectional study using a paper-based English version of the Satisfaction with Simulation Experience Scale was administered to paramedic students from all year levels.Results: A total of 511 students participated in this study; 306 students (60% from Australia (Monash University and 205 students (40% from Jordan (Jordan University of Science and Technology. There were statistically significant differences with large effect size noted in all three original factors between Australian and Jordanian students: debrief and feedback (mean =38.66 vs mean =34.15; P<0.001; d=0.86, clinical reasoning (mean =21.32 vs mean =18.28; P<0.001; d=0.90, and clinical learning (mean =17.59 vs mean =15.47; P<0.001; d=1.12.Conclusion: This study has demonstrated that simulation education is generally well received by students in Australia and Jordan although Australian students reported having higher satisfaction levels then their Jordanian counterparts. These results

  16. Non-robust numerical simulations of analogue extension experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naliboff, John; Buiter, Susanne

    2016-04-01

    Numerical and analogue models of lithospheric deformation provide significant insight into the tectonic processes that lead to specific structural and geophysical observations. As these two types of models contain distinct assumptions and tradeoffs, investigations drawing conclusions from both can reveal robust links between first-order processes and observations. Recent studies have focused on detailed comparisons between numerical and analogue experiments in both compressional and extensional tectonics, sometimes involving multiple lithospheric deformation codes and analogue setups. While such comparisons often show good agreement on first-order deformation styles, results frequently diverge on second-order structures, such as shear zone dip angles or spacing, and in certain cases even on first-order structures. Here, we present finite-element experiments that are designed to directly reproduce analogue "sandbox" extension experiments at the cm-scale. We use material properties and boundary conditions that are directly taken from analogue experiments and use a Drucker-Prager failure model to simulate shear zone formation in sand. We find that our numerical experiments are highly sensitive to numerous numerical parameters. For example, changes to the numerical resolution, velocity convergence parameters and elemental viscosity averaging commonly produce significant changes in first- and second-order structures accommodating deformation. The sensitivity of the numerical simulations to small parameter changes likely reflects a number of factors, including, but not limited to, high angles of internal friction assigned to sand, complex, unknown interactions between the brittle sand (used as an upper crust equivalent) and viscous silicone (lower crust), highly non-linear strain weakening processes and poor constraints on the cohesion of sand. Our numerical-analogue comparison is hampered by (a) an incomplete knowledge of the fine details of sand failure and sand

  17. New Methods for Retrieval of Chlorophyll Red Fluorescence from Hyperspectral Satellite Instruments: Simulations and Application to GOME-2 and SCIAMACHY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Joanna; Yoshida, Yasuko; Guanter, Luis; Middleton, Elizabeth M.

    2016-01-01

    to estimate red SIF emission. Our approach is then an extension of previous approaches applied to satellite data that utilized only the filling-in of SFLs by red SIF. We conducted retrievals of red SIF using an extensive database of simulated radiances covering a wide range of conditions. Our new algorithm produces good agreement between the simulated truth and retrievals and shows the potential of the O2 bands for noise reduction in red SIF retrievals as compared with approaches that rely solely on SFL filling. Biases seen with existing satellite data, most likely due to instrumental artifacts that vary in time, space, and with instrument, must be addressed in order to obtain reasonable results. Our 8-year record of red SIF observations over land with the GOME-2 allows for the first time reliable global mapping of monthly anomalies. These anomalies are shown to have similar spatiotemporal structure as those in the far red, particularly for drought-prone regions. There is a somewhat larger percentage response in the red as compared with the far red for these areas that are drought sensitive. We also demonstrate that good-quality ocean fluorescence line height retrievals can be achieved with GOME-2, SCIAMACHY, and similar instruments by utilizing the full complement of radiance measurements that span the red SIF emission feature.

  18. Influence of satellite motion on polarization qubits in a Space-Earth quantum communication link.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonato, Cristian; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Jennewein, Thomas; Pernechele, Claudio; Villoresi, Paolo; Zeilinger, Anton

    2006-10-16

    In a Space quantum-cryptography experiment a satellite pointing system is needed to send single photons emitted by the source on the satellite to the polarization analysis apparatus on Earth. In this paper a simulation is presented regarding how the satellite pointing systems affect the polarization state of the single photons, to help designing a proper compensation system.

  19. Simulation Experiments of Reacting Two-Phase Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-04-06

    Simulation Experiments 16 2.8 Lord’s Work Done in the 1960’s 17 2.9 Investigations Performed by Wilkins and Carros in the 1960’s 19 2.10 Statement of Work 20...the fundamental research work described here. A gas gun facility, based on the studies of Lord (21 and Wilkins and Carros [3] was built at EMI-AFB...show that the calculations of Lord [2] are in error (see Section 4.). ’i 3-X: 2.9 Investigations Performed by Wilkins and Carros inthe 196o’s- Wilkins

  20. Audio-haptic interaction in simulated walking experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serafin, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    and interchangeable use of the haptic and auditory modality in floor interfaces, and for the synergy of perception and action in capturing and guiding human walking. We describe the technology developed in the context of this project, together with some experiments performed to evaluate the role of auditory......In this paper an overview of the work conducted on audio-haptic physically based simulation and evaluation of walking is provided. This work has been performed in the context of the Natural Interactive Walking (NIW) project, whose goal is to investigate possibilities for the integrated...

  1. Design of Experiment Using Simulation of a Discrete Dynamical System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mašek Jan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The topic of the presented paper is a promising approach to achieve optimal Design of Experiment (DoE, i.e. spreading of points within a design domain, using a simulation of a discrete dynamical system of interacting particles within an n-dimensional design space. The system of mutually repelling particles represents a physical analogy of the Audze-Eglājs (AE optimization criterion and its periodical modification (PAE, respectively. The paper compares the performance of two approaches to implementation: a single-thread process using the JAVA language environment and a massively parallel solution employing the nVidia CUDA platform.

  2. Simulations, Diagnostics and Recent Results of the VISA II Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Andonian, G; Pellegrini, C; Reiche, S; Rosenzweig, J B; Travish, G

    2005-01-01

    The VISA II experiment entails use of a chirped beam to drive a high gain SASE FEL. The output radiation is diagnosed with a modified frequency resolved optical gating (FROG) technique. Sextupoles are implemented to correct the lonigtudinal aberrations affecting the high energy spread chirped beam during transport to the undulator. The double differential energy spectrum is measured with a pair of slits and a set of gratings. In this paper, we report on start-to-end simulations, radiation diagnostics, as well as intial experimental results; experimental methods are described.

  3. Simulation of Upstream Tracker Detector Response for Modernised LHCb Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Pikies, M

    2015-01-01

    LHCb experiment operates a forward spectrometer that collects proton–proton collision data at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. During the so-called Long Shutdown 2 period in years 2018–2019, LHCb detector will undergo a major modernisation. A vital part of this upgrade process is building a silicon micro-strip tracking detector — Upstream Tracker (UT) — that will be placed before the bending magnet. The UT will play a critical role in the upgraded trigger system. This paper contains a general discussion of the UT detector and presents description of a silicon response simulation platform that is being currently designed by the AGH UST LHCb group.

  4. Analysis of 3-dimensional Hydro-dynamical Model Simulation in the Gulf of Kutch, India and Its Comparison with Satellite Data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Osawa, T.; Zhao, C.; Kunte, P.D.; Ae, L.S.; Hara, M.; Moriyama, T.

    . The similar trend was also found in NOAA/AVHRR data. However the detail structure of sea surface temperature differs as satellites measures the skin temperature of water body whereas the model considers entire first layer. The sea surface temperature... is considered in the model simulation. The similar trend was also found in NOAA/AVHRR data. However the detail structure of sea surface temperature differs as satellites measures the skin temperature of water body whereas the model considers entire first...

  5. Initial NIF Shock Timing Experiments: Comparison with Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Boehly, T. R.; Datte, P. S.; Bowers, M. W.; Olson, R. E.; Munro, D. H.; Milovich, J. L.; Jones, O. S.; Nikroo, A.; Kroll, J. J.; Horner, J. B.; Hamza, A. V.; Bhandarkar, S. D.; Giraldez, E.; Castro, C.; Gibson, C. R.; Eggert, J. H.; Smith, R. F.; Park, H.-S.; Young, B. K.; Hsing, W. W.; Landen, O. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    2010-11-01

    Initial experiments are underway to demonstrate the techniques required to tune the shock timing of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). These experiments use a modified cryogenic hohlraum geometry designed to precisely match the performance of ignition hohlraums. The targets employ a re-entrant Au cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shocks is diagnosed with VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) and DANTE. The results of these measurements will be used to set the precision pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions to follow. Experimental results and comparisons with numerical simulation are presented.

  6. What do we learn from computer simulations of Bell experiments?

    CERN Document Server

    Kupczynski, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to counterfactual definiteness quantum theory teaches us that measuring instruments are not passively reading predetermined values of physical observables. Counterfactual definiteness allows proving Bell inequalities. If the contextual character of quantum measurements is correctly taken into account the proofs of these inequalities may not be done. In recent computer simulations of idealized Bell experiment predetermined successive outcomes of measurements for each setting and predetermined time delays of their registrations are calculated. Time windows and time delays are used to select various samples. Correlations, estimated using these selected samples are consistent with the predictions of quantum theory and the time window dependence is similar to the dependence observed in some real experiments. It is an important example how correlations can be explained without evoking quantum magic. However by using a suitable post-selection one may prove anything. Moreover before the post-selection genera...

  7. Cryogenic Fracturing: Laboratory Visualization Experiments and Numerical Simulations Using Peridynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Short, R.; Edmiston, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    Typical hydraulic fracturing operations involve the use of a large quantity of water, which can be problematic for several reasons including possible formation (permeability) damage, disposal of waste water, and the use of precious local water resource. An alternate reservoir permeability enhancing technology not requiring water is cryogenic fracturing. This method induces controlled fracturing of rock formations by thermal shock and has potentially important applications in the geothermal and hydrocarbon industries. In this process, cryogenic fluid—such as liquid nitrogen—is injected into the subsurface, causing fracturing due to thermal gradients. These fractures may improve the formation permeability relative to that achievable by hydraulic fracturing alone. We conducted combined laboratory visualization and numerical simulations studies of thermal-shock-induced fracture initiation and propagation resulting from liquid nitrogen injection in rock and analog materials. The experiment used transparent soda-lime glass cubes to facilitate real-time visualization of fracture growth and the fracture network geometry. In this contribution, we report the effect of overall temperature difference between cryogenic fluid and solid material on the produced fracture network, by pre-heating the glass cubes to several temperatures and injecting liquid nitrogen. Temperatures are monitored at several points by thermocouple and the fracture evolution is captured visually by camera. The experiment was modeled using a customized, thermoelastic, fracture-capable numerical simulation code based on peridynamics. The performance of the numerical code was validated by the results of the laboratory experiments, and then the code was used to study the different factors affecting a cryogenic fracturing operation, including the evolution of residual stresses and constitutive relationships for material failure. In complex rock such as shale, understanding the process of cryogenic

  8. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI),a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly,the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases:The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube; the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability,which is conducted on the AWE’s shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data,good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models acceler-ated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM),which are adopted in our experi-ments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces,and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer ex-periment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface,and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer,bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images,and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely,especially at late times.

  9. An Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE to Assess the Impact of Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL Measurements on the Numerical Simulation of a Tropical Cyclone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of wind observations has been recognized for many years. However, wind observations—especially three-dimensional global wind measurements—are very limited. A satellite-based Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL is proposed to measure three-dimensional wind profiles using remote sensing techniques. Assimilating these observations into a mesoscale model is expected to improve the performance of the numerical weather prediction (NWP models. In order to examine the potential impact of the DWL three-dimensional wind profile observations on the numerical simulation and prediction of tropical cyclones, a set of observing simulation system experiments (OSSEs is performed using the advanced research version of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF model and its three-dimensional variational (3DVAR data assimilation system. Results indicate that assimilating the DWL wind observations into the mesoscale numerical model has significant potential for improving tropical cyclone track and intensity forecasts.

  10. Rain-fade simulation and power augmentation for satellite communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Nagy, Lawrence A.; Svoboda, James S.

    1990-01-01

    The design and implementation of an automated rain-fade simulation and power augmentation system is presented. The system experimentally simulates and measures the effects of radiofrequency power fade on a 20 GHz communication link using a multimode travelling wave tube amplifier for loss compensation. Precision, computer-controlled attenuators are used in the fade simulation. Test plans for analog and digital testing are discussed.

  11. Simulation for Proton Charge Radius (PRad) Experiment at Jefferson Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Li; PRad Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The ``Proton Charge Radius Puzzle'' refers to 7 σ discrepancy between the proton charge radius extracted from muonic hydrogen Lamb shift measurements and that from the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift and e-p elastic scattering measurements. In order to get a better understanding of this puzzle, the PRad experiment (E12-11-106) was proposed and recently performed with 1.1 and 2.2 GeV unpolarized electron beam in Hall B at Jefferson Lab. The experiment aims to extract the electric form factor and the charge radius of proton by simultaneously measuring the e - p elastic scattering cross section and the Møller cross section at very low Q2(2 × 10-4 10-1(GeV / c) 2) region, with sub-percent precision. A windowless hydrogen gas flow target was used to better control the background. A high-efficiency and high-resolution calorimeter (HyCal) and a pair of Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) chambers were used in the experiment. This talk will focus on comparing the detailed simulation of PRad experiment and its background with preliminary spectra from the data. This work is supported in part by NSF MRI Award PHY-1229153, the U.S. Department of Energy under Contacts No. DE-FG02-07ER41528, Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Mississippi State University and PRad collaboration.

  12. Assessment of ionospheric Joule heating by GUMICS-4 MHD simulation, AMIE, and satellite-based statistics: towards a synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palmroth

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the Northern Hemisphere Joule heating from several observational and computational sources with the purpose of calibrating a previously identified functional dependence between solar wind parameters and ionospheric total energy consumption computed from a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD simulation (Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling Simulation, GUMICS-4. In this paper, the calibration focuses on determining the amount and temporal characteristics of Northern Hemisphere Joule heating. Joule heating during a substorm is estimated from global observations, including electric fields provided by Super Dual Auroral Network (SuperDARN and Pedersen conductances given by the ultraviolet (UV and X-ray imagers on board the Polar satellite. Furthermore, Joule heating is assessed from several activity index proxies, large statistical surveys, assimilative data methods (AMIE, and the global MHD simulation GUMICS-4. We show that the temporal and spatial variation of the Joule heating computed from the GUMICS-4 simulation is consistent with observational and statistical methods. However, the different observational methods do not give a consistent estimate for the magnitude of the global Joule heating. We suggest that multiplying the GUMICS-4 total Joule heating by a factor of 10 approximates the observed Joule heating reasonably well. The lesser amount of Joule heating in GUMICS-4 is essentially caused by weaker Region 2 currents and polar cap potentials. We also show by theoretical arguments that multiplying independent measurements of averaged electric fields and Pedersen conductances yields an overestimation of Joule heating.

    Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere; Modeling and forecasting; Electric fields and currents

  13. Assessment of ionospheric Joule heating by GUMICS-4 MHD simulation, AMIE, and satellite-based statistics: towards a synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmroth, M.; Janhunen, P.; Pulkkinen, T. I.; Aksnes, A.; Lu, G.; Østgaard, N.; Watermann, J.; Reeves, G. D.; Germany, G. A.

    2005-09-01

    We investigate the Northern Hemisphere Joule heating from several observational and computational sources with the purpose of calibrating a previously identified functional dependence between solar wind parameters and ionospheric total energy consumption computed from a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation (Grand Unified Magnetosphere Ionosphere Coupling Simulation, GUMICS-4). In this paper, the calibration focuses on determining the amount and temporal characteristics of Northern Hemisphere Joule heating. Joule heating during a substorm is estimated from global observations, including electric fields provided by Super Dual Auroral Network (SuperDARN) and Pedersen conductances given by the ultraviolet (UV) and X-ray imagers on board the Polar satellite. Furthermore, Joule heating is assessed from several activity index proxies, large statistical surveys, assimilative data methods (AMIE), and the global MHD simulation GUMICS-4. We show that the temporal and spatial variation of the Joule heating computed from the GUMICS-4 simulation is consistent with observational and statistical methods. However, the different observational methods do not give a consistent estimate for the magnitude of the global Joule heating. We suggest that multiplying the GUMICS-4 total Joule heating by a factor of 10 approximates the observed Joule heating reasonably well. The lesser amount of Joule heating in GUMICS-4 is essentially caused by weaker Region 2 currents and polar cap potentials. We also show by theoretical arguments that multiplying independent measurements of averaged electric fields and Pedersen conductances yields an overestimation of Joule heating. Keywords. Ionosphere (Auroral ionosphere; Modeling and forecasting; Electric fields and currents)

  14. An offline constrained data assimilation technique for aerosols: Improving GCM simulations over South Asia using observations from two satellite sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraskar, Ankit; Bhushan, Mani; Venkataraman, Chandra; Cherian, Ribu

    2016-05-01

    Aerosol properties simulated by general circulation models (GCMs) exhibit large uncertainties due to biases in model processes and inaccuracies in aerosol emission inputs. In this work, we propose an offline, constrained optimization based procedure to improve these simulations by assimilating them with observational data. The proposed approach explicitly incorporates the non-negativity constraint on the aerosol optical depth (AOD) which is a key metric to quantify aerosol distributions. The resulting optimization problem is quadratic programming in nature and can be easily solved by available optimization routines. The utility of the approach is demonstrated by performing offline assimilation of GCM simulated aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing over South Asia (40-120 E, 5-40 N), with satellite AOD measurements from two sensors, namely Moderate Resolution Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MODIS) and Multi-Angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). Uncertainty in observational data used in the assimilation is computed by developing different error bands around regional AOD observations, based on their quality assurance flags. The assimilation, evaluated on monthly and daily scales, compares well with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) observations as determined by goodness of fit statistics. Assimilation increased both model predicted atmospheric absorption and clear sky radiative forcing by factors consistent with recent estimates in literature. Thus, the constrained assimilation algorithm helps in systematically reducing uncertainties in aerosol simulations.

  15. A study and experiment plan for digital mobile communication via satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J. J.; Craighill, E. J.; Evans, R. G.; Vincze, A. D.; Tom, N. N.

    1978-01-01

    The viability of mobile communications is examined within the context of a frequency division multiple access, single channel per carrier satellite system emphasizing digital techniques to serve a large population of users. The intent is to provide the mobile users with a grade of service consistant with the requirements for remote, rural (perhaps emergency) voice communications, but which approaches toll quality speech. A traffic model is derived on which to base the determination of the required maximum number of satellite channels to provide the anticipated level of service. Various voice digitalization and digital modulation schemes are reviewed along with a general link analysis of the mobile system. Demand assignment multiple access considerations and analysis tradeoffs are presented. Finally, a completed configuration is described.

  16. Wireless Power Transfer Protocols in Sensor Networks: Experiments and Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sotiris Nikoletseas

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Rapid technological advances in the domain of Wireless Power Transfer pave the way for novel methods for power management in systems of wireless devices, and recent research works have already started considering algorithmic solutions for tackling emerging problems. In this paper, we investigate the problem of efficient and balanced Wireless Power Transfer in Wireless Sensor Networks. We employ wireless chargers that replenish the energy of network nodes. We propose two protocols that configure the activity of the chargers. One protocol performs wireless charging focused on the charging efficiency, while the other aims at proper balance of the chargers’ residual energy. We conduct detailed experiments using real devices and we validate the experimental results via larger scale simulations. We observe that, in both the experimental evaluation and the evaluation through detailed simulations, both protocols achieve their main goals. The Charging Oriented protocol achieves good charging efficiency throughout the experiment, while the Energy Balancing protocol achieves a uniform distribution of energy within the chargers.

  17. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Cybulska

    Full Text Available Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  18. Simulation of force spectroscopy experiments on galacturonic acid oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulska, Justyna; Brzyska, Agnieszka; Zdunek, Artur; Woliński, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Pectins, forming a matrix for cellulose and hemicellulose, determine the mechanics of plant cell walls. They undergo salient structural changes during their development. In the presence of divalent cations, usually calcium, pectins can form gel-like structures. Because of their importance they have been the subject of many force spectroscopy experiments, which have examined the conformational changes and molecular tensions due to external forces. The most abundant unit present in the pectin backbone is polygalacturonic acid. Unfortunately, experimental force spectroscopy on polygalacturonic acid molecules is still not a trivial task. The mechanism of the single-molecule response to external forces can be inferred by theoretical methods. Therefore, in this work we simulated such force spectroscopy experiments using the Enforced Geometry Optimization (EGO) method. We examined the oligomeric (up to hexamer) structures of α-D-galacturonic acid exposed to external stretching forces. The EGO simulation of the force spectroscopy appropriately reproduced the experimental course of the enforced conformational transition: chair →inverted chair via the twisted boat conformation(s) in the pyranose ring of α-D-galacturonic acid. Additionally, our theoretical approach also allowed to determine the minimum oligomer size adequate for the description of nano-mechanical properties of (poly)-α-D-galacturonic acid.

  19. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadau, Kai [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena -- nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  20. Shocked materials at the intersection of experiment and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzana, H. E.; Belak, J. F.; Bradley, K. S.; Bringa, E. M.; Budil, K. S.; Cazamias, J. U.; El-Dasher, B.; Hawreliak, J. A.; Hessler, J.; Kadau, K.; Kalantar, D. H.; McNaney, J. M.; Milathianaki, D.; Rosolankova, K.; Swift, D. C.; Taravillo, M.; Van Buuren, T. W.; Wark, J. S.; de la Rubia, T. Diaz

    2008-04-01

    Understanding the dynamic lattice response of solids under the extreme conditions of pressure, temperature and strain rate is a scientific quest that spans nearly a century. Critical to developing this understanding is the ability to probe and model the spatial and temporal evolution of the material microstructure and properties at the scale of the relevant physical phenomena-nanometers to micrometers and picoseconds to nanoseconds. While experimental investigations over this range of spatial and temporal scales were unimaginable just a decade ago, new technologies and facilities currently under development and on the horizon have brought these goals within reach for the first time. The equivalent advancements in simulation capabilities now mean that we can conduct simulations and experiments at overlapping temporal and spatial scales. In this article, we describe some of our studies which exploit existing and new generation ultrabright, ultrafast x-ray sources and large scale molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the real-time physical phenomena that control the dynamic response of shocked materials.

  1. A Little Vacation on Mars: Mars Simulation Microbial Challenge Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boston, P.; Todd, P.; Van De Camp, J.; Northup, D.; Spilde, M.

    2008-06-01

    Communities of microbial organisms isolated from a variety of extreme environments were subjected to 1 to 5 weeks of simulated Martian environmental conditions using the Mars Environment Simulation Chamber at the Techshot, Inc. facility in Greenville, Indiana. The goal of the overall experiment program was to assess survival of test Earth organisms under Mars full spectrum sunlight, low-latitude daily temperature profile and various Mars-atmosphere pressures (~50 mbar to 500 mbar, 100% CO2) and low moisture content. Organisms surviving after 5 weeks at 100 mbar included those from gypsum surface fracture communities in a Permian aged evaporite basin, desert varnish on andesite lavas around a manganese mine, and iron and manganese oxidizing organisms isolated from two caves in Mew Mexico. Phylogenetic DNA analysis revealed strains of cyanobacteria, bacterial genera (present in all surviving communities) Asticacaulis, Achromobacter, Comamonas, Pantoea, Verrucomicrobium, Bacillus, Gemmatimonas, Actinomyces, and others. At least one microcolonial fungal strain from a desert varnish community and at least one strain from Utah survived simulations. Strains related to the unusual cave bacterial group Bacteroidetes are present in survivor communities that resist isolation into pure culture implying that their consortial relationships may be critical to their survival.

  2. A depolarization and attenuation experiment using the COMSTAR and CTS satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostian, C. W.; Babula, S. M.; Dent, J. R.; Dombroski, R. E.; Lane, S. O.; Manus, E. A.; Marshall, R. E.; Meadows, D. N.; Stutzman, W. L.; Wiley, P. H.

    1979-01-01

    Monthly and annual percent-of-time data on ground rain fall rate and attenuation on satellite downlinks at 11.7 GHz, 19.04 GHz, and 28.56 GHz is presented. Equal probability values of attenuation and rain rate are compared for monthly, quarterly, half-year periods and for the entire year. Regression equations relating cross polarization isolation to the logarithm of attenuation are also presented.

  3. ACCORD Broadband ATM Satellite Experiment (BASE)-DS3 Ku-band channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    broadband ATM traf- fic. ATM was initially designed for fibre - optic media, i.e. a random error, low delay, and virtually error free channel...satellite links will soon be required to support broadband ATM traffic. ATM was initially designed for fibre - optic media, i.e. a random error, low...traffic generator and analyser. - Fibre Loop Converter: converts a DS-3 signal into a single-mode fibre optic signal and vice-versa. - EF Data Modem

  4. Continuation of the mission NINA: Nina-2 experiment on MITA satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolino, Marco

    NINA-2 is a silicon detector cosmic ray telescope to be launched on board the Italian satellite MITA by the end of 1999. Its physics objectives are to study - for a period of at least 3 years - the cosmic ray component for nuclei from Hydrogen to Iron in the energy range between 10 and 200 MeV/n. Furthermore, the segmented nature of the silicon strip detector will allow the detection outside the containment of particles up to 1 GeV/n. As the satellite will be placed in 87.3 degrees sun-synchronous polar orbit around the Earth, it will be able to detect particle of solar and galactic nature, studying long and short term transient phenomena such as solar modulation effects - as we move toward solar maximum - and the composition of solar flares. The interaction of the Sun with Earth's magnetosphere will also be observed. The characteristics of MITA on board computer system allowed a very fast hardware and software integration between the scientific payload and the satellite, optimising the device observational capabilities.

  5. An overview of the design and analysis of simulation experiments for sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, J.P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis may serve validation, optimization, and risk analysis of simulation models. This review surveys 'classic' and 'modern' designs for experiments with simulation models. Classic designs were developed for real, non-simulated systems in agriculture, engineering, etc. These designs

  6. The World Climate Exercise: Is (Simulated) Experience Our Best Teacher?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, K.; Rooney-varga, J. N.; Jones, A.; Johnston, E.; Sterman, J.

    2015-12-01

    Meeting the challenge of climate change will clearly require 'deep learning' - learning that motivates a search for underlying meaning, a willingness to exert the sustained effort needed to understand complex problems, and innovative problem-solving. This type of learning is dependent on the level of the learner's engagement with the material, their intrinsic motivation to learn, intention to understand, and relevance of the material to the learner. Here, we present evidence for deep learning about climate change through a simulation-based role-playing exercise, World Climate. The exercise puts participants into the roles of delegates to the United Nations climate negotiations and asks them to create an international climate deal. They find out the implications of their decisions, according to the best available science, through the same decision-support computer simulation used to provide feedback for the real-world negotiations, C-ROADS. World Climate provides an opportunity for participants have an immersive, social experience in which they learn first-hand about both the social dynamics of climate change decision-making, through role-play, and the dynamics of the climate system, through an interactive computer simulation. Evaluation results so far have shown that the exercise is highly engaging and memorable and that it motivates large majorities of participants (>70%) to take action on climate change. In addition, we have found that it leads to substantial gains in understanding key systems thinking concepts (e.g., the stock-flow behavior of atmospheric CO2), as well as improvements in understanding of climate change causes and impacts. While research is still needed to better understand the impacts of simulation-based role-playing exercises like World Climate on behavior change, long-term understanding, transfer of systems thinking skills across topics, and the importance of social learning during the exercise, our results to date indicate that it is a

  7. A possible experiment with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites to obtain a new test of Einstein's general theory of relativity and improved measurements in geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Patten, R. A.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1976-01-01

    In 1918, Lense and Thirring calculated that a moon in orbit around a massive rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect by means of two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar orbit about the earth. For a 2-1/2 year experiment, the measurement should approach an accuracy of 1%. An independent measurement of the geodetic precession of the orbit plane due to the motion about the sun may also be possible to about 10% accuracy. In addition to precision tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler data are taken at points of passing near the poles to yield an accurate measurement of the separation distance between the two satellites. New geophysical information on both earth harmonics and tidal effects is inherent in this polar ranging data.

  8. Operational experience from the satellite fields Statfjord Nord and East; Driftserfaringer fra satellittfeltene Statfjord Nord og Oest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retterdal, Atle; Hansen, Hans Birger [Statoil, Stavanger (Norway)

    1999-07-01

    Since production started on the satellite fields Statfjord Nord and East in 1995 and 1994, respectively, some opportunities for improvement have been discovered and realized both with respect to the subsea systems and the operational routines and philosophy. This presentation discusses the improvement projects. It is known from experience that creative ideas usually originate at the interfaces between supplier/customer, engineers with different backgrounds, or between different technologies. The interface between supplier and operator is very important for discovering creative solutions. The interface between Statoil and the suppliers of underwater equipment is not sufficiently well developed on the operational side.

  9. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI JingSong; WANG Tao; LI Ping; ZOU LiYong; LIU CangLi

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI), a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly, the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases: The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube;the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability, which is conducted on the AWE's shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data, good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models accelerated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM), which are adopted in our experiments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces, and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer experiment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface, and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer, bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images, and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely, especially at late times.

  10. Applications of TRMM-based Multi-Satellite Precipitation Estimation for Global Runoff Simulation: Prototyping a Global Flood Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yang; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.; Pierce, Harold

    2008-01-01

    Advances in flood monitoring/forecasting have been constrained by the difficulty in estimating rainfall continuously over space (catchment-, national-, continental-, or even global-scale areas) and flood-relevant time scale. With the recent availability of satellite rainfall estimates at fine time and space resolution, this paper describes a prototype research framework for global flood monitoring by combining real-time satellite observations with a database of global terrestrial characteristics through a hydrologically relevant modeling scheme. Four major components included in the framework are (1) real-time precipitation input from NASA TRMM-based Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA); (2) a central geospatial database to preprocess the land surface characteristics: water divides, slopes, soils, land use, flow directions, flow accumulation, drainage network etc.; (3) a modified distributed hydrological model to convert rainfall to runoff and route the flow through the stream network in order to predict the timing and severity of the flood wave, and (4) an open-access web interface to quickly disseminate flood alerts for potential decision-making. Retrospective simulations for 1998-2006 demonstrate that the Global Flood Monitor (GFM) system performs consistently at both station and catchment levels. The GFM website (experimental version) has been running at near real-time in an effort to offer a cost-effective solution to the ultimate challenge of building natural disaster early warning systems for the data-sparse regions of the world. The interactive GFM website shows close-up maps of the flood risks overlaid on topography/population or integrated with the Google-Earth visualization tool. One additional capability, which extends forecast lead-time by assimilating QPF into the GFM, also will be implemented in the future.

  11. Use of Airborne Hyperspectral Data in the Simulation of Satellite Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, Eduardo; Jimenez, Marcos; Ruiz, Elena; Salido, Elena; Gutierrez de la Camara, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    The simulation of future images is part of the development phase of most Earth Observation missions. This simulation uses frequently as starting point images acquired from airborne instruments. These instruments provide the required flexibility in acquisition parameters (time, date, illumination and observation geometry...) and high spectral and spatial resolution, well above the target values (as required by simulation tools). However, there are a number of important problems hampering the use of airborne imagery. One of these problems is that observation zenith angles (OZA), are far from those that the misisons to be simulated would use.We examine this problem by evaluating the difference in ground reflectance estimated from airborne images for different observation/illumination geometries. Next, we analyze a solution for simulation purposes, in which a Bi- directional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model is attached to an image of the isotropic surface reflectance. The results obtained confirm the need for reflectance anisotropy correction when using airborne images for creating a reflectance map for simulation purposes. But this correction should not be used without providing the corresponding estimation of BRDF, in the form of model parameters, to the simulation teams.

  12. Neutron Transport Simulations for NIST Neutron Lifetime Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fangchen; BL2 Collaboration Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Neutrons in stable nuclei can exist forever; a free neutron lasts for about 15 minutes on average before it beta decays to a proton, an electron, and an antineutrino. Precision measurements of the neutron lifetime test the validity of weak interaction theory and provide input into the theory of the evolution of light elements in the early universe. There are two predominant ways of measuring the neutron lifetime: the bottle method and the beam method. The bottle method measures decays of ultracold neutrons that are stored in a bottle. The beam method measures decay protons in a beam of cold neutrons of known flux. An improved beam experiment is being prepared at the National Institute of Science and Technology (Gaithersburg, MD) with the goal of reducing statistical and systematic uncertainties to the level of 1 s. The purpose of my studies was to develop computer simulations of neutron transport to determine the beam collimation and study the neutron distribution's effect on systematic effects for the experiment, such as the solid angle of the neutron flux monitor. The motivation for the experiment and the results of this work will be presented. This work was supported, in part, by a Grant to Gettysburg College from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute through the Precollege and Undergraduate Science Education Program.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation experiments on box-type radon dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamil, Khalid; Kamran, Muhammad; Illahi, Ahsan; Manzoor, Shahid

    2014-11-01

    Epidemiological studies show that inhalation of radon gas (222Rn) may be carcinogenic especially to mine workers, people living in closed indoor energy conserved environments and underground dwellers. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to measure the 222Rn concentrations (Bq/m3) in indoors environments. For this purpose, box-type passive radon dosimeters employing ion track detector like CR-39 are widely used. Fraction of the number of radon alphas emitted in the volume of the box type dosimeter resulting in latent track formation on CR-39 is the latent track registration efficiency. Latent track registration efficiency is ultimately required to evaluate the radon concentration which consequently determines the effective dose and the radiological hazards. In this research, Monte Carlo simulation experiments were carried out to study the alpha latent track registration efficiency for box type radon dosimeter as a function of dosimeter's dimensions and range of alpha particles in air. Two different self developed Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed namely: (a) Surface ratio (SURA) method and (b) Ray hitting (RAHI) method. Monte Carlo simulation experiments revealed that there are two types of efficiencies i.e. intrinsic efficiency (ηint) and alpha hit efficiency (ηhit). The ηint depends upon only on the dimensions of the dosimeter and ηhit depends both upon dimensions of the dosimeter and range of the alpha particles. The total latent track registration efficiency is the product of both intrinsic and hit efficiencies. It has been concluded that if diagonal length of box type dosimeter is kept smaller than the range of alpha particle then hit efficiency is achieved as 100%. Nevertheless the intrinsic efficiency keeps playing its role. The Monte Carlo simulation experimental results have been found helpful to understand the intricate track registration mechanisms in the box type dosimeter. This paper explains that how radon concentration from the

  14. Monte Carlo simulation experiments on box-type radon dosimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jamil, Khalid, E-mail: kjamil@comsats.edu.pk; Kamran, Muhammad; Illahi, Ahsan; Manzoor, Shahid

    2014-11-11

    Epidemiological studies show that inhalation of radon gas ({sup 222}Rn) may be carcinogenic especially to mine workers, people living in closed indoor energy conserved environments and underground dwellers. It is, therefore, of paramount importance to measure the {sup 222}Rn concentrations (Bq/m{sup 3}) in indoors environments. For this purpose, box-type passive radon dosimeters employing ion track detector like CR-39 are widely used. Fraction of the number of radon alphas emitted in the volume of the box type dosimeter resulting in latent track formation on CR-39 is the latent track registration efficiency. Latent track registration efficiency is ultimately required to evaluate the radon concentration which consequently determines the effective dose and the radiological hazards. In this research, Monte Carlo simulation experiments were carried out to study the alpha latent track registration efficiency for box type radon dosimeter as a function of dosimeter’s dimensions and range of alpha particles in air. Two different self developed Monte Carlo simulation techniques were employed namely: (a) Surface ratio (SURA) method and (b) Ray hitting (RAHI) method. Monte Carlo simulation experiments revealed that there are two types of efficiencies i.e. intrinsic efficiency (η{sub int}) and alpha hit efficiency (η{sub hit}). The η{sub int} depends upon only on the dimensions of the dosimeter and η{sub hit} depends both upon dimensions of the dosimeter and range of the alpha particles. The total latent track registration efficiency is the product of both intrinsic and hit efficiencies. It has been concluded that if diagonal length of box type dosimeter is kept smaller than the range of alpha particle then hit efficiency is achieved as 100%. Nevertheless the intrinsic efficiency keeps playing its role. The Monte Carlo simulation experimental results have been found helpful to understand the intricate track registration mechanisms in the box type dosimeter. This paper

  15. Nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulations: synergies between theory and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavernelli, Ivano

    2015-03-17

    Recent developments in nonadiabatic dynamics enabled ab inito simulations of complex ultrafast processes in the condensed phase. These advances have opened new avenues in the study of many photophysical and photochemical reactions triggered by the absorption of electromagnetic radiation. In particular, theoretical investigations can be combined with the most sophisticated femtosecond experimental techniques to guide the interpretation of measured time-resolved observables. At the same time, the availability of experimental data at high (spatial and time) resolution offers a unique opportunity for the benchmarking and the improvement of those theoretical models used to describe complex molecular systems in their natural environment. The established synergy between theory and experiments can produce a better understanding of new ultrafast physical and chemical processes at atomistic scale resolution. Furthermore, reliable ab inito molecular dynamics simulations can already be successfully employed as predictive tools to guide new experiments as well as the design of novel and better performing materials. In this paper, I will give a concise account on the state of the art of molecular dynamics simulations of complex molecular systems in their excited states. The principal aim of this approach is the description of a given system of interest under the most realistic ambient conditions including all environmental effects that influence experiments, for instance, the interaction with the solvent and with external time-dependent electric fields, temperature, and pressure. To this end, time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is among the most efficient and accurate methods for the representation of the electronic dynamics, while trajectory surface hopping gives a valuable representation of the nuclear quantum dynamics in the excited states (including nonadiabatic effects). Concerning the environment and its effects on the dynamics, the quantum mechanics

  16. Nickel cadmium battery performance simulation - A means toward optimum design in satellite applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, K.; Halpert, G.; Timmerman, P.

    1988-01-01

    It is noted that electrochemically based cell models can advance state-of-the-art battery prediction by allowing variations in the parameters that constitute wear-out and predict end-of-life performance. This modeling method is used as the foundation for the simulation of Ni-Cd battery performance. This simulation tool consists of a comprehensive computer model to be developed which would predict the voltage behavior of a battery under mission conditions.

  17. Elevated Heat Pump hypothesis validation by using satellite data and CMIP5 climate model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, R.; Cagnazzo, C.; Cairo, F.; Fierli, F.

    2016-12-01

    Air pollution assumes an important role for the health of the south Asian countries population due to the increasing emission of atmospheric pollutants connected to the population growth and industrial development. At the same time the monsoon rainfall trends and patterns have been changed causing serious economic and societal impacts. In this study we have analyzed the link between the aerosols and the monsoon system focusing the attention on a specific mechanism: the Elevated Heat Pump (EHP) hypothesis. According to the EHP the load of dust, organic carbon and black carbon in the pre-monsoon season over the Indo-Gangetic Plain and the foothills of the Himalayas induces enhanced warming in the middle and upper troposphere and changes the convection patterns. As a consequence the rainfall over northern India in late spring and early summer increases and the rainfall in all India in late summer decreases. However, there are still debated conclusions and large uncertainties in this proposed mechanism with ambiguity and uncertainties coming from the lack of real observations and to the consistency of the measurements. By using Historical Natural runs of 3 different Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models with interactive aerosol loading, we have analysed the variation of precipitation and atmospheric temperature in correspondence to high and low aerosol load years in a time range of 160 years. For deepening the study and validating the model results, we have also included in our analyses the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) Deep Convective Tracking Database and the GPS Radio Occultation (RO) measurements. Our preliminary results with models and the two satellite measurements do not show significant evidence of EHP in terms of convection patterns, while the middle and upper troposphere thermal structure is consistent with previous findings.

  18. STUDY OF POLLUTANT DISTRIBUTION IN BENOA BAY USING NUMERICAL SIMULATION AND SATELLITE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komang Ardana

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Euthrofication that caused by nitrate and phosphate contamination and also sedimentation process is the mainproblem that took place in Benoa Bay Territorial water. The distribution of phosphate pollutant in Benoa bay territorialwater was modeled by numeric of Princeton Ocean model (POM. The input of this pollutant model were a tidal currentpattern, M2 tidal current residue, biological factor, physic and chemistry, that influenced pollutant concentration.Meanwhile, the sedimentation concentration was mapped with ALOS AVNIR-2 sensor image satellite and this image wasanalysed with statistic method (Linear Regression.The result of phosphate modeling concentration was 0.1 mg/1 to 0.0022 mg/1, where the concentration wascategorized very hazardous to the territorial water environment. Because the phosphate concentration in a pollutantresources was beyond the standard level of environmental quality, that was 0.015 mg/1 for fishery cultivation and alsotourism activity (Bali Governor Regulation No.8th 2007. While, the direction of the distribution was affected by currentpattern of movement, that was when the ebb level of high water moving into the bay and when the ebb to high tidemoving out of the bay.The result of statistic approaches with ALOS of AVNIR-2 censor can be used for mapping sedimentationdistribution advantages in Benoa Bay. The values were: R2 Band 1 is 0.3839, Band 2 is 0.6123 and Band 3 is 0.5468. Inthis methodology, the correlation was not significant, due to, the quantity of in-situ data was small and the time researchwas not at the same time with satellite data.

  19. Simulation of Extreme Arctic Cyclones in IPCC AR5 Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavrus, S. J.

    2012-12-01

    Although impending Arctic climate change is widely recognized, a wild card in its expression is how extreme weather events in this region will respond to greenhouse warming. Intense polar cyclones represent one type of high-latitude phenomena falling into this category, including very deep synoptic-scale cyclones and mesoscale polar lows. These systems inflict damage through high winds, heavy precipitation, and wave action along coastlines, and their impact is expected to expand in the future, when reduced sea ice cover allows enhanced wave energy. The loss of a buffering ice pack could greatly increase the rate of coastal erosion, which has already been increasing in the Arctic. These and related threats may amplify if extreme Arctic cyclones become more frequent and/or intense in a warming climate with much more open water to fuel them. This possibility has merit on the basis of GCM experiments, which project that greenhouse forcing causes lower mean sea level pressure (SLP) in the Arctic and a strengthening of the deepest storms over boreal high latitudes. In this study, the latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) climate model output is used to investigate the following questions: (1) What are the spatial and seasonal characteristics of extreme Arctic cyclones? (2) How well do GCMs simulate these phenomena? (3) Are Arctic cyclones already showing the expected response to greenhouse warming in climate models? To address these questions, a retrospective analysis is conducted of the transient 20th century simulations among the CMIP5 GCMs (spanning years 1850-2005). The results demonstrate that GCMs are able to reasonably represent extreme Arctic cyclones and that the simulated characteristics do not depend significantly on model resolution. Consistent with observational evidence, climate models generate these storms primarily during winter and within the climatological Aleutian and Icelandic Low regions. Occasionally the cyclones remain very intense

  20. Analysis and forecast experiments incorporating satellite soundings and cloud and water vapor drift wind information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Brian M.; Diak, George R.; Mills, Graham A.

    1986-01-01

    A system for assimilating conventional meteorological data and satellite-derived data in order to produce four-dimensional gridded data sets of the primary atmospheric variables used for updating limited area forecast models is described. The basic principles of a data assimilation scheme as proposed by Lorenc (1984) are discussed. The design of the system and its incremental assimilation cycles are schematically presented. The assimilation system was tested using radiosonde, buoy, VAS temperature, dew point, gradient wind data, cloud drift, and water vapor motion data. The rms vector errors for the data are analyzed.

  1. TESIS experiment on XUV imaging spectroscopy of the Sun onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzin, S. V.; Zhitnik, I. A.; Bogachev, S. A.; Shestov, S. V.; Bugaenko, O. I.; Suhodrev, N. K.; Pertsov, A. A.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Ignat'ev, A. P.; Slemzin, V. A.

    We present a brief description of new complex of space telescopes and spectrographs, TESIS, which will be placed aboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. The complex is intended for high-resolution imaging observation of full Sun in the coronal spectral lines and in the spectral lines of the solar transition region. TESIS will be launched at the end of 2007 - early of 2008. About 25 % of the daily TESIS images will be free for use and for downloading from the TESIS data center that is planned to open 2 months before the TESIS launching at http://www.tesis.lebedev.ru

  2. ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite) Propagation Experiment: Preprocessing Software User's Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crane, Robert K.; Wang, Xuhe; Westenhaver, David

    1996-01-01

    The preprocessing software manual describes the Actspp program originally developed to observe and diagnose Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS) propagation terminal/receiver problems. However, it has been quite useful for automating the preprocessing functions needed to convert the terminal output to useful attenuation estimates. Prior to having data acceptable for archival functions, the individual receiver system must be calibrated and the power level shifts caused by ranging tone modulation must be received. Actspp provides three output files: the daylog, the diurnal coefficient file, and the file that contains calibration information.

  3. SEU results from the Advanced Photovoltaic and Electronics Experiments (APEX) satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullen, E.G.; Ray, K.P. [Phillips Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (United States); Koga, R. [Aerospace Corp., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Holeman, E.G.; Delorey, D.E. [Boston Coll., Newton, MA (United States). Inst. for Space Research

    1995-12-01

    The APEX satellite, launched in August of 1994, had a solid state data recorder (SSDR) as its onboard data storage system. The recorder contained 220 4Mbit X 1 Hitachi DRAMs of which 176 were routinely interrogated for SEUs and corrected with an EDAC code. Corrections were recorded in the spacecraft housekeeping files and are the basis of this study. The SEU rates and spatial locations are compared to in-situ particle measurements and to ground test results from devices from the same lot flown. The results show that properly designed SSDRs are a viable alternative to conventional tap recording systems for all orbits in near-Earth space.

  4. Sweating the small stuff: simulating dwarf galaxies, ultra-faint dwarf galaxies, and their own tiny satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Coral Rose

    2016-06-01

    The high dark matter content and the shallow potential wells of low mass galaxies (10^3 Msun 10 Gyr), having had their star formation shut down by reionization. Additionally, we show that the kinematics and ellipticities of isolated simulated dwarf centrals are consistent with observed dSphs satellites without the need for harassment from a massive host. We further show that most (but not all) observed *isolated* dIrrs in the Local Volume also have dispersion-supported stellar populations, contradicting the previous view that these objects are rotating. Finally, we investigate the stellar age gradients in dwarfs — showing that early mergers and strong feedback can create an inverted gradient, with the older stars occupying larger galactocentric radii.These results offer an interesting direction in testing models that attempt to solve dark matter problems via explosive feedback episodes. Can the same models that create large cores in simulated dwarfs preserve the mild stellar rotation that is seen in a minority of isolated dIrrs? Can the bursty star formation that created a dark matter core also match observed stellar gradients in low mass galaxies? Comparisons between our simulations and observed dwarfs should provide an important benchmark for this question going forward.

  5. Four Step to Control in the Use of Satellite Format Simulation%四层梯阶控制在卫星编队的应用仿真

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘猛; 冯永新; 范增

    2012-01-01

    研究了四层阶梯控制在卫星编队的控制问题及仿真.利用卫星相对运动的线性方程组和轨道机动算法的基础上,结合卫星任务规划、行为决策、行为规划和操作控制的四层阶梯卫星编队结构,从而建立建立卫星编队绕飞半径的滤波控制.仿真结果表明了四层阶梯控制在卫星编队在上对运动过程中,缩小卫星之间相对距离变换范围,增强卫星编队的稳定性.%The satellite format control and emulation by four steps to control are studied in the thesis. Based on the research of the relative equations of linear equations and track the algorithms, combining satellite mission planning,decision-making,behavior planning and operation control of four step satellite formation structure, leading to the establishment of satellite formation flying around the radius of the filter control. The simulation results show that the cfour step control in satellite formation in relative motion process,reduce the satellite relative distance between the trasformation range,enhance the stability of satellite formation flying.

  6. A teaching experience using a flight simulator: Educational Simulation in practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Ruiz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of appropriate Educational Simulation systems (software and hardware for learning purposes may contribute to the application of the “Learning by Doing” (LbD paradigm in classroom, thus helping the students to assimilate the theoretical concepts of a subject and acquire certain pre-defined competencies in a more didactical way. The main objective of this work is to conduct a teaching experience using a flight simulation environment so that the students of Aeronautical Management degree can assume the role of an aircraft pilot, in order to allow the students understanding the basic processes of the air navigation and observe how the new technologies can transform and improve these processes. This is especially helpful in classroom to teach the contents of the Single European Sky ATM Research (SESAR programme, an European project that introduces a new Air Traffic Management (ATM paradigm based on several relevant technological and procedural changes that will affect the entire air transportation system in the short and medium term. After the execution of several activities with a flight simulator in the classroom a short test and a satisfaction survey have been requested to the students in order to assess the teaching experience.

  7. On the feasibility of monitoring carbon monoxide in the lower troposphere from a constellation of northern hemisphere geostationary satellites: Global scale assimilation experiments (Part II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barré, Jérôme; Edwards, David; Worden, Helen; Arellano, Avelino; Gaubert, Benjamin; Da Silva, Arlindo; Lahoz, William; Anderson, Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the second phase of an Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) that utilizes the synthetic measurements from a constellation of satellites measuring atmospheric composition from geostationary (GEO) Earth orbit presented in part I of the study. Our OSSE is focused on carbon monoxide observations over North America, East Asia and Europe where most of the anthropogenic sources are located. Here we assess the impact of a potential GEO constellation on constraining northern hemisphere (NH) carbon monoxide (CO) using data assimilation. We show how cloud cover affects the GEO constellation data density with the largest cloud cover (i.e., lowest data density) occurring during Asian summer. We compare the modeled state of the atmosphere (Control Run), before CO data assimilation, with the known "true" state of the atmosphere (Nature Run) and show that our setup provides realistic atmospheric CO fields and emission budgets. Overall, the Control Run underestimates CO concentrations in the northern hemisphere, especially in areas close to CO sources. Assimilation experiments show that constraining CO close to the main anthropogenic sources significantly reduces errors in NH CO compared to the Control Run. We assess the changes in error reduction when only single satellite instruments are available as compared to the full constellation. We find large differences in how measurements for each continental scale observation system affect the hemispherical improvement in long-range transport patterns, especially due to seasonal cloud cover. A GEO constellation will provide the most efficient constraint on NH CO during winter when CO lifetime is longer and increments from data assimilation associated with source regions are advected further around the globe.

  8. Evaluation of CMIP5 continental precipitation simulations relative to satellite-based gauge-adjusted observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehran, Ali [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; AghaKouchak, Amir [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Phillips, Thomas J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-02-25

    Numerous studies have emphasized that climate simulations are subject to various biases and uncertainties. The objective of this study is to cross-validate 34 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) historical simulations of precipitation against the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data, quantifying model pattern discrepancies and biases for both entire data distributions and their upper tails. The results of the Volumetric Hit Index (VHI) analysis of the total monthly precipitation amounts show that most CMIP5 simulations are in good agreement with GPCP patterns in many areas, but that their replication of observed precipitation over arid regions and certain sub-continental regions (e.g., northern Eurasia, eastern Russia, central Australia) is problematical. Overall, the VHI of the multi-model ensemble mean and median also are superior to that of the individual CMIP5 models. However, at high quantiles of reference data (e.g., the 75th and 90th percentiles), all climate models display low skill in simulating precipitation, except over North America, the Amazon, and central Africa. Analyses of total bias (B) in CMIP5 simulations reveal that most models overestimate precipitation over regions of complex topography (e.g. western North and South America and southern Africa and Asia), while underestimating it over arid regions. Also, while most climate model simulations show low biases over Europe, inter-model variations in bias over Australia and Amazonia are considerable. The Quantile Bias (QB) analyses indicate that CMIP5 simulations are even more biased at high quantiles of precipitation. Lastly, we found that a simple mean-field bias removal improves the overall B and VHI values, but does not make a significant improvement in these model performance metrics at high quantiles of precipitation.

  9. Experiences using DAKOTA stochastic expansion methods in computational simulations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, Jeremy Alan; Ruthruff, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty quantification (UQ) methods bring rigorous statistical connections to the analysis of computational and experiment data, and provide a basis for probabilistically assessing margins associated with safety and reliability. The DAKOTA toolkit developed at Sandia National Laboratories implements a number of UQ methods, which are being increasingly adopted by modeling and simulation teams to facilitate these analyses. This report disseminates results as to the performance of DAKOTA's stochastic expansion methods for UQ on a representative application. Our results provide a number of insights that may be of interest to future users of these methods, including the behavior of the methods in estimating responses at varying probability levels, and the expansion levels for the methodologies that may be needed to achieve convergence.

  10. Apertureless SNOM study on gold nanoparticles: Experiments and simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Weizhe; Kimel, Alexey; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Rasing, Theo [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2010-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles (about 10 nm in diameter) are investigated by an apertureless (or scattering-type) scanning near-field optical microscope (aSNOM) at 633 nm and a negative optical amplitude signal contrast is observed. To understand the size effect and the interactions between light, tip, and sample, an analytical solution is obtained by adopting a model considering the tip as a point dipole. This model successfully shows the contrast reversal measured in experiments. Some important aspects, however, are neglected by the quasistatic dipole model. Thus, three-dimensional (3D) numerical calculations by a finite integration technique are applied to study the interactions between tip apex, gold nanoparticle, and the substrate surface. The simulated near-field and far-field results help us not only to understand the experimentally acquired aSNOM images but also to investigate the complicated tip-particle-surface interactions. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  11. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amadio, G. [Sao Paulo State U.; Apostolakis, J. [CERN; Bandieramonte, M. [Catania Astrophys. Observ.; Bianchini, C. [Mackenzie Presbiteriana U.; Bitzes, G. [CERN; Brun, R. [CERN; Canal, P. [Fermilab; Carminati, F. [CERN; Licht, J.de Fine [U. Copenhagen (main); Duhem, L. [Intel, Santa Clara; Elvira, D. [Fermilab; Gheata, A. [CERN; Jun, S. Y. [Fermilab; Lima, G. [Fermilab; Novak, M. [CERN; Presbyterian, M. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Shadura, O. [CERN; Seghal, R. [Bhabha Atomic Res. Ctr.; Wenzel, S. [CERN

    2015-12-23

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  12. Movement of patches during thermoforming: Experiment and simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schell, J. S. U.; Amory, L.; Guillon, D.

    2016-10-01

    The application of local reinforcement like uni-directional patches can locally increase the strength of composite parts without adding much weight. During design through structural analysis, shape and position of local reinforcement can easily be determined. In the thermoforming process, patches can be integrated into the ply-stack by preassembling. During forming, these patches can move and change their position reducing the structural effect of the patch. The movement of patches has been investigated experimentally. Key factors that influence this movement are orientation, size, position in the pile and slope of the mold. The forming process is simulated using HYPERFORM. The results show that this complex process needs special models which can be computationally intensive. In this work, we model the movement of patches and compare with experiments. The final goal is to have a reasonable predictive capability for movement of patches and design the process to minimize it.

  13. Aerodynamics of ski jumping: experiments and CFD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meile, W.; Reisenberger, E.; Brenn, G. [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, Graz (Austria); Mayer, M. [VRVis GmbH, Vienna (Austria); Schmoelzer, B.; Mueller, W. [Medical University of Graz, Department for Biophysics, Graz (Austria)

    2006-12-15

    The aerodynamic behaviour of a model ski jumper is investigated experimentally at full-scale Reynolds numbers and computationally applying a standard RANS code. In particular we focus on the influence of different postures on aerodynamic forces in a wide range of angles of attack. The experimental results proved to be in good agreement with full-scale measurements with athletes in much larger wind tunnels, and form a reliable basis for further predictions of the effects of position changes on the performance. The comparison of CFD results with the experiments shows poor agreement, but enables a clear outline of simulation potentials and limits when accurate predictions of effects from small variations are required. (orig.)

  14. Social Network Mixing Patterns In Mergers & Acquisitions - A Simulation Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fabac

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary world of global business and continuously growing competition, organizations tend to use mergers and acquisitions to enforce their position on the market. The future organization’s design is a critical success factor in such undertakings. The field of social network analysis can enhance our uderstanding of these processes as it lets us reason about the development of networks, regardless of their origin. The analysis of mixing patterns is particularly useful as it provides an insight into how nodes in a network connect with each other. We hypothesize that organizational networks with compatible mixing patterns will be integrated more successfully. After conducting a simulation experiment, we suggest an integration model based on the analysis of network assortativity. The model can be a guideline for organizational integration, such as occurs in mergers and acquisitions.

  15. The Impact of theory and simulation on tokomak experiments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. R. Wilson; T.S. Hahm; F. Zonca

    2007-01-01

    @@ In this section, we consider how theory and simulation have influenced tokamak experiments. Over the years, there have been numerous examples, and it is not possible to review all of them in this section. Instead, we have identified a number of areas that raise key research issues for ITER: either for its performance, or for its structural integrity. Although the review is not exhaustive, it does provide an illustration of how the theoretical physics community helps to shape and guide the experimental programmes on the world's tokamaks. We have listed a number of important references. Again, it is not possible to include all references, but we have aimed to construct a representative list which will provide access to the wider literature in these areas.

  16. First experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models for detector simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, G.; Apostolakis, J.; Bandieramonte, M.; Bianchini, C.; Bitzes, G.; Brun, R.; Canal, P.; Carminati, F.; de Fine Licht, J.; Duhem, L.; Elvira, D.; Gheata, A.; Jun, S. Y.; Lima, G.; Novak, M.; Presbyterian, M.; Shadura, O.; Seghal, R.; Wenzel, S.

    2015-12-01

    The recent emergence of hardware architectures characterized by many-core or accelerated processors has opened new opportunities for concurrent programming models taking advantage of both SIMD and SIMT architectures. The GeantV vector prototype for detector simulations has been designed to exploit both the vector capability of mainstream CPUs and multi-threading capabilities of coprocessors including NVidia GPUs and Intel Xeon Phi. The characteristics of these architectures are very different in terms of the vectorization depth, parallelization needed to achieve optimal performance or memory access latency and speed. An additional challenge is to avoid the code duplication often inherent to supporting heterogeneous platforms. In this paper we present the first experience of vectorizing electromagnetic physics models developed for the GeantV project.

  17. An Atmospheric Science Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Meemong; Weidner, Richard; Qu, Zheng; Bowman, Kevin; Eldering, Annmarie

    2010-01-01

    An atmospheric sounding mission starts with a wide range of concept designs involving measurement technologies, observing platforms, and observation scenarios. Observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) is a technical approach to evaluate the relative merits of mission and instrument concepts. At Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the OSSE team has developed an OSSE environment that allows atmospheric scientists to systematically explore a wide range of mission and instrument concepts and formulate a science traceability matrix with a quantitative science impact analysis. The OSSE environment virtually creates a multi-platform atmospheric sounding testbed (MAST) by integrating atmospheric phenomena models, forward modeling methods, and inverse modeling methods. The MAST performs OSSEs in four loosely coupled processes, observation scenario exploration, measurement quality exploration, measurement quality evaluation, and science impact analysis.

  18. Hydrodynamics of Hypersonic Jets: Experiments and Numerical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Belan, Marco; Tordella, Daniela; Massaglia, Silvano; Ferrari, Attilio; Mignone, Andrea; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2011-01-01

    Stars form in regions of the galaxy that are denser and cooler than the mean interstellar medium. These regions are called Giant Molecular Clouds. At the beginning of their life, up to $10^5-10^6$ years, stars accrete matter from their rich surrounding environment and are origin of a peculiar phenomenon that is the jet emission. Jets from Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) are intensively studied by the astrophysical community by observations at different wavelengths, analytical and numerical modeling and laboratory experiments. Indications about the jet propagation and its resulting morphologies are here obtained by means of a combined study of hypersonic jets carried out both in the laboratory and by numerical simulations.

  19. US plant and radiation dosimetry experiments flown on the Soviet satellite Cosmos 1129

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, M. R. (Editor); Souza, K. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Experiments included: 30 young male Wistar SPF rats used for wide range physiological studies; experiments with plants, fungi, insects, and mammalian tissue cultures; radiation physics experiments; a heat convection study; a rat embryology experiment in which an attempt was made to breed 2 male and 5 female rats during the flight; and fertile quail eggs used to determine the effects of spaceflight on avian embryogenesis. Specimens for US experiments were initially prepared at the recovery site or in Moscow and transferred to US laboratories for complete analyses. An overview of the mission focusing on preflight, on orbit, and postflight activities pertinent to the fourteen US experiments aboard Cosmos 1129 is presented.

  20. Combining experiments and simulations using the maximum entropy principle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter Boomsma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A key component of computational biology is to compare the results of computer modelling with experimental measurements. Despite substantial progress in the models and algorithms used in many areas of computational biology, such comparisons sometimes reveal that the computations are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy applications in our field has grown steadily in recent years, in areas as diverse as sequence analysis, structural modelling, and neurobiology. In this Perspectives article, we give a broad introduction to the method, in an attempt to encourage its further adoption. The general procedure is explained in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results that are at not in complete and quantitative accordance with experiments. A common solution to this problem is to explicitly ensure agreement between the two by perturbing the potential energy function towards the experimental data. So far, a general consensus for how such perturbations should be implemented has been lacking. Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges.

  1. Combining experiments and simulations using the maximum entropy principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boomsma, Wouter; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten

    2014-02-01

    A key component of computational biology is to compare the results of computer modelling with experimental measurements. Despite substantial progress in the models and algorithms used in many areas of computational biology, such comparisons sometimes reveal that the computations are not in quantitative agreement with experimental data. The principle of maximum entropy is a general procedure for constructing probability distributions in the light of new data, making it a natural tool in cases when an initial model provides results that are at odds with experiments. The number of maximum entropy applications in our field has grown steadily in recent years, in areas as diverse as sequence analysis, structural modelling, and neurobiology. In this Perspectives article, we give a broad introduction to the method, in an attempt to encourage its further adoption. The general procedure is explained in the context of a simple example, after which we proceed with a real-world application in the field of molecular simulations, where the maximum entropy procedure has recently provided new insight. Given the limited accuracy of force fields, macromolecular simulations sometimes produce results that are at not in complete and quantitative accordance with experiments. A common solution to this problem is to explicitly ensure agreement between the two by perturbing the potential energy function towards the experimental data. So far, a general consensus for how such perturbations should be implemented has been lacking. Three very recent papers have explored this problem using the maximum entropy approach, providing both new theoretical and practical insights to the problem. We highlight each of these contributions in turn and conclude with a discussion on remaining challenges.

  2. Simulation experiments on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were made on 58 sediment samples from four sites(1244,1245,1250 and 1251) of ODP204 at five temperature points(25,35,45,55 and 65℃) to simulate methane production from hydrate-bearing sediments.Simulation results from site 1244 show that the gas components consist mainly of methane and carbon dioxide,and heavy hydrocarbons more than C2+ cannot be detected.This site also gives results,similar to those from the other three,that the methane production is controlled by experimental temperatures,generally reaching the maximum gas yields per gram sediment or TOC under lower temperatures(25 and 35 ℃).In other words,the methane amount could be related to the buried depth of sediments,given the close relation between the depth and temperature.Sediments less than 1200 m below seafloor are inferred to still act as a biogenic gas producer to pour methane into the present hydrate zone,while sedimentary layers more than 1200 m below seafloor have become too biogenically exhausted to offer any biogas,but instead they produce thermogenic gas to give additional supply to the hydrate formation in the study area.

  3. Simulation experiments on gas production from hydrate-bearing sediments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG JianMing; CAO ZhiMin; CHEN JianWen; ZHANG Min; LI Jin; YANG GuiFang

    2009-01-01

    Experiments were made on 58 sediment samples from four sites (1244, 1245, 1250 and 1251) of ODP204 at five temperature points (25, 35, 45, 55 and 65℃) to simulate methane production from hy drate-bearing sediments. Simulation results from site 1244 show that the gas components consist mainly of methane and carbon dioxide, and heavy hydrocarbons more than C2+ cannot be detected.This site also gives results, similar to those from the other three, that the methane production is con trolled by experimental temperatures, generally reaching the maximum gas yields per gram sediment or TOC under lower temperatures (25 and 35℃). In other words, the methane amount could be related to the buried depth of sediments, given the close relation between the depth and temperature. Sediments less than 1200 m below seafioor are inferred to still act as a biogenic gas producer to pour methane into the present hydrate zone, while sedimentary layers more than 1200 m below seafloor have become too biogenically exhausted to offer any biogas, but instead they produce thermogenic gas to give ad ditional supply to the hydrate formation in the study area.

  4. Hydrologic Simulations Driven by Satellite Rainfall to Study the Hydroelectric Development Impacts on River Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuan B. Le

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the impact of hydroelectric dams on the discharge and total suspended solids (TSS concentration in the Huong River basin in Vietnam. The analysis is based on hydrologic and sediment transport simulations by the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT model driven by the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM 3B42V6 rainfall data, from January 2003 through December 2010. An upstream sub-basin not affected by the hydroelectric dams was used for model calibration. The calibration results indicate good agreement between simulated and observed daily data (0.67 Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, 0.82 Pearson correlation coefficient. The calibrated model for discharge and TSS simulation is then applied on another major sub-basin and then the whole Huong River basin. The simulation results indicate that dam operation in 2010 decreased downstream discharge during the rainy season by about 35% and augmented it during the dry season by about 226%. The downstream TSS concentration has decreased due to the dam operation but the total sediment loading increased during the dry season and decreased during the rainy season. On average, the dam construction and operation affected the pattern of discharge more than that of the sediment loading. Results indicate that SWAT, driven by remotely sensed inputs, can reasonably simulate discharge and water quality in ungauged or poorly gauged river basins and can be very useful for water resources assessment and climate change impact studies in such basins.

  5. The Italian Radio Occultation experiment on-board the Indian OCEANSAT-2 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perona, G.; Rosa Team

    During the June 2007 the Indian satellite OCEANSAT-2 will be launched The Italian Space Agency ASI signed a Memorandum of Understandings with the Indian Space Research Organization ISRO in which it is agreed to put on-board the OCEANSAT-2 satellite the Italian GNSS receiver devoted to Radio Occultation ROSA - Radio Occultation Sounder of the Atmosphere In the framework of this mission this instrument can only be able to observe rising occultations the Radio Occultation antenna will be mounted on the aft-velocity direction collecting data both in Open-Loop and in Close-Loop modes These data will be downloaded to the Indian and the Italian receiving stations where they will be processed by the ROSA ground segment completely developed by Italian universities and research centres In particular this ground segment will be implemented at a first level in an integrated computing infrastructure installed in Matera and mirrored at Hyderbad in India and at a second level on a distributed software and hardware infrastructure This second infrastructure will perform the rapid and precise Orbit Determination and Prediction the bending and impact parameters profiles extraction the ionospheric correction and the stratospheric initialization the refractivity pressure temperature and humidity profile retrieval the value added services for meteorology climate and space weather applications by computing units of each research centre or university connected through a Web-based GRID computing infrastructure After a description of these two

  6. Visualizing simulated learning experiences through the use of informatics tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Teri L; Warren, Judith J

    2009-01-01

    High-fidelity simulation technology is a growing educational technology. Designing effective simulations requires the use of informatics tools such as UML modeling. This poster demonstrates the steps in modeling a simulation exercise.

  7. Simulating Experiment and Circuit Simulation of RTD/HPT Photo-Controlled MOBILE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐海涛; 张之圣; 郭维廉; 钟明; 梁惠来; 张世林

    2004-01-01

    The MOBILE is a logic element realizing the monostable-bistable transition of a circuit that consists of two resonant tunneling transistors-the resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs) connected in series. It has several advantages including multiple inputs and multiple functions. In this paper, by connecting a heterojunction phototransistor (HPT) with the MOBILE, a novel optoelectronic functional device can be got, which presents the function of both photocurrent switching and photocurrent latching. These behaviors have been demonstrated for the first time by simulating experiments and circuit simulations, with RTDs firstly manufactured in China. Research indicates that the novel photo-controlled MOBILE has the same logic functions as conventional electrical MOBILE except for with light as an input signal.

  8. Evaluation of CMIP5 continental precipitation simulations relative to satellite-based gauge-adjusted observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehran, A.; AghaKouchak, A.; Phillips, T. J.

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this study is to cross-validate 34 Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) historical simulations of precipitation against the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) data, quantifying model pattern discrepancies, and biases for both entire distributions and their upper tails. The results of the volumetric hit index (VHI) analysis of the total monthly precipitation amounts show that most CMIP5 simulations are in good agreement with GPCP patterns in many areas but that their replication of observed precipitation over arid regions and certain subcontinental regions (e.g., northern Eurasia, eastern Russia, and central Australia) is problematical. Overall, the VHI of the multimodel ensemble mean and median also are superior to that of the individual CMIP5 models. However, at high quantiles of reference data (75th and 90th percentiles), all climate models display low skill in simulating precipitation, except over North America, the Amazon, and Central Africa. Analyses of total bias (B) in CMIP5 simulations reveal that most models overestimate precipitation over regions of complex topography (e.g., western North and South America and southern Africa and Asia), while underestimating it over arid regions. Also, while most climate model simulations show low biases over Europe, intermodel variations in bias over Australia and Amazonia are considerable. The quantile bias analyses indicate that CMIP5 simulations are even more biased at high quantiles of precipitation. It is found that a simple mean field bias removal improves the overall B and VHI values but does not make a significant improvement at high quantiles of precipitation.

  9. Statistical Properties of Car Following: Theory and Driving Simulator Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Ando, Hiromasa; Zgonnikov, Arkady; Saito, Yoshiaki

    2015-01-01

    A fair simple car driving simulator was created based on the open source engine TORCS and used in car-following experiments aimed at studying the basic features of human behavior in car driving. Four subjects with different skill in driving real cars participated in these experiments. The subjects were instructed to drive a car without overtaking and losing sight of a lead car driven by computer at a fixed speed. Based on the collected data the distributions of the headway distance, the car velocity, acceleration, and jerk are constructed and compared with the available experimental data for the real traffic flow. A new model for the car-following is proposed to capture the found properties. As the main result, we draw a conclusion that human actions in car driving should be categorized as generalized intermittent control with noise-driven activation. Besides, we hypothesize that the car jerk together with the car acceleration are additional phase variables required for describing the dynamics of car motion g...

  10. Numerical Simulation of Receptivity for a Transition Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, S. Scott; Joslin, R. D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The cost of fuel to overcome turbulence induced viscous drag on a commercial airplane constitutes a significant fraction of the operating cost of an airline. Achieving laminar flow and maintaining it over a large portion of the wing can significantly reduce the viscous drag, and hence the cost. Design of such laminar-flow-control wings and their practical operation requires the ability to accurately and reliably predict the transition from laminar to turbulent flow. The transition process begins with the conversion of environmental and surface disturbances into the instability waves of the flow by a process called receptivity. The goal of the current research project has been to improve the prediction of transition through a better understanding of the physics of receptivity. The initial objective of this work was to investigate the specific stability and receptivity characteristics of a particular experimental investigation of boundary layer receptivity at NASA Langley. Some simulation results using direct solutions of the linearized Navier-Stokes equations which modeled this experiment where presented in the 1999 APS DFD meeting. However, based on these initial investigations, it became clear that to cover the vast receptivity parameter space required for a practical transition prediction tool, more efficient methods would be required. Thus, the focus of this research was shifted from modeling this particular experiment to formulating and developing new techniques that could efficiently yet accurately predict receptivity for a wide range of disturbance conditions.

  11. Simulation of at-sensor radiance over land for proposed thermal channels of Imager payload onboard INSAT-3D satellite using MODTRAN model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M R Pandya; D B Shah; H J Trivedi; S Panigrahy

    2011-02-01

    INSAT-3D is the new generation Indian satellite designed for improved Earth observations through two payloads – Imager and Sounder. Study was conducted with an aim of simulating satellite level signal over land in the infrared channels of the Imager payload using a radiative transfer model MODTRAN. Satellite level at-sensor radiance corresponding to all four infrared channels of INSAT-3D Imager payload is obtained using MODTRAN and sensitivity of at-sensor radiance was inferred as a function of input parameters namely, surface temperature, emissivity, view angle and atmospheric water vapour, which is helpful in understanding the signal simulation scheme needed for retrieving a very critical parameter namely, land surface temperature.

  12. Selected time delay data, phase 3. [computerized simulation of time lag of teleoperators for communication satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, J. R.; Wetherington, R. D.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study on time delays in communication systems applicable to the teleoperator program are presented. Time delay data for 11 specific orbits of interest are shown. These data can be used in the MSFC teleoperator simulator to investigate the effect of time delays in the communications link on the teleoperator control functions.

  13. Simulation of suspended sediment transport initialized with satellite derived suspended sediment concentrations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ratheesh Ramakrishnan; A S Rajawat

    2012-10-01

    Suspended sediment transport in the Gulf of Kachchh is simulated utilizing the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) derived from Oceansat OCM imagery, as the initial condition in MIKE-21 Mud Transport model. Optimization of the model mud parameters, like settling velocity and critical shear stress for erosion are realized with respect to the sediment size distribution and the bottom bed materials observed in the Gulf. Simulated SSCs are compared with alternate OCM derived SSC. The results are observed to be impetus where the model is able to generate the spatial dynamics of the sediment concentrations. Sediment dynamics like deposition, erosion and dispersion are explained with the simulated tidal currents and OCM derived sediment concentrations. Tidal range is observed as the important physical factor controlling the deposition and resuspension of sediments within the Gulf. From the simulation studies; maximum residual current velocities, tidal fronts and high turbulent zones are found to characterise the islands and shoals within the Gulf, which results in high sediment concentrations in those regions. Remarkable variability in the bathymetry of the Gulf, different bed materials and varying tidal conditions induces several circulation patterns and turbulence creating the unique suspended sediment concentration pattern in the Gulf.

  14. Experiments and numerical simulation of mixing under supercritical conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, T.; Rodriguez, J.; Leyva, I. A.; Candel, S.

    2012-05-01

    Supercritical pressure conditions designate a situation where the working fluid pressure is above the critical point. Among these conditions, it is interesting to identify a transcritical range which corresponds to cases where the pressure is above the critical point, but the injection temperature is below the critical value. This situation is of special interest because it raises fundamental issues which have technological relevance in the analysis of flows in liquid rocket engines. This situation is here envisaged by analyzing the behavior of a nitrogen shear coaxial jet comprising an inner stream injected at temperatures close to the critical temperature and a coaxial flow at a higher temperature. Experiments are carried out both in the absence of external modulation and by imposing a large amplitude transverse acoustic field. Real gas large eddy simulations are performed for selected experiments. The combination of experiments and calculations is used to evaluate effects of injector geometry and operating parameters. Calculations retrieve what is observed experimentally when the momentum flux ratio of the outer to the inner stream J= (ρ _eu_e^2)/(ρ _iu_i^2) is varied. Results exhibit the change in flow structure and the development of a recirculation region when this parameter exceeds a critical value. The instantaneous flow patterns for different momentum flux ratios are used in a second stage to characterize the dynamical behavior of the flow in terms of power spectral density of velocity and density fluctuations. Results obtained under acoustic modulation provide insight into mixing enhancement of coaxial streams with a view of its possible consequences in high frequency combustion instabilities. It is shown in particular that the presence of strong acoustic modulations notably reduces the high density jet core length, indicating an increased mixing efficiency. This behavior is more pronounced when the jet is placed at the location of maximum transverse

  15. Transit navigation through Northern Sea Route from satellite data and CMIP5 simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khon, Vyacheslav C.; Mokhov, Igor I.; Semenov, Vladimir A.

    2017-02-01

    Rapid Arctic sea ice decline over the last few decades opens new perspectives for Arctic marine navigation. Further warming in the Arctic will promote the Northern Sea Route (NSR) as an alternative to the conventional Suez or Panama Canal routes for intercontinental shipping. Here we use both satellite data and CMIP5 ensemble of climate models to estimate the NSR transit window allowing intercontinental navigation between Atlantic and Pacific regions. To this end, we introduce a novel approach to calculate start and end dates of the navigation season along the NSR. We show that modern climate models are able to reproduce the mean time of the NSR transit window and its trend over the last few decades. The selected models demonstrate that the rate of increase of the NSR navigation season will slow down over the next few decades with the RCP4.5 scenario. By the end of the 21st century ensemble-mean estimates show an increase of the NSR transit window by about 4 and 6.5 months according to RCP4.5 and 8.5, respectively. Estimated trends for the end date of the navigation season are found to be stronger compared to those for the start date.

  16. Conceptual Issues in Quantifying Unusualness and Conceiving Stochastic Experiments: Insights from Students' Experiences in Designing Sampling Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saldanha, Luis

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a classroom teaching experiment that engaged a group of high school students in designing sampling simulations within a computer microworld. The simulation-design activities aimed to foster students' abilities to conceive of contextual situations as stochastic experiments, and to engage them with the logic of hypothesis…

  17. C and L band transionospheric scintillation experiment - Some results for applications to satellite radio systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, P. K.; Dabas, R. S.; Reddy, B. M.

    1992-12-01

    The signal statistics of some scintillation events at the C/L bands are estimated for the high solar activity period of solar cycle 22 at a low-latitude station in the Indian zone. In addition to the morphology at 4 Ghz, data on signal statistics such as the cumulative amplitude distribution function, fade rate distribution, and signal reliability for different message lengths for some events of scintillations, both at C and L band, are presented. The theoretical Nakagami m distribution is found to be the best for describing various levels of fade. Autocorrelation and power-spectrum analysis are used to estimate average fade rates and ground correlation distances. Performance evaluation of satellite earth terminals using small antennas is carried out to show the vulnerability of the system in the hostile ionospheric environment, notwithstanding the advanced modulation systems being employed.

  18. Efficient enhancing scheme for TCP performance over satellite-based internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Lina; Gu Xuemai

    2007-01-01

    Satellite link characteristics drastically degrade transport control protocol (TCP) performance. An efficient performance enhancing scheme is proposed. The improvement of TCP performance over satellite-based Intemet is accomplished by protocol transition gateways at each end ora satellite link. The protocol which runs over a satellite link executes the receiver-driven flow control and acknowledgements- and timeouts-based error control strategies. The validity of this TCP performance enhancing scheme is verified by a series of simulation experiments. Results show that the proposed scheme can efficiently enhance the TCP performance over satellite-based Intemet and ensure that the available bandwidth resources of the satellite link are fully utilized.

  19. A study of Asian dust plumes using satellite, surface, and aircraft measurements during the INTEX-B field experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Timothy; Xi, Baike; Dong, Xiquan; Obrecht, Rebecca; Li, Zhanqing; Cribb, Maureen

    2010-04-01

    Asian dust events occur frequently during the boreal spring season. Their optical properties have been analyzed by using a combination of source region (ground-based and satellite) and remote Pacific Ocean (aircraft) measurements during the Intercontinental Chemical Transport Experiment-Phase B (INTEX-B) field campaign which lasted from 7 April to 15 May 2006. A strong dust event originating from the Gobi Desert and passing over the Xianghe surface site on 17 April 2006 has been extensively analyzed. The surface averaged aerosol optical depth (AOD) values increased from 0.17 (clear sky) to 4.0 (strong dust), and the Angström exponent (α) dropped from 1.26 (clear sky) to below 0.1. Its total downwelling SW flux over the Xianghe site (thousands of kilometers away from the dust source region) is only 46% of the clear-sky value with almost no direct transmission and nearly double the diffuse SW clear-sky value. This event was also captured 6 days later by satellite observations as well as the UND/NASA DC-8 aircraft over the eastern Pacific Ocean. The DC-8 measurements in the remote Pacific region further classified the plumes into dust dominant, pollution dominant, and a mixture of dust and pollution events. HYSPLIT backward trajectories not only verified the origins of each case we selected but also showed (1) two possible origins for the dust: the Gobi and Taklimakan deserts; and (2) pollution: urban areas in eastern China, Japan, and other industrialized cities east of the two deserts. Based on the averaged satellite retrieved AOD data (0.5° × 0.5° grid box), declining AOD values with respect to longitude demonstrated the evolution of the transpacific transport pathway of Asian dust and pollution over the period of the field campaign.

  20. Open Cherry Picker simulation results. [manned platform for satellite servicing from Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Open Cherry Picker (OCP) is a manned platform, mounted at the end of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), which is used to enhance extravehicular activities. The objective of the simulation program described was to reduce the existing complexity of those OCP design features that are mandatory for initial Space Shuttle applications. The OCP development test article consists of a torque box, a rotating foot restraint, a rotating stanchion that houses handholds, and a tool storage section with an interface with payload modules. If the size or complexity of the payload increases, payload handling devices may be added at a later data. The simulations have shown that the crew can control the RMS from the Aft Flight Deck of the Shuttle, using voice commands from the EVA crewman. No need for a stabilizer was evident, and RMS dynamics due to crew-induced workloads were found to be minor.

  1. Water Yield and Sediment Yield Simulations for Teba Catchment in Spain Using SWRRB Model: Ⅰ. Model Input and Simulation Experiment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Water yield and sediment yield in the Teba catchment, Spain, were simulated using SWRRB (Simulator for Water Resources in Rural Basins) model. The model is composed of 198 mathematical equations. About 120 items (variables) were input for the simulation, including meteorological and climatic factors, hydrologic factors, topographic factors, parent materials, soils, vegetation, human activities, etc. The simulated results involved surface runoff, subsurface runoff, sediment, peak flow, evapotranspiration, soil water, total biomass,etc. Careful and thorough input data preparation and repeated simulation experiments are the key to get the accurate results. In this work the simulation accuracy for annual water yield prediction reached to 83.68%.``

  2. Evaluation of ACCMIP ozone simulations and ozonesonde sampling biases using a satellite-based multi-constituent chemical reanalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kazuyuki; Bowman, Kevin

    2017-07-01

    The Atmospheric Chemistry Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) ensemble ozone simulations for the present day from the 2000 decade simulation results are evaluated by a state-of-the-art multi-constituent atmospheric chemical reanalysis that ingests multiple satellite data including the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), and the Measurement of Pollution in the Troposphere (MOPITT) for 2005-2009. Validation of the chemical reanalysis against global ozonesondes shows good agreement throughout the free troposphere and lower stratosphere for both seasonal and year-to-year variations, with an annual mean bias of less than 0.9 ppb in the middle and upper troposphere at the tropics and mid-latitudes. The reanalysis provides comprehensive spatiotemporal evaluation of chemistry-model performance that compliments direct ozonesonde comparisons, which are shown to suffer from significant sampling bias. The reanalysis reveals that the ACCMIP ensemble mean overestimates ozone in the northern extratropics by 6-11 ppb while underestimating by up to 18 ppb in the southern tropics over the Atlantic in the lower troposphere. Most models underestimate the spatial variability of the annual mean lower tropospheric concentrations in the extratropics of both hemispheres by up to 70 %. The ensemble mean also overestimates the seasonal amplitude by 25-70 % in the northern extratropics and overestimates the inter-hemispheric gradient by about 30 % in the lower and middle troposphere. A part of the discrepancies can be attributed to the 5-year reanalysis data for the decadal model simulations. However, these differences are less evident with the current sonde network. To estimate ozonesonde sampling biases, we computed model bias separately for global coverage and the ozonesonde network. The ozonesonde sampling bias in the evaluated model bias for the seasonal mean concentration relative to global

  3. Evaluating the design of satellite scanning radiometers for earth radiation budget measurements with system simulations. Part 1: Instantaneous estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Larry; Ardanuy, Philip; Hucek, Richard; Abel, Peter; Jacobowitz, Herbert

    1991-10-01

    A set of system simulations was performed to evaluate candidate scanner configurations to fly as a part of the Earth Radiation Budget Instrument (ERBI) on the polar platforms during the 1990's. The simulation is considered of instantaneous sampling (without diurnal averaging) of the longwave and shortwave fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). After measurement and subsequent inversion to the TOA, the measured fluxes were compared to the reference fluxes for 2.5 deg lat/long resolution targets. The reference fluxes at this resolution are obtained by integrating over the 25 x 25 = 625 grid elements in each target. The differences between each of these two resultant spatially averaged sets of target measurements (errors) are taken and then statistically summarized. Five instruments are considered: (1) the Conically Scanning Radiometer (CSR); (2) the ERBE Cross Track Scanner; (3) the Nimbus-7 Biaxial Scanner; (4) the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System Instrument (CERES-1); and (5) the Active Cavity Array (ACA). Identical studies of instantaneous error were completed for many days, two seasons, and several satellite equator crossing longitudes. The longwave flux errors were found to have the same space and time characteristics as for the shortwave fluxes, but the errors are only about 25 pct. of the shortwave errors.

  4. MATCHING THE DARK MATTER PROFILES OF dSph GALAXIES WITH THOSE OF SIMULATED SATELLITES: A TWO-PARAMETER COMPARISON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breddels, Maarten A.; Helmi, Amina [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV Groningen (Netherlands); Vera-Ciro, Carlos, E-mail: breddels@astro.rug.nl [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 2535 Sterling Hall, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53076 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    We compare the dark matter halos’ structural parameters derived for four Milky Way dwarf spheroidal galaxies to those of subhalos found in cosmological N-body simulations. We confirm that estimates of the mass at a single fixed radius are fully consistent with the observations. However, when a second structural parameter such as the logarithmic slope of the dark halo density profile measured close to the half-light radius is included in the comparison, we find little to no overlap between the satellites and the subhalos. Typically the right mass subhalos have steeper profiles at these radii than measurements of the dSph suggest. Using energy arguments we explore if it is possible to solve this discrepancy by invoking baryonic effects. Assuming that feedback from supernovae (SNe) can lead to a reshaping of the halos, we compute the required efficiency and find entirely plausible values for a significant fraction of the subhalos and even as low as 0.1%. This implies that care must be taken not to exaggerate the effect of SNe feedback as this could make the halos too shallow. These results could be used to calibrate and possibly constrain feedback recipes in hydrodynamical simulations.

  5. [Experiment with rats on a 22-day flight on the "Kosmos-605" biological satellite (objectives and methods)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'in, E A; Serova, L V; Noskin, A D

    1976-01-01

    In 1974 a rat experiment was carried out onboard the Cosmos-605 biosatellite. Inflight Wistar rats were kept unrestrained in small cages. The cages were equipped with a feeder, water supply, light source and a ventilation device. The state of the animals was assessed with respect to their motor activity. The flight experiment was preceded by a number of preparatory runs and testinns that were completed with an end-to-end experiment in a biosatellite mockup. The flight experiment was paralleled by the ground-based synchroneous experiment which simulated almost entirely the flight profile. For each experiment rats were selected and trained during a month's observation. Postflight rats were exposed to clinical, physiological, morphological, cytochemical and biochemical investigations. Tissue examinations were performed on the 2nd-3rd day (20 rats) and 26-27th day (12 rats) after flight. Four rats were kept to study remote aftereffects.

  6. Cascade processes in stratified media: experiment and direct numerical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibgatullin, Ilias; Brouzet, Christophe; Joubaud, Sylvain; Ermanyuk, Evgeny; Dauxois, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    Internal gravity waves may transfer substantial part of energy in oceans and astrophysical objects, influence the background stratification, and angular momentum. Internal waves can be generated by convection in astrophysical objects, by tidal motion and interaction with orography in oceans. Internal and inertial waves obey similar system of equations. Due to very particular type of dispersive relation and the way internal waves are reflected from surfaces, in confined domains the monochromatic internal waves after sequence of reflections may form closed paths, the "wave attractors" [1]. Presently, linear theory of wave attractors is quite elaborated and a principal interest of research is focused on nonlinear regimes and unstable configurations, overturning events and mixing. We have performed direct numerical simulation of wave attractors which closely reproduces experiments [2] being carried out in Ecole Normal Superior de Lyon (ENS de Lyon). Direct numerical simulation is realized with the help of spectral element approach and code nek5000. Triadic resonance is confirmed as the first instability which appears on the most energetic ray of the attractor at sufficiently large forcing. With further increase of the forcing amplitude the daughter waves also become unstable resulting in a sophisticated cascade process which was first observed experimentally. For very high forcing amplitude interaction of focused waves with the walls results in appearance of small-scale folded structures. Their interaction with principal flow is the subject of further research. 1. Maas, L. R. M. & Lam, F.-P. A., Geometric focusing of internal waves. J. Fluid Mech, 1995,. 300, 1-41 2. Scolan, H., Ermanyuk, E., Dauxois, T., 2013, Physical Review Letters, 110, 234501

  7. NASA Earth Observing System Simulator Suite (NEOS3): A Forward Simulation Framework for Observing System Simulation Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niamsuwan, N.; Tanelli, S.; Johnson, M. P.; Jacob, J. C.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Oveisgharan, S.; Dao, D.; Simard, M.; Turk, F. J.; Tsang, L.; Liao, T. H.; Chau, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Future Earth observation missions will produce a large volume of interrelated data sets that will help us to cross-calibrate and validate spaceborne sensor measurements. A forward simulator is a crucial tool for examining the quality of individual products as well as resolving discrepancy among related data sets. NASA Earth Observing System Simulator Suite (NEOS3) is a highly customizable forward simulation tool for Earth remote sensing instruments. Its three-stage simulation process converts the 3D geophysical description of the scene being observed to corresponding electromagnetic emission and scattering signatures, and finally to observable parameters as reported by a (passive or active) remote sensing instrument. User-configurable options include selection of models for describing geophysical properties of atmospheric particles and their effects on the signal of interest, selection of wave scattering and propagation models, and activation of simplifying assumptions (trading between computation time and solution accuracy). The next generation of NEOS3, to be released in 2015, will feature additional state-of-the-art electromagnetic scattering models for various types of the Earth's surfaces and ground covers (e.g. layered snowpack, forest, vegetated soil, and sea ice) tailored specifically for missions like GPM and SMAP. To be included in 2015 is dedicated functionalities and interface that facilitate integrating NEOS3 into Observing System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) environments. This new generation of NEOS3 can also utilize high performance computing resources (parallel processing and cloud computing) and can be scaled to handle large or computation intensive problems. This presentation will highlight some notable features of NEOS3. Demonstration of its applications for evaluating new mission concepts, especially in the context of OSSE frameworks will also be presented.

  8. Transient Simulation of the Multi-SERTTA Experiment with MAMMOTH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortensi, Javier [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Baker, Benjamin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wang, Yaqi [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schunert, Sebastian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); deHart, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-07-11

    This work details the MAMMOTH reactor physics simulations of the Static Environment Rodlet Transient Test Apparatus (SERTTA) conducted at Idaho National Laboratory in FY-2017. TREAT static-environment experiment vehicles are being developed to enable transient testing of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type fuel specimens, including fuel concepts with enhanced accident tolerance (Accident Tolerant Fuels, ATF). The MAMMOTH simulations include point reactor kinetics as well as spatial dynamics for a temperature-limited transient. The strongly coupled multi-physics solutions of the neutron flux and temperature fields are second order accurate both in the spatial and temporal domains. MAMMOTH produces pellet stack powers that are within 1.5% of the Monte Carlo reference solutions. Some discrepancies between the MCNP model used in the design of the flux collars and the Serpent/MAMMOTH models lead to higher power and energy deposition values in Multi-SERTTA unit 1. The TREAT core results compare well with the safety case computed with point reactor kinetics in RELAP5-3D. The reactor period is 44 msec, which corresponds to a reactivity insertion of 2.685% delta k/k$. The peak core power in the spatial dynamics simulation is 431 MW, which the point kinetics model over-predicts by 12%. The pulse width at half the maximum power is 0.177 sec. Subtle transient effects are apparent at the beginning insertion in the experimental samples due to the control rod removal. Additional difference due to transient effects are observed in the sample powers and enthalpy. The time dependence of the power coupling factor (PCF) is calculated for the various fuel stacks of the Multi-SERTTA vehicle. Sample temperatures in excess of 3100 K, the melting point UO$_2$, are computed with the adiabatic heat transfer model. The planned shaped-transient might introduce additional effects that cannot be predicted with PRK models. Future modeling will be focused on the shaped-transient by improving the

  9. Simulation of signal and background processes for collider experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, S.

    2008-10-08

    In this thesis new theoretical tools for the accurate simulation of scattering processes at present and future collider experiments have been developed. Special emphasis has thereby to be given to multi-particle/multi-jet final states that often constitute signals for interesting (new) physics. Considering final states with a number of hard jets, there seems to be enough evidence that the traditional simulation tools HERWIG and PYTHIA cannot fully accomplish their description. Starting from a 2{yields}2 core process, they account only for soft and collinear QCD emissions through parton-shower models. Only recently, theoretical prescriptions have been found to consistently combine tree-level matrix-element calculations with the existing parton-shower algorithms. The gain of such methods is that phase-space regions covered by hard and by soft parton kinematics are simultaneously well described. In Chapter 2 of this thesis the working principles of such prescriptions have been discussed with special attention being paid to the merging scheme implemented in the SHERPA Monte Carlo. To consistently match QCD higher-order calculations (at one-loop or tree-level) with parton showers, a good analytical control over the perturbative terms present in the latter is required. This has triggered the demand for improved parton-shower models that facilitate the inclusion of exact matrix elements. In this line a completely new shower algorithm has been presented in Chapter 3. It is based on the Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction formalism, a universal method for calculating arbitrary processes at next-to-leading order in QCD. The splitting kernels used in the shower are justified approximations of the Catani-Seymour dipole functions. The kinematics of the individual splittings is accomplished such that exact four-momentum conservation can be ensured for each single branching. Accordingly, the shower can be stopped and started again at each intermediate stage of the evolution. The

  10. CRRES/SPACERAD (Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite/Space Radiation Effects Program) Experiment Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-24

    A., Hertzberg, E., Battel, S.J., Altwegg-Von Burg, K., and Balsiger, H. (1984) AMPTE/CCE hot plasma composition experiment (HPCE), submitted to IEEE...CCE hot plasma composition experiment (HPCE), submitted to IEEE Trans. Remote Sensing. 151 iL Contents 1. Scientific Objectives 153 2. Applications 154

  11. Effect of Bias Correction of Satellite-Rainfall Estimates on Runoff Simulations at the Source of the Upper Blue Nile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emad Habib

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Results of numerous evaluation studies indicated that satellite-rainfall products are contaminated with significant systematic and random errors. Therefore, such products may require refinement and correction before being used for hydrologic applications. In the present study, we explore a rainfall-runoff modeling application using the Climate Prediction Center-MORPHing (CMORPH satellite rainfall product. The study area is the Gilgel Abbay catchment situated at the source basin of the Upper Blue Nile basin in Ethiopia, Eastern Africa. Rain gauge networks in such area are typically sparse. We examine different bias correction schemes applied locally to the CMORPH product. These schemes vary in the degree to which spatial and temporal variability in the CMORPH bias fields are accounted for. Three schemes are tested: space and time-invariant, time-variant and spatially invariant, and space and time variant. Bias-corrected CMORPH products were used to calibrate and drive the Hydrologiska Byråns Vattenbalansavdelning (HBV rainfall-runoff model. Applying the space and time-fixed bias correction scheme resulted in slight improvement of the CMORPH-driven runoff simulations, but in some instances caused deterioration. Accounting for temporal variation in the bias reduced the rainfall bias by up to 50%. Additional improvements were observed when both the spatial and temporal variability in the bias was accounted for. The rainfall bias was found to have a pronounced effect on model calibration. The calibrated model parameters changed significantly when using rainfall input from gauges alone, uncorrected, and bias-corrected CMORPH estimates. Changes of up to 81% were obtained for model parameters controlling the stream flow volume.

  12. Characterisation of Central-African emissions based on MAX-DOAS measurements, satellite observations and model simulations over Bujumbura, Burundi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Clio; Hendrick, Francois; Pinardi, Gaia; De Smedt, Isabelle; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Yu, Huan; Fayt, Caroline; Hermans, Christian; Bauwens, Maité; Ndenzako, Eugene; Nzohabonayo, Pierre; Akimana, Rachel; Niyonzima, Sébastien; Müller, Jean-Francois; Van Roozendael, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Central Africa is known for its strong biogenic, pyrogenic, and to a lesser extent anthropogenic emissions. Satellite observations of species like nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO), as well as inverse modelling results have shown that there are large uncertainties associated with the emissions in this region. There is thus a need for additional measurements, especially from the ground, in order to better characterise the biomass-burning and biogenic products emitted in this area. We present MAX-DOAS measurements of NO2, HCHO, and aerosols performed in Central Africa, in the city of Bujumbura, Burundi (3°S, 29°E, 850m). A MAX-DOAS instrument has been operating at this location by BIRA-IASB since late 2013. Aerosol-extinction and trace-gases vertical profiles are retrieved by applying the optimal-estimation-based profiling tool bePRO to the measured O4, NO2 and HCHO slant-column densities. The MAX-DOAS vertical columns and profiles are used for investigating the diurnal and seasonal cycles of NO2, HCHO, and aerosols. Regarding the aerosols, the retrieved AODs are compared to co-located AERONET sun photometer measurements for verification purpose, while in the case of NO2 and HCHO, the MAX-DOAS vertical columns and profiles are used for validating GOME-2 and OMI satellite observations. To characterise the biomass-burning and biogenic emissions in the Bujumbura region, the trace gases and aerosol MAX-DOAS retrievals are used in combination to MODIS fire counts/radiative-power and GOME-2/OMI NO2 and HCHO satellite data, as well as simulations from the NOAA backward trajectory model HYSPLIT. First results show that HCHO seasonal variation around local noon is driven by the alternation of rain and dry periods, the latter being associated with intense biomass-burning agricultural activities and forest fires in the south/south-east and transport from this region to Bujumbura. In contrast, NO2 is seen to depend mainly on local emissions close to the city, due

  13. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penacchioni, A. V., E-mail: ana.penacchioni@inpe.br; Braga, J., E-mail: joao.braga@inpe.br; Castro, M. A., E-mail: manuel.castro@inpe.br; Sacahui, J. R., E-mail: rodrigo.sacahui@inpe.br; D’Amico, F., E-mail: flavio.damico@inpe.br [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE) São José dos Campos (Brazil)

    2015-12-17

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modelled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galactic Centre (CG) region during balloon flights in Brazil (∼ −23° of latitude and an altitude of ∼40 km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the GC: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  14. Telescope performance and image simulations of the balloon-borne coded-mask protoMIRAX experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Penacchioni, A V; Castro, M A; D'Amico, F

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present the results of imaging simulations performed with the help of the GEANT4 package for the protoMIRAX hard X-ray balloon experiment. The instrumental background was simulated taking into account the various radiation components and their angular dependence, as well as a detailed mass model of the experiment. We modeled the meridian transits of the Crab Nebula and the Galatic Centre region during balloon flights in Brazil ($\\sim -23^{\\circ}$ of latitude and an altitude of $\\sim 40 \\thinspace$ km) and introduced the correspondent spectra as inputs to the imaging simulations. We present images of the Crab and of three sources in the Galactic Centre region: 1E 1740.7-2942, GRS 1758-258 and GX 1+4. The results show that the protoMIRAX experiment is capable of making spectral and timing observations of bright hard X-ray sources as well as important imaging demonstrations that will contribute to the design of the MIRAX satellite mission.

  15. CLARREO shortwave observing system simulation experiments of the twenty-first century: Simulator design and implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, D.R.; Algieri, C.A.; Ong, J.R.; Collins, W.D.

    2011-04-01

    Projected changes in the Earth system will likely be manifested in changes in reflected solar radiation. This paper introduces an operational Observational System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to calculate the signals of future climate forcings and feedbacks in top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectra. The OSSE combines simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report for the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to calculate reflectance spectra for simulations of current and future climatic conditions over the 21st century. The OSSE produces narrowband reflectances and broadband fluxes, the latter of which have been extensively validated against archived CCSM results. The shortwave reflectance spectra contain atmospheric features including signals from water vapor, liquid and ice clouds, and aerosols. The spectra are also strongly influenced by the surface bidirectional reflectance properties of predicted snow and sea ice and the climatological seasonal cycles of vegetation. By comparing and contrasting simulated reflectance spectra based on emissions scenarios with increasing projected and fixed present-day greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations, we find that prescribed forcings from increases in anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are detectable and are spatially confined to lower latitudes. Also, changes in the intertropical convergence zone and poleward shifts in the subsidence zones and the storm tracks are all detectable along with large changes in snow cover and sea ice fraction. These findings suggest that the proposed NASA Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission to measure shortwave reflectance spectra may help elucidate climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks.

  16. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO SIMULATE CO2 OCEAN DISPOSAL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen M. Masutani

    1999-12-31

    This Final Technical Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of an investigation entitled ''Laboratory Experiments to Simulate CO{sub 2} Ocean Disposal'', funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's University Coal Research Program. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation was to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. A number of critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} were addressed by performing laboratory experiments on liquid CO{sub 2} jet break-up into a dispersed droplet phase, and hydrate formation, under deep ocean conditions. Major accomplishments of this study included: (1) five jet instability regimes were identified that occur in sequence as liquid CO{sub 2} jet disintegration progresses from laminar instability to turbulent atomization; (2) linear regression to the data yielded relationships for the boundaries between the five instability regimes in dimensionless Ohnesorge Number, Oh, and jet Reynolds Number, Re, space; (3) droplet size spectra was measured over the full range of instabilities; (4) characteristic droplet diameters decrease steadily with increasing jet velocity (and increasing Weber Number), attaining an asymptotic value in instability regime 5 (full atomization); and (5) pre-breakup hydrate formation appears to affect the size distribution of the droplet phase primary by changing the effective geometry of the jet.

  17. Simulation Based on Negative ion pair Techniques of Electric propulsion In Satellite Mission Using Chlorine Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    R.Bakkiyaraj,Assistant professor,Government college of Engineering ,Bargur,Tamilnadu. *C.Sathiyavel, PG Student and Department of Aeronautical Engineering/Branch of Avionics, PSN college of Engineering and Technology,Tirunelveli,India. Abstract: Ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of ion-ion pair techniques because of their stimulated of low propellant, Design of repulsive between negative ions with low electric power and high efficiency. A Negative ion pair of ion propulsion rocket system is proposed in this work .Negative Ion Based Rocket system consists of three parts 1.ionization chamber 2. Repulsion force and ion accelerator 3. Exhaust of Nozzle. The Negative ions from electro negatively gas are produced by attachment of the gas ,such as chlorine with electron emitted from a Electron gun ionization chamber. The formulate of large stable negative ion is achievable in chlorine gas with respect to electron affinity (∆E). When a neutral chlorine atom in the gaseous form picks up an electron to form a cl- ion, it releases energy of 349 kJ/mol or 3.6 eV/atom. It is said to have an electron affinity of -349 kJ/mol ,the negative sign indicating that energy is released during this process .The distance between negative ions pair is important for the evaluation of the rocket thrust and is also determined by the exhaust velocity of the propellant. The mass flow rate of ions is related to the ion beam current. Accelerate the Negative ions to a high velocity in the thrust vector direction with a significantly intense grids and the exhaust of negative ions through Nozzle. The simulation of the ion propulsion system has been carried out by MATLAB. By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results, we have found that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with low electric power for simulating the ion propulsion rocket system

  18. Sensitivity of Distributed Hydrologic Simulations to Ground and Satellite Based Rainfall Products

    OpenAIRE

    Singaiah Chintalapudi; Hatim O. Sharif; Hongjie Xie

    2014-01-01

    In this study, seven precipitation products (rain gauges, NEXRAD MPE, PERSIANN 0.25 degree, PERSIANN CCS-3hr, PERSIANN CCS-1hr, TRMM 3B42V7, and CMORPH) were used to force a physically-based distributed hydrologic model. The model was driven by these products to simulate the hydrologic response of a 1232 km2 watershed in the Guadalupe River basin, Texas. Storm events in 2007 were used to analyze the precipitation products. Comparison with rain gauge observations reveals that there were signif...

  19. Sensitivity of Distributed Hydrologic Simulations to Ground and Satellite Based Rainfall Products

    OpenAIRE

    Singaiah Chintalapudi; Hatim O. Sharif; Hongjie Xie

    2014-01-01

    In this study, seven precipitation products (rain gauges, NEXRAD MPE, PERSIANN 0.25 degree, PERSIANN CCS-3hr, PERSIANN CCS-1hr, TRMM 3B42V7, and CMORPH) were used to force a physically-based distributed hydrologic model. The model was driven by these products to simulate the hydrologic response of a 1232 km2 watershed in the Guadalupe River basin, Texas. Storm events in 2007 were used to analyze the precipitation products. Comparison with rain gauge observations reveals that there were signif...

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of the jet stream process. [planetary/satellite systems formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, W.-H.

    1977-01-01

    A Monte Carlo model is formulated to simulate the orbital evolution of a system of colliding particles. It is found that inelastic collision alone (even if the impact energy dissipation from collision is very large) does not lead to the formation of a narrow ring-like jet stream; instead, a flat disk structure, similar to Saturn's rings, usually results. To produce the radial focusing effect, it is argued that additional dynamical effects, which would strengthen the collisional interaction between the particles in near-circular orbits, is needed.